Science.gov

Sample records for accumulate deleterious mutations

  1. Deleterious mutation accumulation in asexual Timema stick insects.

    PubMed

    Henry, Lee; Schwander, Tanja; Crespi, Bernard J

    2012-01-01

    Sexual reproduction is extremely widespread in spite of its presumed costs relative to asexual reproduction, indicating that it must provide significant advantages. One postulated benefit of sex and recombination is that they facilitate the purging of mildly deleterious mutations, which would accumulate in asexual lineages and contribute to their short evolutionary life span. To test this prediction, we estimated the accumulation rate of coding (nonsynonymous) mutations, which are expected to be deleterious, in parts of one mitochondrial (COI) and two nuclear (Actin and Hsp70) genes in six independently derived asexual lineages and related sexual species of Timema stick insects. We found signatures of increased coding mutation accumulation in all six asexual Timema and for each of the three analyzed genes, with 3.6- to 13.4-fold higher rates in the asexuals as compared with the sexuals. In addition, because coding mutations in the asexuals often resulted in considerable hydrophobicity changes at the concerned amino acid positions, coding mutations in the asexuals are likely associated with more strongly deleterious effects than in the sexuals. Our results demonstrate that deleterious mutation accumulation can differentially affect sexual and asexual lineages and support the idea that deleterious mutation accumulation plays an important role in limiting the long-term persistence of all-female lineages.

  2. Deleterious mutation accumulation and the regeneration of genetic resources

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Daniel J.; David, Jacques L.; Bataillon, Thomas M.

    1998-01-01

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious mutations accompanying recurrent regeneration of plant germ plasm was modeled under regeneration conditions characterized by different amounts of selection and genetic drift. Under some regeneration conditions (sample sizes ≥75 individuals and bulk harvesting of seed) mutation accumulation was negligible, but under others (sample sizes <75 individuals or equalization of seed production by individual plants) mutation numbers per genome increased significantly during 25–50 cycles of regeneration. When mutations also are assumed to occur (at elevated rates) during seed storage, significant mutation accumulation and fitness decline occurred in 10 or fewer cycles of regeneration regardless of the regeneration conditions. Calculations also were performed to determine the numbers of deleterious mutations introduced and remaining in the genome of an existing variety after hybridization with a genetic resource and subsequent backcrossing. The results suggest that mutation accumulation has the potential to reduce the viability of materials held in germ plasm collections and to offset gains expected by the introduction of particular genes of interest from genetic resources. PMID:9419386

  3. Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations on the Neo-Y Chromosome of Japan Sea Stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus).

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kohta; Makino, Takashi; Kitano, Jun

    2017-01-01

    Degeneration of Y chromosomes is a common evolutionary path of XY sex chromosome systems. Recent genomic studies in flies and plants have revealed that even young neo-sex chromosomes with the age of a few million years show signs of Y degeneration, such as the accumulation of nonsense and frameshift mutations. However, it remains unclear whether neo-Y chromosomes also show rapid degeneration in fishes, which often have homomorphic sex chromosomes. Here, we investigated whether a neo-Y chromosome of Japan Sea stickleback (Gasterosteus nipponicus), which was formed by a Y-autosome fusion within the last 2 million years, accumulates deleterious mutations. Our previous genomic analyses did not detect excess nonsense and frameshift mutations on the Japan Sea stickleback neo-Y. In the present study, we found that the nonrecombining region of the neo-Y near the fusion end has accumulated nonsynonymous mutations altering amino acids of evolutionarily highly conserved residues. Enrichment of gene ontology terms related to protein phosphorylation and cellular protein modification process was found in the genes with potentially deleterious mutations on the neo-Y. These results suggest that the neo-Y of the Japan Sea stickleback has already accumulated mutations that may impair protein functions.

  4. Mutation accumulation in real branches: fitness assays for genomic deleterious mutation rate and effect in large-statured plants.

    PubMed

    Schultz, Stewart T; Scofield, Douglas G

    2009-08-01

    The genomic deleterious mutation rate and mean effect are central to the biology and evolution of all species. Large-statured plants, such as trees, are predicted to have high mutation rates due to mitotic mutation and the absence of a sheltered germ line, but their size and generation time has hindered genetic study. We develop and test approaches for estimating deleterious mutation rates and effects from viability comparisons within the canopy of large-statured plants. Our methods, inspired by E. J. Klekowski, are a modification of the classic Bateman-Mukai mutation-accumulation experiment. Within a canopy, cell lineages accumulate mitotic mutations independently. Gametes or zygotes produced at more distal points by these cell lineages contain more mitotic mutations than those at basal locations, and within-flower selfs contain more homozygous mutations than between-flower selfs. The resulting viability differences allow demonstration of lethal mutation with experiments similar in size to assays of genetic load and allow estimates of the rate and effect of new mutations with moderate precision and bias similar to that of classic mutation-accumulation experiments in small-statured organisms. These methods open up new possibilities with the potential to provide valuable new insights into the evolutionary genetics of plants.

  5. Increased mitochondrial mutation frequency after an island colonization: positive selection or accumulation of slightly deleterious mutations?

    PubMed

    Hardouin, Emilie A; Tautz, Diethard

    2013-04-23

    Island colonizations are excellent models for studying early processes of evolution. We found in a previous study on mice that had colonized the sub-Antarctic Kerguelen Archipelago about 200 years ago that they were derived from a single founder lineage and that this showed an unexpectedly large number of new mutations in the mitochondrial D-loop. To assess whether positive selection has played a role in the emergence of these variants, we have obtained 16 full mitochondrial genome sequences from these mice. For comparison, we have compiled 57 mitochondrial genome sequences from laboratory inbred lines that became established about 100 years ago, also starting from a single founder lineage. We find that the island mice and the laboratory lines show very similar mutation frequencies and patterns. None of the patterns in the Kerguelen mice provides evidence for positive selection. We conclude that nearly neutral evolutionary processes that assume the presence of slightly deleterious variants can fully explain the patterns. This supports the notion of time-dependency of molecular evolution and provides a new calibration point. Based on the observed mutation frequency, we calculate an average evolutionary rate of 0.23 substitutions per site per Myr for the earliest time frame of divergence, which is about six times higher than the long-term rate of 0.037 substitutions per site per Myr.

  6. The Accumulation of Deleterious Mutations as a Consequence of Domestication and Improvement in Sunflowers and Other Compositae Crops.

    PubMed

    Renaut, Sebastien; Rieseberg, Loren H

    2015-09-01

    For populations to maintain optimal fitness, harmful mutations must be efficiently purged from the genome. Yet, under circumstances that diminish the effectiveness of natural selection, such as the process of plant and animal domestication, deleterious mutations are predicted to accumulate. Here, we compared the load of deleterious mutations in 21 accessions from natural populations and 19 domesticated accessions of the common sunflower using whole-transcriptome single nucleotide polymorphism data. Although we find that genetic diversity has been greatly reduced during domestication, the remaining mutations were disproportionally biased toward nonsynonymous substitutions. Bioinformatically predicted deleterious mutations affecting protein function were especially strongly over-represented. We also identify similar patterns in two other domesticated species of the sunflower family (globe artichoke and cardoon), indicating that this phenomenon is not due to idiosyncrasies of sunflower domestication or the sunflower genome. Finally, we provide unequivocal evidence that deleterious mutations accumulate in low recombining regions of the genome, due to the reduced efficacy of purifying selection. These results represent a conundrum for crop improvement efforts. Although the elimination of harmful mutations should be a long-term goal of plant and animal breeding programs, it will be difficult to weed them out because of limited recombination.

  7. Accumulation of Deleterious Passenger Mutations Is Associated with the Progression of Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    d’Avigdor, William M. H.; McCaughan, Geoffrey W.; Luciani, Fabio; Shackel, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    In hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), somatic genome-wide DNA mutations are numerous, universal and heterogeneous. Some of these somatic mutations are drivers of the malignant process but the vast majority are passenger mutations. These passenger mutations can be deleterious to individual protein function but are tolerated by the cell or are offset by a survival advantage conferred by driver mutations. It is unknown if these somatic deleterious passenger mutations (DPMs) develop in the precancerous state of cirrhosis or if it is confined to HCC. Therefore, we studied four whole-exome sequencing datasets, including patients with non-cirrhotic liver (n = 12), cirrhosis without HCC (n = 6) and paired HCC with surrounding non-HCC liver (n = 74 paired samples), to identify DPMs. After filtering out putative germline mutations, we identified 187±22 DPMs per non-diseased tissue. DPMs number was associated with liver disease progressing to HCC, independent of the number of exonic mutations. Tumours contained significantly more DPMs compared to paired non-tumour tissue (258–293 per HCC exome). Cirrhosis- and HCC-associated DPMs do not occur predominantly in specific genes, chromosomes or biological pathways and the effect on tumour biology is presently unknown. Importantly, for the first time we have shown a significant increase in DPMs with HCC. PMID:27631787

  8. The accumulation of deleterious mutations in rice genomes: a hypothesis on the cost of domestication.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jian; Tang, Tian; Tang, Hua; Huang, Jianzi; Shi, Suhua; Wu, Chung-I

    2006-03-01

    The extent of molecular differentiation between domesticated animals or plants and their wild relatives is postulated to be small. The availability of the complete genome sequences of two subspecies of the Asian rice, Oryza sativa (indica and japonica) and their wild relatives have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study divergence following domestication. We observed significantly more amino acid substitutions during rice domestication than can be expected from a comparison among wild species. This excess is disproportionately larger for the more radical kinds of amino acid changes (e.g. Cys<-->Tyr). We estimate that approximately a quarter of the amino acid differences between rice cultivars are deleterious, not accountable by the relaxation of selective constraints. This excess is negatively correlated with the rate of recombination, suggesting that 'hitchhiking' has occurred. We hypothesize that during domestication artificial selection increased the frequency of many deleterious mutations.

  9. Efficient purging of deleterious mutations in plants with haploid selfing.

    PubMed

    Szövényi, Péter; Devos, Nicolas; Weston, David J; Yang, Xiaohan; Hock, Zsófia; Shaw, Jonathan A; Shimizu, Kentaro K; McDaniel, Stuart F; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-05-14

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here, we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more nonsynonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale.

  10. Efficient Purging of Deleterious Mutations in Plants with Haploid Selfing

    PubMed Central

    Szövényi, Péter; Devos, Nicolas; Weston, David J.; Yang, Xiaohan; Hock, Zsófia; Shaw, Jonathan A.; Shimizu, Kentaro K.; McDaniel, Stuart F.; Wagner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here, we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more nonsynonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale. PMID:24879432

  11. Efficient purging of deleterious mutations in plants with haploid selfing

    SciTech Connect

    Szovenyi, Peter; Shaw, Jon; Yang, Xiaohan; Devos, Nicolas

    2014-05-30

    In diploid organisms, selfing reduces the efficiency of selection in removing deleterious mutations from a population. This need not be the case for all organisms. Some plants, for example, undergo an extreme form of selfing known as intragametophytic selfing, which immediately exposes all recessive deleterious mutations in a parental genome to selective purging. Here we ask how effectively deleterious mutations are removed from such plants. Specifically, we study the extent to which deleterious mutations accumulate in a predominantly selfing and a predominantly outcrossing pair of moss species, using genome-wide transcriptome data. We find that the selfing species purge significantly more non-synonymous mutations, as well as a greater proportion of radical amino acid changes which alter physicochemical properties of amino acids. Moreover, their purging of deleterious mutation is especially strong in conserved regions of protein-coding genes. Our observations show that selfing need not impede but can even accelerate the removal of deleterious mutations, and do so on a genome-wide scale.

  12. Validation of Deleterious Mutations in Vorderwald Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Sina; Distl, Ottmar

    2016-01-01

    In Montbéliarde cattle two candidate mutations on bovine chromosomes 19 and 29 responsible for embryonic lethality have been detected. Montbéliarde bulls have been introduced into Vorderwald cattle to improve milk and fattening performance. Due to the small population size of Vorderwald cattle and the wide use of a few Montbéliarde bulls through artificial insemination, inbreeding on Montbéliarde bulls in later generations was increasing. Therefore, we genotyped an aborted fetus which was inbred on Montbéliarde as well as Vorderwald x Montbéliarde crossbred bulls for both deleterious mutations. The abortion was observed in an experimental herd of Vorderwald cattle. The objectives of the present study were to prove if one or both lethal mutations may be assumed to have caused this abortion and to show whether these deleterious mutations have been introduced into the Vorderwald cattle population through Montbéliarde bulls. The aborted fetus was homozygous for the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation (ss2019324563) on BTA29 and both parents as well as the paternal and maternal grandsire were heterozygous for this mutation. In addition, the parents and the paternal grandsire were carriers of the MH2-haplotype linked with the T-allele of the SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation. For the SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation (rs38377500) on BTA19 (MH1), the aborted fetus and its sire were heterozygous. Among all further 341 Vorderwald cattle genotyped we found 27 SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T heterozygous animals resulting in an allele frequency of 0.0396. Among the 120 male Vorderwald cattle, there were 12 heterozygous with an allele frequency of 0.05. The SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T mutation could not be found in further nine cattle breeds nor in Vorderwald cattle with contributions from Ayrshire bulls. In 69 Vorderwald cattle without genes from Montbéliarde bulls the mutated allele of SLC37A2:g.28879810C>T could not be detected. The SHBG:g.27956790C>T mutation appeared unlikely to be responsible

  13. Effect of deleterious mutations on life span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Gong, Yi; Thompson, James N; Woodruff, R C

    2006-12-01

    Evolutionary theories of aging assume that the accumulation of deleterious mutations will reduce life span. We tested this assumption in Drosophila melanogaster by a newly designed mating scheme, in which mutations accumulate on the Binscy balancer X chromosome in heterozygous females in the absence of selection and recombination. We found that the life span of Binscy/RY(L) males from this cross decreased faster than the life span of their sibling controls over time in two of three runs, and that there was an age-specific increase in mortality in the Binscy/RY(L) males with time in one of three runs. Therefore, the accumulation of deleterious mutations can decrease life span by increasing fragility and can cause age-specific changes in mortality. These results support the evolutionary theory of aging.

  14. RNA chaperones buffer deleterious mutations in E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Rudan, Marina; Schneider, Dominique; Warnecke, Tobias; Krisko, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Both proteins and RNAs can misfold into non-functional conformations. Protein chaperones promote native folding of nascent polypeptides and refolding of misfolded species, thereby buffering mutations that compromise protein structure and function. Here, we show that RNA chaperones can also act as mutation buffers that enhance organismal fitness. Using competition assays, we demonstrate that overexpression of select RNA chaperones, including three DEAD box RNA helicases (DBRHs) (CsdA, SrmB, RhlB) and the cold shock protein CspA, improves fitness of two independently evolved Escherichia coli mutator strains that have accumulated deleterious mutations during short- and long-term laboratory evolution. We identify strain-specific mutations that are deleterious and subject to buffering when introduced individually into the ancestral genotype. For DBRHs, we show that buffering requires helicase activity, implicating RNA structural remodelling in the buffering process. Our results suggest that RNA chaperones might play a fundamental role in RNA evolution and evolvability. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04745.001 PMID:25806682

  15. Dynamics and Fate of Beneficial Mutations Under Lineage Contamination by Linked Deleterious Mutations.

    PubMed

    Pénisson, Sophie; Singh, Tanya; Sniegowski, Paul; Gerrish, Philip

    2017-03-01

    Beneficial mutations drive adaptive evolution, yet their selective advantage does not ensure their fixation. Haldane's application of single-type branching process theory showed that genetic drift alone could cause the extinction of newly arising beneficial mutations with high probability. With linkage, deleterious mutations will affect the dynamics of beneficial mutations and might further increase their extinction probability. Here, we model the lineage dynamics of a newly arising beneficial mutation as a multitype branching process. Our approach accounts for the combined effects of drift and the stochastic accumulation of linked deleterious mutations, which we call lineage contamination We first study the lineage-contamination phenomenon in isolation, deriving dynamics and survival probabilities (the complement of extinction probabilities) of beneficial lineages. We find that survival probability is zero when [Formula: see text] where U is deleterious mutation rate and [Formula: see text] is the selective advantage of the beneficial mutation in question, and is otherwise depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by [Formula: see text] We then put the lineage contamination phenomenon into the context of an evolving population by incorporating the effects of background selection. We find that, under the combined effects of lineage contamination and background selection, ensemble survival probability is never zero but is depressed below classical predictions by a factor bounded from below by [Formula: see text] where [Formula: see text] is mean selective advantage of beneficial mutations, and [Formula: see text] This factor, and other bounds derived from it, are independent of the fitness effects of deleterious mutations. At high enough mutation rates, lineage contamination can depress fixation probabilities to values that approach zero. This fact suggests that high mutation rates can, perhaps paradoxically, (1) alleviate competition

  16. Estimate of the genomic mutation rate deleterious to overall fitness in E. coll

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kibota, Travis T.; Lynch, Michael

    1996-06-01

    MUTATIONS are a double-edged sword: they are the ultimate source of genetic variation upon which evolution depends, yet most mutations affecting fitness (viability and reproductive success) appear to be harmful1. Deleterious mutations of small effect can escape natural selection, and should accumulate in small populations2-4. Reduced fitness from deleterious-mutation accumulation may be important in the evolution of sex5-7, mate choice8,9, and diploid life-cycles10, and in the extinction of small populations11,12. Few empirical data exist, however. Minimum estimates of the genomic deleterious-mutation rate for viability in Drosophila melanogaster are surprisingly high1,13,14, leading to the conjecture that the rate for total fitness could exceed 1.0 mutation per individual per generation5,6. Here we use Escherichia coli to provide an estimate of the genomic deleterious-mutation rate for total fitness in a microbe. We estimate that the per-microbe rate of deleterious mutations is in excess of 0.0002.

  17. Nonequilibrium model for estimating parameters of deleterious mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordo, Isabel; Dionisio, Francisco

    2005-03-01

    Deleterious mutations are of extreme evolutionary importance because, even though they are eliminated by natural selection, their continuous pressure creates a pool of variability in natural populations. They are of potential relevance for the existence of several features in evolution, such as sexual reproduction, and pose a risk to small asexual populations. Despite their extreme importance, the deleterious mutation rate and the effects of each mutation on fitness are poorly known quantities. Here we analyze a simple model that can be applied to simple experiments, in microorganisms, aiming at the quantification of these values.

  18. Deleterious mutations and selection for sex in finite diploid populations.

    PubMed

    Roze, Denis; Michod, Richard E

    2010-04-01

    In diploid populations, indirect benefits of sex may stem from segregation and recombination. Although it has been recognized that finite population size is an important component of selection for recombination, its effects on selection for segregation have been somewhat less studied. In this article, we develop analytical two- and three-locus models to study the effect of recurrent deleterious mutations on a modifier gene increasing sex, in a finite diploid population. The model also incorporates effects of mitotic recombination, causing loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Predictions are tested using multilocus simulations representing deleterious mutations occurring at a large number of loci. The model and simulations show that excess of heterozygosity generated by finite population size is an important component of selection for sex, favoring segregation when deleterious alleles are nearly additive to dominant. Furthermore, sex tends to break correlations in homozygosity among selected loci, which disfavors sex when deleterious alleles are either recessive or dominant. As a result, we find that it is difficult to maintain costly sex when deleterious alleles are recessive. LOH tends to favor sex when deleterious mutations are recessive, but the effect is relatively weak for rates of LOH corresponding to current estimates (of the order 10(-4)-10(-5)).

  19. Prevalence of deleterious ATM germline mutations in gastric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Huang, Dong-Sheng; Tao, Hou-Quan; He, Xu-Jun; Long, Ming; Yu, Sheng; Xia, Ying-Jie; Wei, Zhang; Xiong, Zikai; Jones, Sian; He, Yiping; Yan, Hai; Wang, Xiaoyue

    2015-12-01

    Besides CDH1, few hereditary gastric cancer predisposition genes have been previously reported. In this study, we discovered two germline ATM mutations (p.Y1203fs and p.N1223S) in a Chinese family with a history of gastric cancer by screening 83 cancer susceptibility genes. Using a published exome sequencing dataset, we found deleterious germline mutations of ATM in 2.7% of 335 gastric cancer patients of different ethnic origins. The frequency of deleterious ATM mutations in gastric cancer patients is significantly higher than that in general population (p=0.0000435), suggesting an association of ATM mutations with gastric cancer predisposition. We also observed biallelic inactivation of ATM in tumors of two gastric cancer patients. Further evaluation of ATM mutations in hereditary gastric cancer will facilitate genetic testing and risk assessment.

  20. Parasites and deleterious mutations: interactions influencing the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

    PubMed

    Park, A W; Jokela, J; Michalakis, Y

    2010-05-01

    The restrictive assumptions associated with purely genetic and purely ecological mechanisms suggest that neither of the two forces, in isolation, can offer a general explanation for the evolutionary maintenance of sex. Consequently, attention has turned to pluralistic models (i.e. models that apply both ecological and genetic mechanisms). Existing research has shown that combining mutation accumulation and parasitism allows restrictive assumptions about genetic and parasite parameter values to be relaxed while still predicting the maintenance of sex. However, several empirical studies have shown that deleterious mutations and parasitism can reduce fitness to a greater extent than would be expected if the two acted independently. We show how interactions between these genetic and ecological forces can completely reverse predictions about the evolution of reproductive modes. Moreover, we demonstrate that synergistic interactions between infection and deleterious mutations can render sex evolutionarily stable even when there is antagonistic epistasis among deleterious mutations, thereby widening the conditions for the evolutionary maintenance of sex.

  1. Amino acid composition of proteins reduces deleterious impact of mutations

    PubMed Central

    Hormoz, Sahand

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionary origin of amino acid occurrence frequencies in proteins (composition) is not yet fully understood. We suggest that protein composition works alongside the genetic code to minimize impact of mutations on protein structure. First, we propose a novel method for estimating thermodynamic stability of proteins whose sequence is constrained to a fixed composition. Second, we quantify the average deleterious impact of substituting one amino acid with another. Natural proteome compositions are special in at least two ways: 1) Natural compositions do not generate more stable proteins than the average random composition, however, they result in proteins that are less susceptible to damage from mutations. 2) Natural proteome compositions that result in more stable proteins (i.e. those of thermophiles) are also tuned to have a higher tolerance for mutations. This is consistent with the observation that environmental factors selecting for more stable proteins also enhance the deleterious impact of mutations. PMID:24108121

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and the mutation load

    PubMed Central

    Roze, D

    2012-01-01

    According to current estimates of genomic deleterious mutation rates (which are often of the order 0.1–1) the mutation load (defined as a reduction in the average fitness of a population due to the presence of deleterious alleles) may be important in many populations. In this paper, I use multilocus simulations to explore the effect of spatial heterogeneity in the strength of selection against deleterious alleles on the mutation load (for example, it has been suggested that stressful environments may increase the strength of selection). These simulations show contrasted results: in some situations, spatial heterogeneity may greatly reduce the mutation load, due to the fact that migrants coming from demes under stronger selection carry relatively few deleterious alleles, and benefit from a strong advantage within demes under weaker selection (where individuals carry many more deleterious alleles); in other situations, however, deleterious alleles accumulate within demes under stronger selection, due to migration pressure from demes under weaker selection, leading to fitness erosion within those demes. This second situation is more frequent when the productivity of the different demes is proportional to their mean fitness. The effect of spatial heterogeneity is greatly reduced, however, when the response to environmental differences is inconsistent across loci. PMID:22588129

  3. Limited dispersal, deleterious mutations and the evolution of sex

    SciTech Connect

    Peck, J.R.

    1996-03-01

    This study presents a mathematical model that allows for some offspring to be dispersed at random, while others stay close to their mothers. A single genetic locus is assumed to control fertility, and this locus is subject to the occurrence of deletions mutations. It is shown that, at equilibrium, the frequency of deleterious mutations in the population is inversely related to the rate of dispersal. The results also show that sexual reproduction can lead to a decrease in the equilibrium frequency of deleterious mutations. The reason for this relationship is that sex involves the dispersal of genetic material, and thus, like the dispersal of offspring, sex enhances competition among adults. The model is described using the example of a hermaphroditic plant population. However, the results should apply to animal populations as well. 36 refs., 1 fig.

  4. Mate choice among yeast gametes can purge deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Tazzyman, S J; Seymour, R M; Pomiankowski, A; Greig, D

    2012-08-01

    Meiosis in Saccharomyces yeast produces four haploid gametes that usually fuse with each other, an extreme form of self-fertilization among the products of a single meiosis known as automixis. The gametes signal to each other with sex pheromone. Better-quality gametes produce stronger signals and are preferred as mates. We suggest that the function of this signalling system is to enable mate choice among the four gametes from a single meiosis and so to promote the clearance of deleterious mutations. To support this claim, we construct a mathematical model that shows that signalling during automixis (i) improves the long-term fitness of a yeast colony and (ii) lowers its mutational load. We also show that the benefit to signalling is greater with larger numbers of segregating mutations.

  5. Quantifying genetic diversity under a broad spectrum of deleterious mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Good, Benjamin; Desai, Michael

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies have shown that selection against deleterious mutations may play a major role in shaping observed patterns of sequence variation in natural populations. However, our understanding of these patterns remains limited, since selection creates correlations along the genome that are difficult to disentangle from each other. Previous theoretical work has focused on the qualitative effects of selection on sequence diversity, using simplified models in which all selected mutations have the same fitness cost. Yet is known that deleterious mutations follow a wide distribution in most organisms, so it is necessary to extend our theoretical predictions to this more general case before we can make quantitative connections with existing data. The evolutionary dynamics of this regime are complicated: extant mutant lineages represent large, correlated fluctuations away from the background expectation, which hinders efforts to apply existing methods based on deterministic or ``mean-field'' approximations. Here, we will describe recent progress towards this goal, which is based on a ``coarse-graining'' of the underlying distribution of fitnesses in the population.

  6. Analysis of the Estimators of the Average Coefficient of Dominance of Deleterious Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, B.; García-Dorado, A.; Caballero, A.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the sources of bias that affect the most commonly used methods of estimation of the average degree of dominance (h) of deleterious mutations, focusing on estimates from segregating populations. The main emphasis is on the effect of the finite size of the populations, but other sources of bias are also considered. Using diffusion approximations to the distribution of gene frequencies in finite populations as well as stochastic simulations, we assess the behavior of the estimators obtained from populations at mutation-selection-drift balance under different mutational scenarios and compare averages of h for newly arisen and segregating mutations. Because of genetic drift, the inferences concerning newly arisen mutations based on the mutation-selection balance theory can have substantial upward bias depending upon the distribution of h. In addition, estimates usually refer to h weighted by the homozygous deleterious effect in different ways, so that inferences are complicated when these two variables are negatively correlated. Due to both sources of bias, the widely used regression of heterozygous on homozygous means underestimates the arithmetic mean of h for segregating mutations, in contrast to their repeatedly assumed equality in the literature. We conclude that none of the estimators from segregating populations provides, under general conditions, a useful tool to ascertain the properties of the degree of dominance, either for segregating or for newly arisen deleterious mutations. Direct estimates of the average h from mutation-accumulation experiments are shown to suffer some bias caused by purging selection but, because they do not require assumptions on the causes maintaining segregating variation, they appear to give a more reliable average dominance for newly arisen mutations. PMID:15514075

  7. Analysis of the estimators of the average coefficient of dominance of deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Fernández, B; García-Dorado, A; Caballero, A

    2004-10-01

    We investigate the sources of bias that affect the most commonly used methods of estimation of the average degree of dominance (h) of deleterious mutations, focusing on estimates from segregating populations. The main emphasis is on the effect of the finite size of the populations, but other sources of bias are also considered. Using diffusion approximations to the distribution of gene frequencies in finite populations as well as stochastic simulations, we assess the behavior of the estimators obtained from populations at mutation-selection-drift balance under different mutational scenarios and compare averages of h for newly arisen and segregating mutations. Because of genetic drift, the inferences concerning newly arisen mutations based on the mutation-selection balance theory can have substantial upward bias depending upon the distribution of h. In addition, estimates usually refer to h weighted by the homozygous deleterious effect in different ways, so that inferences are complicated when these two variables are negatively correlated. Due to both sources of bias, the widely used regression of heterozygous on homozygous means underestimates the arithmetic mean of h for segregating mutations, in contrast to their repeatedly assumed equality in the literature. We conclude that none of the estimators from segregating populations provides, under general conditions, a useful tool to ascertain the properties of the degree of dominance, either for segregating or for newly arisen deleterious mutations. Direct estimates of the average h from mutation-accumulation experiments are shown to suffer some bias caused by purging selection but, because they do not require assumptions on the causes maintaining segregating variation, they appear to give a more reliable average dominance for newly arisen mutations.

  8. On the retention of gene duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Malaguti, Giulia; Singh, Param Priya; Isambert, Hervé

    2014-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that gene families from different functional categories have been preferentially expanded either by small scale duplication (SSD) or by whole-genome duplication (WGD). In particular, gene families prone to dominant deleterious mutations and implicated in cancers and other genetic diseases in human have been greatly expanded through two rounds of WGD dating back from early vertebrates. Here, we strengthen this intriguing observation, showing that human oncogenes involved in different primary tumors have retained many WGD duplicates compared to other human genes. In order to rationalize this evolutionary outcome, we propose a consistent population genetics model to analyze the retention of SSD and WGD duplicates taking into account their propensity to acquire dominant deleterious mutations. We solve a deterministic haploid model including initial duplicated loci, their retention through sub-functionalization or their neutral loss-of-function or deleterious gain-of-function at one locus. Extensions to diploid genotypes are presented and population size effects are analyzed using stochastic simulations. The only difference between the SSD and WGD scenarios is the initial number of individuals with duplicated loci. While SSD duplicates need to spread through the entire population from a single individual to reach fixation, WGD duplicates are de facto fixed in the small initial post-WGD population arising through the ploidy incompatibility between post-WGD individuals and the rest of the pre-WGD population. WGD duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations are then shown to be indirectly selected through purifying selection in post-WGD species, whereas SSD duplicates typically require positive selection. These results highlight the long-term evolution mechanisms behind the surprising accumulation of WGD duplicates prone to dominant deleterious mutations and are shown to be consistent with cancer genome data on the prevalence of human

  9. Sexual selection against deleterious mutations via variable male search success

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, Kelsie; Whitlock, Michael C.; Rundle, Howard D.

    2009-01-01

    In many species, successful mating requires the initial step of actively searching for and locating a female. The overall health or condition of a male is likely to affect their ability to do this, making search effort a potentially important component of sexual fitness that may have important consequences for population mean fitness. We investigated the potential population genetic consequences of search effort using 10 populations of Drosophila melanogaster, each fixed for a different recessive mutation with a visible phenotypic effect. Mate choice trials were conducted in arenas of varying size, requiring different levels of search ability. Sexual selection against mutant males was stronger when increased search effort was included than when it was excluded. Varying abilities to find mates can substantially increase the strength of selection against deleterious alleles. PMID:19625301

  10. Mutation Accumulation in an Asexual Relative of Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Stephen I.; McKay, John K.

    2017-01-01

    Asexual populations experience weaker responses to natural selection, which causes deleterious mutations to accumulate over time. Additionally, stochastic loss of individuals free of deleterious mutations can lead to an irreversible increase in mutational load in asexuals (the “click” in Muller’s Ratchet). Here we report on the genomic divergence and distribution of mutations across eight sympatric pairs of sexual and apomictic (asexual) Boechera (Brassicaceae) genotypes. We show that apomicts harbor a greater number of derived mutations than sympatric sexual genotypes. Furthermore, in phylogenetically constrained sites that are subject to contemporary purifying selection, the ancestral, conserved allele is more likely to be retained in sexuals than apomicts. These results indicate that apomictic lineages accumulate mutations at otherwise conserved sites more often than sexuals, and support the conclusion that deleterious mutation accumulation can be a powerful force in the evolution of asexual higher plants. PMID:28068346

  11. Joint Prediction of the Effective Population Size and the Rate of Fixation of Deleterious Mutations.

    PubMed

    Santiago, Enrique; Caballero, Armando

    2016-11-01

    Mutation, genetic drift, and selection are considered the main factors shaping genetic variation in nature. There is a lack, however, of general predictions accounting for the mutual interrelation between these factors. In the context of the background selection model, we provide a set of equations for the joint prediction of the effective population size and the rate of fixation of deleterious mutations, which are applicable both to sexual and asexual species. For a population of N haploid individuals and a model of deleterious mutations with effect s appearing with rate U in a genome L Morgans long, the asymptotic effective population size (Ne) and the average number of generations (T) between consecutive fixations can be approximated by [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] The solution is applicable to Muller's ratchet, providing satisfactory approximations to the rate of accumulation of mutations for a wide range of parameters. We also obtain predictions of the effective size accounting for the expected nucleotide diversity. Predictions for sexual populations allow for outlining the general conditions where mutational meltdown occurs. The equations can be extended to any distribution of mutational effects and the consideration of hotspots of recombination, showing that Ne is rather insensitive and not proportional to changes in N for many combinations of parameters. This could contribute to explain the observed small differences in levels of polymorphism between species with very different census sizes.

  12. Simulating inbreeding depression through the mutation accumulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, A. O.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2000-04-01

    Using the Penna model for biological aging, which is based on the mutation accumulation theory, we show that the number of homozygous loci corresponding to deleterious mutations is higher in small populations than in large ones. This decrease of heterozygosity may drive small populations to extinction even when no drastic change of the environment occurs.

  13. Relative Effectiveness of Mating Success and Sperm Competition at Eliminating Deleterious Mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Sean C. A.; Sharp, Nathaniel P.; Rowe, Locke; Agrawal, Aneil F.

    2012-01-01

    Condition-dependence theory predicts that sexual selection will facilitate adaptation by selecting against deleterious mutations that affect the expression of sexually selected traits indirectly via condition. Recent empirical studies have provided support for this prediction; however, their results do not elucidate the relative effects of pre- and postcopulatory sexual selection on deleterious mutations. We used the Drosophila melanogaster model system to discern the relative contributions of pre- and postcopulatory processes to selection against deleterious mutations. To assess second-male ejaculate competition success (P2; measured as the proportion of offspring attributable to the experimental male) and mating success, mutant and wild-type male D. melanogaster were given the opportunity to mate with females that were previously mated to a standard competitor male. This process was repeated for males subjected to a diet quality manipulation to test for effects of environmentally-manipulated condition on P2 and mating success. While none of the tested mutations affected P2, there was a clear effect of condition. Conversely, several of the mutations affected mating success, while condition showed no effect. Our results suggest that precopulatory selection may be more effective than postcopulatory selection at removing deleterious mutations. The opposite result obtained for our diet manipulation points to an interesting discrepancy between environmental and genetic manipulations of condition, which may be explained by the multidimensionality of condition. Establishing whether the various stages of sexual selection affect deleterious mutations differently, and to what extent, remains an important issue to resolve. PMID:22662148

  14. Somatic deleterious mutation rate in a woody plant: estimation from phenotypic data

    PubMed Central

    Bobiwash, K; Schultz, S T; Schoen, D J

    2013-01-01

    We conducted controlled crosses in populations of the long-lived clonal shrub, Vaccinium angustifolium (lowbush blueberry) to estimate inbreeding depression and mutation parameters associated with somatic deleterious mutation. Inbreeding depression level was high, with many plants failing to set fruit after self-pollination. We also compared fruit set from autogamous pollinations (pollen collected from within the same inflorescence) with fruit set from geitonogamous pollinations (pollen collected from the same plant but from inflorescences separated by several meters of branch growth). The difference between geitonogamous versus autogamous fitness within single plants is referred to as ‘autogamy depression' (AD). AD can be caused by somatic deleterious mutation. AD was significantly different from zero for fruit set. We developed a maximum-likelihood procedure to estimate somatic mutation parameters from AD, and applied it to geitonogamous and autogamous fruit set data from this experiment. We infer that, on average, approximately three sublethal, partially dominant somatic mutations exist within the crowns of the plants studied. We conclude that somatic mutation in this woody plant results in an overall genomic deleterious mutation rate that exceeds the rate measured to date for annual plants. Some implications of this result for evolutionary biology and agriculture are discussed. PMID:23778990

  15. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  16. Analysis of the biases in the estimation of deleterious mutation parameters from natural populations at mutation-selection balance.

    PubMed

    Caballero, A

    2006-12-01

    Indirect estimates of the genomic rate of deleterious mutations (lambda), their average homozygous effect (s) and their degree of dominance (h) can be obtained from genetic parameters of natural populations, assuming that the frequencies of the loci controlling a given fitness trait are at mutation-selection equilibrium. In 1996, H.-W. Deng and M. Lynch developed a general methodology for obtaining these estimates from inbreeding/outbreeding experiments. The prediction of the sign and magnitude of the biases incurred by these estimators is essential for a correct interpretation of the empirical results. However, the assessment of these biases has been tested so far under a rather limited model of the distribution of dominance effects. In this paper, the application of this method to outbred populations is evaluated, focusing on the level of variation in h values (sigma(h)(2) and the magnitude of the negative correlation (rs,h) between s and h. It is shown that the method produces upwardly biased estimates of lambda and downwardly biased estimates of the average s in the reference situation where rs,h=0, particularly for large values of sigma(h)(2), and biases of different sign depending on the magnitude of the correlation. A modification of the method, substituting the estimates of the average h for alternative ones, allows estimates to be obtained with little or no bias for the case of rs,h=0, but is otherwise biased. Information on rs,h and sigma(h)(2), gathered from mutation-accumulation experiments, suggests that sigma(h)(2) may be rather large and rs,h is usually negative but not higher than about -0.2, although the data are scarce and noisy, and should be used with caution.

  17. Excess of Deleterious Mutations around HLA Genes Reveals Evolutionary Cost of Balancing Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Tobias L.; Spirin, Victor; Jordan, Daniel M.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2016-01-01

    Deleterious mutations are expected to evolve under negative selection and are usually purged from the population. However, deleterious alleles segregate in the human population and some disease-associated variants are maintained at considerable frequencies. Here, we test the hypothesis that balancing selection may counteract purifying selection in neighboring regions and thus maintain deleterious variants at higher frequency than expected from their detrimental fitness effect. We first show in realistic simulations that balancing selection reduces the density of polymorphic sites surrounding a locus under balancing selection, but at the same time markedly increases the population frequency of the remaining variants, including even substantially deleterious alleles. To test the predictions of our simulations empirically, we then use whole-exome sequencing data from 6,500 human individuals and focus on the most established example for balancing selection in the human genome, the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our analysis shows an elevated frequency of putatively deleterious coding variants in nonhuman leukocyte antigen (non-HLA) genes localized in the MHC region. The mean frequency of these variants declined with physical distance from the classical HLA genes, indicating dependency on genetic linkage. These results reveal an indirect cost of the genetic diversity maintained by balancing selection, which has hitherto been perceived as mostly advantageous, and have implications both for the evolution of recombination and also for the epidemiology of various MHC-associated diseases. PMID:27436009

  18. Sexual selection is ineffectual or inhibits the purging of deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Arbuthnott, Devin; Rundle, Howard D

    2012-07-01

    The effects of sexual selection on population mean fitness are unclear and a subject of debate. Recent models propose that, because reproductive success may be condition dependent, much of the genome may be a target of sexual selection. Under this scenario, mutations that reduce health, and thus nonsexual fitness, may also be deleterious with respect to reproductive success, meaning that sexual selection may contribute to the purging of deleterious alleles. We tested this hypothesis directly by subjecting replicate Drosophila melanogaster populations to two treatments that altered the opportunity for sexual selection and then tracked changes in the frequency of six separate deleterious alleles with recessive and visible phenotypic effects. While natural selection acted to decrease the frequency of all six mutations, the addition of sexual selection did not aid in the purging of any of them, and for three of them appears to have hampered it. Courtship and mating have harmful effects in this species and mate choice assays showed that males directed more courtship and mating behavior toward wild-type over mutant females, providing a likely explanation for sexual selection's cost. Whether this cost extends to other mutations (e.g., those lacking visible phenotypic effects) is an important topic for future research.

  19. Additive genetic breeding values correlate with the load of partially deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Joseph L; Penrose, Marissa A; Greeff, Johan; LeBas, Natasha R

    2010-05-14

    The mutation-selection-balance model predicts most additive genetic variation to arise from numerous mildly deleterious mutations of small effect. Correspondingly, "good genes" models of sexual selection and recent models for the evolution of sex are built on the assumption that mutational loads and breeding values for fitness-related traits are correlated. In support of this concept, inbreeding depression was negatively genetically correlated with breeding values for traits under natural and sexual selection in the weevil Callosobruchus maculatus. The correlations were stronger in males and strongest for condition. These results confirm the role of existing, partially recessive mutations in maintaining additive genetic variation in outbred populations, reveal the nature of good genes under sexual selection, and show how sexual selection can offset the cost of sex.

  20. Deleterious mutation in GPR88 is associated with chorea, speech delay, and learning disabilities

    PubMed Central

    Alkufri, Fadi; Shaag, Avraham; Abu-Libdeh, Bassam

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To identify the underlying molecular basis of a familial developmental disorder characterized by chorea, marked speech delay, and learning difficulties in 4 sisters from a consanguineous family. Methods: Whole-exome analysis of DNA of the 2 older patients followed by Sanger sequencing of the mutated exon in all family members. Results: A homozygous deleterious mutation, p.C291X, was identified in the GPR88 gene in both exome analyses. The mutation segregated with the disease in the family and was absent from a large cohort of controls. Conclusions: Homozygous deleterious mutation in GPR88 in humans is associated with marked speech delay, learning disabilities, and chorea, which manifest at 8–9 years of age. The finding is consistent with the reported abundant expression of GPR88 in the striatum and the hyperkinetic activity and learning impairment observed in GPR88 knockout mice. Although further functional characterization is needed, the finding underscores the importance of GPR88 in movement control and learning. PMID:27123486

  1. The role of mutation accumulation in HIV progression

    PubMed Central

    Galvani, Alison P

    2005-01-01

    The onset of AIDS is characterized by the collapse of the immune system after a prolonged asymptomatic period. The mechanistic basis of this disease progression has remained obscure, hindering the development of effective therapies. Here I present a mechanism that underlies the deterioration of the immune system during HIV infection. The elevated turnover of lymphocytes throughout the asymptomatic period is postulated to result in the accumulation of deleterious mutations, which impairs immunological function, replicative ability and viability of lymphocytes. This mutational meltdown is proposed to occur throughout the hierarchy of lymphocyte progenitors, resulting in the deterioration of lymphocyte regeneration and an ensuing rise in viral loads. A mathematical model is used to illustrate this mechanism of progressive immunological deterioration. Mutation accumulation may explain not only the decline in CD4+T cells, but also the functional deterioration of CD4+T cells, CD8+T cells and B cells, and the exhaustion of lymphocyte regeneration. PMID:16096099

  2. Rare deleterious mutations are associated with disease in bipolar disorder families

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Aliz R; Yourshaw, Michael; Christensen, Bryce; Nelson, Stanley F; Kerner, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Bipolar disorder (BD) is a common, complex, and heritable psychiatric disorder characterized by episodes of severe mood swings. The identification of rare, damaging genomic mutations in families with BD could inform about disease mechanisms and lead to new therapeutic interventions. To determine whether rare, damaging mutations shared identity-by-descent in families with BD could be associated with disease, exome sequencing was performed in multigenerational families of the NIMH BD Family Study followed by in silico functional prediction. Disease association and disease specificity was determined using 5 090 exomes from the Sweden-Schizophrenia (SZ) Population-Based Case-Control Exome Sequencing study. We identified 14 rare and likely deleterious mutations in 14 genes that were shared identity-by-descent among affected family members. The variants were associated with BD (p<0.05 after Bonferroni correction) and disease specificity was supported by the absence of the mutations in patients with SZ. In addition, we found rare, functional mutations in known causal genes for neuropsychiatric disorders including holoprosencephaly and epilepsy. Our results demonstrate that exome sequencing in multigenerational families with BD is effective in identifying rare genomic variants of potential clinical relevance and also disease modifiers related to coexisting medical conditions. Replication of our results and experimental validation are required before disease causation could be assumed. PMID:27725659

  3. Outcome of triple-negative breast cancer in patients with or without deleterious BRCA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Soley; Gutierrez-Barrera, Angelica M.; Liu, Diane; Tasbas, Tunc; Akar, Ugur; Litton, Jennifer K.; Lin, E.; Albarracin, Constance T.; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Gonzalez-Angulo, Ana M.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.

    2015-01-01

    More than 75% of breast cancers that develop in BRCA1 mutation carriers are triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC). The aim of this study was to compare the recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) in high-risk patients with TNBC with and without deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations. A total of 227 women with TNBC who were referred for genetic counseling and underwent BRCA genetic testing between 1997 and 2010 were included in the study. The relationships between clinical variables and outcomes were evaluated using univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression models. Of 227 high-risk women with TNBC, 50% (n = 114) tested positive for BRCA1/2 mutations. Age, race, and tumor characteristics did not differ between BRCA non-carriers and carriers. At a median follow-up of 3.4 years, the 5-year RFS rates were 74 and 81% (P = 0.21), and 5-year OS rates were 85 and 93% in BRCA non-carriers and BRCA carriers, respectively (P = 0.11). In a multivariate model, after adjusting for age and disease stage, BRCA carriers tended to have a decreased risk of recurrence (HR = 0.67; 95% CI: 0.38–1.19; P = 0.17) or death (HR = 0.51; 95% CI:0.23–1.17; P = 0.11) compared to non-carriers. Our data indicate a 50% prevalence of deleterious BRCA1/2 mutations in high-risk women diagnosed with TNBC. Overall prognosis of TNBC in BRCA carriers and non-carriers is not significantly different within the first 5 years following an initial diagnosis. Further studies need to evaluate whether different therapies will change the outcome in these subgroups of TNBC. PMID:21830012

  4. Estimation of the upper limit of the mutation rate and mean heterozygous effect of deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Caballero, A

    2006-12-01

    Deng et al. have recently proposed that estimates of an upper limit to the rate of spontaneous mutations and their average heterozygous effect can be obtained from the mean and variance of a given fitness trait in naturally segregating populations, provided that allele frequencies are maintained at the balance between mutation and selection. Using simulations they show that this estimation method generally has little bias and is very robust to violations of the mutation-selection balance assumption. Here I show that the particular parameters and models used in these simulations generally reduce the amount of bias that can occur with this estimation method. In particular, the assumption of a large mutation rate in the simulations always implies a low bias of estimates. In addition, the specific model of overdominance used to check the violation of the mutation-selection balance assumption is such that there is not a dramatic decline in mean fitness from overdominant mutations, again implying a low bias of estimates. The assumption of lower mutation rates and/or other models of balancing selection may imply considerably larger biases of the estimates, making the reliability of the proposed method highly questionable.

  5. Predicting the impact of deleterious single point mutations in SMAD gene family using structural bioinformatics approach.

    PubMed

    George Priya Doss, C; Nagasundaram, N; Tanwar, Himani

    2012-06-01

    Functional alteration in SMAD proteins leads to dis-regulation of its mechanism results in possibilities of high risk diseases like fibrosis, cancer, juvenile polyposis etc. Studying single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in SMAD genes helps understand the malfunction of these proteins. In this study, we focused on deleterious effects of nsSNPs in both structural and functional level using publically available bioinformatics tools. We have mainly focused on identifying deleterious nsSNPs in both structural and functional level in SMAD genes by using SIFT, PolyPhen, SNPs&GO, I-Mutant 3.0, MUpro and PANTHER. Structure analysis was carried out with the major mutation that occurred in the native protein coded by SMAD genes and its amino acid positions (R358W, K306S, R310G, S433R and R361C). SRide was used to check the stability of the native and mutant modelled proteins. In addition, we used MAPPER to identify SNPs present in transcription factor binding sites. These findings demonstrate that the in silico approaches can be used efficiently to identify potential candidate SNPs in large scale analysis.

  6. A novel deleterious PTEN mutation in a patient with early-onset bilateral breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background An early age at Breast Cancer (BC) onset may be a hallmark of inherited predisposition, but BRCA1/2 mutations are only found in a minority of younger BC patients. Among the others, a fraction may carry mutations in rarer BC genes, such as TP53, STK11, CDH1 and PTEN. As the identification of women harboring such mutations allows for targeted risk-management, the knowledge of associated manifestations and an accurate clinical and family history evaluation are warranted. Case presentation We describe the case of a woman who developed an infiltrating ductal carcinoma of the right breast at the age of 32, a contralateral BC at age 36 and another BC of the right breast at 40. When she was 39 years-old, during a dermatological examination, mucocutaneous features suggestive of Cowden Syndrome, a disorder associated to germ-line PTEN mutations, were noticed. PTEN genetic testing revealed the novel c.71A > T (p.Asp24Val) mutation, whose deleterious effect, suggested by conservation data and in silico tools, was definitely demonstrated by the incapacity of mutant PTEN to inhibit Akt phosphorylation when used to complement PTEN-null cells. In BC tissue, despite the absence of LOH or somatic mutations of PTEN, Akt phosphorylation was markedly increased in comparison to normal tissue, thus implying additional somatic events into the deregulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway and, presumably, into carcinogenesis. Hence, known oncogenic mutations in PIK3CA (exons 10 and 21) and AKT1 (exon 2) were screened in tumor DNA with negative results, which suggests that the responsible somatic event(s) is a different, uncommon one. Conclusion This case stresses the importance of clinical/genetic assessment of early-onset BC patients in order to identify mutation carriers, who are at high risk of new events, so requiring tailored management. Moreover, it revealed a novel PTEN mutation with pathogenic effect, pointing out, however, the need for further efforts to elucidate the

  7. Distributions of selectively constrained sites and deleterious mutation rates in the hominid and murid genomes.

    PubMed

    Eory, Lél; Halligan, Daniel L; Keightley, Peter D

    2010-01-01

    Protein-coding sequences make up only about 1% of the mammalian genome. Much of the remaining 99% has been long assumed to be junk DNA, with little or no functional significance. Here, we show that in hominids, a group with historically low effective population sizes, all classes of noncoding DNA evolve more slowly than ancestral transposable elements and so appear to be subject to significant evolutionary constraints. Under the nearly neutral theory, we expected to see lower levels of selective constraints on most sequence types in hominids than murids, a group that is thought to have a higher effective population size. We found that this is the case for many sequence types examined, the most extreme example being 5'UTRs, for which constraint in hominids is only about one-third that of murids. Surprisingly, however, we observed higher constraints for some sequence types in hominids, notably 4-fold sites, where constraint is more than twice as high as in murids. This implies that more than about one-fifth of mutations at 4-fold sites are effectively selected against in hominids. The higher constraint at 4-fold sites in hominids suggests a more complex protein-coding gene structure than murids and indicates that methods for detecting selection on protein-coding sequences (e.g., using the d(N)/d(S) ratio), with 4-fold sites as a neutral standard, may lead to biased estimates, particularly in hominids. Our constraint estimates imply that 5.4% of nucleotide sites in the human genome are subject to effective negative selection and that there are three times as many constrained sites within noncoding sequences as within protein-coding sequences. Including coding and noncoding sites, we estimate that the genomic deleterious mutation rate U = 4.2. The mutational load predicted under a multiplicative model is therefore about 99% in hominids.

  8. Deleterious mutations of a claw keratin in multiple taxa of reptiles.

    PubMed

    Dalla Valle, Luisa; Benato, Francesca; Rossi, Chiara; Alibardi, Lorenzo; Tschachler, Erwin; Eckhart, Leopold

    2011-03-01

    We have recently shown that homologs of mammalian hair keratins are expressed in the claws of the green anole lizard, Anolis carolinensis. To test whether reptilian hair keratin homologs are functionally associated with claws, we investigated the conservation of the prototypical reptilian hair keratin homolog, hard acidic keratin 1 (HA1), in representative species from all main clades of reptiles. A complete cDNA of HA1 was cloned from the claw-forming epidermis of the lacertid lizard Podarcis sicula, and partial HA1 gene sequences could be amplified from genomic DNA of tuatara, lizards, gekkos, turtles, and crocodiles. In contrast, the HA1 gene of the limbless slow worm, Anguis fragilis, and of two species of turtles contained at least one deleterious mutation. Moreover, an HA1 gene was undetectable in the softshell turtle, snakes, and birds. Mapping the presence and absence of HA1 onto the phylogenetic tree of sauropsids suggested that the HA1 gene has been lost independently in several lineages of reptiles. The species distribution of HA1 is compatible with the hypothesis of a primary function of HA1 in claws but also shows that the formation of reptilian claws does not strictly depend on this keratin.

  9. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans.

    PubMed

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-09-15

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates.

  10. Deleterious mutations in the essential mRNA metabolism factor, hGle1, in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Kaneb, Hannah M.; Folkmann, Andrew W.; Belzil, Véronique V.; Jao, Li-En; Leblond, Claire S.; Girard, Simon L.; Daoud, Hussein; Noreau, Anne; Rochefort, Daniel; Hince, Pascale; Szuto, Anna; Levert, Annie; Vidal, Sabrina; André-Guimont, Catherine; Camu, William; Bouchard, Jean-Pierre; Dupré, Nicolas; Rouleau, Guy A.; Wente, Susan R.; Dion, Patrick A.

    2015-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the selective death of motor neurons. Causative mutations in the global RNA-processing proteins TDP-43 and FUS among others, as well as their aggregation in ALS patients, have identified defects in RNA metabolism as an important feature in this disease. Lethal congenital contracture syndrome 1 and lethal arthrogryposis with anterior horn cell disease are autosomal recessive fetal motor neuron diseases that are caused by mutations in another global RNA-processing protein, hGle1. In this study, we carried out the first screening of GLE1 in ALS patients (173 familial and 760 sporadic) and identified 2 deleterious mutations (1 splice site and 1 nonsense mutation) and 1 missense mutation. Functional analysis of the deleterious mutants revealed them to be unable to rescue motor neuron pathology in zebrafish morphants lacking Gle1. Furthermore, in HeLa cells, both mutations caused a depletion of hGle1 at the nuclear pore where it carries out an essential role in nuclear export of mRNA. These results suggest a haploinsufficiency mechanism and point to a causative role for GLE1 mutations in ALS patients. This further supports the involvement of global defects in RNA metabolism in ALS. PMID:25343993

  11. Interlocus gene conversion events introduce deleterious mutations into at least 1% of human genes associated with inherited disease.

    PubMed

    Casola, Claudio; Zekonyte, Ugne; Phillips, Andrew D; Cooper, David N; Hahn, Matthew W

    2012-03-01

    Establishing the molecular basis of DNA mutations that cause inherited disease is of fundamental importance to understanding the origin, nature, and clinical sequelae of genetic disorders in humans. The majority of disease-associated mutations constitute single-base substitutions and short deletions and/or insertions resulting from DNA replication errors and the repair of damaged bases. However, pathological mutations can also be introduced by nonreciprocal recombination events between paralogous sequences, a phenomenon known as interlocus gene conversion (IGC). IGC events have thus far been linked to pathology in more than 20 human genes. However, the large number of duplicated gene sequences in the human genome implies that many more disease-associated mutations could originate via IGC. Here, we have used a genome-wide computational approach to identify disease-associated mutations derived from IGC events. Our approach revealed hundreds of known pathological mutations that could have been caused by IGC. Further, we identified several dozen high-confidence cases of inherited disease mutations resulting from IGC in ∼1% of all genes analyzed. About half of the donor sequences associated with such mutations are functional paralogous genes, suggesting that epistatic interactions or differential expression patterns will determine the impact upon fitness of specific substitutions between duplicated genes. In addition, we identified thousands of hitherto undescribed and potentially deleterious mutations that could arise via IGC. Our findings reveal the extent of the impact of interlocus gene conversion upon the spectrum of human inherited disease.

  12. Spectrum and characterisation of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in high-risk Czech patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Machackova, Eva; Foretova, Lenka; Lukesova, Mirka; Vasickova, Petra; Navratilova, Marie; Coene, Ilse; Pavlu, Hana; Kosinova, Veronika; Kuklova, Jitka; Claes, Kathleen

    2008-01-01

    Background The incidence of breast cancer has doubled over the past 20 years in the Czech Republic. Hereditary factors may be a cause of young onset, bilateral breast or ovarian cancer, and familial accumulation of the disease. BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations account for an important fraction of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer cases. One thousand and ten unrelated high-risk probands with breast and/or ovarian cancer were analysed for the presence of a BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene mutation at the Masaryk Memorial Cancer Institute (Czech Republic) during 1999–2006. Methods The complete coding sequences and splice sites of both genes were screened, and the presence of large intragenic rearrangements in BRCA1 was verified. Putative splice-site variants were analysed at the cDNA level for their potential to alter mRNA splicing. Results In 294 unrelated families (29.1% of the 1,010 probands) pathogenic mutations were identified, with 44 different BRCA1 mutations and 41 different BRCA2 mutations being detected in 204 and 90 unrelated families, respectively. In total, three BRCA1 founder mutations (c.5266dupC; c.3700_3704del5; p.Cys61Gly) and two BRCA2 founder mutations (c.7913_7917del5; c.8537_8538del2) represent 52% of all detected mutations in Czech high-risk probands. Nine putative splice-site variants were evaluated at the cDNA level. Three splice-site variants in BRCA1 (c.302-3C>G; c.4185G>A and c.4675+1G>A) and six splice-site variants in BRCA2 (c.475G>A; c.476-2>G; c.7007G>A; c.8755-1G>A; c.9117+2T>A and c.9118-2A>G) were demonstrated to result in aberrant transcripts and are considered as deleterious mutations. Conclusion This study represents an evaluation of deleterious genetic variants in the BRCA1 and 2 genes in the Czech population. The classification of several splice-site variants as true pathogenic mutations may prove useful for genetic counselling of families with high risk of breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:18489799

  13. A deleterious Nav1.1 mutation selectively impairs telencephalic inhibitory neurons derived from Dravet Syndrome patients

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yishan; Paşca, Sergiu P; Portmann, Thomas; Goold, Carleton; Worringer, Kathleen A; Guan, Wendy; Chan, Karen C; Gai, Hui; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Ying-Jiun J; Mao, Rong; Chan, Karrie; Rubenstein, John LR; Madison, Daniel V; Hallmayer, Joachim; Froehlich-Santino, Wendy M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Dolmetsch, Ricardo E

    2016-01-01

    Dravet Syndrome is an intractable form of childhood epilepsy associated with deleterious mutations in SCN1A, the gene encoding neuronal sodium channel Nav1.1. Earlier studies using human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have produced mixed results regarding the importance of Nav1.1 in human inhibitory versus excitatory neurons. We studied a Nav1.1 mutation (p.S1328P) identified in a pair of twins with Dravet Syndrome and generated iPSC-derived neurons from these patients. Characterization of the mutant channel revealed a decrease in current amplitude and hypersensitivity to steady-state inactivation. We then differentiated Dravet-Syndrome and control iPSCs into telencephalic excitatory neurons or medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-like inhibitory neurons. Dravet inhibitory neurons showed deficits in sodium currents and action potential firing, which were rescued by a Nav1.1 transgene, whereas Dravet excitatory neurons were normal. Our study identifies biophysical impairments underlying a deleterious Nav1.1 mutation and supports the hypothesis that Dravet Syndrome arises from defective inhibitory neurons. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13073.001 PMID:27458797

  14. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries

    PubMed Central

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2015-01-01

    Approximately 5%–10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:26187060

  15. Comprehensive spectrum of BRCA1 and BRCA2 deleterious mutations in breast cancer in Asian countries.

    PubMed

    Kwong, Ava; Shin, Vivian Y; Ho, John C W; Kang, Eunyoung; Nakamura, Seigo; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Lee, Ann S G; Sng, Jen-Hwei; Ginsburg, Ophira M; Kurian, Allison W; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Siu, Man-Ting; Law, Fian B F; Chan, Tsun-Leung; Narod, Steven A; Ford, James M; Ma, Edmond S K; Kim, Sung-Won

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 5%-10% of breast cancers are due to genetic predisposition caused by germline mutations; the most commonly tested genes are BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. Some mutations are unique to one family and others are recurrent; the spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations varies depending on the geographical origins, populations or ethnic groups. In this review, we compiled data from 11 participating Asian countries (Bangladesh, Mainland China, Hong Kong SAR, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Vietnam), and from ethnic Asians residing in Canada and the USA. We have additionally conducted a literature review to include other Asian countries mainly in Central and Western Asia. We present the current pathogenic mutation spectrum of BRCA1/BRCA2 genes in patients with breast cancer in various Asian populations. Understanding BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations in Asians will help provide better risk assessment and clinical management of breast cancer.

  16. Frequent germline deleterious mutations in DNA repair genes in familial prostate cancer cases are associated with advanced disease

    PubMed Central

    Leongamornlert, D; Saunders, E; Dadaev, T; Tymrakiewicz, M; Goh, C; Jugurnauth-Little, S; Kozarewa, I; Fenwick, K; Assiotis, I; Barrowdale, D; Govindasami, K; Guy, M; Sawyer, E; Wilkinson, R; Antoniou, A C; Eeles, R; Kote-Jarai, Z

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prostate cancer (PrCa) is one of the most common diseases to affect men worldwide and among the leading causes of cancer-related death. The purpose of this study was to use second-generation sequencing technology to assess the frequency of deleterious mutations in 22 tumour suppressor genes in familial PrCa and estimate the relative risk of PrCa if these genes are mutated. Methods: Germline DNA samples from 191 men with 3 or more cases of PrCa in their family were sequenced for 22 tumour suppressor genes using Agilent target enrichment and Illumina technology. Analysis for genetic variation was carried out by using a pipeline consisting of BWA, Genome Analysis Toolkit (GATK) and ANNOVAR. Clinical features were correlated with mutation status using standard statistical tests. Modified segregation analysis was used to determine the relative risk of PrCa conferred by the putative loss-of-function (LoF) mutations identified. Results: We discovered 14 putative LoF mutations in 191 samples (7.3%) and these mutations were more frequently associated with nodal involvement, metastasis or T4 tumour stage (P=0.00164). Segregation analysis of probands with European ancestry estimated that LoF mutations in any of the studied genes confer a relative risk of PrCa of 1.94 (95% CI: 1.56–2.42). Conclusions: These findings show that LoF mutations in DNA repair pathway genes predispose to familial PrCa and advanced disease and therefore warrants further investigation. The clinical utility of these findings will become increasingly important as targeted screening and therapies become more widespread. PMID:24556621

  17. Identification of Deleterious Mutations in Myostatin Gene of Rohu Carp (Labeo rohita) Using Modeling and Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approaches.

    PubMed

    Rasal, Kiran Dashrath; Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Mohapatra, Shibani D; Nayak, Swapnarani; Jena, Sasmita; Sundaray, Jitendra Kumar; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Barman, Hirak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The myostatin (MSTN) is a known negative growth regulator of skeletal muscle. The mutated myostatin showed a double-muscular phenotype having a positive significance for the farmed animals. Consequently, adequate information is not available in the teleosts, including farmed rohu carp, Labeo rohita. In the absence of experimental evidence, computational algorithms were utilized in predicting the impact of point mutation of rohu myostatin, especially its structural and functional relationships. The four mutations were generated at different positions (p.D76A, p.Q204P, p.C312Y, and p.D313A) of MSTN protein of rohu. The impacts of each mutant were analyzed using SIFT, I-Mutant 2.0, PANTHER, and PROVEAN, wherein two substitutions (p.D76A and p.Q204P) were predicted as deleterious. The comparative structural analysis of each mutant protein with the native was explored using 3D modeling as well as molecular-dynamic simulation techniques. The simulation showed altered dynamic behaviors concerning RMSD and RMSF, for either p.D76A or p.Q204P substitution, when compared with the native counterpart. Interestingly, incorporated two mutations imposed a significant negative impact on protein structure and stability. The present study provided the first-hand information in identifying possible amino acids, where mutations could be incorporated into MSTN gene of rohu carp including other carps for undertaking further in vivo studies.

  18. Identification of Deleterious Mutations in Myostatin Gene of Rohu Carp (Labeo rohita) Using Modeling and Molecular Dynamic Simulation Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Rasal, Kiran Dashrath; Chakrapani, Vemulawada; Patra, Swagat Kumar; Mohapatra, Shibani D.; Nayak, Swapnarani; Jena, Sasmita; Sundaray, Jitendra Kumar; Jayasankar, Pallipuram; Barman, Hirak Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The myostatin (MSTN) is a known negative growth regulator of skeletal muscle. The mutated myostatin showed a double-muscular phenotype having a positive significance for the farmed animals. Consequently, adequate information is not available in the teleosts, including farmed rohu carp, Labeo rohita. In the absence of experimental evidence, computational algorithms were utilized in predicting the impact of point mutation of rohu myostatin, especially its structural and functional relationships. The four mutations were generated at different positions (p.D76A, p.Q204P, p.C312Y, and p.D313A) of MSTN protein of rohu. The impacts of each mutant were analyzed using SIFT, I-Mutant 2.0, PANTHER, and PROVEAN, wherein two substitutions (p.D76A and p.Q204P) were predicted as deleterious. The comparative structural analysis of each mutant protein with the native was explored using 3D modeling as well as molecular-dynamic simulation techniques. The simulation showed altered dynamic behaviors concerning RMSD and RMSF, for either p.D76A or p.Q204P substitution, when compared with the native counterpart. Interestingly, incorporated two mutations imposed a significant negative impact on protein structure and stability. The present study provided the first-hand information in identifying possible amino acids, where mutations could be incorporated into MSTN gene of rohu carp including other carps for undertaking further in vivo studies. PMID:27019850

  19. Dietary stress does not strengthen selection against single deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    MacLellan, K; Kwan, L; Whitlock, M C; Rundle, H D

    2012-01-01

    Stress is generally thought to increase the strength of selection, although empirical results are mixed and general conclusions are difficult because data are limited. Here we compare the fitness effects of nine independent recessive mutations in Drosophila melanogaster in a high- and low-dietary-stress environment, estimating the strength of selection on these mutations arising from both a competitive measure of male reproductive success and productivity (female fecundity and the subsequent survival to adulthood of her offspring). The effect of stress on male reproductive success has not been addressed previously for individual loci and is of particular interest with respect to the alignment of natural and sexual selection. Our results do not support the hypothesis that stress increases the efficacy of selection arising from either fitness component. Results concerning the alignment of natural and sexual selection were mixed, although data are limited. In the low-stress environment, selection on mating success and productivity were concordant for five of nine mutations (four out of four when restricted to those with significant or near-significant productivity effects), whereas in the high-stress environment, selection aligned for seven of nine mutations (two out of two when restricted to those having significant productivity effects). General conclusions as to the effects of stress on the strength of selection and the alignment of natural and sexual selection await data from additional mutations, fitness components and stressors. PMID:21792225

  20. Enhanced fixation and preservation of a newly arisen duplicate gene by masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kentaro M; Takahasi, K Ryo; Takano-Shimizu, Toshiyuki

    2009-08-01

    Segmental duplications are enriched within many eukaryote genomes, and their potential consequence is gene duplication. While previous theoretical studies of gene duplication have mainly focused on the gene silencing process after fixation, the process leading to fixation is even more important for segmental duplications, because the majority of duplications would be lost before reaching a significant frequency in a population. Here, by a series of computer simulations, we show that purifying selection against loss-of-function mutations increases the fixation probability of a new duplicate gene, especially when the gene is haplo-insufficient. Theoretically, the probability of simultaneous preservation of both duplicate genes becomes twice the loss-of-function mutation rate (u(c)) when the population size (N), the degree of dominance of mutations (h) and the recombination rate between the duplicate genes (c) are all sufficiently large (Nu(c)>1, h>0.1 and c>u(c)). The preservation probability declines rapidly with h and becomes 0 when h=0 (haplo-sufficiency). We infer that masking deleterious loss-of-function mutations give duplicate genes an immediate selective advantage and, together with effects of increased gene dosage, would predominantly determine the fates of the duplicate genes in the early phase of their evolution.

  1. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans.

  2. The effects of a deleterious mutation load on patterns of influenza A/H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, Katia; Rasmussen, David A

    2015-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic analyses indicate that RNA virus populations carry a significant deleterious mutation load. This mutation load has the potential to shape patterns of adaptive evolution via genetic linkage to beneficial mutations. Here, we examine the effect of deleterious mutations on patterns of influenza A subtype H3N2's antigenic evolution in humans. By first analyzing simple models of influenza that incorporate a mutation load, we show that deleterious mutations, as expected, act to slow the virus's rate of antigenic evolution, while making it more punctuated in nature. These models further predict three distinct molecular pathways by which antigenic cluster transitions occur, and we find phylogenetic patterns consistent with each of these pathways in influenza virus sequences. Simulations of a more complex phylodynamic model further indicate that antigenic mutations act in concert with deleterious mutations to reproduce influenza's spindly hemagglutinin phylogeny, co-circulation of antigenic variants, and high annual attack rates. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07361.001 PMID:26371556

  3. A deleterious mutation in SAMD9 causes normophosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis.

    PubMed

    Topaz, Orit; Indelman, Margarita; Chefetz, Ilana; Geiger, Dan; Metzker, Aryeh; Altschuler, Yoram; Choder, Mordechai; Bercovich, Dani; Uitto, Jouni; Bergman, Reuven; Richard, Gabriele; Sprecher, Eli

    2006-10-01

    Familial tumoral calcinosis (FTC) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by the progressive deposition of calcified masses in cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, which results in painful ulcerative lesions and severe skin and bone infections. Two major types of FTC have been recognized: hyperphosphatemic FTC (HFTC) and normophosphatemic FTC (NFTC). HFTC was recently shown to result from mutations in two different genes: GALNT3, which codes for a glycosyltransferase, and FGF23, which codes for a potent phosphaturic protein. To determine the molecular cause of NFTC, we performed homozygosity mapping in five affected families of Jewish Yemenite origin and mapped NFTC to 7q21-7q21.3. Mutation analysis revealed a homozygous mutation in the SAMD9 gene (K1495E), which was found to segregate with the disease in all families and to interfere with the protein expression. Our data suggest that SAMD9 is involved in the regulation of extraosseous calcification, a process of considerable importance in a wide range of diseases as common as atherosclerosis and autoimmune disorders.

  4. Origin and dynamics of admixture in Brazilians and its effect on the pattern of deleterious mutations.

    PubMed

    Kehdy, Fernanda S G; Gouveia, Mateus H; Machado, Moara; Magalhães, Wagner C S; Horimoto, Andrea R; Horta, Bernardo L; Moreira, Rennan G; Leal, Thiago P; Scliar, Marilia O; Soares-Souza, Giordano B; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Araújo, Gilderlanio S; Zamudio, Roxana; Sant Anna, Hanaisa P; Santos, Hadassa C; Duarte, Nubia E; Fiaccone, Rosemeire L; Figueiredo, Camila A; Silva, Thiago M; Costa, Gustavo N O; Beleza, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E; Cabrera, Lilia; Debortoli, Guilherme; Duarte, Denise; Ghirotto, Silvia; Gilman, Robert H; Gonçalves, Vanessa F; Marrero, Andrea R; Muniz, Yara C; Weissensteiner, Hansi; Yeager, Meredith; Rodrigues, Laura C; Barreto, Mauricio L; Lima-Costa, M Fernanda; Pereira, Alexandre C; Rodrigues, Maíra R; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2015-07-14

    While South Americans are underrepresented in human genomic diversity studies, Brazil has been a classical model for population genetics studies on admixture. We present the results of the EPIGEN Brazil Initiative, the most comprehensive up-to-date genomic analysis of any Latin-American population. A population-based genome-wide analysis of 6,487 individuals was performed in the context of worldwide genomic diversity to elucidate how ancestry, kinship, and inbreeding interact in three populations with different histories from the Northeast (African ancestry: 50%), Southeast, and South (both with European ancestry >70%) of Brazil. We showed that ancestry-positive assortative mating permeated Brazilian history. We traced European ancestry in the Southeast/South to a wider European/Middle Eastern region with respect to the Northeast, where ancestry seems restricted to Iberia. By developing an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we infer more recent European immigration to the Southeast/South than to the Northeast. Also, the observed low Native-American ancestry (6-8%) was mostly introduced in different regions of Brazil soon after the European Conquest. We broadened our understanding of the African diaspora, the major destination of which was Brazil, by revealing that Brazilians display two within-Africa ancestry components: one associated with non-Bantu/western Africans (more evident in the Northeast and African Americans) and one associated with Bantu/eastern Africans (more present in the Southeast/South). Furthermore, the whole-genome analysis of 30 individuals (42-fold deep coverage) shows that continental admixture rather than local post-Columbian history is the main and complex determinant of the individual amount of deleterious genotypes.

  5. Origin and dynamics of admixture in Brazilians and its effect on the pattern of deleterious mutations

    PubMed Central

    Kehdy, Fernanda S. G.; Gouveia, Mateus H.; Machado, Moara; Magalhães, Wagner C. S.; Horimoto, Andrea R.; Horta, Bernardo L.; Moreira, Rennan G.; Leal, Thiago P.; Scliar, Marilia O.; Soares-Souza, Giordano B.; Rodrigues-Soares, Fernanda; Araújo, Gilderlanio S.; Zamudio, Roxana; Sant Anna, Hanaisa P.; Santos, Hadassa C.; Duarte, Nubia E.; Fiaccone, Rosemeire L.; Figueiredo, Camila A.; Silva, Thiago M.; Costa, Gustavo N. O.; Beleza, Sandra; Berg, Douglas E.; Cabrera, Lilia; Debortoli, Guilherme; Duarte, Denise; Ghirotto, Silvia; Gilman, Robert H.; Gonçalves, Vanessa F.; Marrero, Andrea R.; Muniz, Yara C.; Weissensteiner, Hansi; Yeager, Meredith; Rodrigues, Laura C.; Barreto, Mauricio L.; Lima-Costa, M. Fernanda; Pereira, Alexandre C.; Rodrigues, Maíra R.; Tarazona-Santos, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    While South Americans are underrepresented in human genomic diversity studies, Brazil has been a classical model for population genetics studies on admixture. We present the results of the EPIGEN Brazil Initiative, the most comprehensive up-to-date genomic analysis of any Latin-American population. A population-based genome-wide analysis of 6,487 individuals was performed in the context of worldwide genomic diversity to elucidate how ancestry, kinship, and inbreeding interact in three populations with different histories from the Northeast (African ancestry: 50%), Southeast, and South (both with European ancestry >70%) of Brazil. We showed that ancestry-positive assortative mating permeated Brazilian history. We traced European ancestry in the Southeast/South to a wider European/Middle Eastern region with respect to the Northeast, where ancestry seems restricted to Iberia. By developing an approximate Bayesian computation framework, we infer more recent European immigration to the Southeast/South than to the Northeast. Also, the observed low Native-American ancestry (6–8%) was mostly introduced in different regions of Brazil soon after the European Conquest. We broadened our understanding of the African diaspora, the major destination of which was Brazil, by revealing that Brazilians display two within-Africa ancestry components: one associated with non-Bantu/western Africans (more evident in the Northeast and African Americans) and one associated with Bantu/eastern Africans (more present in the Southeast/South). Furthermore, the whole-genome analysis of 30 individuals (42-fold deep coverage) shows that continental admixture rather than local post-Columbian history is the main and complex determinant of the individual amount of deleterious genotypes. PMID:26124090

  6. Deleterious mutation in FDX1L gene is associated with a novel mitochondrial muscle myopathy.

    PubMed

    Spiegel, Ronen; Saada, Ann; Halvardson, Jonatan; Soiferman, Devorah; Shaag, Avraham; Edvardson, Simon; Horovitz, Yoseph; Khayat, Morad; Shalev, Stavit A; Feuk, Lars; Elpeleg, Orly

    2014-07-01

    Isolated metabolic myopathies encompass a heterogeneous group of disorders, with mitochondrial myopathies being a subgroup, with depleted skeletal muscle energy production manifesting either by recurrent episodes of myoglobinuria or progressive muscle weakness. In this study, we investigated the genetic cause of a patient from a consanguineous family who presented with adolescent onset autosomal recessive mitochondrial myopathy. Analysis of enzyme activities of the five respiratory chain complexes in our patients' skeletal muscle showed severely impaired activities of iron sulfur (Fe-S)-dependent complexes I, II and III and mitochondrial aconitase. We employed exome sequencing combined with homozygosity mapping to identify a homozygous mutation, c.1A>T, in the FDX1L gene, which encodes the mitochondrial ferredoxin 2 (Fdx2) protein. The mutation disrupts the ATG initiation translation site resulting in severe reduction of Fdx2 content in the patient muscle and fibroblasts mitochondria. Fdx2 is the second component of the Fe-S cluster biogenesis machinery, the first being IscU that is associated with isolated mitochondrial myopathy. We suggest adding genetic analysis of FDX1L in cases of mitochondrial myopathy especially when associated with reduced activity of the respiratory chain complexes I, II and III.

  7. A human laterality disorder caused by a homozygous deleterious mutation in MMP21

    PubMed Central

    Perles, Zeev; Moon, Sungjin; Ta-Shma, Asaf; Yaacov, Barak; Francescatto, Ludmila; Edvardson, Simon; Rein, Azaria JJT; Elpeleg, Orly; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2016-01-01

    Background Laterality in the vertebrate embryo is determined by left–right asymmetric gene expression driven by the flow of extraembryonic fluid across the embryonic node. Defects in these processes cause heterotaxy, the abnormal formation and arrangement of visceral organs that can range from complete inversion of symmetry to the selective misarrangement of organs. However, our understanding of the genetic causality for laterality defects in human beings remains relatively limited. Methods We performed whole exome sequencing in a consanguineous family with heterotaxia. To interrogate the pathogenic potential of the discovered variant, we used an in vivo system in which the potential of the candidate gene to induce L-R asymmetry was tested by transient suppression and CRISPR/Cas9-induced deletions. We also used in vitro assays to test a possible link between our exome-derived candidate and Notch signaling. Results We identified a homozygous 2 bp deletion in MMP21, encoding matrix metalloproteinase-21, as the sole coding mutation that segregated with the phenotype. Transient suppression or CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of mmp21 in zebrafish embryos induced cardiac looping defects, with concomitant disruption of laterality markers in the lateral plate mesoderm and disrupted notch signalling in vitro and in vivo. Conclusions Our data implicate loss of MMP21 as a cause of heterotaxy in humans with concomitant defects in Notch signaling. In support of this finding, a homozygous missense mutation in MMP21 was identified previously in mice with N-Ethyl-N-Nitrosourea (ENU)-induced heterotaxy. Taken together, these observations suggest a role of matrix metalloproteinases in the establishment of asymmetric organ development, likely through the regulation of morphogenetic signals. PMID:26429889

  8. A novel deleterious mutation in the COMP gene that causes pseudoachondroplasia

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huaichao; Yu, Sisi; Lin, Ying; Guo, Qi; Ma, Rongchuan; Ye, Zimeng; Di, Yanan; Li, Ning; Miao, Yuanying; Zhou, Yu; Li, Yuanfeng; Yang, Jiyun; Yang, Zhenglin

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) is a rare and severe genetic disease; therefore, an accurate molecular diagnosis is essential for appropriate disease treatment and family planning. Currently, the diagnosis of PSACH is based mainly on family history, physical examination and radiographic evaluation. Genetic studies of patients with PSACH in Chinese populations have been very limited. With the application of next-generation sequencing (NGS), a comprehensive molecular diagnosis of PSACH is now possible. The purpose of this study was to perform comprehensive NGS-based molecular diagnoses for patients with PSACH in China. We investigated the molecular genetics of one suspected PSACH family in this study. The DNA sample from the proband was sequenced using a custom capture panel that included 249 bone disease genes. Variant calls were filtered and annotated using an in-house automated pipeline. Then, we confirmed the variants by Sanger sequencing in three family members. After co-segregation analysis, the variant, c.1160_1162del of the COMP gene, was identified as a novel mutation responsible for this spontaneous form of PSACH. PMID:27330822

  9. Deleterious Mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 Gene Cause Brittle Cornea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Abu, Almogit; Frydman, Moshe; Marek, Dina; Pras, Eran; Nir, Uri; Reznik-Wolf, Haike; Pras, Elon

    2008-01-01

    Brittle cornea syndrome (BCS) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by a thin cornea that tends to perforate, causing progressive visual loss and blindness. Additional systemic symptoms such as joint hypermotility, hyperlaxity of the skin, and kyphoscoliosis place BCS among the connective-tissue disorders. Previously, we assigned the disease gene to a 4.7 Mb interval on chromosome 16q24. In order to clone the BCS gene, we first narrowed the disease locus to a 2.8 Mb interval and systematically sequenced genes expressed in connective tissue in this chromosomal segment. We have identified two frameshift mutations in the Zinc-Finger 469 gene (ZNF469). In five unrelated patients of Tunisian Jewish ancestry, we found a 1 bp deletion at position 5943 (5943 delA), and in an inbred Palestinian family we detected a single-nucleotide deletion at position 9527 (9527 delG). The function of ZNF469 is unknown. However, a 30% homology to a number of collagens suggests that it could act as a transcription factor involved in the synthesis and/or organization of collagen fibers. PMID:18452888

  10. Accelerated mutation accumulation in asexual lineages of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T; Logsdon, John M; Taylor, Douglas R

    2010-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction.

  11. Human Spermatogenic Failure Purges Deleterious Mutation Load from the Autosomes and Both Sex Chromosomes, including the Gene DMRT1

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Emma; Carvalho, Filipa; Gonçalves, João; Huang, Ni; Matthiesen, Rune; Noordam, Michiel J.; Quintela, Inés; Ramu, Avinash; Seabra, Catarina; Wilfert, Amy B.; Dai, Juncheng; Downie, Jonathan M.; Fernandes, Susana; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Amorim, António; Barros, Alberto; Carracedo, Angel; Hu, Zhibin; Hurles, Matthew E.; Moskovtsev, Sergey; Ober, Carole; Paduch, Darius A.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Schlegel, Peter N.; Sousa, Mário; Carrell, Douglas T.; Conrad, Donald F.

    2013-01-01

    Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04–1.16], p<2×10−3), rare X-linked CNVs by 29%, (OR 1.29 [1.11–1.50], p<1×10−3), and rare Y-linked duplications by 88% (OR 1.88 [1.13–3.13], p<0.03). By contrasting the properties of our case-specific CNVs with those of CNV callsets from cases of autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2×10−5). Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes. PMID:23555275

  12. Human spermatogenic failure purges deleterious mutation load from the autosomes and both sex chromosomes, including the gene DMRT1.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Alexandra M; Aston, Kenneth I; Thompson, Emma; Carvalho, Filipa; Gonçalves, João; Huang, Ni; Matthiesen, Rune; Noordam, Michiel J; Quintela, Inés; Ramu, Avinash; Seabra, Catarina; Wilfert, Amy B; Dai, Juncheng; Downie, Jonathan M; Fernandes, Susana; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao; Amorim, António; Barros, Alberto; Carracedo, Angel; Hu, Zhibin; Hurles, Matthew E; Moskovtsev, Sergey; Ober, Carole; Paduch, Darius A; Schiffman, Joshua D; Schlegel, Peter N; Sousa, Mário; Carrell, Douglas T; Conrad, Donald F

    2013-03-01

    Gonadal failure, along with early pregnancy loss and perinatal death, may be an important filter that limits the propagation of harmful mutations in the human population. We hypothesized that men with spermatogenic impairment, a disease with unknown genetic architecture and a common cause of male infertility, are enriched for rare deleterious mutations compared to men with normal spermatogenesis. After assaying genomewide SNPs and CNVs in 323 Caucasian men with idiopathic spermatogenic impairment and more than 1,100 controls, we estimate that each rare autosomal deletion detected in our study multiplicatively changes a man's risk of disease by 10% (OR 1.10 [1.04-1.16], p<2 × 10(-3)), rare X-linked CNVs by 29%, (OR 1.29 [1.11-1.50], p<1 × 10(-3)), and rare Y-linked duplications by 88% (OR 1.88 [1.13-3.13], p<0.03). By contrasting the properties of our case-specific CNVs with those of CNV callsets from cases of autism, schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and intellectual disability, we propose that the CNV burden in spermatogenic impairment is distinct from the burden of large, dominant mutations described for neurodevelopmental disorders. We identified two patients with deletions of DMRT1, a gene on chromosome 9p24.3 orthologous to the putative sex determination locus of the avian ZW chromosome system. In an independent sample of Han Chinese men, we identified 3 more DMRT1 deletions in 979 cases of idiopathic azoospermia and none in 1,734 controls, and found none in an additional 4,519 controls from public databases. The combined results indicate that DMRT1 loss-of-function mutations are a risk factor and potential genetic cause of human spermatogenic failure (frequency of 0.38% in 1306 cases and 0% in 7,754 controls, p = 6.2 × 10(-5)). Our study identifies other recurrent CNVs as potential causes of idiopathic azoospermia and generates hypotheses for directing future studies on the genetic basis of male infertility and IVF outcomes.

  13. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): A Comprehensive Informatics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Obaid, Ayesha; Ikram, Aqsa; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-translational modifications (PTMs) and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A), 1 in LC3B (S92C), 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H) and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C) coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform. PMID:28085066

  14. Mutation-Structure-Function Relationship Based Integrated Strategy Reveals the Potential Impact of Deleterious Missense Mutations in Autophagy Related Proteins on Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC): A Comprehensive Informatics Approach.

    PubMed

    Awan, Faryal Mehwish; Obaid, Ayesha; Ikram, Aqsa; Janjua, Hussnain Ahmed

    2017-01-11

    Autophagy, an evolutionary conserved multifaceted lysosome-mediated bulk degradation system, plays a vital role in liver pathologies including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Post-translational modifications (PTMs) and genetic variations in autophagy components have emerged as significant determinants of autophagy related proteins. Identification of a comprehensive spectrum of genetic variations and PTMs of autophagy related proteins and their impact at molecular level will greatly expand our understanding of autophagy based regulation. In this study, we attempted to identify high risk missense mutations that are highly damaging to the structure as well as function of autophagy related proteins including LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1. Number of putative structural and functional residues, including several sites that undergo PTMs were also identified. In total, 16 high-risk SNPs in LC3A, 18 in LC3B, 40 in BECN1 and 43 in SCD1 were prioritized. Out of these, 2 in LC3A (K49A, K51A), 1 in LC3B (S92C), 6 in BECN1 (S113R, R292C, R292H, Y338C, S346Y, Y352H) and 6 in SCD1 (Y41C, Y55D, R131W, R135Q, R135W, Y151C) coincide with potential PTM sites. Our integrated analysis found LC3B Y113C, BECN1 I403T, SCD1 R126S and SCD1 Y218C as highly deleterious HCC-associated mutations. This study is the first extensive in silico mutational analysis of the LC3A, LC3B, BECN1 and SCD1 proteins. We hope that the observed results will be a valuable resource for in-depth mechanistic insight into future investigations of pathological missense SNPs using an integrated computational platform.

  15. Spectrum of BRCA1/2 variants in 940 patients from Argentina including novel, deleterious and recurrent germline mutations: impact on healthcare and clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Solano, Angela Rosaria; Cardoso, Florencia Cecilia; Romano, Vanesa; Perazzo, Florencia; Bas, Carlos; Recondo, Gonzalo; Santillan, Francisco Bernardo; Gonzalez, Eduardo; Abalo, Eduardo; Viniegra, María; Michel, José Davalos; Nuñez, Lina María; Noblia, Cristina Maria; Mc Lean, Ignacio; Canton, Enrique Diaz; Chacon, Reinaldo Daniel; Cortese, Gustavo; Varela, Eduardo Beccar; Greco, Martín; Barrientos, María Laura; Avila, Silvia Adela; Vuotto, Hector; Lorusso, Antonio; Podesta, Ernesto Jorge; Mando, Oscar Gaspar

    2016-07-24

    BRCA1/2 mutations in Latin America are scarcely documented and in serious need of knowledge about the spectrum of BRCA pathogenic variants, information which may alter clinical practice and subsequently improve patient outcome. In addition, the search for data on testing policies in different regions constitutes a fundamental strength for the present study, which analyzes BRCA1/2 gene sequences and large rearrangements in 940 probands with familial and/or personal history of breast/ovary cancer (BOC). In non-mutated DNA samples, Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification assays (MLPA) were used for the analysis of large rearrangements.Our studies detected 179 deleterious mutations out of 940 (19.04%) probands, including 5 large rearrangements and 22 novel mutations. The recurrent mutations accounted for 15.08% of the total and only 2.87% of the probands analyzed, very different from a Hispanic panel previously described.

  16. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but this diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more

  17. Weakly Deleterious Mutations and Low Rates of Recombination Limit the Impact of Natural Selection on Bacterial Genomes

    DOE PAGES

    Price, Morgan N.; Arkin, Adam P.

    2015-12-15

    Free-living bacteria are usually thought to have large effective population sizes, and so tiny selective differences can drive their evolution. However, because recombination is infrequent, “background selection” against slightly deleterious alleles should reduce the effective population size (Ne) by orders of magnitude. For example, for a well-mixed population with 1012 individuals and a typical level of homologous recombination (r/m= 3, i.e., nucleotide changes due to recombination [r] occur at 3 times the mutation rate [m]), we predict that Ne is<107. An argument for high Ne values for bacteria has been the high genetic diversity within many bacterial “species,” but thismore » diversity may be due to population structure: diversity across subpopulations can be far higher than diversity within a subpopulation, which makes it difficult to estimate Ne correctly. Given an estimate ofNe, standard population genetics models imply that selection should be sufficient to drive evolution if Ne ×s is >1, where s is the selection coefficient. We found that this remains approximately correct if background selection is occurring or when population structure is present. Overall, we predict that even for free-living bacteria with enormous populations, natural selection is only a significant force ifs is above 10-7 or so. Because bacteria form huge populations with trillions of individuals, the simplest theoretical prediction is that the better allele at a site would predominate even if its advantage was just 10-9 per generation. In other words, virtually every nucleotide would be at the local optimum in most individuals. A more sophisticated theory considers that bacterial genomes have millions of sites each and selection events on these many sites could interfere with each other, so that only larger effects would be important. However, bacteria can exchange genetic material, and in principle, this exchange could eliminate the interference between the evolution of

  18. Structural Analysis Reveals the Deleterious Effects of Telomerase Mutations in Telomerase-Associated Bone Marrow Failure Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Hunter; Rice, Cory; Skordalakes, Emmanuel

    2017-02-01

    Naturally occurring mutations in the ribonucleoprotein reverse transcriptase, telomerase, are associated with the bone marrow failure syndromes dyskeratosis congenita (DKC), aplastic anemia (AA), and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). However, the mechanism by which these mutations impact telomerase function remains unknown. Here we present the structure of the human telomerase c-terminal extension (CTE or thumb domain) determined by the method of single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) to 2.31 A resolution. We also used direct telomerase activity and nucleic acid binding assays to explain how naturally occurring mutations within this portion of telomerase contribute to human disease. The single mutations localize within three highly conserved regions of the telomerase thumb domain referred to as motifs E-I, (thumb loop and helix) E-II and E-III (the FVYL pocket, comprising the hydrophobic residues F1012, V1025, Y1089 and L1092). Biochemical data shows that the mutations associated with DKC, AA and IFP disrupt the binding between telomerases protein subunit reverse transcriptase (TERT) and its nucleic acid substrates leading to loss of telomerase activity and processivity. Collectively our data shows that although these mutations do not alter the overall stability or expression of TERT, these rare genetic disorders are associated with an impaired telomerase holoenzyme that is unable to correctly assemble with its nucleic acid substrates, leading to incomplete telomere extension and telomere attrition, which are hallmarks of these diseases.

  19. An exactly solvable, spatial model of mutation accumulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Chay; Nowak, Martin A.; Waclaw, Bartlomiej

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the accumulation of driver mutations which increase the net reproductive rate of cancer cells and allow them to spread. This process has been studied in mathematical models of well mixed populations, and in computer simulations of three-dimensional spatial models. But the computational complexity of these more realistic, spatial models makes it difficult to simulate realistically large and clinically detectable solid tumours. Here we describe an exactly solvable mathematical model of a tumour featuring replication, mutation and local migration of cancer cells. The model predicts a quasi-exponential growth of large tumours, even if different fragments of the tumour grow sub-exponentially due to nutrient and space limitations. The model reproduces clinically observed tumour growth times using biologically plausible rates for cell birth, death, and migration rates. We also show that the expected number of accumulated driver mutations increases exponentially in time if the average fitness gain per driver is constant, and that it reaches a plateau if the gains decrease over time. We discuss the realism of the underlying assumptions and possible extensions of the model. PMID:28004754

  20. An exactly solvable, spatial model of mutation accumulation in cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paterson, Chay; Nowak, Martin A.; Waclaw, Bartlomiej

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is the accumulation of driver mutations which increase the net reproductive rate of cancer cells and allow them to spread. This process has been studied in mathematical models of well mixed populations, and in computer simulations of three-dimensional spatial models. But the computational complexity of these more realistic, spatial models makes it difficult to simulate realistically large and clinically detectable solid tumours. Here we describe an exactly solvable mathematical model of a tumour featuring replication, mutation and local migration of cancer cells. The model predicts a quasi-exponential growth of large tumours, even if different fragments of the tumour grow sub-exponentially due to nutrient and space limitations. The model reproduces clinically observed tumour growth times using biologically plausible rates for cell birth, death, and migration rates. We also show that the expected number of accumulated driver mutations increases exponentially in time if the average fitness gain per driver is constant, and that it reaches a plateau if the gains decrease over time. We discuss the realism of the underlying assumptions and possible extensions of the model.

  1. Genotyping of a family with a novel deleterious DPYD mutation supports the pretherapeutic screening of DPD deficiency with dihydrouracil/uracil ratio.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F; Hennebelle, I; Delmas, C; Lochon, I; Dhelens, C; Garnier Tixidre, C; Bonadona, A; Penel, N; Goncalves, A; Delord, J P; Toulas, C; Chatelut, E

    2016-02-01

    Despite the growing evidence that dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase deficiency (DPD, encoded by the DPYD gene) confers a higher risk of developing severe toxicity, most patients are not screened for DPD deficiency before fluoropyrimidine treatment. We report here the genetic and phenotypic analyses of DPD in a family related to a patient who died after a first cycle of 5-fluorouracil and in 15 additional retrospective patients having a partial DPD deficiency (as measured by plasma dihydrouracil/uracil ratio). The patient with lethal toxicity was found to be a compound heterozygote for two DPYD mutations: a novel 8-bp duplication (c.168_175dupGAATAATT, p.Phe59Ter) and c.1679T>G (Ile560Ser). The patient's dihydrouracil/uracil ratio indicates complete DPD deficiency. The novel mutation was found in two members of the patient's family. Deleterious DPYD mutations were identified in 9 out of the 15 patients. The relationship between genotype and dihydrouracil/uracil values in the 22 patients of the present study was significant (P = 0.01).

  2. Detection of haplotypes associated with prenatal death in dairy cattle and identification of deleterious mutations in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Sébastien; Capitan, Aurelien; Djari, Anis; Rodriguez, Sabrina C; Barbat, Anne; Baur, Aurélia; Grohs, Cécile; Weiss, Bernard; Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Klopp, Christophe; Rocha, Dominique; Boichard, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The regular decrease of female fertility over time is a major concern in modern dairy cattle industry. Only half of this decrease is explained by indirect response to selection on milk production, suggesting the existence of other factors such as embryonic lethal genetic defects. Genomic regions harboring recessive deleterious mutations were detected in three dairy cattle breeds by identifying frequent haplotypes (>1%) showing a deficit in homozygotes among Illumina Bovine 50k Beadchip haplotyping data from the French genomic selection database (47,878 Holstein, 16,833 Montbéliarde, and 11,466 Normande animals). Thirty-four candidate haplotypes (p<10(-4)) including previously reported regions associated with Brachyspina, CVM, HH1, and HH3 in Holstein breed were identified. Haplotype length varied from 1 to 4.8 Mb and frequencies from 1.7 up to 9%. A significant negative effect on calving rate, consistent in heifers and in lactating cows, was observed for 9 of these haplotypes in matings between carrier bulls and daughters of carrier sires, confirming their association with embryonic lethal mutations. Eight regions were further investigated using whole genome sequencing data from heterozygous bull carriers and control animals (45 animals in total). Six strong candidate causative mutations including polymorphisms previously reported in FANCI (Brachyspina), SLC35A3 (CVM), APAF1 (HH1) and three novel mutations with very damaging effect on the protein structure, according to SIFT and Polyphen-2, were detected in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2 genes. In conclusion, this study reveals a yet hidden consequence of the important inbreeding rate observed in intensively selected and specialized cattle breeds. Counter-selection of these mutations and management of matings will have positive consequences on female fertility in dairy cattle.

  3. Detection of Haplotypes Associated with Prenatal Death in Dairy Cattle and Identification of Deleterious Mutations in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, Sébastien; Capitan, Aurelien; Djari, Anis; Rodriguez, Sabrina C.; Barbat, Anne; Baur, Aurélia; Grohs, Cécile; Weiss, Bernard; Boussaha, Mekki; Esquerré, Diane; Klopp, Christophe; Rocha, Dominique; Boichard, Didier

    2013-01-01

    The regular decrease of female fertility over time is a major concern in modern dairy cattle industry. Only half of this decrease is explained by indirect response to selection on milk production, suggesting the existence of other factors such as embryonic lethal genetic defects. Genomic regions harboring recessive deleterious mutations were detected in three dairy cattle breeds by identifying frequent haplotypes (>1%) showing a deficit in homozygotes among Illumina Bovine 50k Beadchip haplotyping data from the French genomic selection database (47,878 Holstein, 16,833 Montbéliarde, and 11,466 Normande animals). Thirty-four candidate haplotypes (p<10−4) including previously reported regions associated with Brachyspina, CVM, HH1, and HH3 in Holstein breed were identified. Haplotype length varied from 1 to 4.8 Mb and frequencies from 1.7 up to 9%. A significant negative effect on calving rate, consistent in heifers and in lactating cows, was observed for 9 of these haplotypes in matings between carrier bulls and daughters of carrier sires, confirming their association with embryonic lethal mutations. Eight regions were further investigated using whole genome sequencing data from heterozygous bull carriers and control animals (45 animals in total). Six strong candidate causative mutations including polymorphisms previously reported in FANCI (Brachyspina), SLC35A3 (CVM), APAF1 (HH1) and three novel mutations with very damaging effect on the protein structure, according to SIFT and Polyphen-2, were detected in GART, SHBG and SLC37A2 genes. In conclusion, this study reveals a yet hidden consequence of the important inbreeding rate observed in intensively selected and specialized cattle breeds. Counter-selection of these mutations and management of matings will have positive consequences on female fertility in dairy cattle. PMID:23762392

  4. Rice PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL METHYLTRANSFERASE isoforms differentially accumulate during seed maturation to restrict deleterious isoAsp and reactive oxygen species accumulation and are implicated in seed vigor and longevity.

    PubMed

    Petla, Bhanu Prakash; Kamble, Nitin Uttam; Kumar, Meenu; Verma, Pooja; Ghosh, Shraboni; Singh, Ajeet; Rao, Venkateswara; Salvi, Prafull; Kaur, Harmeet; Saxena, Saurabh Chandra; Majee, Manoj

    2016-07-01

    PROTEIN l-ISOASPARTYL O-METHYLTRANSFERASE (PIMT) is a protein-repairing enzyme involved in seed vigor and longevity. However, the regulation of PIMT isoforms during seed development and the mechanism of PIMT-mediated improvement of seed vigor and longevity are largely unknown. In this study in rice (Oryza sativa), we demonstrate the dynamics and correlation of isoaspartyl (isoAsp)-repairing demands and PIMT activity, and their implications, during seed development, germination and aging, through biochemical, molecular and genetic studies. Molecular and biochemical analyses revealed that rice possesses various biochemically active and inactive PIMT isoforms. Transcript and western blot analyses clearly showed the seed development stage and tissue-specific accumulation of active isoforms. Immunolocalization studies revealed distinct isoform expression in embryo and aleurone layers. Further analyses of transgenic lines for each OsPIMT isoform revealed a clear role in the restriction of deleterious isoAsp and age-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation to improve seed vigor and longevity. Collectively, our data suggest that a PIMT-mediated, protein repair mechanism is initiated during seed development in rice, with each isoform playing a distinct, yet coordinated, role. Our results also raise the intriguing possibility that PIMT repairs antioxidative enzymes and proteins which restrict ROS accumulation, lipid peroxidation, etc. in seed, particularly during aging, thus contributing to seed vigor and longevity.

  5. Loss of starch granule initiation has a deleterious effect on the growth of arabidopsis plants due to an accumulation of ADP-glucose.

    PubMed

    Ragel, Paula; Streb, Sebastian; Feil, Regina; Sahrawy, Mariam; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Lunn, John E; Zeeman, Samuel; Mérida, Ángel

    2013-09-01

    STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4) is required for proper starch granule initiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), although SS3 can partially replace its function. Unlike other starch-deficient mutants, ss4 and ss3/ss4 mutants grow poorly even under long-day conditions. They have less chlorophyll and carotenoids than the wild type and lower maximal rates of photosynthesis. There is evidence of photooxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus in the mutants from chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters and their high levels of malondialdehyde. Metabolite profiling revealed that ss3/ss4 accumulates over 170 times more ADP-glucose (Glc) than wild-type plants. Restricting ADP-Glc synthesis, by introducing mutations in the plastidial phosphoglucomutase (pgm1) or the small subunit of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (aps1), largely restored photosynthetic capacity and growth in pgm1/ss3/ss4 and aps1/ss3/ss4 triple mutants. It is proposed that the accumulation of ADP-Glc in the ss3/ss4 mutant sequesters a large part of the plastidial pools of adenine nucleotides, which limits photophosphorylation, leading to photooxidative stress, causing the chlorotic and stunted growth phenotypes of the plants.

  6. Deleterious background selection with recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, R.R.; Kaplan, N.L.

    1995-12-01

    An analytic expression for the expected nucleotide diversity is obtained for a neutral locus in a region with deleterious mutation and recombination. Our analytic results are used to predict levels of variation for the entire third chromosome of Drosophila melanogaster. The predictions are consistent with the low levels of variation that have been observed at loci near the centromeres of the third chromosome of D. melanogaster. However, the low levels of variation observed near the tips of this chromosome are not predicted using currently available estimates of the deleterious mutation rate and of selection coefficients. If considerably smaller selection coefficients are assumed, the low observed levels of variation at the tips of the third chromosome are consistent with the background selection model. 33 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Asexual genome evolution in the apomictic Ranunculus auricomus complex: examining the effects of hybridization and mutation accumulation.

    PubMed

    Pellino, Marco; Hojsgaard, Diego; Schmutzer, Thomas; Scholz, Uwe; Hörandl, Elvira; Vogel, Heiko; Sharbel, Timothy F

    2013-12-01

    Asexual lineages are thought to be prone to extinction because of deleterious mutation accumulation (Muller's ratchet). Here, we analyse genomic effects of hybridity, polyploidy and allelic divergence in apomictic plants, and identify loci under divergent selection among sexual/apomictic lineages. RNAseq was used to sequence the flower-specific transcriptomes of five genotypes of the Ranunculus auricomus complex, representing three sexual and two apomictic reproductive biotypes. The five sequence libraries were pooled and de novo assembly performed, and the resultant assembly was used as a backbone for a subsequent alignment of each separate library. High-quality single-nucleotide (SNP) and insertion-deletion (indel) polymorphisms were mined from each library. Annotated genes for which open reading frames (ORF) could be determined were analysed for signatures of divergent versus stabilizing selection. A comparison between all genotypes supports the hypothesis of Pleistocene hybrid origin of both apomictic genotypes from R. carpaticola and R. cassubicifolius, with subsequent allelic divergence of apomictic lineages (Meselson effect). Pairwise comparisons of nonsynonymous (dN) to synonymous (dS) substitution rate ratios between apomictic and sexual genotypes for 1231 genes demonstrated similar distributions for all comparisons, although 324 genes demonstrated outlier (i.e. elevated) dN/dS ratios. Gene ontology analyses of these outliers revealed significant enrichment of genes associated with reproduction including meiosis and gametogenesis, following predictions of divergent selection between sexual and apomictic reproduction, although no significant signal of genome-wide mutation accumulation could be identified. The results suggest that gene function should be considered in order to understand effects of mutation accumulation in asexual lineages.

  8. Distinct mutation accumulation rates among tissues determine the variation in cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Dapeng; Wang, Li; Di, Li-jun

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is believed to be a result of accumulated mutations. However, this concept has not been fully confirmed owing to the impossibility of tracking down the ancestral somatic cell. We sought to verify the concept by exploring the correlation between cancer risk and mutation accumulation among different tissues. We hypothesized that the detected mutations through bulk tumor sequencing are commonly shared in majority, if not all, of tumor cells and are therefore largely a reflection of the mutations accumulated in the ancestral cell that gives rise to tumor. We collected a comprehensive list of mutation frequencies revealed by bulk tumor sequencing, and investigated its correlation with cancer risk to mirror the correlation between mutation accumulation and cancer risk. This revealed an approximate 1:1 relationship between mutation frequency and cancer risk in 41 different cancer types based on the sequencing data of 5,542 patients. The correlation strongly suggests that variation in cancer risk among tissues is mainly attributable to distinct mutation accumulation rates. Moreover, the correlation establishes a baseline to evaluate the effect of non-mutagenic carcinogens on cancer risk. Finally, our mathematic modeling provides a reasonable explanation to reinforce that cancer risk is predominantly determined by the first rate-limiting mutation. PMID:26785814

  9. The Dynamics of the roo Transposable Element In Mutation-Accumulation Lines and Segregating Populations of Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Papaceit, Montserrat; Ávila, Victoria; Aguadé, Montserrat; García-Dorado, Aurora

    2007-01-01

    We estimated the number of copies for the long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposable element roo in a set of long-standing Drosophila melanogaster mutation-accumulation full-sib lines and in two large laboratory populations maintained with effective population size ∼500, all of them derived from the same isogenic origin. Estimates were based on real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization. Considering previous estimates of roo copy numbers obtained at earlier stages of the experiment, the results imply a strong acceleration of the insertion rate in the accumulation lines. The detected acceleration is consistent with a model where only one (maybe a few) of the ∼70 roo copies in the ancestral isogenic genome was active and each active copy caused new insertions with a relatively high rate (∼10−2), with new inserts being active copies themselves. In the two laboratory populations, however, a stabilized copy number or no accelerated insertion was found. Our estimate of the average deleterious viability effects per accumulated insert [E(s) < 0.003] is too small to account for the latter finding, and we discuss the mechanisms that could contain copy number. PMID:17890368

  10. Tissue-specific mutation accumulation in human adult stem cells during life

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blokzijl, Francis; de Ligt, Joep; Jager, Myrthe; Sasselli, Valentina; Roerink, Sophie; Sasaki, Nobuo; Huch, Meritxell; Boymans, Sander; Kuijk, Ewart; Prins, Pjotr; Nijman, Isaac J.; Martincorena, Inigo; Mokry, Michal; Wiegerinck, Caroline L.; Middendorp, Sabine; Sato, Toshiro; Schwank, Gerald; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E. S.; Verstegen, Monique M. A.; van der Laan, Luc J. W.; de Jonge, Jeroen; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Vries, Robert G.; van de Wetering, Marc; Stratton, Michael R.; Clevers, Hans; Cuppen, Edwin; van Boxtel, Ruben

    2016-10-01

    The gradual accumulation of genetic mutations in human adult stem cells (ASCs) during life is associated with various age-related diseases, including cancer. Extreme variation in cancer risk across tissues was recently proposed to depend on the lifetime number of ASC divisions, owing to unavoidable random mutations that arise during DNA replication. However, the rates and patterns of mutations in normal ASCs remain unknown. Here we determine genome-wide mutation patterns in ASCs of the small intestine, colon and liver of human donors with ages ranging from 3 to 87 years by sequencing clonal organoid cultures derived from primary multipotent cells. Our results show that mutations accumulate steadily over time in all of the assessed tissue types, at a rate of approximately 40 novel mutations per year, despite the large variation in cancer incidence among these tissues. Liver ASCs, however, have different mutation spectra compared to those of the colon and small intestine. Mutational signature analysis reveals that this difference can be attributed to spontaneous deamination of methylated cytosine residues in the colon and small intestine, probably reflecting their high ASC division rate. In liver, a signature with an as-yet-unknown underlying mechanism is predominant. Mutation spectra of driver genes in cancer show high similarity to the tissue-specific ASC mutation spectra, suggesting that intrinsic mutational processes in ASCs can initiate tumorigenesis. Notably, the inter-individual variation in mutation rate and spectra are low, suggesting tissue-specific activity of common mutational processes throughout life.

  11. Fitness effects of mutation accumulation in a natural outbred population of wild radish (Raphanus raphanistrum): comparison of field and greenhouse environments.

    PubMed

    Roles, Angela J; Conner, Jeffrey K

    2008-05-01

    Spontaneous deleterious mutation has been measured in a handful of organisms, always under laboratory conditions and usually employing inbred species or genotypes. We report the results of a mutation accumulation experiment with an outbred annual plant, Raphanus raphanistrum, with lifetime fitness measured in both the field and the greenhouse. This is the first study to report the effects of spontaneous mutation measured under field conditions. Two large replicate populations (N(e) approximately 600) were maintained with random mating in the greenhouse under relaxed selection for nine generations before the field assay was performed and ten generations before the greenhouse assay. Each generation, every individual was mated twice, once as a pollen donor and once as a pollen recipient, and a single seed from each plant was chosen randomly to create the next generation. The ancestral population was maintained as seeds at 4 degrees C. Declines in lifetime fitness were observed in both the field (1.7% per generation; P= 0.27) and the greenhouse (0.6% per generation; P= 0.07). Significant increases in additive genetic variance for fitness were found for stems per day, flowers per stem, fruits per flower and seeds per fruit in the field as well as for fruits per flower in the greenhouse. Lack of significance of the fitness decline may be due to the short period of mutation accumulation, the use of outbred populations, or both. The percent declines in fitness are at the high end of the range observed in other mutation accumulation experiments and give some support to the idea that mutational effects may be magnified under harsher field conditions. Thus, measurement of mutational parameters under laboratory conditions may underestimate the effects of mutations in natural populations.

  12. PLA2G6 mutations and other rare causes of neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Alisdair

    2012-08-01

    There is a wide variety of genetic and sporadic causes for neurodegenerative disorders with apparent brain iron accumulation on magnetic resonance imaging. Rare recessive causes include PLA2G6 mutations (infantile neuroaxonal dystrophy), and mutations of ATP13A2 (Kufor Rakeb syndrome) and FA2H. A variety of sporadic neurological disorders can present brain iron accumulation on imaging, including multiple sclerosis and neurological manifestations of HIV infection. The relevant clinical and imaging features will be discussed.

  13. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  14. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  15. C-terminally mutated tubby protein accumulates in aggresomes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sunshin; Sung, Ho Jin; Lee, Ji Won; Kim, Yun Hee; Oh, Yong-Seok; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Heo, Kyun; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2017-01-01

    The tubby protein (Tub), a putative transcription factor, plays important roles in the maintenance and function of neuronal cells. A splicing defect-causing mutation in the 3′-end of the tubby gene, which is predicted to disrupt the carboxy-terminal region of the Tub protein, causes maturity-onset obesity, blindness, and deafness in mice. Although this pathological Tub mutation leads to a loss of function, the precise mechanism has not yet been investigated. Here, we found that the mutant Tub proteins were mostly localized to puncta found in the perinuclear region and that the C-terminus was important for its solubility. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed that puncta of mutant Tub co-localized with the aggresome. Moreover, whereas wild-type Tub was translocated to the nucleus by extracellular signaling, the mutant forms failed to undergo such translocation. Taken together, our results suggest that the malfunctions of the Tub mutant are caused by its misfolding and subsequent localization to aggresomes. PMID:27697107

  16. Obstruction of adaptation in diploids by recessive, strongly deleterious alleles.

    PubMed

    Assaf, Zoe June; Petrov, Dmitri A; Blundell, Jamie R

    2015-05-19

    Recessive deleterious mutations are common, causing many genetic disorders in humans and producing inbreeding depression in the majority of sexually reproducing diploids. The abundance of recessive deleterious mutations in natural populations suggests they are likely to be present on a chromosome when a new adaptive mutation occurs, yet the dynamics of recessive deleterious hitchhikers and their impact on adaptation remains poorly understood. Here we model how a recessive deleterious mutation impacts the fate of a genetically linked dominant beneficial mutation. The frequency trajectory of the adaptive mutation in this case is dramatically altered and results in what we have termed a "staggered sweep." It is named for its three-phased trajectory: (i) Initially, the two linked mutations have a selective advantage while rare and will increase in frequency together, then (ii), at higher frequencies, the recessive hitchhiker is exposed to selection and can cause a balanced state via heterozygote advantage (the staggered phase), and (iii) finally, if recombination unlinks the two mutations, then the beneficial mutation can complete the sweep to fixation. Using both analytics and simulations, we show that strongly deleterious recessive mutations can substantially decrease the probability of fixation for nearby beneficial mutations, thus creating zones in the genome where adaptation is suppressed. These mutations can also significantly prolong the number of generations a beneficial mutation takes to sweep to fixation, and cause the genomic signature of selection to resemble that of soft or partial sweeps. We show that recessive deleterious variation could impact adaptation in humans and Drosophila.

  17. Sexual selection and maintenance of sex: evidence from comparisons of rates of genomic accumulation of mutations and divergence of sex-related genes in sexual and hermaphroditic species of Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Artieri, Carlo G; Haerty, Wilfried; Gupta, Bhagwati P; Singh, Rama S

    2008-05-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the persistence of dioecy despite the reproductive advantages conferred to hermaphrodites, including greater efficiency at purging deleterious mutations in the former. Dioecy can benefit from both mutation purging and accelerated evolution by bringing together beneficial mutations in the same individual via recombination and shuffling of genotypes. In addition, mathematical treatment has shown that sexual selection is also capable of mitigating the cost of maintaining separate sexes by increasing the overall fitness of sexual populations, and genomic comparisons have shown that sexual selection can lead to accelerated evolution. Here, we examine the advantages of dioecy versus hermaphroditism by comparing the rate of evolution in sex-related genes and the rate of accumulation of deleterious mutations using a large number of orthologs (11,493) in the dioecious Caenorhabditis remanei and the hermaphroditic Caenorhabditis briggsae. We have used this data set to estimate the deleterious mutation rate per generation, U, in both species and find that although it is significantly higher in hermaphrodites, both species are at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the value required to explain the persistence of sex by efficiency at purging deleterious mutations alone. We also find that genes expressed in sperm are evolving rapidly in both species; however, they show a greater increase in their rate of evolution relative to genes expressed in other tissues in C. remanei, suggesting stronger sexual selection pressure acting on these genes in dioecious species. Interestingly, the persistence of a signal of rapid evolution of sperm genes in C. briggsae suggests a recent evolutionary origin of hermaphrodism in this lineage. Our results provide empirical evidence of increased sexual selection pressure in dioecious animals, supporting the possibility that sexual selection may play an important role in the maintenance of sexual

  18. The Role of Deleterious Substitutions in Crop Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Kono, Thomas J. Y.; Fu, Fengli; Mohammadi, Mohsen; Hoffman, Paul J.; Liu, Chaochih; Stupar, Robert M.; Smith, Kevin P.; Tiffin, Peter; Fay, Justin C.; Morrell, Peter L.

    2016-01-01

    Populations continually incur new mutations with fitness effects ranging from lethal to adaptive. While the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations is not directly observable, many mutations likely either have no effect on organismal fitness or are deleterious. Historically, it has been hypothesized that a population may carry many mildly deleterious variants as segregating variation, which reduces the mean absolute fitness of the population. Recent advances in sequencing technology and sequence conservation-based metrics for inferring the functional effect of a variant permit examination of the persistence of deleterious variants in populations. The issue of segregating deleterious variation is particularly important for crop improvement, because the demographic history of domestication and breeding allows deleterious variants to persist and reach moderate frequency, potentially reducing crop productivity. In this study, we use exome resequencing of 15 barley accessions and genome resequencing of 8 soybean accessions to investigate the prevalence of deleterious single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the protein-coding regions of the genomes of two crops. We conclude that individual cultivars carry hundreds of deleterious SNPs on average, and that nonsense variants make up a minority of deleterious SNPs. Our approach identifies known phenotype-altering variants as deleterious more frequently than the genome-wide average, suggesting that putatively deleterious variants are likely to affect phenotypic variation. We also report the implementation of a SNP annotation tool BAD_Mutations that makes use of a likelihood ratio test based on alignment of all currently publicly available Angiosperm genomes. PMID:27301592

  19. Spontaneous mutation accumulation in multiple strains of the green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Andrew D; Ness, Rob W; Keightley, Peter D; Colegrave, Nick

    2014-09-01

    Estimates of mutational parameters, such as the average fitness effect of a new mutation and the rate at which new genetic variation for fitness is created by mutation, are important for the understanding of many biological processes. However, the causes of interspecific variation in mutational parameters and the extent to which they vary within species remain largely unknown. We maintained multiple strains of the unicellular eukaryote Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, for approximately 1000 generations under relaxed selection by transferring a single cell every ~10 generations. Mean fitness of the lines tended to decline with generations of mutation accumulation whereas mutational variance increased. We did not find any evidence for differences among strains in any of the mutational parameters estimated. The overall change in mean fitness per cell division and rate of input of mutational variance per cell division were more similar to values observed in multicellular organisms than to those in other single-celled microbes. However, after taking into account differences in genome size among species, estimates from multicellular organisms and microbes, including our new estimates from C. reinhardtii, become substantially more similar. Thus, we suggest that variation in genome size is an important determinant of interspecific variation in mutational parameters.

  20. Estimating the dynamics and dependencies of accumulating mutations with applications to HIV drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Montazeri, Hesam; Günthard, Huldrych F; Yang, Wan-Lin; Kouyos, Roger; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2015-10-01

    We introduce a new model called the observed time conjunctive Bayesian network (OT-CBN) that describes the accumulation of genetic events (mutations) under partial temporal ordering constraints. Unlike other CBN models, the OT-CBN model uses sampling time points of genotypes in addition to genotypes themselves to estimate model parameters. We developed an expectation-maximization algorithm to obtain approximate maximum likelihood estimates by accounting for this additional information. In a simulation study, we show that the OT-CBN model outperforms the continuous time CBN (CT-CBN) (Beerenwinkel and Sullivant, 2009. Markov models for accumulating mutations. Biometrika 96: (3), 645-661), which does not take into account individual sampling times for parameter estimation. We also show superiority of the OT-CBN model on several datasets of HIV drug resistance mutations extracted from the Swiss HIV Cohort Study database.

  1. Accumulation of Mitochondrial DNA Mutations Disrupts Cardiac Progenitor Cell Function and Reduces Survival.

    PubMed

    Orogo, Amabel M; Gonzalez, Eileen R; Kubli, Dieter A; Baptista, Igor L; Ong, Sang-Bing; Prolla, Tomas A; Sussman, Mark A; Murphy, Anne N; Gustafsson, Åsa B

    2015-09-04

    Transfer of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) improves cardiac function in heart failure patients. However, CPC function is reduced with age, limiting their regenerative potential. Aging is associated with numerous changes in cells including accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations, but it is unknown how this impacts CPC function. Here, we demonstrate that acquisition of mtDNA mutations disrupts mitochondrial function, enhances mitophagy, and reduces the replicative and regenerative capacities of the CPCs. We show that activation of differentiation in CPCs is associated with expansion of the mitochondrial network and increased mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Interestingly, mutant CPCs are deficient in mitochondrial respiration and rely on glycolysis for energy. In response to differentiation, these cells fail to activate mitochondrial respiration. This inability to meet the increased energy demand leads to activation of cell death. These findings demonstrate the consequences of accumulating mtDNA mutations and the importance of mtDNA integrity in CPC homeostasis and regenerative potential.

  2. Establishment and characterization of a penile cancer cell line, penl1, with a deleterious TP53 mutation as a paradigm of HPV-negative penile carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zaishang; Deng, Chuangzhong; Wang, Liangjiao; Yu, Xingsu; Liang, Peili; Xie, Qiankun; Chen, Peng; Qin, Zike; Ye, Yunlin; Liu, Zhuowei; Zhou, Fangjian; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Han, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To establish penile cancer (PeCa) cell lines for the study of molecular mechanisms of carcinogenesis and testing therapeutic reagents. Materials and Methods We successfully established two PeCa cell lines from fresh tumor tissues from 21 cases. One cell line named Penl1 was isolated from a lymph node metastasis (LNM) of penile squamous cell carcinoma (PeSCC), usual type and comprehensively characterized here. Our in-depth characterization analysis of the Penl1 cell line included morphology, tumorigenicity, genetic characteristics, protein expression, biology, and chemosensitivity. Penl1 was authenticated by single tandem repeat (STR) DNA typing. Results Comparative histomorphology, genetic characteristics, and protein expression patterns revealed essential similarities between the cell line and its corresponding LNM. In-depth characterization analysis of Penl1 cell line revealed tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice, negative human papilloma virus (HPV) and mycoplasma infection, TP53 mutations and sensitivity to cisplatin and epirubicin. STR DNA typing did not match any cell lines within three international cell banks. The limitation of this study is that one patient cannot represent the complete heterogeneity of PeCa, especially primary tumor. Conclusions We established and characterized an HPV-negative and moderately differentiated PeCa cell model with a TP53 missense mutation from a PeSCC, usual type patient. A preliminarily study of carcinogenesis and chemosensitivity suggests that this cell model carries a tumor suppressor gene mutation and is sensitive to chemotherapy drugs. PMID:27351128

  3. Prevalent Accumulation of Non-Optimal Codons through Somatic Mutations in Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xudong; Li, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by uncontrolled cell growth, and the cause of different cancers is generally attributed to checkpoint dysregulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis. Recent studies have shown that non-optimal codons were preferentially adopted by genes to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels. This raises the intriguing question of how dynamic changes of codon usage modulate the cancer genome to cope with a non-controlled proliferative cell cycle. In this study, we comprehensively analyzed the somatic mutations of codons in human cancers, and found that non-optimal codons tended to be accumulated through both synonymous and non-synonymous mutations compared with other types of genomic substitution. We further demonstrated that non-optimal codons were prevalently accumulated across different types of cancers, amino acids, and chromosomes, and genes with accumulation of non-optimal codons tended to be involved in protein interaction/signaling networks and encoded important enzymes in metabolic networks that played roles in cancer-related pathways. This study provides insights into the dynamics of codons in the cancer genome and demonstrates that accumulation of non-optimal codons may be an adaptive strategy for cancerous cells to win the competition with normal cells. This deeper interpretation of the patterns and the functional characterization of somatic mutations of codons will help to broaden the current understanding of the molecular basis of cancers. PMID:27513638

  4. A Heterozygous ZMPSTE24 Mutation Associated with Severe Metabolic Syndrome, Ectopic Fat Accumulation, and Dilated Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Galant, Damien; Gaborit, Bénédicte; Desgrouas, Camille; Abdesselam, Ines; Bernard, Monique; Levy, Nicolas; Merono, Françoise; Coirault, Catherine; Roll, Patrice; Lagarde, Arnaud; Bonello-Palot, Nathalie; Bourgeois, Patrice; Dutour, Anne; Badens, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    ZMPSTE24 encodes the only metalloprotease, which transforms prelamin into mature lamin A. Up to now, mutations in ZMPSTE24 have been linked to Restrictive Dermopathy (RD), Progeria or Mandibulo-Acral Dysplasia (MAD). We report here the phenotype of a patient referred for severe metabolic syndrome and cardiomyopathy, carrying a mutation in ZMPSTE24. The patient presented with a partial lipodystrophic syndrome associating hypertriglyceridemia, early onset type 2 diabetes, and android obesity with truncal and abdominal fat accumulation but without subcutaneous lipoatrophy. Other clinical features included acanthosis nigricans, liver steatosis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and high myocardial and hepatic triglycerides content. Mutated fibroblasts from the patient showed increased nuclear shape abnormalities and premature senescence as demonstrated by a decreased Population Doubling Level, an increased beta-galactosidase activity and a decreased BrdU incorporation rate. Reduced prelamin A expression by siRNA targeted toward LMNA transcripts resulted in decreased nuclear anomalies. We show here that a central obesity without subcutaneous lipoatrophy is associated with a laminopathy due to a heterozygous missense mutation in ZMPSTE24. Given the high prevalence of metabolic syndrome and android obesity in the general population, and in the absence of familial study, the causative link between mutation and phenotype cannot be formally established. Nevertheless, altered lamina architecture observed in mutated fibroblasts are responsible for premature cellular senescence and could contribute to the phenotype observed in this patient. PMID:27120622

  5. Mutations in nucleolar proteins lead to nucleolar accumulation of polyA+ RNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, T; Schneiter, R; Hitomi, M; Tartakoff, A M

    1995-01-01

    Synthesis of mRNA and rRNA occur in the chromatin-rich nucleoplasm and the nucleolus, respectively. Nevertheless, we here report that a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene, MTR3, previously implicated in mRNA transport, codes for a novel essential 28-kDa nucleolar protein. Moreover, in mtr3-1 the accumulated polyA+ RNA actually colocalizes with nucleolar antigens, the nucleolus becomes somewhat disorganized, and rRNA synthesis and processing are inhibited. A strain with a ts conditional mutation in RNA polymerase I also shows nucleolar accumulation of polyA+ RNA, whereas strains with mutations in the nucleolar protein Nop1p do not. Thus, in several mutant backgrounds, when mRNA cannot be exported i concentrates in the nucleolus. mRNA may normally encounter nucleolar components before export and proteins such as Mtr3p may be critical for export of both mRNA and ribosomal subunits. Images PMID:8534909

  6. Mutational analysis of PVX TGBp3 links subcellular accumulation and protein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, H.-J.; Ye, C.-M.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2008-05-25

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell transport, has an N-terminal transmembrane domain, and a C-terminal cytosolic domain. In the absence of virus infection TGBp3:GFP is seen in the cortical and perinuclear ER. In PVX infected cells the TGBp3:GFP fusion is also seen in the nucleoplasm indicating that events during PVX infection trigger entry into the nucleus. Mutational analysis failed to identify a nuclear targeting domain. Mutations inhibiting TGBp3 association with the ER and inhibiting virus movement did not block TGBp3:GFP in the nucleoplasm. A mutation disrupting the N-terminal transmembrane domain of TGBp3 caused the fusion to accumulate in the nucleus indicating that nuclear import is regulated by ER interactions. Tunicamycin, an ER-stress inducing chemical, caused lower levels of GFP and TGBp3:GFP to accumulate in virus infected protoplasts. MG115 and MG132 were used to demonstrate that wild-type and mutant TGBp3:GFP fusions were degraded by the 26S proteasome. These observations are consistent with an ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggesting that PVX TGBp3, similar to aberrant ER proteins, is translocate to the cytoplasm for degradation. Nuclear accumulation of mutant and wild-type TGBp3:GFP is independent of other PVX proteins and may be another feature of an ERAD pathway.

  7. Most of rare missense alleles in humans are deleterious:implications for evolution of complex disease and associationstudies

    SciTech Connect

    Kryukov, Gregory V.; Pennacchio, Len A.; Sunyaev, Shamil R.

    2006-10-24

    The accumulation of mildly deleterious missense mutations inindividual human genomes has been proposed to be a genetic basis forcomplex diseases. The plausibility of this hypothesis depends onquantitative estimates of the prevalence of mildly deleterious de novomutations and polymorphic variants in humans and on the intensity ofselective pressure against them. We combined analysis of mutationscausing human Mendelian diseases, human-chimpanzee divergence andsystematic data on human SNPs and found that about 20 percent of newmissense mutations in humans result in a loss of function, while about 27percent are effectively neutral. Thus, more than half of new missensemutations have mildly deleterious effects. These mutations give rise tomany low frequency deleterious allelic variants in the human populationas evident from a new dataset of 37 genes sequenced in over 1,500individual human chromosomes. Surprisingly, up to 70 percent of lowfrequency missense alleles are mildly deleterious and associated with aheterozygous fitness loss in the range 0.001-0.003. Thus, the low allelefrequency of an amino acid variant can by itself serve as a predictor ofits functional significance. Several recent studies have reported asignificant excess of rare missense variants in disease populationscompared to controls in candidate genes or pathways. These studies wouldbe unlikely to work if most rare variants were neutral or if rarevariants were not a significant contributor to the genetic component ofphenotypic inheritance. Our results provide a justification for thesetypes of candidate gene (pathway) association studies and imply thatmutation-selection balance may be a feasible mechanism for evolution ofsome common diseases.

  8. Ultraviolet radiation exposure accelerates the accumulation of the aging-dependent T414G mitochondrial DNA mutation in human skin.

    PubMed

    Birket, Matthew J; Birch-Machin, Mark A

    2007-08-01

    The accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations has been proposed as an underlying cause of the aging process. Such mutations are thought to be generated principally through mechanisms involving oxidative stress. Skin is frequently exposed to a potent mutagen in the form of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and mtDNA deletion mutations have previously been shown to accumulate with photoaging. Here we report that the age-related T414G point mutation originally identified in skin fibroblasts from donors over 65 years also accumulates with age in skin tissue. Moreover, there is a significantly greater incidence of this mutation in skin from sun-exposed sites (chi(2)= 6.8, P < 0.01). Identification and quantification of the T414G mutation in dermal skin tissue from 108 donors ranging from 8 to 97 years demonstrated both increased occurrence with photoaging as well as an increase in the proportion of molecules affected. In addition, we have discovered frequent genetic linkage between a common photoaging-associated mtDNA deletion and the T414G mutation. This linkage indicates that mtDNA mutations such as these are unlikely to be distributed equally across the mtDNA population within the skin tissue, increasing their likelihood of exerting focal effects at the cellular level. Taken together, these data significantly contribute to our understanding of the DNA damaging effects of UV exposure and how resultant mutations may ultimately contribute towards premature aging.

  9. Evidence that accumulation of mutants in a biofilm reflects natural selection rather than stress-induced adaptive mutation.

    PubMed

    Banas, Jeffrey A; Miller, Justin D; Fuschino, Meghan E; Hazlett, Karsten R O; Toyofuku, Wendy; Porter, Kristen A; Reutzel, Sarah B; Florczyk, Matthew A; McDonough, Kathleen A; Michalek, Suzanne M

    2007-01-01

    The accumulation of mutant genotypes within a biofilm evokes the controversy over whether the biofilm environment induces adaptive mutation or whether the accumulation can be explained by natural selection. A comparison of the virulence of two strains of the dental pathogen Streptococcus mutans showed that rats infected with one of the strains accumulated a high proportion (average, 22%) of organisms that had undergone a deletion between two contiguous and highly homologous genes. To determine if the accumulation of deletion mutants was due to selection or to an increased mutation rate, accumulations of deletion mutants within in vitro planktonic and biofilm cultures and within rats inoculated with various proportions of deletion organisms were quantified. We report here that natural selection was the primary force behind the accumulation of the deletion mutants.

  10. Is selection required for the accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations in post-mitotic cells?

    PubMed

    Durham, S E; Samuels, D C; Chinnery, P F

    2006-06-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations accumulate in the skeletal muscle of patients with mtDNA disease, and also as part of healthy ageing. Simulations of human muscle fibres suggest that, over many decades, the continuous destruction and copying of mtDNA (relaxed replication) can lead to dramatic changes in the percentage level of mutant mtDNA in non-dividing cells through random genetic drift. This process should apply to both pathogenic and neutral mutations. To test this hypothesis we sequenced the entire mitochondrial genome for 20 muscle fibres from a healthy elderly 85-year-old individual, chosen because of the low frequency of cytochrome c oxidase negative fibres. Phenotypically neutral single base substitutions were detected in 15% of the healthy fibres, supporting the hypothesis that positive selection is not essential for the clonal expansion of mtDNA point mutations during human life. Treatments that enhance mtDNA replication, such as vigorous excercise, could amplify this process, with potentially detrimental long-term consequences.

  11. Mutation accumulation may only be a minor force in shaping life-history traits, even when reproduction is sexual.

    PubMed

    Dańko, Maciej Jan; Kozłowski, Jan

    2012-01-01

    In a previous theoretical study we investigated whether adaptive or non-adaptive processes are more important in the evolution of senescence. We built a model that combined both processes and found that mutation accumulation is important only at those ages where mortality has a negligible impact on fitness. This model, however, was limited to haploid organisms. Here we extend our model by introducing diploidy and sexual reproduction. We assume that only recessive (mutated) homozygotes experience detrimental effects. Our results corroborate our previous conclusions, confirming that life histories are largely determined by adaptive processes. We also found that the equilibrium frequencies of mutated alleles are at higher values than in haploid model, because mutations in heterozygotes are hidden for directional selection. Nevertheless, the equilibrium frequencies of recessive homozygotes that make mutations visible to selection are very similar to the equilibrium frequencies of these alleles in our haploid model. Diploidy and sexual reproduction with recombination slows down approaching selection-mutation balance.

  12. Hierarchical tissue organization as a general mechanism to limit the accumulation of somatic mutations

    PubMed Central

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2017-01-01

    How can tissues generate large numbers of cells, yet keep the divisional load (the number of divisions along cell lineages) low in order to curtail the accumulation of somatic mutations and reduce the risk of cancer? To answer the question we consider a general model of hierarchically organized self-renewing tissues and show that the lifetime divisional load of such a tissue is independent of the details of the cell differentiation processes, and depends only on two structural and two dynamical parameters. Our results demonstrate that a strict analytical relationship exists between two seemingly disparate characteristics of self-renewing tissues: divisional load and tissue organization. Most remarkably, we find that a sufficient number of progressively slower dividing cell types can be almost as efficient in minimizing the divisional load, as non-renewing tissues. We argue that one of the main functions of tissue-specific stem cells and differentiation hierarchies is the prevention of cancer. PMID:28230094

  13. Slow accumulation of mutations in Xpc-/- mice upon induction of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Melis, Joost P M; Kuiper, Raoul V; Zwart, Edwin; Robinson, Joke; Pennings, Jeroen L A; van Oostrom, Conny T M; Luijten, Mirjam; van Steeg, Harry

    2013-12-01

    XPC is one of the key DNA damage recognition proteins in the global genome repair route of the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Previously, we demonstrated that NER-deficient mouse models Xpa(-/-) and Xpc(-/-) exhibit a divergent spontaneous tumor spectrum and proposed that XPC might be functionally involved in the defense against oxidative DNA damage. Others have mechanistically dissected several functionalities of XPC to oxidative DNA damage sensitivity using in vitro studies. XPC has been linked to regulation of base excision repair (BER) activity, redox homeostasis and recruitment of ATM and ATR to damage sites, thereby possibly regulating cell cycle checkpoints and apoptosis. XPC has additionally been implicated in recognition of bulky (e.g. cyclopurines) and non-bulky DNA damage (8-oxodG). However, the ultimate contribution of the XPC functionality in vivo in the oxidative DNA damage response and subsequent mutagenesis process remains unclear. Our study indicates that Xpc(-/-) mice, in contrary to Xpa(-/-) and wild type mice, have an increased mutational load upon induction of oxidative stress and that mutations arise in a slowly accumulative fashion. The effect of non-functional XPC in vivo upon oxidative stress exposure appears to have implications in mutagenesis, which can contribute to the carcinogenesis process. The levels and rate of mutagenesis upon oxidative stress correlate with previous findings that lung tumors in Xpc(-/-) mice overall arise late in the lifespan and that the incidence of internal tumors in XP-C patients is relatively low in comparison to skin cancer incidence.

  14. Inferences on the role of insertion in a mutation accumulation experiment with Drosophila melanogaster using RAPDs.

    PubMed

    Salgado, C; Nieto, B; Toro, M A; López-Fanjul, C; García-Dorado, A

    2005-01-01

    The genetic variability for RAPDs band pattern was studied in a set of 157 mutation accumulation (MA) lines of Drosophila melanogaster. These MA lines were derived from the same isogenic base population and subsequently maintained by full-sib mating during 132 generations. The ancestral pattern of the original isogenic base can be unambiguously established as the consensus pattern of the MA lines and, because these lines are expected to be homozygous, dominance for band pattern is not a concern. Only repeatable changes in band pattern were considered. The number of ancestral bands detected implies that nine-nucleotide targets are enough for repeatable PCR amplification. Compared with the ancestral pattern, one MA line lost one band and two MA lines gained a new one. These results can be accounted for by the insertion of transposable elements occurring at a rate 0.07 < i < 0.21 per whole haploid genome and generation. This range is typical for Drosophila and consistent with the previously observed mobility for the roo family, supporting the generality of previous estimates of spontaneous mutation rates for morphological and fitness traits based on these MA lines. The sequence of one of the new bands suggests that the Idefix family is also active in the lines.

  15. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A; Martin, George M; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening.

  16. An Experimental Test of the Accumulated Copying Error Model of Cultural Mutation for Acheulean Handaxe Size

    PubMed Central

    Kempe, Marius; Lycett, Stephen; Mesoudi, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Archaeologists interested in explaining changes in artifact morphology over long time periods have found it useful to create models in which the only source of change is random and unintentional copying error, or ‘cultural mutation’. These models can be used as null hypotheses against which to detect non-random processes such as cultural selection or biased transmission. One proposed cultural mutation model is the accumulated copying error model, where individuals attempt to copy the size of another individual's artifact exactly but make small random errors due to physiological limits on the accuracy of their perception. Here, we first derive the model within an explicit mathematical framework, generating the predictions that multiple independently-evolving artifact chains should diverge over time such that their between-chain variance increases while the mean artifact size remains constant. We then present the first experimental test of this model in which 200 participants, split into 20 transmission chains, were asked to faithfully copy the size of the previous participant's handaxe image on an iPad. The experimental findings supported the model's prediction that between-chain variance should increase over time and did so in a manner quantitatively in line with the model. However, when the initial size of the image that the participants resized was larger than the size of the image they were copying, subjects tended to increase the size of the image, resulting in the mean size increasing rather than staying constant. This suggests that items of material culture formed by reductive vs. additive processes may mutate differently when individuals attempt to replicate faithfully the size of previously-produced artifacts. Finally, we show that a dataset of 2601 Acheulean handaxes shows less variation than predicted given our empirically measured copying error variance, suggesting that other processes counteracted the variation in handaxe size generated by

  17. Monogenic Recessive Mutations Causing Both Late Floral Initiation and Excess Starch Accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Eimert, K.; Wang, S. M.; Lue, W. I.; Chen, J.

    1995-01-01

    A recessive Arabidopsis mutation, carbohydrate accumulation mutant1 (cam1), which maps to position 22.8 on chromosome 3, was identified by screening leaves of ethyl methanesulfonate-mutagenized M2 plants stained with iodine for altered starch content. Increased starch content in leaves of the cam1 mutant was observed at the onset of flowering. This mutant also had a delayed floral initiation phenotype with more rosette leaves than the parental line. In addition, activities of several enzymes associated with starch metabolism were altered in the cam1 mutant. The late-flowering mutant gigantea (gi) also manifested an elevated starch level in leaves. However, not all late-flowering mutants had increased leaf starch content. Double mutants cam1 adg1 (for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase), cam1 pgm (for phosphoglucomutase), and gi pgm had no observable starch in leaves but showed the late-flowering phenotype, demonstrating that the elevated starch content is not the cause of late floral initiation. The pleiotropic effects of cam1 and gi suggest that they may play regulatory roles in starch metabolism and floral initiation. These data suggest that starch accumulation and floral initiation may share a common regulatory pathway. PMID:12242359

  18. Coding Microsatellite Frameshift Mutations Accumulate in Atherosclerotic Carotid Artery Lesions: Evaluation of 26 Cases and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Carolin; Hakimi, Maani; Kloor, Matthias; Grond-Ginsbach, Caspar; Gross-Weissmann, Marie-Luise; Böckler, Dittmar; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Dihlmann, Susanne

    2015-06-09

    Somatic DNA alterations are known to occur in atherosclerotic carotid artery lesions; however, their significance is unknown. The accumulation of microsatellite mutations in coding DNA regions may reflect a deficiency of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) system. Alternatively, accumulation of these coding microsatellite mutations may indicate that they contribute to the pathology. To discriminate between these two possibilities, we compared the mutation frequencies in coding microsatellites (likely functionally relevant) with those in noncoding microsatellites (likely neutral). Genomic DNA was isolated from carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens of 26 patients undergoing carotid surgery and from 15 nonatherosclerotic control arteries. Samples were analyzed by DNA fragment analysis for instability at three noncoding (BAT25, BAT26, CAT25) and five coding (AIM2, ACVR2, BAX, CASP5, TGFBR2) microsatellite loci, with proven validity for detection of microsatellite instability in neoplasms. We found an increased frequency of coding microsatellite mutations in CEA specimens compared with control specimens (34.6 versus 0%; p = 0.0013). Five CEA specimens exhibited more than one frameshift mutation, and ACVR2 and CASP5 were affected most frequently (5/26 and 6/26). Moreover, the rate of coding microsatellite alterations (15/130) differed significantly from that of noncoding alterations (0/78) in CEA specimens (p = 0.0013). In control arteries, no microsatellite alterations were observed, neither in coding nor in noncoding microsatellite loci. In conclusion, the specific accumulation of coding mutations suggests that these mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic carotid lesions, since the absence of mutations in noncoding microsatellites argues against general microsatellite instability, reflecting MMR deficiency.

  19. Frozen human cells can record radiation damage accumulated during space flight: mutation induction and radioadaptation.

    PubMed

    Yatagai, Fumio; Honma, Masamitsu; Takahashi, Akihisa; Omori, Katsunori; Suzuki, Hiromi; Shimazu, Toru; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Ukai, Akiko; Sugasawa, Kaoru; Abe, Tomoko; Dohmae, Naoshi; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ohnishi, Takeo; Gordon, Alasdair; Ishioka, Noriaki

    2011-03-01

    To estimate the space-radiation effects separately from other space-environmental effects such as microgravity, frozen human lymphoblastoid TK6 cells were sent to the "Kibo" module of the International Space Station (ISS), preserved under frozen condition during the mission and finally recovered to Earth (after a total of 134 days flight, 72 mSv). Biological assays were performed on the cells recovered to Earth. We observed a tendency of increase (2.3-fold) in thymidine kinase deficient (TK(-)) mutations over the ground control. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) analysis on the mutants also demonstrated a tendency of increase in proportion of the large deletion (beyond the TK locus) events, 6/41 in the in-flight samples and 1/17 in the ground control. Furthermore, in-flight samples exhibited 48% of the ground-control level in TK(-) mutation frequency upon exposure to a subsequent 2 Gy dose of X-rays, suggesting a tendency of radioadaptation when compared with the ground-control samples. The tendency of radioadaptation was also supported by the post-flight assays on DNA double-strand break repair: a 1.8- and 1.7-fold higher efficiency of in-flight samples compared to ground control via non-homologous end-joining and homologous recombination, respectively. These observations suggest that this system can be used as a biodosimeter, because DNA damage generated by space radiation is considered to be accumulated in the cells preserved frozen during the mission, Furthermore, this system is also suggested to be applicable for evaluating various cellular responses to low-dose space radiation, providing a better understanding of biological space-radiation effects as well as estimation of health influences of future space explores.

  20. DNA damage accumulation and TRF2 degradation in atypical Werner syndrome fibroblasts with LMNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bidisha; Zitnik, Galynn; Johnson, Simon; Nguyen, Quyen; Risques, Rosa A.; Martin, George M.; Oshima, Junko

    2013-01-01

    Segmental progeroid syndromes are groups of disorders with multiple features suggestive of accelerated aging. One subset of adult-onset progeroid syndromes, referred to as atypical Werner syndrome, is caused by mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes a class of nuclear intermediate filaments, lamin A/C. We previously described rapid telomere attrition and accelerated replicative senescence in cultured fibroblasts overexpressing mutant lamin A. In this study, we investigated the cellular phenotypes associated with accelerated telomere shortening in LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts. In early passage primary fibroblasts with R133L or L140R LMNA mutations, shelterin protein components were already reduced while cells still retained telomere lengths comparable to those of controls. There was a significant inverse correlation between the degree of abnormal nuclear morphology and the level of TRF2, a shelterin subunit, suggesting a potential causal relationship. Stabilization of the telomeres via the introduction of the catalytic subunit of human telomerase, hTERT (human telomerase reverse transcriptase), did not prevent degradation of shelterin components, indicating that reduced TRF2 in LMNA mutants is not mediated by short telomeres. Interestingly, γ-H2AX foci (reflecting double strand DNA damage) in early passage LMNA mutant primary fibroblasts and LMNA mutant hTERT fibroblasts were markedly increased in non-telomeric regions of DNA. Our results raise the possibility that mutant lamin A/C causes global genomic instability with accumulation of non-telomeric DNA damage as an early event, followed by TRF2 degradation and telomere shortening. PMID:23847654

  1. p53 nuclear protein accumulation correlates with mutations in the p53 gene, tumor grade, and stage in bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Esrig, D; Spruck, C H; Nichols, P W; Chaiwun, B; Steven, K; Groshen, S; Chen, S C; Skinner, D G; Jones, P A; Cote, R J

    1993-11-01

    Seventy-three transitional cell carcinomas of the bladder were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for p53 nuclear accumulation, and the results were compared to mutations detected in the p53 gene by single strand conformational polymorphism analysis (SSCP) and DNA sequence analysis. Immunohistochemical studies were performed on formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections. A highly significant association between the presence of p53 mutations and p53 nuclear reactivity as detected by immunohistochemistry was found (P = 0.0001). Of 32 tumors that demonstrated p53 mutations by SSCP, 27 (84%) showed p53 nuclear reactivity. Of the five cases that did not demonstrate p53 nuclear reactivity, four had mutations in exon 5. However, of 41 tumors with no evidence of p53 mutation by molecular analysis, 12 (29%) showed p53 immunoreactivity. This indicates that immunohistochemical methods may be more sensitive than SSCP in detecting p53 mutations or that discordant cases represent tumors with accumulation of wild type p53 protein, without mutations at the p53 locus. Of the 15 tumors that were found to have mutations at exon 8, 13 demonstrated high-intensity homogeneous p53 nuclear reactivity by immunohistochemistry, and all mutations located at codon 280 demonstrated high-intensity homogeneous immunoreactivity. However, three of three tumors with exon 6 mutations demonstrated low-level p53 immunoreactivity, and four of six tumors with mutations in exon 5 showed no detectable p53 nuclear reactivity. This indicates that the heterogeneity of immunoreactivity observed when analyzing p53 nuclear accumulation may be related to the site of the p53 gene mutation. Information on tumor grade, stage, lymph node status, disease-free interval, and overall survival were available in 54 patients who had undergone cystectomy. A significant association was observed between p53 alterations (detected by immunohistochemistry and SSCP) and histological tumor grade (P = 0.003) and stage (P = 0

  2. The Human Epilepsy Mutation GABRG2(Q390X) Causes Chronic Subunit Accumulation and Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jing-Qiong; Shen, Wangzhen; Zhou, Chengwen; Xu, Dong; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic epilepsy and neurodegenerative diseases are two common neurological disorders conventionally viewed as being unrelated. A subset of patients with severe genetic epilepsies with impaired development and often death respond poorly to anticonvulsant drug therapy, suggesting a need for new therapeutic targets. Previously, we reported that multiple GABAA receptor epilepsy mutations caused protein misfolding and abnormal receptor trafficking. Here we establish in a novel model of a severe human genetic epileptic encephalopathy, the Gabrg2+/Q390X knock-in mouse, that in addition to impairing inhibitory neurotransmission, mutant GABAA receptor γ2(Q390X) subunits accumulated and aggregated intracellularly, activated caspase 3 and caused widespread, age-dependent neurodegeneration. These novel findings suggest that the fundamental protein metabolism and cellular consequences of the epilepsy-associated mutant γ2(Q390X) ion channel subunit are not fundamentally different from those associated with neurodegeneration. The study has far-reaching significance for identification of conserved pathological cascades and mechanism-based therapies that overlap genetic epilepsies and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26005849

  3. Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fenwick, J. R.; Karigan, G. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An accumulator particularly adapted for use in controlling the pressure of a stream of fluid in its liquid phase utilizing the fluid in its gaseous phase was designed. The accumulator is characterized by a shell defining a pressure chamber having an entry throat for a liquid and adapted to be connected in contiguous relation with a selected conduit having a stream of fluid flowing through the conduit in its liquid phase. A pressure and volume stabilization tube, including an array of pressure relief perforations is projected into the chamber with the perforations disposed adjacent to the entry throat for accommodating a discharge of the fluid in either gaseous or liquid phases, while a gas inlet and liquid to gas conversion system is provided, the chamber is connected with a source of the fluid for continuously pressuring the chamber for controlling the pressure of the stream of liquid.

  4. Costs and benefits of mutational robustness in RNA viruses.

    PubMed

    Stern, Adi; Bianco, Simone; Yeh, Ming Te; Wright, Caroline; Butcher, Kristin; Tang, Chao; Nielsen, Rasmus; Andino, Raul

    2014-08-21

    The accumulation of mutations in RNA viruses is thought to facilitate rapid adaptation to changes in the environment. However, most mutations have deleterious effects on fitness, especially for viruses. Thus, tolerance to mutations should determine the nature and extent of genetic diversity that can be maintained in the population. Here, we combine population genetics theory, computer simulation, and experimental evolution to examine the advantages and disadvantages of tolerance to mutations, also known as mutational robustness. We find that mutational robustness increases neutral diversity and, as expected, can facilitate adaptation to a new environment. Surprisingly, under certain conditions, robustness may also be an impediment for viral adaptation, if a highly diverse population contains a large proportion of previously neutral mutations that are deleterious in the new environment. These findings may inform therapeutic strategies that cause extinction of otherwise robust viral populations.

  5. Evidence that mutation accumulation does not cause aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Alaattin; Lobanov, Alexei V; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2015-06-01

    The concept that mutations cause aging phenotypes could not be directly tested previously due to inability to identify age-related mutations in somatic cells and determine their impact on organismal aging. Here, we subjected Saccharomyces cerevisiae to multiple rounds of replicative aging and assessed de novo mutations in daughters of mothers of different age. Mutations did increase with age, but their low numbers, < 1 per lifespan, excluded their causal role in aging. Structural genome changes also had no role. A mutant lacking thiol peroxidases had the mutation rate well above that of wild-type cells, but this did not correspond to the aging pattern, as old wild-type cells with few or no mutations were dying, whereas young mutant cells with many more mutations continued dividing. In addition, wild-type cells lost mitochondrial DNA during aging, whereas shorter-lived mutant cells preserved it, excluding a causal role of mitochondrial mutations in aging. Thus, DNA mutations do not cause aging in yeast. These findings may apply to other damage types, suggesting a causal role of cumulative damage, as opposed to individual damage types, in organismal aging.

  6. Different mutation profiles associated to P53 accumulation in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    López, Ignacio; P Oliveira, Ligia; Tucci, Paula; Alvarez-Valín, Fernando; A Coudry, Renata; Marín, Mónica

    2012-05-10

    The tumor suppressor TP53 gene is one of the most frequently mutated in different types of human cancer. Particularly in colorectal cancer (CRC), it is believed that TP53 mutations play a role in the adenoma-carcinoma transition of tumors during pathological process. In order to analyze TP53 expressed alleles in CRC, we examined TP53 mRNA in tumor samples from 101 patients with sporadic CRC. Samples were divided in two groups defined according to whether they exhibit positive or negative P53 protein expression as detected by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The presence of TP53 mutation was a common event in tumors with an overall frequency of 54.5%. By direct sequencing, we report 42 different TP53 sequence changes in 55 CRC patients, being two of them validated polymorphisms. TP53 mutations were more frequent in positive than in negative P53 detection group (p<0.0001), being the precise figures 79.6% and 30.8%, respectively. In addition, the mutation profiles were also different between the two groups of samples; while most of the mutations detected in P53 positive group were missense (38 out of 39), changes in P53 negative detection group include 7 insertions/deletions, 6 missense, 2 nonsense and 1 silent mutation. As previously observed, most mutations were concentrated in regions encoding P53 DNA binding domain (DBD). Codons 175, 248 and 273 together account for 36.7% of point mutations, in agreement with previous observations provided that these codons are considered mutation hotspots. Interestingly, we detected two new deletions and two new insertions. In addition, in three samples we detected two deletions and one insertion that could be explained as putative splicing variants or splicing errors.

  7. Point mutation of the xylose reductase (XR) gene reduces xylitol accumulation and increases citric acid production in Aspergillus carbonarius.

    PubMed

    Weyda, István; Lübeck, Mette; Ahring, Birgitte K; Lübeck, Peter S

    2014-04-01

    Aspergillus carbonarius accumulates xylitol when it grows on D-xylose. In fungi, D-xylose is reduced to xylitol by the NAD(P)H-dependent xylose reductase (XR). Xylitol is then further oxidized by the NAD(+)-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH). The cofactor impairment between the XR and XDH can lead to the accumulation of xylitol under oxygen-limiting conditions. Most of the XRs are NADPH dependent and contain a conserved Ile-Pro-Lys-Ser motif. The only known naturally occurring NADH-dependent XR (from Candida parapsilosis) carries an arginine residue instead of the lysine in this motif. In order to overcome xylitol accumulation in A. carbonarius a Lys-274 to Arg point mutation was introduced into the XR with the aim of changing the specificity toward NADH. The effect of the genetic engineering was examined in fermentation for citric acid production and xylitol accumulation by using D-xylose as the sole carbon source. Fermentation with the mutant strain showed a 2.8-fold reduction in xylitol accumulation and 4.5-fold increase in citric acid production compared to the wild-type strain. The fact that the mutant strain shows decreased xylitol levels is assumed to be associated with the capability of the mutated XR to use the NADH generated by the XDH, thus preventing the inhibition of XDH by the high levels of NADH and ensuring the flux of xylose through the pathway. This work shows that enhanced production of citric acid can be achieved using xylose as the sole carbon source by reducing accumulation of other by-products, such as xylitol.

  8. Analysis of mutational effects of a polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) polymerase on bacterial PHB accumulation using an in vivo assay system.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, S; Maehara, A; Takase, K; Nakahara, M; Nakamura, H; Doi, Y

    2001-04-20

    Polymerase is a central enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), a well-known bacterial biodegradable polyester. In this study, we have established an in vivo assay system to analyze mutational effects of Ralstonia eutropha polymerase (termed PhbC(Re)) on the level of PHB accumulation in recombinant strains of Escherichia coli. This in vitro evolution system consists of a polymerase chain reaction-mediated random mutagenesis and two assay procedures, a plate assay using a PHB-staining dye and a high-pressure liquid chromatographic assay based on the converting reaction from PHB to crotonic acid. The distribution pattern of the PHB accumulation level of the mutant population using 378 clones arbitrarily selected, suggested that the present level of PhbC(Re) is high and well-optimized. It is noteworthy that many of the amino acid substitutions affecting the PHB accumulation occurred in the conserved positions or regions within an 'alpha/beta hydrolase fold' which is commonly found among hydrolytic enzymes. From a good correlation with the level of PHB accumulation, an activity estimation of the PhbC(Re) would be efficiently achieved by monitoring the level of PHB accumulation using the in vivo assay system established here.

  9. Thiamine-dependent Accumulation of Tetramethylpyrazine Accompanying a Mutation in the Isoleucine-Valine Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Demain, A. L.; Jackson, M.; Trenner, N. R.

    1967-01-01

    A mutant of Corynebacterium glutamicum was found to accumulate high concentrations of a material which crystallized upon cooling of the broth. The compound was identified as tetramethylpyrazine. The mutant was found to require isoleucine, valine, leucine, and pantothenate for growth. All four requirements probably result from the loss of a single enzyme of the isoleucine-valine pathway. Since similar mutants of Neurospora crassa accumulate acetoin, the present mutant probably forms tetramethylpyrazine from acetoin. Accumulation of tetramethylpyrazine was dependent upon addition of thiamine. This observation is consistent with the known activity of diphosphothiamine as a cofactor for the formation of acetolactate (a precursor of acetoin) from pyruvate. PMID:6039355

  10. Mutation of a Rice Gene Encoding a Phenylalanine Biosynthetic Enzyme Results in Accumulation of Phenylalanine and Tryptophan[W

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Tetsuya; Matsuda, Fumio; Kasai, Koji; Fukuoka, Shuichi; Kitamura, Keisuke; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Miyagawa, Hisashi; Wakasa, Kyo

    2008-01-01

    Two distinct biosynthetic pathways for Phe in plants have been proposed: conversion of prephenate to Phe via phenylpyruvate or arogenate. The reactions catalyzed by prephenate dehydratase (PDT) and arogenate dehydratase (ADT) contribute to these respective pathways. The Mtr1 mutant of rice (Oryza sativa) manifests accumulation of Phe, Trp, and several phenylpropanoids, suggesting a link between the synthesis of Phe and Trp. Here, we show that the Mtr1 mutant gene (mtr1-D) encodes a form of rice PDT with a point mutation in the putative allosteric regulatory region of the protein. Transformed callus lines expressing mtr1-D exhibited all the characteristics of Mtr1 callus tissue. Biochemical analysis revealed that rice PDT possesses both PDT and ADT activities, with a preference for arogenate as substrate, suggesting that it functions primarily as an ADT. The wild-type enzyme is feedback regulated by Phe, whereas the mutant enzyme showed a reduced feedback sensitivity, resulting in Phe accumulation. In addition, these observations indicate that rice PDT is critical for regulating the size of the Phe pool in plant cells. Feeding external Phe to wild-type callus tissue and seedlings resulted in Trp accumulation, demonstrating a connection between Phe accumulation and Trp pool size. PMID:18487352

  11. Spontaneous frameshift mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: accumulation during DNA replication and removal by proofreading and mismatch repair activities.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, C N; Jinks-Robertson, S

    2001-01-01

    The accumulation of frameshift mutations during DNA synthesis is determined by the rate at which frameshift intermediates are generated during DNA polymerization and the efficiency with which frameshift intermediates are removed by DNA polymerase-associated exonucleolytic proofreading activity and/or the postreplicative mismatch repair machinery. To examine the relative contributions of these factors to replication fidelity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we determined the reversion rates and spectra of the lys2 Delta Bgl +1 frameshift allele. Wild-type and homozygous mutant diploid strains with all possible combinations of defects in the exonuclease activities of DNA polymerases delta and epsilon (conferred by the pol3-01 and pol2-4 alleles, respectively) and in mismatch repair (deletion of MSH2) were analyzed. Although there was no direct correlation between homopolymer run length and frameshift accumulation in the wild-type strain, such a correlation was evident in the triple mutant strain lacking all repair capacity. Furthermore, examination of strains defective in one or two repair activities revealed distinct biases in the removal of the corresponding frameshift intermediates by exonucleolytic proofreading and/or mismatch repair. Finally, these analyses suggest that the mismatch repair machinery may be important for generating some classes of frameshift mutations in yeast. PMID:11560887

  12. Mutation of the Glucosinolate Biosynthesis Enzyme Cytochrome P450 83A1 Monooxygenase Increases Camalexin Accumulation and Powdery Mildew Resistance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Simu; Bartnikas, Lisa M; Volko, Sigrid M; Ausubel, Frederick M; Tang, Dingzhong

    2016-01-01

    Small secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates and the major phytoalexin camalexin, play important roles in immunity in Arabidopsis thaliana. We isolated an Arabidopsis mutant with increased resistance to the powdery mildew fungus Golovinomyces cichoracearum and identified a mutation in the gene encoding cytochrome P450 83A1 monooxygenase (CYP83A1), which functions in glucosinolate biosynthesis. The cyp83a1-3 mutant exhibited enhanced defense responses to G. cichoracearum and double mutant analysis showed that this enhanced resistance requires NPR1, EDS1, and PAD4, but not SID2 or EDS5. In cyp83a1-3 mutants, the expression of genes related to camalexin synthesis increased upon G. cichoracearum infection. Significantly, the cyp83a1-3 mutant also accumulated higher levels of camalexin. Decreasing camalexin levels by mutation of the camalexin synthetase gene PAD3 or the camalexin synthesis regulator AtWRKY33 compromised the powdery mildew resistance in these mutants. Consistent with these observations, overexpression of PAD3 increased camalexin levels and enhanced resistance to G. cichoracearum. Taken together, our data indicate that accumulation of higher levels of camalexin contributes to increased resistance to powdery mildew.

  13. Do all of the neurologic diseases in patients with DNA repair gene mutations result from the accumulation of DNA damage?

    PubMed

    Brooks, P J; Cheng, Tsu-Fan; Cooper, Lori

    2008-06-01

    The classic model for neurodegeneration due to mutations in DNA repair genes holds that DNA damage accumulates in the absence of repair, resulting in the death of neurons. This model was originally put forth to explain the dramatic loss of neurons observed in patients with xeroderma pigmentosum neurologic disease, and is likely to be valid for other neurodegenerative diseases due to mutations in DNA repair genes. However, in trichiothiodystrophy (TTD), Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS), and Cockayne syndrome (CS), abnormal myelin is the most prominent neuropathological feature. Myelin is synthesized by specific types of glial cells called oligodendrocytes. In this review, we focus on new studies that illustrate two disease mechanisms for myelin defects resulting from mutations in DNA repair genes, both of which are fundamentally different than the classic model described above. First, studies using the TTD mouse model indicate that TFIIH acts as a co-activator for thyroid hormone-dependent gene expression in the brain, and that a causative XPD mutation in TTD results in reduction of this co-activator function and a dysregulation of myelin-related gene expression. Second, in AGS, which is caused by mutations in either TREX1 or RNASEH2, recent evidence indicates that failure to degrade nucleic acids produced during S-phase triggers activation of the innate immune system, resulting in myelin defects and calcification of the brain. Strikingly, both myelin defects and brain calcification are both prominent features of CS neurologic disease. The similar neuropathology in CS and AGS seems unlikely to be due to the loss of a common DNA repair function, and based on the evidence in the literature, we propose that vascular abnormalities may be part of the mechanism that is common to both diseases. In summary, while the classic DNA damage accumulation model is applicable to the neuronal death due to defective DNA repair, the myelination defects and brain calcification seem to

  14. Cytosolic Ribosomal Mutations That Abolish Accumulation of Circular Intron in the Mitochondria without Preventing Senescence of Podospora Anserina

    PubMed Central

    Silar, P.; Koll, F.; Rossignol, M.

    1997-01-01

    The filamentous fungus Podospora anserina presents a degeneration syndrome called Senescence associated with mitochondrial DNA modifications. We show that mutations affecting the two different and interacting cytosolic ribosomal proteins (S7 and S19) systematically and specifically prevent the accumulation of senDNAα (a circular double-stranded DNA plasmid derived from the first intron of the mitochondrial cox1 gene or intron α) without abolishing Senescence nor affecting the accumulation of other usually observed mitochondrial DNA rearrangements. One of the mutant proteins is homologous to the Escherichia coli S4 and Saccharomyces cerevisiae S13 ribosomal proteins, known to be involved in accuracy control of cytosolic translation. The lack of accumulation of senDNAα seems to result from a nontrivial ribosomal alteration unrelated to accuracy control, indicating that S7 and S19 proteins have an additional function. The results strongly suggest that modified expression of nucleus-encoded proteins contributes to Senescence in P. anserina. These data do not fit well with some current models, which propose that intron α plays the role of the cytoplasmic and infectious Determinant of Senescence that was defined in early studies. PMID:9055079

  15. The role of the interactome in the maintenance of deleterious variability in human populations

    PubMed Central

    Garcia-Alonso, Luz; Jiménez-Almazán, Jorge; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Vela-Boza, Alicia; Santoyo-López, Javier; Antiñolo, Guillermo; Dopazo, Joaquin

    2014-01-01

    Recent genomic projects have revealed the existence of an unexpectedly large amount of deleterious variability in the human genome. Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain such an apparently high mutational load. However, the mechanisms by which deleterious mutations in some genes cause a pathological effect but are apparently innocuous in other genes remain largely unknown. This study searched for deleterious variants in the 1,000 genomes populations, as well as in a newly sequenced population of 252 healthy Spanish individuals. In addition, variants causative of monogenic diseases and somatic variants from 41 chronic lymphocytic leukaemia patients were analysed. The deleterious variants found were analysed in the context of the interactome to understand the role of network topology in the maintenance of the observed mutational load. Our results suggest that one of the mechanisms whereby the effect of these deleterious variants on the phenotype is suppressed could be related to the configuration of the protein interaction network. Most of the deleterious variants observed in healthy individuals are concentrated in peripheral regions of the interactome, in combinations that preserve their connectivity, and have a marginal effect on interactome integrity. On the contrary, likely pathogenic cancer somatic deleterious variants tend to occur in internal regions of the interactome, often with associated structural consequences. Finally, variants causative of monogenic diseases seem to occupy an intermediate position. Our observations suggest that the real pathological potential of a variant might be more a systems property rather than an intrinsic property of individual proteins. PMID:25261458

  16. Lineage dynamics and mutation-selection balance in non-adapting asexual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pénisson, Sophie; Sniegowski, Paul D.; Colato, Alexandre; Gerrish, Philip J.

    2013-02-01

    In classical population genetics, mutation-selection balance refers to the equilibrium frequency of a deleterious allele established and maintained under two opposing forces: recurrent mutation, which tends to increase the frequency of the allele; and selection, which tends to decrease its frequency. In a haploid population, if μ denotes the per capita rate of production of the deleterious allele by mutation and s denotes the selective disadvantage of carrying the allele, then the classical mutation-selection balance frequency of the allele is approximated by μ/s. This calculation assumes that lineages carrying the mutant allele in question—the ‘focal allele’—do not accumulate deleterious mutations linked to the focal allele. In principle, indirect selection against the focal allele caused by such additional mutations can decrease the frequency of the focal allele below the classical mutation-selection balance. This effect of indirect selection will be strongest in an asexual population, in which the entire genome is in linkage. Here, we use an approach based on a multitype branching process to investigate this effect, analyzing lineage dynamics under mutation, direct selection, and indirect selection in a non-adapting asexual population. We find that the equilibrium balance between recurrent mutation to the focal allele and the forces of direct and indirect selection against the focal allele is closely approximated by γμ/(s + U) (s = 0 if the focal allele is neutral), where γ ≈ eθθ-(ω+θ)(ω + θ)(Γ(ω + θ) - Γ(ω + θ,θ)), \\theta =U/\\tilde {s}, and \\omega =s/\\tilde {s}; U denotes the genomic deleterious mutation rate and \\tilde {s} denotes the geometric mean selective disadvantage of deleterious mutations elsewhere on the genome. This mutation-selection balance for asexual populations can remain surprisingly invariant over wide ranges of the mutation rate.

  17. PANK2 gene analysis confirms genetic heterogeneity in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) but mutations are rare in other types of adult neurodegenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Matarin, M M; Singleton, A B; Houlden, H

    2006-10-23

    Mutations in the pantothenate kinase 2 gene (PANK2) are the cause of pantothenate kinase associated neurodegeneration (PKAN), an autosomal recessive (AR) disorder characterized by motor symptoms as such as dystonia or parkinsonism, mental retardation, retinitis pigmentosa and iron accumulation in the brain. As many neurodegenerative conditions have similar clinical features we screened a number of adult and childhood onset movement disorders for PANK2 mutation. This included cases with neurodegeneration and brain iron accumulation, corticobasal degeneartion, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), Parkinson's disease (PD), multiple system atropy, giant axonal neuropathy (GAN), neuroaxonal dystrophy (NAD), Guam dementia and HARP syndrome (pallido-pyramidal syndrome and hypoprebetalipoproteinemia, acanthocytosis, retinitis pigmentosa and pallidal degeneration). From our series of patients one patient with PKAN and a progressive severe dystonic syndrome, cerebellar ataxia, retinitis pigmentosa and eventual anarthria had a novel combination of two compound heterozygote mutations identified in the PANK2 gene, G-->A transition at base 1238 (G411R) and a C-->A transition at base 1184 (A395E). In the patient with HARP syndrome two compound heterozygote mutations (Met327Thr and IVS5-1 G to T) in the PANK2 gene were found. No other mutations were found in any of the other patient groups, suggesting that PANK2 mutations are not associated with the aetiology of these adult degenerative conditions and confirms the genetic heterogeneity in neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation.

  18. Feline congenital erythropoietic porphyria: two homozygous UROS missense mutations cause the enzyme deficiency and porphyrin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Clavero, Sonia; Bishop, David F; Giger, Urs; Haskins, Mark E; Desnick, Robert J

    2010-01-01

    The first feline model of human congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) due to deficient uroporphyrinogen III synthase (URO-synthase) activity was identified by its characteristic clinical phenotype, and confirmed by biochemical and molecular genetic studies. The proband, an adult domestic shorthair cat, had dark-red urine and brownish discolored teeth with red fluorescence under ultraviolet light. Biochemical studies demonstrated markedly increased uroporphyrinogen I in urine and plasma (2,650- and 10,700-fold greater than wild type, respectively), whereas urinary 5-aminolevulinic acid and porphobilinogen were lower than normal. Erythrocytic URO-synthase activity was <1% of mean wild-type activity, confirming the diagnosis and distinguishing it from feline phenocopies having acute intermittent porphyria. Sequencing of the affected cat's UROS gene revealed two missense mutations, c.140C>T (p.S47F) in exon 3 and c.331G>A (p.G111S) in exon 6, both of which were homozygous, presumably owing to parental consanguinity. Neither was present in 100 normal cat alleles. Prokaryotic expression and thermostability studies of the purified monomeric wild-type, p.S47F, p.G111S, and p.S47F/G111S enzymes showed that the p.S47F enzyme had 100% of wild-type specific activity but ~50% decreased thermostability, whereas the p.G111S and p.S47F/G111S enzymes had about 60% and 20% of wild-type specific activity, respectively, and both were markedly thermolabile. Molecular modeling results indicated that the less active/less stable p.G111S enzyme was further functionally impaired by a structural interaction induced by the presence of the S47F substitution. Thus, the synergistic interaction of two rare amino acid substitutions in the URO-synthase polypeptide caused the feline model of human CEP.

  19. Essentiality Is a Strong Determinant of Protein Rates of Evolution during Mutation Accumulation Experiments in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Ponce, David; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Toft, Christina; Ruiz-González, Mario X; Fares, Mario A

    2016-09-26

    The Neutral Theory of Molecular Evolution is considered the most powerful theory to understand the evolutionary behavior of proteins. One of the main predictions of this theory is that essential proteins should evolve slower than dispensable ones owing to increased selective constraints. Comparison of genomes of different species, however, has revealed only small differences between the rates of evolution of essential and nonessential proteins. In some analyses, these differences vanish once confounding factors are controlled for, whereas in other cases essentiality seems to have an independent, albeit small, effect. It has been argued that comparing relatively distant genomes may entail a number of limitations. For instance, many of the genes that are dispensable in controlled lab conditions may be essential in some of the conditions faced in nature. Moreover, essentiality can change during evolution, and rates of protein evolution are simultaneously shaped by a variety of factors, whose individual effects are difficult to isolate. Here, we conducted two parallel mutation accumulation experiments in Escherichia coli, during 5,500-5,750 generations, and compared the genomes at different points of the experiments. Our approach (a short-term experiment, under highly controlled conditions) enabled us to overcome many of the limitations of previous studies. We observed that essential proteins evolved substantially slower than nonessential ones during our experiments. Strikingly, rates of protein evolution were only moderately affected by expression level and protein length.

  20. The Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations Nearly Unseen by Selection in a Bacterium with Multiple Chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Dillon, Marcus M; Cooper, Vaughn S

    2016-11-01

    Mutation accumulation (MA) experiments employ the strategy of minimizing the population size of evolving lineages to greatly reduce effects of selection on newly arising mutations. Thus, most mutations fix within MA lines independently of their fitness effects. This approach, more recently combined with genome sequencing, has detailed the rates, spectra, and biases of different mutational processes. However, a quantitative understanding of the fitness effects of mutations virtually unseen by selection has remained an untapped opportunity. Here, we analyzed the fitness of 43 sequenced MA lines of the multi-chromosome bacterium Burkholderia cenocepacia that had each undergone 5554 generations of MA and accumulated an average of 6.73 spontaneous mutations. Most lineages exhibited either neutral or deleterious fitness in three different environments in comparison with their common ancestor. The only mutational class that was significantly overrepresented in lineages with reduced fitness was the loss of the plasmid, though nonsense mutations, missense mutations, and coding insertion-deletions were also overrepresented in MA lineages whose fitness had significantly declined. Although the overall distribution of fitness effects was similar between the three environments, the magnitude and even the sign of the fitness of a number of lineages changed with the environment, demonstrating that the fitness of some genotypes was environmentally dependent. These results present an unprecedented picture of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations in a bacterium with multiple chromosomes and provide greater quantitative support for the theory that the vast majority of spontaneous mutations are neutral or deleterious.

  1. Chemical chaperone treatment reduces intracellular accumulation of mutant collagen IV and ameliorates the cellular phenotype of a COL4A2 mutation that causes haemorrhagic stroke.

    PubMed

    Murray, Lydia S; Lu, Yinhui; Taggart, Aislynn; Van Regemorter, Nicole; Vilain, Catheline; Abramowicz, Marc; Kadler, Karl E; Van Agtmael, Tom

    2014-01-15

    Haemorrhagic stroke accounts for ∼20% of stroke cases and porencephaly is a clinical consequence of perinatal cerebral haemorrhaging. Here, we report the identification of a novel dominant G702D mutation in the collagen domain of COL4A2 (collagen IV alpha chain 2) in a family displaying porencephaly with reduced penetrance. COL4A2 is the obligatory protein partner of COL4A1 but in contrast to most COL4A1 mutations, the COL4A2 mutation does not lead to eye or kidney disease. Analysis of dermal biopsies from a patient and his unaffected father, who also carries the mutation, revealed that both display basement membrane (BM) defects. Intriguingly, defective collagen IV incorporation into the dermal BM was observed in the patient only and was associated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention of COL4A2 in primary dermal fibroblasts. This intracellular accumulation led to ER stress, unfolded protein response activation, reduced cell proliferation and increased apoptosis. Interestingly, the absence of ER retention of COL4A2 and ER stress in cells from the unaffected father indicate that accumulation and/or clearance of mutant COL4A2 from the ER may be a critical modifier for disease development. Our analysis also revealed that mutant collagen IV is degraded via the proteasome. Importantly, treatment of patient cells with a chemical chaperone decreased intracellular COL4A2 levels, ER stress and apoptosis, demonstrating that reducing intracellular collagen accumulation can ameliorate the cellular phenotype of COL4A2 mutations. Importantly, these data highlight that manipulation of chaperone levels, intracellular collagen accumulation and ER stress are potential therapeutic options for collagen IV diseases including haemorrhagic stroke.

  2. The low phytic acid1-241 (lpa1-241) maize mutation alters the accumulation of anthocyanin pigment in the kernel.

    PubMed

    Badone, Francesco Cerino; Cassani, Elena; Landoni, Michela; Doria, Enrico; Panzeri, Dario; Lago, Chiara; Mesiti, Francesca; Nielsen, Erik; Pilu, Roberto

    2010-04-01

    The lpa1 mutations in maize are caused by lesions in the ZmMRP4 (multidrug resistance-associated proteins 4) gene. In previous studies (Raboy et al. in Plant Physiol 124:355-368, 2000; Pilu et al. in Theor Appl Genet 107:980-987, 2003a; Shi et al. Nat Biotechnol 25:930-937, 2007), several mutations have been isolated in this locus causing a reduction of phytic acid (myo-inositol-1,2,3,4,5,6-hexakisphosphate, or InsP(6)) content and an equivalent increasing of free phosphate. In particular, the lpa1-241 mutation causes a reduction of up to 90% of phytic acid, associated with strong pleiotropic effects on the whole plant. In this work, we show, for the first time to our knowledge, an interaction between the accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in the kernel and the lpa mutations. In fact the lpa1-241 mutant accumulates a higher level of anthocyanins as compared to wild type either in the embryo (about 3.8-fold) or in the aleurone layer (about 0.3-fold) in a genotype able to accumulate anthocyanin. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these pigments are mislocalised in the cytoplasm, conferring a blue pigmentation of the scutellum, because of the neutral/basic pH of this cellular compartment. As a matter of fact, the propionate treatment, causing a specific acidification of the cytoplasm, restored the red pigmentation of the scutellum in the mutant and expression analysis showed a reduction of ZmMRP3 anthocyanins' transporter gene expression. On the whole, these data strongly suggest a possible interaction between the lpa mutation and anthocyanin accumulation and compartmentalisation in the kernel.

  3. A nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutation disrupts accumulation of mitochondrial ATP synthase subunit alpha in developing pollen of S male-sterile maize.

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lanying; Ruesch, Kimberly L; Ortega, Victor M; Kamps, Terry L; Gabay-Laughnan, Susan; Chase, Christine D

    2003-01-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis and function depend upon the interaction of mitochondrial and nuclear genomes. Forward genetic analysis of mitochondrial function presents a challenge in organisms that are obligated to respire. In the S-cytoplasmic male sterility (CMS-S) system of maize, expression of mitochondrial open reading frames (orf355-orf77) conditions collapse of developing haploid pollen. Nuclear restorer-of-fertility mutations that circumvent pollen collapse are often homozygous lethal. These spontaneous mutations potentially result from disruption of nuclear genes required for mitochondrial gene expression, in contrast to homozygous-viable restorer-of-fertility alleles that function to block or compensate for the expression of mitochondrial CMS genes. Consistent with this hypothesis, the homozygous-lethal restoring allele historically designated RfIII was shown to be recessive in diploid pollen produced by tetraploid CMS-S plants. Accordingly, the symbol for this allele has been changed to restorer-of-fertility lethal 1 (rfl1). In haploid rfl1 pollen, orf355-orf77 transcripts and mitochondrial transcripts encoding the alpha-subunit of the ATP synthase (ATPA) were decreased in abundance. Haploid rfl1 pollen failed to accumulate wild-type levels of ATPA protein, indicating that functional requirements for mitochondrial protein accumulation are relaxed in maize pollen. The CMS-S system and rfl mutations therefore allow for the selection of nuclear mutations disrupting mitochondrial biogenesis in a multicellular eukaryote. PMID:14573487

  4. A bird's eye view of a deleterious recessive allele.

    PubMed

    Ekblom, Robert

    2016-07-01

    In the endangered Scottish chough (Pyrrhocorax pyrrhocorax) population, a lethal blindness syndrome is found to be caused by a deleterious recessive allele. Photo: Gordon Yates. In Focus: Trask, A.E., Bignal, E.M., McCracken, D.I., Monaghan, P., Piertney, S.B. & Reid, J.M. (2016) Evidence of the phenotypic expression of a lethal recessive allele under inbreeding in a wild population of conservation concern. Journal of Animal Ecology, 85, 879-891. In this issue of Journal of Animal Ecology, Trask et al. () report on a strange, lethal, blindness that regularly affects chicks of an endangered bird population. The authors show that the inheritance mode of this blindness disease precisely matches the expectations of a recessive deleterious mutation. Intriguingly, there is also an indication that the disease-causing variant might be maintained in the population by balancing selection, due to a selective advantage for heterozygotes. Could this finding have consequences for conservation actions implemented for the population?

  5. The deleterious role of basophils in systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Pellefigues, Christophe; Charles, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus is a complex autoimmune disease of multifactorial origins. All compartments of the immune system appear to be affected, at least in some way, and to contribute to disease pathogenesis. Due to an escape from negative selection autoreactive T and B cells accumulate in SLE patients leading to the production of autoantibodies mainly raised against nuclear components and their subsequent deposition into target organs. We recently showed that basophils, in an IgE and IL-4 dependent manner, contribute to SLE pathogenesis by amplifying autoantibody production. Here, we summarize what we have learned about the deleterious role of basophils in lupus both in a mouse model and in SLE patients. We discuss which possible pathways could be involved in basophil activation and recruitment to secondary lymphoid organs during SLE, and how basophils may amplify autoantibody production. PMID:24209595

  6. Congenital Cataract-Causing Mutation G129C in γC-Crystallin Promotes the Accumulation of Two Distinct Unfolding Intermediates That Form Highly Toxic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yi-Bo; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Zhao, Wei-Jie; Yan, Yong-Bin

    2015-08-28

    Cataract is a lens opacification disease prevalent worldwide. Cataract-causing mutations in crystallins generally lead to the formation of light-scattering particles in the lens. However, it remains unclear for the detailed structural and pathological mechanisms of most mutations. In this study, we showed that the G129C mutation in γC-crystallin, which is associated with autosomal dominant congenital nuclear cataract, perturbed the unfolding process by promoting the accumulation of two distinct aggregation-prone intermediates under mild denaturing conditions. The abnormally accumulated intermediates escaped from the chaperone-like function of αA-crystallin during refolding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicated that the mutation altered domain pairing geometry and allowed the penetration of extra solvent molecules into the domain binding interface, thereby weakening domain binding energy. Under mild denaturation conditions, the increased domain movements may facilitate the formation of non-native oligomers via domain swapping, which further assembled into amyloid-like fibrils. The intermediate that appeared at 1.6M guanidine hydrochloride was more compact and less aggregatory than the one populated at 0.9 M guanidine hydrochloride, which was caused by the increased solvation of acidic residues in the ion-pairing network via the competitive binding of guanidinium ions. More importantly, both the amyloid-like fibrils preformed in vitro and intracellular aggresomes formed by exogenously overexpressed mutant proteins significantly inhibited cell proliferation and induced cell death. The combined data from spectroscopic, structural and cellular studies strongly suggest that both the formation of light-scattering aggregates and the toxic effects of the aggregates may contribute to the onset and development of cataract.

  7. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  8. A mutation in the CASQ1 gene causes a vacuolar myopathy with accumulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Daniela; Vezzani, Bianca; Galli, Lucia; Paolini, Cecilia; Toniolo, Luana; Pierantozzi, Enrico; Spinozzi, Simone; Barone, Virginia; Pegoraro, Elena; Bello, Luca; Cenacchi, Giovanna; Vattemi, Gaetano; Tomelleri, Giuliano; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Protasi, Feliciano; Reggiani, Carlo; Sorrentino, Vincenzo

    2014-10-01

    A missense mutation in the calsequestrin-1 gene (CASQ1) was found in a group of patients with a myopathy characterized by weakness, fatigue, and the presence of large vacuoles containing characteristic inclusions resulting from the aggregation of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) proteins. The mutation affects a conserved aspartic acid in position 244 (p.Asp244Gly) located in one of the high-affinity Ca(2+) -binding sites of CASQ1 and alters the kinetics of Ca(2+) release in muscle fibers. Expression of the mutated CASQ1 protein in COS-7 cells showed a markedly reduced ability in forming elongated polymers, whereas both in cultured myotubes and in in vivo mouse fibers induced the formation of electron-dense SR vacuoles containing aggregates of the mutant CASQ1 protein that resemble those observed in muscle biopsies of patients. Altogether, these results support the view that a single missense mutation in the CASQ1 gene causes the formation of abnormal SR vacuoles containing aggregates of CASQ1, and other SR proteins, results in altered Ca(2+) release in skeletal muscle fibers, and, hence, is responsible for the clinical phenotype observed in these patients.

  9. Nickel accumulation in lung tissues is associated with increased risk of p53 mutation in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Chiou, Yu-Hu; Wong, Ruey-Hong; Chao, Mu-Rong; Chen, Chih-Yi; Liou, Saou-Hsing; Lee, Huei

    2014-10-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compounds has been associated with lung cancer. The correlation between high nickel levels and increased risk of lung cancer has been previously reported in a case-control study. This study assessed whether nickel exposure increased the occurrence of p53 mutations due to DNA repair inhibition by nickel. A total of 189 lung cancer patients were enrolled to determine nickel levels in tumor-adjacent normal lung tissues and p53 mutation status in lung tumors through atomic absorption spectrometry and direct sequencing, respectively. Nickel levels in p53 mutant patients were significantly higher than those in p53 wild-type patients. When patients were divided into high- and low-nickel subgroups by median nickel level, the high-nickel subgroup of patients had an odds ratio (OR) of 3.25 for p53 mutation risk relative to the low-nickel subgroup patients. The OR for p53 mutation risk of lifetime non-smokers, particularly females, in the high-nickel subgroup was greater than that in the low-nickel subgroup. To determine whether nickel affected DNA repair capacity, we conducted the host cell reactivation assay in A549 and H1975 lung cancer cells and showed that the DNA repair activity was reduced by nickel chloride in a dose-dependent manner. This was associated with elevated production of hydrogen peroxide-induced 8-oxo-deoxyguanosine. Therefore, increased risk of p53 mutation due to defective DNA repair caused by high nickel levels in lung tissues may be one mechanism by which nickel exposure contributes to lung cancer development, especially in lifetime female non-smokers.

  10. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  11. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  12. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  13. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  14. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  15. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  16. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  17. 21 CFR 509.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 509.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 509.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  18. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6...-PACKAGING MATERIAL General Provisions § 109.6 Added poisonous or deleterious substances. (a) Use of an added... approved under the criteria of section 409 of the act, or when the added poisonous or deleterious...

  19. A Temporal Perspective on the Interplay of Demography and Selection on Deleterious Variation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Evan; Novembre, John

    2017-01-01

    When mutations have small effects on fitness, population size plays an important role in determining the amount and nature of deleterious genetic variation. The extent to which recent population size changes have impacted deleterious variation in humans has been a question of considerable interest and debate. An emerging consensus is that the Out-of-Africa bottleneck and subsequent growth events have been too short to cause meaningful differences in genetic load between populations; though changes in the number and average frequencies of deleterious variants have taken place. To provide more support for this view and to offer additional insight into the divergent evolution of deleterious variation across populations, we numerically solve time-inhomogeneous diffusion equations and study the temporal dynamics of the frequency spectra in models of population size change for modern humans. We observe how the response to demographic change differs by the strength of selection, and we then assess whether similar patterns are observed in exome sequence data from 33,370 and 5203 individuals of non-Finnish European and West African ancestry, respectively. Our theoretical results highlight how even simple summaries of the frequency spectrum can have complex responses to demographic change. These results support the finding that some apparent discrepancies between previous results have been driven by the behaviors of the precise summaries of deleterious variation. Further, our empirical results make clear the difficulty of inferring slight differences in frequency spectra using recent next-generation sequence data. PMID:28159863

  20. Mutations in VP2 and VP1 capsid proteins increase infectivity and mouse lethality of enterovirus 71 by virus binding and RNA accumulation enhancement.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sheng-Wen; Wang, Ya-Fang; Yu, Chun-Keung; Su, Ih-Jen; Wang, Jen-Ren

    2012-01-05

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is a major cause of hand-foot-and-mouth disease. EV71 infection occasionally associates with severe neurological sequelae such as brainstem encephalitis or poliovirus-like paralysis. We demonstrated that mouse-adapted strain increases infectivity, resulting in higher cytotoxicity of neuron cells and mortality to neonatal mice than a non-adapted strain. Results pointed to EV71 capsid region determining viral infectivity and mouse lethality. Mutant virus with lysine to methionine substitution at VP2(149) (VP2(149M)) or glutamine to glutamic acid substitution at VP1(145) (VP1(145E)) showed greater viral titers and apoptosis. Synergistic effect of VP2(149M) and VP1(145E) double mutations enhanced viral binding and RNA accumulation in infected Neuro-2a cells. The dual substitution mutants markedly reduced value of 50% lethal dose in neonatal mice infection, indicating they raised mouse lethality in vivo. In sum, VP2(149M) and VP1(145E) mutations cooperatively promote viral binding and RNA accumulation of EV71, contributing to viral infectivity in vitro and mouse lethality in vivo.

  1. Accumulation of Krebs cycle intermediates and over-expression of HIF1alpha in tumours which result from germline FH and SDH mutations.

    PubMed

    Pollard, P J; Brière, J J; Alam, N A; Barwell, J; Barclay, E; Wortham, N C; Hunt, T; Mitchell, M; Olpin, S; Moat, S J; Hargreaves, I P; Heales, S J; Chung, Y L; Griffiths, J R; Dalgleish, A; McGrath, J A; Gleeson, M J; Hodgson, S V; Poulsom, R; Rustin, P; Tomlinson, I P M

    2005-08-01

    The nuclear-encoded Krebs cycle enzymes, fumarate hydratase (FH) and succinate dehydrogenase (SDHB, -C and -D), act as tumour suppressors. Germline mutations in FH predispose individuals to leiomyomas and renal cell cancer (HLRCC), whereas mutations in SDH cause paragangliomas and phaeochromocytomas (HPGL). In this study, we have shown that FH-deficient cells and tumours accumulate fumarate and, to a lesser extent, succinate. SDH-deficient tumours principally accumulate succinate. In situ analyses showed that these tumours also have over-expression of hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha), activation of HIF1alphatargets (such as vascular endothelial growth factor) and high microvessel density. We found no evidence of increased reactive oxygen species in our cells. Our data provide in vivo evidence to support the hypothesis that increased succinate and/or fumarate causes stabilization of HIF1alpha a plausible mechanism, inhibition of HIF prolyl hydroxylases, has previously been suggested by in vitro studies. The basic mechanism of tumorigenesis in HPGL and HLRCC is likely to be pseudo-hypoxic drive, just as it is in von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

  2. Accumulation of Human-Adapting Mutations during Circulation of A(H1N1)pdm09 Influenza Virus in Humans in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Elderfield, Ruth A.; Watson, Simon J.; Godlee, Alexandra; Adamson, Walt E.; Thompson, Catherine I.; Dunning, Jake; Fernandez-Alonso, Mirian; Blumenkrantz, Deena; Hussell, Tracy; Zambon, Maria; Openshaw, Peter; Kellam, Paul

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The influenza pandemic that emerged in 2009 provided an unprecedented opportunity to study adaptation of a virus recently acquired from an animal source during human transmission. In the United Kingdom, the novel virus spread in three temporally distinct waves between 2009 and 2011. Phylogenetic analysis of complete viral genomes showed that mutations accumulated over time. Second- and third-wave viruses replicated more rapidly in human airway epithelial (HAE) cells than did the first-wave virus. In infected mice, weight loss varied between viral isolates from the same wave but showed no distinct pattern with wave and did not correlate with viral load in the mouse lungs or severity of disease in the human donor. However, second- and third-wave viruses induced less alpha interferon in the infected mouse lungs. NS1 protein, an interferon antagonist, had accumulated several mutations in second- and third-wave viruses. Recombinant viruses with the third-wave NS gene induced less interferon in human cells, but this alone did not account for increased virus fitness in HAE cells. Mutations in HA and NA genes in third-wave viruses caused increased binding to α-2,6-sialic acid and enhanced infectivity in human mucus. A recombinant virus with these two segments replicated more efficiently in HAE cells. A mutation in PA (N321K) enhanced polymerase activity of third-wave viruses and also provided a replicative advantage in HAE cells. Therefore, multiple mutations allowed incremental changes in viral fitness, which together may have contributed to the apparent increase in severity of A(H1N1)pdm09 influenza virus during successive waves. IMPORTANCE Although most people infected with the 2009 pandemic influenza virus had mild or unapparent symptoms, some suffered severe and devastating disease. The reasons for this variability were unknown, but the numbers of severe cases increased during successive waves of human infection in the United Kingdom. To determine the causes

  3. Rasgrp1 mutation increases naïve T-cell CD44 expression and drives mTOR-dependent accumulation of Helios+ T cells and autoantibodies

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Darienne R; Polakos, Noelle K; Enders, Anselm; Roots, Carla; Balakishnan, Bhavani; Miosge, Lisa A; Sjollema, Geoff; Bertram, Edward M; Field, Matthew A; Shao, Yunli; Andrews, T Daniel; Whittle, Belinda; Barnes, S Whitney; Walker, John R; Cyster, Jason G

    2013-01-01

    Missense variants are a major source of human genetic variation. Here we analyze a new mouse missense variant, Rasgrp1Anaef, with an ENU-mutated EF hand in the Rasgrp1 Ras guanine nucleotide exchange factor. Rasgrp1Anaef mice exhibit anti-nuclear autoantibodies and gradually accumulate a CD44hi Helios+ PD-1+ CD4+ T cell population that is dependent on B cells. Despite reduced Rasgrp1-Ras-ERK activation in vitro, thymocyte selection in Rasgrp1Anaef is mostly normal in vivo, although CD44 is overexpressed on naïve thymocytes and T cells in a T-cell-autonomous manner. We identify CD44 expression as a sensitive reporter of tonic mTOR-S6 kinase signaling through a novel mouse strain, chino, with a reduction-of-function mutation in Mtor. Elevated tonic mTOR-S6 signaling occurs in Rasgrp1Anaef naïve CD4+ T cells. CD44 expression, CD4+ T cell subset ratios and serum autoantibodies all returned to normal in Rasgrp1AnaefMtorchino double-mutant mice, demonstrating that increased mTOR activity is essential for the Rasgrp1Anaef T cell dysregulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01020.001 PMID:24336796

  4. Bottlenecks and selective sweeps during domestication have increased deleterious genetic variation in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Clare D.; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; O’Brien, Dennis P.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Ramirez, Oscar; Vilà, Carles; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Schnabel, Robert D.; Wayne, Robert K.; Lohmueller, Kirk E.

    2016-01-01

    Population bottlenecks, inbreeding, and artificial selection can all, in principle, influence levels of deleterious genetic variation. However, the relative importance of each of these effects on genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation remains controversial. Domestic and wild canids offer a powerful system to address the role of these factors in influencing deleterious variation because their history is dominated by known bottlenecks and intense artificial selection. Here, we assess genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation in 90 whole-genome sequences from breed dogs, village dogs, and gray wolves. We find that the ratio of amino acid changing heterozygosity to silent heterozygosity is higher in dogs than in wolves and, on average, dogs have 2–3% higher genetic load than gray wolves. Multiple lines of evidence indicate this pattern is driven by less efficient natural selection due to bottlenecks associated with domestication and breed formation, rather than recent inbreeding. Further, we find regions of the genome implicated in selective sweeps are enriched for amino acid changing variants and Mendelian disease genes. To our knowledge, these results provide the first quantitative estimates of the increased burden of deleterious variants directly associated with domestication and have important implications for selective breeding programs and the conservation of rare and endangered species. Specifically, they highlight the costs associated with selective breeding and question the practice favoring the breeding of individuals that best fit breed standards. Our results also suggest that maintaining a large population size, rather than just avoiding inbreeding, is a critical factor for preventing the accumulation of deleterious variants. PMID:26699508

  5. Bottlenecks and selective sweeps during domestication have increased deleterious genetic variation in dogs.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Clare D; Ortega-Del Vecchyo, Diego; O'Brien, Dennis P; Taylor, Jeremy F; Ramirez, Oscar; Vilà, Carles; Marques-Bonet, Tomas; Schnabel, Robert D; Wayne, Robert K; Lohmueller, Kirk E

    2016-01-05

    Population bottlenecks, inbreeding, and artificial selection can all, in principle, influence levels of deleterious genetic variation. However, the relative importance of each of these effects on genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation remains controversial. Domestic and wild canids offer a powerful system to address the role of these factors in influencing deleterious variation because their history is dominated by known bottlenecks and intense artificial selection. Here, we assess genome-wide patterns of deleterious variation in 90 whole-genome sequences from breed dogs, village dogs, and gray wolves. We find that the ratio of amino acid changing heterozygosity to silent heterozygosity is higher in dogs than in wolves and, on average, dogs have 2-3% higher genetic load than gray wolves. Multiple lines of evidence indicate this pattern is driven by less efficient natural selection due to bottlenecks associated with domestication and breed formation, rather than recent inbreeding. Further, we find regions of the genome implicated in selective sweeps are enriched for amino acid changing variants and Mendelian disease genes. To our knowledge, these results provide the first quantitative estimates of the increased burden of deleterious variants directly associated with domestication and have important implications for selective breeding programs and the conservation of rare and endangered species. Specifically, they highlight the costs associated with selective breeding and question the practice favoring the breeding of individuals that best fit breed standards. Our results also suggest that maintaining a large population size, rather than just avoiding inbreeding, is a critical factor for preventing the accumulation of deleterious variants.

  6. Mutations in the Hyperosmotic Stress-Responsive Mitochondrial BASIC AMINO ACID CARRIER2 Enhance Proline Accumulation in Arabidopsis1[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Toka, Iman; Planchais, Séverine; Cabassa, Cécile; Justin, Anne-Marie; De Vos, Delphine; Richard, Luc; Savouré, Arnould; Carol, Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Mitochondrial carrier family proteins are diverse in their substrate specificity, organellar location, and gene expression. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), 58 genes encode these six-transmembrane-domain proteins. We investigated the biological role of the basic amino acid carrier Basic Amino Acid Carrier2 (BAC2) from Arabidopsis that is structurally and functionally similar to ARG11, a yeast ornithine and arginine carrier, and to Arabidopsis BAC1. By studying the expression of BAC2 and the consequences of its mutation in Arabidopsis, we showed that BAC2 is a genuine mitochondrial protein and that Arabidopsis requires expression of the BAC2 gene in order to use arginine. The BAC2 gene is induced by hyperosmotic stress (with either 0.2 m NaCl or 0.4 m mannitol) and dark-induced senescence. The BAC2 promoter contains numerous stress-related cis-regulatory elements, and the transcriptional activity of BAC2:β-glucuronidase is up-regulated by stress and senescence. Under hyperosmotic stress, bac2 mutants express the P5CS1 proline biosynthetic gene more strongly than the wild type, and this correlates with a greater accumulation of Pro. Our data suggest that BAC2 is a hyperosmotic stress-inducible transporter of basic amino acids that contributes to proline accumulation in response to hyperosmotic stress in Arabidopsis. PMID:20172963

  7. [Adult-onset case of idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation without mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes].

    PubMed

    Saiki, Shinji; Sekine, Takeshi; Ueno, Yuji; Yoshino, Hiroyo; Takahashi, Junko; Tani, Yoshihiko; Kambe, Yasunori; Motoi, Yumiko; Hattori, Nobutaka

    2009-08-01

    A 47-year-old man with a 15-year history of bipolar disorder treated with anti-depressants, lithium carbonate or neuroleptics was admitted because of marked difficulty in gait and speech. At the age 45, he was unable to walk without bilateral assists and became a wheel-chair state. There was no family history and his mother, father and younger sister were neurologically free. General physical examinations revealed no abnormalities. Neurologically, he was moderately demented (mini mental state examination: 18/30) and showed bilateral horizontal gaze nystagmus, parkinsonism, cerebellar ataxia, dysarthria and moderate spastic paraparesis. No involuntary movements were noted. Wet blood smear showed acanthocytes, while blood chemistries revealed no abnormalities including levels of serum creatine kinase, hepatic enzymes and blood beta-lipoprotein. Kell antigen expressions of the red blood cells were within normal limit. Western blot analysis with anti-chorein antibody detected normal chorein expression levels of the red blood cells. Cranial MRI showed severe symmetric atrophy of the frontotemporal lobes, caudate nuclei, putamen, and brainstem. Also, MRI-gradient echo showed symmetric iron accumulation in the medial portion of the globus pallidus without surrounding high intensity areas, so called "eye-of-the-tiger sign". Genetic analyses revealed no mutations in the PANK2 and PLA2G6 genes. Therefore, he was diagnosed as idiopathic neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA). These findings suggest that NBIA is heterogeneous and other additional genes remain to be found.

  8. Dominance of mutations affecting viability in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed Central

    Fry, James D; Nuzhdin, Sergey V

    2003-01-01

    There have been several attempts to estimate the average dominance (ratio of heterozygous to homozygous effects) of spontaneous deleterious mutations in Drosophila melanogaster, but these have given inconsistent results. We investigated whether transposable element (TE) insertions have higher average dominance for egg-to-adult viability than do point mutations, a possibility suggested by the types of fitness-depressing effects that TEs are believed to have. If so, then variation in dominance estimates among strains and crosses would be expected as a consequence of variation in TE activity. As a first test, we estimated the average dominance of all mutations and of copia insertions in a set of lines that had accumulated spontaneous mutations for 33 generations. A traditional regression method gave a dominance estimate for all mutations of 0.17, whereas average dominance of copia insertions was 0.51; the difference between these two estimates approached significance (P = 0.08). As a second test, we reanalyzed Ohnishi 1974 data on dominance of spontaneous and EMS-induced mutations. Because a considerable fraction of spontaneous mutations are caused by TE insertions, whereas EMS induces mainly point mutations, we predicted that average dominance would decline with increasing EMS concentration. This pattern was observed, but again fell short of formal significance (P = 0.07). Taken together, however, the two results give modest support for the hypothesis that TE insertions have greater average dominance in their viability effects than do point mutations, possibly as a result of deleterious effects of expression of TE-encoded genes. PMID:12702680

  9. The build up of mutation-selection- drift balance in laboratory Drosophila populations.

    PubMed

    García-Dorado, Aurora; Avila, Victoria; Sánchez-Molano, Enrique; Manrique, Antonio; López-Fanjul, Carlos

    2007-03-01

    The build up of an equilibrium between mutation, selection, and drift in populations of moderate size is an important evolutionary issue, and can be critical in the conservation of endangered populations. We studied this process in two Drosophila melanogaster populations initially lacking genetic variability (C1 and C2) that were subsequently maintained during 431 or 165 generations with effective population size N(e) approximately 500 (estimated by lethal complementation analysis). Each population originated synchronously to a companion set of full-sib mutation accumulation (MA) lines, C1 and MA1 were derived from an isogenic origin and C2 and MA2 from a single MA1 line at generation 265. The results suggest that both C1 and C2 populations were close to the mutation-selection-drift balance for viability and bristle traits, and are consistent with a 2.5-fold increase of the mutation rate in C2 and MA2. Despite this increase, the average panmictic viability in C2 was only slightly below that of C1, indicating that the expressed loads due to segregating deleterious mutation were small, in agreement with the low deleterious mutation rate (0.015-0.045) previously reported for the MA1 lines. In C1, the nonlethal inbreeding depression rate for viability was 30% of that usually estimated in segregating populations. The genetic variance for bristles regenerated in C1 and C2 was moderately smaller than the average value reported for natural populations, implying that they have accumulated a substantial adaptive potential. In light of neutral and selective predictions, these results suggest that bristle additive variance was predominantly due to segregation of mutations with deleterious effects of the order of 10(-3), and is consistent with relatively weak causal stabilizing selection (V(s) approximately 30).

  10. Mutations in LPIN1 cause recurrent acute myoglobinuria in childhood.

    PubMed

    Zeharia, Avraham; Shaag, Avraham; Houtkooper, Riekelt H; Hindi, Tareq; de Lonlay, Pascale; Erez, Gilli; Hubert, Laurence; Saada, Ann; de Keyzer, Yves; Eshel, Gideon; Vaz, Frédéric M; Pines, Ophry; Elpeleg, Orly

    2008-10-01

    Recurrent episodes of life-threatening myoglobinuria in childhood are caused by inborn errors of glycogenolysis, mitochondrial fatty acid beta-oxidation, and oxidative phosphorylation. Nonetheless, approximately half of the patients do not suffer from a defect in any of these pathways. Using homozygosity mapping, we identified six deleterious mutations in the LPIN1 gene in patients who presented at 2-7 years of age with recurrent, massive rhabdomyolysis. The LPIN1 gene encodes the muscle-specific phosphatidic acid phosphatase, a key enzyme in triglyceride and membrane phospholipid biosynthesis. Of six individuals who developed statin-induced myopathy, one was a carrier for Glu769Gly, a pathogenic mutation in the LPIN1 gene. Analysis of phospholipid content disclosed accumulation of phosphatidic acid and lysophospholipids in muscle tissue of the more severe genotype. Mutations in the LPIN1 gene cause recurrent rhabdomyolysis in childhood, and a carrier state may predispose for statin-induced myopathy.

  11. B-RAF mutation and accumulated gene methylation in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), sessile serrated adenoma/polyp (SSA/P) and cancer in SSA/P

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, A; Okamoto, K; Fujino, Y; Nakagawa, T; Muguruma, N; Sannomiya, K; Mitsui, Y; Takaoka, T; Kitamura, S; Miyamoto, H; Okahisa, T; Fujimori, T; Imoto, I; Takayama, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Sessile serrated adenomas/polyps (SSA/Ps) are a putative precursor of colon cancer with microsatellite instability (MSI). However, the developmental mechanism of SSA/P remains unknown. We performed genetic analysis and genome-wide DNA methylation analysis in aberrant crypt foci (ACF), SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P specimens to show a close association between ACF and the SSA/P-cancer sequence. We also evaluated the prevalence and number of ACF in SSA/P patients. Methods: ACF in the right-side colon were observed in 36 patients with SSA/Ps alone, 2 with cancers in SSA/P, and 20 normal subjects and biopsied under magnifying endoscopy. B-RAF mutation and MSI were analysed by PCR–restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and PCR–SSCP, respectively, in 15 ACF, 20 SSA/P, and 2 cancer specimens. DNA methylation array analysis of seven ACF, seven SSA/P, and two cancer in SSA/P specimens was performed using the microarray-based integrated analysis of methylation by isochizomers (MIAMI) method. Results: B-RAF mutations were frequently detected in ACF, SSA/P, and cancer in SSA/P tissues. The number of methylated genes increased significantly in the order of ACFmutation and methylation of some of the six identified genes and develop into SSA/Ps through accumulated methylation of these genes. PMID

  12. Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations in Picoeukaryotic Marine Green Algae

    PubMed Central

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Grimsley, Nigel; Salmeron, Christophe; Pecqueur, David; Piganeau, Gwenael; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Estimates of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are important for understanding the adaptive potential of species. Here, we present the results of mutation accumulation experiments over 265–512 sequential generations in four species of marine unicellular green algae, Ostreococcus tauri RCC4221, Ostreococcus mediterraneus RCC2590, Micromonas pusilla RCC299, and Bathycoccus prasinos RCC1105. Cell division rates, taken as a proxy for fitness, systematically decline over the course of the experiment in O. tauri, but not in the three other species where the MA experiments were carried out over a smaller number of generations. However, evidence of mutation accumulation in 24 MA lines arises when they are exposed to stressful conditions, such as changes in osmolarity or exposure to herbicides. The selection coefficients, estimated from the number of cell divisions/day, varies significantly between the different environmental conditions tested in MA lines, providing evidence for advantageous and deleterious effects of spontaneous mutations. This suggests a common environmental dependence of the fitness effects of mutations and allows the minimum mutation/genome/generation rates to be inferred at 0.0037 in these species. PMID:27175016

  13. Fitness Effects of Spontaneous Mutations in Picoeukaryotic Marine Green Algae.

    PubMed

    Krasovec, Marc; Eyre-Walker, Adam; Grimsley, Nigel; Salmeron, Christophe; Pecqueur, David; Piganeau, Gwenael; Sanchez-Ferandin, Sophie

    2016-07-07

    Estimates of the fitness effects of spontaneous mutations are important for understanding the adaptive potential of species. Here, we present the results of mutation accumulation experiments over 265-512 sequential generations in four species of marine unicellular green algae, Ostreococcus tauri RCC4221, Ostreococcus mediterraneus RCC2590, Micromonas pusilla RCC299, and Bathycoccus prasinos RCC1105. Cell division rates, taken as a proxy for fitness, systematically decline over the course of the experiment in O. tauri, but not in the three other species where the MA experiments were carried out over a smaller number of generations. However, evidence of mutation accumulation in 24 MA lines arises when they are exposed to stressful conditions, such as changes in osmolarity or exposure to herbicides. The selection coefficients, estimated from the number of cell divisions/day, varies significantly between the different environmental conditions tested in MA lines, providing evidence for advantageous and deleterious effects of spontaneous mutations. This suggests a common environmental dependence of the fitness effects of mutations and allows the minimum mutation/genome/generation rates to be inferred at 0.0037 in these species.

  14. Null mutation of the murine ATP7B (Wilson disease) gene results in intracellular copper accumulation and late-onset hepatic nodular transformation.

    PubMed

    Buiakova, O I; Xu, J; Lutsenko, S; Zeitlin, S; Das, K; Das, S; Ross, B M; Mekios, C; Scheinberg, I H; Gilliam, T C

    1999-09-01

    The Atp7b protein is a copper-transporting ATPase expressed predominantly in the liver and to a lesser extent in most other tissues. Mutations in the ATP7B gene lead to Wilson disease, a copper toxicity disorder characterized by dramatic build-up of intracellular hepatic copper with subsequent hepatic and neuro-logical abnormalities. Using homologous recombination to disrupt the normal translation of ATP7B, we have generated a strain of mice that are homozygous mutants (null) for the Wilson disease gene. The ATP7B null mice display a gradual accumulation of hepatic copper that increases to a level 60-fold greater than normal by 5 months of age. An increase in copper concentration was also observed in the kidney, brain, placenta and lactating mammary glands of homo-zygous mutants, although milk from the mutant glands was copper deficient. Morphological abnormalities resembling cirrhosis developed in the majority of the livers from homozygous mutants older than 7 months of age. Progeny of the homozygous mutant females demonstrated neurological abnormalities and growth retardation characteristic of copper deficiency. Copper concentration in the livers of the newborn homozygous null mutants was decreased dramatically. In summary, inactivation of the murine ATP7B gene produces a form of cirrhotic liver disease that resembles Wilson disease in humans and the 'toxic milk' phenotype in the mouse.

  15. A flexible method for estimating the fraction of fitness influencing mutations from large sequencing data sets

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sunjin; Akey, Joshua M.

    2016-01-01

    A continuing challenge in the analysis of massively large sequencing data sets is quantifying and interpreting non-neutrally evolving mutations. Here, we describe a flexible and robust approach based on the site frequency spectrum to estimate the fraction of deleterious and adaptive variants from large-scale sequencing data sets. We applied our method to approximately 1 million single nucleotide variants (SNVs) identified in high-coverage exome sequences of 6515 individuals. We estimate that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is higher than previously reported; quantify the effects of genomic context, codon bias, chromatin accessibility, and number of protein–protein interactions on deleterious protein-coding SNVs; and identify pathways and networks that have likely been influenced by positive selection. Furthermore, we show that the fraction of deleterious nonsynonymous SNVs is significantly higher for Mendelian versus complex disease loci and in exons harboring dominant versus recessive Mendelian mutations. In summary, as genome-scale sequencing data accumulate in progressively larger sample sizes, our method will enable increasingly high-resolution inferences into the characteristics and determinants of non-neutral variation. PMID:27197222

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing reveals multiple deleterious variants in OPLL-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Guo, Jun; Cai, Tao; Zhang, Fengshan; Pan, Shengfa; Zhang, Li; Wang, Shaobo; Zhou, Feifei; Diao, Yinze; Zhao, Yanbin; Chen, Zhen; Liu, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zhongqiang; Liu, Zhongjun; Sun, Yu; Du, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (OPLL), which is characterized by ectopic bone formation in the spinal ligaments, can cause spinal-cord compression. To date, at least 11 susceptibility genes have been genetically linked to OPLL. In order to identify potential deleterious alleles in these OPLL-associated genes, we designed a capture array encompassing all coding regions of the target genes for next-generation sequencing (NGS) in a cohort of 55 unrelated patients with OPLL. By bioinformatics analyses, we successfully identified three novel and five extremely rare variants (MAF < 0.005). These variants were predicted to be deleterious by commonly used various algorithms, thereby resulting in missense mutations in four OPLL-associated genes (i.e., COL6A1, COL11A2, FGFR1, and BMP2). Furthermore, potential effects of the patient with p.Q89E of BMP2 were confirmed by a markedly increased BMP2 level in peripheral blood samples. Notably, seven of the variants were found to be associated with the patients with continuous subtype changes by cervical spinal radiological analyses. Taken together, our findings revealed for the first time that deleterious coding variants of the four OPLL-associated genes are potentially pathogenic in the patients with OPLL. PMID:27246988

  17. Mutations within the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrovirus FP25K gene decrease the accumulation of ODV-E66 and alter its intranuclear transport.

    PubMed

    Braunagel, S C; Burks, J K; Rosas-Acosta, G; Harrison, R L; Ma, H; Summers, M D

    1999-10-01

    Previous reports indicate that mutations within the Autographa californica nucleopolyhedrosis virus FP25K gene (open reading frame 61) significantly reduce incorporation of enveloped nucleocapsids into viral occlusions. We report that FP25K is a nucleocapsid protein of both the budded virus (BV) and occluded virus (ODV), and we describe the effects of two FP25K mutations (480-1 [N-terminal truncation] and FP-betagal [C-terminal fusion]) on the expression and cellular localization of ODV-E66 and ODV-E25. Significantly decreased amounts of ODV-E66 are detected in cells infected with 480-1 or FP-betagal viral mutants, even though during FP-betagal infection, steady-state levels of ODV-E66 transcripts remain unchanged. While ODV-E66 is normally detected in intranuclear microvesicles and ODV envelopes by 24 h postinfection (p.i.), ODV-E66 remains cytosolic throughout infection in cells infected with 480-1 virus (up to 96 h p.i.), and its intranuclear localization is not detected until 96 h p.i. in cells infected with the FP-betagal mutant virus. The nuclear localization of ODV-E25 is not affected during infection by the FP-betagal mutant; however, its trafficking is significantly delayed during infection by the 480-1 mutant. Temporal Western blot analyses of cell lysates show that both 480-1 and FP-betagal mutant virus infections result in altered accumulation patterns of several structural proteins, including gp67, BV/ODV-E26, and the major capsid protein p39. In addition to BV/ODV-E26, ODV-E66 and gp67 may interact with FP25K, and ODV-E25 and p39 may also be components of a protein complex containing ODV-E66 and FP25K. Together, these data suggest that FP25K and its associated protein complex(es) may play an important role in the targeting and intracellular transport of viral proteins during infection.

  18. Deleterious alleles in the human genome are on average younger than neutral alleles of the same frequency.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, Adam; Pulit, Sara L; Francioli, Laurent C; van Dijk, Freerk; Swertz, Morris; Boomsma, Dorret I; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Slagboom, P Eline; van Ommen, G J B; Wijmenga, Cisca; de Bakker, Paul I W; Sunyaev, Shamil R

    2013-01-01

    Large-scale population sequencing studies provide a complete picture of human genetic variation within the studied populations. A key challenge is to identify, among the myriad alleles, those variants that have an effect on molecular function, phenotypes, and reproductive fitness. Most non-neutral variation consists of deleterious alleles segregating at low population frequency due to incessant mutation. To date, studies characterizing selection against deleterious alleles have been based on allele frequency (testing for a relative excess of rare alleles) or ratio of polymorphism to divergence (testing for a relative increase in the number of polymorphic alleles). Here, starting from Maruyama's theoretical prediction (Maruyama T (1974), Am J Hum Genet USA 6:669-673) that a (slightly) deleterious allele is, on average, younger than a neutral allele segregating at the same frequency, we devised an approach to characterize selection based on allelic age. Unlike existing methods, it compares sets of neutral and deleterious sequence variants at the same allele frequency. When applied to human sequence data from the Genome of the Netherlands Project, our approach distinguishes low-frequency coding non-synonymous variants from synonymous and non-coding variants at the same allele frequency and discriminates between sets of variants independently predicted to be benign or damaging for protein structure and function. The results confirm the abundance of slightly deleterious coding variation in humans.

  19. Accumulating mutations in series of haplotypes at the KIT and MITF loci are major determinants of white markings in Franches-Montagnes horses.

    PubMed

    Haase, Bianca; Signer-Hasler, Heidi; Binns, Matthew M; Obexer-Ruff, Gabriela; Hauswirth, Regula; Bellone, Rebecca R; Burger, Dominik; Rieder, Stefan; Wade, Claire M; Leeb, Tosso

    2013-01-01

    Coat color and pattern variations in domestic animals are frequently inherited as simple monogenic traits, but a number are known to have a complex genetic basis. While the analysis of complex trait data remains a challenge in all species, we can use the reduced haplotypic diversity in domestic animal populations to gain insight into the genomic interactions underlying complex phenotypes. White face and leg markings are examples of complex traits in horses where little is known of the underlying genetics. In this study, Franches-Montagnes (FM) horses were scored for the occurrence of white facial and leg markings using a standardized scoring system. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) was performed for several white patterning traits in 1,077 FM horses. Seven quantitative trait loci (QTL) affecting the white marking score with p-values p≤10(-4) were identified. Three loci, MC1R and the known white spotting genes, KIT and MITF, were identified as the major loci underlying the extent of white patterning in this breed. Together, the seven loci explain 54% of the genetic variance in total white marking score, while MITF and KIT alone account for 26%. Although MITF and KIT are the major loci controlling white patterning, their influence varies according to the basic coat color of the horse and the specific body location of the white patterning. Fine mapping across the MITF and KIT loci was used to characterize haplotypes present. Phylogenetic relationships among haplotypes were calculated to assess their selective and evolutionary influences on the extent of white patterning. This novel approach shows that KIT and MITF act in an additive manner and that accumulating mutations at these loci progressively increase the extent of white markings.

  20. The rate and effects of spontaneous mutation on fitness traits in the social amoeba, Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Hall, David W; Fox, Sara; Kuzdzal-Fick, Jennie J; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2013-07-08

    We performed a mutation accumulation (MA) experiment in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum to estimate the rate and distribution of effects of spontaneous mutations affecting eight putative fitness traits. We found that the per-generation mutation rate for most fitness components is 0.0019 mutations per haploid genome per generation or larger. This rate is an order of magnitude higher than estimates for fitness components in the unicellular eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae, even though the base-pair substitution rate is two orders of magnitude lower. The high rate of fitness-altering mutations observed in this species may be partially explained by a large mutational target relative to S. cerevisiae. Fitness-altering mutations also may occur primarily at simple sequence repeats, which are common throughout the genome, including in coding regions, and may represent a target that is particularly likely to give fitness effects upon mutation. The majority of mutations had deleterious effects on fitness, but there was evidence for a substantial fraction, up to 40%, being beneficial for some of the putative fitness traits. Competitive ability within the multicellular slug appears to be under weak directional selection, perhaps reflecting the fact that slugs are sometimes, but not often, comprised of multiple clones in nature. Evidence for pleiotropy among fitness components across MA lines was absent, suggesting that mutations tend to act on single fitness components.

  1. Deleterious oral habits in children with hearing impairment

    PubMed Central

    SUHANI, RALUCA DIANA; SUHANI, MIHAI FLAVIU; MUNTEAN, ALEXANDRINA; MESAROS, MICHAELA; BADEA, MINDRA EUGENIA

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Deleterious oral habits represent a serious public health issue. The information available about this problem in children with hearing impairment is insufficient. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of deleterious oral habits among children with hearing impairment and comparing results against children without hearing impairment. Method This epidemiological study was carried out in a sample size of 315 children. We used a random sampling technique that included 150 children with hearing impairment and 165 without hearing impairment. All subjects were submitted to a clinical examination. The parents/legal guardians were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding the deleterious habits of their children. Results The data collected indicated a higher prevalence of deleterious oral habits among children with hearing impairment: 53.3% as opposed to 40.6% among children without hearing impairment. There was a higher incidence of malocclusion in children with hearing impairment (79.3%) compared to children without hearing impairment (57%). Conclusions This study highlighted the need to establish protocols for preventive orthodontic treatment at an early age, in order to reduce the deleterious oral habits and prevent malocclusion. Dental institutions/clinicians need to implement oral care programs including proper oral education aiming to promote oral health. PMID:26609277

  2. Increased burden of deleterious variants in essential genes in autism spectrum disorder

    PubMed Central

    Kember, Rachel L.; Brown, Christopher D.; Bućan, Maja

    2016-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous, highly heritable neurodevelopmental syndrome characterized by impaired social interaction, communication, and repetitive behavior. It is estimated that hundreds of genes contribute to ASD. We asked if genes with a strong effect on survival and fitness contribute to ASD risk. Human orthologs of genes with an essential role in pre- and postnatal development in the mouse [essential genes (EGs)] are enriched for disease genes and under strong purifying selection relative to human orthologs of mouse genes with a known nonlethal phenotype [nonessential genes (NEGs)]. This intolerance to deleterious mutations, commonly observed haploinsufficiency, and the importance of EGs in development suggest a possible cumulative effect of deleterious variants in EGs on complex neurodevelopmental disorders. With a comprehensive catalog of 3,915 mammalian EGs, we provide compelling evidence for a stronger contribution of EGs to ASD risk compared with NEGs. By examining the exonic de novo and inherited variants from 1,781 ASD quartet families, we show a significantly higher burden of damaging mutations in EGs in ASD probands compared with their non-ASD siblings. The analysis of EGs in the developing brain identified clusters of coexpressed EGs implicated in ASD. Finally, we suggest a high-priority list of 29 EGs with potential ASD risk as targets for future functional and behavioral studies. Overall, we show that large-scale studies of gene function in model organisms provide a powerful approach for prioritization of genes and pathogenic variants identified by sequencing studies of human disease. PMID:27956632

  3. APC germline mutations in families with familial adenomatous polyposis.

    PubMed

    De Queiroz Rossanese, Lillian Barbosa; De Lima Marson, Fernando Augusto; Ribeiro, José Dirceu; Coy, Claudio Saddy Rodrigues; Bertuzzo, Carmen Silvia

    2013-11-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) germline mutations are responsible for the occurrence of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Somatic mutations lead to malignant transformation of adenomas. In this context, considering the significance of APC germline mutations in FAP, we aimed to identify APC germline mutations. In the present study, 20 FAP patients were enrolled. The determination of APC germline mutations was performed using sequencing, and the mutations were compared with clinical markers (gender, age at diagnosis, smoking habits, TNM stage, Astler‑Coller stage, degree of differentiation of adenocarcinoma). The data were compared using the SPSS program, with the Fisher's exact test and χ2 test, considering α=0.05. According to the main results in our sample, 16 alleles with deleterious mutations (80% of the patients) were identified while 7 (35%) patients had no deleterious mutations. There was a predominance of nonsense (45% of the patients) and frameshift (20% of the patients) mutations. There was no statistical significance between the APC germline mutations identified and the clinical variables considered in our study. Only TNM stage was associated with the presence of deleterious mutations. Patients with deleterious mutations had an OR, 0.086 (IC=0.001-0.984); TNM stage I+II in comparison with III+IV, when compared with the patients with no deleterious mutations identified. In this context, as a conclusion, we demonstrated the molecular heterogeneity of APC germline mutations in FAP and the difficulty to perform molecular diagnostics in a Brazilian population, considering the admixed population analyzed.

  4. In Silico profiling of deleterious amino acid substitutions of potential pathological importance in haemophlia A and haemophlia B

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In this study, instead of current biochemical methods, the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions in F8 and F9 gene upon protein structure and function were assayed by means of computational methods and information from the databases. Deleterious substitutions of F8 and F9 are responsible for Haemophilia A and Haemophilia B which is the most common genetic disease of coagulation disorders in blood. Yet, distinguishing deleterious variants of F8 and F9 from the massive amount of nonfunctional variants that occur within a single genome is a significant challenge. Methods We performed an in silico analysis of deleterious mutations and their protein structure changes in order to analyze the correlation between mutation and disease. Deleterious nsSNPs were categorized based on empirical based and support vector machine based methods to predict the impact on protein functions. Furthermore, we modeled mutant proteins and compared them with the native protein for analysis of protein structure stability. Results Out of 510 nsSNPs in F8, 378 nsSNPs (74%) were predicted to be 'intolerant' by SIFT, 371 nsSNPs (73%) were predicted to be 'damaging' by PolyPhen and 445 nsSNPs (87%) as 'less stable' by I-Mutant2.0. In F9, 129 nsSNPs (78%) were predicted to be intolerant by SIFT, 131 nsSNPs (79%) were predicted to be damaging by PolyPhen and 150 nsSNPs (90%) as less stable by I-Mutant2.0. Overall, we found that I-Mutant which emphasizes support vector machine based method outperformed SIFT and PolyPhen in prediction of deleterious nsSNPs in both F8 and F9. Conclusions The models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the deleterious amino acid substitutions and their functions in gene regulation which would be useful for further genotype-phenotype researches as well as the pharmacogenetics studies. These in silico tools, despite being helpful in providing information about the nature of mutations, may also function as a first-pass filter to

  5. G206D Mutation of Presenilin-1 Reduces Pen2 Interaction, Increases Aβ42/Aβ40 Ratio and Elevates ER Ca(2+) Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ting; Hsieh, Yi-Fang; Huang, Yan-Jing; Lin, Che-Ching; Lin, Yen-Tung; Liu, Yu-Chao; Lien, Cheng-Chang; Cheng, Irene Han-Juo

    2015-12-01

    Early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease (AD) is most commonly associated with the mutations in presenilin-1 (PS1). PS1 is the catalytic component of the γ-secretase complex, which cleaves amyloid precursor protein to produce amyloid-β (Aβ), the major cause of AD. Presenilin enhancer 2 (Pen2) is critical for activating γ-secretase and exporting PS1 from endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Among all the familial AD-linked PS1 mutations, mutations at the G206 amino acid are the most adjacent position to the Pen2 binding site. Here, we characterized the effect of a familial AD-linked PS1 G206D mutation on the PS1-Pen2 interaction and the accompanied alteration in γ-secretase-dependent and -independent functions. We found that the G206D mutation reduced PS1-Pen2 interaction, but did not abolish γ-secretase formation and PS1 endoproteolysis. For γ-secretase-dependent function, the G206D mutation increased Aβ42 production but not Notch cleavage. For γ-secretase-independent function, this mutation disrupted the ER calcium homeostasis but not lysosomal calcium homeostasis and autophagosome maturation. Impaired ER calcium homeostasis may due to the reduced mutant PS1 level in the ER. Although this mutation did not alter the cell survival under stress, both increased Aβ42 ratio and disturbed ER calcium regulation could be the mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of the familial AD-linked PS1 G206D mutation.

  6. Accumulation of Pol Mutations Selected by HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 Protective Haplotype-Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes Causes Low Plasma Viral Load Due to Low Viral Fitness of Mutant Viruses.

    PubMed

    Murakoshi, Hayato; Koyanagi, Madoka; Chikata, Takayuki; Rahman, Mohammad Arif; Kuse, Nozomi; Sakai, Keiko; Gatanaga, Hiroyuki; Oka, Shinichi; Takiguchi, Masafumi

    2017-02-15

    HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02, which is the most abundant haplotype in Japan, has a protective effect on disease progression in HIV-1-infected Japanese individuals, whereas HLA-B*57 and -B*27 protective alleles are very rare in Japan. A previous study on HLA-associated polymorphisms demonstrated that the number of HLA-B*52:01-associated mutations at four Pol positions was inversely correlated with plasma viral load (pVL) in HLA-B*52:01-negative individuals, suggesting that the transmission of HIV-1 with these mutations could modulate the pVL in the population. However, it remains unknown whether these mutations were selected by HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs and also reduced viral fitness. In this study, we identified two HLA-B*52:01-restricted and one HLA-C*12:02-restricted novel cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) epitopes in Pol. Analysis using CTLs specific for these three epitopes demonstrated that these CTLs failed to recognize mutant epitopes or more weakly recognized cells infected with mutant viruses than wild-type virus, supporting the idea that these mutations were selected by the HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted T cells. We further showed that these mutations reduced viral fitness, although the effect of each mutation was weak. The present study demonstrated that the accumulation of these Pol mutations selected by HLA-B*52:01- or HLA-C*12:02-restricted CTLs impaired viral replication capacity and thus reduced the pVL. The fitness cost imposed by the mutations partially accounted for the effect of the HLA-B*52:01-C*12:02 haplotype on clinical outcome, together with the effect of HLA-B*52:01-restricted CTLs on viral replication, which had been previously demonstrated.

  7. Rare beneficial mutations can halt Muller's ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balick, Daniel; Goyal, Sidhartha; Jerison, Elizabeth; Neher, Richard; Shraiman, Boris; Desai, Michael

    2012-02-01

    In viral, bacterial, and other asexual populations, the vast majority of non-neutral mutations are deleterious. This motivates the application of models without beneficial mutations. Here we show that the presence of surprisingly few compensatory mutations halts fitness decay in these models. Production of deleterious mutations is balanced by purifying selection, stabilizing the fitness distribution. However, stochastic vanishing of fitness classes can lead to slow fitness decay (i.e. Muller's ratchet). For weakly deleterious mutations, production overwhelms purification, rapidly decreasing population fitness. We show that when beneficial mutations are introduced, a stable steady state emerges in the form of a dynamic mutation-selection balance. We argue this state is generic for all mutation rates and population sizes, and is reached as an end state as genomes become saturated by either beneficial or deleterious mutations. Assuming all mutations have the same magnitude selective effect, we calculate the fraction of beneficial mutations necessary to maintain the dynamic balance. This may explain the unexpected maintenance of asexual genomes, as in mitochondria, in the presence of selection. This will affect in the statistics of genetic diversity in these populations.

  8. 21 CFR 109.6 - Added poisonous or deleterious substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Added poisonous or deleterious substances. 109.6 Section 109.6 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION UNAVOIDABLE CONTAMINANTS IN FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION AND...

  9. Prevention of deleterious deposits in a coal liquefaction system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, Norman L.; Prudich, Michael E.; King, Jr., William E.; Moon, William G.

    1984-07-03

    A process for preventing the formation of deleterious coke deposits on the walls of coal liquefaction reactor vessels involves passing hydrogen and a feed slurry comprising feed coal and recycle liquid solvent to a coal liquefaction reaction zone while imparting a critical mixing energy of at least 3500 ergs per cubic centimeter of reaction zone volume per second to the reacting slurry.

  10. Three mutations in Zea mays affecting zein accumulation: a comparison of zein polypeptides, in vitro synthesis and processing, mRNA levels, and genomic organization

    SciTech Connect

    Burr, F.A.; Burr, B.

    1982-07-01

    Researchers studied three mutations, opaque-2 (o2), opaque-7 (o7), and floury-2(fl2), each of which causes a depression in zein synthesis. Researchers examined the processing efficiencies of the rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes in vitro, the levels of RNA transcription using cloned zein probes, and the genomic organization of the zein sequences as possible sites for the genetic defects. The results obtained indicate that the steps in prezein translation and processing occurring on the protein body membranes are not accountable for the lowered zein content in any ofl the mutations. The o2 mutation that typically shows a paucity of 22.5-kdalton zein polypeptides was found to have a concomitant reduction in a particular subgroup of mRNAs coding for this size class. Southern analyses suggest that the 02 mutation is not the result of a large deletion of tandem-linked zein genes.

  11. Three mutations in Zea mays affecting zein accumulation: a comparison of zein polypeptides, in vitro synthesis and processing, mRNA levels, and genomic organization

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    We studied three mutations, opaque-2 (o2), opaque-7 (o7), and floury- 2(fI2), each of which causes a depression in zein synthesis. We examined the processing efficiencies of the rough endoplasmic reticulum membranes in vitro, the levels of RNA transcription using cloned zein probes, and the genomic organization of the zein sequences as possible sites for the genetic defects. The results obtained indicate that the steps in prezein translation and processing occurring on the protein body membranes are not accountable for the lowered zein content in any of the mutations. The o2 mutation that typically shows a paucity of 22.5-kdalton zein polypeptides was found to have a concomitant reduction in a particular subgroup of mRNAs coding for this size class. Southern analyses suggest that the o2 mutation is not the result of a large deletion of tandem-linked zein genes. PMID:7119014

  12. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  13. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact of Pseudomonas aeruginosa on airway epithelial repair.

    PubMed

    Ruffin, Manon; Bilodeau, Claudia; Maillé, Émilie; LaFayette, Shantelle L; McKay, Geoffrey A; Trinh, Nguyen Thu Ngan; Beaudoin, Trevor; Desrosiers, Martin-Yvon; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao; Brochiero, Emmanuelle

    2016-09-01

    Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa lung infections are associated with progressive epithelial damage and lung function decline. In addition to its role in tissue injury, the persistent presence of P. aeruginosa-secreted products may also affect epithelial repair ability, raising the need for new antivirulence therapies. The purpose of our study was to better understand the outcomes of P. aeruginosa exoproducts exposure on airway epithelial repair processes to identify a strategy to counteract their deleterious effect. We found that P. aeruginosa exoproducts significantly decreased wound healing, migration, and proliferation rates, and impaired the ability of directional migration of primary non-cystic fibrosis (CF) human airway epithelial cells. Impact of exoproducts was inhibited after mutations in P. aeruginosa genes that encoded for the quorum-sensing (QS) transcriptional regulator, LasR, and the elastase, LasB, whereas impact was restored by LasB induction in ΔlasR mutants. P. aeruginosa purified elastase also induced a significant decrease in non-CF epithelial repair, whereas protease inhibition with phosphoramidon prevented the effect of P. aeruginosa exoproducts. Furthermore, treatment of P. aeruginosa cultures with 4-hydroxy-2,5-dimethyl-3(2H)-furanone, a QS inhibitor, abrogated the negative impact of P. aeruginosa exoproducts on airway epithelial repair. Finally, we confirmed our findings in human airway epithelial cells from patients with CF, a disease featuring P. aeruginosa chronic respiratory infection. These data demonstrate that secreted proteases under the control of the LasR QS system impair airway epithelial repair and that QS inhibitors could be of benefit to counteract the deleterious effect of P. aeruginosa in infected patients.-Ruffin, M., Bilodeau, C., Maillé, É., LaFayette, S. L., McKay, G. A., Trinh, N. T. N., Beaudoin, T., Desrosiers, M.-Y., Rousseau, S., Nguyen, D., Brochiero, E. Quorum-sensing inhibition abrogates the deleterious impact

  14. Deleterious effects of recombination and possible nonrecombinatorial advantages of sex in a fungal model.

    PubMed

    López-Villavicencio, M; Debets, A J M; Slakhorst, M; Giraud, T; Schoustra, S E

    2013-09-01

    Why sexual reproduction is so prevalent in nature remains a major question in evolutionary biology. Most of the proposed advantages of sex rely on the benefits obtained from recombination. However, it is still unclear whether the conditions under which these recombinatorial benefits would be sufficient to maintain sex in the short term are met in nature. Our study addresses a largely overlooked hypothesis, proposing that sex could be maintained in the short term by advantages due to functions linked with sex, but not related to recombination. These advantages would be so essential that sex could not be lost in the short term. Here, we used the fungus Aspergillus nidulans to experimentally test predictions of this hypothesis. Specifically, we were interested in (i) the short-term deleterious effects of recombination, (ii) possible nonrecombinatorial advantages of sex particularly through the elimination of mutations and (iii) the outcrossing rate under choice conditions in a haploid fungus able to reproduce by both outcrossing and haploid selfing. Our results were consistent with our hypotheses: we found that (i) recombination can be strongly deleterious in the short term, (ii) sexual reproduction between individuals derived from the same clonal lineage provided nonrecombinatorial advantages, likely through a selection arena mechanism, and (iii) under choice conditions, outcrossing occurs in a homothallic species, although at low rates.

  15. Structural analysis of disease-related TDP-43 D169G mutation: linking enhanced stability and caspase cleavage efficiency to protein accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Chien-Hao; Grauffel, Cédric; Wu, Lien-Szu; Kuo, Pan-Hsien; Doudeva, Lyudmila G.; Lim, Carmay; Shen, Che-Kun James; Yuan, Hanna S.

    2016-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein TDP-43 forms intracellular inclusions in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). While TDP-43 mutations have been identified in ALS patients, how these mutations are linked to ALS remains unclear. Here we examined the biophysical properties of six ALS-linked TDP-43 mutants and found that one of the mutants, D169G, had higher thermal stability than wild-type TDP-43 and that it was cleaved by caspase 3 more efficiently, producing increased levels of the C-terminal 35 kD fragments (TDP-35) in vitro and in neuroblastoma cells. The crystal structure of the TDP-43 RRM1 domain containing the D169G mutation in complex with DNA along with molecular dynamics simulations reveal that the D169G mutation induces a local conformational change in a β turn and increases the hydrophobic interactions in the RRM1 core, thus enhancing the thermal stability of the RRM1 domain. Our results provide the first crystal structure of TDP-43 containing a disease-linked D169G mutation and a disease-related mechanism showing that D169G mutant is more susceptible to proteolytic cleavage by caspase 3 into the pathogenic C-terminal 35-kD fragments due to its increased stability in the RRM1 domain. Modulation of TDP-43 stability and caspase cleavage efficiency could present an avenue for prevention and treatment of TDP-43-linked neurodegeneration. PMID:26883171

  16. Selective propagation of functional mitochondrial DNA during oogenesis restricts the transmission of a deleterious mitochondrial variant.

    PubMed

    Hill, Jahda H; Chen, Zhe; Xu, Hong

    2014-04-01

    Although mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is prone to mutation and few mtDNA repair mechanisms exist, crippling mitochondrial mutations are exceedingly rare. Recent studies have demonstrated strong purifying selection in the mouse female germline. However, the mechanisms underlying positive selection of healthy mitochondria remain to be elucidated. We visualized mtDNA replication during Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis, finding that mtDNA replication commenced before oocyte determination during the late germarium stage and was dependent on mitochondrial fitness. We isolated a temperature-sensitive lethal mtDNA allele, mt:CoI(T300I), which resulted in reduced mtDNA replication in the germarium at the restrictive temperature. Additionally, the frequency of the mt:CoI(T300I) allele in heteroplasmic flies was decreased, both during oogenesis and over multiple generations, at the restrictive temperature. Furthermore, we determined that selection against mt:CoI(T300I) overlaps with the timing of selective replication of mtDNA in the germarium. These findings establish a previously uncharacterized developmental mechanism for the selective amplification of wild-type mtDNA, which may be evolutionarily conserved to limit the transmission of deleterious mutations.

  17. Tandem-base mutations occur in mouse liver and adipose tissue preferentially as G:C to T:A transversions and accumulate with age.

    PubMed

    Buettner, V L; Hill, K A; Halangoda, A; Sommer, S S

    1999-01-01

    Tandem-base mutations (TBM) are associated with ultraviolet light and other mutagens. Herein, we report an age- and tissue-specific difference in the frequency of spontaneous TBM in Big Blue transgenic mice. A total of 390 mutants from liver and adipose tissue contained 17 and 4 TBM, respectively, while no TBM were detected in 683 mutants from six other tissues. There was a proportional increase in the frequency of TBM in liver with age (29 days postconception to 25 months of age). Nine TBM (43%) were GG to TT transversions that preferentially occurred at specific sites. The remaining 12 mutants contained at least one transversion mutation each. We speculate that the increase of TBM in liver and adipose tissue with age is due to chronic mutagen exposure, perhaps derived from fat in the diet.

  18. Intestinal nutrient absorption - A biomarker for deleterious heavy metals in aquatic environments

    SciTech Connect

    Farmanfarmaian, A. )

    1988-09-01

    The deleterious effects of heavy metals on absorptive processes at the membrane surface will be summarized. Among the deleterious heavy metal chlorides (HgCl{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}HgCl, CdCl{sub 2}, CoCl{sub 2}, SrCl{sub 2}) tested HgCl{sub 2}, CH{sub 3}HgCl, and CdCl{sub 2} inhibit the absorption of several amino acids and sugars (L-leucine, L-methionine, L-isoleucine, L-lysine, cyclolencine, D-glucose, and D-galactose). The dose dependent inhibition of L-leucine uptake by HgCl{sub 2} is shown in a number of fish from different collection sites representing nektonic plankton feeders as well as demersal carnivores. The same type of data is shown for both HgCl{sub 2} and HC{sub 3}HgCl in the case of the commercially important summer flounder. Since the overall rate of intestinal absorption of amino acids and sugars involves the three processes of simple diffusion, protein-mediated facilitated diffusions, and protein-mediated sodium dependent active transport, the inhibition of the overall rate may not be sensitive enough as a biomarker. However, the active component, which alone accumulates essential amino acids in the tissue, appears to be very sensitive and can be used as a biomarker. The terminal tissue-to-medium (T/M) ratio of L-leucine concentration shows a 2-3 fold accumulation in the absence of mercury. Since the diffusional components can at best equilibrate L-leucine across the membrane % inhibition of the active component can be calculated after subtracting 1 from the experimental T/M values. The resulting inhibition is very sever ranging from approximately 50-100% for HgCl{sub 2} and 20-70% for CH{sub 3}HgCl over a range of 5-20 ppm of mercury.

  19. The spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations, ubiquitous in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Shain, A Hunter; Pollack, Jonathan R

    2013-01-01

    SWI/SNF is a multi-subunit chromatin remodeling complex that uses the energy of ATP hydrolysis to reposition nucleosomes, thereby modulating gene expression. Accumulating evidence suggests that SWI/SNF functions as a tumor suppressor in some cancers. However, the spectrum of SWI/SNF mutations across human cancers has not been systematically investigated. Here, we mined whole-exome sequencing data from 24 published studies representing 669 cases from 18 neoplastic diagnoses. SWI/SNF mutations were widespread across diverse human cancers, with an excess of deleterious mutations, and an overall frequency approaching TP53 mutation. Mutations occurred most commonly in the SMARCA4 enzymatic subunit, and in subunits thought to confer functional specificity (ARID1A, ARID1B, PBRM1, and ARID2). SWI/SNF mutations were not mutually-exclusive of other mutated cancer genes, including TP53 and EZH2 (both previously linked to SWI/SNF). Our findings implicate SWI/SNF as an important but under-recognized tumor suppressor in diverse human cancers, and provide a key resource to guide future investigations.

  20. The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope are a mutational cold spot

    PubMed Central

    Geller, Ron; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Cuevas, José M.; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    In RNA viruses, mutations occur fast and have large fitness effects. While this affords remarkable adaptability, it can also endanger viral survival due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. How RNA viruses reconcile these two opposed facets of mutation is still unknown. Here we show that, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), spontaneous mutations are not randomly located along the viral genome. We find that the viral mutation rate experiences a threefold reduction in the region encoding the most external domains of the viral envelope, which are strongly targeted by neutralizing antibodies. This contrasts with the hypermutation mechanisms deployed by other, more slowly mutating pathogens such as DNA viruses and bacteria, in response to immune pressure. We show that downregulation of the mutation rate in HIV-1 is exerted by the template RNA through changes in sequence context and secondary structure, which control the activity of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (A3)-mediated cytidine deamination and the fidelity of the viral reverse transcriptase. PMID:26450412

  1. The external domains of the HIV-1 envelope are a mutational cold spot.

    PubMed

    Geller, Ron; Domingo-Calap, Pilar; Cuevas, José M; Rossolillo, Paola; Negroni, Matteo; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2015-10-09

    In RNA viruses, mutations occur fast and have large fitness effects. While this affords remarkable adaptability, it can also endanger viral survival due to the accumulation of deleterious mutations. How RNA viruses reconcile these two opposed facets of mutation is still unknown. Here we show that, in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1), spontaneous mutations are not randomly located along the viral genome. We find that the viral mutation rate experiences a threefold reduction in the region encoding the most external domains of the viral envelope, which are strongly targeted by neutralizing antibodies. This contrasts with the hypermutation mechanisms deployed by other, more slowly mutating pathogens such as DNA viruses and bacteria, in response to immune pressure. We show that downregulation of the mutation rate in HIV-1 is exerted by the template RNA through changes in sequence context and secondary structure, which control the activity of apolipoprotein B mRNA-editing enzyme catalytic polypeptide-like 3 (A3)-mediated cytidine deamination and the fidelity of the viral reverse transcriptase.

  2. The Molecular Chaperone DnaK Is a Source of Mutational Robustness.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Rodríguez, José; Sabater-Muñoz, Beatriz; Montagud-Martínez, Roser; Berlanga, Víctor; Alvarez-Ponce, David; Wagner, Andreas; Fares, Mario A

    2016-10-05

    Molecular chaperones, also known as heat-shock proteins, refold misfolded proteins and help other proteins reach their native conformation. Thanks to these abilities, some chaperones, such as the Hsp90 protein or the chaperonin GroEL, can buffer the deleterious phenotypic effects of mutations that alter protein structure and function. Hsp70 chaperones use a chaperoning mechanism different from that of Hsp90 and GroEL, and it is not known whether they can also buffer mutations. Here, we show that they can. To this end, we performed a mutation accumulation experiment in Escherichia coli, followed by whole-genome resequencing. Overexpression of the Hsp70 chaperone DnaK helps cells cope with mutational load and completely avoid the extinctions we observe in lineages evolving without chaperone overproduction. Additionally, our sequence data show that DnaK overexpression increases mutational robustness, the tolerance of its clients to nonsynonymous nucleotide substitutions. We also show that this elevated mutational buffering translates into differences in evolutionary rates on intermediate and long evolutionary time scales. Specifically, we studied the evolutionary rates of DnaK clients using the genomes of E. coli, Salmonella enterica, and 83 other gamma-proteobacteria. We find that clients that interact strongly with DnaK evolve faster than weakly interacting clients. Our results imply that all three major chaperone classes can buffer mutations and affect protein evolution. They illustrate how an individual protein like a chaperone can have a disproportionate effect on the evolution of a proteome.

  3. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Stewart, James B; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M; Larsson, Erik

    2015-06-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3' to 5' direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems.

  4. Simultaneous DNA and RNA Mapping of Somatic Mitochondrial Mutations across Diverse Human Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, James B.; Alaei-Mahabadi, Babak; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Samuelsson, Tore; Gorodkin, Jan; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Larsson, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Somatic mutations in the nuclear genome are required for tumor formation, but the functional consequences of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations are less understood. Here we identify somatic mtDNA mutations across 527 tumors and 14 cancer types, using an approach that takes advantage of evidence from both genomic and transcriptomic sequencing. We find that there is selective pressure against deleterious coding mutations, supporting that functional mitochondria are required in tumor cells, and also observe a strong mutational strand bias, compatible with endogenous replication-coupled errors as the major source of mutations. Interestingly, while allelic ratios in general were consistent in RNA compared to DNA, some mutations in tRNAs displayed strong allelic imbalances caused by accumulation of unprocessed tRNA precursors. The effect was explained by altered secondary structure, demonstrating that correct tRNA folding is a major determinant for processing of polycistronic mitochondrial transcripts. Additionally, the data suggest that tRNA clusters are preferably processed in the 3′ to 5′ direction. Our study gives insights into mtDNA function in cancer and answers questions regarding mitochondrial tRNA biogenesis that are difficult to address in controlled experimental systems. PMID:26125550

  5. Rats with a missense mutation in Atm display neuroinflammation and neurodegeneration subsequent to accumulation of cytosolic DNA following unrepaired DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Quek, Hazel; Luff, John; Cheung, KaGeen; Kozlov, Sergei; Gatei, Magtouf; Lee, C Soon; Bellingham, Mark C; Noakes, Peter G; Lim, Yi Chieh; Barnett, Nigel L; Dingwall, Steven; Wolvetang, Ernst; Mashimo, Tomoji; Roberts, Tara L; Lavin, Martin F

    2016-11-28

    Mutations in the ataxia-telangiectasia (A-T)-mutated (ATM) gene give rise to the human genetic disorder A-T, characterized by immunodeficiency, cancer predisposition, and neurodegeneration. Whereas a series of animal models recapitulate much of the A-T phenotype, they fail to present with ataxia or neurodegeneration. We describe here the generation of an Atm missense mutant [amino acid change of leucine (L) to proline (P) at position 2262 (L2262P)] rat by intracytoplasmic injection (ICSI) of mutant sperm into oocytes. Atm-mutant rats (Atm(L2262P/L2262P)) expressed low levels of ATM protein, suggesting a destabilizing effect of the mutation, and had a significantly reduced lifespan compared with Atm(+/+) Whereas these rats did not show cerebellar atrophy, they succumbed to hind-limb paralysis (45%), and the remainder developed tumors. Closer examination revealed the presence of both dsDNA and ssDNA in the cytoplasm of cells in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and spinal cord of Atm(L2262P/L2262P) rats. Significantly increased levels of IFN-β and IL-1β in all 3 tissues were indicative of DNA damage induction of the type 1 IFN response. This was further supported by NF-κB activation, as evidenced by p65 phosphorylation (P65) and translocation to the nucleus in the spinal cord and parahippocampus. Other evidence of neuroinflammation in the brain and spinal cord was the loss of motor neurons and the presence of increased activation of microglia. These data provide support for a proinflammatory phenotype that is manifested in the Atm mutant rat as hind-limb paralysis. This mutant represents a useful model to investigate the importance of neuroinflammation in A-T .

  6. Variable region gene analysis of B cell subsets derived from a 4-year- old child: somatically mutated memory B cells accumulate in the peripheral blood already at young age

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Tonsillar germinal center and immunoglobulin M+ (IgM+)IgD+ B cells as well as peripheral blood (PB) CD5+ and CD5- (conventional) B cells from a 4-yr-old child were isolated and nucleotide sequences of expressed Ig heavy chain variable regions encoded by VH4 gene family members were determined from amplified cDNA. Whereas both tonsillar IgM+IgD+ cells and the majority of IgM-expressing CD5+ and CD5- PB B cells showed no or little somatic mutation, tonsillar germinal center (GC) B cells and IgG-expressing PB B cells carried a high load of somatic mutations in their V region genes. This suggests that somatically mutated memory B cells which have switched isotype accumulate in the PB already at young age. Their frequency seems to increase with age. On the other hand, the antibody repertoire of tonsillar IgM+IgD+ B cells and the majority of IgM-expressing PB B cells is determined by germline-encoded specificities and by generation of variability in the complementary determining region III through VH-DH-JH recombination. A fraction of IgM-bearing PB B cells carries somatically mutated V region genes and probably represents GC-derived B cells which have left the GC at an early stage of the GC reaction without undergoing isotype switching. 10 VH4 germline genes were found to be expressed. Three gene segments were overrepresented in the sequence collection (35 of 50 clones): VH4.21 (30%), V71-4 (20%), and 3D279D (20%). It appears that most potentially functional VH4 germline genes are expressed in peripheral B cells. Some members of this VH gene family are clearly overrepresented over others. PMID:7931072

  7. Gestational mutations in radiation carcinogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meza, R.; Luebeck, G.; Moolgavkar, S.

    Mutations in critical genes during gestation could increase substantially the risk of cancer. We examine the consequences of such mutations using the Luebeck-Moolgavkar model for colorectal cancer and the Lea-Coulson modification of the Luria-Delbruck model for the accumulation of mutations during gestation. When gestational mutation rates are high, such mutations make a significant contribution to cancer risk even for adult tumors. Furthermore, gestational mutations ocurring at distinct times during emryonic developmemt lead to substantially different numbers of mutated cells at birth, with early mutations leading to a large number (jackpots) of mutated cells at birth and mutation occurring late leading to only a few mutated cells. Thus gestational mutations could confer considerable heterogeneity of the risk of cancer. If the fetus is exposed to an environmental mutagen, such as ionizing radiation, the gestational mutation rate would be expected to increase. We examine the consequences of such exposures during gestation on the subsequent development of cancer.

  8. Mutations in TrkA Causing Congenital Insensitivity to Pain with Anhidrosis (CIPA) Induce Misfolding, Aggregation, and Mutation-dependent Neurodegeneration by Dysfunction of the Autophagic Flux.

    PubMed

    Franco, María Luisa; Melero, Cristina; Sarasola, Esther; Acebo, Paloma; Luque, Alfonso; Calatayud-Baselga, Isabel; García-Barcina, María; Vilar, Marçal

    2016-10-07

    Congenital insensitivity to pain with anhidrosis (CIPA) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by insensitivity to noxious stimuli and variable intellectual disability (ID) due to mutations in the NTRK1 gene encoding the NGF receptor TrkA. To get an insight in the effect of NTRK1 mutations in the cognitive phenotype we biochemically characterized three TrkA mutations identified in children diagnosed of CIPA with variable ID. These mutations are located in different domains of the protein; L213P in the extracellular domain, Δ736 in the kinase domain, and C300stop in the extracellular domain, a new mutation causing CIPA diagnosed in a Spanish teenager. We found that TrkA mutations induce misfolding, retention in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and aggregation in a mutation-dependent manner. The distinct mutations are degraded with a different kinetics by different ER quality control mechanisms; although C300stop is rapidly disposed by autophagy, Δ736 degradation is sensitive to the proteasome and to autophagy inhibitors, and L213P is a long-lived protein refractory to degradation. In addition L213P enhances the formation of autophagic vesicles triggering an increase in the autophagic flux with deleterious consequences. Mouse cortical neurons expressing L213P showed the accumulation of LC3-GFP positive puncta and dystrophic neurites. Our data suggest that TrkA misfolding and aggregation induced by some CIPA mutations disrupt the autophagy homeostasis causing neurodegeneration. We propose that distinct disease-causing mutations of TrkA generate different levels of cell toxicity, which may provide an explanation of the variable intellectual disability observed in CIPA patients.

  9. Estimating Mutation Load in Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Botigué, Laura R.; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Clark, Andrew G.; Gravel, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has facilitated the discovery of millions of variants in human genomes. A sizeable fraction of these alleles are thought to be deleterious. We review the pattern of deleterious alleles as ascertained in genomic data and ask whether human populations differ in their predicted burden of deleterious alleles, a phenomenon known as “mutation load.” We discuss three demographic models that are predicted to affect mutation load and relate these models to the evidence (or the lack thereof) for variation in the efficacy of purifying selection in diverse human genomes. We also discuss why accurate estimation of mutation load depends on assumptions regarding the distribution of dominance and selection coefficients, quantities that are poorly characterized for current genomic datasets. PMID:25963372

  10. Evolutionarily stable sex ratios and mutation load.

    PubMed

    Hough, Josh; Immler, Simone; Barrett, Spencer C H; Otto, Sarah P

    2013-07-01

    Frequency-dependent selection should drive dioecious populations toward a 1:1 sex ratio, but biased sex ratios are widespread, especially among plants with sex chromosomes. Here, we develop population genetic models to investigate the relationships between evolutionarily stable sex ratios, haploid selection, and deleterious mutation load. We confirm that when haploid selection acts only on the relative fitness of X- and Y-bearing pollen and the sex ratio is controlled by the maternal genotype, seed sex ratios evolve toward 1:1. When we also consider haploid selection acting on deleterious mutations, however, we find that biased sex ratios can be stably maintained, reflecting a balance between the advantages of purging deleterious mutations via haploid selection, and the disadvantages of haploid selection on the sex ratio. Our results provide a plausible evolutionary explanation for biased sex ratios in dioecious plants, given the extensive gene expression that occurs across plant genomes at the haploid stage.

  11. Estimating the mutation load in human genomes.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Bustamante, Carlos D; Clark, Andrew G; Gravel, Simon

    2015-06-01

    Next-generation sequencing technology has facilitated the discovery of millions of genetic variants in human genomes. A sizeable fraction of these variants are predicted to be deleterious. Here, we review the pattern of deleterious alleles as ascertained in genome sequencing data sets and ask whether human populations differ in their predicted burden of deleterious alleles - a phenomenon known as mutation load. We discuss three demographic models that are predicted to affect mutation load and relate these models to the evidence (or the lack thereof) for variation in the efficacy of purifying selection in diverse human genomes. We also emphasize why accurate estimation of mutation load depends on assumptions regarding the distribution of dominance and selection coefficients - quantities that remain poorly characterized for current genomic data sets.

  12. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  13. Mutation of Glycosylation Sites in BST-2 Leads to Its Accumulation at Intracellular CD63-Positive Vesicles without Affecting Its Antiviral Activity against Multivesicular Body-Targeted HIV-1 and Hepatitis B Virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhu; Lv, Mingyu; Shi, Ying; Yu, Jinghua; Niu, Junqi; Yu, Xiao-Fang; Zhang, Wenyan

    2016-02-29

    BST-2/tetherin blocks the release of various enveloped viruses including HIV-1 with a "physical tethering" model. The detailed contribution of N-linked glycosylation to this model is controversial. Here, we confirmed that mutation of glycosylation sites exerted an effect of post-translational mis-trafficking, leading to an accumulation of BST-2 at intracellular CD63-positive vesicles. BST-2 with this phenotype potently inhibited the release of multivesicular body-targeted HIV-1 and hepatitis B virus, without affecting the co-localization of BST-2 with EEA1 and LAMP1. These results suggest that N-linked glycosylation of human BST-2 is dispensable for intracellular virion retention and imply that this recently discovered intracellular tethering function may be evolutionarily distinguished from the canonical antiviral function of BST-2 by tethering nascent virions at the cell surface.

  14. Novel PANK2 gene mutations in two Chinese siblings with atypical pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Shan, Jingli; Wen, Bing; Zhu, Jun; Lin, Pengfei; Zheng, Jinfan; Yan, Chuanzhu

    2013-04-01

    Pantothenate kinase-associated neurodegeneration (PKAN) is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by neurodegeneration and iron accumulation in the brain. Classic and atypical PKAN are distinguished on the basis of age at onset and disease progression. PANK2, localized on chromosome20p13, is confirmed as the responsible gene. We report two Chinese siblings with atypical PKAN, who had a 26- and 24-year disease course, respectively. Brain MRI scans of the two siblings showed the specific "eye of the tiger" sign. Genetic analysis identified novel compound heterozygous mutations (IVS1-2 A>T, c.T1130C) in PANK2 gene, which were confirmed to be deleterious. We verify the clinical heterogeneity even in siblings with identical genotype and expand the gene mutation pool for PKAN.

  15. Estimates of the genomic mutation rate for detrimental alleles in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Charlesworth, Brian; Borthwick, Helen; Bartolomé, Carolina; Pignatelli, Patricia

    2004-06-01

    The net rate of mutation to deleterious but nonlethal alleles and the sizes of effects of these mutations are of great significance for many evolutionary questions. Here we describe three replicate experiments in which mutations have been accumulated on chromosome 3 of Drosophila melanogaster by means of single-male backcrosses of heterozygotes for a wild-type third chromosome. Egg-to-adult viability was assayed for nonlethal homozygous chromosomes. The rates of decline in mean and increase in variance (DM and DV, respectively) were estimated. Scaled up to the diploid whole genome, the mean DM for homozygous detrimental mutations over the three experiments was between 0.8 and 1.8%. The corresponding DV estimate was approximately 0.11%. Overall, the results suggest a lower bound estimate of at least 12% for the diploid per genome mutation rate for detrimentals. The upper bound estimates for the mean selection coefficient were between 2 and 10%, depending on the method used. Mutations with selection coefficients of at least a few percent must be the major contributors to the effects detected here and are likely to be caused mostly by transposable element insertions or indels.

  16. Induction, rapid fixation and retention of mutations in vegetatively propagated banana

    PubMed Central

    Jankowicz-Cieslak, Joanna; Huynh, Owen A; Brozynska, Marta; Nakitandwe, Joy; Till, Bradley J

    2012-01-01

    Mutation discovery technologies have enabled the development of reverse genetics for many plant species and allowed sophisticated evaluation of the consequences of mutagenesis. Such methods are relatively straightforward for seed-propagated plants. To develop a platform suitable for vegetatively propagated species, we treated isolated banana shoot apical meristems with the chemical mutagen ethyl methanesulphonate, recovered plantlets and screened for induced mutations. A high density of GC-AT transition mutations were recovered, similar to that reported in seed-propagated polyploids. Through analysis of the inheritance of mutations, we observed that genotypically heterogeneous stem cells resulting from mutagenic treatment are rapidly sorted to fix a single genotype in the meristem. Further, mutant genotypes are stably inherited in subsequent generations. Evaluation of natural nucleotide variation showed the accumulation of potentially deleterious heterozygous alleles, suggesting that mutation induction may uncover recessive traits. This work therefore provides genotypic insights into the fate of totipotent cells after mutagenesis and suggests rapid approaches for mutation-based functional genomics and improvement of vegetatively propagated crops. PMID:22928630

  17. A mutation in the E2 subunit of the mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex in Arabidopsis reduces plant organ size and enhances the accumulation of amino acids and intermediate products of the TCA cycle.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hailan; Du, Xiaoqiu; Zhang, Fengxia; Zhang, Fang; Hu, Yong; Liu, Shichang; Jiang, Xiangning; Wang, Guodong; Liu, Dong

    2012-08-01

    The mitochondrial pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (mtPDC) plays a pivotal role in controlling the entry of carbon into the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle for energy production. This multi-enzyme complex consists of three components: E1, E2, and E3. In Arabidopsis, there are three genes, mtE2-1, mtE2-2, and mtE2-3, which encode the putative mtPDC E2 subunit but how each of them contributes to the total mtPDC activity remains unknown. In this work, we characterized an Arabidopsis mutant, m132, that has abnormal small organs. Molecular cloning indicated that the phenotype of m132 is caused by a mutation in the mtE2-1 gene, which results in a truncation of 109 amino acids at the C-terminus of the encoded protein. In m132, mtPDC activity is only 30% of the WT and ATP production is severely impaired. The mutation in the mtE2-1 gene also leads to the over-accumulation of most intermediate products of the TCA cycle and of all the amino acids for protein synthesis. Our results suggest that, among the three mtE2 genes, mtE2-1 is a major contributor to the function of Arabidopsis mtPDC and that the functional disruption of mtE2-1 profoundly affects plant growth and development, as well as its metabolism.

  18. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  19. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  20. Campylobacter jejuni CsrA complements an Escherichia coli csrA mutation for the regulation of biofilm formation, motility and cellular morphology but not glycogen accumulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although Campylobacter jejuni is consistently ranked as one of the leading causes of bacterial diarrhea worldwide, the mechanisms by which C. jejuni causes disease and how they are regulated have yet to be clearly defined. The global regulator, CsrA, has been well characterized in several bacterial genera and is known to regulate a number of independent pathways via a post transcriptional mechanism, but remains relatively uncharacterized in the genus Campylobacter. Previously, we reported data illustrating the requirement for CsrA in several virulence related phenotypes of C. jejuni strain 81–176, indicating that the Csr pathway is important for Campylobacter pathogenesis. Results We compared the Escherichia coli and C. jejuni orthologs of CsrA and characterized the ability of the C. jejuni CsrA protein to functionally complement an E. coli csrA mutant. Phylogenetic comparison of E. coli CsrA to orthologs from several pathogenic bacteria demonstrated variability in C. jejuni CsrA relative to the known RNA binding domains of E. coli CsrA and in several amino acids reported to be involved in E. coli CsrA-mediated gene regulation. When expressed in an E. coli csrA mutant, C. jejuni CsrA succeeded in recovering defects in motility, biofilm formation, and cellular morphology; however, it failed to return excess glycogen accumulation to wild type levels. Conclusions These findings suggest that C. jejuni CsrA is capable of efficiently binding some E. coli CsrA binding sites, but not others, and provide insight into the biochemistry of C. jejuni CsrA. PMID:23051923

  1. Implications of various phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system mutations on glycerol utilization and poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation in Ralstonia eutropha H16

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    The enhanced global biodiesel production is also yielding increased quantities of glycerol as main coproduct. An effective application of glycerol, for example, as low-cost substrate for microbial growth in industrial fermentation processes to specific products will reduce the production costs for biodiesel. Our study focuses on the utilization of glycerol as a cheap carbon source during cultivation of the thermoplastic producing bacterium Ralstonia eutropha H16, and on the investigation of carbohydrate transport proteins involved herein. Seven open reading frames were identified in the genome of strain H16 to encode for putative proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate-carbohydrate phosphotransferase system (PEP-PTS). Although the core components of PEP-PTS, enzyme I (ptsI) and histidine phosphocarrier protein (ptsH), are available in strain H16, a complete PTS-mediated carbohydrate transport is lacking. Growth experiments employing several PEP-PTS mutants indicate that the putative ptsMHI operon, comprising ptsM (a fructose-specific EIIA component of PTS), ptsH, and ptsI, is responsible for limited cell growth and reduced PHB accumulation (53%, w/w, less PHB than the wild type) of this strain in media containing glycerol as a sole carbon source. Otherwise, the deletion of gene H16_A0384 (ptsN, nitrogen regulatory EIIA component of PTS) seemed to largely compensate the effect of the deleted ptsMHI operon (49%, w/w, PHB). The involvement of the PTS homologous proteins on the utilization of the non-PTS sugar alcohol glycerol and its effect on cell growth as well as PHB and carbon metabolism of R. eutropha will be discussed. PMID:21906371

  2. Evolution of Human Calicivirus RNA In Vivo: Accumulation of Mutations in the Protruding P2 Domain of the Capsid Leads to Structural Changes and Possibly a New Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Mikael; Hedlund, Kjell-Olof; Thorhagen, Margareta; Larson, Göran; Johansen, Kari; Ekspong, Anders; Svensson, Lennart

    2003-01-01

    In the present study we report on evolution of calicivirus RNA from a patient with chronic diarrhea (i.e., lasting >2 years) and viral shedding. Partial sequencing of open reading frame 1 (ORF1) from 12 consecutive isolates revealed shedding of a genogroup II virus with relatively few nucleotide changes during a 1-year period. The entire capsid gene (ORF2) was also sequenced from the same isolates and found to contain 1,647 nucleotides encoding a protein of 548 amino acids with similarities to the Arg320 and Mx strains. Comparative sequence analysis of ORF2 revealed 32 amino acid changes during the year. It was notable that the vast majority of the cumulative amino acid changes (8 of 11) appeared within residues 279 to 405 located within the hypervariable domain (P2) of the capsid protein and hence were subject to immune pressure. An interesting and novel observation was that the accumulated amino acid changes in the P2 domain resulted in predicted structural changes, including disappearance of a helix structure, and thus a possible emergence of a new phenotype. FUT2 gene polymorphism characterization revealed that the patient is heterozygous at nucleotide 428 and thus Secretor+, a finding in accordance with the hypothesis of FUT2 gene polymorphism and calicivirus susceptibility. To our knowledge, this is the first report of RNA evolution of calicivirus in a single individual, and our data suggest an immunity-driven mechanism for viral evolution. We also report on chronic virus excretion, immunoglobulin treatment, and modification of clinical symptoms; our observations from these studies, together with the FUT2 gene characterization, may lead to a better understanding of calicivirus pathogenesis. PMID:14645568

  3. Betel nut chewing and its deleterious effects on oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Anand, Richa; Dhingra, Chandan; Prasad, Sumanth; Menon, Ipseeta

    2014-01-01

    The habit of chewing betel nut has a long history of use. Betel nut and products derived from it are widely used as a masticatory product among various communities and in several countries across the world. Over a long period, several additives have been added to a simple betel nut preparation; thus, creating the betel quid (BQ) and encompassing chewing tobacco in the preparation. Betel nut has deleterious effects on oral soft tissues. Its effects on dental caries and periodontal diseases, two major oral diseases are less well-documented. Betel-induced lichenoid lesions mainly on buccal mucosa have been reported at quid retained sites. In chronic chewers, a condition called betel chewers mucosa is often found where the quid is placed. Betel nut chewing is implicated in oral submucous fibrosis (OSF) and its use along with tobacco can cause leukoplakia, both of which are potentially malignant in the oral cavity. Oral cancer often arises from such precancerous changes. Thus, public health measures to quit betel use are recommended to control disabling conditions such as OSF and oral cancer.

  4. Endocrine dysfunction in sepsis: a beneficial or deleterious host response?

    PubMed

    Gheorghiţă, Valeriu; Barbu, Alina Elena; Gheorghiu, Monica Livia; Căruntu, Florin Alexandru

    2015-03-01

    Sepsis is a systemic, deleterious inflammatory host response triggered by an infective agent leading to severe sepsis, septic shock and multi-organ failure. The host response to infection involves a complex, organized and coherent interaction between immune, autonomic, neuroendocrine and behavioral systems. Recent data have confirmed that disturbances of the autonomic nervous and neuroendocrine systems could contribute to sepsis-induced organ dysfunction. Through this review, we aimed to summarize the current knowledge about the endocrine dysfunction as response to sepsis, specifically addressed to vasopressin, copeptin, cortisol, insulin and leptin. We searched the following readily accessible, clinically relevant databases: PubMed, UpToDate, BioMed Central. The immune system could be regarded as a "diffuse sensory organ" that signals the presence of pathogens to the brain through different pathways, such as the vagus nerve, endothelial activation/dysfunction, cytokines and neurotoxic mediators and the circumventricular organs, especially the neurohypophysis. The hormonal profile changes substantially as a consequence of inflammatory mediators and microorganism products leading to inappropriately low levels of vasopressin, sick euthyroid syndrome, reduced adrenal responsiveness to ACTH, insulin resistance, hyperglycemia as well as hyperleptinemia. In conclusion, clinical diagnosis of this "pan-endocrine illness" is frequently challenging due to the many limiting factors. The most important benefits of endocrine markers in the management of sepsis may be reflected by their potential to be used as biomarkers in different scoring systems to estimate the severity of the disease and the risk of death.

  5. Deleterious effects of reactive aldehydes and glycated proteins on macrophage proteasomal function: possible links between diabetes and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moheimani, Fatemeh; Morgan, Philip E; van Reyk, David M; Davies, Michael J

    2010-06-01

    People with diabetes experience chronic hyperglycemia and are at a high risk of developing atherosclerosis and microvascular disease. Reactions of glucose, or aldehydes derived from glucose (e.g. methylglyoxal, glyoxal, or glycolaldehyde), with proteins result in glycation that ultimately yield advanced glycation end products (AGE). AGE are present at elevated levels in plasma and atherosclerotic lesions from people with diabetes, and previous in vitro studies have postulated that the presence of these materials is deleterious to cell function. This accumulation of AGE and glycated proteins within cells may arise from either increased formation and/or ineffective removal by cellular proteolytic systems, such as the proteasomes, the major multi-enzyme complex that removes proteins within cells. In this study it is shown that whilst high glucose concentrations fail to modify proteasome enzyme activities in J774A.1 macrophage-like cell extracts, reactive aldehydes enhanced proteasomal enzyme activities. In contrast BSA, pre-treated with high glucose for 8 weeks, inhibited both the chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activities. BSA glycated using methylglyoxal or glycolaldehyde, also inhibited proteasomal activity though to differing extents. This suppression of proteasome activity by glycated proteins may result in further intracellular accumulation of glycated proteins with subsequent deleterious effects on cellular function.

  6. Effects of population size and mutation rate on the evolution of mutational robustness.

    PubMed

    Elena, Santiago F; Wilke, Claus O; Ofria, Charles; Lenski, Richard E

    2007-03-01

    It is often assumed that the efficiency of selection for mutational robustness would be proportional to mutation rate and population size, thus being inefficient in small populations. However, Krakauer and Plotkin (2002) hypothesized that selection in small populations would favor robustness mechanisms, such as redundancy, that mask the effect of deleterious mutations. In large populations, by contrast, selection is more effective at removing deleterious mutants and fitness would be improved by eliminating mechanisms that mask the effect of deleterious mutations and thus impede their removal. Here, we test whether these predictions are supported in experiments with evolving populations of digital organisms. Digital organisms are self-replicating programs that inhabit a virtual world inside a computer. Like their organic counterparts, digital organisms mutate, compete, evolve, and adapt by natural selection to their environment. In this study, 160 populations evolved at different combinations of mutation rate and population size. After 10(4) generations, we measured the mutational robustness of the most abundant genotype in each population. Mutational robustness tended to increase with mutation rate and to decline with population size, although the dependence with population size was in part mediated by a negative relationship between fitness and robustness. These results are independent of whether genomes were constrained to their original length or allowed to change in size.

  7. Hyperglycaemia induces metabolic dysfunction and glycogen accumulation in pancreatic β-cells

    PubMed Central

    Brereton, Melissa F.; Rohm, Maria; Shimomura, Kenju; Holland, Christian; Tornovsky-Babeay, Sharona; Dadon, Daniela; Iberl, Michaela; Chibalina, Margarita V.; Lee, Sheena; Glaser, Benjamin; Dor, Yuval; Rorsman, Patrik; Clark, Anne; Ashcroft, Frances M.

    2016-01-01

    Insulin secretion from pancreatic β-cells is impaired in all forms of diabetes. The resultant hyperglycaemia has deleterious effects on many tissues, including β-cells. Here we show that chronic hyperglycaemia impairs glucose metabolism and alters expression of metabolic genes in pancreatic islets. In a mouse model of human neonatal diabetes, hyperglycaemia results in marked glycogen accumulation, and increased apoptosis in β-cells. Sulphonylurea therapy rapidly normalizes blood glucose levels, dissipates glycogen stores, increases autophagy and restores β-cell metabolism. Insulin therapy has the same effect but with slower kinetics. Similar changes are observed in mice expressing an activating glucokinase mutation, in in vitro models of hyperglycaemia, and in islets from type-2 diabetic patients. Altered β-cell metabolism may underlie both the progressive impairment of insulin secretion and reduced β-cell mass in diabetes. PMID:27882918

  8. Mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome, characterized by intellectual disability, skeletal malformations, and macrodontia.

    PubMed

    Sirmaci, Asli; Spiliopoulos, Michail; Brancati, Francesco; Powell, Eric; Duman, Duygu; Abrams, Alex; Bademci, Guney; Agolini, Emanuele; Guo, Shengru; Konuk, Berrin; Kavaz, Asli; Blanton, Susan; Digilio, Maria Christina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Young, Juan; Zuchner, Stephan; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-08-12

    KBG syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability associated with macrodontia of the upper central incisors as well as distinct craniofacial findings, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Although believed to be genetic in origin, the specific underlying defect is unknown. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified deleterious heterozygous mutations in ANKRD11 encoding ankyrin repeat domain 11, also known as ankyrin repeat-containing cofactor 1. A splice-site mutation, c.7570-1G>C (p.Glu2524_Lys2525del), cosegregated with the disease in a family with three affected members, whereas in a simplex case a de novo truncating mutation, c.2305delT (p.Ser769GlnfsX8), was detected. Sanger sequencing revealed additional de novo truncating ANKRD11 mutations in three other simplex cases. ANKRD11 is known to interact with nuclear receptor complexes to modify transcriptional activation. We demonstrated that ANKRD11 localizes mainly to the nuclei of neurons and accumulates in discrete inclusions when neurons are depolarized, suggesting that it plays a role in neural plasticity. Our results demonstrate that mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome and outline a fundamental role of ANKRD11 in craniofacial, dental, skeletal, and central nervous system development and function.

  9. Mutations in ANKRD11 Cause KBG Syndrome, Characterized by Intellectual Disability, Skeletal Malformations, and Macrodontia

    PubMed Central

    Sirmaci, Asli; Spiliopoulos, Michail; Brancati, Francesco; Powell, Eric; Duman, Duygu; Abrams, Alex; Bademci, Guney; Agolini, Emanuele; Guo, Shengru; Konuk, Berrin; Kavaz, Asli; Blanton, Susan; Digilio, Maria Christina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Young, Juan; Zuchner, Stephan; Tekin, Mustafa

    2011-01-01

    KBG syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability associated with macrodontia of the upper central incisors as well as distinct craniofacial findings, short stature, and skeletal anomalies. Although believed to be genetic in origin, the specific underlying defect is unknown. Through whole-exome sequencing, we identified deleterious heterozygous mutations in ANKRD11 encoding ankyrin repeat domain 11, also known as ankyrin repeat-containing cofactor 1. A splice-site mutation, c.7570-1G>C (p.Glu2524_Lys2525del), cosegregated with the disease in a family with three affected members, whereas in a simplex case a de novo truncating mutation, c.2305delT (p.Ser769GlnfsX8), was detected. Sanger sequencing revealed additional de novo truncating ANKRD11 mutations in three other simplex cases. ANKRD11 is known to interact with nuclear receptor complexes to modify transcriptional activation. We demonstrated that ANKRD11 localizes mainly to the nuclei of neurons and accumulates in discrete inclusions when neurons are depolarized, suggesting that it plays a role in neural plasticity. Our results demonstrate that mutations in ANKRD11 cause KBG syndrome and outline a fundamental role of ANKRD11 in craniofacial, dental, skeletal, and central nervous system development and function. PMID:21782149

  10. Spontaneous mutational variances and covariances for fitness-related traits in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez, J.; Lopez-Fanjul, C.

    1996-06-01

    Starting from a completely homozygous population of Drosophila melanogaster, 176 lines were derived and independently maintained by a single brother-sister mating per generation. Three fitness-related traits were considered (fecundity, egg-to-pupa and pupa-to-adult viabilities). Mutational heritabilities of these traits and genetic correlations between all possible pairs were calculated from the between line divergence (codivergence), after 104-106 generations of mutation accumulation. Mutational heritabilities ranged from 0.60 x 10{sup -3} to 0.82 x 10{sup -3} and correlations from -0.11 to 0.25. These values are likely to be underestimates due to selection against deleterious mutations. The distribution of the means of the lines was asymmetric, positive for fecundity and negative for both viability components. The coefficients of asymmetry are also likely to be biased, again due to selection. Extreme lines from the two tails of the distribution were examined in detail. Homozygous line effects were all negative for viability traits but predominantly positive for fecundity, indicating the fixation of mutations with positive effects on the latter. Corresponding heterozygous line effects showed a variable degree of dominance. 30 refs., 1 fig., 7 tabs.

  11. Fitness effects of new mutations in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii across two stress gradients.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, S A; Morgan, A D; Ness, R W; Keightley, P D; Colegrave, N

    2016-03-01

    Most spontaneous mutations affecting fitness are likely to be deleterious, but the strength of selection acting on them might be impacted by environmental stress. Such stress-dependent selection could expose hidden genetic variation, which in turn might increase the adaptive potential of stressed populations. On the other hand, this variation might represent a genetic load and thus lead to population extinction under stress. Previous studies to determine the link between stress and mutational effects on fitness, however, have produced inconsistent results. Here, we determined the net change in fitness in 29 genotypes of the green algae Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that accumulated mutations in the near absence of selection for approximately 1000 generations across two stress gradients, increasing NaCl and decreasing phosphate. We found mutational effects to be magnified under extremely stressful conditions, but such effects were specific both to the type of stress and to the genetic background. The detection of stress-dependent fitness effects of mutations depended on accurately scaling relative fitness measures by generation times, thus offering an explanation for the inconsistencies among previous studies.

  12. Age-associated molecular changes are deleterious and may modulate life span through diet

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Goo; Kaya, Alaattin; Avanesov, Andrei S.; Podolskiy, Dmitriy I.; Song, Eun Ju; Go, Du-Min; Jin, Gwi-Deuk; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Eun Bae; Kim, Dae-Yong; Gladyshev, Vadim N.

    2017-01-01

    Transition through life span is accompanied by numerous molecular changes, such as dysregulated gene expression, altered metabolite levels, and accumulated molecular damage. These changes are thought to be causal factors in aging; however, because they are numerous and are also influenced by genotype, environment, and other factors in addition to age, it is difficult to characterize the cumulative effect of these molecular changes on longevity. We reasoned that age-associated changes, such as molecular damage and tissue composition, may influence life span when used in the diet of organisms that are closely related to those that serve as a dietary source. To test this possibility, we used species-specific culture media and diets that incorporated molecular extracts of young and old organisms and compared the influence of these diets on the life span of yeast, fruitflies, and mice. In each case, the “old” diet or medium shortened the life span for one or both sexes. These findings suggest that age-associated molecular changes, such as cumulative damage and altered dietary composition, are deleterious and causally linked with aging and may affect life span through diet. PMID:28232953

  13. Age-associated molecular changes are deleterious and may modulate life span through diet.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Goo; Kaya, Alaattin; Avanesov, Andrei S; Podolskiy, Dmitriy I; Song, Eun Ju; Go, Du-Min; Jin, Gwi-Deuk; Hwang, Jae Yeon; Kim, Eun Bae; Kim, Dae-Yong; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2017-02-01

    Transition through life span is accompanied by numerous molecular changes, such as dysregulated gene expression, altered metabolite levels, and accumulated molecular damage. These changes are thought to be causal factors in aging; however, because they are numerous and are also influenced by genotype, environment, and other factors in addition to age, it is difficult to characterize the cumulative effect of these molecular changes on longevity. We reasoned that age-associated changes, such as molecular damage and tissue composition, may influence life span when used in the diet of organisms that are closely related to those that serve as a dietary source. To test this possibility, we used species-specific culture media and diets that incorporated molecular extracts of young and old organisms and compared the influence of these diets on the life span of yeast, fruitflies, and mice. In each case, the "old" diet or medium shortened the life span for one or both sexes. These findings suggest that age-associated molecular changes, such as cumulative damage and altered dietary composition, are deleterious and causally linked with aging and may affect life span through diet.

  14. Partition dataset according to amino acid type improves the prediction of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Li, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Yi-Xue; Ye, Zhi-Qiang

    2012-03-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proper dataset partition can improve the prediction of deleterious nsSNPs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Partition according to original residue type at nsSNP is a good criterion. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Similar strategy is supposed promising in other machine learning problems. -- Abstract: Many non-synonymous SNPs (nsSNPs) are associated with diseases, and numerous machine learning methods have been applied to train classifiers for sorting disease-associated nsSNPs from neutral ones. The continuously accumulated nsSNP data allows us to further explore better prediction approaches. In this work, we partitioned the training data into 20 subsets according to either original or substituted amino acid type at the nsSNP site. Using support vector machine (SVM), training classification models on each subset resulted in an overall accuracy of 76.3% or 74.9% depending on the two different partition criteria, while training on the whole dataset obtained an accuracy of only 72.6%. Moreover, the dataset was also randomly divided into 20 subsets, but the corresponding accuracy was only 73.2%. Our results demonstrated that partitioning the whole training dataset into subsets properly, i.e., according to the residue type at the nsSNP site, will improve the performance of the trained classifiers significantly, which should be valuable in developing better tools for predicting the disease-association of nsSNPs.

  15. The population genetics of beneficial mutations

    PubMed Central

    Orr, H. Allen

    2010-01-01

    The population genetic study of advantageous mutations has lagged behind that of deleterious and neutral mutations. But over the past two decades, a number of significant developments, both theoretical and empirical, have occurred. Here, I review two of these developments: the attempt to determine the distribution of fitness effects among beneficial mutations and the attempt to determine their average dominance. Considering both theory and data, I conclude that, while considerable theoretical progress has been made, we still lack sufficient data to draw confident conclusions about the distribution of effects or the dominance of beneficial mutations. PMID:20308094

  16. A GYS1 gene mutation is highly associated with polysaccharide storage myopathy in Cob Normand draught horses.

    PubMed

    Herszberg, B; McCue, M E; Larcher, T; Mata, X; Vaiman, A; Chaffaux, S; Chérel, Y; Valberg, S J; Mickelson, J R; Guérin, G

    2009-02-01

    Glycogen storage diseases or glycogenoses are inherited diseases caused by abnormalities of enzymes that regulate the synthesis or degradation of glycogen. Deleterious mutations in many genes of the glyco(geno)lytic or the glycogenesis pathways can potentially cause a glycogenosis, and currently mutations in fourteen different genes are known to cause animal or human glycogenoses, resulting in myopathies and/or hepatic disorders. The genetic bases of two forms of glycogenosis are currently known in horses. A fatal neonatal polysystemic type IV glycogenosis, inherited recessively in affected Quarter Horse foals, is due to a mutation in the glycogen branching enzyme gene (GBE1). A second type of glycogenosis, termed polysaccharide storage myopathy (PSSM), is observed in adult Quarter Horses and other breeds. A severe form of PSSM also occurs in draught horses. A mutation in the skeletal muscle glycogen synthase gene (GYS1) was recently reported to be highly associated with PSSM in Quarter Horses and Belgian draught horses. This GYS1 point mutation appears to cause a gain-of-function of the enzyme and to result in the accumulation of a glycogen-like, less-branched polysaccharide in skeletal muscle. It is inherited as a dominant trait. The aim of this work was to test for possible associations between genetic polymorphisms in four candidate genes of the glycogen pathway or the GYS1 mutation in Cob Normand draught horses diagnosed with PSSM by muscle biopsy.

  17. Genome destabilizing mutator alleles drive specific mutational trajectories in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Stirling, Peter C; Shen, Yaoqing; Corbett, Richard; Jones, Steven J M; Hieter, Philip

    2014-02-01

    In addition to environmental factors and intrinsic variations in base substitution rates, specific genome-destabilizing mutations can shape the mutational trajectory of genomes. How specific alleles influence the nature and position of accumulated mutations in a genomic context is largely unknown. Understanding the impact of genome-destabilizing alleles is particularly relevant to cancer genomes where biased mutational signatures are identifiable. We first created a more complete picture of cellular pathways that impact mutation rate using a primary screen to identify essential Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene mutations that cause mutator phenotypes. Drawing primarily on new alleles identified in this resource, we measure the impact of diverse mutator alleles on mutation patterns directly by whole-genome sequencing of 68 mutation-accumulation strains derived from wild-type and 11 parental mutator genotypes. The accumulated mutations differ across mutator strains, displaying base-substitution biases, allele-specific mutation hotspots, and break-associated mutation clustering. For example, in mutants of POLα and the Cdc13-Stn1-Ten1 complex, we find a distinct subtelomeric bias for mutations that we show is independent of the target sequence. Together our data suggest that specific genome-instability mutations are sufficient to drive discrete mutational signatures, some of which share properties with mutation patterns seen in tumors. Thus, in a population of cells, genome-instability mutations could influence clonal evolution by establishing discrete mutational trajectories for genomes.

  18. De novo, systemic, deleterious amino acid substitutions are common in large cytoskeleton-related protein coding regions

    PubMed Central

    Stoll, Rebecca J.; Thompson, Grace R.; Samy, Mohammad D.; Blanck, George

    2017-01-01

    Human mutagenesis is largely random, thus large coding regions, simply on the basis of probability, represent relatively large mutagenesis targets. Thus, we considered the possibility that large cytoskeletal-protein related coding regions (CPCRs), including extra-cellular matrix (ECM) coding regions, would have systemic nucleotide variants that are not present in common SNP databases. Presumably, such variants arose recently in development or in recent, preceding generations. Using matched breast cancer and blood-derived normal datasets from the cancer genome atlas, CPCR single nucleotide variants (SNVs) not present in the All SNPs(142) or 1000 Genomes databases were identified. Using the Protein Variation Effect Analyzer internet-based tool, it was discovered that apparent, systemic mutations (not shared among others in the analysis group) in the CPCRs, represented numerous deleterious amino acid substitutions. However, no such deleterious variants were identified among the (cancer blood-matched) variants shared by other members of the analysis group. These data indicate that private SNVs, which potentially have a medical consequence, occur de novo with significant frequency in the larger, human coding regions that collectively impact the cytoskeleton and ECM. PMID:28357075

  19. De novo PHIP-predicted deleterious variants are associated with developmental delay, intellectual disability, obesity, and dysmorphic features

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Emily; Cho, Megan T.; Alexander, Nora; Desai, Sonal; Naidu, Sakkubai; Bekheirnia, Mir Reza; Lewis, Andrea; Retterer, Kyle; Juusola, Jane; Chung, Wendy K.

    2016-01-01

    Using whole-exome sequencing, we have identified novel de novo heterozygous pleckstrin homology domain-interacting protein (PHIP) variants that are predicted to be deleterious, including a frameshift deletion, in two unrelated patients with common clinical features of developmental delay, intellectual disability, anxiety, hypotonia, poor balance, obesity, and dysmorphic features. A nonsense mutation in PHIP has previously been associated with similar clinical features. Patients with microdeletions of 6q14.1, including PHIP, have a similar phenotype of developmental delay, intellectual disability, hypotonia, and obesity, suggesting that the phenotype of our patients is a result of loss-of-function mutations. PHIP produces multiple protein products, such as PHIP1 (also known as DCAF14), PHIP, and NDRP. PHIP1 is one of the multiple substrate receptors of the proteolytic CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase complex. CUL4B deficiency has been associated with intellectual disability, central obesity, muscle wasting, and dysmorphic features. The overlapping phenotype associated with CUL4B deficiency suggests that PHIP mutations cause disease through disruption of the ubiquitin ligase pathway. PMID:27900362

  20. Understanding and predicting the fitness decline of shrunk populations: inbreeding, purging, mutation, and standard selection.

    PubMed

    García-Dorado, Aurora

    2012-04-01

    The joint consequences of inbreeding, natural selection, and deleterious mutation on mean fitness after population shrinkage are of great importance in evolution and can be critical to the conservation of endangered populations. I present simple analytical equations that predict these consequences, improving and extending a previous heuristic treatment. Purge is defined as the "extra" selection induced by inbreeding, due to the "extra" fitness disadvantage (2d) of homozygotes for (partially) recessive deleterious alleles. Its effect is accounted for by using, instead of the classical inbreeding coefficient f, a purged inbreeding coefficient g that is weighed by the reduction of the frequency of deleterious alleles caused by purging. When the effective size of a large population is reduced to a smaller stable value N (with Nd ≥ 1), the purged inbreeding coefficient after t generations can be predicted as g(t) ≈ [(1 - 1/2N) g(t)(-1) + 1/2N](1 - 2d f(t)(-1)), showing how purging acts upon previously accumulated inbreeding and how its efficiency increases with N. This implies an early fitness decay, followed by some recovery. During this process, the inbreeding depression rate shifts from its ancestral value (δ) to that of the mutation-selection-drift balance corresponding to N (δ*), and standard selection cancels out the inbreeding depression ascribed to δ*. Therefore, purge and inbreeding operate only upon the remaining δ - δ*. The method is applied to the conservation strategy in which family contributions to the breeding pool are equal and is extended to make use of genealogical information. All these predictions are checked using computer simulation.

  1. Preservation of duplicate genes by complementary, degenerative mutations.

    PubMed Central

    Force, A; Lynch, M; Pickett, F B; Amores, A; Yan, Y L; Postlethwait, J

    1999-01-01

    The origin of organismal complexity is generally thought to be tightly coupled to the evolution of new gene functions arising subsequent to gene duplication. Under the classical model for the evolution of duplicate genes, one member of the duplicated pair usually degenerates within a few million years by accumulating deleterious mutations, while the other duplicate retains the original function. This model further predicts that on rare occasions, one duplicate may acquire a new adaptive function, resulting in the preservation of both members of the pair, one with the new function and the other retaining the old. However, empirical data suggest that a much greater proportion of gene duplicates is preserved than predicted by the classical model. Here we present a new conceptual framework for understanding the evolution of duplicate genes that may help explain this conundrum. Focusing on the regulatory complexity of eukaryotic genes, we show how complementary degenerative mutations in different regulatory elements of duplicated genes can facilitate the preservation of both duplicates, thereby increasing long-term opportunities for the evolution of new gene functions. The duplication-degeneration-complementation (DDC) model predicts that (1) degenerative mutations in regulatory elements can increase rather than reduce the probability of duplicate gene preservation and (2) the usual mechanism of duplicate gene preservation is the partitioning of ancestral functions rather than the evolution of new functions. We present several examples (including analysis of a new engrailed gene in zebrafish) that appear to be consistent with the DDC model, and we suggest several analytical and experimental approaches for determining whether the complementary loss of gene subfunctions or the acquisition of novel functions are likely to be the primary mechanisms for the preservation of gene duplicates. For a newly duplicated paralog, survival depends on the outcome of the race between

  2. Mitochondria: Biogenesis and mitophagy balance in segregation and clonal expansion of mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Carelli, Valerio; Maresca, Alessandra; Caporali, Leonardo; Trifunov, Selena; Zanna, Claudia; Rugolo, Michela

    2015-06-01

    Mitochondria are cytoplasmic organelles containing their own multi-copy genome. They are organized in a highly dynamic network, resulting from balance between fission and fusion, which maintains homeostasis of mitochondrial mass through mitochondrial biogenesis and mitophagy. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutates much faster than nuclear DNA. In particular, mtDNA point mutations and deletions may occur somatically and accumulate with aging, coexisting with the wild type, a condition known as heteroplasmy. Under specific circumstances, clonal expansion of mutant mtDNA may occur within single cells, causing a wide range of severe human diseases when mutant overcomes wild type. Furthermore, mtDNA deletions accumulate and clonally expand as a consequence of deleterious mutations in nuclear genes involved in mtDNA replication and maintenance, as well as in mitochondrial fusion genes (mitofusin-2 and OPA1), possibly implicating mtDNA nucleoids segregation. We here discuss how the intricacies of mitochondrial homeostasis impinge on the intracellular propagation of mutant mtDNA. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Energy Metabolism Disorders and Therapies.

  3. Male mutation rates and the cost of sex for females

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Redfield, Rosemary J.

    1994-05-01

    ALTHOUGH we do not know why sex evolved, the twofold cost of meiosis for females provides a standard against which postulated benefits of sex can be evaluated1. The most reliable benefit is sex's ability to reduce the impact of deleterious mutations2,3. But deleterious mutations may themselves generate a large and previously overlooked female-specific cost of sex. DNA sequence comparisons have confirmed Haldane's suggestion that most mutations arise in the male germ line4,5; recent estimates of α, the ratio of male to female mutation rates, are ten, six and two in humans, primates and rodents, respectively6-8. Consequently, male gametes may give progeny more mutations than the associated sexual recombination eliminates. Here I describe computer simulations showing that the cost of male mutations can easily exceed the benefits of recombination, causing females to produce fitter progeny by parthenogenesis than by mating. The persistence of sexual reproduction by females thus becomes even more problematic.

  4. Rate of fixation of beneficial mutations in sexual populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouveia, Joseilme F.; de Oliveira, Viviane M.; Sátiro, Caio; Campos, Paulo R. A.

    2009-06-01

    We have investigated the rate of substitution of advantageous mutations in populations of haploid organisms where the rate of recombination can be controlled. We have verified that in all the situations recombination speeds up adaptation through recombination of beneficial mutations from distinct lineages in a single individual, and so reducing the intensity of clonal interference. The advantage of sex for adaptation is even stronger when deleterious mutations occur since now recombination can also restore genetic background free of deleterious mutations. However, our simulation results demonstrate that evidence of clonal interference, as increased mean selective effect of fixed mutations and reduced likelihood of fixation of small-effect mutations, are also present in sexual populations. What we see is that this evidence is delayed when compared to asexual populations.

  5. Effects of potyvirus effective population size in inoculated leaves on viral accumulation and the onset of symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zwart, Mark P; Daròs, José-Antonio; Elena, Santiago F

    2012-09-01

    Effective population size (N(e)) is a key parameter for understanding evolutionary processes, but it is generally not considered in epidemiological studies or in studying infections of individual hosts. Whether N(e) has an effect on the onset of symptoms and viral accumulation in Tobacco etch virus (TEV) infection of Nicotiana tabacum plants is considered here. Using mixtures of TEV variants carrying fluorescent markers, the dose dependence of N(e) was confirmed, and the inoculation procedure was found to be the main source of variation in these experiments. Whereas the onset of symptoms was independent of N(e), there was less and more variable accumulation at 6 days postinoculation for small N(e) values (N(e) < 5). The observed variation in accumulation was not heritable, however, suggesting that this variation was not due to the fixation of deleterious mutations in the small founder populations. On the other hand, virus-induced fluorescence and accumulation in the inoculated leaf were strongly N(e) dependent. Systemic accumulation was independent of N(e), although removal of the inoculated leaf led to a small reduction in systemic accumulation for small N(e) values. For whole plants, N(e)-dependent effects on accumulation were no longer observed at 9 days postinoculation. Therefore, the effects of N(e) on accumulation are due mainly to limited expansion in the inoculated leaf and are transient. In this system, N(e)-dependent effects will be strongest at low doses and early in infection. We conclude that N(e) can have implications for epidemiology and infection at the individual host level, beyond determining the rate of mixed-genotype infection.

  6. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  7. Deleterious coding variants in multi-case families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pengelly, Reuben J.; Arias, Liliana; Martínez, Julio; Upstill-Goddard, Rosanna; Seaby, Eleanor G.; Gibson, Jane; Ennis, Sarah; Collins, Andrew; Briceño, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Nonsyndromic Cleft Lip and/or Palate (NSCLP) is regarded as a multifactorial condition in which clefting is an isolated phenotype, distinguished from the largely monogenic, syndromic forms which include clefts among a spectrum of phenotypes. Nonsyndromic clefting has been shown to arise through complex interactions between genetic and environmental factors. However, there is increasing evidence that the broad NSCLP classification may include a proportion of cases showing familial patterns of inheritance and contain highly penetrant deleterious variation in specific genes. Through exome sequencing of multi-case families ascertained in Bogota, Colombia, we identify 28 non-synonymous single nucleotide variants that are considered damaging by at least one predictive score. We discuss the functional impact of candidate variants identified. In one family we find a coding variant in the MSX1 gene which is predicted damaging by multiple scores. This variant is in exon 2, a highly conserved region of the gene. Previous sequencing has suggested that mutations in MSX1 may account for ~2% of NSCLP. Our analysis further supports evidence that a proportion of NSCLP cases arise through monogenic coding mutations, though further work is required to unravel the complex interplay of genetics and environment involved in facial clefting. PMID:27456059

  8. Missense UROS mutations causing congenital erythropoietic porphyria reduce UROS homeostasis that can be rescued by proteasome inhibition.

    PubMed

    Blouin, Jean-Marc; Bernardo-Seisdedos, Ganeko; Sasso, Emma; Esteve, Julie; Ged, Cécile; Lalanne, Magalie; Sanz-Parra, Arantza; Urquiza, Pedro; de Verneuil, Hubert; Millet, Oscar; Richard, Emmanuel

    2017-02-21

    Congenital erythropoietic porphyria (CEP) is an inborn error of heme biosynthesis characterized by uroporphyrinogen III synthase (UROS) deficiency resulting in deleterious porphyrin accumulation in blood cells responsible for hemolytic anemia and cutaneous photosensitivity. We analyzed here the molecular basis of UROS impairment associated with twenty nine UROS missense mutations actually described in CEP patients. Using a computational and biophysical joint approach we predicted that most disease-causing mutations would affect UROS folding and stability. Through the analysis of enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged versions of UROS enzyme we experimentally confirmed these data and showed that thermodynamic instability and premature protein degradation is a major mechanism accounting for the enzymatic deficiency associated with twenty UROS mutants in human cells. Since the intracellular loss in protein homeostasis is in excellent agreement with the in vitro destabilization, we used molecular dynamic simulation to rely structural 3D modification with UROS disability. We found that destabilizing mutations could be clustered within three types of mechanism according to side chain rearrangements or contact alterations within the pathogenic UROS enzyme so that the severity degree correlated with cellular protein instability. Furthermore, proteasome inhibition using bortezomib, a clinically available drug, significantly enhanced proteostasis of each unstable UROS mutant. Finally, we show evidence that abnormal protein homeostasis is a prevalent mechanism responsible for UROS deficiency and that modulators of UROS proteolysis such as proteasome inhibitors or chemical chaperones may represent an attractive therapeutic option to reduce porphyrin accumulation and prevent skin photosensitivity in CEP patients when the genotype includes a missense variant.

  9. Somatic Mutations Favorable to Patient Survival Are Predominant in Ovarian Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wensheng; Edwards, Andrea; Flemington, Erik; Zhang, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Somatic mutation accumulation is a major cause of abnormal cell growth. However, some mutations in cancer cells may be deleterious to the survival and proliferation of the cancer cells, thus offering a protective effect to the patients. We investigated this hypothesis via a unique analysis of the clinical and somatic mutation datasets of ovarian carcinomas published by the Cancer Genome Atlas. We defined and screened 562 macro mutation signatures (MMSs) for their associations with the overall survival of 320 ovarian cancer patients. Each MMS measures the number of mutations present on the member genes (except for TP53) covered by a specific Gene Ontology (GO) term in each tumor. We found that somatic mutations favorable to the patient survival are predominant in ovarian carcinomas compared to those indicating poor clinical outcomes. Specially, we identified 19 (3) predictive MMSs that are, usually by a nonlinear dose-dependent effect, associated with good (poor) patient survival. The false discovery rate for the 19 “positive” predictors is at the level of 0.15. The GO terms corresponding to these MMSs include “lysosomal membrane” and “response to hypoxia”, each of which is relevant to the progression and therapy of cancer. Using these MMSs as features, we established a classification tree model which can effectively partition the training samples into three prognosis groups regarding the survival time. We validated this model on an independent dataset of the same disease (Log-rank p-value <2.3×10-4) and a dataset of breast cancer (Log-rank p-value <9.3×10−3). We compared the GO terms corresponding to these MMSs and those enriched with expression-based predictive genes. The analysis showed that the GO term pairs with large similarity are mainly pertinent to the proteins located on the cell organelles responsible for material transport and waste disposal, suggesting the crucial role of these proteins in cancer mortality. PMID:25390899

  10. Identification and Functional Characterization of GAA Mutations in Colombian Patients Affected by Pompe Disease.

    PubMed

    Niño, Mónica Yasmín; Mateus, Heidi Eliana; Fonseca, Dora Janeth; Kroos, Marian A; Ospina, Sandra Yaneth; Mejía, Juan Fernando; Uribe, Jesús Alfredo; Reuser, Arnold J J; Laissue, Paul

    2013-01-01

    Pompe disease (PD) is a recessive metabolic disorder characterized by acid α-glucosidase (GAA) deficiency, which results in lysosomal accumulation of glycogen in all tissues, especially in skeletal muscles. PD clinical course is mainly determined by the nature of the GAA mutations. Although ~400 distinct GAA sequence variations have been described, the genotype-phenotype correlation is not always evident.In this study, we describe the first clinical and genetic analysis of Colombian PD patients performed in 11 affected individuals. GAA open reading frame sequencing revealed eight distinct mutations related to PD etiology including two novel missense mutations, c.1106 T > C (p.Leu369Pro) and c.2236 T > C (p.Trp746Arg). In vitro functional studies showed that the structural changes conferred by both mutations did not inhibit the synthesis of the 110 kD GAA precursor form but affected the processing and intracellular transport of GAA. In addition, analysis of previously described variants located at this position (p.Trp746Gly, p.Trp746Cys, p.Trp746Ser, p.Trp746X) revealed new insights in the molecular basis of PD. Notably, we found that p.Trp746Cys mutation, which was previously described as a polymorphism as well as a causal mutation, displayed a mild deleterious effect. Interestingly and by chance, our study argues in favor of a remarkable Afro-American and European ancestry of the Colombian population. Taken together, our report provides valuable information on the PD genotype-phenotype correlation, which is expected to facilitate and improve genetic counseling of affected individuals and their families.

  11. Two classes of deleterious recessive alleles in a natural population of zebrafish, Danio rerio.

    PubMed Central

    McCune, Amy R.; Houle, David; McMillan, Kyle; Annable, Rebecca; Kondrashov, Alexey S.

    2004-01-01

    Natural populations carry deleterious recessive alleles which cause inbreeding depression. We compared mortality and growth of inbred and outbred zebrafish, Danio rerio, between 6 and 48 days of age. Grandparents of the studied fish were caught in the wild. Inbred fish were generated by brother-sister mating. Mortality was 9% in outbred fish, and 42% in inbred fish, which implies at least 3.6 lethal equivalents of deleterious recessive alleles per zygote. There was no significant inbreeding depression in the growth, perhaps because the surviving inbred fish lived under less crowded conditions. In contrast to alleles that cause embryonic and early larval mortality in the same population, alleles responsible for late larval and early juvenile mortality did not result in any gross morphological abnormalities. Thus, deleterious recessive alleles that segregate in a wild zebrafish population belong to two sharply distinct classes: early-acting, morphologically overt, unconditional lethals; and later-acting, morphologically cryptic, and presumably milder alleles. PMID:15451692

  12. Variation in Mutational Robustness between Different Proteins and the Predictability of Fitness Effects.

    PubMed

    Lind, Peter A; Arvidsson, Lars; Berg, Otto G; Andersson, Dan I

    2016-11-08

    Random mutations in genes from disparate protein classes may have different distributions of fitness effects (DFEs) depending on different structural, functional, and evolutionary constraints. We measured the fitness effects of 156 single mutations in the genes encoding AraC (transcription factor), AraD (enzyme), and AraE (transporter) used for bacterial growth on l-arabinose. Despite their different molecular functions these genes all had bimodal DFEs with most mutations either being neutral or strongly deleterious, providing a general expectation for the DFE. This contrasts with the unimodal DFEs previously obtained for ribosomal protein genes where most mutations were slightly deleterious. Based on theoretical considerations, we suggest that the 33-fold higher average mutational robustness of ribosomal proteins is due to stronger selection for reduced costs of translational and transcriptional errors. Whereas the large majority of synonymous mutations were deleterious for ribosomal proteins genes, no fitness effects could be detected for the AraCDE genes. Four mutations in AraC and AraE increased fitness, suggesting that slightly advantageous mutations make up a significant fraction of the DFE, but that they often escape detection due to the limited sensitivity of commonly used fitness assays. We show that the fitness effects of amino acid substitutions can be predicted based on evolutionary conservation, but those weakly deleterious mutations are less reliably detected. This suggests that large-effect mutations and the fraction of highly deleterious mutations can be computationally predicted, but that experiments are required to characterize the DFE close to neutrality, where many mutations ultimately fixed in a population will occur.

  13. Mutation-selection balance and mixed mating with asexual reproduction.

    PubMed

    Marriage, Tara N; Orive, Maria E

    2012-09-07

    The effects of asexual reproduction on both the number of deleterious mutations per gamete and the mean fitness under mutation-selection balance are investigated. We use two simulation models, considering both finite and infinite populations. The two models incorporate asexual reproduction with varying levels of outcrossing and selfing, degrees of dominance and selection coefficients. The values for mean fitness and number of deleterious mutations per gamete are compared within and among finite and infinite populations to identify the effect of asexual reproduction on levels of load, and how asexual reproduction may interact with genetic drift (population size). Increasing asexual reproduction resulted in an increase in mean fitness and a decrease in the average number of deleterious mutations per gamete for both nearly recessive and additive alleles in both the infinite and finite simulations. Increased mean fitness with increasing asexuality is possibly due to two interacting forces: a greater opportunity for selection to act on heterozygous versus homozygous mutations and the shielding of a proportion of the population from meiotic mutations due to asexual reproduction. The results found here highlight the need to consider asexual reproduction along with mixed mating in models of genetic load and mutation-selection balance.

  14. [Study on species and valence state of heavy metals and deleterious elements of mineral medicine].

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Luo, Jiao-yang; Liu, Qiu-tao; Li, Yan-jun; Xie, Yan-jun; Yang, Shi-hai; Yang, Mei-hua

    2015-12-01

    As an important part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), mineral medicine plays an irreplaceable role. However, little has been reported on its species and valence state of heavy metals and deleterious elements, and also the relevance to pharmacological effect and toxicology. The present paper, in a new perspective, summarized the determination of the species and valence state of heavy metals and deleterious elements in recent years, discussed the progress of the pharmacological effect and toxicology, and prospected for future study which might provide reference for mineral medicine.

  15. Too Many Mutants with Multiple Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Drake, John W.

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These “multiples” appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts. PMID:17687667

  16. Too many mutants with multiple mutations.

    PubMed

    Drake, John W

    2007-01-01

    It has recently become clear that the classical notion of the random nature of mutation does not hold for the distribution of mutations among genes: most collections of mutants contain more isolates with two or more mutations than predicted by the mutant frequency on the assumption of a random distribution of mutations. Excesses of multiples are seen in a wide range of organisms, including riboviruses, DNA viruses, prokaryotes, yeasts, and higher eukaryotic cell lines and tissues. In addition, such excesses are produced by DNA polymerases in vitro. These "multiples" appear to be generated by transient, localized hypermutation rather than by heritable mutator mutations. The components of multiples are sometimes scattered at random and sometimes display an excess of smaller distances between mutations. As yet, almost nothing is known about the mechanisms that generate multiples, but such mutations have the capacity to accelerate those evolutionary pathways that require multiple mutations where the individual mutations are neutral or deleterious. Examples that impinge on human health may include carcinogenesis and the adaptation of microbial pathogens as they move between individual hosts.

  17. Separating multiple, short-term deleterious effects of saline solutions to the growth of cowpea seedlings

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Reductions in plant growth due to salinity are of global importance in natural and agricultural landscapes. Short-term (48 h) solution culture experiments studied 404 treatments with seedlings of cowpea (Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp. cv. Caloona) to examine the multiple deleterious effects of Ca, Mg...

  18. Deleterious Rare Variants Reveal Risk for Loss of GABAA Receptor Function in Patients with Genetic Epilepsy and in the General Population

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Ciria C.; Klassen, Tara L.; Jackson, Laurel G.; Gurba, Katharine; Hu, Ningning; Macdonald, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic epilepsies (GEs) account for approximately 50% of all seizure disorders, and familial forms include mutations in single GABAA receptor subunit genes (GABRs). In 144 sporadic GE cases (GECs), exome sequencing of 237 ion channel genes identified 520 GABR variants. Among these variants, 33 rare variants in 11 GABR genes were present in 24 GECs. To assess functional risk of variants in GECs, we selected 8 variants found in GABRA, 3 in GABRB, and 3 in GABRG and compared them to 18 variants found in the general population for GABRA1 (n = 9), GABRB3 (n = 7), and GABRG2 (n = 2). To identify deleterious variants and gain insight into structure-function relationships, we studied the gating properties, surface expression and structural perturbations of the 32 variants. Significant reduction of GABAA receptor function was strongly associated with variants scored as deleterious and mapped within the N-terminal and transmembrane domains. In addition, 12 out of 17 variants mapped along the β+/α- GABA binding interface, were associated with reduction in channel gating and were predicted to cause structural rearrangements of the receptor by in silico simulations. Missense or nonsense mutations of GABRA1, GABRB3 and GABRG2 primarily impair subunit biogenesis. In contrast, GABR variants affected receptor function by impairing gating, suggesting that different mechanisms are operating in GABR epilepsy susceptibility variants and disease-causing mutations. The functional impact of single GABR variants found in individuals with sporadic GEs warrants the use of molecular diagnosis and will ultimately improve the treatment of genetic epilepsies by using a personalized approach. PMID:27622563

  19. A glycogene mutation map for discovery of diseases of glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, Lars; Lind-Thomsen, Allan; Joshi, Hiren J; Pedersen, Nis Borbye; Have, Christian Theil; Kong, Yun; Wang, Shengjun; Sparso, Thomas; Grarup, Niels; Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Schjoldager, Katrine; Freeze, Hudson H; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Henrissat, Bernard; Mandel, Ulla; Clausen, Henrik; Wandall, Hans H; Bennett, Eric P

    2015-01-01

    Glycosylation of proteins and lipids involves over 200 known glycosyltransferases (GTs), and deleterious defects in many of the genes encoding these enzymes cause disorders collectively classified as congenital disorders of glycosylation (CDGs). Most known CDGs are caused by defects in glycogenes that affect glycosylation globally. Many GTs are members of homologous isoenzyme families and deficiencies in individual isoenzymes may not affect glycosylation globally. In line with this, there appears to be an underrepresentation of disease-causing glycogenes among these larger isoenzyme homologous families. However, genome-wide association studies have identified such isoenzyme genes as candidates for different diseases, but validation is not straightforward without biomarkers. Large-scale whole-exome sequencing (WES) provides access to mutations in, for example, GT genes in populations, which can be used to predict and/or analyze functional deleterious mutations. Here, we constructed a draft of a functional mutational map of glycogenes, GlyMAP, from WES of a rather homogenous population of 2000 Danes. We cataloged all missense mutations and used prediction algorithms, manual inspection and in case of carbohydrate-active enzymes family GT27 experimental analysis of mutations to map deleterious mutations. GlyMAP (http://glymap.glycomics.ku.dk) provides a first global view of the genetic stability of the glycogenome and should serve as a tool for discovery of novel CDGs. PMID:25267602

  20. Mapping rare, deleterious mutations in Factor H: Association with early onset, drusen burden, and lower antigenic levels in familial AMD

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Erin K.; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Villalonga, Mercedes B.; Java, Anuja; Triebwasser, Michael P.; Daly, Mark J.; Atkinson, John P.; Seddon, Johanna M.

    2016-01-01

    The genetic architecture of age-related macular degeneration (AMD) involves numerous genetic variants, both common and rare, in the coding region of complement factor H (CFH). While these variants explain high disease burden in some families, they fail to explain the pathology in all. We selected families whose AMD was unexplained by known variants and performed whole exome sequencing to probe for other rare, highly penetrant variants. We identified four rare loss-of-function variants in CFH associated with AMD. Missense variant CFH 1:196646753 (C192F) segregated perfectly within a family characterized by advanced AMD and drusen temporal to the macula. Two families, each comprising a pair of affected siblings with extensive extramacular drusen, carried essential splice site variant CFH 1:196648924 (IVS6+1G>A) or missense variant rs139360826 (R175P). In a fourth family, missense variant rs121913058 (R127H) was associated with AMD. Most carriers had early onset bilateral advanced AMD and extramacular drusen. Carriers tended to have low serum Factor H levels, especially carriers of the splice variant. One missense variant (R127H) has been previously shown not to be secreted. The two other missense variants were produced recombinantly: compared to wild type, one (R175P) had no functional activity and the other (C192F) had decreased secretion. PMID:27572114

  1. Romidepsin-induced HIV-1 viremia during effective antiretroviral therapy contains identical viral sequences with few deleterious mutations

    PubMed Central

    Winckelmann, Anni; Barton, Kirston; Hiener, Bonnie; Schlub, Timothy E.; Shao, Wei; Rasmussen, Thomas A.; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S.; Tolstrup, Martin; Palmer, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the origin of the HIV-1 viremia induced by the latency-reversing agent romidepsin. Design: Six individuals on suppressive antiretroviral therapy received romidepsin administered intravenously once weekly for 3 consecutive weeks. CD4+ T cells were obtained at baseline, following the second and third romidepsin infusion, and 10 weeks after the final romidepsin treatment. Plasma samples were collected 24 and 72 h after romidepsin infusions. Methods: Single-genome sequencing of the env and p24-RT region was used to genetically characterize the virus from proviral DNA, the transcribed cell-associated RNA and the plasma RNA pool. Results: In three of six participants with available plasma samples we identified plasma HIV-1 RNA sequences that were identical to DNA and/or cell-associated RNA sequences from peripheral blood CD4+ T cells. In two participants, plasma RNA sequences contained expansions of identical sequences, corresponding to 62 and 100% of the total sequences, respectively. Plasma HIV-1 RNA had very low amounts of defective viruses compared to cell-associated RNA (odds ratio 20.85, P < 0.001) and to DNA (odds ratio 7.07, P = 0.011) during romidepsin therapy. Conclusions: Romidepsin induced transcription from proviruses in peripheral blood cells, which contributed to viremia in patients on suppressive therapy. The intermingling of these cell-associated HIV-1 RNA with DNA sequences indicates transcription from a diverse range of proviruses, but the expansions of identical viral plasma sequences with few defects indicate that the romidepsin-induced viremia arises from intact proviruses with highly similar or identical genetic backgrounds. PMID:28272134

  2. Tanshinol Attenuates the Deleterious Effects of Oxidative Stress on Osteoblastic Differentiation via Wnt/FoxO3a Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yajun; Su, Yanjie; Wang, Dongtao; Chen, Yahui; Wu, Tie; Li, Gang; Sun, Xuegang

    2013-01-01

    There is now increasing evidence which suggests a pivotal role for oxidative stress in the development and progression of osteoporosis. We confirm herein the protective effects of natural antioxidant Tanshinol against oxidative stress in osteoblastic differentiation and the underlying mechanism. Our results show that hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) leads to accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), decrease in cell viability, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a caspase-3-dependent manner, and inhibition of osteoblastic differentiation. Tanshinol reverses these deleterious consequence triggered by oxidative stress. Moreover, under the condition of oxidative stress, Tanshinol suppresses the activation of FoxO3a transcription factor and expressions of its target genes Gadd45a and catalase (CAT) and simultaneously counteracts the inhibition of Wnt signalling and expressions of target genes Axin2, alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and Osteoprotegerin (OPG). The findings are further consolidated using FoxO3a siRNA interference and overexpression of Tcf4. The results illustrate that Tanshinol attenuates oxidative stress via down-regulation of FoxO3a signaling, and rescues the decrease of osteoblastic differentiation through upregulation of Wnt signal under oxidative stress. The present findings suggest that the beneficial effects of Tanshinol may be adopted as a novel therapeutic approach in recently recognized conditions of niche targeting osteoporosis. PMID:24489983

  3. Novel FANCI mutations in Fanconi anemia with VACTERL association.

    PubMed

    Savage, Sharon A; Ballew, Bari J; Giri, Neelam; Chandrasekharappa, Settara C; Ameziane, Najim; de Winter, Johan; Alter, Blanche P

    2016-02-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an inherited bone marrow failure syndrome caused by mutations in DNA repair genes; some of these patients may have features of the VACTERL association. Autosomal recessive mutations in FANCI are a rare cause of FA. We identified FANCI mutations by next generation sequencing in three patients in our FA cohort among several whose mutated gene was unknown. Four of the six mutations are novel and all mutations are likely deleterious to protein function. There are now 16 reported cases of FA due to FANCI of whom 7 have at least 3 features of the VACTERL association (44%). This suggests that the VACTERL association in patients with FA may be seen in patients with FANCI mutations more often than previously recognized.

  4. Deleterious Effects of Minocycline after in vivo Target Deprivation of Thalamocortical Neurons in the Immature, Metallothionein-Deficient Mouse Brain

    PubMed Central

    Potter, Emily G.; Cheng, Ying; Natale, JoAnne E.

    2015-01-01

    Compared to adults, immature metallothionein I & II knockout (MT−/−) mice incur greater neuronal loss and a more rapid rate of microglia accumulation following target deprivation-induced injury. Since minocycline has been proposed to inhibit microglial activation and associated production of neuroinflammatory factors, we investigated its ability to promote neuronal survival in the immature, metallothionein-deficient brain. Following ablation of the visual cortex, 10-day-old MT−/− mice were treated with minocycline or saline and sacrificed 24 or 48 hours after injury. Using stereological methods, the number of microglia and neurons were estimated in the ipsilateral dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN) by an investigator blinded to the treatment. No effect on neuronal survival was observed at 24 hours, but 48 hours after injury an unanticipated but significant minocycline-mediated increase in neuronal loss was detected. Further, while failing to inhibit microglial accumulation, minocycline treatment increased the proportion of amoeboid microglia in the ipsilateral dLGN. To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying this neurotoxic response, we identified minocycline-mediated changes in the expression of three potentially pro-apoptotic/ inflammatory genes: growth arrest- and DNA damage-inducible gene 45γ (GADD45γ); interferon-inducible protein 1 (IFI1) and cytokine induced growth factor (CTGF). We also observed increased mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) p38 phosphorylation with minocycline treatment. Although minocycline inhibited calpain activity at 12 hours post-injury, this effect was not sustained at 24 hours. Together, these results help to explain how minocycline has a deleterious effect on neuronal survival in this injury model. PMID:19115404

  5. Quantifying rare, deleterious variation in 12 human cytochrome P450 drug-metabolism genes in a large-scale exome dataset

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Adam S.; Tabor, Holly K.; Johnson, Andrew D.; Snively, Beverly M.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Auer, Paul L.; Ioannidis, John P.A.; Peters, Ulrike; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Sucheston, Lara E.; Wang, Danxin; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rotter, Jerome I.; Psaty, Bruce M.; Jackson, Rebecca D.; Herrington, David M.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Reiner, Alexander P.; Rich, Stephen S.; Rieder, Mark J.; Bamshad, Michael J.; Nickerson, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The study of genetic influences on drug response and efficacy (‘pharmacogenetics’) has existed for over 50 years. Yet, we still lack a complete picture of how genetic variation, both common and rare, affects each individual's responses to medications. Exome sequencing is a promising alternative method for pharmacogenetic discovery as it provides information on both common and rare variation in large numbers of individuals. Using exome data from 2203 AA and 4300 Caucasian individuals through the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project, we conducted a survey of coding variation within 12 Cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes that are collectively responsible for catalyzing nearly 75% of all known Phase I drug oxidation reactions. In addition to identifying many polymorphisms with known pharmacogenetic effects, we discovered over 730 novel nonsynonymous alleles across the 12 CYP genes of interest. These alleles include many with diverse functional effects such as premature stop codons, aberrant splicesites and mutations at conserved active site residues. Our analysis considering both novel, predicted functional alleles as well as known, actionable CYP alleles reveals that rare, deleterious variation contributes markedly to the overall burden of pharmacogenetic alleles within the populations considered, and that the contribution of rare variation to this burden is over three times greater in AA individuals as compared with Caucasians. While most of these impactful alleles are individually rare, 7.6–11.7% of individuals interrogated in the study carry at least one newly described potentially deleterious alleles in a major drug-metabolizing CYP. PMID:24282029

  6. Quantifying rare, deleterious variation in 12 human cytochrome P450 drug-metabolism genes in a large-scale exome dataset.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Adam S; Tabor, Holly K; Johnson, Andrew D; Snively, Beverly M; Assimes, Themistocles L; Auer, Paul L; Ioannidis, John P A; Peters, Ulrike; Robinson, Jennifer G; Sucheston, Lara E; Wang, Danxin; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Rotter, Jerome I; Psaty, Bruce M; Jackson, Rebecca D; Herrington, David M; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Reiner, Alexander P; Rich, Stephen S; Rieder, Mark J; Bamshad, Michael J; Nickerson, Deborah A

    2014-04-15

    The study of genetic influences on drug response and efficacy ('pharmacogenetics') has existed for over 50 years. Yet, we still lack a complete picture of how genetic variation, both common and rare, affects each individual's responses to medications. Exome sequencing is a promising alternative method for pharmacogenetic discovery as it provides information on both common and rare variation in large numbers of individuals. Using exome data from 2203 AA and 4300 Caucasian individuals through the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project, we conducted a survey of coding variation within 12 Cytochrome P450 (CYP) genes that are collectively responsible for catalyzing nearly 75% of all known Phase I drug oxidation reactions. In addition to identifying many polymorphisms with known pharmacogenetic effects, we discovered over 730 novel nonsynonymous alleles across the 12 CYP genes of interest. These alleles include many with diverse functional effects such as premature stop codons, aberrant splicesites and mutations at conserved active site residues. Our analysis considering both novel, predicted functional alleles as well as known, actionable CYP alleles reveals that rare, deleterious variation contributes markedly to the overall burden of pharmacogenetic alleles within the populations considered, and that the contribution of rare variation to this burden is over three times greater in AA individuals as compared with Caucasians. While most of these impactful alleles are individually rare, 7.6-11.7% of individuals interrogated in the study carry at least one newly described potentially deleterious alleles in a major drug-metabolizing CYP.

  7. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.

  8. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; Sale, Julian E.; Campbell, Peter J.; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Stratton, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    During the course of a lifetime somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell’s genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutation rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This study provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operative in human somatic cells. PMID:26551669

  9. Anaerobically Grown Escherichia coli Has an Enhanced Mutation Rate and Distinct Mutational Spectra

    PubMed Central

    Shewaramani, Sonal; Finn, Thomas J.; Kassen, Rees; Rainey, Paul B.

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress is a major cause of mutation but little is known about how growth in the absence of oxygen impacts the rate and spectrum of mutations. We employed long-term mutation accumulation experiments to directly measure the rates and spectra of spontaneous mutation events in Escherichia coli populations propagated under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. To detect mutations, whole genome sequencing was coupled with methods of analysis sufficient to identify a broad range of mutational classes, including structural variants (SVs) generated by movement of repetitive elements. The anaerobically grown populations displayed a mutation rate nearly twice that of the aerobic populations, showed distinct asymmetric mutational strand biases, and greater insertion element activity. Consistent with mutation rate and spectra observations, genes for transposition and recombination repair associated with SVs were up-regulated during anaerobic growth. Together, these results define differences in mutational spectra affecting the evolution of facultative anaerobes. PMID:28103245

  10. Pathway to neural resilience: Self-esteem buffers against deleterious effects of poverty on the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yinan; Zhang, Lin; Kong, Xiangzhen; Hong, Yingyi; Cheon, Bobby; Liu, Jia

    2016-11-01

    Human neuroimaging studies have shown that people living in poverty tend to suffer hippocampal atrophy, which leads to impaired memory and learning throughout life. However, behavioral studies demonstrate that poor people with high self-esteem are often exempt from the deleterious effect of poverty and instead possess a happy and successful life. Here we investigated whether high self-esteem can buffer against the deleterious effects of poverty, as indicated by low subjective socioeconomic status (SSS), on the hippocampal gray matter volume (GMV) in a large cohort of young participants (N = 280). As expected, findings revealed that although low (vs. high) SSS was linked with a smaller hippocampal GMV, the deleterious effect of low SSS on hippocampal GMV was alleviated when the participants have high self-esteem. Commonality analyses further confirmed this observation. The current study suggests that positive psychological resources such as self-esteem may provide protection for the hippocampal atrophy in adversity. Hum Brain Mapp 37:3757-3766, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Establishment of Mouse Model of MYH9 Disorders: Heterozygous R702C Mutation Provokes Macrothrombocytopenia with Leukocyte Inclusion Bodies, Renal Glomerulosclerosis and Hearing Disability

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Kunishima, Shinji; Ikejiri, Makoto; Maruyama, Shoichi; Sone, Michihiko; Takagi, Akira; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Saito, Hidehiko; Naoe, Tomoki; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHCIIA) encoded by MYH9 is associated with autosomal dominantly inherited diseases called MYH9 disorders. MYH9 disorders are characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and very characteristic inclusion bodies in granulocytes. MYH9 disorders frequently cause nephritis, sensorineural hearing disability and cataracts. One of the most common and deleterious mutations causing these disorders is the R702C missense mutation. We generated knock-in mice expressing the Myh9 R702C mutation. R702C knock-in hetero mice (R702C+/− mice) showed macrothrombocytopenia. We studied megakaryopoiesis of cultured fetal liver cells of R702C+/− mice and found that proplatelet formation was impaired: the number of proplatelet tips was decreased, proplatelet size was increased, and proplatelet shafts were short and enlarged. Although granulocyte inclusion bodies were not visible by May–Grünwald Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NMMHCIIA proteins aggregated and accumulated in the granulocyte cytoplasm. In other organs, R702C+/− mice displayed albuminuria which increased with age. Renal pathology examination revealed glomerulosclerosis. Sensory hearing loss was indicated by lowered auditory brainstem response. These findings indicate that Myh9 R702C knock-in mice mirror features of human MYH9 disorders arising from the R702C mutation. PMID:23976996

  12. Establishment of mouse model of MYH9 disorders: heterozygous R702C mutation provokes macrothrombocytopenia with leukocyte inclusion bodies, renal glomerulosclerosis and hearing disability.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Nobuaki; Kunishima, Shinji; Ikejiri, Makoto; Maruyama, Shoichi; Sone, Michihiko; Takagi, Akira; Ikawa, Masahito; Okabe, Masaru; Kojima, Tetsuhito; Saito, Hidehiko; Naoe, Tomoki; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-01-01

    Nonmuscle myosin heavy chain IIA (NMMHCIIA) encoded by MYH9 is associated with autosomal dominantly inherited diseases called MYH9 disorders. MYH9 disorders are characterized by macrothrombocytopenia and very characteristic inclusion bodies in granulocytes. MYH9 disorders frequently cause nephritis, sensorineural hearing disability and cataracts. One of the most common and deleterious mutations causing these disorders is the R702C missense mutation. We generated knock-in mice expressing the Myh9 R702C mutation. R702C knock-in hetero mice (R702C+/- mice) showed macrothrombocytopenia. We studied megakaryopoiesis of cultured fetal liver cells of R702C+/- mice and found that proplatelet formation was impaired: the number of proplatelet tips was decreased, proplatelet size was increased, and proplatelet shafts were short and enlarged. Although granulocyte inclusion bodies were not visible by May-Grünwald Giemsa staining, immunofluorescence analysis indicated that NMMHCIIA proteins aggregated and accumulated in the granulocyte cytoplasm. In other organs, R702C+/- mice displayed albuminuria which increased with age. Renal pathology examination revealed glomerulosclerosis. Sensory hearing loss was indicated by lowered auditory brainstem response. These findings indicate that Myh9 R702C knock-in mice mirror features of human MYH9 disorders arising from the R702C mutation.

  13. Mutation Load under Vegetative Reproduction and Cytoplasmic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Kondrashov, A. S.

    1994-01-01

    For reasons that remain unclear, even multicellular organisms usually originate from a single cell. Here I consider the balance between deleterious mutations and selection against them in a population with obligate vegetative reproduction, when every offspring is initiated by more than one cell of a parent. The mutation load depends on the genomic deleterious mutation rate U, strictness of selection, number of cells which initiate an offspring n, and the relatedness among the initial cells. The load grows with increasing U, n and strictness of selection, and declines when an offspring is initiated by more closely related cells. If Un >> 1, the load under obligate vegetative reproduction may be substantially higher than under sexual or asexual reproduction, which may account for its rarity. In nature obligate vegetative reproduction seems to be more common and long term in taxa whose cytological features ensure a relatively low load under it. The same model also describes the mutation load under two other modes of inheritance: (1) uniparental transmission of organelles and (2) reproduction by division of multinuclear cells, where each daughter cell receives many nuclei. The load declines substantially when the deleterious mutation rate per organelle genome gets lower or when the number of nuclei in a cell sometimes drops. This may explain the small sizes of organelle genomes in sexual lineages and the presence of karyonic cycles in asexual unicellular multinuclear eukaryotes. PMID:8056318

  14. Biallelic DICER1 mutations occur in Wilms tumours.

    PubMed

    Wu, M K; Sabbaghian, N; Xu, B; Addidou-Kalucki, S; Bernard, C; Zou, D; Reeve, A E; Eccles, M R; Cole, C; Choong, C S; Charles, A; Tan, T Y; Iglesias, D M; Goodyer, P R; Foulkes, W D

    2013-06-01

    DICER1 is an endoribonuclease central to the generation of microRNAs (miRNAs) and short interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Germline mutations in DICER1 have been associated with a pleiotropic tumour predisposition syndrome and Wilms tumour (WT) is a rare manifestation of this syndrome. Three WTs, each in a child with a deleterious germline DICER1 mutation, were screened for somatic DICER1 mutations and were found to bear specific mutations in either the RNase IIIa (n = 1) or the RNase IIIb domain (n = 2). In the two latter cases, we demonstrate that the germline and somatic DICER1 mutations were in trans, suggesting that the two-hit hypothesis of tumour formation applies for these examples of WT. Among 191 apparently sporadic WTs, we identified five different missense or deletion somatic DICER1 mutations (2.6%) in four individual WTs; one tumour had two very likely deleterious somatic mutations in trans in the RNase IIIb domain (c.5438A>G and c.5452G>A). In vitro studies of two somatic single-base substitutions (c.5429A>G and c.5438A>G) demonstrated exon 25 skipping from the transcript, a phenomenon not previously reported in DICER1. Further we show that DICER1 transcripts lacking exon 25 can be translated in vitro. This study has demonstrated that a subset of WTs exhibits two 'hits' in DICER1, suggesting that these mutations could be key events in the pathogenesis of these tumours.

  15. Biallelic BRCA2 Mutations Shape the Somatic Mutational Landscape of Aggressive Prostate Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Decker, Brennan; Karyadi, Danielle M.; Davis, Brian W.; Karlins, Eric; Tillmans, Lori S.; Stanford, Janet L.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.; Ostrander, Elaine A.

    2016-01-01

    To identify clinically important molecular subtypes of prostate cancer (PCa), we characterized the somatic landscape of aggressive tumors via deep, whole-genome sequencing. In our discovery set of ten tumor/normal subject pairs with Gleason scores of 8–10 at diagnosis, coordinated analysis of germline and somatic variants, including single-nucleotide variants, indels, and structural variants, revealed biallelic BRCA2 disruptions in a subset of samples. Compared to the other samples, the PCa BRCA2-deficient tumors exhibited a complex and highly specific mutation signature, featuring a 2.88-fold increased somatic mutation rate, depletion of context-specific C>T substitutions, and an enrichment for deletions, especially those longer than 10 bp. We next performed a BRCA2 deficiency-targeted reanalysis of 150 metastatic PCa tumors, and each of the 18 BRCA2-mutated samples recapitulated the BRCA2 deficiency-associated mutation signature, underscoring the potent influence of these lesions on somatic mutagenesis and tumor evolution. Among all 21 individuals with BRCA2-deficient tumors, only about half carried deleterious germline alleles. Importantly, the somatic mutation signature in tumors with one germline and one somatic risk allele was indistinguishable from those with purely somatic mutations. Our observations clearly demonstrate that BRCA2-disrupted tumors represent a unique and clinically relevant molecular subtype of aggressive PCa, highlighting both the promise and utility of this mutation signature as a prognostic and treatment-selection biomarker. Further, any test designed to leverage BRCA2 status as a biomarker for PCa must consider both germline and somatic mutations and all types of deleterious mutations. PMID:27087322

  16. Prevalence of rare mitochondrial DNA mutations in mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bannwarth, Sylvie; Procaccio, Vincent; Lebre, Anne Sophie; Jardel, Claude; Chaussenot, Annabelle; Hoarau, Claire; Maoulida, Hassani; Charrier, Nathanaël; Gai, Xiaowu; Xie, Hongbo M; Ferre, Marc; Fragaki, Konstantina; Hardy, Gaëlle; Mousson de Camaret, Bénédicte; Marlin, Sandrine; Dhaenens, Claire Marie; Slama, Abdelhamid; Rocher, Christophe; Paul Bonnefont, Jean; Rötig, Agnès; Aoutil, Nadia; Gilleron, Mylène; Desquiret-Dumas, Valérie; Reynier, Pascal; Ceresuela, Jennifer; Jonard, Laurence; Devos, Aurore; Espil-Taris, Caroline; Martinez, Delphine; Gaignard, Pauline; Le Quan Sang, Kim-Hanh; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Falk, Marni J; Florentz, Catherine; Chabrol, Brigitte; Durand-Zaleski, Isabelle; Paquis-Flucklinger, Véronique

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) diseases are rare disorders whose prevalence is estimated around 1 in 5000. Patients are usually tested only for deletions and for common mutations of mtDNA which account for 5–40% of cases, depending on the study. However, the prevalence of rare mtDNA mutations is not known. Methods We analysed the whole mtDNA in a cohort of 743 patients suspected of manifesting a mitochondrial disease, after excluding deletions and common mutations. Both heteroplasmic and homoplasmic variants were identified using two complementary strategies (Surveyor and MitoChip). Multiple correspondence analyses followed by hierarchical ascendant cluster process were used to explore relationships between clinical spectrum, age at onset and localisation of mutations. Results 7.4% of deleterious mutations and 22.4% of novel putative mutations were identified. Pathogenic heteroplasmic mutations were more frequent than homoplasmic mutations (4.6% vs 2.8%). Patients carrying deleterious mutations showed symptoms before 16 years of age in 67% of cases. Early onset disease (<1 year) was significantly associated with mutations in protein coding genes (mainly in complex I) while late onset disorders (>16 years) were associated with mutations in tRNA genes. MTND5 and MTND6 genes were identified as ‘hotspots’ of mutations, with Leigh syndrome accounting for the large majority of associated phenotypes. Conclusions Rare mitochondrial DNA mutations probably account for more than 7.4% of patients with respiratory chain deficiency. This study shows that a comprehensive analysis of mtDNA is essential, and should include young children, for an accurate diagnosis that is now accessible with the development of next generation sequencing technology. PMID:23847141

  17. Estimating the Distribution of Selection Coefficients from Phylogenetic Data Using Sitewise Mutation-Selection Models

    PubMed Central

    Tamuri, Asif U.; dos Reis, Mario; Goldstein, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Estimation of the distribution of selection coefficients of mutations is a long-standing issue in molecular evolution. In addition to population-based methods, the distribution can be estimated from DNA sequence data by phylogenetic-based models. Previous models have generally found unimodal distributions where the probability mass is concentrated between mildly deleterious and nearly neutral mutations. Here we use a sitewise mutation–selection phylogenetic model to estimate the distribution of selection coefficients among novel and fixed mutations (substitutions) in a data set of 244 mammalian mitochondrial genomes and a set of 401 PB2 proteins from influenza. We find a bimodal distribution of selection coefficients for novel mutations in both the mitochondrial data set and for the influenza protein evolving in its natural reservoir, birds. Most of the mutations are strongly deleterious with the rest of the probability mass concentrated around mildly deleterious to neutral mutations. The distribution of the coefficients among substitutions is unimodal and symmetrical around nearly neutral substitutions for both data sets at adaptive equilibrium. About 0.5% of the nonsynonymous mutations and 14% of the nonsynonymous substitutions in the mitochondrial proteins are advantageous, with 0.5% and 24% observed for the influenza protein. Following a host shift of influenza from birds to humans, however, we find among novel mutations in PB2 a trimodal distribution with a small mode of advantageous mutations. PMID:22209901

  18. The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the mitochondrial matrix is sensed by PINK1 to induce PARK2/Parkin-mediated mitophagy of polarized mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Jin, Seok Min; Youle, Richard J

    2013-11-01

    Defective mitochondria exert deleterious effects on host cells. To manage this risk, mitochondria display several lines of quality control mechanisms: mitochondria-specific chaperones and proteases protect against misfolded proteins at the molecular level, and fission/fusion and mitophagy segregate and eliminate damage at the organelle level. An increase in unfolded proteins in mitochondria activates a mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPR(mt)) to increase chaperone production, while the mitochondrial kinase PINK1 and the E3 ubiquitin ligase PARK2/Parkin, whose mutations cause familial Parkinson disease, remove depolarized mitochondria through mitophagy. It is unclear, however, if there is a connection between those different levels of quality control (QC). Here, we show that the expression of unfolded proteins in the matrix causes the accumulation of PINK1 on energetically healthy mitochondria, resulting in mitochondrial translocation of PARK2, mitophagy and subsequent reduction of unfolded protein load. Also, PINK1 accumulation is greatly enhanced by the knockdown of the LONP1 protease. We suggest that the accumulation of unfolded proteins in mitochondria is a physiological trigger of mitophagy.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: actin-accumulation myopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... fibers and are important for muscle contraction. Attachment (binding) and release of the overlapping thick and thin filaments allows them to move relative to each other so that the muscles can contract. ACTA1 gene mutations that cause actin-accumulation myopathy ...

  20. Fitness effects of mutations in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Gordo, Isabel; Perfeito, Lilia; Sousa, Ana

    2011-01-01

    Mutation is the primary source of variation in any organism. Without it, natural selection cannot operate and organisms cannot adapt to novel environments. Mutation is also generally a source of defect: many mutations are not neutral but cause fitness decreases in the organisms where they arise. In bacteria, another important source of variation is horizontal gene transfer. This source of variation can also cause beneficial or deleterious effects. Determining the distribution of fitness effects of mutations in different environments and genetic backgrounds is an active research field. In bacteria, knowledge of these distributions is key for understanding important traits. For example, for determining the dynamics of microorganisms with a high genomic mutation rate (mutators), and for understanding the evolution of antibiotic resistance, and the emergence of pathogenic traits. All of these characteristics are extremely relevant for human health both at the individual and population levels. Experimental evolution has been a valuable tool to address these questions. Here, we review some of the important findings of mutation effects in bacteria revealed through laboratory experiments.

  1. SDS, a structural disruption score for assessment of missense variant deleteriousness

    PubMed Central

    Preeprem, Thanawadee; Gibson, Greg

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a novel structure-based evaluation for missense variants that explicitly models protein structure and amino acid properties to predict the likelihood that a variant disrupts protein function. A structural disruption score (SDS) is introduced as a measure to depict the likelihood that a case variant is functional. The score is constructed using characteristics that distinguish between causal and neutral variants within a group of proteins. The SDS score is correlated with standard sequence-based deleteriousness, but shows promise for improving discrimination between neutral and causal variants at less conserved sites. The prediction was performed on 3-dimentional structures of 57 gene products whose homozygous SNPs were identified as case-exclusive variants in an exome sequencing study of epilepsy disorders. We contrasted the candidate epilepsy variants with scores for likely benign variants found in the EVS database, and for positive control variants in the same genes that are suspected to promote a range of diseases. To derive a characteristic profile of damaging SNPs, we transformed continuous scores into categorical variables based on the score distribution of each measurement, collected from all possible SNPs in this protein set, where extreme measures were assumed to be deleterious. A second epilepsy dataset was used to replicate the findings. Causal variants tend to receive higher sequence-based deleterious scores, induce larger physico-chemical changes between amino acid pairs, locate in protein domains, buried sites or on conserved protein surface clusters, and cause protein destabilization, relative to negative controls. These measures were agglomerated for each variant. A list of nine high-priority putative functional variants for epilepsy was generated. Our newly developed SDS protocol facilitates SNP prioritization for experimental validation. PMID:24795746

  2. High-protein-low-carbohydrate diet: deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular effects depend on age.

    PubMed

    Bedarida, Tatiana; Baron, Stephanie; Vessieres, Emilie; Vibert, Francoise; Ayer, Audrey; Marchiol-Fournigault, Carmen; Henrion, Daniel; Paul, Jean-Louis; Noble, Florence; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Beaudeux, Jean-Louis; Cottart, Charles-Henry; Nivet-Antoine, Valerie

    2014-09-01

    High-protein-low-carbohydrate (HP-LC) diets have become widespread. Yet their deleterious consequences, especially on glucose metabolism and arteries, have already been underlined. Our previous study (2) has already shown glucose intolerance with major arterial dysfunction in very old mice subjected to an HP-LC diet. The hypothesis of this work was that this diet had an age-dependent deleterious metabolic and cardiovascular outcome. Two groups of mice, young and adult (3 and 6 mo old), were subjected for 12 wk to a standard or to an HP-LC diet. Glucose and lipid metabolism was studied. The cardiovascular system was explored from the functional stage with Doppler-echography to the molecular stage (arterial reactivity, mRNA, immunohistochemistry). Young mice did not exhibit any significant metabolic modification, whereas adult mice presented marked glucose intolerance associated with an increase in resistin and triglyceride levels. These metabolic disturbances were responsible for cardiovascular damages only in adult mice, with decreased aortic distensibility and left ventricle dysfunction. These seemed to be the consequence of arterial dysfunctions. Mesenteric arteries were the worst affected with a major oxidative stress, whereas aorta function seemed to be maintained with an appreciable role of cyclooxygenase-2 to preserve endothelial function. This study highlights for the first time the age-dependent deleterious effects of an HP-LC diet on metabolism, with glucose intolerance and lipid disorders and vascular (especially microvessels) and cardiac functions. This work shows that HP-LC lead to equivalent cardiovascular alterations, as observed in very old age, and underlines the danger of such diet.

  3. Increased burden of de novo predicted deleterious variants in complex congenital diaphragmatic hernia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lan; Sawle, Ashley D.; Wynn, Julia; Aspelund, Gudrun; Stolar, Charles J.; Arkovitz, Marc S.; Potoka, Douglas; Azarow, Kenneth S.; Mychaliska, George B.; Shen, Yufeng; Chung, Wendy K.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a serious birth defect that accounts for 8% of all major birth anomalies. Approximately 40% of cases occur in association with other anomalies. As sporadic complex CDH likely has a significant impact on reproductive fitness, we hypothesized that de novo variants would account for the etiology in a significant fraction of cases. We performed exome sequencing in 39 CDH trios and compared the frequency of de novo variants with 787 unaffected controls from the Simons Simplex Collection. We found no significant difference in overall frequency of de novo variants between cases and controls. However, among genes that are highly expressed during diaphragm development, there was a significant burden of likely gene disrupting (LGD) and predicted deleterious missense variants in cases (fold enrichment = 3.2, P-value = 0.003), and these genes are more likely to be haploinsufficient (P-value = 0.01) than the ones with benign missense or synonymous de novo variants in cases. After accounting for the frequency of de novo variants in the control population, we estimate that 15% of sporadic complex CDH patients are attributable to de novo LGD or deleterious missense variants. We identified several genes with predicted deleterious de novo variants that fall into common categories of genes related to transcription factors and cell migration that we believe are related to the pathogenesis of CDH. These data provide supportive evidence for novel genes in the pathogenesis of CDH associated with other anomalies and suggest that de novo variants play a significant role in complex CDH cases. PMID:26034137

  4. Sperm competition can drive a male-biased mutation rate.

    PubMed

    Blumenstiel, Justin P

    2007-12-07

    A pattern of male-biased mutation has been found in a wide range of species. The standard explanation for this bias is that there are greater numbers of mitotic cell divisions in the history of the average sperm, compared to the average egg, and that mutations typically result from errors made during replication. However, this fails to provide an ultimate evolutionary explanation for why the male germline would tolerate more mutations that are typically deleterious. One possibility is that if there is a tradeoff between producing large numbers of sperm and expending energetic resources in maintaining a lower mutation rate, sperm competition would select for males that produce larger numbers of sperm despite a higher resulting mutation rate. Here I describe a model that jointly considers the fitness consequences of deleterious mutation and mating success in the face of sperm competition. I show that a moderate level of sperm competition can account for the observation that the male germline tolerates a higher mutation rate than the female germline.

  5. Identification of novel CELSR1 mutations in spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Lei, Yunping; Zhu, Huiping; Yang, Wei; Ross, M Elizabeth; Shaw, Gary M; Finnell, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Spina bifida is one of the most common neural tube defects (NTDs) with a complex etiology. Variants in planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been associated with NTDs including spina bifida in both animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we sequenced all exons of CELSR1 in 192 spina bifida patients from a California population to determine the contribution of CELSR1 mutations in the studied population. Novel and rare variants identified in these patients were subsequently genotyped in 190 ethnically matched control individuals. Six missense mutations not found in controls were predicted to be deleterious by both SIFT and PolyPhen. Two TG dinucleotide repeat variants were individually detected in 2 spina bifida patients but not detected in controls. In vitro functional analysis showed that the two TG dinucleotide repeat variants not only changed subcellular localization of the CELSR1 protein, but also impaired the physical association between CELSR1 and VANGL2, and thus diminished the ability to recruit VANGL2 for cell-cell contact. In total, 3% of our spina bifida patients carry deleterious or predicted to be deleterious CELSR1 mutations. Our findings suggest that CELSR1 mutations contribute to the risk of spina bifida in a cohort of spina bifida patients from California.

  6. Identification of Novel CELSR1 Mutations in Spina Bifida

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Yunping; Zhu, Huiping; Yang, Wei; Ross, M. Elizabeth; Shaw, Gary M.; Finnell, Richard H.

    2014-01-01

    Spina bifida is one of the most common neural tube defects (NTDs) with a complex etiology. Variants in planar cell polarity (PCP) genes have been associated with NTDs including spina bifida in both animal models and human cohorts. In this study, we sequenced all exons of CELSR1 in 192 spina bifida patients from a California population to determine the contribution of CELSR1 mutations in the studied population. Novel and rare variants identified in these patients were subsequently genotyped in 190 ethnically matched control individuals. Six missense mutations not found in controls were predicted to be deleterious by both SIFT and PolyPhen. Two TG dinucleotide repeat variants were individually detected in 2 spina bifida patients but not detected in controls. In vitro functional analysis showed that the two TG dinucleotide repeat variants not only changed subcellular localization of the CELSR1 protein, but also impaired the physical association between CELSR1 and VANGL2, and thus diminished the ability to recruit VANGL2 for cell-cell contact. In total, 3% of our spina bifida patients carry deleterious or predicted to be deleterious CELSR1 mutations. Our findings suggest that CELSR1 mutations contribute to the risk of spina bifida in a cohort of spina bifida patients from California. PMID:24632739

  7. Asperger syndrome and early-onset schizophrenia associated with a novel MECP2 deleterious missense variant.

    PubMed

    Curie, Aurore; Lesca, Gaëtan; Bussy, Gérald; Manificat, Sabine; Arnaud, Valérie; Gonzalez, Sibylle; Revol, Olivier; Calender, Alain; Gérard, Daniel; des Portes, Vincent

    2017-02-27

    Methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) deleterious variants, which are responsible for Rett syndrome in girls, are involved in a wide spectrum of developmental disabilities in males. A neuropsychiatric phenotype without intellectual disability is uncommon in patients with MECP2 deleterious variants. We report on two dizygotic twins with an MECP2-related psychiatric disorder without intellectual disability. Neuropsychological and psychiatric phenotype assessments were performed, and a genetic analysis was carried out. Both patients fulfilled the Pervasive Developmental Disorder criteria on Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule and Asperger syndrome criteria on Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, 4th ed. (DSM-IV). One patient developed early-onset schizophrenia (DSM-IV criteria) with two acute psychotic episodes, the latest one following corticosteroids and sodium valproate intake, with major hyperammonemia. A novel MECP2 gene transversion c.491 G>T [p.(Ser164Ile)] was found in both twins. Pathogenicity of this variant was considered on the basis of strong clinical and molecular data. The underlying molecular basis of neuropsychiatric disorders may have important consequences on genetic counseling and therapeutic strategies.

  8. Profiling deleterious non-synonymous SNPs of smoker's gene CYP1A1.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, A Sai; Khan, Imran; Farhan, Md; Thiagarajan, Padma

    2013-01-01

    CYP1A1 gene belongs to the cytochrome P450 family and is known better as smokers' gene due to its hyperactivation as a consequence of long term smoking. The expression of CYP1A1 induces polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon production in the lungs, which when over expressed, is known to cause smoking related diseases, such as cardiovascular pathologies, cancer, and diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) are the simplest form of genetic variations that occur at a higher frequency, and are denoted as synonymous and non-synonymous SNPs on the basis of their effects on the amino acids. This study adopts a systematic in silico approach to predict the deleterious SNPs that are associated with disease conditions. It is inferred that four SNPs are highly deleterious, among which the SNP with rs17861094 is commonly predicted to be harmful by all tools. Hydrophobic (isoleucine) to hydrophilic (serine) amino acid variation was observed in the candidate gene. Hence, this investigation aims to characterize a candidate gene from 159 SNPs of CYP1A1.

  9. BRCA1, BRCA2, PALB2, and CDKN2A Mutations in Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC): A PACGENE Study

    PubMed Central

    Zhen, David B.; Rabe, Kari G.; Gallinger, Steven; Syngal, Sapna; Schwartz, Ann G.; Goggins, Michael G.; Hruban, Ralph H.; Cote, Michele L.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Roberts, Nicholas J.; Cannon-Albright, Lisa A.; Li, Donghui; Moyes, Kelsey; Wenstrup, Richard J.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Seminara, Daniela; Klein, Alison P.; Petersen, Gloria M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Familial Pancreatic Cancer (FPC) kindreds contain at least two affected first-degree relatives (FDR). Comprehensive data are needed to assist clinical risk assessment and genetic testing. Methods Germline DNA samples from 727 unrelated probands with positive family history (521 met criteria for FPC) were CLIA-tested for mutations in BRCA1 and BRCA2 (including analysis of deletions and rearrangements), PALB2, and CDKN2A. We compared prevalence of deleterious mutations between FPC probands and non-FPC probands (kindreds containing at least two affected biologic relatives, but not FDR). We also examined the impact of family history of breast and ovarian cancer and melanoma. Results Prevalence of deleterious mutations (excluding variants of unknown significance) among FPC probands was: BRCA1, 1.2%; BRCA2, 3.7%; PALB2, 0.6%; CDKN2A, 2.5%. Four novel deleterious mutations were detected. FPC probands carry more mutations in the four genes (8.0%) than non-FPC probands (3.5%) (odds ratio=2.40, 95% CI=(1.06, 5.44), p=0.03). The probability of testing positive for deleterious mutations in any of the four genes ranges up to 10.4%, depending upon family history of cancers. BRCA2 and CDKN2A account for the majority of mutations in FPC. Conclusion Genetic testing of multiple relevant genes in probands with a positive family history is warranted, particularly for FPC. PMID:25356972

  10. Estimating the Fitness Effects of New Mutations in the Wild Yeast Saccharomyces paradoxus.

    PubMed

    Koufopanou, Vassiliki; Lomas, Susan; Tsai, Isheng J; Burt, Austin

    2015-06-16

    The nature of selection acting on a population is in large measure determined by the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations. In this study, we use DNA sequences from four closely related clades of Saccharomyces paradoxus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae to identify and polarize new mutations and estimate their fitness effects. By progressively restricting the analyses to narrower categories of sites, we further seek to characterize sites with predictable mutational effects, that is, unconditionally deleterious, neutral or beneficial. Consistent with previous studies on S. paradoxus, we have failed to find evidence for mutations with beneficial effects, even in regions that were divergent in two outgroup clades, perhaps a consequence of the relatively unchallenged, predominantly asexual and highly inbred lifestyle of this species. On the other hand, there is abundant evidence of deleterious mutations, varying in severity of effect from strongly deleterious to very mild, particularly in regions conserved in the outgroup taxa, indicating a history of persistent purifying selection. Narrowing the analysis down to individual amino acids reduces further the range of effects: for example, mutations changing cysteine are predicted to be nearly always strongly deleterious, whereas those changing arginine, serine, and tyrosine are expected to be nearly neutral. The proportion of mutations with deleterious effects for a particular amino acid is correlated with long-term stasis of that amino acid among highly divergent sequences from a variety of organisms, showing that functionality of sites tends to persist through the diversification of clades and that our findings are also relevant to longer evolutionary times and other taxa.

  11. Identification of a new RNA.RNA interaction site for human telomerase RNA (hTR): structural implications for hTR accumulation and a dyskeratosis congenita point mutation.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xiaojun; Gavory, Gérald; Li, Haitao; Ying, Liming; Klenerman, David; Balasubramanian, Shankar

    2003-11-15

    The enzyme telomerase is a ribonucleoprotein that has a critical role in the maintenance of stable telomeres in organisms that possess linear chromosomes. Using a recently developed single molecule fluorescence coincidence method, we have studied the RNA component of telomerase (hTR) and directly observed multimerisation of hTR in solution. RNA mutagenesis and blocking oligonucleotides were employed to identify the single-stranded internal loop J7b/8a as an important and specific hTR.hTR interaction site. This observation was confirmed by studies on a model RNA fragment (hTR(380-444)), comprising part of the H/ACA domain, the internal loop J7b/8a and the CR7 domain, that was found to dimerise. Substitution mutagenesis within the proposed RNA.RNA interaction site of hTR(380-444) resulted in a loss of dimerisation potential and insertion of the dyskeratosis congenita mutation C408G led to a significant reduction in dimer formation. Together, these results suggest that this RNA.RNA interaction site may be functionally relevant.

  12. Effects of Interference Between Selected Loci on the Mutation Load, Inbreeding Depression, and Heterosis

    PubMed Central

    Roze, Denis

    2015-01-01

    A classical prediction from single-locus models is that inbreeding increases the efficiency of selection against partially recessive deleterious alleles (purging), thereby decreasing the mutation load and level of inbreeding depression. However, previous multilocus simulation studies found that increasing the rate of self-fertilization of individuals may not lead to purging and argued that selective interference among loci causes this effect. In this article, I derive simple analytical approximations for the mutation load and inbreeding depression, taking into account the effects of interference between pairs of loci. I consider two classical scenarios of nonrandomly mating populations: a single population undergoing partial selfing and a subdivided population with limited dispersal. In the first case, correlations in homozygosity between loci tend to reduce mean fitness and increase inbreeding depression. These effects are stronger when deleterious alleles are more recessive, but only weakly depend on the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and on recombination rates. In subdivided populations, interference increases inbreeding depression within demes, but decreases heterosis between demes. Comparisons with multilocus, individual-based simulations show that these analytical approximations are accurate as long as the effects of interference stay moderate, but fail for high deleterious mutation rates and low dominance coefficients of deleterious alleles. PMID:26269503

  13. Effects of Interference Between Selected Loci on the Mutation Load, Inbreeding Depression, and Heterosis.

    PubMed

    Roze, Denis

    2015-10-01

    A classical prediction from single-locus models is that inbreeding increases the efficiency of selection against partially recessive deleterious alleles (purging), thereby decreasing the mutation load and level of inbreeding depression. However, previous multilocus simulation studies found that increasing the rate of self-fertilization of individuals may not lead to purging and argued that selective interference among loci causes this effect. In this article, I derive simple analytical approximations for the mutation load and inbreeding depression, taking into account the effects of interference between pairs of loci. I consider two classical scenarios of nonrandomly mating populations: a single population undergoing partial selfing and a subdivided population with limited dispersal. In the first case, correlations in homozygosity between loci tend to reduce mean fitness and increase inbreeding depression. These effects are stronger when deleterious alleles are more recessive, but only weakly depend on the strength of selection against deleterious alleles and on recombination rates. In subdivided populations, interference increases inbreeding depression within demes, but decreases heterosis between demes. Comparisons with multilocus, individual-based simulations show that these analytical approximations are accurate as long as the effects of interference stay moderate, but fail for high deleterious mutation rates and low dominance coefficients of deleterious alleles.

  14. In silico analysis of the deleterious nsSNPs (missense) in the homeobox domain of human HOXB13 gene responsible for hereditary prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekaran, Gopalakrishnan; Hwang, Eu Chang; Kang, Taek Won; Kwon, Dong Deuk; Park, Kwangsung; Lee, Je-Jung; Lakshmanan, Vinoth-Kumar

    2017-01-10

    The human HOXB13 gene encodes a transcription factor containing a DNA-binding homeobox domain and a HoxA13 N-terminal domain. SNP is considered to be the primary genetic cause for hereditary prostate cancer (PCa). The study of functional nsSNPs would give an insight into the exact cause underlying the onset of hereditary PCa and possible methodologies for the cure or early management of the disease. Several in silico tools were used to screen and map the deleterious nsSNPs to the protein structure for predicting the structure-function effects. Among the 23 homeobox nsSNPs, sift predicted 20, whereas PolyPhen, panther, and provean predicted 21 nsSNP's as deleterious. W63R, D244N, K239Q, P222R, K218R, and G216C were found to have higher energy values than the native 2CRA. The RMSD value showed increased deviation for T253P(2.53 Å), P222R(2.27 Å), G216C(2.15 Å), K218R(1.66 Å), and K239Q(1.62 Å). The I-Mutant showed increase in the stability of R258C, S254T, S250L, K239Q, and Q227E. Ramachandran plot showed mutants P222R, G216C, W263R, and K218R having drastically unfavorable pattern of amino acid residues. The presence of these mutations may result in the altered structure and function of the transcription factor; however, the exact mechanism and pathology of those predicted nsSNPs should further be validated by in vivo experiments and population-based studies.

  15. β1-C121W Is Down But Not Out: Epilepsy-Associated Scn1b-C121W Results in a Deleterious Gain-of-Function

    PubMed Central

    Kruger, Larisa C.; O'Malley, Heather A.; Hull, Jacob M.; Kleeman, Amanda; Patino, Gustavo A.

    2016-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channel (VGSC) β subunits signal through multiple pathways on multiple time scales. In addition to modulating sodium and potassium currents, β subunits play nonconducting roles as cell adhesion molecules, which allow them to function in cell–cell communication, neuronal migration, neurite outgrowth, neuronal pathfinding, and axonal fasciculation. Mutations in SCN1B, encoding VGSC β1 and β1B, are associated with epilepsy. Autosomal-dominant SCN1B-C121W, the first epilepsy-associated VGSC mutation identified, results in genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). This mutation has been shown to disrupt both the sodium-current-modulatory and cell-adhesive functions of β1 subunits expressed in heterologous systems. The goal of this study was to compare mice heterozygous for Scn1b-C121W (Scn1b+/W) with mice heterozygous for the Scn1b-null allele (Scn1b+/−) to determine whether the C121W mutation results in loss-of-function in vivo. We found that Scn1b+/W mice were more susceptible than Scn1b+/− and Scn1b+/+ mice to hyperthermia-induced convulsions, a model of pediatric febrile seizures. β1-C121W subunits are expressed at the neuronal cell surface in vivo. However, despite this, β1-C121W polypeptides are incompletely glycosylated and do not associate with VGSC α subunits in the brain. β1-C121W subcellular localization is restricted to neuronal cell bodies and is not detected at axon initial segments in the cortex or cerebellum or at optic nerve nodes of Ranvier of Scn1bW/W mice. These data, together with our previous results showing that β1-C121W cannot participate in trans-homophilic cell adhesion, lead to the hypothesis that SCN1B-C121W confers a deleterious gain-of-function in human GEFS+ patients. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanisms underlying genetic epilepsy syndromes are poorly understood. Closing this gap in knowledge is essential to the development of new medicines to treat epilepsy. We have used mouse models to

  16. Covert deformed wing virus infections have long-term deleterious effects on honeybee foraging and survival.

    PubMed

    Benaets, Kristof; Van Geystelen, Anneleen; Cardoen, Dries; De Smet, Lina; de Graaf, Dirk C; Schoofs, Liliane; Larmuseau, Maarten H D; Brettell, Laura E; Martin, Stephen J; Wenseleers, Tom

    2017-02-08

    Several studies have suggested that covert stressors can contribute to bee colony declines. Here we provide a novel case study and show using radiofrequency identification tracking technology that covert deformed wing virus (DWV) infections in adult honeybee workers seriously impact long-term foraging and survival under natural foraging conditions. In particular, our experiments show that adult workers injected with low doses of DWV experienced increased mortality rates, that DWV caused workers to start foraging at a premature age, and that the virus reduced the workers' total activity span as foragers. Altogether, these results demonstrate that covert DWV infections have strongly deleterious effects on honeybee foraging and survival. These results are consistent with previous studies that suggested DWV to be an important contributor to the ongoing bee declines in Europe and the USA. Overall, our study underlines the strong impact that covert pathogen infections can have on individual and group-level performance in bees.

  17. Genome-wide Polygenic Burden of Rare Deleterious Variants in Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Leu, Costin; Balestrini, Simona; Maher, Bridget; Hernández-Hernández, Laura; Gormley, Padhraig; Hämäläinen, Eija; Heggeli, Kristin; Schoeler, Natasha; Novy, Jan; Willis, Joseph; Plagnol, Vincent; Ellis, Rachael; Reavey, Eleanor; O'Regan, Mary; Pickrell, William O.; Thomas, Rhys H.; Chung, Seo-Kyung; Delanty, Norman; McMahon, Jacinta M.; Malone, Stephen; Sadleir, Lynette G.; Berkovic, Samuel F.; Nashef, Lina; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Rees, Mark I.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Sander, Josemir W.; Hughes, Elaine; Helen Cross, J.; Scheffer, Ingrid E.; Palotie, Aarno; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.

    2015-01-01

    Sudden unexpected death in epilepsy (SUDEP) represents the most severe degree of the spectrum of epilepsy severity and is the commonest cause of epilepsy-related premature mortality. The precise pathophysiology and the genetic architecture of SUDEP remain elusive. Aiming to elucidate the genetic basis of SUDEP, we analysed rare, protein-changing variants from whole-exome sequences of 18 people who died of SUDEP, 87 living people with epilepsy and 1479 non-epilepsy disease controls. Association analysis revealed a significantly increased genome-wide polygenic burden per individual in the SUDEP cohort when compared to epilepsy (P = 5.7 × 10− 3) and non-epilepsy disease controls (P = 1.2 × 10− 3). The polygenic burden was driven both by the number of variants per individual, and over-representation of variants likely to be deleterious in the SUDEP cohort. As determined by this study, more than a thousand genes contribute to the observed polygenic burden within the framework of this study. Subsequent gene-based association analysis revealed five possible candidate genes significantly associated with SUDEP or epilepsy, but no one single gene emerges as common to the SUDEP cases. Our findings provide further evidence for a genetic susceptibility to SUDEP, and suggest an extensive polygenic contribution to SUDEP causation. Thus, an overall increased burden of deleterious variants in a highly polygenic background might be important in rendering a given individual more susceptible to SUDEP. Our findings suggest that exome sequencing in people with epilepsy might eventually contribute to generating SUDEP risk estimates, promoting stratified medicine in epilepsy, with the eventual aim of reducing an individual patient's risk of SUDEP. PMID:26501104

  18. TNF and its receptors in the CNS: The essential, the desirable and the deleterious effects.

    PubMed

    Probert, L

    2015-08-27

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is the prototypic pro-inflammatory cytokine. It is central to host defense and inflammatory responses but under certain circumstances also triggers cell death and tissue degeneration. Its pleiotropic effects often lead to opposing outcomes during the development of immune-mediated diseases, particularly those affecting the central nervous system (CNS). The reported contradictions may result from lack of precision in discussing TNF. TNF signaling comprises at minimum a two-ligand (soluble and transmembrane TNF) and two-receptor (TNFR1 and TNFR2) system, with ligands and receptors both differentially expressed and regulated on different cell types. The "functional multiplicity" this engenders is the focus of much research, but there is still no general consensus on functional outcomes of TNF signaling in general, let alone in the CNS. In this review, evidence showing the effects of TNF in the CNS under physiological and pathophysiological conditions is placed in the context of major advances in understanding of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that govern TNF function in general. Thus the roles of TNF signaling in the CNS shift from the conventional dichotomy of beneficial and deleterious, that mainly explain effects under pathological conditions, to incorporate a growing number of "essential" and "desirable" roles for TNF and its main cellular source in the CNS, microglia, under physiological conditions including regulation of neuronal activity and maintenance of myelin. An improved holistic view of TNF function in the CNS might better reconcile the expansive experimental data with stark clinical evidence that reduced functioning of TNF and its dominant pro-inflammatory receptor, TNFR1, are risk factors for the development of multiple sclerosis. It will also facilitate the safe translation of basic research findings from animal models to humans and propel the development of more selective anti-TNF therapies aimed at selectively

  19. Methylphenidate and environmental enrichment ameliorate the deleterious effects of prenatal stress on attention functioning.

    PubMed

    Zubedat, Salman; Aga-Mizrachi, Shlomit; Cymerblit-Sabba, Adi; Ritter, Ami; Nachmani, Maayan; Avital, Avi

    2015-01-01

    Either pre- or post-natal environmental factors seem to play a key role in brain and behavioral development and to exert long-term effects. Increasing evidence suggests that exposure to prenatal stress (PS) leads to motor and learning deficits and elevated anxiety, while enriched environment (EE) shows protective effects. The dopaminergic system is also sensitive to environmental life circumstances and affects attention functioning, which serves as the preliminary gate to cognitive processes. However, the effects of methylphenidate (MPH) on the dopaminergic system and attentional functioning, in the context of these life experiences, remain unclear. Therefore, we aimed to examine the effects of EE or PS on distinct types of attention, along with possible effects of MPH exposure. We found that PS impaired selective attention as well as partial sustained attention, while EE had beneficial effects. Both EE and MPH ameliorated the deleterious effects of PS on attention functioning. Considering the possible psychostimulant effect of MPH, we examined both anxiety-like behavior as well as motor learning. We found that PS had a clear anxiogenic effect, whereas EE had an anxiolytic effect. Nevertheless, the treatment with both MPH and/or EE recovered the deleterious effects of PS. In the motor-learning task, the PS group showed superior performance while MPH led to impaired motor learning. Performance decrements were prevented in both the PS + MPH and EE + MPH groups. This study provides evidence that peripubertal exposure to EE (by providing enhanced sensory, motor, and social opportunities) or MPH treatments might be an optional therapeutic intervention in preventing the PS long-term adverse consequences.

  20. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome.

    PubMed

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth; d'Enfert, Christophe; Legrand, Mélanie

    2016-10-11

    The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species.

  1. Albumin infusion may deleteriously promote extracellular fluid overload without improving circulating hypovolemia in patients of advanced cirrhosis with diabetes mellitus and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramesh; Kumar, Sachin; Lata, Suman

    2013-04-01

    In patients with liver cirrhosis, albumin is given to improve relative hypovolemia caused by marked splanchnic arteriolar vasodilatation. However, the volume effect of albumin is not predictable and depends also on capillary permeability, hydrostatic pressure and lymphatic ability to re-circulate albumin from interstitium to plasma. In patients with decompensated cirrhosis, the capillary permeability is increased, hydrostatic pressure is higher, and the lymphatics functions are deficient. Hence the albumin molecules are more likely to be extravasated rapidly into the interstitium and are subsequently less likely to be re-circulated back into the plasma. This would not only fail to correct circulating hypovolemia, the purpose for which it is given, but also would favor development of reverse colloid oncotic pressure and fluid movement out of the capillaries leading to development of edema. Thus, anything else which could further increase capillary permeability or hydrostatic pressure in cirrhotic patients might create more problems with albumin infusion. An increased capillary permeability is the hallmark of diabetes mellitus. Furthermore, diabetes mellitus may worsen immunodepression in cirrhotic patients thus increasing the incidence of severe infections which may further have a deleterious effect on hemodynamics and capillary permeability. A diabetic patient with advanced cirrhosis and sepsis usually has markedly increased capillary permeability, high hydrostatic pressure due to hyperdynamic circulation, and compromised lymphatic drainage capacity. Hence, using albumin infusion in them would not only fail to improve relative hypovolemia, but also would deleteriously promote extravascular accumulation of fluid, which might impair the functions of many vital organs. However, the efficacy and safety of albumin infusion in diabetic patients with advanced cirrhosis and sepsis is not known. Such data can have a great clinical implication and would necessitate search of

  2. Analysis of Repair Mechanisms following an Induced Double-Strand Break Uncovers Recessive Deleterious Alleles in the Candida albicans Diploid Genome

    PubMed Central

    Feri, Adeline; Loll-Krippleber, Raphaël; Commere, Pierre-Henri; Maufrais, Corinne; Sertour, Natacha; Schwartz, Katja; Sherlock, Gavin; Bougnoux, Marie-Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The diploid genome of the yeast Candida albicans is highly plastic, exhibiting frequent loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH) events. To provide a deeper understanding of the mechanisms leading to LOH, we investigated the repair of a unique DNA double-strand break (DSB) in the laboratory C. albicans SC5314 strain using the I-SceI meganuclease. Upon I-SceI induction, we detected a strong increase in the frequency of LOH events at an I-SceI target locus positioned on chromosome 4 (Chr4), including events spreading from this locus to the proximal telomere. Characterization of the repair events by single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole-genome sequencing revealed a predominance of gene conversions, but we also observed mitotic crossover or break-induced replication events, as well as combinations of independent events. Importantly, progeny that had undergone homozygosis of part or all of Chr4 haplotype B (Chr4B) were inviable. Mining of genome sequencing data for 155 C. albicans isolates allowed the identification of a recessive lethal allele in the GPI16 gene on Chr4B unique to C. albicans strain SC5314 which is responsible for this inviability. Additional recessive lethal or deleterious alleles were identified in the genomes of strain SC5314 and two clinical isolates. Our results demonstrate that recessive lethal alleles in the genomes of C. albicans isolates prevent the occurrence of specific extended LOH events. While these and other recessive lethal and deleterious alleles are likely to accumulate in C. albicans due to clonal reproduction, their occurrence may in turn promote the maintenance of corresponding nondeleterious alleles and, consequently, heterozygosity in the C. albicans species. PMID:27729506

  3. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Botigué, Laura R; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K; Martin, Alicia R; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2016-01-26

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼ 50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive.

  4. Distance from sub-Saharan Africa predicts mutational load in diverse human genomes

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Botigué, Laura R.; Peischl, Stephan; Dupanloup, Isabelle; Lipatov, Mikhail; Maples, Brian K.; Martin, Alicia R.; Musharoff, Shaila; Cann, Howard; Snyder, Michael P.; Excoffier, Laurent; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2016-01-01

    The Out-of-Africa (OOA) dispersal ∼50,000 y ago is characterized by a series of founder events as modern humans expanded into multiple continents. Population genetics theory predicts an increase of mutational load in populations undergoing serial founder effects during range expansions. To test this hypothesis, we have sequenced full genomes and high-coverage exomes from seven geographically divergent human populations from Namibia, Congo, Algeria, Pakistan, Cambodia, Siberia, and Mexico. We find that individual genomes vary modestly in the overall number of predicted deleterious alleles. We show via spatially explicit simulations that the observed distribution of deleterious allele frequencies is consistent with the OOA dispersal, particularly under a model where deleterious mutations are recessive. We conclude that there is a strong signal of purifying selection at conserved genomic positions within Africa, but that many predicted deleterious mutations have evolved as if they were neutral during the expansion out of Africa. Under a model where selection is inversely related to dominance, we show that OOA populations are likely to have a higher mutation load due to increased allele frequencies of nearly neutral variants that are recessive or partially recessive. PMID:26712023

  5. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues. Stem Cells Translational Medicine 2017;6:68-76.

  6. Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Expanded Under Ambient Oxygen Concentration Accumulate Oxidative DNA Lesions and Experience Procarcinogenic DNA Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Bétous, Rémy; Renoud, Marie-Laure; Hoede, Claire; Gonzalez, Ignacio; Jones, Natalie; Longy, Michel; Sensebé, Luc; Cazaux, Christophe; Hoffmann, Jean-Sébastien

    2016-08-24

    : Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) have led to growing interest in cell-based therapy because they can be easily harvested from an abundant tissue. ADSCs must be expanded in vitro before transplantation. This essential step causes concerns about the safety of adult stem cells in terms of potential transformation. Tumorigenesis is driven in its earliest step by DNA replication stress, which is characterized by the accumulation of stalled DNA replication forks and activation of the DNA damage response. Thus, to evaluate the safety of ADSCs during ex vivo expansion, we monitored DNA replication under atmospheric (21%) or physiologic (1%) oxygen concentration. Here, by combining immunofluorescence and DNA combing, we show that ADSCs cultured under 21% oxygen accumulate endogenous oxidative DNA lesions, which interfere with DNA replication by increasing fork stalling events, thereby leading to incomplete DNA replication and fork collapse. Moreover, we found by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) that culture of ADSCs under atmospheric oxygen concentration leads to misexpression of cell cycle and DNA replication genes, which could contribute to DNA replication stress. Finally, analysis of acquired small nucleotide polymorphism shows that expansion of ADSCs under 21% oxygen induces a mutational bias toward deleterious transversions. Overall, our results suggest that expanding ADSCs at a low oxygen concentration could reduce the risk for DNA replication stress-associated transformation, as occurs in neoplastic tissues.

  7. Phenotypic effect of mutations in evolving populations of RNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The secondary structure of folded RNA sequences is a good model to map phenotype onto genotype, as represented by the RNA sequence. Computational studies of the evolution of ensembles of RNA molecules towards target secondary structures yield valuable clues to the mechanisms behind adaptation of complex populations. The relationship between the space of sequences and structures, the organization of RNA ensembles at mutation-selection equilibrium, the time of adaptation as a function of the population parameters, the presence of collective effects in quasispecies, or the optimal mutation rates to promote adaptation all are issues that can be explored within this framework. Results We investigate the effect of microscopic mutations on the phenotype of RNA molecules during their in silico evolution and adaptation. We calculate the distribution of the effects of mutations on fitness, the relative fractions of beneficial and deleterious mutations and the corresponding selection coefficients for populations evolving under different mutation rates. Three different situations are explored: the mutation-selection equilibrium (optimized population) in three different fitness landscapes, the dynamics during adaptation towards a goal structure (adapting population), and the behavior under periodic population bottlenecks (perturbed population). Conclusions The ratio between the number of beneficial and deleterious mutations experienced by a population of RNA sequences increases with the value of the mutation rate μ at which evolution proceeds. In contrast, the selective value of mutations remains almost constant, independent of μ, indicating that adaptation occurs through an increase in the amount of beneficial mutations, with little variations in the average effect they have on fitness. Statistical analyses of the distribution of fitness effects reveal that small effects, either beneficial or deleterious, are well described by a Pareto distribution. These results

  8. Systematic mutation of bacteriophage T4 lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Rennell, D; Bouvier, S E; Hardy, L W; Poteete, A R

    1991-11-05

    Amber mutations were introduced into every codon (except the initiating AUG) of the bacteriophage T4 lysozyme gene. The amber alleles were introduced into a bacteriophage P22 hybrid, called P22 e416, in which the normal P22 lysozyme gene is replaced by its T4 homologue, and which consequently depends upon T4 lysozyme for its ability to form a plaque. The resulting amber mutants were tested for plaque formation on amber suppressor strains of Salmonella typhimurium. Experiments with other hybrid phages engineered to produce different amounts of wild-type T4 lysozyme have shown that, to score as deleterious, a mutation must reduce lysozyme activity to less than 3% of that produced by wild-type P22 e416. Plating the collection of amber mutants covering 163 of the 164 codons of T4 lysozyme, on 13 suppressor strains that each insert a different amino acid substitutions at every position in the protein (except the first). Of the resulting 2015 single amino acid substitutions in T4 lysozyme, 328 were found to be sufficiently deleterious to inhibit plaque formation. More than half (55%) of the positions in the protein tolerated all substitutions examined. Among (N-terminal) amber fragments, only those of 161 or more residues are active. The effects of many of the deleterious substitutions are interpretable in light of the known structure of T4 lysozyme. Residues in the molecule that are refractory to replacements generally have solvent-inaccessible side-chains; the catalytic Glu11 and Asp20 residues are notable exceptions. Especially sensitive sites include residues involved in buried salt bridges near the catalytic site (Asp10, Arg145 and Arg148) and a few others that may have critical structural roles (Gly30, Trp138 and Tyr161).

  9. Parental origin of mutation and the risk of breast cancer in a prospective study of women with a BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation.

    PubMed

    Senst, N; Llacuachaqui, M; Lubinski, J; Lynch, H; Armel, S; Neuhausen, S; Ghadirian, P; Sun, P; Narod, S A

    2013-07-01

    The objective is to estimate the risk of breast cancer in women who carry a deleterious BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation, according to parental origin of mutation. We conducted a cohort study of women with a BRCA1 mutation (n = 1523) or BRCA2 mutation (n = 369) who had not been diagnosed with breast or ovarian cancer. For each woman, the pedigree was reviewed and the origin of the mutation was assigned as probable paternal or maternal. The hazard ratio (HR) for developing breast cancer in the follow-up period was estimated for women with a paternal mutation compared to a maternal mutation. The risk of breast cancer was modestly higher in women with a paternal BRCA1 mutation compared to women with a maternal BRCA1 mutation (HR = 1.46; 95% CI = 0.99-2.16) but the difference was not significant (p = 0.06). The parental mutation origin did not affect the risk in women with a BRCA2 mutation. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that there is an increased risk of breast cancer among women with a paternally inherited BRCA1 mutation compared to a maternally inherited mutation. However, the data are not sufficiently compelling to justify different screening recommendations for the two subgroups.

  10. Blind Prediction of Deleterious Amino Acid Variations with SNPs&GO.

    PubMed

    Capriotti, Emidio; Martelli, Pier Luigi; Fariselli, Piero; Casadio, Rita

    2017-01-19

    SNPs&GO is a machine learning method for predicting the association of single amino acid variations (SAVs) to disease, considering protein functional annotation. The method is a binary classifier that implements a Support Vector Machine algorithm to discriminate between disease-related and neutral SAVs. SNPs&GO combines information from protein sequence with functional annotation encoded by Gene Ontology terms. Tested in sequence mode on more than 38,000 SAVs from the SwissVar dataset, our method reached 81% overall accuracy and an area under the receiving operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.88 with low false positive rate. In almost all the editions of the Critical Assessment of Genome Interpretation (CAGI) experiments, SNPs&GO ranked among the most accurate algorithms for predicting the effect of SAVs. In this paper we summarize the best results obtained by SNPs&GO on disease related variations of four CAGI challenges relative to the following genes: CHEK2 (CAGI 2010), RAD50 (CAGI 2011), p16-INK (CAGI 2013) and NAGLU (CAGI 2016). Result evaluation provides insights about the accuracy of our algorithm and the relevance of GO terms in annotating the effect of the variants. It also helps to define good practices for the detection of deleterious SAVs.

  11. Female rats are more susceptible to the deleterious effects of paradoxical sleep deprivation on cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Hajali, Vahid; Sheibani, Vahid; Esmaeili-Mahani, Saeed; Shabani, Mohammad

    2012-03-17

    Paradoxical sleep deprivation (PSD) may alter subsequent learning and memory capacity. There are differences in both the intensity and direction of responses of the male and female species to the same environmental stimuli and experimental conditions. In the present study, we examined the extent of the effects of PSD for 72h on spatial learning and memory, anxiety-like behavior, corticosterone levels, and the body weight in male as well as in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) female Wistar rats. Multiple platform method was used for PSD induction. Spatial learning and memory and anxiety-like behavior were determined using Morris water maze (MWM) task and open field test, respectively. The data showed that PSD could not significantly affect subsequent spatial learning and short-term memory in male rats, while it significantly impaired the performance of the intact and OVX female rats. The PSD-intact and -OVX female rats showed more memory impairment than the PSD-male animals. Those impairments do not appear to be due to elevated stress level, since the plasma corticosterone did not significantly change following PSD induction. The open field data showed that PSD significantly reduced anxiety-like behavior in all experimental groups. In addition, PSD had a reducing effect on the mean body weight of female groups. Such results suggest that the female rats are more vulnerable to the deleterious effects of sleep loss on cognitive performance.

  12. Lipoxidation adducts with peptides and proteins: deleterious modifications or signaling mechanisms?

    PubMed

    Domingues, Rosário M; Domingues, Pedro; Melo, Tânia; Pérez-Sala, Dolores; Reis, Ana; Spickett, Corinne M

    2013-10-30

    Protein lipoxidation refers to the modification by electrophilic lipid oxidation products to form covalent adducts, which for many years has been considered as a deleterious consequence of oxidative stress. Oxidized lipids or phospholipids containing carbonyl moieties react readily with lysine to form Schiff bases; alternatively, oxidation products containing α,β-unsaturated moieties are susceptible to nucleophilic attack by cysteine, histidine or lysine residues to yield Michael adducts, overall corresponding to a large number of possible protein adducts. The most common detection methods for lipoxidized proteins take advantage of the presence of reactive carbonyl groups to add labels, or use antibodies. These methods have limitations in terms of specificity and identification of the modification site. The latter question is satisfactorily addressed by mass spectrometry, which enables the characterization of the adduct structure. This has allowed the identification of lipoxidized proteins in physiological and pathological situations. While in many cases lipoxidation interferes with protein function, causing inhibition of enzymatic activity and increased immunogenicity, there are a small number of cases where lipoxidation results in gain of function or activity. For certain proteins lipoxidation may represent a form of redox signaling, although more work is required to confirm the physiological relevance and mechanisms of such processes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine.

  13. Metformin reverts deleterious effects of advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) on osteoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Schurman, L; McCarthy, A D; Sedlinsky, C; Gangoiti, M V; Arnol, V; Bruzzone, L; Cortizo, A M

    2008-06-01

    Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are implicated in the complications of diabetes and ageing, affecting several tissues, including bone. Metformin, an insulin-sensitizer drug, reduces the risk of life-threatening macrovascular complications. We have evaluated the hypothesis that metformin can abrogate AGE-induced deleterious effects in osteoblastic cells in culture. In two osteoblast-like cell lines (UMR106 and MC3T3E1), AGE-modified albumin induced cell death, caspase-3 activity, altered intracellular oxidative stress and inhibited alkaline phosphatase activity. Metformin-treatment of osteoblastic cells prevented these AGE-induced alterations. We also assessed the expression of AGE receptors as a possible mechanism by which metformin could modulate the action of AGEs. AGEs-treatment of osteoblast-like cells enhanced RAGE protein expression, and this up-regulation was prevented in the presence of metformin. Although the precise mechanisms involved in metformin signaling are still elusive, our data implicate the AGE-RAGE interaction in the modulation of growth and differentiation of osteoblastic cells.

  14. Deleterious effects of maternal ingestion of cocoa upon fetal ductus arteriosus in late pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zielinsky, Paulo; Martignoni, Felipe V.; Vian, Izabele

    2014-01-01

    Cocoa powder has twice more antioxidants than red wine and three times more than green tea. Ten percent of its weight is made up of flavonoids. Cocoa has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects by downregulating cyclooxigenase-2 receptors expression in the endothelium and enhancing nitric oxide bioavailability. There are evidences that while polyphenols ingestion have cardioprotective effects in the adult, it may have deleterious effect on the fetus if ingested by the mother on the third trimester of pregnancy, causing intrauterine fetal ductus arteriosus (DA) constriction. Polyphenols present in many foods and their anti-inflammatory and antinociceptive activities have been shown to be as or more powerful than those of indomethacin. These effects are dependent on the inhibition of modulation of the arachidonic acid and the synthesis of prostaglandins, especially E-2, which is responsible for fetal DA patency. So, we hypothesized that this same mechanism is responsible for the harmful effect of polyphenol-rich foods, such as cocoa, upon the fetal DA after maternal intake of such substances in the third trimester of pregnancy, thereby rising the perspective of a note of caution for pregnant women diet. PMID:25566077

  15. Malocclusion and deleterious oral habits among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Cangussu, Maria Cristina Teixeira; Assis, Ana Marlúcia Oliveira

    2013-01-01

    Although malocclusions represent a serious public health issue, there is insufficient information about this problem in adolescents in Brazil, especially in poorer areas. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the prevalence of facial alterations, dental malocclusions, and deleterious oral habits (DOH) among adolescents in a developing area in northeastern Brazil and to test the hypothesis that the occurrence of DOH in infancy is associated with DOH during adolescence. The study included a probabilistic population-based sample of 2,060 Brazilian students aged 12-15 years. Facial characteristics (type of facial profile, facial symmetry, and passive lip sealing) and malocclusions (Angle and Dental Aesthetic Index, DAI) were evaluated. DOH in infancy and adolescence were evaluated by interviews with the parents and adolescents. Most adolescents presented with normal facial characteristics. The malocclusion prevalence (Angle) was 83%. The DAI ranged from 13 to 69 (mean ± SD: 25.9 ± 7.7). Orthodontic treatment was necessary in 45.1% of the sample. The most prevalent DOH in adolescents were nail biting, object biting, cheek/lip biting, and bruxism, which were associated with finger sucking during infancy (P < 0.05). We conclude that malocclusions and DOH are common among Brazilian adolescents and that finger sucking during infancy may be a good predictor of DOH occurrence during adolescence.

  16. Tattoo inks contain polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons that additionally generate deleterious singlet oxygen.

    PubMed

    Regensburger, Johannes; Lehner, Karin; Maisch, Tim; Vasold, Rudolf; Santarelli, Francesco; Engel, Eva; Gollmer, Anita; König, Burkhard; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2010-08-01

    In the past years, tattoos have become very popular worldwide, and millions of people have tattoos with mainly black colours. Black tattoo inks are usually based on soot, are not regulated and may contain hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Part of PAHs possibly stay lifelong in skin, absorb UV radiation and generate singlet oxygen, which may affect skin integrity. Therefore, we analysed 19 commercially available tattoo inks using HPLC and mass spectrometry. The total concentrations of PAHs in the different inks ranged from 0.14 to 201 microg/g tattoo ink. Benz(a)pyrene was found in four ink samples at a mean concentration of 0.3 +/- 0.2 microg/g. We also found high concentrations of phenol ranging from 0.2 to 385 microg/g tattoo ink. PAHs partly show high quantum yields of singlet oxygen (Phi(Delta)) in the range from 0.18 to 0.85. We incubated keratinocytes with extracts of different inks. Subsequent UVA irradiation decreased the mitochondrial activity of cells when the extracts contained PAHs, which sufficiently absorb UVA and show simultaneously high Phi(Delta) value. Tattooing with black inks entails an injection of substantial amounts of phenol and PAHs into skin. Most of these PAHs are carcinogenic and may additionally generate deleterious singlet oxygen inside the dermis when skin is exposed to UVA (e.g. solar radiation).

  17. Ursolic acid derivative ameliorates streptozotocin-induced diabestic bone deleterious effects in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Su-Guo; Zhang, Cheng-Jie; Xu, Xiu-E; Sun, Ji-Hua; Zhang, Li; Yu, Peng-Fei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was performed to investigate bone deteriorations of diabetic mice in response to the treatment of ursolic acid derivative (UAD). Methods: The biomarkers in serum and urine were measured, tibias were taken for the measurement on gene and protein expression and histomorphology analysis, and femurs were taken for the measurement on bone Ca and three-dimensional architecture of trabecular bone. Results: UAD showed a greater increase in bone Ca, BMD and significantly increased FGF-23 and OCN, reduced PTH and CTX in diabetic mice. UAD reversed STZ-induced trabecular deleterious effects and stimulated bone remodeling. The treatment of STZ group with UAD significantly elevated the ratio of OPG/RANKL. Moreover, insulin and IGF-1 showed a negative correlation with both FBG and Hb1Ac in STZ group. We attributed down-regulating the level of Hb1Ac in diabetic mice to that ursolic acid derivative could primely control blood sugar levels. After analyzing of two adipocyte markers, PPARγ and aP2, increased expression in the tibias of diabetic mice, and UAD could improve STZ-induced adipocyte dysfunction. Conclusions: These results demonstrated that UAD could ameliorate STZ-induced bone deterioration through improving adipocyte dysfunction and enhancing new bone formation and inhibiting absorptive function of osteoclast in the bone of diabetic mice. PMID:26097549

  18. Are There Deleterious Cardiac Effects of Acute and Chronic Endurance Exercise?

    PubMed

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M H; Fernandez, Antonio B; Thompson, Paul D

    2016-01-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies document that habitual physical activity reduces the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), and most demonstrate progressively lower rates of ASCVD with progressively more physical activity. Few studies have included individuals performing high-intensity, lifelong endurance exercise, however, and recent reports suggest that prodigious amounts of exercise may increase markers for, and even the incidence of, cardiovascular disease. This review examines the evidence that extremes of endurance exercise may increase cardiovascular disease risk by reviewing the causes and incidence of exercise-related cardiac events, and the acute effects of exercise on cardiovascular function, the effect of exercise on cardiac biomarkers, including "myocardial" creatine kinase, cardiac troponins, and cardiac natriuretic peptides. This review also examines the effect of exercise on coronary atherosclerosis and calcification, the frequency of atrial fibrillation in aging athletes, and the possibility that exercise may be deleterious in individuals genetically predisposed to such cardiac abnormalities as long QT syndrome, right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review is to our knowledge unique because it addresses all known potentially adverse cardiovascular effects of endurance exercise. The best evidence remains that physical activity and exercise training benefit the population, but it is possible that prolonged exercise and exercise training can adversely affect cardiac function in some individuals. This hypothesis warrants further examination.

  19. Deleterious effects of obesity upon the hormonal and molecular mechanisms controlling spermatogenesis and male fertility.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Lien M; Millar, Kate; Jones, Celine; Fatum, Muhammad; Coward, Kevin

    2015-09-01

    Worldwide obesity rates have nearly doubled since 1980 and currently over 10% of the population is obese. In 2008, over 1.4 billion adults aged 20 years and older had a body mass index or BMI above a healthy weight and of these, over 200 million men and nearly 300 million women were obese. While obesity can have many ramifications upon adult life, one growing area of concern is that of reproductive capacity. Obesity affects male infertility by influencing the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, thus causing detrimental effects upon spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility. In particular, evidence indicates that excess adipose tissue can alter the relative ratio of testosterone and oestrogen. Additional effects involve the homeostatic disruption of insulin, sex-hormone-binding-globulin, leptin and inhibin B, leading to diminished testosterone production and impairment to spermatogenesis. Aberrant spermatogenesis arising from obesity is associated with downstream changes in key semen parameters, defective sperm capacitation and binding, and deleterious effects on sperm chromatin structure. More recent investigations into trans-generational epigenetic inheritance further suggest that molecular changes in sperm that arise from obesity-related impaired spermatogenesis, such as modified sperm RNA levels, DNA methylation, protamination and histone acetylation, can impact upon the development of offspring. Here, we summarise our current understanding of how obesity exerts influence over spermatogenesis and subsequent fertility status, and make recommendations for future investigative research.

  20. Rare deleterious variants in GRHL3 are associated with human spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Philippe; De Marco, Patrizia; Emond, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Laurent, Sandra; Merello, Elisa; Accogli, Andrea; Rouleau, Guy A; Capra, Valeria; Kibar, Zoha

    2017-03-08

    Neural tube defects, including spina bifida, are among the most common birth defects caused by failure of neural tube closure during development. They have a complex etiology involving largely undetermined environmental and genetic factors. Previous studies in mouse models have implicated the transcription factor Grhl3 as an important factor in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. In the present study, we conducted a resequencing analysis of GRHL3 in a cohort of 233 familial and sporadic cases of spina bifida. We identified two novel truncating variants: one homozygous frameshift variant, p.Asp16Aspfs*10, in two affected siblings and one heterozygous intronic splicing variant, p.Ala318Glyfs*26. We also identified five missense variants, one of which was demonstrated to reduce the activation of gene targets in a luciferase reporter assay. With the previously identified p.Arg391Cys variant, eight variants were found in GRHL3. Comparison of the variant rate between our cohort and the ExAC database identified a significant enrichment of deleterious variants in GRHL3 in the whole gene and the transactivation region in spina bifida patients. These data provide strong evidence for a role of GRHL3 as a predisposing factor to spina bifida and will help dissect the complex etiology and pathogenic mechanisms of these malformations.

  1. Deleterious localized stress fields: the effects of boundaries and stiffness tailoring in anisotropic laminated plates

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, P. M.

    2016-01-01

    The safe design of primary load-bearing structures requires accurate prediction of stresses, especially in the vicinity of geometric discontinuities where deleterious three-dimensional stress fields can be induced. Even for thin-walled structures significant through-thickness stresses arise at edges and boundaries, and this is especially precarious for laminates of advanced fibre-reinforced composites because through-thickness stresses are the predominant drivers in delamination failure. Here, we use a higher-order equivalent single-layer model derived from the Hellinger–Reissner mixed variational principle to examine boundary layer effects in laminated plates comprising constant-stiffness and variable-stiffness laminae and deforming statically in cylindrical bending. The results show that zigzag deformations, which arise due to layerwise differences in the transverse shear moduli, drive boundary layers towards clamped edges and are therefore critically important in quantifying localized stress gradients. The relative significance of the boundary layer scales with the degree of layerwise anisotropy and the thickness to characteristic length ratio. Finally, we demonstrate that the phenomenon of alternating positive and negative transverse shearing deformation through the thickness of composite laminates, previously only observed at clamped boundaries, can also occur at other locations as a result of smoothly varying the material properties over the in-plane dimensions of the laminate. PMID:27843401

  2. Are There Deleterious Cardiac Effects of Acute and Chronic Endurance Exercise?

    PubMed Central

    Eijsvogels, Thijs M. H.; Fernandez, Antonio B.; Thompson, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Multiple epidemiological studies document that habitual physical activity reduces the risk of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD), and most demonstrate progressively lower rates of ASCVD with progressively more physical activity. Few studies have included individuals performing high-intensity, lifelong endurance exercise, however, and recent reports suggest that prodigious amounts of exercise may increase markers for, and even the incidence of, cardiovascular disease. This review examines the evidence that extremes of endurance exercise may increase cardiovascular disease risk by reviewing the causes and incidence of exercise-related cardiac events, and the acute effects of exercise on cardiovascular function, the effect of exercise on cardiac biomarkers, including “myocardial” creatine kinase, cardiac troponins, and cardiac natriuretic peptides. This review also examines the effect of exercise on coronary atherosclerosis and calcification, the frequency of atrial fibrillation in aging athletes, and the possibility that exercise may be deleterious in individuals genetically predisposed to such cardiac abnormalities as long QT syndrome, right ventricular cardiomyopathy, and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. This review is to our knowledge unique because it addresses all known potentially adverse cardiovascular effects of endurance exercise. The best evidence remains that physical activity and exercise training benefit the population, but it is possible that prolonged exercise and exercise training can adversely affect cardiac function in some individuals. This hypothesis warrants further examination. PMID:26607287

  3. Is the deleterious effect of cryotherapy on proprioception mitigated by exercise?

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, F; Moreira, S; Neto, J; Oliveira, J

    2013-05-01

    This study aimed to examine the acute effects of cryotherapy on knee position sense and to determine the time period necessary to normalize joint position sense when exercising after cryotherapy. 12 subjects visited the laboratory twice, once for cryotherapy followed by 30 min of exercise on a cycloergometer and once for cryotherapy followed by 30 min of rest. Sessions were randomly determined and separated by 48 h. Cryotherapy was applied in the form of ice bag, filled with 1 kg of crushed ice, for 20 min. Knee position sense was measured at baseline, after cryotherapy and every 5 min after cryotherapy removal until a total of 30 min. The main effect of cryotherapy was significant showing an increase in absolute (F7,154=43.76, p<0.001) and relative (F7,154=7.97, p<0.001) errors after cryotherapy. The intervention after cryotherapy (rest vs. exercise) revealed a significant main effect only for absolute error (F7,154=4.05, p<0.001), i.e., when subjects exercised after cryotherapy, the proprioceptive acuity reached the baseline values faster (10 min vs. 15 min). Our results indicated that the deleterious effect of cryotherapy on proprioception is mitigated by low intensity exercise, being the time necessary to normalize knee position sense reduced from 15 to 10 min.

  4. Rapid Detection of Rare Deleterious Variants by Next Generation Sequencing with Optional Microarray SNP Genotype Data.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Gurgel-Gianetti, Juliana; Harrison, Sally M; Daly, Catherine; Antanavicuite, Agne; Lascelles, Carolina; Markham, Alexander F; Pena, Sergio D J; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    Autozygosity mapping is a powerful technique for the identification of rare, autosomal recessive, disease-causing genes. The ease with which this category of disease gene can be identified has greatly increased through the availability of genome-wide SNP genotyping microarrays and subsequently of exome sequencing. Although these methods have simplified the generation of experimental data, its analysis, particularly when disparate data types must be integrated, remains time consuming. Moreover, the huge volume of sequence variant data generated from next generation sequencing experiments opens up the possibility of using these data instead of microarray genotype data to identify disease loci. To allow these two types of data to be used in an integrated fashion, we have developed AgileVCFMapper, a program that performs both the mapping of disease loci by SNP genotyping and the analysis of potentially deleterious variants using exome sequence variant data, in a single step. This method does not require microarray SNP genotype data, although analysis with a combination of microarray and exome genotype data enables more precise delineation of disease loci, due to superior marker density and distribution.

  5. A familial ATP13A2 mutation enhances alpha-synuclein aggregation and promotes cell death.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Fonseca, Tomás; Pinho, Raquel; Outeiro, Tiago F

    2016-07-15

    Aberrant protein-protein interactions are a common pathological hallmark among neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's disease (PD). Thus far, mutations in more than 20 genes have been associated with PD. These genes encode for proteins involved in distinct intracellular pathways, complicating our understanding of the precise molecular mechanisms underlying the disease. Recent reports suggested that the endolysosomal protein ATP13A2 can determine the fate of alpha-synuclein (α-Syn), although no consensus has yet been reached on the mechanisms underlying this effect. Here, we describe, for the first time, the deleterious effect arising from the interaction between the ATP13A2 familial mutant Dup22 with α-Syn. We show that this ATP13A2 mutant can enhance α-Syn oligomerization and aggregation in cell culture. Additionally, we report the accumulation of both proteins in abnormal endoplasmic reticulum membranous structures and the activation of the protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase pathway. Ultimately, our data bring new insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying the interplay of these two proteins, opening novel perspectives for therapeutic intervention.

  6. Human Germline Mutation and the Erratic Evolutionary Clock

    PubMed Central

    Przeworski, Molly

    2016-01-01

    Our understanding of the chronology of human evolution relies on the “molecular clock” provided by the steady accumulation of substitutions on an evolutionary lineage. Recent analyses of human pedigrees have called this understanding into question by revealing unexpectedly low germline mutation rates, which imply that substitutions accrue more slowly than previously believed. Translating mutation rates estimated from pedigrees into substitution rates is not as straightforward as it may seem, however. We dissect the steps involved, emphasizing that dating evolutionary events requires not “a mutation rate” but a precise characterization of how mutations accumulate in development in males and females—knowledge that remains elusive. PMID:27760127

  7. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    DOE PAGES

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposedmore » for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.« less

  8. Understanding mutagenesis through delineation of mutational signatures in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Petljak, Mia; Alexandrov, Ludmil B.

    2016-05-04

    Each individual cell within a human body acquires a certain number of somatic mutations during a course of its lifetime. These mutations originate from a wide spectra of both endogenous and exogenous mutational processes that leave distinct patterns of mutations, termed mutational signatures, embedded within the genomes of all cells. In recent years, the vast amount of data produced by sequencing of cancer genomes was coupled with novel mathematical models and computational tools to generate the first comprehensive map of mutational signatures in human cancer. Up to date, >30 distinct mutational signatures have been identified, and etiologies have been proposed for many of them. This paper provides a brief historical background on examination of mutational patterns in human cancer, summarizes the knowledge accumulated since introducing the concept of mutational signatures and discusses their future potential applications and perspectives within the field.

  9. Germ-line and somatic DICER1 mutations in pineoblastoma.

    PubMed

    de Kock, Leanne; Sabbaghian, Nelly; Druker, Harriet; Weber, Evan; Hamel, Nancy; Miller, Suzanne; Choong, Catherine S; Gottardo, Nicholas G; Kees, Ursula R; Rednam, Surya P; van Hest, Liselotte P; Jongmans, Marjolijn C; Jhangiani, Shalini; Lupski, James R; Zacharin, Margaret; Bouron-Dal Soglio, Dorothée; Huang, Annie; Priest, John R; Perry, Arie; Mueller, Sabine; Albrecht, Steffen; Malkin, David; Grundy, Richard G; Foulkes, William D

    2014-10-01

    Germ-line RB-1 mutations predispose to pineoblastoma (PinB), but other predisposing genetic factors are not well established. We recently identified a germ-line DICER1 mutation in a child with a PinB. This was accompanied by loss of heterozygosity (LOH) of the wild-type allele within the tumour. We set out to establish the prevalence of DICER1 mutations in an opportunistically ascertained series of PinBs. Twenty-one PinB cases were studied: Eighteen cases had not undergone previous testing for DICER1 mutations; three patients were known carriers of germ-line DICER1 mutations. The eighteen PinBs were sequenced by Sanger and/or Fluidigm-based next-generation sequencing to identify DICER1 mutations in blood gDNA and/or tumour gDNA. Testing for somatic DICER1 mutations was also conducted on one case with a known germ-line DICER1 mutation. From the eighteen PinBs, we identified four deleterious DICER1 mutations, three of which were germ line in origin, and one for which a germ line versus somatic origin could not be determined; in all four, the second allele was also inactivated leading to complete loss of DICER1 protein. No somatic DICER1 RNase IIIb mutations were identified. One PinB arising in a germ-line DICER1 mutation carrier was found to have LOH. This study suggests that germ-line DICER1 mutations make a clinically significant contribution to PinB, establishing DICER1 as an important susceptibility gene for PinB and demonstrates PinB to be a manifestation of a germ-line DICER1 mutation. The means by which the second allele is inactivated may differ from other DICER1-related tumours.

  10. Optical spectroscopy and prevention of deleterious cerebral vascular effects of ethanol by magnesium ions.

    PubMed

    Barbour, Randall L; Gebrewold, Asefa; Altura, Bella T; Altura, Burton M

    2002-06-28

    Previously, it has been suggested that acute ethanol (alcohol) administration can result in concentration-dependent vasoconstriction and decreased cerebral blood flow. Here, we present in vivo results using rapid (240 nm/min) optical backscatter measurements, with an intact cranial preparation in the rat, indicating that acute infusion of ethanol directly into the rat brain rapidly produces dose-dependent vasoconstriction of the cerebral microcirculation associated with a pronounced reduction in tissue blood content, pronounced rises in deoxyhemoglobin, significantly increased levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase and microvascular damage as the dose increases. Furthermore, we present in vivo experiments demonstrating the capability of magnesium ions (Mg(2+)) to attenuate and prevent these deleterious responses. Optical backscatter spectra (500-800 nm) were obtained by directing a single sending and receiving fiber to a portion of the left parietal cranium (in anesthetized rats), shaved to a translucent appearance to facilitate optical penetration. In the absence of added Mg(2+), infusion of a 10% solution of ethanol at 0.34 ml/min ( approximately 26.8 mg/min) produced prompt vasoconstriction as evidenced by a greater than 90% loss of oxyhemoglobin from the field-of-view and increases in levels of reduced cytochrome oxidase to between 50% and >90%. These effects were partially, to nearly completely, attenuated by the addition of MgCl(2) to the infusate containing added ethanol. Of special interest was the observation that attenuation of the vasoconstrictive effect of ethanol by Mg(2+) persisted despite a subsequent ethanol challenge without added Mg(2+). The results obtained demonstrate that, depending on dose, ethanol can produce prompt and severe vasoconstriction of the intact cerebral microcirculation and that infusion of moderate doses of Mg(2+) can largely attenuate and prevent this response. We conclude that appreciable, graded changes in cerebral cytochrome

  11. Extracellular localization of galectin-3 has a deleterious role in joint tissues.

    PubMed

    Janelle-Montcalm, Audrée; Boileau, Christelle; Poirier, Françoise; Pelletier, Jean-Pierre; Guévremont, Mélanie; Duval, Nicolas; Martel-Pelletier, Johanne; Reboul, Pascal

    2007-01-01

    In this study we examine the extracellular role of galectin-3 (gal-3) in joint tissues. Following intra-articular injection of gal-3 or vehicle in knee joints of mice, histological evaluation of articular cartilage and subchondral bone was performed. Further studies were then performed using human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes and subchondral bone osteoblasts, in which the effect of gal-3 (0 to 10 microg/ml) was analyzed. Osteoblasts were incubated in the presence of vitamin D3 (50 nM), which is an inducer of osteocalcin, encoded by an osteoblast terminal differentiation gene. Genes of interest mainly expressed in either chondrocytes or osteoblasts were analyzed with real-time RT-PCR and enzyme immunoassays. Signalling pathways regulating osteocalcin were analyzed in the presence of gal-3. Intra-articular injection of gal-3 induced knee swelling and lesions in both cartilage and subchondral bone. On human OA chondrocytes, gal-3 at 1 microg/ml stimulated ADAMTS-5 expression in chondrocytes and, at higher concentrations (5 and 10 microg/ml), matrix metalloproteinase-3 expression. Experiments performed with osteoblasts showed a weak but bipolar effect on alkaline phosphatase expression: stimulation at 1 microg/ml or inhibition at 10 microg/ml. In the absence of vitamin D3, type I collagen alpha 1 chain expression was inhibited by 10 microg/ml of gal-3. The vitamin D3 induced osteocalcin was strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner in the presence of gal-3, at both the mRNA and protein levels. This inhibition was mainly mediated by phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase. These findings indicate that high levels of extracellular gal-3, which could be encountered locally during the inflammatory process, have deleterious effects in both cartilage and subchondral bone tissues.

  12. Malarial pathocoenosis: beneficial and deleterious interactions between malaria and other human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Faure, Eric

    2014-01-01

    In nature, organisms are commonly infected by an assemblage of different parasite species or by genetically distinct parasite strains that interact in complex ways. Linked to co-infections, pathocoenosis, a term proposed by M. Grmek in 1969, refers to a pathological state arising from the interactions of diseases within a population and to the temporal and spatial dynamics of all of the diseases. In the long run, malaria was certainly one of the most important component of past pathocoenoses. Today this disease, which affects hundreds of millions of individuals and results in approximately one million deaths each year, is always highly endemic in over 20% of the world and is thus co-endemic with many other diseases. Therefore, the incidences of co-infections and possible direct and indirect interactions with Plasmodium parasites are very high. Both positive and negative interactions between malaria and other diseases caused by parasites belonging to numerous taxa have been described and in some cases, malaria may modify the process of another disease without being affected itself. Interactions include those observed during voluntary malarial infections intended to cure neuro-syphilis or during the enhanced activations of bacterial gastro-intestinal diseases and HIV infections. Complex relationships with multiple effects should also be considered, such as those observed during helminth infections. Moreover, reports dating back over 2000 years suggested that co- and multiple infections have generally deleterious consequences and analyses of historical texts indicated that malaria might exacerbate both plague and cholera, among other diseases. Possible biases affecting the research of etiological agents caused by the protean manifestations of malaria are discussed. A better understanding of the manner by which pathogens, particularly Plasmodium, modulate immune responses is particularly important for the diagnosis, cure, and control of diseases in human populations

  13. Review: Bucephalus minimus, a deleterious trematode parasite of cockles Cerastoderma spp.

    PubMed

    Magalhães, L; Freitas, R; de Montaudouin, X

    2015-04-01

    Trematodes are the most prevalent and abundant macroparasites in coastal waters. They display a complex life cycle with alternation of free-living and parasitic stages generally involving three host species. The most deleterious stage is in the first intermediate host (a mollusc) where the parasite penetrates as miracidium larvae and asexually multiplicates in sporocysts/rediae to provide cercariae larvae. However, due to basic low prevalence in ecosystems, this system remains difficult to study. Taking the example of the cockle (Cerastoderma edule), an exploited bivalve along North-Eastern Atlantic coasts, and Bucephalus minimus, its most prevalent parasite as first intermediate host, we summarised the 51 most relevant papers (1887-2015). Besides, a 16-year monthly monitoring was performed at Banc d'Arguin (Atlantic coast of France), and allowed to obtain a sufficient number of infected cockles (276 out of 5,420 individuals) in order to provide new information concerning this parasite/host system. Sporocysts (diameter 80-500 μm) and developing cercariae (length 300-500 μm) are not visible before cockle reaches 16-mm shell length and then prevalence increases with host size. Seasonality of infection was not observed but variation of prevalence was significant among years and negatively correlated to the temperature of the former year, which could correspond to the period of infection by miracidium. Seven other species of trematode were identified in cockles as second intermediate host. For six of them, metacercariae abundance per individual was 2 to 12 folds higher in B. minimus-infected cockles, exacerbating the potential negative impact on host. From the parasite point of view, metacercariae can be considered as hitchhikers, taking advantage of the abnormal migration of B. minimus-infected cockles to the sediment surface where they become more vulnerable to predators that are also the final hosts of many of these parasites.

  14. Multiple deleterious effects of experimentally aged sperm in a monogamous bird

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, J.; Wagner, R.H.; Helfenstein, F.; Hatch, Shyla A.; Mulard, Hervé; Naves, L.C.; Danchin, E.

    2008-01-01

    Sperm aging is known to be detrimental to reproductive performance. However, this apparently general phenomenon has seldom been studied in an evolutionary context. The negative impact of sperm aging on parental fitness should constitute a strong selective pressure for adaptations to avoid its effects. We studied the impact of sperm aging on black-legged kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla), a monogamous seabird. Kittiwakes comprise a model system because (i) of evidence that females eject their mates' sperm to prevent fertilization by sperm that would be old and degraded by the time of fertilization and result in reduced reproductive performance and (ii) the lack of extra-pair fertilization in this species makes cryptic female choice an unlikely explanation of postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. We experimentally manipulated the age of the sperm fertilizing kittiwake eggs by fitting males with anti-insemination rings for variable periods of time preceding egg-laying. We found evidence that sperm aging negatively affected four sequential stages of reproduction: fertilization potential, rate of embryonic development, embryonic mortality, and chick condition at hatching. These results may be produced by a continuum of a single process of sperm aging that differentially affects various aspects of development, depending on the degree of damage incurred to the spermatozoa. The marked impact of sperm age on female fitness may thus drive postcopulatory sperm ejection by females. These results provide experimental evidence of deleterious effects of sperm aging on a nondomestic vertebrate, underlining its taxonomic generality and its potential to select for a wide array of adaptations. ?? 2008 by The National Academy of Sciences of the USA.

  15. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations.

    PubMed

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V; Elena, Santiago F

    2014-04-09

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  16. Variability in mutational fitness effects prevents full lethal transitions in large quasispecies populations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sardanyés, Josep; Simó, Carles; Martínez, Regina; Solé, Ricard V.; Elena, Santiago F.

    2014-04-01

    The distribution of mutational fitness effects (DMFE) is crucial to the evolutionary fate of quasispecies. In this article we analyze the effect of the DMFE on the dynamics of a large quasispecies by means of a phenotypic version of the classic Eigen's model that incorporates beneficial, neutral, deleterious, and lethal mutations. By parameterizing the model with available experimental data on the DMFE of Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and Tobacco etch virus (TEV), we found that increasing mutation does not totally push the entire viral quasispecies towards deleterious or lethal regions of the phenotypic sequence space. The probability of finding regions in the parameter space of the general model that results in a quasispecies only composed by lethal phenotypes is extremely small at equilibrium and in transient times. The implications of our findings can be extended to other scenarios, such as lethal mutagenesis or genomically unstable cancer, where increased mutagenesis has been suggested as a potential therapy.

  17. Mutational load analysis of unrelated individuals

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Evolutionary genetic models predict that the cumulative effect of rare deleterious mutations across the genome—known as mutational load burden—increases the susceptibility to complex disease. To test the mutational load burden hypothesis, we adopted a two-tiered approach: assessing the impact of whole-exome minor allele load burden and then conducting individual-gene screening. For our primary analysis, we examined various minor allele frequency (MAF) thresholds and weighting schemes to examine the overall effect of minor allele load on affection status. We found a consistent association between minor allele load and affection status, but this effect did not markedly increase within rare and/or functional single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Our follow-up analysis considered minor allele load in individual genes to see whether only one or a few genes were driving the overall effect. Examining our most significant result—minor allele load of nonsynonymous SNPs with MAF < 2.4%—we detected no significantly associated genes after Bonferroni correction for multiple testing. After moderately significant genes (p < 0.05) were removed, the overall effect of rare nonsynonymous allele load remained significant. Overall, we did not find clear support for mutational load burden on affection status; however, these results are ultimately dependent on and limited by the nature of the Genetic Analysis Workshop 17 simulation. PMID:22373138

  18. An MRPS12 mutation modifies aminoglycoside sensitivity caused by 12S rRNA mutations

    PubMed Central

    Emperador, Sonia; Pacheu-Grau, David; Bayona-Bafaluy, M. Pilar; Garrido-Pérez, Nuria; Martín-Navarro, Antonio; López-Pérez, Manuel J.; Montoya, Julio; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Several homoplasmic pathologic mutations in mitochondrial DNA, such as those causing Leber hereditary optic neuropathy or non-syndromic hearing loss, show incomplete penetrance. Therefore, other elements must modify their pathogenicity. Discovery of these modifying factors is not an easy task because in multifactorial diseases conventional genetic approaches may not always be informative. Here, we have taken an evolutionary approach to unmask putative modifying factors for a particular homoplasmic pathologic mutation causing aminoglycoside-induced and non-syndromic hearing loss, the m.1494C>T transition in the mitochondrial DNA. The mutation is located in the decoding site of the mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. We first looked at mammalian species that had fixed the human pathologic mutation. These mutations are called compensated pathogenic deviations because an organism carrying one must also have another that suppresses the deleterious effect of the first. We found that species from the primate family Cercopithecidae (old world monkeys) harbor the m.1494T allele even if their auditory function is normal. In humans the m.1494T allele increases the susceptibility to aminoglycosides. However, in primary fibroblasts from a Cercopithecidae species, aminoglycosides do not impair cell growth, respiratory complex IV activity and quantity or the mitochondrial protein synthesis. Interestingly, this species also carries a fixed mutation in the mitochondrial ribosomal protein S12. We show that the expression of this variant in a human m.1494T cell line reduces its susceptibility to aminoglycosides. Because several mutations in this human protein have been described, they may possibly explain the absence of pathologic phenotype in some pedigree members with the most frequent pathologic mutations in mitochondrial ribosomal RNA. PMID:25642242

  19. Mutation and the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L. ); Albertini, R.J. )

    1990-01-01

    This book is covered under the following topics: Somatic Mutation: Animal Model; Somatic Mutation: Human; Heritable Mutation: Animal Model; Heritable Mutation: Approaches to Human Induction Rates; Heritable Mutation: Human Risk; Epidemiology: Population Studies on Genotoxicity; and Epidemiology: Workplace Studies of Genotoxicity.

  20. Estimate of the penetrance of BRCA mutation and the COS software for the assessment of BRCA mutation probability.

    PubMed

    Berrino, Jacopo; Berrino, Franco; Francisci, Silvia; Peissel, Bernard; Azzollini, Jacopo; Pensotti, Valeria; Radice, Paolo; Pasanisi, Patrizia; Manoukian, Siranoush

    2015-03-01

    We have designed the user-friendly COS software with the intent to improve estimation of the probability of a family carrying a deleterious BRCA gene mutation. The COS software is similar to the widely-used Bayesian-based BRCAPRO software, but it incorporates improved assumptions on cancer incidence in women with and without a deleterious mutation, takes into account relatives up to the fourth degree and allows researchers to consider an hypothetical third gene or a polygenic model of inheritance. Since breast cancer incidence and penetrance increase over generations, we estimated birth-cohort-specific incidence and penetrance curves. We estimated breast and ovarian cancer penetrance in 384 BRCA1 and 229 BRCA2 mutated families. We tested the COS performance in 436 Italian breast/ovarian cancer families including 79 with BRCA1 and 27 with BRCA2 mutations. The area under receiver operator curve (AUROC) was 84.4 %. The best probability threshold for offering the test was 22.9 %, with sensitivity 80.2 % and specificity 80.3 %. Notwithstanding very different assumptions, COS results were similar to BRCAPRO v6.0.

  1. Evolutionary constraints and the neutral theory. [mutation-caused nucleotide substitutions in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jukes, T. H.; Kimura, M.

    1984-01-01

    The neutral theory of molecular evolution postulates that nucleotide substitutions inherently take place in DNA as a result of point mutations followed by random genetic drift. In the absence of selective constraints, the substitution rate reaches the maximum value set by the mutation rate. The rate in globin pseudogenes is about 5 x 10 to the -9th substitutions per site per year in mammals. Rates slower than this indicate the presence of constraints imposed by negative (natural) selection, which rejects and discards deleterious mutations.

  2. First description of a sporadic breast cancer in a woman with BRCA1 germline mutation

    PubMed Central

    Curtit, Elsa; Benhamo, Vanessa; Gruel, Nadège; Popova, Tatiana; Manie, Elodie; Cottu, Paul; Mariani, Odette; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique; Pivot, Xavier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    We describe the case of a woman carrying a germline pathogenic BRCA1 mutation diagnosed with a breast cancer overexpressing HER2. Clinical presentation of the tumor, HER2-positivity, genomic profile and loss of the mutated BRCA1 allele in tumor evidence that BRCA1 is not inactivated in this breast cancer. It represents the first biological demonstration for the existence of a sporadic HER2-positive breast cancer independent from BRCA loss of function in a woman carrier of a deleterious BRCA1 mutation. In a context where targeted therapies based on BRCA loss of function in the tumor are developed, such case could have direct implications. PMID:26426992

  3. Phenotypic diversity associated with the MT-TV gene m.1644G>A mutation, a matter of quantity.

    PubMed

    Fraidakis, Matthew J; Jardel, Claude; Allouche, Stéphane; Nelson, Isabelle; Auré, Karine; Slama, Abdelhamid; Lemière, Isabelle; Thenint, Jean Philippe; Hamon, Jean Baptiste; Zagnoli, Fabien; Heron, Delphine; Sedel, Frédéric; Lombès, Anne

    2014-03-01

    We describe four patients from three independent families with the m.1644G>A in the MT-TV gene, previously reported without demonstration of its deleterious impact. Very high mutation proportion co-segregated with cytochrome oxidase defect in single muscle fibers and respiratory defect in cybrids as shown by spectrophotometric assays and polarography. The mutation appeared to have a very steep threshold effect with asymptomatic life up to 70% mutation proportion, progressive encephalopathy above 80% and severe Leigh-like syndrome above 95% mutation. One patient did not fit within that frame but presented with characteristics suggesting the presence of an additional disease.

  4. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis activity and function ability: deleterious effects in periodontal disease?

    PubMed

    Pugliese, Camila; van der Vinne, Roberta T A; Campos, Lucia M A; Guardieiro, Priscila R; Saviolli, Cynthia; Bonfá, Eloisa; Pereira, Rosa M R; Viana, Vilma S; Borba, Eduardo F; Silva, Clovis A

    2016-01-01

    provides additional evidence that increased activity and reduced functional ability underlies the deleterious effect of JIA in oral health.

  5. The deleterious effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status of hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Soleymanian, Tayebeh; Ghods, Ahad

    2011-11-01

    One of the main causes of protein-energy malnutrition in patients on maintenance hemodialysis (MHD) is metabolic acidosis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of metabolic acidosis on nutritional status in a group of MHD patients with adequately delivered dialysis treatment. Of 165 eligible anuric MHD outpatients with Kt/V ≥ 1 and no underlying inflammatory diseases, 47 subjects were enrolled. In order to evaluate the effect of different parameters on serum albumin, we measured the pre-dialysis serum albumin, blood pH, serum bicarbonate (HCO 3‾ ), Kt/V, normalized protein catabolic rate (nPCR) and body mass index (BMI) in these patients. The mean age of the study patients was 55 ± 13.8 years; there were 22 females and six diabetics. The average Kt/V was 1.22 ± 0.16, pH was 7.40 ± 0.15, serum HCO 3‾ was 23.18 ± 2.38 mEq/L, serum albumin was 4.03 ± 0.56 g/dL, nPCR was 1.00 ± 0.16 g/kg/day, post-dialysis body weight was 58.50 ± 11.50 kg and BMI was 23.47 ± 2.70 kg/m 2 . There was a statistically significant direct correlation between serum albumin and BMI (r = 0.415, P = 0.004), and between serum albumin and serum HCO 3 (r = 0.341, P = 0.019). On multiple regression analysis, the predictors of serum albumin were serum HCO3‾ and BMI (direct effect) and nPCR (inverse effect). In 17 patients on MHD with serum HCO3‾ <22 mEq/L, there was a significant inverse correlation between HCO 3 and nPCR (r = 0.492, P = 0.045), and these patients had significantly lower serum albumin compared with patients with serum HCO3‾ >22 mEq/L (P = 0.046). These data demonstrate that patients on MHD with metabolic acidosis had a lower serum albumin concentration despite adequate dialysis treatment. The inverse effect of nPCR on serum albumin concentration in acidotic MHD patients may be due to hypercatabolism in the setting of metabolic acidosis, leading to deleterious effects on the nutritional status of patients on MHD.

  6. Distinguishing between longevity and buffered-deleterious genotypes for exceptional human longevity: the case of the MTP gene.

    PubMed

    Huffman, Derek M; Deelen, Joris; Ye, Kenny; Bergman, Aviv; Slagboom, Eline P; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil

    2012-11-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphism, rs2866164, in the MTP gene, has been associated with human longevity but has not been validated by subsequent longevity studies. Using our population of Ashkenazi Jews, we find that the MTP CC genotype is significantly overrepresented in centenarians and their offspring, as compared with controls (p < .05). However, when we examined MTP CC genotype frequency pattern with aging, we observed a monotonic decline between ages 55-85 years followed by a dramatic enrichment after age 90 years, forming a U-shape pattern (p < .05). Furthermore, the MTP CC genotype was buffered by three validated longevity genotypes (p < .05). This buffering effect was found to confer an enrichment of the MTP CC genotype in centenarians, whereas their absence in CC controls resulted in poorer survivorship (p < .05). Thus, we conclude that MTP CC is a buffered-deleterious genotype and that assessing genotype frequency across aging is essential for discerning longevity from buffered-deleterious genotypes.

  7. Minute doping with deleterious rare earths in YBa2Cu3O7-δ films for flux pinning enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, P. N.; Kell, J. W.; Harrison, B. C.; Haugan, T. J.; Varanasi, C. V.; Rane, M.; Ramos, F.

    2006-07-01

    To enhance the critical current density of YBa2Cu3O7-δ films, flux pinning centers are intentionally added to inhibit flux flow in applied magnetic fields. Here we provide an initial demonstration that the incorporation of very minor additions (⩽1% of Y as opposed to the 10%-40% in standard substitutions) of typically deleterious rare earths into high quality YBa2Cu3O7-δ thin films provides significant improvement of the film's in-field current density. This is accomplished without reoptimization of the deposition parameters. Instead of site substitution for Y as might be expected, the deleterious rare earths potentially result in the formation of nanoparticulates.

  8. An epidemiological study to know the prevalence of deleterious oral habits among 6 to 12 year old children

    PubMed Central

    Garde, J B; Suryavanshi, Rajendra K; Jawale, Bhushan Arun; Deshmukh, Vikramsingh; Dadhe, Dattaprasad P; Suryavanshi, Maneesha Kshirsagar

    2014-01-01

    Background: This study was taken to assess the prevalence of deleterious oral habits among 6-12 year old school going children. Materials & Methods: A sample size of 832 children was finalized with simple random sampling technique including 444 males and 388 females. To get the demographic information and presence of harmful oral habits a closed-ended questionnaire was developed. Clinical evaluation was also done using mirror and water tests. Chi-square test was done to compare the prevalence of oral habits among different age groups and gender at p<0.05. Results: Bruxism (17.3%) was most commonly seen followed by bottle feeding (10.1%), thumb sucking (8.7%), nail biting (5.8%), tongue thrusting (4.9%) and mouth breathing (4.3%). Prevalence of all deleterious habits were more among female children and it also showed significant differences according to age. Conclusion: The data showed high prevalence of these oral habits. This highlighted the need for preventive orthodontic treatment at early age of life so that future occurrence of malocclusion can be avoided. How to cite the article: Garde JB, Suryavanshi RK, Jawale BA, Deshmukh V, Dadhe DP, Suryavanshi MK. An epidemiological study to know the prevalence of deleterious oral habits among 6 to 12 year old children. J Int Oral Health 2014;6(1):39-43. PMID:24653601

  9. Liver X receptors interfere with the deleterious effect of diethylstilbestrol on testicular physiology

    SciTech Connect

    Oumeddour, Abdelkader; Viennois, Emilie; Caira, Françoise; Decourbey, Clélia; Maqdasy, Salwan; and others

    2014-04-11

    Highlights: • Part of the neonatal effect of DES on testis needs the presence of Lxrα/β. • Some DES-induced pathways are blocked in Lxr-deficient mice. • Lxr-deficient mice analysis defines DES-target genes protected by Lxr. - Abstract: Liver X receptors LXRα (NR1H3) and LXRβ (NR1H2) are transcription factors belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily, activated by specific oxysterols, oxidized derivatives of cholesterol. These receptors are involved in the regulation of testis physiology. Lxr-deficient mice pointed to the physiological roles of these nuclear receptors in steroid synthesis, lipid homeostasis and germ cell apoptosis and proliferation. Diethylstilbestrol (DES) is a synthetic estrogen considered as an endocrine disruptor that affects the functions of the testis. Various lines of evidences have made a clear link between estrogens, their nuclear receptors ERα (NR3A1) and ERβ (NR3A2), and Lxrα/β. As LXR activity could also be regulated by the nuclear receptor small heterodimer partner (SHP, NR0A2) and DES could act through SHP, we wondered whether LXR could be targeted by estrogen-like endocrine disruptors such as DES. For that purpose, wild-type and Lxr-deficient mice were daily treated with 0.75 μg DES from days 1 to 5 after birth. The effects of DES were investigated at 10 or 45 days of age. We demonstrated that DES induced a decrease of the body mass at 10 days only in the Lxr-deficient mice suggesting a protective effect of Lxr. We defined three categories of DES-target genes in testis: those whose accumulation is independent of Lxr; those whose accumulation is enhanced by the lack of both Lxrα/β; those whose accumulation is repressed by the absence of Lxrα/β. Lipid accumulation is also modified by neonatal DES injection. Lxr-deficient mice present different lipid profiles, demonstrating that DES could have its effects in part due to Lxrα/β. Altogether, our study shows that both nuclear receptors Lxrα and Lxrβ are not only

  10. Mutation tendency of mutator Plasmodium berghei with proofreading-deficient DNA polymerase δ

    PubMed Central

    Honma, Hajime; Niikura, Mamoru; Kobayashi, Fumie; Horii, Toshihiro; Mita, Toshihiro; Endo, Hiroyoshi; Hirai, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the mutation tendency of a mutator rodent malaria parasite, Plasmodium berghei, with proofreading-deficient DNA polymerase δ. Wild-type and mutator parasites were maintained in mice for over 24 weeks, and the genome-wide accumulated mutations were determined by high-throughput sequencing. The mutator P. berghei had a significant preference for C/G to A/T substitutions; thus, its genome had a trend towards a higher AT content. The mutation rate was influenced by the sequence context, and mutations were markedly elevated at TCT. Some genes mutated repeatedly in replicate passage lines. In particular, knockout mutations of the AP2-G gene were frequent, which conferred strong growth advantages on parasites during the blood stage but at the cost of losing the ability to form gametocytes. This is the first report to demonstrate a biased mutation tendency in malaria parasites, and its results help to promote our basic understanding of Plasmodium genetics. PMID:27845384

  11. Equilibrium Distribution of Mutators in the Single Fitness Peak Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tannenbaum, Emmanuel; Deeds, Eric J.; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2003-09-01

    This Letter develops an analytically tractable model for determining the equilibrium distribution of mismatch repair deficient strains in unicellular populations. The approach is based on the single fitness peak model, which has been used in Eigen’s quasispecies equations in order to understand various aspects of evolutionary dynamics. As with the quasispecies model, our model for mutator-nonmutator equilibrium undergoes a phase transition in the limit of infinite sequence length. This “repair catas­trophe” occurs at a critical repair error probability of ɛr=Lvia/L, where Lvia denotes the length of the genome controlling viability, while L denotes the overall length of the genome. The repair catastrophe therefore occurs when the repair error probability exceeds the fraction of deleterious mutations. Our model also gives a quantitative estimate for the equilibrium fraction of mutators in Escherichia coli.

  12. Strong sexual selection in males against a mutation load that reduces offspring production in seed beetles.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, K; Stångberg, J; Martinossi-Allibert, I; Arnqvist, G; Berger, D

    2016-06-01

    Theory predicts that sexual reproduction can increase population viability relative to asexual reproduction by allowing sexual selection in males to remove deleterious mutations from the population without large demographic costs. This requires that selection acts more strongly in males than females and that mutations affecting male reproductive success have pleiotropic effects on population productivity, but empirical support for these assumptions is mixed. We used the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus to implement a three-generation breeding design where we induced mutations via ionizing radiation (IR) in the F0 generation and measured mutational effects (relative to nonirradiated controls) on an estimate of population productivity in the F1 and effects on sex-specific competitive lifetime reproductive success (LRS) in the F2 . Regardless of whether mutations were induced via F0 males or females, they had strong negative effects on male LRS, but a nonsignificant influence on female LRS, suggesting that selection is more efficient in removing deleterious alleles in males. Moreover, mutations had seemingly shared effects on population productivity and competitive LRS in both sexes. Thus, our results lend support to the hypothesis that strong sexual selection on males can act to remove the mutation load on population viability, thereby offering a benefit to sexual reproduction.

  13. Overproduction of the rbo gene product from Desulfovibrio species suppresses all deleterious effects of lack of superoxide dismutase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Pianzzola, M J; Soubes, M; Touati, D

    1996-01-01

    In an attempt to isolate the superoxide dismutase (SOD) gene from the anaerobic sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfoarculus baarsii, a DNA fragment was isolated which functionally complemented an Escherichia coli mutant (sodA sodB) deficient in cytoplasmic SODs. This region carries two open reading frames with sequences which are very similar to that of the rbo-rub operon from Desulfovibrio vulgaris. Independent expression of the rbo and rub genes from ptac showed that expression of rbo was responsible for the observed phenotype. rbo overexpression suppressed all deleterious effects of SOD deficiency in E. coli, including inactivation by superoxide of enzymes containing 4Fe-4S clusters and DNA damage produced via the superoxide-enhanced Fenton reaction. Thus, rbo restored to the sodA sodB mutant the ability to grow on minimal medium without the addition of branched amino acids, and growth on gluconate and succinate carbon sources was no longer impaired. The spontaneous mutation rate, which is elevated in SOD-deficient mutants, returned to the wild-type level in the presence of Rbo, which also restored aerobic viability of sodA sodB recA mutants. Rbo from Desulfovibrio vulgaris, but not Desulfovibrio gigas desulforedoxin, which corresponds to the NH2-terminal domain of Rbo, complemented sod mutants. The physiological role of Rbo in sulfate-reducing bacteria is unknown. In E. coli, Rbo may permit the bacterium to avoid superoxide stress by maintaining functional (reduced) superoxide sensitive 4Fe-4S clusters. It would thereby restore enzyme activities and prevent the release of iron that occurs after cluster degradation and presumably leads to DNA damage. PMID:8955290

  14. Tumor-specific mutations in low-frequency genes affect their functional properties.

    PubMed

    Erdem-Eraslan, Lale; Heijsman, Daphne; de Wit, Maurice; Kremer, Andreas; Sacchetti, Andrea; van der Spek, Peter J; Sillevis Smitt, Peter A E; French, Pim J

    2015-05-01

    Causal genetic changes in oligodendrogliomas (OD) with 1p/19q co-deletion include mutations in IDH1, IDH2, CIC, FUBP1, TERT promoter and NOTCH1. However, it is generally assumed that more somatic mutations are required for tumorigenesis. This study aimed to establish whether genes mutated at low frequency can be involved in OD initiation and/or progression. We performed whole-genome sequencing on three anaplastic ODs with 1p/19q co-deletion. To estimate mutation frequency, we performed targeted resequencing on an additional 39 ODs. Whole-genome sequencing identified a total of 55 coding mutations (range 8-32 mutations per tumor), including known abnormalities in IDH1, IDH2, CIC and FUBP1. We also identified mutations in genes, most of which were previously not implicated in ODs. Targeted resequencing on 39 additional ODs confirmed that these genes are mutated at low frequency. Most of the mutations identified were predicted to have a deleterious functional effect. Functional analysis on a subset of these genes (e.g. NTN4 and MAGEH1) showed that the mutation affects the subcellular localization of the protein (n = 2/12). In addition, HOG cells stably expressing mutant GDI1 or XPO7 showed altered cell proliferation compared to those expressing wildtype constructs. Similarly, HOG cells expressing mutant SASH3 or GDI1 showed altered migration. The significantly higher rate of predicted deleterious mutations, the changes in subcellular localization and the effects on proliferation and/or migration indicate that many of these genes functionally may contribute to gliomagenesis and/or progression. These low-frequency genes and their affected pathways may provide new treatment targets for this tumor type.

  15. Germline mutations in Japanese familial pancreatic cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Shimizu, Kyoko; Furuse, Junji; Kubo, Emi; Ohmoto, Akihiro; Suzuki, Masami; Hruban, Ralph H.; Okusaka, Takuji; Morizane, Chigusa; Furukawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Clinicopathologic and genetic features of familial pancreatic cancer (FPC) in Asian countries remain largely unknown. The main purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of FPC and to define causative FPC-predisposition genes in a Japanese cohort with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). We reviewed 1,197 patients with a pathologically proven PDAC and found that 88 (7.3%) were FPC patients who had at least one first-degree relative with PDAC. There were no significant differences between the FPC cases and sporadic cases in terms of gender, age, tumor location, stage, family history of any cancer except PDAC, and personal history of smoking, other cancers, diabetes mellitus and chronic pancreatitis. In the FPC patients, we then investigated the prevalence of germline mutations in 21 genes associated with hereditary predispositions for pancreatic, breast and ovarian cancers by means of the next-generation sequencing using a custom multiple-gene panel. We found that eight (14.5%) of the 54 FPC patients with available germline DNA carried deleterious mutations in BRCA2, PALB2, ATM, or MLH1. These results indicate that a significant fraction of patients with PDAC in Japan have a family history of pancreatic cancer, and some of them harbor deleterious causative mutations in known FPC predisposition genes. PMID:27732944

  16. Mutational characteristics of ANK1 and SPTB genes in hereditary spherocytosis.

    PubMed

    Park, J; Jeong, D-C; Yoo, J; Jang, W; Chae, H; Kim, J; Kwon, A; Choi, H; Lee, J W; Chung, N-G; Kim, M; Kim, Y

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the mutational characteristics in Korean hereditary spherocytosis (HS) patients. Relevant literatures including genetically confirmed cases with well-documented clinical summaries and relevant information were also reviewed to investigate the mutational gene- or domain-specific laboratory and clinical association. Twenty-five HS patients carried one heterozygous mutation of ANK1 (n = 13) or SPTB (n = 12) but not in SPTA1, SLC4A1, or EPB42. Deleterious mutations including frameshift, nonsense, and splice site mutations were identified in 91% (21/23), and non-hotspot mutations were dispersed across multiple exons. Genotype-phenotype correlation was clarified after combined analysis of the cases and the literature review; anemia was most severe in HS patients with mutations on the ANK1 spectrin-binding domain (p < 0.05), and SPTB mutations in HS patients spared the tetramerization domain in which mutations of hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis are located. Splenectomy (17/75) was more frequent in ANK1 mutant HS (32%) than in HS with SPTB mutation (10%) (p = 0.028). Aplastic crisis occurred in 32.0% of the patients (8/25; 3 ANK1 and 5 SPTB), and parvovirus B19 was detected in 88%. The study clarifies ANK1 or SPTB mutational characteristics in HS Korean patients. The genetic association of laboratory and clinical aspects suggests comprehensive considerations for genetic-based management of HS.

  17. Antimicrobial Resistance and Virulence: a Successful or Deleterious Association in the Bacterial World?

    PubMed Central

    Beceiro, Alejandro; Tomás, María

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Hosts and bacteria have coevolved over millions of years, during which pathogenic bacteria have modified their virulence mechanisms to adapt to host defense systems. Although the spread of pathogens has been hindered by the discovery and widespread use of antimicrobial agents, antimicrobial resistance has increased globally. The emergence of resistant bacteria has accelerated in recent years, mainly as a result of increased selective pressure. However, although antimicrobial resistance and bacterial virulence have developed on different timescales, they share some common characteristics. This review considers how bacterial virulence and fitness are affected by antibiotic resistance and also how the relationship between virulence and resistance is affected by different genetic mechanisms (e.g., coselection and compensatory mutations) and by the most prevalent global responses. The interplay between these factors and the associated biological costs depend on four main factors: the bacterial species involved, virulence and resistance mechanisms, the ecological niche, and the host. The development of new strategies involving new antimicrobials or nonantimicrobial compounds and of novel diagnostic methods that focus on high-risk clones and rapid tests to detect virulence markers may help to resolve the increasing problem of the association between virulence and resistance, which is becoming more beneficial for pathogenic bacteria. PMID:23554414

  18. Selectivity filters to edit out deleterious side effects in kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Sessel, Sean; Fernández, Ariel

    2011-01-01

    As the molecular etiology of cancer unravels, revealing the heterogeneous nature of the malignancy, multi-target drug treatments are more frequently advocated. Such therapeutic avenues often target kinases, the basic signal transducers in the cell. Because kinases share common evolutionary backgrounds, they also share many structural attributes, making it difficult for molecular targeted therapy to distinguish between paralogs. Thus, kinase inhibitors (KIs) tend to have undesired cross-reactivities, resulting in potentially lethal side effects. The health risks are obviously higher in these multi-pronged treatments when contrasted with the effects of more selective therapeutic agents. Using a nonconserved physicochemical biomarker, we present a rationally designed molecular filter that enables the control of specificity and the development of adjuvant drugs to edit out the side effects of the primary therapeutic agent. These editors work by overlapping therapeutically with the primary drug in cancer cells, while interfering with toxicity-related signaling pathways recruited by the primary drug in off-target cells. We then examine the possible application of these filtering methods to specifically target kinases when they present idiosyncratic cancer-related mutations. Such applications open the door to engineer personalized drugs tailored to the genetic makeup of the patient. These various methods of enhancing efficacy and safety show some degree of modularity, allowing drug designers to utilize multiple techniques and various drug combinations to create the safest and most powerful treatment for any given therapeutic scenario.

  19. Nucleosomes suppress spontaneous mutations base-specifically in eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaoshu; Chen, Zhidong; Chen, Han; Su, Zhijian; Yang, Jianfeng; Lin, Fangqin; Shi, Suhua; He, Xionglei

    2012-03-09

    It is unknown how the composition and structure of DNA within the cell affect spontaneous mutations. Theory suggests that in eukaryotic genomes, nucleosomal DNA undergoes fewer C→T mutations because of suppressed cytosine hydrolytic deamination relative to nucleosome-depleted DNA. Comparative genomic analyses and a mutation accumulation experiment showed that nucleosome occupancy nearly eliminated cytosine deamination, resulting in an ~50% decrease of the C→T mutation rate in nucleosomal DNA. Furthermore, the rates of G→T and A→T mutations were also about twofold suppressed by nucleosomes. On the basis of these results, we conclude that nucleosome-dependent mutation spectra affect eukaryotic genome structure and evolution and may have implications for understanding the origin of mutations in cancers and in induced pluripotent stem cells.

  20. Early mutation bursts in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Salomon, Matthew P.; Shibata, Darryl; Curtis, Christina; Siegmund, Kimberly; Marjoram, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Tumor growth is an evolutionary process involving accumulation of mutations, copy number alterations, and cancer stem cell (CSC) division and differentiation. As direct observation of this process is impossible, inference regarding when mutations occur and how stem cells divide is difficult. However, this ancestral information is encoded within the tumor itself, in the form of intratumoral heterogeneity of the tumor cell genomes. Here we present a framework that allows simulation of these processes and estimation of mutation rates at the various stages of tumor development and CSC division patterns for single-gland sequencing data from colorectal tumors. We parameterize the mutation rate and the CSC division pattern, and successfully retrieve their posterior distributions based on DNA sequence level data. Our approach exploits Approximate Bayesian Computation (ABC), a method that is becoming widely-used for problems of ancestral inference. PMID:28257429

  1. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-02-29

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  2. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  3. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  4. Latent mitochondrial DNA deletion mutations drive muscle fiber loss at old age.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Allen; Wanagat, Jonathan; Cheema, Nashwa; Widjaja, Kevin; McKenzie, Debbie; Aiken, Judd M

    2016-08-25

    With age, somatically derived mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) deletion mutations arise in many tissues and species. In skeletal muscle, deletion mutations clonally accumulate along the length of individual fibers. At high intrafiber abundances, these mutations disrupt individual cell respiration and are linked to the activation of apoptosis, intrafiber atrophy, breakage, and necrosis, contributing to fiber loss. This sequence of molecular and cellular events suggests a putative mechanism for the permanent loss of muscle fibers with age. To test whether mtDNA deletion mutation accumulation is a significant contributor to the fiber loss observed in aging muscle, we pharmacologically induced deletion mutation accumulation. We observed a 1200% increase in mtDNA deletion mutation-containing electron transport chain-deficient muscle fibers, an 18% decrease in muscle fiber number and 22% worsening of muscle mass loss. These data affirm the hypothesized role for mtDNA deletion mutation in the etiology of muscle fiber loss at old age.

  5. Accumulation of Phosphatidic Acid Increases Vancomycin Resistance in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sutterlin, Holly A.; Zhang, Sisi

    2014-01-01

    In Gram-negative bacteria, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) contributes to the robust permeability barrier of the outer membrane, preventing entry of toxic molecules such as antibiotics. Mutations in lptD, the beta-barrel component of the LPS transport and assembly machinery, compromise LPS assembly and result in increased antibiotic sensitivity. Here, we report rare vancomycin-resistant suppressors that improve barrier function of a subset of lptD mutations. We find that all seven suppressors analyzed mapped to the essential gene cdsA, which is responsible for the conversion of phosphatidic acid to CDP-diacylglycerol in phospholipid biosynthesis. These cdsA mutations cause a partial loss of function and, as expected, accumulate phosphatidic acid. We show that this suppression is not confined to mutations that cause defects in outer membrane biogenesis but rather that these cdsA mutations confer a general increase in vancomycin resistance, even in a wild-type cell. We use genetics and quadrupole time of flight (Q-TOF) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to show that accumulation of phosphatidic acid by means other than cdsA mutations also increases resistance to vancomycin. We suggest that increased levels of phosphatidic acid change the physical properties of the outer membrane to impede entry of vancomycin into the periplasm, hindering access to its target, an intermediate required for the synthesis of the peptidoglycan cell wall. PMID:24957626

  6. Mutation and Human Exceptionalism: Our Future Genetic Load.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Although the human germline mutation rate is higher than that in any other well-studied species, the rate is not exceptional once the effective genome size and effective population size are taken into consideration. Human somatic mutation rates are substantially elevated above those in the germline, but this is also seen in other species. What is exceptional about humans is the recent detachment from the challenges of the natural environment and the ability to modify phenotypic traits in ways that mitigate the fitness effects of mutations, e.g., precision and personalized medicine. This results in a relaxation of selection against mildly deleterious mutations, including those magnifying the mutation rate itself. The long-term consequence of such effects is an expected genetic deterioration in the baseline human condition, potentially measurable on the timescale of a few generations in westernized societies, and because the brain is a particularly large mutational target, this is of particular concern. Ultimately, the price will have to be covered by further investment in various forms of medical intervention. Resolving the uncertainties of the magnitude and timescale of these effects will require the establishment of stable, standardized, multigenerational measurement procedures for various human traits.

  7. Mutation and Human Exceptionalism: Our Future Genetic Load

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Although the human germline mutation rate is higher than that in any other well-studied species, the rate is not exceptional once the effective genome size and effective population size are taken into consideration. Human somatic mutation rates are substantially elevated above those in the germline, but this is also seen in other species. What is exceptional about humans is the recent detachment from the challenges of the natural environment and the ability to modify phenotypic traits in ways that mitigate the fitness effects of mutations, e.g., precision and personalized medicine. This results in a relaxation of selection against mildly deleterious mutations, including those magnifying the mutation rate itself. The long-term consequence of such effects is an expected genetic deterioration in the baseline human condition, potentially measurable on the timescale of a few generations in westernized societies, and because the brain is a particularly large mutational target, this is of particular concern. Ultimately, the price will have to be covered by further investment in various forms of medical intervention. Resolving the uncertainties of the magnitude and timescale of these effects will require the establishment of stable, standardized, multigenerational measurement procedures for various human traits. PMID:26953265

  8. Vitamin E prevents deleterious effects of di (2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate, a plasticizer used in PVC blood storage bags.

    PubMed

    Dhanya, C R; Gayathri, N S; Mithra, K; Nair, K V Neelakantan; Kurup, P A

    2004-09-01

    Vitamin E administration prevented DEHP induced deleterious effects like (i) degenerative changes in the brain and thyroid, (ii) decrease in the activity of neuronal membrane Na+ - K+ ATPase, (iii) decrease in the concentration of insulin, cortisol and TSH, and (iv) the increase in T3 and T4 in female Albino rats. The results suggest use of vitamin E to prevent harmful effects of repeated transfusion of DEHP containing blood as in thalassemia patient. The possibility of using vitamin E to prevent the harmful effects of repeated transfusion of DEHP containing blood, as in thalassemia patients, is discussed.

  9. Duration of Sexual Harassment and Generalized Harassment in the Workplace Over Ten Years: Effects on Deleterious Drinking Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    McGinley, Meredith; Richman, Judith A.; Rospenda, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    While harassment in the workplace has been linked to deleterious drinking outcomes, researchers have yet to examine the long-term effects of chronic workplace harassment. During a ten year longitudinal mail survey, university employees (N = 2265) were administered measures of sexual harassment, generalized workplace harassment, and problematic drinking. Using growth mixture modeling, two latent classes of workplace harassment emerged: infrequent and chronic. Demographic characteristics (gender, age, and race) predicted the shape of the trajectories and likelihood of class membership. As hypothesized, membership in the chronic harassment classes was linked to future problematic drinking, even after controlling for previous drinking. PMID:21745045

  10. Duration of sexual harassment and generalized harassment in the workplace over ten years: effects on deleterious drinking outcomes.

    PubMed

    McGinley, Meredith; Richman, Judith A; Rospenda, Kathleen M

    2011-01-01

    Although harassment in the workplace has been linked to deleterious drinking outcomes, researchers have yet to examine the long-term effects of chronic workplace harassment. During a 10-year longitudinal mail survey, university employees (N = 2,265) were administered measures of sexual harassment, generalized workplace harassment, and problematic drinking. Using growth mixture modeling, two latent classes of workplace harassment emerged: infrequent and chronic. Demographic characteristics (gender, age, and race) predicted the shape of the trajectories and likelihood of class membership. As hypothesized, membership in the chronic harassment classes was linked to future problematic drinking, even after controlling for previous drinking.

  11. Acetaldehyde Content and Oxidative Stress in the Deleterious Effects of Alcohol Drinking on Rat Uterine Horn

    PubMed Central

    Buthet, Lara Romina; Maciel, María Eugenia; Quintans, Leandro Néstor; Rodríguez de Castro, Carmen; Costantini, Martín Hernán; Castro, José Alberto

    2013-01-01

    After alcohol exposure through a standard Lieber and De Carli diet for 28 days, a severe atrophy in the rat uteirne horn was observed, accompanied by significant alterations in its epithelial cells. Microsomal pathway of acetaldehyde production was slightly increased. Hydroxyl radicals were detected in the cytosolic fraction, and this was attributed to participation of xanthine oxidoreductase. They were also observed in the microsomal fraction in the presence of NADPH generating system. No generation of 1-hydroxyethyl was evidenced. The t-butylhydroperoxide-induced chemiluminescence analysis of uterine horn homogenates revealed a significant increase in the chemiluminiscence emission due to ethanol exposure. In the animals repeatedly exposed to alcohol, sulfhydryl content from uterine horn proteins was decreased, but no significant changes were observed in the protein carbonyl content from the same samples. Minor but significant decreasing changes were observed in the GSH content accompanied by a tendency to decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio. A highly significant finding was the diminished activity content of glutathione peroxidase. Results suggest that acetaldehyde accumulation plus the oxidative stress may play an additional effect to the alcohol-promoted hormonal changes in the uterus reported by others after chronic exposure to alcohol. PMID:24348548

  12. Acetaldehyde content and oxidative stress in the deleterious effects of alcohol drinking on rat uterine horn.

    PubMed

    Buthet, Lara Romina; Maciel, María Eugenia; Quintans, Leandro Néstor; Rodríguez de Castro, Carmen; Costantini, Martín Hernán; Fanelli, Silvia Laura; Castro, José Alberto; Castro, Gerardo Daniel

    2013-01-01

    After alcohol exposure through a standard Lieber and De Carli diet for 28 days, a severe atrophy in the rat uteirne horn was observed, accompanied by significant alterations in its epithelial cells. Microsomal pathway of acetaldehyde production was slightly increased. Hydroxyl radicals were detected in the cytosolic fraction, and this was attributed to participation of xanthine oxidoreductase. They were also observed in the microsomal fraction in the presence of NADPH generating system. No generation of 1-hydroxyethyl was evidenced. The t-butylhydroperoxide-induced chemiluminescence analysis of uterine horn homogenates revealed a significant increase in the chemiluminiscence emission due to ethanol exposure. In the animals repeatedly exposed to alcohol, sulfhydryl content from uterine horn proteins was decreased, but no significant changes were observed in the protein carbonyl content from the same samples. Minor but significant decreasing changes were observed in the GSH content accompanied by a tendency to decrease in the GSH/GSSG ratio. A highly significant finding was the diminished activity content of glutathione peroxidase. Results suggest that acetaldehyde accumulation plus the oxidative stress may play an additional effect to the alcohol-promoted hormonal changes in the uterus reported by others after chronic exposure to alcohol.

  13. Normal physical activity obliterates the deleterious effects of a high-caloric intake.

    PubMed

    Krogh-Madsen, Rikke; Pedersen, Maria; Solomon, Thomas P J; Knudsen, Sine Haugaard; Hansen, Louise Seier; Karstoft, Kristian; Lehrskov-Schmidt, Louise; Pedersen, Karin Kaereby; Thomsen, Carsten; Holst, Jens Juul; Pedersen, Bente K

    2014-02-01

    A high-caloric intake combined with a sedentary lifestyle is an important player in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). The present study was undertaken to examine if the level of physical activity has impact on the metabolic effects of a high-caloric (+2,000 kcal/day) intake. Therefore, healthy individuals on a high-caloric intake were randomized to either 10,000 or 1,500 steps/day for 14 days. Step number, total energy expenditure, dietary records, neuropsychological tests, maximal oxygen uptake (Vo2max), whole body dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and abdominal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, continuous glucose monitoring (CGM), and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) with stable isotopes were performed before and after the intervention. Both study groups gained the same amount of body weight. However, the inactive group accumulated significantly more visceral fat compared with the active group. Following the 2-wk period, the inactive group also experienced a poorer glycemic control, increased endogenous glucose production, decreased hepatic insulin extraction, increased baseline plasma levels of total cholesterol and LDL, and a decreased cognitive function with regard to capacity of attention. In conclusion, we find evidence to support that habitual physical activity may prevent pathophysiological symptoms associated with diet-induced obesity.

  14. A dietary test of putative deleterious sterols for the aphid Myzus persicae.

    PubMed

    Bouvaine, Sophie; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J; Behmer, Spencer T; Douglas, Angela E

    2014-01-01

    The aphid Myzus persicae displays high mortality on tobacco plants bearing a transgene which results in the accumulation of the ketosteroids cholestan-3-one and cholest-4-en-3-one in the phloem sap. To test whether the ketosteroids are the basis of the plant resistance to the aphids, M. persicae were reared on chemically-defined diets with different steroid contents at 0.1-10 µg ml(-1). Relative to sterol-free diet and dietary supplements of the two ketosteroids and two phytosterols, dietary cholesterol significantly extended aphid lifespan and increased fecundity at one or more dietary concentrations tested. Median lifespan was 50% lower on the diet supplemented with cholest-4-en-3-one than on the cholesterol-supplemented diet. Aphid feeding rate did not vary significantly across the treatments, indicative of no anti-feedant effect of any sterol/steroid. Aphids reared on diets containing equal amounts of cholesterol and cholest-4-en-3-one showed fecundity equivalent to aphids on diets containing only cholesterol. Aphids were reared on diets that reproduced the relative steroid abundance in the phloem sap of the control and modified tobacco plants, and their performance on the two diet formulations was broadly equivalent. We conclude that, at the concentrations tested, plant ketosteroids support weaker aphid performance than cholesterol, but do not cause acute toxicity to the aphids. In plants, the ketosteroids may act synergistically with plant factors absent from artificial diets but are unlikely to be solely responsible for resistance of modified tobacco plants.

  15. Mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Sandy Chan; Sears, Renee L.; Lemos, Roberta R.; Quintáns, Beatriz; Huang, Alden; Spiteri, Elizabeth; Nevarez, Lisette; Mamah, Catherine; Zatz, Mayana; Pierce, Kerrie D.; Fullerton, Janice M.; Adair, John C.; Berner, Jon E.; Bower, Matthew; Brodaty, Henry; Carmona, Olga; Dobricić, Valerija; Fogel, Brent L.; García-Estevez, Daniel; Goldman, Jill; Goudreau, John L.; Hopfer, Suellen; Janković, Milena; Jaumà, Serge; Jen, Joanna C.; Kirdlarp, Suppachok; Klepper, Joerg; Kostić, Vladimir; Lang, Anthony E.; Linglart, Agnès; Maisenbacher, Melissa K.; Manyam, Bala V.; Mazzoni, Pietro; Miedzybrodzka, Zofia; Mitarnun, Witoon; Mitchell, Philip B.; Mueller, Jennifer; Novaković, Ivana; Paucar, Martin; Paulson, Henry; Simpson, Sheila A.; Svenningsson, Per; Tuite, Paul; Vitek, Jerrold; Wetchaphanphesat, Suppachok; Williams, Charles; Yang, Michele; Schofield, Peter R.; de Oliveira, João R. M.; Sobrido, María-Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Familial idiopathic basal ganglia calcification (IBGC) or Fahr’s disease is a rare neurodegenerative disorder characterized by calcium deposits in the basal ganglia and other brain regions, which is associated with neuropsychiatric and motor symptoms. Familial IBGC is genetically heterogeneous and typically transmitted in an autosomal dominant fashion. We performed a mutational analysis of SLC20A2, the first gene found to cause IBGC, to assess its genetic contribution to familial IBGC. We recruited 218 subjects from 29 IBGC-affected families of varied ancestry and collected medical history, neurological exam, and head CT scans to characterize each patient’s disease status. We screened our patient cohort for mutations in SLC20A2. Twelve novel (nonsense, deletions, missense, and splice site) potentially pathogenic variants, one synonymous variant, and one previously reported mutation were identified in 13 families. Variants predicted to be deleterious cosegregated with disease in five families. Three families showed nonsegregation with clinical disease of such variants, but retrospective review of clinical and neuroimaging data strongly suggested previous misclassification. Overall, mutations in SLC20A2 account for as many as 41 % of our familial IBGC cases. Our screen in a large series expands the catalog of SLC20A2 mutations identified to date and demonstrates that mutations in SLC20A2 are a major cause of familial IBGC. Non-perfect segregation patterns of predicted deleterious variants highlight the challenges of phenotypic assessment in this condition with highly variable clinical presentation. PMID:23334463

  16. Mitochondrial DNA exhibits resistance to induced point and deletion mutations

    PubMed Central

    Valente, William J.; Ericson, Nolan G.; Long, Alexandra S.; White, Paul A.; Marchetti, Francesco; Bielas, Jason H.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations contributes to the pathogenesis of human disease. Currently, mitochondrial mutations are largely considered results of inaccurate processing of its heavily damaged genome. However, mainly from a lack of methods to monitor mtDNA mutations with sufficient sensitivity and accuracy, a link between mtDNA damage and mutation has not been established. To test the hypothesis that mtDNA-damaging agents induce mtDNA mutations, we exposed MutaTMMouse mice to benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) or N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU), daily for 28 consecutive days, and quantified mtDNA point and deletion mutations in bone marrow and liver using our newly developed Digital Random Mutation Capture (dRMC) and Digital Deletion Detection (3D) assays. Surprisingly, our results demonstrate mutagen treatment did not increase mitochondrial point or deletion mutation frequencies, despite evidence both compounds increase nuclear DNA mutations and demonstrated B[a]P adduct formation in mtDNA. These findings contradict models of mtDNA mutagenesis that assert the elevated rate of mtDNA mutation stems from damage sensitivity and abridged repair capacity. Rather, our results demonstrate induced mtDNA damage does not readily convert into mutation. These findings suggest robust mitochondrial damage responses repress induced mutations after mutagen exposure. PMID:27550180

  17. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-01-01

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, ihas long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice. PMID:27626311

  18. Clock-like mutational processes in human somatic cells

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrov, Ludmil B.; Jones, Philip H.; Wedge, David C.; ...

    2015-11-09

    During the course of a lifetime, somatic cells acquire mutations. Different mutational processes may contribute to the mutations accumulated in a cell, with each imprinting a mutational signature on the cell's genome. Some processes generate mutations throughout life at a constant rate in all individuals, and the number of mutations in a cell attributable to these processes will be proportional to the chronological age of the person. Using mutations from 10,250 cancer genomes across 36 cancer types, we investigated clock-like mutational processes that have been operating in normal human cells. Two mutational signatures show clock-like properties. Both exhibit different mutationmore » rates in different tissues. However, their mutation rates are not correlated, indicating that the underlying processes are subject to different biological influences. For one signature, the rate of cell division may influence its mutation rate. This paper provides the first survey of clock-like mutational processes operating in human somatic cells.« less

  19. Immunohistochemical correlates of TP53 somatic mutations in cancer.

    PubMed

    Murnyák, Balázs; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2016-10-04

    Despite controversy on the correlation between p53 accumulation and TP53 mutational status, immunohistochemical (IHC) detection of overexpressed protein has long been used as a surrogate method for mutation analysis. The aim of our study was to characterise the IHC expression features of TP53 somatic mutations and define their occurrence in human cancers. A large-scale database analysis was conducted in the IARC TP53 Database (R17); 7878 mutations with IHC features were retrieved representing 60 distinct tumour sites. The majority of the alterations were immunopositive (p <0.001). Sex was known for 4897 mutations showing a female dominance (57.2%) and females carrying negative mutations were significantly younger. TP53 mutations were divided into three IHC groups according to mutation frequency and IHC positivity. Each group had female dominance. Among the IHC groups, significant correlations were observed with age at diagnosis in breast, bladder, liver, haematopoietic system and head & neck cancers. An increased likelihood of false negative IHC associated with rare nonsense mutations was observed in certain tumour sites. Our study demonstrates that p53 immunopositivity largely correlates with TP53 mutational status but expression is absent in certain mutation types.Besides, describing the complex IHC expression of TP53 somatic mutations, our results reveal some caveats for the diagnostic practice.

  20. Lethal hydroxyl radical accumulation by a lactococcal bacteriocin, lacticin Q.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengqi; Yoneyama, Fuminori; Toshimitsu, Nayu; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro; Sonomoto, Kenji

    2013-08-01

    The antimicrobial mechanism of a lactococcal bacteriocin, lacticin Q, can be described by the toroidal pore model without any receptor. However, lacticin Q showed different degrees of activity (selective antimicrobial activity) against Gram-positive bacteria even among related species. The ability of lacticin Q to induce pore formation in liposomes composed of lipids from different indicator strains indicated that its selective antimicrobial activity could not be attributed only to membrane lipid composition. We investigated the accumulation of deleterious hydroxyl radicals after exposure to lacticin Q as a contributing factor to cell death in the indicator strains. When lacticin Q of the same concentration as the MIC or minimum bactericidal concentration was added to the indicator cultures, high levels of hydroxyl radical accumulation were detected. Treatment with hydroxyl radical scavengers, thiourea and 2,2'-bipyridyl, decreased the levels of hydroxyl radical accumulation and recovered cell viability. These results suggest that, with or without pore formation, the final antimicrobial mechanism of lacticin Q is the accumulation of hydroxyl radicals, which varies by strain, resulting in the selective antimicrobial activity of lacticin Q.

  1. Lethal Hydroxyl Radical Accumulation by a Lactococcal Bacteriocin, Lacticin Q

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mengqi; Yoneyama, Fuminori; Toshimitsu, Nayu; Zendo, Takeshi; Nakayama, Jiro

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial mechanism of a lactococcal bacteriocin, lacticin Q, can be described by the toroidal pore model without any receptor. However, lacticin Q showed different degrees of activity (selective antimicrobial activity) against Gram-positive bacteria even among related species. The ability of lacticin Q to induce pore formation in liposomes composed of lipids from different indicator strains indicated that its selective antimicrobial activity could not be attributed only to membrane lipid composition. We investigated the accumulation of deleterious hydroxyl radicals after exposure to lacticin Q as a contributing factor to cell death in the indicator strains. When lacticin Q of the same concentration as the MIC or minimum bactericidal concentration was added to the indicator cultures, high levels of hydroxyl radical accumulation were detected. Treatment with hydroxyl radical scavengers, thiourea and 2,2′-bipyridyl, decreased the levels of hydroxyl radical accumulation and recovered cell viability. These results suggest that, with or without pore formation, the final antimicrobial mechanism of lacticin Q is the accumulation of hydroxyl radicals, which varies by strain, resulting in the selective antimicrobial activity of lacticin Q. PMID:23733459

  2. Genome-wide survey of artificial mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate and gamma rays in tomato.

    PubMed

    Shirasawa, Kenta; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nunome, Tsukasa; Tabata, Satoshi; Isobe, Sachiko

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide mutations induced by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and gamma irradiation in the tomato Micro-Tom genome were identified by a whole-genome shotgun sequencing analysis to estimate the spectrum and distribution of whole-genome DNA mutations and the frequency of deleterious mutations. A total of ~370 Gb of paired-end reads for four EMS-induced mutants and three gamma-ray-irradiated lines as well as a wild-type line were obtained by next-generation sequencing technology. Using bioinformatics analyses, we identified 5920 induced single nucleotide variations and insertion/deletion (indel) mutations. The predominant mutations in the EMS mutants were C/G to T/A transitions, while in the gamma-ray mutants, C/G to T/A transitions, A/T to T/A transversions, A/T to G/C transitions and deletion mutations were equally common. Biases in the base composition flanking mutations differed between the mutagenesis types. Regarding the effects of the mutations on gene function, >90% of the mutations were located in intergenic regions, and only 0.2% were deleterious. In addition, we detected 1,140,687 spontaneous single nucleotide polymorphisms and indel polymorphisms in wild-type Micro-Tom lines. We also found copy number variation, deletions and insertions of chromosomal segments in both the mutant and wild-type lines. The results provide helpful information not only for mutation research, but also for mutant screening methodology with reverse-genetic approaches.

  3. The Slavic NBN Founder Mutation: A Role for Reproductive Fitness?

    PubMed Central

    Seemanova, Eva; Varon, Raymonda; Vejvalka, Jan; Seeman, Pavel; Chrzanowska, Krystyna H.; Digweed, Martin; Resnick, Igor; Kremensky, Ivo; Saar, Kathrin; Hoffmann, Katrin; Dutrannoy, Véronique; Karbasiyan, Mohsen; Ghani, Mehdi; Barić, Ivo; Tekin, Mustafa; Kovacs, Peter; Krawczak, Michael; Reis, André; Sperling, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of patients with Nijmegen Breakage Syndrome (NBS) are of Slavic origin and carry a deleterious deletion (c.657del5; rs587776650) in the NBN gene on chromosome 8q21. This mutation is essentially confined to Slavic populations and may thus be considered a Slavic founder mutation. Notably, not a single parenthood of a homozygous c.657del5 carrier has been reported to date, while heterozygous carriers do reproduce but have an increased cancer risk. These observations seem to conflict with the considerable carrier frequency of c.657del5 of 0.5% to 1% as observed in different Slavic populations because deleterious mutations would be eliminated quite rapidly by purifying selection. Therefore, we propose that heterozygous c.657del5 carriers have increased reproductive success, i.e., that the mutation confers heterozygote advantage. In fact, in our cohort study of the reproductive history of 24 NBS pedigrees from the Czech Republic, we observed that female carriers gave birth to more children on average than female non-carriers, while no such reproductive differences were observed for males. We also estimate that c.657del5 likely occurred less than 300 generations ago, thus supporting the view that the original mutation predated the historic split and subsequent spread of the ‘Slavic people’. We surmise that the higher fertility of female c.657del5 carriers reflects a lower miscarriage rate in these women, thereby reflecting the role of the NBN gene product, nibrin, in the repair of DNA double strand breaks and their processing in immune gene rearrangements, telomere maintenance, and meiotic recombination, akin to the previously described role of the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. PMID:27936167

  4. Low prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in the sporadic breast cancer of Spanish population.

    PubMed

    de Juan Jiménez, Inmaculada; Esteban Cardeñosa, Eva; Palanca Suela, Sarai; Barragán González, Eva; Aznar Carretero, Ismael; Munárriz Gandía, Blanca; Santaballa Bertran, Ana; Torregrosa Maicas, María Dolores; Guillén Ponce, Carmen; Sánchez Heras, Ana Beatriz; Bayón Lara, Ana; Fuster Lluch, Oscar; Bolufer Gilabert, Pascual

    2012-03-01

    The true prevalence of BRCA1/BRCA2 (BRCAs) germline mutations in sporadic breast or ovarian cancer (SBC/SOC) in Caucasian population is not well established. The aim of the study is to establish the prevalence of BRCAs mutations in SBC to ponder its relevance in the programs of genetic counseling in cancer and to explore the genotype-phenotype relationship of these particular breast cancers. The study was performed in 495 SBC. We sought 46 BRCA1 and 53 BRCA2 pathogenic mutations reported in the Spanish population. We followed a high resolution melting method performed in the LightCycler 480 (Roche Diagnostics) for the screening of these Spanish mutations using 49 primer pairs. Eight different deleterious mutations, one of them novel, were detected in nine patients, five without family history of BC/OC, what yields a true prevalence of 1.05% for BRCAs mutations in SBC. Furthermore, we found 18 unknown variants. Larger tumour size (T > 1) and earlier presentation are the independent parameters associated with the presence of BRCAs pathogenic mutations in SBC (P < 0.01) and the BRCA1 mutations carriers develop steroid-receptors negative tumors. Our results indicate that the true prevalence of BRCAs germline deleterious mutations in SBC of Spaniards is low. However, this does not lessens its relevance since the presence of BRCAs mutations in SBC could represent circa 16% of total BRCAs mutations detected in BC. SBCs of BRCAs mutation carriers have phenotype more aggressiveness than SBC without BRCAs mutation.

  5. BRCA1 and BRCA2 Mutations in Ethnic Lebanese Arab Women With High Hereditary Risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zgheib, Nathalie K.; Assi, Hussein A.; Khoury, Katia E.; Bidet, Yannick; Jaber, Sara M.; Charara, Raghid N.; Farhat, Rania A.; Kreidieh, Firas Y.; Decousus, Stephanie; Romero, Pierre; Nemer, Georges M.; Salem, Ziad; Shamseddine, Ali; Tfayli, Arafat; Abbas, Jaber; Jamali, Faek; Seoud, Muhieddine; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Bignon, Yves-Jean; Uhrhammer, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in Lebanon and in Arab countries, with 50% of cases presenting before the age of 50 years. Methods. Between 2009 and 2012, 250 Lebanese women with breast cancer who were considered to be at high risk of carrying BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations because of presentation at young age and/or positive family history (FH) of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited. Clinical data were analyzed statistically. Coding exons and intron-exon boundaries of BRCA1 and BRCA2 were sequenced from peripheral blood DNA. All patients were tested for BRCA1 rearrangements using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). BRCA2 MLPA was done in selected cases. Results. Overall, 14 of 250 patients (5.6%) carried a deleterious BRCA mutation (7 BRCA1, 7 BRCA2) and 31 (12.4%) carried a variant of uncertain significance. Eight of 74 patients (10.8%) aged ≤40 years with positive FH and only 1 of 74 patients (1.4%) aged ≤40 years without FH had a mutated BRCA. Four of 75 patients (5.3%) aged 41–50 years with FH had a deleterious mutation. Only 1 of 27 patients aged >50 years at diagnosis had a BRCA mutation. All seven patients with BRCA1 mutations had grade 3 infiltrating ductal carcinoma and triple-negative breast cancer. Nine BRCA1 and 17 BRCA2 common haplotypes were observed. Conclusion. Prevalence of deleterious BRCA mutations is lower than expected and does not support the hypothesis that BRCA mutations alone cause the observed high percentage of breast cancer in young women of Lebanese and Arab descent. Studies to search for other genetic mutations are recommended. PMID:25777348

  6. A Dietary Test of Putative Deleterious Sterols for the Aphid Myzus persicae

    PubMed Central

    Bouvaine, Sophie; Faure, Marie-Line; Grebenok, Robert J.; Behmer, Spencer T.; Douglas, Angela E.

    2014-01-01

    The aphid Myzus persicae displays high mortality on tobacco plants bearing a transgene which results in the accumulation of the ketosteroids cholestan-3-one and cholest-4-en-3-one in the phloem sap. To test whether the ketosteroids are the basis of the plant resistance to the aphids, M. persicae were reared on chemically-defined diets with different steroid contents at 0.1–10 µg ml−1. Relative to sterol-free diet and dietary supplements of the two ketosteroids and two phytosterols, dietary cholesterol significantly extended aphid lifespan and increased fecundity at one or more dietary concentrations tested. Median lifespan was 50% lower on the diet supplemented with cholest-4-en-3-one than on the cholesterol-supplemented diet. Aphid feeding rate did not vary significantly across the treatments, indicative of no anti-feedant effect of any sterol/steroid. Aphids reared on diets containing equal amounts of cholesterol and cholest-4-en-3-one showed fecundity equivalent to aphids on diets containing only cholesterol. Aphids were reared on diets that reproduced the relative steroid abundance in the phloem sap of the control and modified tobacco plants, and their performance on the two diet formulations was broadly equivalent. We conclude that, at the concentrations tested, plant ketosteroids support weaker aphid performance than cholesterol, but do not cause acute toxicity to the aphids. In plants, the ketosteroids may act synergistically with plant factors absent from artificial diets but are unlikely to be solely responsible for resistance of modified tobacco plants. PMID:24465993

  7. Control of helium accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Varadarajan, V.; Miley, G.H.

    1990-01-01

    The fishbone like oscillations in ignited tokamaks are addressed in an exploratory manner. The effects of the strong m = 1 oscillations and the weak high-frequency oscillations are examined in order to explore the feasibility of utilizing these oscillations for alpha accumulation control. The prospects of achieving small scale continuous alpha removal from the plasma center by mild fishbone-like oscillations are examined.

  8. Methyl donor supplementation in rats reverses the deleterious effect of maternal separation on depression-like behaviour.

    PubMed

    Paternain, Laura; Martisova, Eva; Campión, Javier; Martínez, J Alfredo; Ramírez, Maria J; Milagro, Fermin I

    2016-02-15

    Adverse early life events are associated with altered stress responsiveness and metabolic disturbances in the adult life. Dietary methyl donor supplementation could be able to reverse the negative effects of maternal separation by affecting DNA methylation in the brain. In this study, maternal separation during lactation reduced body weight gain in the female adult offspring without affecting food intake, and altered total and HDL-cholesterol levels. Also, maternal separation induced a cognitive deficit as measured by NORT and an increase in the immobility time in the Porsolt forced swimming test, consistent with increased depression-like behaviour. An 18-week dietary supplementation with methyl donors (choline, betaine, folate and vitamin B12) from postnatal day 60 also reduced body weight without affecting food intake. Some of the deleterious effects induced by maternal separation, such as the abnormal levels of total and HDL-cholesterol, but especially the depression-like behaviour as measured by the Porsolt test, were reversed by methyl donor supplementation. Also, the administration of methyl donors increased total DNA methylation (measured by immunohistochemistry) and affected the expression of insulin receptor in the hippocampus of the adult offspring. However, no changes were observed in the DNA methylation status of insulin receptor and corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) promoter regions in the hypothalamus. In summary, methyl donor supplementation reversed some of the deleterious effects of an early life-induced model of depression in rats and altered the DNA methylation profile in the brain.

  9. The effect of induced mutations on quantitative traits in Arabidopsis thaliana: Natural versus artificial conditions.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Frank W; Fenster, Charles B

    2016-12-01

    Mutations are the ultimate source of all genetic variations. New mutations are expected to affect quantitative traits differently depending on the extent to which traits contribute to fitness and the environment in which they are tested. The dogma is that the preponderance of mutations affecting fitness will be skewed toward deleterious while their effects on nonfitness traits will be bidirectionally distributed. There are mixed views on the role of stress in modulating these effects. We quantify mutation effects by inducing mutations in Arabidopsis thaliana (Columbia accession) using the chemical ethylmethane sulfonate. We measured the effects of new mutations relative to a premutation founder for fitness components under both natural (field) and artificial (growth room) conditions. Additionally, we measured three other quantitative traits, not expected to contribute directly to fitness, under artificial conditions. We found that induced mutations were equally as likely to increase as decrease a trait when that trait was not closely related to fitness (traits that were neither survivorship nor reproduction). We also found that new mutations were more likely to decrease fitness or fitness-related traits under more stressful field conditions than under relatively benign artificial conditions. In the benign condition, the effect of new mutations on fitness components was similar to traits not as closely related to fitness. These results highlight the importance of measuring the effects of new mutations on fitness and other traits under a range of conditions.

  10. The role of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Kui; Le, Han-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alternations in mitochondrial genome resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) is known for its high frequencies of polymorphisms and mutations, however, the roles of these mutations and polymorphisms in lung cancer are among heated debates. To evaluate the possible roles of reported mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer, we examine recent published paper concerning three mt-tRNA mutations with lung cancer: A7460G in tRNASer (UCN) gene, G5563A in tRNATrp gene and A12172G in tRNAHis gene. We perform the phylogenetic approach to investigate the deleterious roles of these mutations in lung cancer, moreover, we use bioinformatics tool to predict the secondary structure of mt-tRNAs with and without these mutations. In addition, through the application of pathogenicity scoring system, we find that only the A12172G mutation is regarded as a pathogenic mutation, whereas other mutations may act as neutral polymorphisms in human population. Thus, our study provides the novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer. PMID:26550263

  11. The role of mitochondrial tRNA mutations in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lie; Chen, Zhi-Jun; Zhang, Yong-Kui; Le, Han-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Alternations in mitochondrial genome resulting in mitochondrial dysfunction have long been hypothesized to be involved in tumorigenesis. Mitochondrial tRNA (mt-tRNA) is known for its high frequencies of polymorphisms and mutations, however, the roles of these mutations and polymorphisms in lung cancer are among heated debates. To evaluate the possible roles of reported mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer, we examine recent published paper concerning three mt-tRNA mutations with lung cancer: A7460G in tRNA(Ser (UCN)) gene, G5563A in tRNA(Trp) gene and A12172G in tRNA(His) gene. We perform the phylogenetic approach to investigate the deleterious roles of these mutations in lung cancer, moreover, we use bioinformatics tool to predict the secondary structure of mt-tRNAs with and without these mutations. In addition, through the application of pathogenicity scoring system, we find that only the A12172G mutation is regarded as a pathogenic mutation, whereas other mutations may act as neutral polymorphisms in human population. Thus, our study provides the novel insight into the molecular pathogenesis of mt-tRNA mutations in lung cancer.

  12. Selenium accumulation by plants

    PubMed Central

    White, Philip J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Selenium (Se) is an essential mineral element for animals and humans, which they acquire largely from plants. The Se concentration in edible plants is determined by the Se phytoavailability in soils. Selenium is not an essential element for plants, but excessive Se can be toxic. Thus, soil Se phytoavailability determines the ecology of plants. Most plants cannot grow on seleniferous soils. Most plants that grow on seleniferous soils accumulate <100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and cannot tolerate greater tissue Se concentrations. However, some plant species have evolved tolerance to Se, and commonly accumulate tissue Se concentrations >100 mg Se kg–1 dry matter. These plants are considered to be Se accumulators. Some species can even accumulate Se concentrations of 1000–15 000 mg Se kg–1 dry matter and are called Se hyperaccumulators. Scope This article provides an overview of Se uptake, translocation and metabolism in plants and highlights the possible genetic basis of differences in these between and within plant species. The review focuses initially on adaptations allowing plants to tolerate large Se concentrations in their tissues and the evolutionary origin of species that hyperaccumulate Se. It then describes the variation in tissue Se concentrations between and within angiosperm species and identifies genes encoding enzymes limiting the rates of incorporation of Se into organic compounds and chromosomal loci that might enable the development of crops with greater Se concentrations in their edible portions. Finally, it discusses transgenic approaches enabling plants to tolerate greater Se concentrations in the rhizosphere and in their tissues. Conclusions The trait of Se hyperaccumulation has evolved several times in separate angiosperm clades. The ability to tolerate large tissue Se concentrations is primarily related to the ability to divert Se away from the accumulation of selenocysteine and selenomethionine, which might be incorporated

  13. High-Throughput Identification of Adaptive Mutations in Experimentally Evolved Yeast Populations

    PubMed Central

    Payen, Celia; Ong, Giang T.; Pogachar, Jamie L.; Zhao, Wei

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has enabled genetic screens that can rapidly identify mutations that occur during experimental evolution. The presence of a mutation in an evolved lineage does not, however, constitute proof that the mutation is adaptive, given the well-known and widespread phenomenon of genetic hitchhiking, in which a non-adaptive or even detrimental mutation can co-occur in a genome with a beneficial mutation and the combined genotype is carried to high frequency by selection. We approximated the spectrum of possible beneficial mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using sets of single-gene deletions and amplifications of almost all the genes in the S. cerevisiae genome. We determined the fitness effects of each mutation in three different nutrient-limited conditions using pooled competitions followed by barcode sequencing. Although most of the mutations were neutral or deleterious, ~500 of them increased fitness. We then compared those results to the mutations that actually occurred during experimental evolution in the same three nutrient-limited conditions. On average, ~35% of the mutations that occurred during experimental evolution were predicted by the systematic screen to be beneficial. We found that the distribution of fitness effects depended on the selective conditions. In the phosphate-limited and glucose-limited conditions, a large number of beneficial mutations of nearly equivalent, small effects drove the fitness increases. In the sulfate-limited condition, one type of mutation, the amplification of the high-affinity sulfate transporter, dominated. In the absence of that mutation, evolution in the sulfate-limited condition involved mutations in other genes that were not observed previously—but were predicted by the systematic screen. Thus, gross functional screens have the potential to predict and identify adaptive mutations that occur during experimental evolution. PMID:27727276

  14. Direct mutation analysis by high-throughput sequencing: from germline to low-abundant, somatic variants

    PubMed Central

    Gundry, Michael; Vijg, Jan

    2011-01-01

    DNA mutations are the source of genetic variation within populations. The majority of mutations with observable effects are deleterious. In humans mutations in the germ line can cause genetic disease. In somatic cells multiple rounds of mutations and selection lead to cancer. The study of genetic variation has progressed rapidly since the completion of the draft sequence of the human genome. Recent advances in sequencing technology, most importantly the introduction of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), have resulted in more than a hundred-fold reduction in the time and cost required for sequencing nucleic acids. These improvements have greatly expanded the use of sequencing as a practical tool for mutation analysis. While in the past the high cost of sequencing limited mutation analysis to selectable markers or small forward mutation targets assumed to be representative for the genome overall, current platforms allow whole genome sequencing for less than $5,000. This has already given rise to direct estimates of germline mutation rates in multiple organisms including humans by comparing whole genome sequences between parents and offspring. Here we present a brief history of the field of mutation research, with a focus on classical tools for the measurement of mutation rates. We then review MPS, how it is currently applied and the new insight into human and animal mutation frequencies and spectra that has been obtained from whole genome sequencing. While great progress has been made, we note that the single most important limitation of current MPS approaches for mutation analysis is the inability to address low-abundance mutations that turn somatic tissues into mosaics of cells. Such mutations are at the basis of intra-tumor heterogeneity, with important implications for clinical diagnosis, and could also contribute to somatic diseases other than cancer, including aging. Some possible approaches to gain access to low-abundance mutations are discussed, with a

  15. Direct mutation analysis by high-throughput sequencing: from germline to low-abundant, somatic variants.

    PubMed

    Gundry, Michael; Vijg, Jan

    2012-01-03

    DNA mutations are the source of genetic variation within populations. The majority of mutations with observable effects are deleterious. In humans mutations in the germ line can cause genetic disease. In somatic cells multiple rounds of mutations and selection lead to cancer. The study of genetic variation has progressed rapidly since the completion of the draft sequence of the human genome. Recent advances in sequencing technology, most importantly the introduction of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), have resulted in more than a hundred-fold reduction in the time and cost required for sequencing nucleic acids. These improvements have greatly expanded the use of sequencing as a practical tool for mutation analysis. While in the past the high cost of sequencing limited mutation analysis to selectable markers or small forward mutation targets assumed to be representative for the genome overall, current platforms allow whole genome sequencing for less than $5000. This has already given rise to direct estimates of germline mutation rates in multiple organisms including humans by comparing whole genome sequences between parents and offspring. Here we present a brief history of the field of mutation research, with a focus on classical tools for the measurement of mutation rates. We then review MPS, how it is currently applied and the new insight into human and animal mutation frequencies and spectra that has been obtained from whole genome sequencing. While great progress has been made, we note that the single most important limitation of current MPS approaches for mutation analysis is the inability to address low-abundance mutations that turn somatic tissues into mosaics of cells. Such mutations are at the basis of intra-tumor heterogeneity, with important implications for clinical diagnosis, and could also contribute to somatic diseases other than cancer, including aging. Some possible approaches to gain access to low-abundance mutations are discussed, with a brief

  16. Exome analysis reveals differentially mutated gene signatures of stage, grade and subtype in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K; Cowan, Kenneth H; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies.

  17. Exome Analysis Reveals Differentially Mutated Gene Signatures of Stage, Grade and Subtype in Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, You; Wang, Xiaosheng; Vural, Suleyman; Mishra, Nitish K.; Cowan, Kenneth H.; Guda, Chittibabu

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancers exhibit highly heterogeneous molecular profiles. Although gene expression profiles have been used to predict the risks and prognostic outcomes of breast cancers, the high variability of gene expression limits its clinical application. In contrast, genetic mutation profiles would be more advantageous than gene expression profiles because genetic mutations can be stably detected and the mutational heterogeneity widely exists in breast cancer genomes. We analyzed 98 breast cancer whole exome samples that were sorted into three subtypes, two grades and two stages. The sum deleterious effect of all mutations in each gene was scored to identify differentially mutated genes (DMGs) for this case-control study. DMGs were corroborated using extensive published knowledge. Functional consequences of deleterious SNVs on protein structure and function were also investigated. Genes such as ERBB2, ESP8, PPP2R4, KIAA0922, SP4, CENPJ, PRCP and SELP that have been experimentally or clinically verified to be tightly associated with breast cancer prognosis are among the DMGs identified in this study. We also identified some genes such as ARL6IP5, RAET1E, and ANO7 that could be crucial for breast cancer development and prognosis. Further, SNVs such as rs1058808, rs2480452, rs61751507, rs79167802, rs11540666, and rs2229437 that potentially influence protein functions are observed at significantly different frequencies in different comparison groups. Protein structure modeling revealed that many non-synonymous SNVs have a deleterious effect on protein stability, structure and function. Mutational profiling at gene- and SNV-level revealed differential patterns within each breast cancer comparison group, and the gene signatures correlate with expected prognostic characteristics of breast cancer classes. Some of the genes and SNVs identified in this study show high promise and are worthy of further investigation by experimental studies. PMID:25803781

  18. PTHR1 mutations associated with Ollier disease result in receptor loss of function

    PubMed Central

    Couvineau, Alain; Wouters, Vinciane; Bertrand, Guylène; Rouyer, Christiane; Gérard, Bénédicte; Boon, Laurence M.; Grandchamp, Bernard; Vikkula, Miikka; Silve, Caroline

    2008-01-01

    PTHR1-signaling pathway is critical for the regulation of endochondral ossification. Thus, abnormalities in genes belonging to this pathway could potentially participate in the pathogenesis of Ollier disease/Maffucci syndrome, two developmental disorders defined by the presence of multiple enchondromas. In agreement, a functionally deleterious mutation in PTHR1 (p.R150C) was identified in enchondromas from two of six unrelated patients with enchondromatosis. However, neither the p.R150C mutation (26 tumors) nor any other mutation in the PTHR1 gene (11 patients) could be identified in another study. To further define the role of PTHR1-signaling pathway in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, we analyzed the coding sequences of four genes (PTHR1, IHH, PTHrP and GNAS1) in leucocyte and/or tumor DNA from 61 and 23 patients affected with Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, respectively. We identified three previously undescribed missense mutations in PTHR1 in patients with Ollier disease at the heterozygous state. Two mutations (p.G121E, p.A122T) were present only in enchondromas, and one (p.R255H) in both enchondroma and leukocyte DNA. Assessment of receptor function demonstrated that these three mutations impair PTHR1 function by reducing either the affinity of the receptor for PTH or the receptor expression at the cell surface. These mutations were not found in DNA from 222 controls. Including our data, PTHR1 functionally deleterious mutations have now been identified in five out 31 enchondromas from Ollier patients. These findings provide further support for the idea that heterozygous mutations in PTHR1 that impair receptor function participate in the pathogenesis of Ollier disease in some patients. PMID:18559376

  19. PTHR1 mutations associated with Ollier disease result in receptor loss of function.

    PubMed

    Couvineau, Alain; Wouters, Vinciane; Bertrand, Guylène; Rouyer, Christiane; Gérard, Bénédicte; Boon, Laurence M; Grandchamp, Bernard; Vikkula, Miikka; Silve, Caroline

    2008-09-15

    PTHR1-signaling pathway is critical for the regulation of endochondral ossification. Thus, abnormalities in genes belonging to this pathway could potentially participate in the pathogenesis of Ollier disease/Maffucci syndrome, two developmental disorders defined by the presence of multiple enchondromas. In agreement, a functionally deleterious mutation in PTHR1 (p.R150C) was identified in enchondromas from two of six unrelated patients with enchondromatosis. However, neither the p.R150C mutation (26 tumors) nor any other mutation in the PTHR1 gene (11 patients) could be identified in another study. To further define the role of PTHR1-signaling pathway in Ollier disease and Maffucci syndrome, we analyzed the coding sequences of four genes (PTHR1, IHH, PTHrP and GNAS1) in leucocyte and/or tumor DNA from 61 and 23 patients affected with Ollier disease or Maffucci syndrome, respectively. We identified three previously undescribed missense mutations in PTHR1 in patients with Ollier disease at the heterozygous state. Two mutations (p.G121E, p.A122T) were present only in enchondromas, and one (p.R255H) in both enchondroma and leukocyte DNA. Assessment of receptor function demonstrated that these three mutations impair PTHR1 function by reducing either the affinity of the receptor for PTH or the receptor expression at the cell surface. These mutations were not found in DNA from 222 controls. Including our data, PTHR1 functionally deleterious mutations have now been identified in five out 31 enchondromas from Ollier patients. These findings provide further support for the idea that heterozygous mutations in PTHR1 that impair receptor function participate in the pathogenesis of Ollier disease in some patients.

  20. Inherited Mutations in 17 Breast Cancer Susceptibility Genes Among a Large Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cohort Unselected for Family History of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Couch, Fergus J.; Hart, Steven N.; Sharma, Priyanka; Toland, Amanda Ewart; Wang, Xianshu; Miron, Penelope; Olson, Janet E.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Pankratz, V. Shane; Olswold, Curtis; Slettedahl, Seth; Hallberg, Emily; Guidugli, Lucia; Davila, Jaime I.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Janni, Wolfgang; Rack, Brigitte; Ekici, Arif B.; Slamon, Dennis J.; Konstantopoulou, Irene; Fostira, Florentia; Vratimos, Athanassios; Fountzilas, George; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Tapper, William J.; Durcan, Lorraine; Cross, Simon S.; Pilarski, Robert; Shapiro, Charles L.; Klemp, Jennifer; Yao, Song; Garber, Judy; Cox, Angela; Brauch, Hiltrud; Ambrosone, Christine; Nevanlinna, Heli; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Slager, Susan L.; Vachon, Celine M.; Eccles, Diana M.; Fasching, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent advances in DNA sequencing have led to the development of breast cancer susceptibility gene panels for germline genetic testing of patients. We assessed the frequency of mutations in 17 predisposition genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, in a large cohort of patients with triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer to determine the utility of germline genetic testing for those with TNBC. Patients and Methods Patients with TNBC (N = 1,824) unselected for family history of breast or ovarian cancer were recruited through 12 studies, and germline DNA was sequenced to identify mutations. Results Deleterious mutations were identified in 14.6% of all patients. Of these, 11.2% had mutations in the BRCA1 (8.5%) and BRCA2 (2.7%) genes. Deleterious mutations in 15 other predisposition genes were detected in 3.7% of patients, with the majority observed in genes involved in homologous recombination, including PALB2 (1.2%) and BARD1, RAD51D, RAD51C, and BRIP1 (0.3% to 0.5%). Patients with TNBC with mutations were diagnosed at an earlier age (P < .001) and had higher-grade tumors (P = .01) than those without mutations. Conclusion Deleterious mutations in predisposition genes are present at high frequency in patients with TNBC unselected for family history of cancer. Mutation prevalence estimates suggest that patients with TNBC, regardless of age at diagnosis or family history of cancer, should be considered for germline genetic testing of BRCA1 and BRCA2. Although mutations in other predisposition genes are observed among patients with TNBC, better cancer risk estimates are needed before these mutations are used for clinical risk assessment in relatives. PMID:25452441

  1. Docking, molecular dynamics and free energy studies on aspartoacylase mutations involved in Canavan disease.

    PubMed

    Kocak, Abdulkadir; Yildiz, Muslum

    2017-03-19

    The disruption of aspartoacylase enzyme's catalytic activity causes fatal neurodegenerative Canavan disease. By molecular dynamics and docking methods, here we studied two deleterious mutations that have been identified in the Canavan patients' genotype E285A, F295S, and revealed the possible cause for the enzyme inhibition due to the drastic changes in active site dynamics, loss of interactions among Arg 71, Arg 168 and the substrate and pKa value of critical Glu178 residue. In addition to changes in the enzyme dynamics, free energy calculations show that the binding energy of substrate decreases dramatically up on mutations.

  2. Identification of novel BRCA founder mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients using capture and Sanger sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Bu, Rong; Siraj, Abdul K; Al-Obaisi, Khadija A S; Beg, Shaham; Al Hazmi, Mohsen; Ajarim, Dahish; Tulbah, Asma; Al-Dayel, Fouad; Al-Kuraya, Khawla S

    2016-09-01

    Ethnic differences of breast cancer genomics have prompted us to investigate the spectra of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in different populations. The prevalence and effect of BRCA 1 and BRCA 2 mutations in Middle Eastern population is not fully explored. To characterize the prevalence of BRCA mutations in Middle Eastern breast cancer patients, BRCA mutation screening was performed in 818 unselected breast cancer patients using Capture and/or Sanger sequencing. 19 short tandem repeat (STR) markers were used for founder mutation analysis. In our study, nine different types of deleterious mutation were identified in 28 (3.4%) cases, 25 (89.3%) cases in BRCA 1 and 3 (10.7%) cases in BRCA 2. Seven recurrent mutations identified accounted for 92.9% (26/28) of all the mutant cases. Haplotype analysis was performed to confirm c.1140 dupG and c.4136_4137delCT mutations as novel putative founder mutation, accounting for 46.4% (13/28) of all BRCA mutant cases and 1.6% (13/818) of all the breast cancer cases, respectively. Moreover, BRCA 1 mutation was significantly associated with BRCA 1 protein expression loss (p = 0.0005). Our finding revealed that a substantial number of BRCA mutations were identified in clinically high risk breast cancer from Middle East region. Identification of the mutation spectrum, prevalence and founder effect in Middle Eastern population facilitates genetic counseling, risk assessment and development of cost-effective screening strategy.

  3. Inflammatory peeling skin syndrome caused a novel mutation in CDSN.

    PubMed

    Telem, Dana Fuchs; Israeli, Shirli; Sarig, Ofer; Sprecher, Eli

    2012-04-01

    Generalized peeling skin syndrome (PSS) is a rare autosomal recessive dermatosis manifesting with continuous exfoliation of the stratum corneum. The inflammatory (type B) subtype of PSS was recently found to be caused by deleterious mutations in the CDSN gene encoding corneodesmosin, a major component of desmosomal junctions in the uppermost layers of the epidermis. In the present study, we assessed a 10-month-old baby, who presented with generalized superficial peeling of the skin. Using PCR amplification and direct sequencing, we identified the third PSS-associated mutation in CDSN, a homozygous 4 bp duplication in the second exon of the gene (c.164_167dup GCCT; p.Thr57ProfsX6). These data further support the notion that corneodesmosin deficiency impairs cell-cell adhesion in the upper epidermis, paving the way for an abnormal inflammatory response due to epidermal barrier disruption.

  4. Robustness and epistasis in mutation-selection models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, Andrea; Krug, Joachim

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the fitness advantage associated with the robustness of a phenotype against deleterious mutations using deterministic mutation-selection models of a quasispecies type equipped with a mesa-shaped fitness landscape. We obtain analytic results for the robustness effect which become exact in the limit of infinite sequence length. Thereby, we are able to clarify a seeming contradiction between recent rigorous work and an earlier heuristic treatment based on mapping to a Schrödinger equation. We exploit the quantum mechanical analogy to calculate a correction term for finite sequence lengths and verify our analytic results by numerical studies. In addition, we investigate the occurrence of an error threshold for a general class of epistatic landscapes and show that diminishing epistasis is a necessary but not sufficient condition for error threshold behaviour.

  5. Quantifying Selection against Synonymous Mutations in HIV-1 env Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zanini, Fabio

    2013-01-01

    Intrapatient evolution of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is driven by the adaptive immune system resulting in rapid change of HIV-1 proteins. When cytotoxic CD8+ T cells or neutralizing antibodies target a new epitope, the virus often escapes via nonsynonymous mutations that impair recognition. Synonymous mutations do not affect this interplay and are often assumed to be neutral. We test this assumption by tracking synonymous mutations in longitudinal intrapatient data from the C2-V5 part of the env gene. We find that most synonymous variants are lost even though they often reach high frequencies in the viral population, suggesting a cost to the virus. Using published data from SHAPE (selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension) assays, we find that synonymous mutations that disrupt base pairs in RNA stems flanking the variable loops of gp120 are more likely to be lost than other synonymous changes: these RNA hairpins might be important for HIV-1. Computational modeling indicates that, to be consistent with the data, a large fraction of synonymous mutations in this genomic region need to be deleterious with a cost on the order of 0.002 per day. This weak selection against synonymous substitutions does not result in a strong pattern of conservation in cross-sectional data but slows down the rate of evolution considerably. Our findings are consistent with the notion that large-scale patterns of RNA structure are functionally relevant, whereas the precise base pairing pattern is not. PMID:23986591

  6. Homozygous STIL mutation causes holoprosencephaly and microcephaly in two siblings.

    PubMed

    Mouden, Charlotte; de Tayrac, Marie; Dubourg, Christèle; Rose, Sophie; Carré, Wilfrid; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Babron, Marie-Claude; Akloul, Linda; Héron-Longe, Bénédicte; Odent, Sylvie; Dupé, Valérie; Giet, Régis; David, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu) in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis.

  7. Disease mutations in disordered regions--exception to the rule?

    PubMed

    Vacic, Vladimir; Iakoucheva, Lilia M

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs) have been implicated in a number of human diseases, including cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative and cardiovascular disorders. Although for some of these conditions molecular mechanisms are now better understood, the big picture connecting distinct structural properties and functional repertoire of IDPs to pathogenesis and disease progression is still incomplete. Recent studies suggest that signaling and regulatory roles carried out by IDPs require them to be tightly regulated, and that altered IDP abundance may lead to disease. Here, we propose another link between IDPs and disease that takes into account disease-associated missense mutations located in the intrinsically disordered regions. We argue that such mutations are more prevalent and have larger functional impact than previously thought. In addition, we demonstrate that deleterious amino acid substitutions that cause disorder-to-order transitions are particularly enriched among disease mutations compared to neutral polymorphisms. Finally, we discuss potential differences in functional outcomes between disease mutations in ordered and disordered regions, and challenge the conventional structure-centric view of missense mutations.

  8. Homozygous STIL Mutation Causes Holoprosencephaly and Microcephaly in Two Siblings

    PubMed Central

    Mouden, Charlotte; de Tayrac, Marie; Dubourg, Christèle; Rose, Sophie; Carré, Wilfrid; Hamdi-Rozé, Houda; Babron, Marie-Claude; Akloul, Linda; Héron-Longe, Bénédicte; Odent, Sylvie; Dupé, Valérie; Giet, Régis; David, Véronique

    2015-01-01

    Holoprosencephaly (HPE) is a frequent congenital malformation of the brain characterized by impaired forebrain cleavage and midline facial anomalies. Heterozygous mutations in 14 genes have been identified in HPE patients that account for only 30% of HPE cases, suggesting the existence of other HPE genes. Data from homozygosity mapping and whole-exome sequencing in a consanguineous Turkish family were combined to identify a homozygous missense mutation (c.2150G>A; p.Gly717Glu) in STIL, common to the two affected children. STIL has a role in centriole formation and has previously been described in rare cases of microcephaly. Rescue experiments in U2OS cells showed that the STIL p.Gly717Glu mutation was not able to fully restore the centriole duplication failure following depletion of endogenous STIL protein indicating the deleterious role of the mutation. In situ hybridization experiments using chick embryos demonstrated that expression of Stil was in accordance with a function during early patterning of the forebrain. It is only the second time that a STIL homozygous mutation causing a recessive form of HPE was reported. This result also supports the genetic heterogeneity of HPE and increases the panel of genes to be tested for HPE diagnosis. PMID:25658757

  9. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  10. Detection of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations in Japanese population using next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Hirotsu, Yosuke; Nakagomi, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Ikuko; Amemiya, Kenji; Mochizuki, Hitoshi; Omata, Masao

    2015-01-01

    Tumor suppressor genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are the two main breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility genes, and their genetic testing has been used to evaluate the risk of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC). While several studies have reported the prevalence of BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations in Japanese populations, there is insufficient information about deleterious mutations compared with western countries. Moreover, because many rare variants are found in BRCA1 and BRCA2, both of which encode large proteins, it is difficult to sequence all coding regions using the Sanger method for mutation detection. In this study, therefore, we performed next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis of the entire coding regions of BRCA1 and BRCA2 in 135 breast and/or ovarian cancer patients. Deleterious BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations were detected in 10 patients (7.4%) by NGS analysis. Of these, one mutation in BRCA1 and two in BRCA2 had not been reported previously. Furthermore, a BRCA2 mutation found in a proband was also identified in two unaffected relatives. These data suggest the utility of screening BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations by NGS in clinical diagnosis. PMID:25802882

  11. De Novo Mutations in CHAMP1 Cause Intellectual Disability with Severe Speech Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Hempel, Maja; Cremer, Kirsten; Ockeloen, Charlotte W.; Lichtenbelt, Klaske D.; Herkert, Johanna C.; Denecke, Jonas; Haack, Tobias B.; Zink, Alexander M.; Becker, Jessica; Wohlleber, Eva; Johannsen, Jessika; Alhaddad, Bader; Pfundt, Rolph; Fuchs, Sigrid; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Strom, Tim M.; van Gassen, Koen L.I.; Kleefstra, Tjitske; Kubisch, Christian; Engels, Hartmut; Lessel, Davor

    2015-01-01

    CHAMP1 encodes a protein with a function in kinetochore-microtubule attachment and in the regulation of chromosome segregation, both of which are known to be important for neurodevelopment. By trio whole-exome sequencing, we have identified de novo deleterious mutations in CHAMP1 in five unrelated individuals affected by intellectual disability with severe speech impairment, motor developmental delay, muscular hypotonia, and similar dysmorphic features including short philtrum and a tented upper and everted lover lip. In addition to two frameshift and one nonsense mutations, we found an identical nonsense mutation, c.1192C>T (p.Arg398∗), in two affected individuals. All mutations, if resulting in a stable protein, are predicted to lead to the loss of the functionally important zinc-finger domains in the C terminus of the protein, which regulate CHAMP1 localization to chromosomes and the mitotic spindle, thereby providing a mechanistic understanding for their pathogenicity. We thus establish deleterious de novo mutations in CHAMP1 as a cause of intellectual disability. PMID:26340335

  12. The role of aromatase inhibitors in ameliorating deleterious effects of ovarian stimulation on outcome of infertility treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mitwally, Mohamed FM; Casper, Robert F; Diamond, Michael P

    2005-01-01

    Clinical utilization of ovulation stimulation to facilitate the ability of a couple to conceive has not only provided a valuable therapeutic approach, but has also yielded extensive information on the physiology of ovarian follicular recruitment, endometrial receptivity and early embryo competency. One of the consequences of the use of fertility enhancing agents for ovarian stimulation has been the creation of a hyperestrogenic state, which may influence each of these parameters. Use of aromatase inhibitors reduces hyperestrogenism inevitably attained during ovarian stimulation. In addition, the adjunct use of aromatase inhibitors during ovarian stimulation reduces amount of gonadotropins required for optimum stimulation. The unique approach of reducing hyperestrogenism, as well as lowering amount of gonadotropins without affecting the number of mature ovarian follicles is an exciting strategy that could result in improvement in the treatment outcome by ameliorating the deleterious effects of the ovarian stimulation on follicular development, endometrial receptivity, as well as oocyte and embryo quality. PMID:16202169

  13. Insight on Mutation-Induced Resistance from Molecular Dynamics Simulations of the Native and Mutated CSF-1R and KIT

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva Figueiredo Celestino Gomes, Priscila; Chauvot De Beauchêne, Isaure; Panel, Nicolas; Lopez, Sophie; De Sepulveda, Paulo; Geraldo Pascutti, Pedro; Solary, Eric; Tchertanov, Luba

    2016-01-01

    The receptors tyrosine kinases (RTKs) for the colony stimulating factor-1, CSF-1R, and for the stem cell factor, SCFR or KIT, are important mediators of signal transduction. The abnormal function of these receptors, promoted by gain-of-function mutations, leads to their constitutive activation, associated with cancer or other proliferative diseases. A secondary effect of the mutations is the alteration of receptors’ sensitivity to tyrosine kinase inhibitors, compromising effectiveness of these molecules in clinical treatment. In particular, the mutation V560G in KIT increases its sensitivity to Imatinib, while the D816V in KIT, and D802V in CSF-1R, triggers resistance to the drug. We analyzed the Imatinib binding affinity to the native and mutated KIT (mutations V560G, S628N and D816V) and CSF-1R (mutation D802V) by using molecular dynamics simulations and energy calculations of Imatinib•target complexes. Further, we evaluated the sensitivity of the studied KIT receptors to Imatinib by measuring the inhibition of KIT phosphorylation. Our study showed that (i) the binding free energy of Imatinib to the targets is highly correlated with their experimentally measured sensitivity; (ii) the electrostatic interactions are a decisive factor affecting the binding energy; (iii) the most deleterious impact to the Imatinib sensitivity is promoted by D802V (CSF-1R) and D816V (KIT) mutations; (iv) the role of the juxtamembrane region, JMR, in the imatinib binding is accessory. These findings contribute to a better description of the mutation-induced effects alternating the targets sensitivity to Imatinib. PMID:27467080

  14. WS-SNPs&GO: a web server for predicting the deleterious effect of human protein variants using functional annotation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background SNPs&GO is a method for the prediction of deleterious Single Amino acid Polymorphisms (SAPs) using protein functional annotation. In this work, we present the web server implementation of SNPs&GO (WS-SNPs&GO). The server is based on Support Vector Machines (SVM) and for a given protein, its input comprises: the sequence and/or its three-dimensional structure (when available), a set of target variations and its functional Gene Ontology (GO) terms. The output of the server provides, for each protein variation, the probabilities to be associated to human diseases. Results The server consists of two main components, including updated versions of the sequence-based SNPs&GO (recently scored as one of the best algorithms for predicting deleterious SAPs) and of the structure-based SNPs&GO3d programs. Sequence and structure based algorithms are extensively tested on a large set of annotated variations extracted from the SwissVar database. Selecting a balanced dataset with more than 38,000 SAPs, the sequence-based approach achieves 81% overall accuracy, 0.61 correlation coefficient and an Area Under the Curve (AUC) of the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.88. For the subset of ~6,600 variations mapped on protein structures available at the Protein Data Bank (PDB), the structure-based method scores with 84% overall accuracy, 0.68 correlation coefficient, and 0.91 AUC. When tested on a new blind set of variations, the results of the server are 79% and 83% overall accuracy for the sequence-based and structure-based inputs, respectively. Conclusions WS-SNPs&GO is a valuable tool that includes in a unique framework information derived from protein sequence, structure, evolutionary profile, and protein function. WS-SNPs&GO is freely available at http://snps.biofold.org/snps-and-go. PMID:23819482

  15. Comparison of the deleterious effects of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure in adolescent and adult mice.

    PubMed

    Lacaille, Hélène; Duterte-Boucher, Dominique; Liot, Donovan; Vaudry, Hubert; Naassila, Mickael; Vaudry, David

    2015-03-01

    A major cause of alcohol toxicity is the production of reactive oxygen species generated during ethanol metabolism. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of binge drinking-like alcohol exposure on a panel of genes implicated in oxidative mechanisms in adolescent and adult mice. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in the repair and protection of oxidative DNA damage such as atr, gpx7, or nudt15 and increased the expression of proapoptotic genes such as casp3. In contrast, in the adult brain, genes activated by alcohol were mainly associated with protective mechanisms that prevent cells from oxidative damage. Whatever the age, iterative binge-like episodes provoked the same deleterious effects as those observed after a single binge episode. In adolescent mice, multiple binge ethanol exposure substantially reduced neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus and impaired short-term memory in the novel object and passive avoidance tests. Taken together, our results indicate that alcohol causes deleterious effects in the adolescent brain which are distinct from those observed in adults. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity. The effects of alcohol exposure were investigated on genes involved in oxidative mechanisms. In adolescent animals, alcohol decreased the expression of genes involved in DNA repair, a potential cause of the observed decrease of neurogenesis. In contrast, in the adult brain, alcohol increased the expression of genes associated with antioxidant mechanisms. Apoptosis was increase in all groups and converged with other biochemical alterations to enhance short-term memory impairment in the adolescent brain. These data contribute to explain the greater sensitivity of the adolescent brain to alcohol toxicity.

  16. UV Signature Mutations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Sequencing complete tumor genomes and exomes has sparked the cancer field's interest in mutation signatures for identifying the tumor's carcinogen. This review and meta-analysis discusses signatures and their proper use. We first distinguish between a mutagen's canonical mutations – deviations from a random distribution of base changes to create a pattern typical of that mutagen – and the subset of signature mutations, which are unique to that mutagen and permit inference backward from mutations to mutagen. To verify UV signature mutations, we assembled literature datasets on cells exposed to UVC, UVB, UVA, or solar simulator light (SSL) and tested canonical UV mutation features as criteria for clustering datasets. A confirmed UV signature was: ≥60% of mutations are C→T at a dipyrimidine site, with ≥5% CC→TT. Other canonical features such as a bias for mutations on the non-transcribed strand or at the 3' pyrimidine had limited application. The most robust classifier combined these features with criteria for the rarity of non-UV canonical mutations. In addition, several signatures proposed for specific UV wavelengths were limited to specific genes or species; non-signature mutations induced by UV may cause melanoma BRAF mutations; and the mutagen for sunlight-related skin neoplasms may vary between continents. PMID:25354245

  17. Exome Sequencing Reveals Cubilin Mutation as a Single-Gene Cause of Proteinuria

    PubMed Central

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A.; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M.; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H.; Yilmaz, Engin

    2011-01-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B12 deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B12-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy. PMID:21903995

  18. Exome sequencing reveals cubilin mutation as a single-gene cause of proteinuria.

    PubMed

    Ovunc, Bugsu; Otto, Edgar A; Vega-Warner, Virginia; Saisawat, Pawaree; Ashraf, Shazia; Ramaswami, Gokul; Fathy, Hanan M; Schoeb, Dominik; Chernin, Gil; Lyons, Robert H; Yilmaz, Engin; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm

    2011-10-01

    In two siblings of consanguineous parents with intermittent nephrotic-range proteinuria, we identified a homozygous deleterious frameshift mutation in the gene CUBN, which encodes cubulin, using exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing. The mutation segregated with affected members of this family and was absent from 92 healthy individuals, thereby identifying a recessive mutation in CUBN as the single-gene cause of proteinuria in this sibship. Cubulin mutations cause a hereditary form of megaloblastic anemia secondary to vitamin B(12) deficiency, and proteinuria occurs in 50% of cases since cubilin is coreceptor for both the intestinal vitamin B(12)-intrinsic factor complex and the tubular reabsorption of protein in the proximal tubule. In summary, we report successful use of exome capture and massively parallel re-sequencing to identify a rare, single-gene cause of nephropathy.

  19. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  20. High proportion of BRCA1/2 founder mutations in Hispanic breast/ovarian cancer families from Colombia.

    PubMed

    Torres, Diana; Rashid, Muhammad Usman; Gil, Fabian; Umana, Angela; Ramelli, Giancarlo; Robledo, Jose Fernando; Tawil, Mauricio; Torregrosa, Lilian; Briceno, Ignacio; Hamann, Ute

    2007-06-01

    In South America, a high proportion of the population is of Hispanic origin with an important representation in Colombia. Since nothing is known about the contribution of BRCA1 and BRCA2 germline mutations to hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in the Hispanic population from Colombia, we conducted the first study of 53 breast/ovarian cancer families from this country. Comprehensive BRCA mutation screening was performed using a range of techniques, including DHPLC, SSCP, and PTT, followed by DNA sequencing analysis. Thirteen deleterious germline mutations (24.5%) were identified in 53 families, comprising eight in BRCA1 and five in BRCA2. The two recurrent BRCA1 mutations, 3450 delCAAG and A1708E, accounted for 100% of all BRCA1 mutations identified in this cohort and the recurrent 3034 delACAA BRCA2 mutation for 40% of all BRCA2 mutations. Haplotype analyses suggested that each of these mutations has arisen from a common ancestor. The prevalence of BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations was 50% in multiple case breast cancer families, and was 33% for the breast-ovarian cancer families. Our findings show that BRCA mutations account for a substantial proportion of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer in Colombia. The spectrum of mutations differed completely to that previously reported in Hispanic families of predominantly Mexican origin from Southern California [1] suggesting that specific genetic risk assessment strategies for the different Hispanic populations in South America and in the United States need to be developed.

  1. Oxidative stress is not a major contributor to somatic mitochondrial DNA mutations.

    PubMed

    Itsara, Leslie S; Kennedy, Scott R; Fox, Edward J; Yu, Selina; Hewitt, Joshua J; Sanchez-Contreras, Monica; Cardozo-Pelaez, Fernando; Pallanck, Leo J

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of somatic mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations is implicated in aging and common diseases of the elderly, including cancer and neurodegenerative disease. However, the mechanisms that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations are poorly understood. To develop a simple invertebrate model system to address this matter, we used the Random Mutation Capture (RMC) assay to characterize the age-dependent frequency and distribution of mtDNA mutations in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Because oxidative stress is a major suspect in the age-dependent accumulation of somatic mtDNA mutations, we also used the RMC assay to explore the influence of oxidative stress on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. We found that many of the features associated with mtDNA mutations in vertebrates are conserved in Drosophila, including a comparable somatic mtDNA mutation frequency (∼10(-5)), an increased frequency of mtDNA mutations with age, and a prevalence of transition mutations. Only a small fraction of the mtDNA mutations detected in young or old animals were G∶C to T∶A transversions, a signature of oxidative damage, and loss-of-function mutations in the mitochondrial superoxide dismutase, Sod2, had no detectable influence on the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency. Moreover, a loss-of-function mutation in Ogg1, which encodes a DNA repair enzyme that removes oxidatively damaged deoxyguanosine residues (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), did not significantly influence the somatic mtDNA mutation frequency of Sod2 mutants. Together, these findings indicate that oxidative stress is not a major cause of somatic mtDNA mutations. Our data instead suggests that somatic mtDNA mutations arise primarily from errors that occur during mtDNA replication. Further studies using Drosophila should aid in the identification of factors that influence the frequency of somatic mtDNA mutations.

  2. Mitochondrial DNA mutations in single human blood cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yong-Gang; Kajigaya, Sachiko; Young, Neal S

    2015-09-01

    Determination mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences from extremely small amounts of DNA extracted from tissue of limited amounts and/or degraded samples is frequently employed in medical, forensic, and anthropologic studies. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification followed by DNA cloning is a routine method, especially to examine heteroplasmy of mtDNA mutations. In this review, we compare the mtDNA mutation patterns detected by three different sequencing strategies. Cloning and sequencing methods that are based on PCR amplification of DNA extracted from either single cells or pooled cells yield a high frequency of mutations, partly due to the artifacts introduced by PCR and/or the DNA cloning process. Direct sequencing of PCR product which has been amplified from DNA in individual cells is able to detect the low levels of mtDNA mutations present within a cell. We further summarize the findings in our recent studies that utilized this single cell method to assay mtDNA mutation patterns in different human blood cells. Our data show that many somatic mutations observed in the end-stage differentiated cells are found in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and progenitors within the CD34(+) cell compartment. Accumulation of mtDNA variations in the individual CD34+ cells is affected by both aging and family genetic background. Granulocytes harbor higher numbers of mutations compared with the other cells, such as CD34(+) cells and lymphocytes. Serial assessment of mtDNA mutations in a population of single CD34(+) cells obtained from the same donor over time suggests stability of some somatic mutations. CD34(+) cell clones from a donor marked by specific mtDNA somatic mutations can be found in the recipient after transplantation. The significance of these findings is discussed in terms of the lineage tracing of HSCs, aging effect on accumulation of mtDNA mutations and the usage of mtDNA sequence in forensic identification.

  3. Effect of Mutation Order on Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Nangalia, Jyoti; Silber, Yvonne; Wedge, David C.; Grinfeld, Jacob; Baxter, E. Joanna; Massie, Charles E.; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Menon, Suraj; Godfrey, Anna L.; Dimitropoulou, Danai; Guglielmelli, Paola; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Döhner, Konstanze; Harrison, Claire N.; Vassiliou, George S.; Vannucchi, Alessandro; Campbell, Peter J.; Green, Anthony R.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cancers result from the accumulation of somatic mutations, and their properties are thought to reflect the sum of these mutations. However, little is known about the effect of the order in which mutations are acquired. METHODS We determined mutation order in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms by genotyping hematopoietic colonies or by means of next-generation sequencing. Stem cells and progenitor cells were isolated to study the effect of mutation order on mature and immature hematopoietic cells. RESULTS The age at which a patient presented with a myeloproliferative neoplasm, acquisition of JAK2 V617F homozygosity, and the balance of immature progenitors were all influenced by mutation order. As compared with patients in whom the TET2 mutation was acquired first (hereafter referred to as “TET2-first patients”), patients in whom the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) mutation was acquired first (“JAK2-first patients”) had a greater likelihood of presenting with polycythemia vera than with essential thrombocythemia, an increased risk of thrombosis, and an increased sensitivity of JAK2-mutant progenitors to ruxolitinib in vitro. Mutation order influenced the proliferative response to JAK2 V617F and the capacity of double-mutant hematopoietic cells and progenitor cells to generate colony-forming cells. Moreover, the hematopoietic stem-and-progenitor-cell compartment was dominated by TET2 single-mutant cells in TET2-first patients but by JAK2–TET2 double-mutant cells in JAK2-first patients. Prior mutation of TET2 altered the transcriptional consequences of JAK2 V617F in a cell-intrinsic manner and prevented JAK2 V617F from up-regulating genes associated with proliferation. CONCLUSIONS The order in which JAK2 and TET2 mutations were acquired influenced clinical features, the response to targeted therapy, the biology of stem and progenitor cells, and clonal evolution in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. (Funded by Leukemia and Lymphoma Research

  4. Sinapic acid ester metabolism in wild type and a sinapoylglucose-accumulating mutant of arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenzen, M; Racicot, V; Strack, D; Chapple, C

    1996-01-01

    Sinapoylmalate is one of the major phenylpropanoid metabolites that is accumulated in the vegetative tissue of Arabidopsis thaliana. A thin-layer chromatography-based mutant screen identified two allelic mutant lines that accumulated sinapoylglucose in their leaves in place of sinapoylmalate. Both mutations were found to be recessive and segregated as single Mendelian genes. These mutants define a new locus called SNG1 for sinapoylglucose accumulator. Plants that are homozygous for the sng1 mutation accumulate normal levels of malate in their leaves but lack detectable levels of the final enzyme in sinapate ester biosynthesis, sinapoylglucose:malate sinapoyltransferase. A study of wild-type and sng1 seedlings found that sinapic acid ester biosynthesis in Arabidopsis is developmentally regulated and that the accumulation of sinapate esters is delayed in sng1 mutant seedlings. PMID:8972602

  5. The Founder Strains of the Collaborative Cross Express a Complex Combination of Advantageous and Deleterious Traits for Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Odet, Fanny; Pan, Wenqi; Bell, Timothy A.; Goodson, Summer G.; Stevans, Alicia M.; Yun, Zianing; Aylor, David L.; Kao, Chia-Yu; McMillan, Leonard; de Villena, Fernando Pardo-Manuel; O’Brien, Deborah A.

    2015-01-01

    Surveys of inbred strains of mice are standard approaches to determine the heritability and range of phenotypic variation for biomedical traits. In addition, they may lead to the identification of novel phenotypes and models of human disease. Surprisingly, male reproductive phenotypes are among the least-represented traits in the Mouse Phenome Database. Here we report the results of a broad survey of the eight founder inbred strains of both the Collaborative Cross (CC) and the Diversity Outbred populations, two new mouse resources that are being used as platforms for systems genetics and sources of mouse models of human diseases. Our survey includes representatives of the three main subspecies of the house mice and a mix of classical and wild-derived inbred strains. In addition to standard staples of male reproductive phenotyping such as reproductive organ weights, sperm counts, and sperm morphology, our survey includes sperm motility and the first detailed survey of testis histology. As expected for such a broad survey, heritability varies widely among traits. We conclude that although all eight inbred strains are fertile, most display a mix of advantageous and deleterious male reproductive traits. The CAST/EiJ strain is an outlier, with an unusual combination of deleterious male reproductive traits including low sperm counts, high levels of morphologically abnormal sperm, and poor motility. In contrast, sperm from the PWK/PhJ and WSB/EiJ strains had the greatest percentages of normal morphology and vigorous motility. Finally, we report an abnormal testis phenotype that is highly heritable and restricted to the WSB/EiJ strain. This phenotype is characterized by the presence of a large, but variable, number of vacuoles in at least 10% of the seminiferous tubules. The onset of the phenotype between 2 and 3 wk of age is temporally correlated with the formation of the blood-testis barrier. We speculate that this phenotype may play a role in high rates of extinction in

  6. Mutators in space: the dynamics of high-mutability clones in a two-patch model.

    PubMed Central

    Travis, E R; Travis, J M J

    2004-01-01

    Clones of bacteria possessing high-mutability rates (or mutators) are being observed in an increasing number of species. In a constant environment most mutations are deleterious, and hence the spontaneous mutation rate is generally low. However, mutators may play an important role in the adaptation of organisms to changing environments. To date, theoretical work has focused on temporal variability in the environment, implicitly assuming that environmental conditions are constant through space. Here, we develop a two-patch model to investigate how spatiotemporal environmental variability and dispersal might influence mutator dynamics. Environmental conditions in each patch fluctuate between two states; the rate of fluctuation varies in each patch at differing phase angles. We find that at low and intermediate rates of fluctuation, an increase in dispersal results in a decrease in the density of mutators. However, at high rates of environmental change, dispersal causes an increase in mutator density. For all frequencies of environmental fluctuation these trends are enhanced as the phase angle approaches 180 degrees. We argue that future work, both empirical and theoretical, is needed to improve our understanding of how spatiotemporal variability impacts on mutator densities and dynamics. PMID:15166173

  7. Low prevalence of germline PALB2 mutations in Australian triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wong-Brown, Michelle W; Avery-Kiejda, Kelly A; Bowden, Nikola A; Scott, Rodney J

    2014-01-15

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a tumour classification that is defined by oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 receptor negativity. TNBCs share a similar gene expression profile to BRCA-mutated tumours, have been shown to carry a high proportion of BRCA mutations and have a more adverse prognosis compared to other types of breast tumours. PALB2 has been shown to be a moderate-penetrance breast cancer susceptibility gene and is involved in the same DNA damage repair pathway as BRCA1 and BRCA2; this raises the possibility that germline PALB2 mutations may be involved in the pathogenesis of TNBCs. In our study, we sequenced the coding regions of PALB2 (including intron/exon boundaries) in genomic DNA from 347 patients diagnosed with TNBC to determine the prevalence of deleterious mutations in this population. Two novel truncating mutations (c.758dup and c.2390del) and one previously detected truncating mutation (c.3113+5G>C) were found. In addition, five variants predicted to be protein-affecting were also identified. Our study shows that the prevalence of PALB2 germline mutations in individuals with TNBC is ∼1%, similar to the prevalence of PALB2 germline mutation of 1% in familial non-BRCA1/2 breast cancer cohorts.

  8. Effective Temperature of Mutations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derényi, Imre; Szöllősi, Gergely J.

    2015-02-01

    Biological macromolecules experience two seemingly very different types of noise acting on different time scales: (i) point mutations corresponding to changes in molecular sequence and (ii) thermal fluctuations. Examining the secondary structures of a large number of microRNA precursor sequences and model lattice proteins, we show that the effects of single point mutations are statistically indistinguishable from those of an increase in temperature by a few tens of kelvins. The existence of such an effective mutational temperature establishes a quantitative connection between robustness to genetic (mutational) and environmental (thermal) perturbations.

  9. Vesicle formation and follicular root sheath separation in mice homozygous for deleterious alleles at the balding (bal) locus.

    PubMed

    Montagutelli, X; Lalouette, A; Boulouis, H J; Guénet, J L; Sundberg, J P

    1997-09-01

    The balding (bal) mutation of the mouse is an autosomal recessive mutation that causes alopecia and immunologic anomalies. A new allele was identified by allelism testing after using an interspecific backcross to localize the mutation to the centromeric end of mouse chromosome 18. We investigated the skin and hair histologic lesions of two alleles (bal(J) and bal(Pas)) at this locus and analyzed the expression of several keratinocyte markers and the production of autoantibodies by immunofluorescence on frozen skin sections. The lesions observed included separation of the inner and outer root sheath in anagen follicles resulting in the hair fiber being very easily plucked from the follicle. Vesicles on the ventral tongue, mucocutaneous junction of the eyelid, foot pads, and rarely in skin were also evident. Separation occurred between the basal and suprabasilar cells forming an empty cleft, resembling that observed in human pemphigus vulgaris. Immunofluorescence studies did not reveal the presence of tissue-bound or circulating autoantibodies. Expression of keratinocyte markers in hair follicles was normal. Keratin 6-positive cells were found on either side of the follicular separation suggesting a molecular defect in adhesion molecules between the inner layer of the outer root sheath cells to layers on either sides. This hypothesis has been confirmed by another group who demonstrated that the bal(J) mutation is due to the insertion of a thymidine in the desmoglein 3 gene, resulting in a premature stop codon.

  10. Somatic CALR Mutations in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms with Nonmutated JAK2

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Van Loo, P.; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O’Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.-Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.P.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.P.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. RESULTS Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. CONCLUSIONS Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with

  11. Molecular Analysis of Factor VIII and Factor IX Genes in Hemophilia Patients: Identification of Novel Mutations and Molecular Dynamics Studies

    PubMed Central

    Al-Allaf, Faisal A.; Taher, Mohiuddin M.; Abduljaleel, Zainularifeen; Bouazzaoui, Abdellatif; Athar, Mohammed; Bogari, Neda M.; Abalkhail, Halah A.; Owaidah, Tarek MA.

    2017-01-01

    Background Hemophilias A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders caused by mutations in the factor VIII and factor IX genes, respectively. Our objective was to identify the spectrum of mutations of the factor VIII and factor IX genes in Saudi Arabian population and determine the genotype and phenotype correlations by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Methods For genotyping, blood samples from Saudi Arabian patients were collected, and the genomic DNA was amplified, and then sequenced by Sanger method. For molecular simulations, we have used softwares such as CHARMM (Chemistry at Harvard Macromolecular Mechanics; http://www.charmm-gui.org) and GROMACS. In addition, the secondary structure was determined based on the solvent accessibility for the confirmation of the protein stability at the site of mutation. Results Six mutations (three novel and three known) were identified in factor VIII gene, and six mutations (one novel and five known) were identified in factor IX gene. The factor VIII novel mutations identified were c.99G>T, p. (W33C) in exon 1, c.2138 DelA, p. (N713Tfs*9) in eon14, also a novel mutation at splicing acceptor site of exon 23 c.6430 - 1G>A. In factor IX, we found a novel mutation c.855G>C, p. (E285D) in exon 8. These novel mutations were not reported in any factor VIII or factor IX databases previously. The deleterious effects of these novel mutations were confirmed by PolyPhen2 and SIFT programs. Conclusion The protein functional and structural studies and the models built in this work would be appropriate for predicting the effects of deleterious amino acid substitutions causing these genetic disorders. These findings are useful for genetic counseling in the case of consanguineous marriages which is more common in the Saudi Arabia. PMID:28270892

  12. The new mutation theory of phenotypic evolution

    PubMed Central

    Nei, Masatoshi

    2007-01-01

    Recent studies of developmental biology have shown that the genes controlling phenotypic characters expressed in the early stage of development are highly conserved and that recent evolutionary changes have occurred primarily in the characters expressed in later stages of development. Even the genes controlling the latter characters are generally conserved, but there is a large component of neutral or nearly neutral genetic variation within and between closely related species. Phenotypic evolution occurs primarily by mutation of genes that interact with one another in the developmental process. The enormous amount of phenotypic diversity among different phyla or classes of organisms is a product of accumulation of novel mutations and their conservation that have facilitated adaptation to different environments. Novel mutations may be incorporated into the genome by natural selection (elimination of preexisting genotypes) or by random processes such as genetic and genomic drift. However, once the mutations are incorporated into the genome, they may generate developmental constraints that will affect the future direction of phenotypic evolution. It appears that the driving force of phenotypic evolution is mutation, and natural selection is of secondary importance. PMID:17640887

  13. Interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations in genetic disease: review of the literature and guidelines for information-theoretical analysis

    PubMed Central

    Caminsky, Natasha; Mucaki, Eliseos J.; Rogan, Peter K.

    2014-01-01

    The interpretation of genomic variants has become one of the paramount challenges in the post-genome sequencing era. In this review we summarize nearly 20 years of research on the applications of information theory (IT) to interpret coding and non-coding mutations that alter mRNA splicing in rare and common diseases. We compile and summarize the spectrum of published variants analyzed by IT, to provide a broad perspective of the distribution of deleterious natural and cryptic splice site variants detected, as well as those affecting splicing regulatory sequences. Results for natural splice site mutations can be interrogated dynamically with Splicing Mutation Calculator, a companion software program that computes changes in information content for any splice site substitution, linked to corresponding publications containing these mutations. The accuracy of IT-based analysis was assessed in the context of experimentally validated mutations. Because splice site information quantifies binding affinity, IT-based analyses can discern the differences between variants that account for the observed reduced (leaky) versus abolished mRNA splicing. We extend this principle by comparing predicted mutations in natural, cryptic, and regulatory splice sites with observed deleterious phenotypic and benign effects. Our analysis of 1727 variants revealed a number of general principles useful for ensuring portability of these analyses and accurate input and interpretation of mutations. We offer guidelines for optimal use of IT software for interpretation of mRNA splicing mutations. PMID:25717368

  14. Congenital myopathy is caused by mutation of HACD1

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Emad; Reish, Orit; Ohno, Yusuke; Scheetz, Todd; DeLuca, Adam; Searby, Charles; Regev, Miriam; Benyamini, Lilach; Fellig, Yakov; Kihara, Akio; Sheffield, Val C.; Parvari, Ruti

    2013-01-01

    Congenital myopathies are heterogeneous inherited diseases of muscle characterized by a range of distinctive histologic abnormalities. We have studied a consanguineous family with congenital myopathy. Genome-wide linkage analysis and whole-exome sequencing identified a homozygous non-sense mutation in 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydratase 1 (HACD1) in affected individuals. The mutation results in non-sense mediated decay of the HACD1 mRNA to 31% of control levels in patient muscle and completely abrogates the enzymatic activity of dehydration of 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA, the third step in the elongation of very long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs). We describe clinical findings correlated with a deleterious mutation in a gene not previously known to be associated with congenital myopathy in humans. We suggest that the mutation in the HACD1 gene causes a reduction in the synthesis of VLCFAs, which are components of membrane lipids and participants in physiological processes, leading to congenital myopathy. These data indicate that HACD1 is necessary for muscle function. PMID:23933735

  15. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E; Park, Daniel J; Southey, Melissa C

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron-exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services.

  16. Mutation screening of PALB2 in clinically ascertained families from the Breast Cancer Family Registry

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Dumont, Tú; Hammet, Fleur; Mahmoodi, Maryam; Tsimiklis, Helen; Teo, Zhi L.; Li, Roger; Pope, Bernard J.; Terry, Mary Beth; Buys, Saundra S.; Daly, Mary; Hopper, John L.; Winship, Ingrid; Goldgar, David E.; Park, Daniel J.; Southey, Melissa C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations in PALB2 are associated with an increased risk of breast cancer, with recent data showing that female breast cancer risks for PALB2 mutation carriers are comparable in magnitude to those for BRCA2 mutation carriers. This study applied targeted massively parallel sequencing to characterize the mutation spectrum of PALB2 in probands attending breast cancer genetics clinics in the USA. The coding regions and proximal intron–exon junctions of PALB2 were screened in probands not known to carry a mutation in BRCA1 or BCRA2 from 1,250 families enrolled through familial cancer clinics by the Breast Cancer Family Registry. Mutation screening was performed using Hi-Plex, an amplicon-based targeted massively parallel sequencing platform. Screening of PALB2 was successful in 1,240/1,250 probands and identified nine women with protein-truncating mutations (three nonsense mutations and five frameshift mutations). Four of the 33 missense variants were predicted to be deleterious to protein function by in silico analysis using two different programs. Analysis of tumors from carriers of truncating mutations revealed that the majority were high histological grade, invasive ductal carcinomas. Young onset was apparent in most families, with 19 breast cancers under 50 years of age, including eight under the age of 40 years. Our data demonstrate the utility of Hi-Plex in the context of high-throughput testing for rare genetic mutations and provide additional timely information about the nature and prevalence of PALB2 mutations, to enhance risk assessment and risk management of women at high risk of cancer attending clinical genetic services. PMID:25575445

  17. Novel Pathogenic Variants in a French Cohort Widen the Mutational Spectrum of GNE Myopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cerino, Mathieu; Gorokhova, Svetlana; Béhin, Anthony; Urtizberea, Jon Andoni; Kergourlay, Virginie; Salvo, Eric; Bernard, Rafaëlle; Lévy, Nicolas; Bartoli, Marc; Krahn, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Background: GNE myopathy is a rare autosomal recessively inherited muscle disease resulting from mutations in the gene encoding GNE (UDP-N-acetylglucosamine-2-epimerase/N-acetylmannosamine kinase), a key enzyme in sialic acid biosynthesis. 154 different pathogenic variants have been previously associated with GNE myopathy. Objective: Describe novel pathogenic variants associated with GNE myopathy in a large French cohort. Methods: We analyzed mutational data from 32 GNE myopathy index patients. Novel, as well as previously published pathogenic variants, were examined for possible deleterious effects on splicing. Results: We describe 13 novel pathogenic variants in GNE, identified in the first large French cohort reported to date. We also find that 6 published pathogenic variants might have a previously unrecognized deleterious effect on splicing. Conclusions: Novel pathogenic GNE variants described here raise the total number of different pathogenic variants reported to 167, complementing the recently published GNE mutation update. Our novel findings on possible splice-disrupting effects by several variants suggest that the pathogenicity mechanism of these variants could be reinterpreted, expanding our knowledge about the GNE mutational spectrum. PMID:27858732

  18. Alpha Helices Are More Robust to Mutations than Beta Strands

    PubMed Central

    Abrusán, György

    2016-01-01

    The rapidly increasing amount of data on human genetic variation has resulted in a growing demand to identify pathogenic mutations computationally, as their experimental validation is currently beyond reach. Here we show that alpha helices and beta strands differ significantly in their ability to tolerate muta