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Sample records for accumulate large numbers

  1. Estimating Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Landy, David; Silbert, Noah; Goldin, Aleah

    2013-01-01

    Despite their importance in public discourse, numbers in the range of 1 million to 1 trillion are notoriously difficult to understand. We examine magnitude estimation by adult Americans when placing large numbers on a number line and when qualitatively evaluating descriptions of imaginary geopolitical scenarios. Prior theoretical conceptions…

  2. Numbers Defy the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Ruma; Lann, Avital Lavie

    2015-01-01

    As the number of independent tosses of a fair coin grows, the rates of heads and tails tend to equality. This is misinterpreted by many students as being true also for the absolute numbers of the two outcomes, which, conversely, depart unboundedly from each other in the process. Eradicating that misconception, as by coin-tossing experiments,…

  3. Insights into Our Understandings of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastberg, Signe E.; Walker, Vicki

    2008-01-01

    This article explores prospective teachers' understandings of one million to gain insights into the development of adult understanding of large numbers. Themes in the prospective teachers' work included number associated with a quantity of objects, number as an abstraction, and additive and multiplicative approaches. The authors suggest that the…

  4. Reading the World through Very Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, Brian; Mukhopadhyay, Swapna

    2010-01-01

    One original, and continuing, source of interest in large numbers is observation of the natural world, such as trying to count the stars on a clear night or contemplation of the number of grains of sand on the seashore. Indeed, a search of the internet quickly reveals many discussions of the relative numbers of stars and grains of sand. Big…

  5. Small and large number discrimination in guppies.

    PubMed

    Piffer, Laura; Agrillo, Christian; Hyde, Daniel C

    2012-03-01

    Non-verbal numerical behavior in human infants, human adults, and non-human primates appears to be rooted in two distinct mechanisms: a precise system for tracking and comparing small numbers of items simultaneously (up to 3 or 4 items) and an approximate system for estimating numerical magnitude of a group of objects. The most striking evidence that these two mechanisms are distinct comes from the apparent inability of young human infants and non-human primates to compare quantites across the small (<3 or 4)/large (>4) number boundary. We ask whether this distinction is present in lower animal species more distantly related to humans, guppies (Poecilia reticulata). We found that, like human infants and non-human primates, fish succeed at comparisons between large numbers only (5 vs. 10), succeed at comparisons between small numbers only (3 vs. 4), but systematically fail at comparisons that closely span the small/large boundary (3 vs. 5). Furthermore, increasing the distance between the small and large number resulted in successful discriminations (3 vs. 6, 3 vs. 7, and 3 vs. 9). This pattern of successes and failures is similar to those observed in human infants and non-human primates to suggest that the two systems are present and functionally distinct across a wide variety of animal species. PMID:21909934

  6. Tutoring Large Numbers: An Unmet Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lentell, Helen; O'Rourke, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Open and distance learning (ODL) is increasingly being regarded as a viable policy option for developing countries with limited educational resources for buildings, books and trained teachers, seeking to increase accessibility for large numbers of learners in education and training opportunities. Advocates of ODL as an appropriate solution to…

  7. Thermocapillary bubble migration for large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.

    1987-01-01

    The thermocapillary motion of spherical bubbles present in an unbounded liquid with a linear temperature distribution, when the Reynolds number and the Marangoni number are large is analyzed. Previous calculations of the terminal velocity performed for this parametric range did not take into complete consideration the thermal boundary layer present near the surface of the bubble. A scaling analysis is presented for this problem. The thermal boundary layer is analyzed by an integral method. The resulting terminal velocity is lower than the one previously calculated, though it is of the same order of magnitude.

  8. Large numbers hypothesis. I - Classical formalism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1982-01-01

    A self-consistent formulation of physics at the classical level embodying Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH) is developed based on units covariance. A scalar 'field' phi(x) is introduced and some fundamental results are derived from the resultant equations. Some unusual properties of phi are noted such as the fact that phi cannot be the correspondence limit of a normal quantum scalar field.

  9. Large numbers hypothesis. II - Electromagnetic radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    This paper develops the theory of electromagnetic radiation in the units covariant formalism incorporating Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). A direct field-to-particle technique is used to obtain the photon propagation equation which explicitly involves the photon replication rate. This replication rate is fixed uniquely by requiring that the form of a free-photon distribution function be preserved, as required by the 2.7 K cosmic radiation. One finds that with this particular photon replication rate the units covariant formalism developed in Paper I actually predicts that the ratio of photon number to proton number in the universe varies as t to the 1/4, precisely in accord with LNH. The cosmological red-shift law is also derived and it is shown to differ considerably from the standard form of (nu)(R) - const.

  10. Forecasting distribution of numbers of large fires

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eidenshink, Jeffery C.; Preisler, Haiganoush K.; Howard, Stephen; Burgan, Robert E.

    2014-01-01

    Systems to estimate forest fire potential commonly utilize one or more indexes that relate to expected fire behavior; however they indicate neither the chance that a large fire will occur, nor the expected number of large fires. That is, they do not quantify the probabilistic nature of fire danger. In this work we use large fire occurrence information from the Monitoring Trends in Burn Severity project, and satellite and surface observations of fuel conditions in the form of the Fire Potential Index, to estimate two aspects of fire danger: 1) the probability that a 1 acre ignition will result in a 100+ acre fire, and 2) the probabilities of having at least 1, 2, 3, or 4 large fires within a Predictive Services Area in the forthcoming week. These statistical processes are the main thrust of the paper and are used to produce two daily national forecasts that are available from the U.S. Geological Survey, Earth Resources Observation and Science Center and via the Wildland Fire Assessment System. A validation study of our forecasts for the 2013 fire season demonstrated good agreement between observed and forecasted values.

  11. Modified large number theory with constant G

    SciTech Connect

    Recami, E.

    1983-03-01

    The inspiring ''numerology'' uncovered by Dirac, Eddington, Weyl, et al. can be explained and derived when it is slightly modified so to connect the ''gravitational world'' (cosmos) with the ''strong world'' (hadron), rather than with the electromagnetic one. The aim of this note is to show the following. In the present approach to the ''Large Number Theory,'' cosmos and hadrons are considered to be (finite) similar systems, so that the ratio R-bar/r-bar of the cosmos typical length R-bar to the hadron typical length r-bar is constant in time (for instance, if both cosmos and hadrons undergo an expansion/contraction cycle: according to the ''cyclical big-bang'' hypothesis: then R-bar and r-bar can be chosen to be the maximum radii, or the average radii). As a consequence, then gravitational constant G results to be independent of time. The present note is based on work done in collaboration with P.Caldirola, G. D. Maccarrone, and M. Pavsic.

  12. Large Rossby number flows in Cozumel Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochoa, J.; Candela, J.; Sheinbaum, J.; Badan, A.

    2003-04-01

    The Caribbean Current flows to the west impinging the Yucatan coast south of Cozumel Island, then, most of its flow turns north, surrounds the island and continues towards the Yucatan Straits. About 4 Sv in the mean pass between the Yucatan coast and the Cozumel Island; through the Cozumel Channel, where subinertial currents exhibit large ageostrophic fluctuations [Chavez et. al. (2003)]. This channel is about 18 km wide, 50 km long, 400 m deep, and 70 km southwest of the Yucatan Straits. The curvature and latitude of the Caribbean Current on its approach to the Yucatan coast vary significantly. Observations with two upward-looking ADCPs, 8.6 km from each other, closely aligned with the mean current at the channel's axis and entrance, allow robust estimations of the current speed (U), direction and curvature (|R|-1). A signed Rossby number (Uf-1R-1), where f is the Coriolis parameter, is readily available as a function of time. The positive/negative curvature is defined by the cyclonic/anticyclonic turn. The currents observations along with pressure measurements at both sides of the channel produce evidence that favor the bend of the current as the cause of the ageostrophic fluctuations. Another possible cause for the ageostrophic fluctuations is the passage of eddies within the channel. We test the gradient wind balance between the currents and pressure observations. A very low frequency component on the seasonal time scale and high frequency fluctuations (superinercial) do not adjust to this balance, only the intermediate frequency variations show a clear equilibrium of centripetal (i.e. due to curvature) plus Coriolis accelerations against the pressure gradient perpendicular to the velocity. The conjecture is that the ageostrophic fluctuations occur when the bend and approach of the Caribbean Current is just south of Cozumel Island, thus influencing all its entrance. When the current impinges the coast further south, the flow, with a longer path to transit

  13. Applications of species accumulation curves in large-scale biological data analysis

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Chao; Daley, Timothy; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    The species accumulation curve, or collector’s curve, of a population gives the expected number of observed species or distinct classes as a function of sampling effort. Species accumulation curves allow researchers to assess and compare diversity across populations or to evaluate the benefits of additional sampling. Traditional applications have focused on ecological populations but emerging large-scale applications, for example in DNA sequencing, are orders of magnitude larger and present new challenges. We developed a method to estimate accumulation curves for predicting the complexity of DNA sequencing libraries. This method uses rational function approximations to a classical non-parametric empirical Bayes estimator due to Good and Toulmin [Biometrika, 1956, 43, 45–63]. Here we demonstrate how the same approach can be highly effective in other large-scale applications involving biological data sets. These include estimating microbial species richness, immune repertoire size, and k-mer diversity for genome assembly applications. We show how the method can be modified to address populations containing an effectively infinite number of species where saturation cannot practically be attained. We also introduce a flexible suite of tools implemented as an R package that make these methods broadly accessible. PMID:27252899

  14. Accumulation-rate history at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, using bubble number-density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, M.; Dennison, A.; Alley, R. B.; Fitzpatrick, J. J.; Fegyveresi, J. M.

    2012-12-01

    Past allowable accumulation rate/temperature combinations at Siple Dome, West Antarctica, are estimated from the measured number-density of bubbles in ice core samples. Mass density increase and grain growth in polar firn both are controlled by temperature and accumulation rate, and their integrated effects are recorded in the number-density of bubbles as the firn changes to ice [1]. Accumulation-rate estimates from measured bubble number-density and additional constraints from numerical modeling of firn densification at Siple Dome are consistent with 1-D ice-flow model results that have little change in the thickness of the ice sheet in the central Ross Embayment of West Antarctica since the last glacial maximum [2]. Using methods developed to analyze late-Holocene bubble number-density samples from the West Antarctic Ice Sheet Divide Ice Core Project [3], Siple Dome bubble number-densities show an early-Holocene high in accumulation rate followed by an approximately 10% reduction in accumulation rate between 11.33 ka and 1.863 ka. [1] Spencer, M.K., R.B. Alley and J.J. Fitzpatrick. Developing a bubble number-density paleoclimatic indicator for glacier ice, J. Glaciol. 52(178), 358-364 (2006). [2] E.D. Waddington et al., Decoding the dipstick: thickness of Siple Dome, West Antarctica, at the last glacial maximum, Geology 33(4), 281-284 (2005). [3] J.M. Fegyveresi, et al., Late-Holocene climate evolution at the WAIS Divide site, West Antarctica: bubble number-density estimates, J. Glaciol., 57(204) , 629 - 638 (2011).

  15. The Intuitiveness of the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lem, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    In this paper two studies are reported in which two contrasting claims concerning the intuitiveness of the law of large numbers are investigated. While Sedlmeier and Gigerenzer ("J Behav Decis Mak" 10:33-51, 1997) claim that people have an intuition that conforms to the law of large numbers, but that they can only employ this intuition…

  16. Thermocapillary Bubble Migration: Thermal Boundary Layers for Large Marangoni Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balasubramaniam, R.; Subramanian, R. S.

    1996-01-01

    The migration of an isolated gas bubble in an immiscible liquid possessing a temperature gradient is analyzed in the absence of gravity. The driving force for the bubble motion is the shear stress at the interface which is a consequence of the temperature dependence of the surface tension. The analysis is performed under conditions for which the Marangoni number is large, i.e. energy is transferred predominantly by convection. Velocity fields in the limit of both small and large Reynolds numbers are used. The thermal problem is treated by standard boundary layer theory. The outer temperature field is obtained in the vicinity of the bubble. A similarity solution is obtained for the inner temperature field. For both small and large Reynolds numbers, the asymptotic values of the scaled migration velocity of the bubble in the limit of large Marangoni numbers are calculated. The results show that the migration velocity has the same scaling for both low and large Reynolds numbers, but with a different coefficient. Higher order thermal boundary layers are analyzed for the large Reynolds number flow field and the higher order corrections to the migration velocity are obtained. Results are also presented for the momentum boundary layer and the thermal wake behind the bubble, for large Reynolds number conditions.

  17. All numbers are not equal: an electrophysiological investigation of small and large number representations.

    PubMed

    Hyde, Daniel C; Spelke, Elizabeth S

    2009-06-01

    Behavioral and brain imaging research indicates that human infants, humans adults, and many nonhuman animals represent large nonsymbolic numbers approximately, discriminating between sets with a ratio limit on accuracy. Some behavioral evidence, especially with human infants, suggests that these representations differ from representations of small numbers of objects. To investigate neural signatures of this distinction, event-related potentials were recorded as adult humans passively viewed the sequential presentation of dot arrays in an adaptation paradigm. In two studies, subjects viewed successive arrays of a single number of dots interspersed with test arrays presenting the same or a different number; numerical range (small numerical quantities 1-3 vs. large numerical quantities 8-24) and ratio difference varied across blocks as continuous variables were controlled. An early-evoked component (N1), observed over widespread posterior scalp locations, was modulated by absolute number with small, but not large, number arrays. In contrast, a later component (P2p), observed over the same scalp locations, was modulated by the ratio difference between arrays for large, but not small, numbers. Despite many years of experience with symbolic systems that apply equally to all numbers, adults spontaneously process small and large numbers differently. They appear to treat small-number arrays as individual objects to be tracked through space and time, and large-number arrays as cardinal values to be compared and manipulated. PMID:18752403

  18. Towards large-Chern-number topological phases by periodic quenching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Tian-Shi; Gong, Jiangbin; An, Jun-Hong

    2016-05-01

    Topological phases with large Chern numbers have important implications. They were previously predicted to exist by considering fabricated long-range interactions or multilayered materials. Stimulated by recent wide interests in Floquet topological phases, here we propose a scheme to engineer large-Chern-number phases with ease by periodic quenching. Using a two-band system as an example, we theoretically show how a variety of topological phases with widely tunable Chern numbers can be generated by periodic quenching between two simple Hamiltonians that otherwise give low Chern numbers. The obtained large Chern numbers are explained through the emergence of multiple Dirac cones in the Floquet spectra. The transition lines between different topological phases in the two-band model are also explicitly found, thus establishing a class of easily solvable but very rich systems useful for further understandings and applications of topological phases in periodically driven systems.

  19. Explicit and probabilistic constructions of distance graphs with small clique numbers and large chromatic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupavskii, A. B.

    2014-02-01

    We study distance graphs with exponentially large chromatic numbers and without k-cliques, that is, complete subgraphs of size k. Explicit constructions of such graphs use vectors in the integer lattice. For a large class of graphs we find a sharp threshold for containing a k-clique. This enables us to improve the lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers of such graphs. We give a new probabilistic approach to the construction of distance graphs without k-cliques, and this yields better lower bounds for the maximum of the chromatic numbers for large k.

  20. Experimental Observation of Large Chern Numbers in Photonic Crystals.

    PubMed

    Skirlo, Scott A; Lu, Ling; Igarashi, Yuichi; Yan, Qinghui; Joannopoulos, John; Soljačić, Marin

    2015-12-18

    Despite great interest in the quantum anomalous Hall phase and its analogs, all experimental studies in electronic and bosonic systems have been limited to a Chern number of one. Here, we perform microwave transmission measurements in the bulk and at the edge of ferrimagnetic photonic crystals. Band gaps with large Chern numbers of 2, 3, and 4 are present in the experimental results, which show excellent agreement with theory. We measure the mode profiles and Fourier transform them to produce dispersion relations of the edge modes, whose number and direction match our Chern number calculations. PMID:26722920

  1. Large eddy breakup devices as low Reynolds number airfoils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, John B.

    1986-01-01

    Turbulent drag reduction downstream of large-eddy breakup (LEBU) devices is analyzed from the viewpoint of low-Reynolds number airfoil aerodynamics. It is argued that the variability of results between different research labs is primarily due to low Reynolds number 'phenomena' associated with unsteady separation/transition of the LEBU device boundary layer. LEBU drag reduction is shown to be an extremely sensitive function of device microgeometry at the low Reynolds numbers of all current investigations, and by analogy with conventional low-Reynolds number airfoil testing, the conclusion is drawn that the full potential for LEBU drag reduction must be explored at chord Reynolds numbers of 300,000 and above.

  2. The factorization of large composite numbers on the MPP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckurdy, Kathy J.; Wunderlich, Marvin C.

    1987-01-01

    The continued fraction method for factoring large integers (CFRAC) was an ideal algorithm to be implemented on a massively parallel computer such as the Massively Parallel Processor (MPP). After much effort, the first 60 digit number was factored on the MPP using about 6 1/2 hours of array time. Although this result added about 10 digits to the size number that could be factored using CFRAC on a serial machine, it was already badly beaten by the implementation of Davis and Holdridge on the CRAY-1 using the quadratic sieve, an algorithm which is clearly superior to CFRAC for large numbers. An algorithm is illustrated which is ideally suited to the single instruction multiple data (SIMD) massively parallel architecture and some of the modifications which were needed in order to make the parallel implementation effective and efficient are described.

  3. Complex networks with large numbers of labelable attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Lisheng; Huang, Xiaodong; Qian, Yu; Hu, Gang; Liao, Xuhong

    2011-09-01

    Information storage in many functional subsystems of the brain is regarded by theoretical neuroscientists to be related to attractors of neural networks. The number of attractors is large and each attractor can be temporarily represented or suppressed easily by corresponding external stimulus. In this letter, we discover that complex networks consisting of excitable nodes have similar fascinating properties of coexistence of large numbers of oscillatory attractors, most of which can be labeled with a few nodes. According to a simple labeling rule, different attractors can be identified and the number of labelable attractors can be predicted from the analysis of network topology. With the cues of the labeling association, these attractors can be conveniently retrieved or suppressed on purpose.

  4. Multimode one-way waveguides of large Chern numbers.

    PubMed

    Skirlo, Scott A; Lu, Ling; Soljačić, Marin

    2014-09-12

    Current experimental realizations of the quantum anomalous Hall phase in both electronic and photonic systems have been limited to a Chern number of one. In photonics, this corresponds to a single-mode one-way edge waveguide. Here, we predict quantum anomalous Hall phases in photonic crystals with large Chern numbers of 2, 3, and 4. These new topological phases were found by simultaneously gapping multiple Dirac and quadratic points. We demonstrate a continuously tunable power splitter as a possible application of multimode one-way waveguides. All our findings are readily realizable at microwave frequencies. PMID:25259982

  5. All Numbers Are Not Equal: An Electrophysiological Investigation of Small and Large Number Representations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyde, Daniel C.; Spelke, Elizabeth S.

    2009-01-01

    Behavioral and brain imaging research indicates that human infants, humans adults, and many nonhuman animals represent large nonsymbolic numbers approximately, discriminating between sets with a ratio limit on accuracy. Some behavioral evidence, especially with human infants, suggests that these representations differ from representations of small…

  6. Nonlinear instability of elementary stratified flows at large Richardson number.

    PubMed

    Majda, Andrew J.; Shefter, Michael G.

    2000-03-01

    Elementary stably stratified flows with linear instability at all large Richardson numbers have been introduced recently by the authors [J. Fluid Mech. 376, 319-350 (1998)]. These elementary stratified flows have spatially constant but time varying gradients for velocity and density. Here the nonlinear stability of such flows in two space dimensions is studied through a combination of numerical simulations and theory. The elementary flows that are linearly unstable at large Richardson numbers are purely vortical flows; here it is established that from random initial data, linearized instability spontaneously generates local shears on buoyancy time scales near a specific angle of inclination that nonlinearly saturates into localized regions of strong mixing with density overturning resembling Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. It is also established here that the phase of these unstable waves does not satisfy the dispersion relation of linear gravity waves. The vortical flows are one family of stably stratified flows with uniform shear layers at the other extreme and elementary stably stratified flows with a mixture of vorticity and strain exhibiting behavior between these two extremes. The concept of effective shear is introduced for these general elementary flows; for each large Richardson number there is a critical effective shear with strong nonlinear instability, density overturning, and mixing for elementary flows with effective shear below this critical value. The analysis is facilitated by rewriting the equations for nonlinear perturbations in vorticity-stream form in a mean Lagrangian reference frame. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779359

  7. Lepton number violation in theories with a large number of standard model copies

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Sergey; Schmidt, Ivan; Paes, Heinrich

    2011-03-01

    We examine lepton number violation (LNV) in theories with a saturated black hole bound on a large number of species. Such theories have been advocated recently as a possible solution to the hierarchy problem and an explanation of the smallness of neutrino masses. On the other hand, the violation of the lepton number can be a potential phenomenological problem of this N-copy extension of the standard model as due to the low quantum gravity scale black holes may induce TeV scale LNV operators generating unacceptably large rates of LNV processes. We show, however, that this issue can be avoided by introducing a spontaneously broken U{sub 1(B-L)}. Then, due to the existence of a specific compensation mechanism between contributions of different Majorana neutrino states, LNV processes in the standard model copy become extremely suppressed with rates far beyond experimental reach.

  8. Dirac cosmology. [large dimensionless numbers relation to universe age

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Lodenquai, J.

    1977-01-01

    The large numbers hypothesis (LNH) linking the magnitude of large dimensionless ratios in physics (on the order of 10 to the 40th power) to cosmic time is examined. The LNH is checked against evidence on 3K background radiation of the universe and the (log N, log S)-relation for radio galaxies. Earlier criticisms of LNH by Gamow and Teller are examined, and alternative hypotheses put forth by Dicke and Carter (1974) are discussed. The discussion covers: continuous (additive or multiplicative) creation of matter, the Einstein metric and the atomic metric, and general cosmological and local astronomical implications of LNH. LNH is also viewed in relation to solar evolution and pulsar physics.

  9. Improving CASINO performance for models with large number of electrons

    SciTech Connect

    Anton, L; Alfe, D; Hood, R Q; Tanqueray, D

    2009-05-13

    Quantum Monte Carlo calculations have at their core algorithms based on statistical ensembles of multidimensional random walkers which are straightforward to use on parallel computers. Nevertheless some computations have reached the limit of the memory resources for models with more than 1000 electrons because of the need to store a large amount of electronic orbitals related data. Besides that, for systems with large number of electrons, it is interesting to study if the evolution of one configuration of random walkers can be done faster in parallel. We present a comparative study of two ways to solve these problems: (1) distributed orbital data done with MPI or Unix inter-process communication tools, (2) second level parallelism for configuration computation.

  10. From the Law of Large Numbers to Large Deviation Theory in Statistical Physics: An Introduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecconi, Fabio; Cencini, Massimo; Puglisi, Andrea; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    This contribution aims at introducing the topics of this book. We start with a brief historical excursion on the developments from the law of large numbers to the central limit theorem and large deviations theory. The same topics are then presented using the language of probability theory. Finally, some applications of large deviations theory in physics are briefly discussed through examples taken from statistical mechanics, dynamical and disordered systems.

  11. Automatic trajectory measurement of large numbers of crowded objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Liu, Ye; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2013-06-01

    Complex motion patterns of natural systems, such as fish schools, bird flocks, and cell groups, have attracted great attention from scientists for years. Trajectory measurement of individuals is vital for quantitative and high-throughput study of their collective behaviors. However, such data are rare mainly due to the challenges of detection and tracking of large numbers of objects with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We present an automatic and effective framework to measure trajectories of large numbers of crowded oval-shaped objects, such as fish and cells. We first use a novel dual ellipse locator to detect the coarse position of each individual and then propose a variance minimization active contour method to obtain the optimal segmentation results. For tracking, cost matrix of assignment between consecutive frames is trainable via a random forest classifier with many spatial, texture, and shape features. The optimal trajectories are found for the whole image sequence by solving two linear assignment problems. We evaluate the proposed method on many challenging data sets.

  12. Electrohydrodynamic deformation of drops and bubbles at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory

    2015-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation by a uniform electric field, inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocities that scale with E2, E being the applied-field magnitude. When considering strong fields and low viscosity fluids, the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number analysis. Balancing viscous and electrical stresses reveals that the velocity scales with E 4 / 3. Considering a gas bubble, the external flow is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. Remarkably, at leading order in the Capillary number the unique scaling allows through application of integral mass and momentum balances to obtain a closed-form expression for the O (E2) bubble deformation. Owing to a concentrated pressure load at the vicinity of the collision region, the deformed profile features an equatorial dimple which is non-smooth on the bubble scale. The dynamical importance of internal circulation in the case of a liquid drop leads to an essentially different deformation mechanism. This is because the external boundary layer velocity attenuates at a short distance from the interface, while the internal boundary-layer matches with a Prandtl-Batchelor (PB) rotational core. The dynamic pressure associated with the internal circulation dominates the interfacial stress profile, leading to an O (E 8 / 3) deformation. The leading-order deformation can be readily determined, up to the PB constant, without solving the circulating boundary-layer problem. To encourage attempts to verify this new scaling, we shall suggest a favourable experimental setup in which inertia is dominant, while finite-deformation, surface-charge advection, and gravity effects are negligible.

  13. Large spin accumulation near a resistive interface due to spin-charge coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shuhan; Zou, Han; Chui, Siu-Tat; Ji, Yi

    2013-12-14

    We experimentally and theoretically investigate large spin signals in special nonlocal spin valves, where a vacuum break-junction is formed between the ferromagnetic spin detector and the nonmagnetic channel. The spin signals are clearly nonlocal and can be either non-inverted (meaning high nonlocal resistance for parallel states and low resistance for antiparallel states) or inverted. The magnitudes are significantly larger than those of standard metallic nonlocal devices with similar dimensions. The magnitudes and the signs can be understood by a theory of spin-charge coupling. The coupling between spin accumulation and charge accumulation across a resistive break junction leads to a large interfacial spin accumulation and thereby large spin signals. By analyzing the profiles of electrochemical potentials near the interface, we show that the sign of the spin signal depends on the values of spin-dependent conductivities, diffusion constants, and densities of states. The magnitude of the spin accumulation in the ferromagnetic spin detector can be higher than that in the nonmagnetic channel, enabling a rare amplification effect for spin accumulation.

  14. Saturation of the Magnetorotational Instability at Large Elssaser Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julien, Keith; Jamroz, Benjamin; Knobloch, Edgar

    2009-11-01

    The MRI is believed to play an important role in accretion disk physics in extracting angular momentum from the disk and allowing accretion to take place. The instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation under conditions of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory. The shear is taken to be the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are suffiently weak that the Elsasser number is large. Thus dissipative forces do not play a role in the leading order linear instability mechanism. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from simulations of the model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of angular momentum transport.

  15. Saturation of the magnetorotational instability at large Elsasser number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamroz, B.; Julien, K.; Knobloch, E.

    2008-09-01

    The magnetorotational instability is investigated within the shearing box approximation in the large Elsasser number regime. In this regime, which is of fundamental importance to astrophysical accretion disk theory, shear is the dominant source of energy, but the instability itself requires the presence of a weaker vertical magnetic field. Dissipative effects are weaker still but not negligible. The regime explored retains the condition that (viscous and ohmic) dissipative forces do not play a role in the leading order linear instability mechanism. However, they are sufficiently large to permit a nonlinear feedback mechanism whereby the turbulent stresses generated by the MRI act on and modify the local background shear in the angular velocity profile. To date this response has been omitted in shearing box simulations and is captured by a reduced pde model derived here from the global MHD fluid equations using multiscale asymptotic perturbation theory. Results from numerical simulations of the reduced pde model indicate a linear phase of exponential growth followed by a nonlinear adjustment to algebraic growth and decay in the fluctuating quantities. Remarkably, the velocity and magnetic field correlations associated with these algebraic growth and decay laws conspire to achieve saturation of the angular momentum transport. The inclusion of subdominant ohmic dissipation arrests the algebraic growth of the fluctuations on a longer, dissipative time scale.

  16. Gravity Wave Driven Instabilities at Large Richardson Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walterscheid, R. L.; Hecht, J. H.; Gelinas, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    The formalism that addresses rigorously the instability of waves on a basic state modulated by a primary wave is Floquet theory. However, the commonly used criteria for shear and convective instabilities were developed for steady horizontally uniform background flows. The prototypical shear instability is the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability. The flow is stable if the local Richardson number Ri =N2/{\\vert{∂ /∂ z}\\vert}2 > 1/4 everywhere, where N is the Brunt-Väisälä frequency and u is the horizontal wind. The prototypical convective instability is the Rayleigh-Taylor instability. Ignoring wind effects and dissipation, the flow is unstable if N2 < 0 (i.e., Ri <0) somewhere. These instability structures drift with the wind. In Floquet theory the linear system of equations is transformed so that the basic wave is stationary and the vertical coordinate points along the wavenumber vector of the basic wave. A Floquet system supports instabilities when conventional Richardson number criteria indicate that the system is stable. Indeed, finite amplitude waves are unstable no matter how large the Richardson number might be. An essential instability mechanism in Floquet systems is a resonant interaction between a forced primary oscillation and a free oscillation of the time-averaged system. These are parametric instabilities. They can have a significant influence on shaping the spectrum by transferring energy from one scale to another. Hecht et al. [2005] in a study of small scale instability structures during the Maui MALT campaign noted that there were occurrences of ripple (instability) structure when the conventional criteria indicated stable conditions. We have followed up this work with a detailed survey of the occurrence of ripple structure over Maui during periods that were stable and unstable according to conventional criteria. Values of Ri were calculated from meteor radar and lidar data. We have found frequent occurrence of ripple structure when Ri > 1/4 and

  17. Unusually Large Number of Mutations in Asexually Reproducing Clonal Planarian Dugesia japonica.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Osamu; Hosoda, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Eri; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Inoue, Takeshi; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    We established a laboratory clonal strain of freshwater planarian (Dugesia japonica) that was derived from a single individual and that continued to undergo autotomous asexual reproduction for more than 20 years, and we performed large-scale genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis on it. Despite the fact that a completely clonal strain of the planarian was used, an unusually large number of mutations were detected. To enable quantitative genetic analysis of such a unique organism, we developed a new model called the Reference Gene Model, and used it to conduct large-scale transcriptome analysis. The results revealed large numbers of mutations not only outside but also inside gene-coding regions. Non-synonymous SNPs were detected in 74% of the genes for which valid ORFs were predicted. Interestingly, the high-mutation genes, such as metabolism- and defense-related genes, were correlated with genes that were previously identified as diverse genes among different planarian species. Although a large number of amino acid substitutions were apparently accumulated during asexual reproduction over this long period of time, the planarian maintained normal body-shape, behaviors, and physiological functions. The results of the present study reveal a unique aspect of asexual reproduction. PMID:26588467

  18. Unusually Large Number of Mutations in Asexually Reproducing Clonal Planarian Dugesia japonica

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Osamu; Hosoda, Kazutaka; Kawaguchi, Eri; Yazawa, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Inoue, Takeshi; Umesono, Yoshihiko; Agata, Kiyokazu

    2015-01-01

    We established a laboratory clonal strain of freshwater planarian (Dugesia japonica) that was derived from a single individual and that continued to undergo autotomous asexual reproduction for more than 20 years, and we performed large-scale genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis on it. Despite the fact that a completely clonal strain of the planarian was used, an unusually large number of mutations were detected. To enable quantitative genetic analysis of such a unique organism, we developed a new model called the Reference Gene Model, and used it to conduct large-scale transcriptome analysis. The results revealed large numbers of mutations not only outside but also inside gene-coding regions. Non-synonymous SNPs were detected in 74% of the genes for which valid ORFs were predicted. Interestingly, the high-mutation genes, such as metabolism- and defense-related genes, were correlated with genes that were previously identified as diverse genes among different planarian species. Although a large number of amino acid substitutions were apparently accumulated during asexual reproduction over this long period of time, the planarian maintained normal body-shape, behaviors, and physiological functions. The results of the present study reveal a unique aspect of asexual reproduction. PMID:26588467

  19. First Contact with Astronomy for a Large Number of Pupils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ros, Rosa M.

    The Spanish Royal Society of Physics (RSEF) co-operates with several European institutions to promote Physics and Astronomy in schools through the project ""Fisica en Acción"". This project started in 2000 integrated with the project ""Physics on Stage"" created by CERN ESA and ESO. ""Fisica en Accion"" is a Spanish competition bringing together a group of teachers in a common endeavour: * showing ""physics demonstrations"" to general audiences * engaging pedagogical presentations to introduce science into the classroom. The national final event of this competition takes place annually in a science museum during one weekend (entrance is free). The Science Fair is especially well received by visitors who can ask the demonstrators-teachers questions. Younger visitors enjoy experimenting for themselves. After the first year the RSEF introduced special prizes to encourage schools to participate in astronomical categories. The ""Centro de Astrobiologia de Madrid"" gave a cash prize and a visit to their headquarters to the winners. The ""Instituto Astrofísico de Canarias"" offered a prize of a trip to its observatories. In summary the astronomical elements of ""Fisica en Acción"" stimulate the teachers and students' interest in international activities and has been the first contact with Astronomy for a large number of pupils.

  20. A modified large number theory with constant G

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Recami, Erasmo

    1983-03-01

    The inspiring “numerology” uncovered by Dirac, Eddington, Weyl, et al. can be explained and derived when it is slightly modified so to connect the “gravitational world” (cosmos) with the “strong world” (hadron), rather than with the electromagnetic one. The aim of this note is to show the following. In the present approach to the “Large Number Theory,” cosmos and hadrons are considered to be (finite) similar systems, so that the ratio{{bar R} / {{bar R} {bar r}} of the cosmos typical lengthbar R to the hadron typical lengthbar r is constant in time (for instance, if both cosmos and hadrons undergo an expansion/contraction cycle—according to the “cyclical bigbang” hypothesis—thenbar R andbar r can be chosen to be the maximum radii, or the average radii). As a consequence, then gravitational constant G results to be independent of time. The present note is based on work done in collaboration with P. Caldirola, G. D. Maccarrone, and M. Pavšič.

  1. Dislocation accumulation at large plastic strains -- An approach to the theoretical strength of materials

    SciTech Connect

    Embury, J.D. |; Han, K.

    1999-04-01

    The usual method of introducing engineers to the concept of dislocations and their role in plastic flow is to compare an estimate of the theoretical strength of solid (of order {micro}/30 where {micro} is the shear modulus) and the observed strength of either single crystals ({mu}/10{sup 4}) or practical engineering material such as structural steels where the yield stress in shear is of order {mu}/10{sup 3}. However, if one considers the problem in reverse, one can consider the accumulation of dislocations as an important mechanism by which one can produce engineering materials in which the strength level approaches the theoretical strength. If one assumes that the flow stress can be expressed in terms of te mean free path between stored dislocations or as the square root of the global dislocation density, then one can see the influence of dislocation density in a diagrammatic form. It is clear that the strengthening by dislocation accumulation due to large imposed plastic strains represents an important approach both to the development of new, potentially valuable, engineering materials and an important area of basic understanding in terms of the mechanical response of materials close to their theoretical strength. Thus, this article will survey some of the factors which influence dislocation accumulation at large strains and the consequences of such accumulation processes.

  2. A large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered salicylic acid accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yezhang; Shaholli, Danjela; Mou, Zhonglin

    2014-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a key defense signal molecule against biotrophic and hemibiotrophic pathogens in plants, but how SA is synthesized in plant cells still remains elusive. Identification of new components involved in pathogen-induced SA accumulation would help address this question. To this end, we performed a large-scale genetic screen for mutants with altered SA accumulation during pathogen infection in Arabidopsis using a bacterial biosensor Acinetobacter sp. ADPWH_lux-based SA quantification method. A total of 35,000 M2 plants in the npr1-3 mutant background have been individually analyzed for the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (Psm) ES4326-induced SA accumulation. Among the mutants isolated, 19 had SA levels lower than npr1 (sln) and two exhibited increased SA accumulation in npr1 (isn). Complementation tests revealed that seven of the sln mutants are new alleles of eds5/sid1, two are sid2/eds16 alleles, one is allelic to pad4, and the remaining seven sln and two isn mutants are new non-allelic SA accumulation mutants. Interestingly, a large group of mutants (in the npr1-3 background), in which Psm ES4326-induced SA levels were similar to those in the wild-type Columbia plants, were identified, suggesting that the signaling network fine-tuning pathogen-induced SA accumulation is complex. We further characterized the sln1 single mutant and found that Psm ES4326-induced defense responses were compromised in this mutant. These defense response defects could be rescued by exogenous SA, suggesting that SLN1 functions upstream of SA. The sln1 mutation was mapped to a region on the north arm of chromosome I, which contains no known genes regulating pathogen-induced SA accumulation, indicating that SLN1 likely encodes a new regulator of SA biosynthesis. Thus, the new sln and isn mutants identified in this genetic screen are valuable for dissecting the molecular mechanisms underlying pathogen-induced SA accumulation in plants. PMID:25610446

  3. Steady bimodal convection in a cylinder at large Prandtl numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buell, Jeffrey C.; Catton, Ivan

    1987-01-01

    Steady bimodal convection of an infinite Prandtl-number Boussinesq fluid in a cylinder is considered. An asymptotic analysis similar to the one used by Buell and Catton (1986) for axisymmetric convection yields a solvability condition that determines the radial wavenumber. The analysis is valid for convection far away from the origin, the lateral boundary, and any pattern dislocations. The azimuthal wave number is treated as a parameter, although in real systems it is dependent on the initial and boundary conditions. Results are presented for Rayleigh numbers between 14,000 and 60,000, and for azimuthal wave numbers between 5 and 7. It is shown that for increasing Rayleigh numbers, the selected radial wave number and the heat transfer tend to become independent of the azimuthal wave number. No quantitative experimental data are available, but one qualitative comparison is good.

  4. Generation of large prime numbers from a sequence of previous prime numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samir, Brahim Belhaouari; Rezk, Youssef A. Y.

    2012-09-01

    A prime number is co-prime with all the primes as well. This paper utilizes this fact by generating larger prime numbers based on a set of smaller prime numbers. The prime numbers are ordered and each two consecutive primes are coupled to generate their co-prime number formula extending this process larger prime sequence is established. Will the process help us produce larger prime numbers faster and more efficiently? This paper investigates the described process.

  5. 27% Probable: Estimating Whether or Not Large Numbers Are Prime.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosse, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    This brief investigation exemplifies such considerations by relating concepts from number theory, set theory, probability, logic, and calculus. Satisfying the call for students to acquire skills in estimation, the following technique allows one to "immediately estimate" whether or not a number is prime. (MM)

  6. Exploring the Potential of Large Scale Distributed Modeling of Snow Accumulation and Melt on GPUs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bisht, G.; Kumar, M.

    2010-12-01

    Water from snow melt is a critical resource in watersheds of the western US, Canada, and other similar regions of the world. The distribution of snow and melt-water controls the temporal and spatial distributions of soil moisture, evapo-transpiration (ET), recharge, stream-aquifer interaction and other hydrologic processes within the watershed. It also influences the quantity and timing of water availability in downstream areas. In spite of the serious impacts on the water resources at multiple scales, the knowledge base for prediction of snow accumulation and melt in mountainous watersheds is notably weak. Physics-based, distributed snow models such as UEB, SNTHERM, SHAW and ISNOBAL, have positioned themselves as an appropriate tool for understanding of snow-process interactions and prediction of melt, and have been applied in numerous watersheds to varying degrees of success. In spite of the significant advances in hardware speed and programming efficiency, the application of the above-mentioned snow models has mostly been limited to small watersheds. Application of these models at finer spatio-temporal resolution, in large domains, and for longer time periods, to address problems such as quantifying the response of snow-dominated watersheds to climate change scenarios, is restrictive due to the large computational cost involved. Additionally, the computational requirement of current generation snow models is expected to rise as improved snow-depth characterization and a tighter coupling with hydrologic processes are incorporated. This poses considerable challenge to their application in feasible time. We suggest alleviating this problem by taking advantage of high performance computing (HPC) systems based on Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) processors. High performance GPUs work like SIMD processors, but can take advantage of larger number of cores thus providing higher throughput. As of June 2010, the second fastest supercomputer in the world uses NVidia Tesla

  7. A MODEL OF NONBELIEF IN THE LAW OF LARGE NUMBERS

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Daniel J.; Rabin, Matthew; Raymond, Collin

    2015-01-01

    People believe that, even in very large samples, proportions of binary signals might depart significantly from the population mean. We model this “non-belief in the Law of Large Numbers” by assuming that a person believes that proportions in any given sample might be determined by a rate different than the true rate. In prediction, a non-believer expects the distribution of signals will have fat tails. In inference, a non-believer remains uncertain and influenced by priors even after observing an arbitrarily large sample. We explore implications for beliefs and behavior in a variety of economic settings. PMID:27087795

  8. Physical mechanisms that lead to large-scale gas accumulation in a volcanic conduit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collombet, Marielle; Burgisser, Alain

    2016-04-01

    The eruption of viscous magma at the Earth's surface often gives rise to abrupt regime changes. The transition from the gentle effusion of a lava dome to brief but powerful explosions is a common regime change. This transition is often preceded by the sealing of the shallow part of the volcanic conduit and the accumulation of volatile-rich magma underneath, a situation that collects the energy to be brutally released during the subsequent explosion. While conduit sealing is well-documented, volatile accumulation has proven harder to characterize. We use a 2D conduit flow model including gas loss within the magma and into the wallrock to find steady-state magma flow configurations in the effusive regime. Model outputs yield a strongly heterogeneous distribution of the gas volume fraction underneath a dense, impermeable magma cap. Gas accumulates in inclined structures hundredths of meters long and several meters thick. These structures probably constitute the gas pockets that accumulate explosive energy and that were intuited by previous studies. We tested the numerical robustness of our results by simulating the fragmented state of the magma contained within the pockets, by testing various fragmentation criteria, and by varying computational gird size. These gas pockets are robust features that occur regardless of wallrock permeability (from very permeable at 10-12 m2 to quasi impermeable at 10-16 m2) but that are sensitive to the volume to surface ratio of the volcanic conduit. One implication is that the formation of these large degassing structures probably plays an essential role in the triggering of violent explosions. Such large scale outgassing feature may also bring a partial answer to the long standing issue of the observed gas transfer across entire magmatic systems despite high magma viscosity and no obvious physical mechanism of transfer.

  9. Large atom number Bose-Einstein condensate machines

    SciTech Connect

    Streed, Erik W.; Chikkatur, Ananth P.; Gustavson, Todd L.; Boyd, Micah; Torii, Yoshio; Schneble, Dominik; Campbell, Gretchen K.; Pritchard, David E.; Ketterle, Wolfgang

    2006-02-15

    We describe experimental setups for producing large Bose-Einstein condensates of {sup 23}Na and {sup 87}Rb. In both, a high-flux thermal atomic beam is decelerated by a Zeeman slower and is then captured and cooled in a magneto-optical trap. The atoms are then transferred into a cloverleaf-style Ioffe-Pritchard magnetic trap and cooled to quantum degeneracy with radio-frequency-induced forced evaporation. Typical condensates contain 20x10{sup 6} atoms. We discuss the similarities and differences between the techniques used for producing large {sup 87}Rb and {sup 23}Na condensates in the context of nearly identical setups.

  10. Confinement at large-N. [N = number of colors

    SciTech Connect

    Klinkhamer, F.R.

    1985-06-01

    Recent numerical results indicate that QCD in the limit of an infinite number (N) of colors also has confinement and moreover that it looks rather similar to normal QCD with N = 3 colors. This imposes severe restrictions on what the mechanism of confinement can be.

  11. Volcanism on Venus: Large shields and major accumulations of small domes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Kozak, Richard C.

    1989-01-01

    The outer layers of the Venusian lithosphere appear to dissipate heat from the interior through mantle-driven thermal anomalies (hot spots, swells). As a result, Venus exhibits diverse forms of thin-skin tectonism and magmatic transfer to and extrusion from countless numbers of volcanic centers (e.g., shields, paterae, domes) and volcano-tectonic complexes (e.g., coronae, arachnoids). What is known about the distribution and morphologies of major Venusian shields is summarized, and the evidence for possible structural control of major accumulations as long as 5000 km of small volcanic domes is described.

  12. Volcanism on Venus: Large shields and major accumulations of small domes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaber, Gerald G.; Kozak, Richard C.

    The outer layers of the Venusian lithosphere appear to dissipate heat from the interior through mantle-driven thermal anomalies (hot spots, swells). As a result, Venus exhibits diverse forms of thin-skin tectonism and magmatic transfer to and extrusion from countless numbers of volcanic centers (e.g., shields, paterae, domes) and volcano-tectonic complexes (e.g., coronae, arachnoids). What is known about the distribution and morphologies of major Venusian shields is summarized, and the evidence for possible structural control of major accumulations as long as 5000 km of small volcanic domes is described.

  13. Planing-surface Tests at Large Froude Numbers - Airfoil Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sambraus, A

    1938-01-01

    The take-off capacity of a flying boat depends upon the design of the hull bottom ahead as well as aft of the step. Systematic tests - largely made by industry itself - had proved the benefit accruing from a well designed hull bottom long before theoretical insight into the flow phenomena involved had been obtained. The theoretical framing of the problem was beset with serious difficulties and, though restricted to the processes within range of the planing bottom ahead of the step, the solutions do not yet afford a comprehensive survey.

  14. Calcite-accumulating large sulfur bacteria of the genus Achromatium in Sippewissett Salt Marsh.

    PubMed

    Salman, Verena; Yang, Tingting; Berben, Tom; Klein, Frieder; Angert, Esther; Teske, Andreas

    2015-11-01

    Large sulfur bacteria of the genus Achromatium are exceptional among Bacteria and Archaea as they can accumulate high amounts of internal calcite. Although known for more than 100 years, they remain uncultured, and only freshwater populations have been studied so far. Here we investigate a marine population of calcite-accumulating bacteria that is primarily found at the sediment surface of tide pools in a salt marsh, where high sulfide concentrations meet oversaturated oxygen concentrations during the day. Dynamic sulfur cycling by phototrophic sulfide-oxidizing and heterotrophic sulfate-reducing bacteria co-occurring in these sediments creates a highly sulfidic environment that we propose induces behavioral differences in the Achromatium population compared with reported migration patterns in a low-sulfide environment. Fluctuating intracellular calcium/sulfur ratios at different depths and times of day indicate a biochemical reaction of the salt marsh Achromatium to diurnal changes in sedimentary redox conditions. We correlate this calcite dynamic with new evidence regarding its formation/mobilization and suggest general implications as well as a possible biological function of calcite accumulation in large bacteria in the sediment environment that is governed by gradients. Finally, we propose a new taxonomic classification of the salt marsh Achromatium based on their adaptation to a significantly different habitat than their freshwater relatives, as indicated by their differential behavior as well as phylogenetic distance on 16S ribosomal RNA gene level. In future studies, whole-genome characterization and additional ecophysiological factors could further support the distinctive position of salt marsh Achromatium. PMID:25909974

  15. Bose-Einstein Condensates with Large Number of Vortices

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Tin-Lun

    2001-08-06

    We show that as the number of vortices in a three dimensional Bose-Einstein condensate increases, the system reaches a ''quantum Hall'' regime where the density profile is a Gaussian in the xy plane and an inverted parabolic profile along z . The angular momentum of the system increases as the vortex lattice shrinks. However, Coriolis force prevents the unit cell of the vortex lattice from shrinking beyond a minimum size. Although the recent MIT experiment is not exactly in the quantum Hall regime, it is close enough for the present results to be used as a guide. The quantum Hall regime can be easily reached by moderate changes of the current experimental parameters.

  16. The Number of Accumulated Photons and the Quality of Stimulated Emission Depletion Lifetime Images

    SciTech Connect

    Syed, Aleem; Lesoine, Michael D; Bhattacharjee, Ujjal; Petrich, Jacob W; Smith, Emily A

    2014-03-03

    Time binning is used to increase the number of photon counts in the peak channel of stimulated emission depletion (STED) fluorescence lifetime decay curves to determine how it affects the resulting lifetime image. The fluorescence lifetime of the fluorophore, Alexa Fluor 594 phalloidin, bound to F-actin is probed in cultured S2 cells at a spatial resolution of ~40 nm. This corresponds to a tenfold smaller probe volume compared to confocal imaging, and a reduced number of photons contributing to the signal. Pixel-by-pixel fluorescence lifetime measurements and error analysis show that an average of 40 ± 30 photon counts in the peak channel with a signal-to-noise ratio of 20 is enough to calculate a reliable fluorescence lifetime from a single exponential fluorescence decay. No heterogeneity in the actin cytoskeleton in different regions of the cultured cells was measured in the 40- to 400-nm spatial regime.

  17. Large woody debris mobility and accumulation by an extreme flood - an example from the Dyje River, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macka, Zdenek; Krejci, Lukas

    2010-05-01

    Large woody debris (LWD) in the form of logs, branches and their fragments play an important geomorphic and ecological role in forested watersheds. Especially when organized in accumulations and jams, LWD have been found to change hydraulic, morphological, sedimentary and biological characteristics of fluvial ecosystems. Our study focuses on LWD jams distribution and properties within the 44 km long forested reach of the Dyje River in south-eastern Czech Republic. The study reach is located between two large water reservoirs and the flow is regulated showing significant daily fluctuation of discharges due to water releases for power generation. River flows in the deeply incised meandering valley with the narrow and patchy floodplain. In 2002, and especially 2006 large volumes of LWD have been transported by river and the water reservoir downstream was congested with wood. Peak discharge of 2006 flood equalled 306 m3.s-1 which was estimated as 500 year flood. The flood caused significant mobility and redistribution of woody debris as in aquatic, so in riparian segment of the river corridor. The high rate of LWD transport is favoured by large bankfull channel width which exceeds the average tree height. LWD jams were defined as aggregations of three or more wood pieces with diameter ≥ 0.1 m and length ≥ 1 m. We surveyed LWD jams in 62 river reaches, which have been located at meander apexes, inflections and intermediate positions; the length of the reaches was 200 m. The overall number of registered LWD jams was 200. Majority of jams consist of solely allochthonous (transported) wood pieces (65 %), some jams are combination of large key trees and trapped transported pieces (29%), and only small proportion are jams formed by locally uprooted trees (12,6%). Number of wood pieces varies greatly from 3 to 98, the most common being the interval 5 - 10 pieces per jam. Spatial distribution of jams is longitudinally and transversally irregular within the river corridor

  18. Influence of mileage accumulation on the particle mass and number emissions of two gasoline direct injection vehicles.

    PubMed

    Maricq, M Matti; Szente, Joseph J; Adams, Jack; Tennison, Paul; Rumpsa, Todd

    2013-10-15

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) is a new engine technology intended to improve fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions as required by recently enacted legislative and environmental regulations. The development of this technology must also ensure that these vehicles meet new LEV III and Tier 3 emissions standards as they phase in between 2017 and 2021. The aim of the present paper is to examine, at least for a small set, how the PM emissions from GDI vehicles change over their lifetime. The paper reports particle mass and number emissions of two GDI vehicles as a function of mileage up to 150K miles. These vehicles exhibit PM emissions that are near or below the upcoming 3 mg/mi FTP and 10 mg/mi US06 mass standards with little, if any, deterioration over 150K miles. Particle number emissions roughly follow the previously observed 2 × 10(12) particles/mg correlation between solid particle number and PM mass. They remained between the interim and final EU stage 6 solid particle count standard for gasoline vehicles throughout the mileage accumulation study. These examples demonstrate feasibility to meet near-term 3 mg/mi and interim EU solid particle number standards, but continued development is needed to ensure that this continues as further fuel economy improvements are made. PMID:24040936

  19. Evolution of Rupture Style with Accumulation of Fault Displacement during Large-scale Biaxial Friction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, S.; Fukuyama, E.; Yamashita, F.; Mizoguchi, K.; Takizawa, S.; Kawakata, H.

    2014-12-01

    We report results with Indian Gabbro (Vs=3.62km/s) that are obtained from a series of large-scale biaxial friction experiments conducted at NIED. We focus on strain gage array data of stick-slip events loaded with 0.01mm/s and under 6.7MPa normal stress, and find the following: (1) During early stage when the contact surface is relatively intact, ruptures mainly behave as slow-slip events, with a transition from extremely slow slip (~ 10 m/s) to normal slow slip (~ 100 m/s). (2) With the accumulation of total fault displacement, grooves indicative of locally high normal-stress patches (i.e. asperities) are generated along the sliding surface, which are primarily elongated along the loading direction and are associated with gouge formation. On the other hand, the rest part of the surface continues being polished, indicated by a contrast in light reflectivity with respect to the initial level. At this stage, rupture speeds start to increase but are still well below the shear wave speed (~ 1/4Vs). (3) After long enough total fault displacement (> 500mm), grooves and gouges of a sufficient amount are generated. The following ruptures then show a classic behavior as documented by Ohnaka (2000), which composes of a quasi-static phase, an accelerating phase, and an unstable propagation phase. Although the terminal propagation speed usually reaches a level comparable to the shear wave speed, there is a significant variability for the earlier phases among different events, suggesting that those earlier phases are more sensitive to the evolving local fault structure and/or stress heterogeneity. Further investigation reveals that fault properties (e.g. grooves and gouges) as a function of the accumulated displacement can influence both the macroscopic and the local strain drop, which are most-likely responsible for the evolution of rupture behavior under the same macroscopic loading conditions. We aim to quantify this relation in a continued study.

  20. Observation of large spin accumulation voltages in nondegenerate Si spin devices due to spin drift effect: Experiments and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahara, Takayuki; Ando, Yuichiro; Kameno, Makoto; Koike, Hayato; Tanaka, Kazuhito; Miwa, Shinji; Suzuki, Yoshishige; Sasaki, Tomoyuki; Oikawa, Tohru; Shiraishi, Masashi

    2016-06-01

    A large spin accumulation voltage of more than 1.5 mV at 1 mA, i.e., a magnetoresistance of 1.5 Ω, was measured by means of the local three-terminal magnetoresistance in nondegenerate Si-based lateral spin valves (LSVs) at room temperature. This is the largest spin accumulation voltage measured in semiconductor-based LSVs. The modified spin drift-diffusion model, which successfully accounts for the spin drift effect, explains the large spin accumulation voltage and significant bias-current-polarity dependence. The model also shows that the spin drift effect enhances the spin-dependent magnetoresistance in the electric two-terminal scheme. This finding provides a useful guiding principle for spin metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor operations.

  1. Staufen targets coracle mRNA to Drosophila neuromuscular junctions and regulates GluRIIA synaptic accumulation and bouton number

    PubMed Central

    Gardiol, Alejandra; St Johnston, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The post-synaptic translation of localised mRNAs has been postulated to underlie several forms of plasticity at vertebrate synapses, but the mechanisms that target mRNAs to these postsynaptic sites are not well understood. Here we show that the evolutionary conserved dsRNA binding protein, Staufen, localises to the postsynaptic side of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where it is required for the localisation of coracle mRNA and protein. Staufen plays a well-characterised role in the localisation of oskar mRNA to the oocyte posterior, where Staufen dsRNA-binding domain 5 is specifically required for its translation. Removal of Staufen dsRNA-binding domain 5, disrupts the postsynaptic accumulation of Coracle protein without affecting the localisation of cora mRNA, suggesting that Staufen similarly regulates Coracle translation. Tropomyosin II, which functions with Staufen in oskar mRNA localisation, is also required for coracle mRNA localisation, suggesting that similar mechanisms target mRNAs to the NMJ and the oocyte posterior. Coracle, the orthologue of vertebrate band 4.1, functions in the anchoring of the glutamate receptor IIA subunit (GluRIIA) at the synapse. Consistent with this, staufen mutant larvae show reduced accumulation of GluRIIA at synapses. The NMJs of staufen mutant larvae have also a reduced number of synaptic boutons. Altogether, this suggests that this novel Staufen-dependent mRNA localisation and local translation pathway may play a role in the developmentally regulated growth of the NMJ. PMID:24951879

  2. Staufen targets coracle mRNA to Drosophila neuromuscular junctions and regulates GluRIIA synaptic accumulation and bouton number.

    PubMed

    Gardiol, Alejandra; St Johnston, Daniel

    2014-08-15

    The post-synaptic translation of localised mRNAs has been postulated to underlie several forms of plasticity at vertebrate synapses, but the mechanisms that target mRNAs to these postsynaptic sites are not well understood. Here we show that the evolutionary conserved dsRNA binding protein, Staufen, localises to the postsynaptic side of the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ), where it is required for the localisation of coracle mRNA and protein. Staufen plays a well-characterised role in the localisation of oskar mRNA to the oocyte posterior, where Staufen dsRNA-binding domain 5 is specifically required for its translation. Removal of Staufen dsRNA-binding domain 5, disrupts the postsynaptic accumulation of Coracle protein without affecting the localisation of cora mRNA, suggesting that Staufen similarly regulates Coracle translation. Tropomyosin II, which functions with Staufen in oskar mRNA localisation, is also required for coracle mRNA localisation, suggesting that similar mechanisms target mRNAs to the NMJ and the oocyte posterior. Coracle, the orthologue of vertebrate band 4.1, functions in the anchoring of the glutamate receptor IIA subunit (GluRIIA) at the synapse. Consistent with this, staufen mutant larvae show reduced accumulation of GluRIIA at synapses. The NMJs of staufen mutant larvae have also a reduced number of synaptic boutons. Altogether, this suggests that this novel Staufen-dependent mRNA localisation and local translation pathway may play a role in the developmentally regulated growth of the NMJ. PMID:24951879

  3. Polyfunctional T cells accumulate in large human cytomegalovirus-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Raskit; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Smith, Helen; Cheek, Elizabeth; Akbar, Arne; Kern, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Large cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses are observed in both young and, somewhat more often, old people. Frequent CMV reactivation is thought to exhaust these cells and render them dysfunctional so that larger numbers of them are needed to control CMV. Expansions of CMV-specific CD4 T cells are also seen but are less well studied. In this study, we examined the T-cell response to the dominant CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in healthy CMV-infected people across a wide age range (20 to 84 years) by using multicolor flow cytometry. CMV-specific T cells were characterized by the activation markers CD40 ligand (CD40L), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the memory markers CD27 and CD45RA. The proportions of effector memory T cells increased in large responses, as did the proportions of polyfunctional CD8 (IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+/-) TNF-α(+)) and CD4 (CD40L(+/-) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) TNF-α(+)) T-cell subsets, while the proportion of naïve T cells decreased. The bigger the CD4 or CD8 T-cell response to pp65, the larger was the proportion of T cells with an advanced memory phenotype in the entire (including non-CMV-specific) T-cell compartment. In addition, the number of activation markers per cell correlated with the degree of T-cell receptor downregulation, suggesting increased antigen sensitivity in polyfunctional cells. In summary, our findings show that polyfunctional CMV-specific T cells were not superseded by dysfunctional cells, even in very large responses. At the same time, however, the memory subset composition of the entire T-cell compartment correlated with the size of the T-cell response to CMV pp65, confirming a strong effect of CMV infection on the immune systems of some, but not all, infected people. PMID:22072753

  4. Large-eddy simulation of very large kinetic and magnetic Reynolds number isotropic magnetohydrodynamic turbulence using a spectral subgrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, T; Sagaut, P; Schilling, O; Zhou, Y

    2006-07-05

    A spectral subggrid-scale eddy viscosity and magnetic resisitivity model based on the eddy-damped quasi-normal Markovian (EDQNM) spectral kinetic and magnetic energy transfer presented in [12] is used in large-eddy simulation (LES) of large kinetic and magnetic Reynold number magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence. The proposed model is assessed via a posteri tests on three-dimensional, incompressible, isotropic, non-helical, freely-decaying MHD turbulence at asymptotically large Reynolds numbers. Using LES with an initial condition characterized by an Alfv{acute e}n ratio of kinetic to magnetic energy {tau}{sub A} equal to unity, it is shown that at the kinetic energy spectrum E{sub K}(k) and magnetic energy spectrum E{sub M}(k) exhibit Kolmogorov -5/3 inertial subrange scalings in the LES, consistent with the EDQNM model.

  5. How and why does tomato accumulate a large amount of GABA in the fruit?

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Mariko; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) has received much attention as a health-promoting functional compound, and several GABA-enriched foods have been commercialized. In higher plants, GABA is primarily metabolized via a short pathway called the GABA shunt. The GABA shunt bypasses two steps (the oxidation of α-ketoglutarate to succinate) of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle via reactions catalyzed by three enzymes: glutamate decarboxylase, GABA transaminase, and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase. The GABA shunt plays a major role in primary carbon and nitrogen metabolism and is an integral part of the TCA cycle under stress and non-stress conditions. Tomato is one of the major crops that accumulate a relatively high level of GABA in its fruits. The GABA levels in tomato fruits dramatically change during fruit development; the GABA levels increase from flowering to the mature green stage and then rapidly decrease during the ripening stage. Although GABA constitutes up to 50% of the free amino acids at the mature green stage, the molecular mechanism of GABA accumulation and the physiological function of GABA during tomato fruit development remain unclear. In this review, we summarize recent studies of GABA accumulation in tomato fruits and discuss the potential biological roles of GABA in tomato fruit development. PMID:26322056

  6. Toddler Subtraction with Large Sets: Further Evidence for an Analog-Magnitude Representation of Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Slaughter, Virginia; Kamppi, Dorian; Paynter, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to test the hypothesis that toddlers have access to an analog-magnitude number representation that supports numerical reasoning about relatively large numbers. Three-year-olds were presented with subtraction problems in which initial set size and proportions subtracted were systematically varied. Two sets of cookies…

  7. Rhesus Monkeys ("Macaca Mulatta") Spontaneously Compute Addition Operations Over Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flombaum, Jonathan I.; Junge, Justin A.; Hauser, Marc D.

    2005-01-01

    Mathematics is a uniquely human capacity. Studies of animals and human infants reveal, however, that this capacity builds on language-independent mechanisms for quantifying small numbers ([less than] 4) precisely and large numbers approximately. It is unclear whether animals and human infants can spontaneously tap mechanisms for quantifying large…

  8. Sediment accumulation and carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus deposition in the large tropical reservoir Lake Kariba (Zambia/Zimbabwe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kunz, Manuel J.; Anselmetti, Flavio S.; Wüest, Alfred; Wehrli, Bernhard; Vollenweider, Adrian; Thüring, Silvan; Senn, David B.

    2011-09-01

    Large dams affect the aquatic continuum from land to ocean by accumulating particles and nutrients in their reservoirs. We examined sediment cores to quantify sediment, organic carbon (OC), nitrogen (N), and phosphorous (P) accumulation, and to examine historic changes and spatial variability in the sedimentation pattern in Lake Kariba, the largest hydropower reservoir in the Zambezi River Basin (ZRB). Sediment characteristics (concentrations of OC, N, P; δ13C and δ15N; wet bulk density) showed large variability both with sediment depth and between cores. While organic matter (OM) in river deltas was primarily allochthonous in origin, OM characteristics (δ13C, C:N) in lacustrine sediments suggest that autochthonous sources account for >45% of the OM that accumulates over large areas of the lake. At the same time, the relative contribution of allochthonous material within individual layers of lacustrine cores varied considerably with depth due to discrete flood deposits. The overall sediment accumulation rate in Lake Kariba is on the order of 4 × 106 t yr-1, and the estimated OC accumulation of 120 × 103 t C yr-1 accounts for ˜1‰ of globally buried OC in reservoirs. In addition, mass balance calculations revealed that approximately 70% and 90% of incoming total N and P, respectively, are eliminated from the water column by sedimentation (N, P) and denitrification (N). Since Lake Kariba attenuates flow from ˜50% of the ZRB, these OC, N, and P removals represent a drastic reduction in nutrient loadings to downstream riparian ecosystems and to the coastal Indian Ocean.

  9. Very Large Data Volumes Analysis of Collaborative Systems with Finite Number of States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ivan, Ion; Ciurea, Cristian; Pavel, Sorin

    2010-01-01

    The collaborative system with finite number of states is defined. A very large database is structured. Operations on large databases are identified. Repetitive procedures for collaborative systems operations are derived. The efficiency of such procedures is analyzed. (Contains 6 tables, 5 footnotes and 3 figures.)

  10. Lessons learned in preparing to receive large numbers of contaminated individuals.

    PubMed

    Miller, Ken; Groff, Lee; Erdman, Mike; King, Steve

    2005-08-01

    Traditionally, medical radiation emergency plans have provided for the receipt and care of a limited number of individuals, usually no more than two or three at any given time. Large numbers of contaminated, uninjured individuals cannot be effectively handled in the emergency departments (EDs) of hospitals as they present a risk of forcing the ED to close because of contamination and they divert ED personnel away from patients needing medical attention. Alternative locations and plans for handling large numbers of contaminated but otherwise uninjured patients must be considered. Such plans developed at the Penn State Hershey Medical Center (HMC) during the 1979 accident at the Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant (TMI) were resurrected post 9/11 and used there in developing and upgrading plans and capabilities for handling large numbers of contaminated, uninjured individuals. PMID:16010120

  11. Solar concentration properties of flat fresnel lenses with large F-numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cosby, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    The solar concentration performances of flat, line-focusing sun-tracking Fresnel lenses with selected f-numbers between 0.9 and 2.0 were analyzed. Lens transmittance was found to have a weak dependence on f-number, with a 2% increase occuring as the f-number is increased from 0.9 to 2.0. The geometric concentration ratio for perfectly tracking lenses peaked for an f-number near 1.35. Intensity profiles were more uniform over the image extent for large f-number lenses when compared to the f/0.9 lens results. Substantial decreases in geometri concentration ratios were observed for transverse tracking errors equal to or below 1 degree for all f-number lenses. With respect to tracking errors, the solar performance is optimum for f-numbers between 1.25 and 1.5.

  12. Large Eddy Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz instabilities at high Reynolds number stratified flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Dana; Goodman, Lou; Raessi, Mehdi

    2015-11-01

    Simulations of Kelvin Helmholtz Instabilities (KHI) at high Reynolds numbers are performed using the Large Eddy Simulation technique. Reynolds numbers up to 100,000 are achieved using our model. The resulting data set is used to examine the effect of Reynolds number on various statistics, including dissipation flux coefficient, turbulent kinetic energy budget, and Thorpe length scale. It is shown that KHI are qualitatively different at high Re, up to and including the onset of vortex pairing and billow collapse and quantitatively different afterward. The effect of Richardson number is also examined. The results are discussed as they apply to ocean experiments.

  13. On the architecture for the X part of a very large FX correlator using two-accumulator CMACs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshev, Stepan; Rezaul Hasan, S. M.

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents an improved input-buffer architecture for the X part of a very large FX correlator that optimizes memory use to both increase performance and reduce the overall power consumption. The architecture uses an array of two-accumulator CMACs that are reused for different pairs of correlated signals. Using two accumulators in every CMAC allows the processing array to alternately correlate two sets of signal pairs selected in such a way so that they share some or all of the processed data samples. This leads to increased processing bandwidth and a significant reduction of the memory read rate due to not having to update some or all of the processing buffers in every second processing cycle. The overall memory access rate is at most 75 % of that of the single-accumulator CMAC array. This architecture is intended for correlators of very large multi-element radio telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA), and is suitable for an ASIC implementation.

  14. On large-scale dynamo action at high magnetic Reynolds number

    SciTech Connect

    Cattaneo, F.; Tobias, S. M.

    2014-07-01

    We consider the generation of magnetic activity—dynamo waves—in the astrophysical limit of very large magnetic Reynolds number. We consider kinematic dynamo action for a system consisting of helical flow and large-scale shear. We demonstrate that large-scale dynamo waves persist at high Rm if the helical flow is characterized by a narrow band of spatial scales and the shear is large enough. However, for a wide band of scales the dynamo becomes small scale with a further increase of Rm, with dynamo waves re-emerging only if the shear is then increased. We show that at high Rm, the key effect of the shear is to suppress small-scale dynamo action, allowing large-scale dynamo action to be observed. We conjecture that this supports a general 'suppression principle'—large-scale dynamo action can only be observed if there is a mechanism that suppresses the small-scale fluctuations.

  15. Central Limit Theorems and Uniform Laws of Large Numbers for Arrays of Random Fields

    PubMed Central

    Jenish, Nazgul; Prucha, Ingmar R.

    2009-01-01

    Over the last decades, spatial-interaction models have been increasingly used in economics. However, the development of a sufficiently general asymptotic theory for nonlinear spatial models has been hampered by a lack of relevant central limit theorems (CLTs), uniform laws of large numbers (ULLNs) and pointwise laws of large numbers (LLNs). These limit theorems form the essential building blocks towards developing the asymptotic theory of M-estimators, including maximum likelihood and generalized method of moments estimators. The paper establishes a CLT, ULLN, and LLN for spatial processes or random fields that should be applicable to a broad range of data processes. PMID:20161289

  16. Multiple paternity: determining the minimum number of sires of a large brood.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, A; Mehlig, B; Panova, M; Andre, C; Johannesson, K

    2010-03-01

    We describe an efficient algorithm for determining exactly the minimum number of sires consistent with the multi-locus genotypes of a mother and her progeny. We consider cases where a simple exhaustive search through all possible sets of sires is impossible in practice because it would take too long to complete. Our algorithm for solving this combinatorial optimization problem avoids visiting large parts of search space that would not result in a solution with fewer sires. This improvement is of particular importance when the number of allelic types in the progeny array is large and when the minimum number of sires is expected to be large. Precisely in such cases, it is important to know the minimum number of sires: this number gives an exact bound on the most likely number of sires estimated by a random search algorithm in a parameter region where it may be difficult to determine whether it has converged. We apply our algorithm to data from the marine snail, Littorina saxatilis. PMID:21565023

  17. Eulerian models for particle trajectory crossing in turbulent flows over a large range of Stokes numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Rodney O.; Vie, Aymeric; Laurent, Frederique; Chalons, Christophe; Massot, Marc

    2012-11-01

    Numerous applications involve a disperse phase carried by a gaseous flow. To simulate such flows, one can resort to a number density function (NDF) governed a kinetic equation. Traditionally, Lagrangian Monte-Carlo methods are used to solve for the NDF, but are expensive as the number of numerical particles needed must be large to control statistical errors. Moreover, such methods are not well adapted to high-performance computing because of the intrinsic inhomogeneity of the NDF. To overcome these issues, Eulerian methods can be used to solve for the moments of the NDF resulting in an unclosed Eulerian system of hyperbolic conservation laws. To obtain closure, in this work a multivariate bi-Gaussian quadrature is used, which can account for particle trajectory crossing (PTC) over a large range of Stokes numbers. This closure uses up to four quadrature points in 2-D velocity phase space to capture large-scale PTC, and an anisotropic Gaussian distribution around each quadrature point to model small-scale PTC. Simulations of 2-D particle-laden isotropic turbulence at different Stokes numbers are employed to validate the Eulerian models against results from the Lagrangian approach. Good agreement is found for the number density fields over the entire range of Stokes numbers tested. Research carried out at the Center for Turbulence Research 2012 Summer Program.

  18. Large Eddy Simulations of a turbulent periodic channel with conjugate heat transfer at low Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monod, R.; Brillant, G.; Toutant, A.; Bataille, F.

    2012-11-01

    Thermal striping is one of the possible initiator of pipe rupture. In this framework, thermal fluctuations in a heated periodic channel have been calculated using Large Eddy Simulation (LES). The fluid Prandtl number is set to 0.01 and the friction Reynolds number to 395. The Werner and Wengle Wall Function is used with the Navier-Stokes equations to reduce the computational cost. Satisfactory results can be noticed on the temperature fluctuations for low Prandtl number fluids. Several boundary conditions are considered, namely isothermal, isoflux, and conjugate heat transfer. The impacts of the wall properties on the temperature statistics for conjugated heat transfer boundary conditions are deeply analysed.

  19. Structure of Wall-Eddies at Very Large Reynolds Number--A Large-Scale PIV Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hommema, S. E.; Adrian, R. J.

    2000-11-01

    The results of an experiment performed in the first 5 m of the neutral atmospheric boundary layer are presented. Large-scale PIV measurements (up to 2 m × 2 m field-of-view) were obtained in the streamwise / wall-normal plane of a very-large Reynolds number (Re_θ > 10^6, based on momentum thickness and freestream velocity), flat-plate, zero-pressure-gradient boundary layer. Measurements were obtained at the SLTEST facility in the U.S. Army's Dugway Proving Grounds. Coherent packets of ramp-like structures with downstream inclination are observed and show a remarkable resemblance to those observed in typical laboratory-scale experiments at far lower Reynolds number. The results are interpreted in terms of a vortex packet paradigm(Adrian, R.J., C.D. Meinhart, and C.D. Tomkins, Vortex organization in the outer region of the turbulent boundary layer, to appear in J. Fluid Mech., 2000.) and begin to extend the model to high Reynolds numbers of technological importance. Additional results obtained during periods of non-neutral atmospheric stability are contrasted with those of the canonical neutral boundary layer. Sample smoke visualization images (3 m × 15 m field-of-view) are available online from the author.

  20. Large-magnitude transient strain accumulation on the Blackwater fault, Eastern California shear zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oskin, Michael; Iriondo, Alex

    2004-04-01

    We investigate the Quaternary slip rate for the Blackwater fault, Eastern California shear zone, through mapping and geochronology of offset volcanic rocks. Basalt flows of the Black Mountains support the presence of faulting at 3.77 ± 0.11 Ma, 1.8 ± 0.1 km of subsequent slip, and a well-constrained long-term slip rate of 0.49 ± 0.04 mm/yr. Total slip diminishes northward, evidenced by a 0.3 1.8 km offset of a 7.23 ± 1.07 Ma dacite flow in the Black Hills and fault termination in the Lava Mountains, 5 km short of the Garlock fault. Slow long-term slip rate together with sparse evidence for Holocene rupture contradict predictions of rapid slip rate from tectonic geodesy. These results support the conclusion that as much as 95% of geodetic strain accumulation across the Blackwater fault, and thus from 1 to 6 mm/yr of geodetic strain measured across the Eastern California shear zone, is a transitory phenomenon. Discrepant geologic and geodetic results may indicate an increased near-term seismic hazard, but merit caution for interpretation of fault slip rates from geodesy alone.

  1. Effects of Imposed Large-scale Flow During Convection at Large Rayleigh Numbers: Plume Dynamics and Heat Flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonnermann, H. M.; Jellinek, M. A.; Richards, M. A.; Manga, M.

    2001-12-01

    We present results from a boundary-layer analysis and laboratory experiments aimed at understanding the effects of an imposed large-scale circulation on thermal convection at high-Rayleigh number (106 <= Ra <= 109) in a fluid with a strongly temperature-dependent viscosity. The ultimate goal of this work is to better understand the effect of plate-scale mantle flow on heat flux from the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and on the dynamics of plume formation at the CMB. We have developed a boundary-layer analysis that predicts heat flux from a hot surface as a function of imposed large-scale velocity, horizontal position along the surface, and viscosity ratio between the hot boundary-layer fluid and cold ambient fluid. In addition, we have examined how the large-scale flow modulates the formation and ascent of plume instabilities from the hot thermal boundary layer. Our theoretical analysis was complemented by lab experiments. In these experiments a layer of corn syrup was heated from below, while a large-scale flow was induced in the fluid above the hot boundary. Our results show that at low velocities, the imposed flow has a negligible effect on heat flux and development of the thermal boundary layer. At intermediate imposed velocities, boundary-layer instabilities, as well as ascending plumes are advected laterally by the imposed flow. In this case both large-scale flow and plumes carry heat from the hot boundary. At large imposed velocities a significant part of the hot boundary-layer fluid is advected laterally. As a consequence, the boundary layer becomes thinned and instabilities that generate plumes are suppressed. At this point the heat flux from the boundary is carried predominantly by the imposed flow. Thermal boundary layer thickness and heat flux from the hot boundary depend on the viscosity ratio between hot boundary layer fluid and ambient fluid, the Rayleigh number and the Peclet number of the flow. For a given Rayleigh number and viscosity ratio, boundary

  2. Observation of lasing modes with exotic localized wave patterns from astigmatic large-Fresnel-number cavities.

    PubMed

    Lu, T H; Lin, Y C; Liang, H C; Huang, Y J; Chen, Y F; Huang, K F

    2010-02-01

    We investigate the lasing modes in large-Fresnel-number laser systems with astigmatism effects. Experimental results reveal that numerous lasing modes are concentrated on exotic patterns corresponding to intriguing geometries. We theoretically use the quantum operator algebra to construct the wave representation for manifesting the origin of the localized wave patterns. PMID:20125716

  3. Assessment of Sugarcane Yield Potential across Large Numbers of Genotypes Using Canopy Reflectance Measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Canopy reflectance indices have been used to monitor plant growth and estimate yields in many field crops. Little is known if canopy reflectance of sugarcane (a complex hybrid of Saccharum spp.) can be used to estimate growth and yield potential across large numbers of genotypes (clones) in the earl...

  4. Infants Use Different Mechanisms to Make Small and Large Number Ordinal Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    vanMarle, Kristy

    2013-01-01

    Previous research has shown indirectly that infants may use two different mechanisms-an object tracking system and an analog magnitude mechanism--to represent small (less than 4) and large (greater than or equal to 4) numbers of objects, respectively. The current study directly tested this hypothesis in an ordinal choice task by presenting 10- to…

  5. Coherent large-scale structures in high Reynolds number supersonic jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lepicovsky, J.; Ahuja, K. K.; Brown, W. H.; Burrin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The flow structure of a 50.8 mm (2 in) diameter jet operated at a full expanded Mach number of 1.37, with Reynolds numbers in the range 1.7 to 2.35 million, was examined for the first 20 jet diameters. To facilitate the study of the large scale structure, and determine any coherence, a discrete tone acoustic excitation method was used. Phase locked flow visualization as well as laser velocimeter quantitative measurements were made. The main conclusions derived from this study are: (1) large scale coherent like turbulence structures do exist in large Reynolds number supersonic jets, and they prevail even beyond the potential core; (2) the most preferential Strouhal number for these structures is in the vicinity of 0.4; and (3) quantitatively, the peak amplitudes of these structures are rather low, and are about 1% of the jet exit velocity. Finally, since a number of unique problems related to LV measurements in supersonic jets were encountered, a summary of these problems and lessons learned therefrom are also reported.

  6. Similarities between 2D and 3D convection for large Prandtl number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ambrish; Verma, Mahendra K.; Chatterjee, Anando G.; Dutta, Biplab

    2016-06-01

    Using direct numerical simulations of Rayleigh-B\\'{e}nard convection (RBC), we perform a comparative study of the spectra and fluxes of energy and entropy, and the scaling of large-scale quantities for large and infinite Prandtl numbers in two (2D) and three (3D) dimensions. We observe close similarities between the 2D and 3D RBC, in particular the kinetic energy spectrum $E_u(k) \\sim k^{-13/3}$, and the entropy spectrum exhibits a dual branch with a dominant $k^{-2}$ spectrum. We showed that the dominant Fourier modes in the 2D and 3D flows are very close. Consequently, the 3D RBC is quasi two-dimensional, which is the reason for the similarities between the 2D and 3D RBC for large- and infinite Prandtl numbers.

  7. Wall-modeling for large-eddy simulation of high Reynolds number supersonic flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan; Lele, Sanjiva

    2010-11-01

    We present an idea of approximate wall-boundary-condition approach with dynamic procedure for large-eddy simulation of Mach 3 supersonic turbulent boundary layer at various Reynolds numbers (Reδ=2 x10^4, 10^5 and 10^6) on a flat plate. This wall-model is the extension of previous work by Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluid, 14, 2043 (2002)] for incompressible flows to compressible flows. We note that the present study is both the first extension of the dynamic concept to compressible flows and also the first test at high Reynolds number flows. The present study also revisits the issue of numerical errors near wall-region on outer-layer coarse LES mesh. The numerical results are compared with wall-resolved LES data (at low Reynolds number case) and available experimental data (at high Reynolds number case).

  8. LEBU drag reduction in high Reynolds number boundary layers. [Large Eddy Break-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anders, J. B.

    1989-01-01

    Conventional and inverted, outer-layer leading-edge breakup devices (LEBUs) were water tunnel tested on an axisymmetric body over the Re number range from 380,000 to 3.8 million. Test results indicate a sharp degradation of the LEBUs' drag-reduction mechanism with increasing Re number. The most likely result of this degradation is a decoupling of the inner and outer scales at higher Re numbers; due to this decoupling, the breakup of the large structures by outer-layer devices has minimal influence on the near-wall, shear-producing scales. This suggests that smaller devices, closer to the walls, may be required for operation at elevated Re numbers.

  9. Indirect interband transition induced by optical near fields with large wave numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Maiku; Nobusada, Katsuyuki

    2016-05-01

    Optical near fields (ONFs) have Fourier components with large wave numbers that are two or three orders of magnitude larger than those of far-field propagating light owing to their nonuniformity in space. By utilizing these large wave numbers, the ONF is expected to induce an indirect interband transition between Bloch states having different wave numbers and directly generate an electron-hole pair without electron-phonon coupling. We perform time-dependent dynamics calculations of a one-dimensional periodic potential with an indirect band-gap structure and demonstrate that the ONF definitely induces an indirect interband transition. Instead of using the general Bloch boundary condition, which is usually imposed in conventional band structure calculations, we adopt an alternative boundary condition, the Born-von Kármán boundary condition, to appropriately treat indirect interband transitions. The calculated absorption spectra for the far-field and ONF excitations show different absorption edges and spectral patterns. We argue that this difference can be experimentally measured as evidence of the effects of the large wave numbers of the ONF.

  10. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotta, H.; Rempel, M.; Yokoyama, T.

    2016-03-01

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲1012square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities—that is, large Reynolds numbers.

  11. Large-scale magnetic fields at high Reynolds numbers in magnetohydrodynamic simulations.

    PubMed

    Hotta, H; Rempel, M; Yokoyama, T

    2016-03-25

    The 11-year solar magnetic cycle shows a high degree of coherence in spite of the turbulent nature of the solar convection zone. It has been found in recent high-resolution magnetohydrodynamics simulations that the maintenance of a large-scale coherent magnetic field is difficult with small viscosity and magnetic diffusivity (≲10 (12) square centimenters per second). We reproduced previous findings that indicate a reduction of the energy in the large-scale magnetic field for lower diffusivities and demonstrate the recovery of the global-scale magnetic field using unprecedentedly high resolution. We found an efficient small-scale dynamo that suppresses small-scale flows, which mimics the properties of large diffusivity. As a result, the global-scale magnetic field is maintained even in the regime of small diffusivities-that is, large Reynolds numbers. PMID:27013727

  12. Large deviations of the shifted index number in the Gaussian ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez Castillo, Isaac

    2016-06-01

    We show that, using the Coulomb fluid approach, we are able to derive a rate function \\Psi(c,x) of two variables that captures: (i) the large deviations of bulk eigenvalues; (ii) the large deviations of extreme eigenvalues (both left and right large deviations); (iii) the statistics of the fraction c of eigenvalues to the left of a position x. Thus, \\Psi(c,x) explains the full order statistics of the eigenvalues of large random Gaussian matrices as well as the statistics of the shifted index number. All our analytical findings are thoroughly compared with Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining excellent agreement. A summary of preliminary results has already been presented in Pérez Castillo (2014 Phys. Rev. E 90 040102) in the context of one-dimensional trapped spinless fermions in a harmonic potential.

  13. Confined rotating convection with large Prandtl number: centrifugal effects on wall modes.

    PubMed

    Curbelo, Jezabel; Lopez, Juan M; Mancho, Ana M; Marques, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Thermal convection in a rotating cylinder with a radius-to-height aspect ratio of Γ=4 for fluids with large Prandtl number is studied numerically. Centrifugal buoyancy effects are investigated in a regime where the Coriolis force is relatively large and the onset of thermal convection is in the so-called wall modes regime, where pairs of hot and cold thermal plumes ascend and descend in the cylinder sidewall boundary layer, forming an essentially one-dimensional pattern characterized by the number of hot and cold plume pairs. In our numerical study, we use the physical parameters corresponding to aqueous mixtures of glycerine with mass concentration in the range of 60%-90% glycerine and a Rayleigh number range that extends from the threshold for wall modes up to values where the bulk fluid region is also convecting. The study shows that for the range of Rayleigh numbers considered, the local variations in viscosity due to temperature variation in the flow are negligible. However, the mean viscosity, which varies faster than exponentially with variations in the percentage of glycerine, leads to a faster than exponential increase in the Froude number for a fixed Coriolis force, and hence an enhancement of the centrifugal buoyancy effects with significant dynamical consequences, which are detailed. PMID:24580332

  14. Large Cellular Inclusions Accumulate in Arabidopsis Roots Exposed to Low-Sulfur Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Terry L.; Baker, Ginger W.; Wilks, Floyd R.; Popov, Vladimir A.; Mathur, Jaideep; Benfey, Philip N.

    2015-01-01

    Sulfur is vital for primary and secondary metabolism in plant roots. To understand the molecular and morphogenetic changes associated with loss of this key macronutrient, we grew Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings in low-sulfur conditions. These conditions induced a cascade of cellular events that converged to produce a profound intracellular phenotype defined by large cytoplasmic inclusions. The inclusions, termed low-sulfur Pox, show cell type- and developmental zone-specific localization. Transcriptome analysis suggested that low sulfur causes dysfunction of the glutathione/ascorbate cycle, which reduces flavonoids. Genetic and biochemical evidence indicated that low-sulfur Pox are the result of peroxidase-catalyzed oxidation of quercetin in roots grown under sulfur-depleted conditions. PMID:26099270

  15. Reynolds number scaling of coherent vortex simulation and stochastic coherent adaptive large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza; Vezolainen, Alexei; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2013-11-01

    In view of the ongoing longtime pursuit of numerical approaches that can capture important flow physics of high Reynolds number flows with fewest degrees of freedom, two important wavelet-based multi-resolution schemes are thoroughly examined, namely, the Coherent Vortex Simulation (CVS) and the Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulation (SCALES) with constant and spatially/temporarily variable thresholding. Reynolds number scaling of active spatial modes for CVS and SCALES of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence at high Reynolds numbers is investigated in dynamic study for the first time. This dynamic computational complexity study demonstrates that wavelet-based methods can capture flow-physics while using substantially fewer degrees of freedom than both direct numerical simulation and marginally resolved LES with the same level of fidelity or turbulence resolution, defined as ratio of subgrid scale and the total dissipations. The study provides four important observations: (1) the linear Reynolds number scaling of energy containing structures at a fixed level of kinetic energy, (2) small, close to unity, fractal dimension for constant-threshold CVS and SCALES simulations, (3) constant, close to two, fractal dimension for constant-dissipation SCALES that is insensitive to the level of fidelity, and (4) faster than quadratic decay of the compression ratio as a function of turbulence resolution. The very promising slope for Reynolds number scaling of CVS and SCALES demonstrates the potential of the wavelet-based methodologies for hierarchical multiscale space/time adaptive variable fidelity simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows.

  16. Investigation of Rossby-number similarity in the neutral boundary layer using large-eddy simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ohmstede, W.D.; Cederwall, R.T.; Meyers, R.E.

    1988-01-01

    One special case of particular interest, especially to theoreticians, is the steady-state, horizontally homogeneous, autobarotropic (PLB), hereafter referred to as the neutral boundary layer (NBL). The NBL is in fact a 'rare' atmospheric phenomenon, generally associated with high-wind situations. Nevertheless, there is a disproportionate interest in this problem because Rossby-number similarity theory provides a sound approach for addressing this issue. Rossby-number similarity theory has rather wide acceptance, but because of the rarity of the 'true' NBL state, there remains an inadequate experimental database for quantifying constants associated with the Rossby-number similarity concept. Although it remains a controversial issue, it has been proposed that large-eddy simulation (LES) is an alternative to physical experimentation for obtaining basic atmospherc 'data'. The objective of the study reported here is to investigate Rossby-number similarity in the NBL using LES. Previous studies have not addressed Rossby-number similarity explicitly, although they made use of it in the interpretation of their results. The intent is to calculate several sets of NBL solutions that are ambiguous relative to the their respective Rossby numbers and compare the results for similarity, or the lack of it. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  17. An autostereoscopic display with high resolution and large number of view zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wu-Li; Hsu, Wei-Liang; Tsai, Chao-Hsu; Wang, Chy-Lin; Wu, Chang-Shuo; Yang, Jinn-Cherng; Cheng, Shu-Chuan

    2008-02-01

    For a spatial-multiplexed 3D display, trade-off between resolution and number of view-zones are usually unavoidable due to the limited number of pixels on the screen. In this paper, we present a new autostereoscopic system, named as "integrated-screen system," to substantially increase the total number of pixels on the screen, which in turn increase both the resolution and number of view-zones. In the integrated-screen system, a large number of mini-projectors are arrayed and the images are tiled together without seams in between. For displaying 3D images, the lenticular screen with predesigned tilted angle is used for distributing different viewing zones. In order to achieve good performance, we design a brand-new projector with special lens set to meet the low-distortion requirement because the distortion of the image will induce serious crosstalk between view-zones. The proposed system has two advantages. One is the extensibility of the screen size. The size of the display can be chosen based on the applications we deal with, including the size of the projected pixel and the number of viewing zones. The other advantage is that the integrated-screen system provides projected pixels in great density to solve the major problem of the poor resolution that a lenticular-type 3D display has.

  18. Viscous instabilities in the q-vortex at large swirl numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, David; Jacquin, Laurent

    2002-11-01

    This comunication deals with the temporal stability of the q-vortex trailing line vortex model. We describe a family of viscous instabilities existing in a range of parameters which is usually assumed to be stable, namely large swirl parameters (q>1.5) and large Reynolds numbers. These instabilities affect negative azimuthal wavenumbers (m < 0) and take the form of centre-modes (i.e. with a structure concentrated along the vortex centerline). They are related to a family of viscous modes described by Stewartson, Ng & Brown (1988) in swirling Poiseuille flow, and are the temporal counterparts of weakly amplified spatial modes recently computed by Olendraru & Sellier (2002). These instabilities are studied numerically using an original and highly accurate Chebyshev collocation method, which allows a mapping of the unstable regions up to Rey 10^6 and q 7. Our results indicate that in the limit of very large Reynolds numbers, trailing vortices are affected by this kind of instabilities whatever the value of the swirl number.

  19. Effect of a large number of parties on the monogamy of quantum correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Asutosh; Prabhu, R.; SenDe, Aditi; Sen, Ujjwal

    2015-01-01

    Monogamy is a nonclassical property that restricts the sharability of quantum correlation among the constituents of a multipartite quantum system. Quantum correlations may satisfy or violate monogamy for quantum states, which was tested mainly for three-qubit states. Here we establish a sufficient condition for monogamy of arbitrary quantum correlation measures of states of an arbitrary number of parties, using which and further numerical results, we obtain evidence for monogamy of measures such as distillable entanglement and relative entropy of entanglement, which are physically important but mathematically intractable, for almost all quantum states of a moderate number of parties. The result is generic and holds for a large class of quantum correlation measures. Nonetheless, we identify important zero Haar measure classes of pure states that remain nonmonogamous with respect to quantum discord and quantum work deficit, irrespective of the number of qubits.

  20. Estimation of parameters in large offspring number models and ratios of coalescence times.

    PubMed

    Eldon, Bjarki

    2011-08-01

    The ratio of singletons to the total number of segregating sites is used to estimate a reproduction parameter in a population model of large offspring numbers without having to jointly estimate the mutation rate. For neutral genetic variation, the ratio of singletons to the total number of segregating sites is equivalent to the ratio of total length of external branches to the total length of the gene genealogy. A multinomial maximum likelihood method that takes into account more frequency classes than just the singletons is developed to estimate the parameter of another large offspring number model. The performance of these methods with regard to sample size, mutation rate, and bias, is investigated by simulation. The expected value of the ratio of the total length of external branches to the total length of the whole tree is, using simulation, shown to decrease for the Kingman coalescent as sample size increases, but can increase or decrease, depending on parameter values, for Λ coalescents. Considering ratios of tree statistics, as opposed to considering lengths of various subtrees separately, can yield better insight into the dynamics of gene genealogies. PMID:21570995

  1. Population Analysis of Large Copy Number Variants and Hotspots of Human Genetic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Itsara, Andy; Cooper, Gregory M.; Baker, Carl; Girirajan, Santhosh; Li, Jun; Absher, Devin; Krauss, Ronald M.; Myers, Richard M.; Ridker, Paul M.; Chasman, Daniel I.; Mefford, Heather; Ying, Phyllis; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2009-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) contribute to human genetic and phenotypic diversity. However, the distribution of larger CNVs in the general population remains largely unexplored. We identify large variants in ∼2500 individuals by using Illumina SNP data, with an emphasis on “hotspots” prone to recurrent mutations. We find variants larger than 500 kb in 5%–10% of individuals and variants greater than 1 Mb in 1%–2%. In contrast to previous studies, we find limited evidence for stratification of CNVs in geographically distinct human populations. Importantly, our sample size permits a robust distinction between truly rare and polymorphic but low-frequency copy number variation. We find that a significant fraction of individual CNVs larger than 100 kb are rare and that both gene density and size are strongly anticorrelated with allele frequency. Thus, although large CNVs commonly exist in normal individuals, which suggests that size alone can not be used as a predictor of pathogenicity, such variation is generally deleterious. Considering these observations, we combine our data with published CNVs from more than 12,000 individuals contrasting control and neurological disease collections. This analysis identifies known disease loci and highlights additional CNVs (e.g., 3q29, 16p12, and 15q25.2) for further investigation. This study provides one of the first analyses of large, rare (0.1%–1%) CNVs in the general population, with insights relevant to future analyses of genetic disease. PMID:19166990

  2. A Simple Method for Estimating Interactions between a Treatment and a Large Number of Covariates

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lu; Alizadeh, Ash A; Gentles, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    We consider a setting in which we have a treatment and a potentially large number of covariates for a set of observations, and wish to model their relationship with an outcome of interest. We propose a simple method for modeling interactions between the treatment and covariates. The idea is to modify the covariate in a simple way, and then fit a standard model using the modified covariates and no main effects. We show that coupled with an efficiency augmentation procedure, this method produces clinically meaningful estimators in a variety of settings. It can be useful for practicing personalized medicine: determining from a large set of biomarkers the subset of patients that can potentially benefit from a treatment. We apply the method to both simulated datasets and real trial data. The modified covariates idea can be used for other purposes, for example, large scale hypothesis testing for determining which of a set of covariates interact with a treatment variable. PMID:25729117

  3. 0{sup +} states in the large boson number limit of the Interacting Boson Approximation model

    SciTech Connect

    Bonatsos, Dennis; McCutchan, E. A.; Casten, R. F.

    2008-11-11

    Studies of the Interacting Boson Approximation (IBA) model for large boson numbers have been triggered by the discovery of shape/phase transitions between different limiting symmetries of the model. These transitions become sharper in the large boson number limit, revealing previously unnoticed regularities, which also survive to a large extent for finite boson numbers, corresponding to valence nucleon pairs in collective nuclei. It is shown that energies of 0{sub n}{sup +} states grow linearly with their ordinal number n in all three limiting symmetries of IBA [U(5), SU(3), and O(6)]. Furthermore, it is proved that the narrow transition region separating the symmetry triangle of the IBA into a spherical and a deformed region is described quite well by the degeneracies E(0{sub 2}{sup +}) = E(6{sub 1}{sup +}, E(0{sub 3}{sup +}) = E(10{sub 1}{sup +}), E(0{sub 4}{sup +}) = E(14{sub 1}{sup +}, while the energy ratio E(6{sub 1}{sup +})/E(0{sub 2}{sup +} turns out to be a simple, empirical, easy-to-measure effective order parameter, distinguishing between first- and second-order transitions. The energies of 0{sub n}{sup +} states near the point of the first order shape/phase transition between U(5) and SU(3) are shown to grow as n(n+3), in agreement with the rule dictated by the relevant critical point symmetries resulting in the framework of special solutions of the Bohr Hamiltonian. The underlying partial dynamical symmetries and quasi-dynamical symmetries are also discussed.

  4. Large scale dynamics in a turbulent compressible rotor/stator cavity flow at high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lachize, C.; Verhille, G.; Le Gal, P.

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports an experimental investigation of a turbulent flow confined within a rotor/stator cavity of aspect ratio close to unity at high Reynolds number. The experiments have been driven by changing both the rotation rate of the disk and the thermodynamical properties of the working fluid. This fluid is sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) whose physical properties are adjusted by imposing the operating temperature and the absolute pressure in a pressurized vessel, especially near the critical point of SF6 reached for T c = 45.58 ◦C, P c = 37.55 bar. This original set-up allows to obtain Reynolds numbers as high as 2 × 107 together with compressibility effects as the Mach number can reach 0.5. Pressure measurements reveal that the resulting fully turbulent flow shows both a direct and an inverse cascade as observed in rotating turbulence and in accordance with Kraichnan conjecture for 2D-turbulence. The spectra are however dominated by low-frequency peaks, which are subharmonics of the rotating disk frequency, involving large scale structures at small azimuthal wavenumbers. These modes appear for a Reynolds number around 105 and experience a transition at a critical Reynolds number Re c ≈ 106. Moreover they show an unexpected nonlinear behavior that we understand with the help of a low dimensional amplitude equations.

  5. Estimating the effective Reynolds number in implicit large-eddy simulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ye; Grinstein, Fernando F; Wachtor, Adam J; Haines, Brian M

    2014-01-01

    In implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES), energy-containing large scales are resolved, and physics capturing numerics are used to spatially filter out unresolved scales and to implicitly model subgrid scale effects. From an applied perspective, it is highly desirable to estimate a characteristic Reynolds number (Re)-and therefore a relevant effective viscosity-so that the impact of resolution on predicted flow quantities and their macroscopic convergence can usefully be characterized. We argue in favor of obtaining robust Re estimates away from the smallest scales of the simulated flow-where numerically controlled dissipation takes place and propose a theoretical basis and framework to determine such measures. ILES examples include forced turbulence as a steady flow case, the Taylor-Green vortex to address transition and decaying turbulence, and simulations of a laser-driven reshock experiment illustrating a fairly complex turbulence problem of current practical interest. PMID:24580356

  6. Impact factors for Reggeon-gluon transition in N=4 SYM with large number of colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadin, V. S.; Fiore, R.

    2014-06-01

    We calculate impact factors for Reggeon-gluon transition in supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory with four supercharges at large number of colours Nc. In the next-to-leading order impact factors are not uniquely defined and must accord with BFKL kernels and energy scales. We obtain the impact factor corresponding to the kernel and the energy evolution parameter, which is invariant under Möbius transformation in momentum space, and show that it is also Möbius invariant up to terms taken into account in the BDS ansatz.

  7. Diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number: Challenge of dynamic mesoscale imaging with hard x rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barber, John L.; Barnes, Cris W.; Sandberg, Richard L.; Sheffield, Richard L.

    2014-05-01

    Real materials have structure at both the atomic or crystalline scale as well as at interfaces and defects at the larger scale of grains. There is a need for the study of materials at the "mesoscale," the scale at which subgranular physical processes and intergranular organization couple to determine microstructure, crucially impacting constitutive response at the engineering macroscale. Diffractive imaging using photons that can penetrate multiple grains of material would be a transformative technique for the study of the performance of materials in dynamic extremes. Thicker samples imply higher energy photons of shorter wavelength, and imaging of multiple grains implies bigger spot sizes. Such imaging requires the use of future planned and proposed hard x-ray free electron lasers (such as the European XFEL) to provide both the spatial coherence transverse to the large spots and the peak brilliance to provide the short illumination times. The result is that the Fresnel number of the system becomes large and is no longer in the Fraunhofer far-field limit. The interrelated issues of diffractive imaging at large Fresnel number are analyzed, including proof that diffractive imaging is possible in this limit and estimates of the signal-to-noise possible. In addition, derivation of the heating rates for brilliant pulses of x rays are presented. The potential and limitations on multiple dynamic images are derived. This paper will present a study of x-ray interactions with materials in this new regime of spatially coherent but relatively large mesoscale spots at very hard energies. It should provide the theory and design background for the experiments and facilities required to control materials in extreme environments, in particular for the next generation of very-hard-x-ray free electron lasers.

  8. Superposition of elliptic functions as solutions for a large number of nonlinear equations

    SciTech Connect

    Khare, Avinash; Saxena, Avadh

    2014-03-15

    For a large number of nonlinear equations, both discrete and continuum, we demonstrate a kind of linear superposition. We show that whenever a nonlinear equation admits solutions in terms of both Jacobi elliptic functions cn(x, m) and dn(x, m) with modulus m, then it also admits solutions in terms of their sum as well as difference. We have checked this in the case of several nonlinear equations such as the nonlinear Schrödinger equation, MKdV, a mixed KdV-MKdV system, a mixed quadratic-cubic nonlinear Schrödinger equation, the Ablowitz-Ladik equation, the saturable nonlinear Schrödinger equation, λϕ{sup 4}, the discrete MKdV as well as for several coupled field equations. Further, for a large number of nonlinear equations, we show that whenever a nonlinear equation admits a periodic solution in terms of dn{sup 2}(x, m), it also admits solutions in terms of dn {sup 2}(x,m)±√(m) cn (x,m) dn (x,m), even though cn(x, m)dn(x, m) is not a solution of these nonlinear equations. Finally, we also obtain superposed solutions of various forms for several coupled nonlinear equations.

  9. Law of Large Numbers: the Theory, Applications and Technology-based Education

    PubMed Central

    Dinov, Ivo D.; Christou, Nicolas; Gould, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Modern approaches for technology-based blended education utilize a variety of recently developed novel pedagogical, computational and network resources. Such attempts employ technology to deliver integrated, dynamically-linked, interactive-content and heterogeneous learning environments, which may improve student comprehension and information retention. In this paper, we describe one such innovative effort of using technological tools to expose students in probability and statistics courses to the theory, practice and usability of the Law of Large Numbers (LLN). We base our approach on integrating pedagogical instruments with the computational libraries developed by the Statistics Online Computational Resource (www.SOCR.ucla.edu). To achieve this merger we designed a new interactive Java applet and a corresponding demonstration activity that illustrate the concept and the applications of the LLN. The LLN applet and activity have common goals – to provide graphical representation of the LLN principle, build lasting student intuition and present the common misconceptions about the law of large numbers. Both the SOCR LLN applet and activity are freely available online to the community to test, validate and extend (Applet: http://socr.ucla.edu/htmls/exp/Coin_Toss_LLN_Experiment.html, and Activity: http://wiki.stat.ucla.edu/socr/index.php/SOCR_EduMaterials_Activities_LLN). PMID:21603584

  10. Molecular replacement with a large number of molecules in the asymmetric unit

    PubMed Central

    Jobichen, Chacko; Swaminathan, Kunchithapadam

    2014-01-01

    The exponential increase in protein structures deposited in the Protein Data Bank (PDB) has resulted in the elucidation of most, if not all, protein folds, thus making molecular replacement (MR) the most frequently used method for structure determination. A survey of the PDB shows that most of the structures determined by molecular replacement contain less than ten molecules in the asymmetric unit and that it is predominantly virus and ribosome structures that contain more than 20 molecules in the asymmetric unit. While the success of the MR method depends on several factors, such as the homology and the size of an input model, it is also a well known fact that this method can become significantly difficult in cases with a large number of molecules in the asymmetric unit, higher crystallographic symmetry and tight packing. In this paper, five representative structures containing 16–18 homomeric molecules in the asymmetric unit and the strategies that have been used to solve these structures are described. The difficulties faced and the lessons learned from these structure-determination efforts will be useful for selected and similar future situations with a large number of molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:25195913

  11. Automated 3D trajectory measuring of large numbers of moving particles.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hai Shan; Zhao, Qi; Zou, Danping; Chen, Yan Qiu

    2011-04-11

    Complex dynamics of natural particle systems, such as insect swarms, bird flocks, fish schools, has attracted great attention of scientists for years. Measuring 3D trajectory of each individual in a group is vital for quantitative study of their dynamic properties, yet such empirical data is rare mainly due to the challenges of maintaining the identities of large numbers of individuals with similar visual features and frequent occlusions. We here present an automatic and efficient algorithm to track 3D motion trajectories of large numbers of moving particles using two video cameras. Our method solves this problem by formulating it as three linear assignment problems (LAP). For each video sequence, the first LAP obtains 2D tracks of moving targets and is able to maintain target identities in the presence of occlusions; the second one matches the visually similar targets across two views via a novel technique named maximum epipolar co-motion length (MECL), which is not only able to effectively reduce matching ambiguity but also further diminish the influence of frequent occlusions; the last one links 3D track segments into complete trajectories via computing a globally optimal assignment based on temporal and kinematic cues. Experiment results on simulated particle swarms with various particle densities validated the accuracy and robustness of the proposed method. As real-world case, our method successfully acquired 3D flight paths of fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) group comprising hundreds of freely flying individuals. PMID:21503074

  12. Methods to produce and safely work with large numbers of Toxoplasma gondii oocysts and bradyzoite cysts

    PubMed Central

    Fritz, H.; Barr, B.; Packham, A.; Melli, A.; Conrad, P.A.

    2012-01-01

    Two major obstacles to conducting studies with Toxoplasma gondii oocysts are the difficulty in reliably producing large numbers of this life stage and safety concerns because the oocyst is the most environmentally resistant stage of this zoonotic organism. Oocyst production requires oral infection of the definitive feline host with adequate numbers of T. gondii organisms to obtain unsporulated oocysts that are shed in the feces for 3-10 days after infection. Since the most successful and common mode of experimental infection of kittens with T. gondii is by ingestion of bradyzoite tissue cysts, the first step in successful oocyst production is to ensure a high bradyzoite tissue cyst burden in the brains of mice that can be used for the oral inoculum. We compared two methods for producing bradyzoite brain cysts in mice, by infecting them either orally or subcutaneously with oocysts. In both cases, oocysts derived from a low passage T. gondii Type II strain (M4) were used to infect eight-ten week-old Swiss Webster mice. First the number of bradyzoite cysts that were purified from infected mouse brains was compared. Then to evaluate the effect of the route of oocyst inoculation on tissue cyst distribution in mice, a second group of mice was infected with oocysts by one of each route and tissues were examined by histology. In separate experiments, brains from infected mice were used to infect kittens for oocyst production. Greater than 1.3 billion oocysts were isolated from the feces of two infected kittens in the first production and greater than 1.8 billion oocysts from three kittens in the second production. Our results demonstrate that oral delivery of oocysts to mice results in both higher cyst loads in the brain and greater cyst burdens in other tissues examined as compared to those of mice that received the same number of oocysts subcutaneously. The ultimate goal in producing large numbers of oocysts in kittens is to generate adequate amounts of starting material

  13. Laws of Large Numbers and Langevin Approximations for Stochastic Neural Field Equations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we consider limit theorems for microscopic stochastic models of neural fields. We show that the Wilson–Cowan equation can be obtained as the limit in uniform convergence on compacts in probability for a sequence of microscopic models when the number of neuron populations distributed in space and the number of neurons per population tend to infinity. This result also allows to obtain limits for qualitatively different stochastic convergence concepts, e.g., convergence in the mean. Further, we present a central limit theorem for the martingale part of the microscopic models which, suitably re-scaled, converges to a centred Gaussian process with independent increments. These two results provide the basis for presenting the neural field Langevin equation, a stochastic differential equation taking values in a Hilbert space, which is the infinite-dimensional analogue of the chemical Langevin equation in the present setting. On a technical level, we apply recently developed law of large numbers and central limit theorems for piecewise deterministic processes taking values in Hilbert spaces to a master equation formulation of stochastic neuronal network models. These theorems are valid for processes taking values in Hilbert spaces, and by this are able to incorporate spatial structures of the underlying model. Mathematics Subject Classification (2000): 60F05, 60J25, 60J75, 92C20. PMID:23343328

  14. Large-eddy simulations of impinging jets at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Wen; Piomelli, Ugo

    2013-11-01

    We have performed large-eddy simulations of an impinging jet with embedded azimuthal vortices. We used a hybrid approach in which the near-wall layer is modelled using the RANS equations with the Spalart-Allmaras model, while away from the wall Lagrangian-averaged dynamic eddy-viscosity modelled LES is used. This method allowed us to reach Reynolds numbers that would be prohibitively expensive for wall-resolving LES. First, we compared the results of the hybrid calculation with a wall-resolved one at moderate Reynolds number, Re = 66 , 000 (based on jet diameter and velocity). The mean velocity and Reynolds stresses were in good agreement between the simulations, and, in particular, the generation of secondary vorticity at the wall and its liftup were captured well. The simulation cost was reduced by 86%. We then carried out simulations at Re = 266 , 000 and 1.3 million. The effect of Reynolds number on vortex development will be discussed. Canada Research Chair in Computational Turbulence, HPCVL-Sun Microsystems Chair in Computational Science and Engineering.

  15. Large Autosomal Copy-Number Differences within Unselected Monozygotic Twin Pairs are Rare.

    PubMed

    McRae, Allan F; Visscher, Peter M; Montgomery, Grant W; Martin, Nicholas G

    2015-02-01

    Monozygotic (MZ) twins form an important system for the study of biological plasticity in humans. While MZ twins are generally considered to be genetically identical, a number of studies have emerged that have demonstrated copy-number differences within a twin pair, particularly in those discordant for disease. The rate of autosomal copy-number variation (CNV) discordance within MZ twin pairs was investigated using a population sample of 376 twin pairs genotyped on Illumina Human610-Quad arrays. After CNV calling using both QuantiSNP and PennCNV followed by manual annotation, only a single CNV difference was observed within the MZ twin pairs, being a 130 KB duplication of chromosome 5. Five other potential discordant CNV were called by the software, but excluded based on manual annotation of the regions. It is concluded that large CNV discordance is rare within MZ twin pairs, indicating that any CNV difference found within phenotypically discordant MZ twin pairs has a high probability of containing the causal gene(s) involved. PMID:25578400

  16. The power of sensitivity analysis and thoughts on models with large numbers of parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Havlacek, William

    2008-01-01

    The regulatory systems that allow cells to adapt to their environments are exceedingly complex, and although we know a great deal about the intricate mechanistic details of many of these systems, our ability to make accurate predictions about their system-level behaviors is severely limited. We would like to make such predictions for a number of reasons. How can we reverse dysfunctional molecular changes of these systems that cause disease? More generally, how can we harness and direct cellular activities for beneficial purposes? Our ability to make accurate predictions about a system is also a measure ofour fundamental understanding of that system. As evidenced by our mastery of technological systems, a useful understanding ofa complex system can often be obtained through the development and analysis ofa mathematical model, but predictive modeling of cellular regulatory systems, which necessarily relies on quantitative experimentation, is still in its infancy. There is much that we need to learn before modeling for practical applications becomes routine. In particular, we need to address a number of issues surrounding the large number of parameters that are typically found in a model for a cellular regulatory system.

  17. Support for the involvement of large copy number variants in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kirov, George; Grozeva, Detelina; Norton, Nadine; Ivanov, Dobril; Mantripragada, Kiran K.; Holmans, Peter; Craddock, Nick; Owen, Michael J.; O'Donovan, Michael C.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated the involvement of rare (<1%) copy number variants (CNVs) in 471 cases of schizophrenia and 2792 controls that had been genotyped using the Affymetrix GeneChip® 500K Mapping Array. Large CNVs >1 Mb were 2.26 times more common in cases (P = 0.00027), with the effect coming mostly from deletions (odds ratio, OR = 4.53, P = 0.00013) although duplications were also more common (OR = 1.71, P = 0.04). Two large deletions were found in two cases each, but in no controls: a deletion at 22q11.2 known to be a susceptibility factor for schizophrenia and a deletion on 17p12, at 14.0–15.4 Mb. The latter is known to cause hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies. The same deletion was found in 6 of 4618 (0.13%) cases and 6 of 36 092 (0.017%) controls in the re-analysed data of two recent large CNV studies of schizophrenia (OR = 7.82, P = 0.001), with the combined significance level for all three studies achieving P = 5 × 10−5. One large duplication on 16p13.1, which has been previously implicated as a susceptibility factor for autism, was found in three cases and six controls (0.6% versus 0.2%, OR = 2.98, P = 0.13). We also provide the first support for a recently reported association between deletions at 15q11.2 and schizophrenia (P = 0.026). This study confirms the involvement of rare CNVs in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia and contributes to the growing list of specific CNVs that are implicated. PMID:19181681

  18. Optimization of evaporative cooling towards a large number of Bose-Einstein-condensed atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Yamashita, Makoto; Mukai, Tetsuya; Mukai, Takaaki; Koashi, Masato; Mitsunaga, Masaharu; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2003-02-01

    We study the optimization of evaporative cooling in trapped bosonic atoms on the basis of quantum kinetic theory of a Bose gas. The optimized cooling trajectory for {sup 87}Rb atoms indicates that the acceleration of evaporative cooling around the transition point of Bose-Einstein condensation is very effective against loss of trapped atoms caused by three-body recombination. The number of condensed atoms is largely enhanced by the optimization, more than two orders of magnitude in our present calculation using relevant experimental parameters, as compared with the typical value given by the conventional evaporative cooling where the frequency of radio-frequency magnetic field is swept exponentially. In addition to this optimized cooling, it is also shown that highly efficient evaporative cooling can be achieved by an initial exponential and then a rapid linear sweep of frequency.

  19. Variation of froude number with discharge for large-gradient steams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wahl, Kenneth L.

    1993-01-01

    Under chemical-control conditions, the Froude number (f) for a cross-section can be approximated as a function of the ratio R2/ 3/d 1/2 , where R is the hydraulic radius and d is the average depth. For cross sections where the ratio increases with increasing depth, F can also increase with depth Current-meter measurement data for 433 streamflow gaging stations in Colorado were reviewed, and 62 stations were identified at which F increases with depth of flow. Data for four streamflow gaging stations are presented. In some cases, F approaches 1 as the discharge approaches the magnitude of the median annual peak discharge. The data also indicate that few actual current meter measurement have been made at the large discharges where velocities can be supercritical.

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of a High Reynolds Number Flow Around a Cylinder Including Aeroacoustic Predictions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spyropoulos, Evangelos T.; Holmes, Bayard S.

    1997-01-01

    The dynamic subgrid-scale model is employed in large-eddy simulations of flow over a cylinder at a Reynolds number, based on the diameter of the cylinder, of 90,000. The Centric SPECTRUM(trademark) finite element solver is used for the analysis. The far field sound pressure is calculated from Lighthill-Curle's equation using the computed fluctuating pressure at the surface of the cylinder. The sound pressure level at a location 35 diameters away from the cylinder and at an angle of 90 deg with respect to the wake's downstream axis was found to have a peak value of approximately 110 db. Slightly smaller peak values were predicted at the 60 deg and 120 deg locations. A grid refinement study suggests that the dynamic model demands mesh refinement beyond that used here.

  1. STARE Observations of a Pc 5 pulsation with large azimuthal wave number

    SciTech Connect

    Allan, W.; Poulter, E.M.; Nielsen, E.

    1982-08-01

    In recent years the STARE system has been used to analyze Pc5 pulsations of several different types. In this paper a detailed description of a new type of pulsation is given. The event described occurred during local magnetic afternoon; it had small amplitude (Vertical BarEVertical Bar< or approx. =5mV m/sup -1/ in the ionosphere), a period which varied from 220 to 385 s during the event, and a large azimuthal wave number (mapprox.35) which varied such as to keep the azimuthal phase velocity approximately constant for a given geomagnetic latitude; propagation was geomagnetic westward. When maped into the equatorial plane, the properties of the wave strongly suggest that the wave phase velocity was determined by hot proton drift motions near the equatorial plane. The observational results are compared with theoretical properties of the drift mirror instability. While the results do not contradict the predicted properties, it is felt that further theoretical development is required.

  2. Properties of sound attenuation around a two-dimensional underwater vehicle with a large cavitation number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Peng-Cheng; Pan, Guang

    2015-06-01

    Due to the high speed of underwater vehicles, cavitation is generated inevitably along with the sound attenuation when the sound signal traverses through the cavity region around the underwater vehicle. The linear wave propagation is studied to obtain the influence of bubbly liquid on the acoustic wave propagation in the cavity region. The sound attenuation coefficient and the sound speed formula of the bubbly liquid are presented. Based on the sound attenuation coefficients with various vapor volume fractions, the attenuation of sound intensity is calculated under large cavitation number conditions. The result shows that the sound intensity attenuation is fairly small in a certain condition. Consequently, the intensity attenuation can be neglected in engineering. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51279165 and 51479170) and the National Defense Basic Scientific Research Program of China (Grant No. B2720133014).

  3. Tail probabilities of extinction time in a large number of experimental populations.

    PubMed

    Drake, John M

    2014-05-01

    Determining the distribution of population extinction times is a fundamental problem in theoretical population biology. In particular, the tail properties, patterns in the probability of long-term persistence, have not been studied. Further, until now there have been no experimental or observational data sets with which to empirically test the "rare event" predictions of the standard stochastic theory of extinction, which holds that extinction times should be exponentially distributed. I performed an experimental study of extinction in a large number of replicate (n = 1076) laboratory populations of the waterflea Daphnia pulicaria. Observed extinction time ranged from 1 to 1239 days. Statistical models supported the hypothesis of a power-law distribution over the exponential distribution and other alternatives. This pattern contradicts the notion that population extinction time has an exponential tail, questioning its ubiquitous use in theoretical ecology. It is also a rare instance of a data set that exhibits power-law scaling under appropriate statistical criteria. PMID:25000743

  4. The Relationship Between the Accumulated Number of Role Transitions and Hard Drug Use Among Hispanic Emerging Adults

    PubMed Central

    Allem, Jon-Patrick; Soto, Daniel; Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Unger, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Emerging adults (ages 18 to 25) who experience multiple role transitions in a short period of time may engage in hard drug use as a maladaptive coping strategy to avoid negative emotions from stress. Given the collectivistic values Hispanics encounter growing up, they may experience additional role transitions due to their group oriented cultural paradigm. This study examined whether those who experience many role transitions are at greater risk for hard drug use compared to those who experience few transitions among Hispanic emerging adults. Participants completed surveys indicating their hard drug use in emerging adulthood, role transitions in the past year of emerging adulthood, age, gender, and hard drug use in high school. Simulation analyses indicated that an increase in the number of role transitions, from 0 to 13, was associated with a 14% (95% CI, 4 to 29) higher probability of hard drug use. Specific role transitions were found to be associated with hard drug use, such as starting to date or experiencing a breakup. Intervention/prevention programs may benefit from acknowledging individual reactions to transitions in emerging adulthood, as these processes may be catalysts for personal growth where identities are consolidated, and decisions regarding hard drug use are formed. PMID:25715073

  5. Large number of endemic equilibria for disease transmission models in patchy environment.

    PubMed

    Knipl, D H; Röst, G

    2014-12-01

    We show that disease transmission models in a spatially heterogeneous environment can have a large number of coexisting endemic equilibria. A general compartmental model is considered to describe the spread of an infectious disease in a population distributed over several patches. For disconnected regions, many boundary equilibria may exist with mixed disease free and endemic components, but these steady states usually disappear in the presence of spatial dispersal. However, if backward bifurcations can occur in the regions, some partially endemic equilibria of the disconnected system move into the interior of the nonnegative cone and persist with the introduction of mobility between the patches. We provide a mathematical procedure that precisely describes in terms of the local reproduction numbers and the connectivity network of the patches, whether a steady state of the disconnected system is preserved or ceases to exist for low volumes of travel. Our results are illustrated on a patchy HIV transmission model with subthreshold endemic equilibria and backward bifurcation. We demonstrate the rich dynamical behavior (i.e., creation and destruction of steady states) and the presence of multiple stable endemic equilibria for various connection networks. PMID:25223233

  6. Conflict of Interest Policies for Organizations Producing a Large Number of Clinical Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Susan L.; Holmer, Haley K.; Burda, Brittany U.; Ogden, Lauren A.; Fu, Rongwei

    2012-01-01

    Background Conflict of interest (COI) of clinical practice guideline (CPG) sponsors and authors is an important potential source of bias in CPG development. The objectives of this study were to describe the COI policies for organizations currently producing a significant number of CPGs, and to determine if these policies meet 2011 Institute of Medicine (IOM) standards. Methodology/Principal Findings We identified organizations with five or more guidelines listed in the National Guideline Clearinghouse between January 1, 2009 and November 5, 2010. We obtained the COI policy for each organization from publicly accessible sources, most often the organization's website, and compared those polices to IOM standards related to COI. 37 organizations fulfilled our inclusion criteria, of which 17 (46%) had a COI policy directly related to CPGs. These COI policies varied widely with respect to types of COI addressed, from whom disclosures were collected, monetary thresholds for disclosure, approaches to management, and updating requirements. Not one organization's policy adhered to all seven of the IOM standards that were examined, and nine organizations did not meet a single one of the standards. Conclusions/Significance COI policies among organizations producing a large number of CPGs currently do not measure up to IOM standards related to COI disclosure and management. CPG developers need to make significant improvements in these policies and their implementation in order to optimize the quality and credibility of their guidelines. PMID:22629391

  7. A New Approach to Reduce Number of Split Fields in Large Field IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chen-Chiao; Wu, Andrew; Garg, Madhur; Mutyala, Subhakar; Kalnicki, Shalom; Sayed, Gary; Mah, Dennis

    2011-04-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) has been applied for treatments of primary head with neck nodes, lung with supraclavicular nodes, and high-risk prostate cancer with pelvis wall nodes, all of which require large fields. However, the design of the Varian multileaf collimator requires fields >14 cm in width to be split into 2 or more carriage movements. With the split-field technique, both the number of monitor units (MUs) and total treatment time are significantly increased. Although many different approaches have been investigated to reduce the MU, including introducing new leaf segmentation algorithms, none have resulted in widespread success. In addition, for most clinics, writing such algorithms is not a feasible solution, particularly with commercial treatment planning systems. We introduce a new approach that can minimize the number of split fields and reduce the total MUs, thereby reducing treatment time. The technique is demonstrated on the Eclipse planning system V7.3, but could be generalized to any other system.

  8. Cosmonumerology, Cosmophysics, and the Large Numbers Hypothesis: British Cosmology in the 1930s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durham, Ian

    2001-04-01

    A number of unorthodox cosmological models were developed in the 1930s, many by British theoreticians. Three of the most notable of these theories included Eddington's cosmonumerology, Milne's cosmophysics, and Dirac's large numbers hypothesis (LNH). Dirac's LNH was based partly on the other two and it has been argued that modern steady-state theories are based partly on Milne's cosmophysics. But what influenced Eddington and Milne? Both were products of the late Victorian education system in Britain and could conceivably have been influenced by Victorian thought which, in addition to its strict (though technically unoffical) social caste system, had a flair for the unusual. Victorianism was filled with a fascination for the occult and the supernatural, and science was not insulated from this trend (witness the Henry Slade trial in 1877). It is conceivable that the normally strict mentality of the scientific process in the minds of Eddington and Milne was affected, indirectly, by this trend for the unusual, possibly pushing them into thinking "outside the box" as it were. In addition, cosmonumerology and the LNH exhibit signs of Pythagorean and Aristotelian thought. It is the aim of this ongoing project at St. Andrews to determine the influences and characterize the relations existing in and within these and related theories.

  9. Bichromatic Cooling used to Achieve a Large Number of Cold Atoms in a Compact Volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cubel Liebisch, Tara; Donley, Elizabeth; Blanshan, Eric; Kitching, John

    2010-03-01

    For cold atomic samples to be used in emerging technologies such as compact atomic clocks and sensors it is necessary to achieve small sample sizes with a large number of cold atoms. This is a challenge because in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) the number of cooled and trapped atoms scales as d^4, where d is the diameter of the laser beams (Gibble et.al.OL17, 526 (1992)). In a MOT the maximum radiation force is limited by spontaneous emission to hkγ/2. Bichromatic cooling first studied by Söding et.al. (PRL78,1420(1997)), takes advantage of stimulated emission and driven Rabi oscillations to cool atoms over a broad velocity range with forces >> hkγ/2. With the faster cooling rates, larger atom numbers can be obtained in very small cooling volumes. We report on preliminary results of cooling a thermal beam down to MOT capture velocities over distances of <1cm, our experimental set up, and theoretical results using our experimental parameters. We expect to be able to load a MOT with 1mm diameter beams with a factor of 100 more atoms than if loaded from a background vapor. With this atom sample we estimate we could achieve a clock stability of 1E-12 @ 1s with a Ramsey time of 4ms, a cycle time of 10ms, and a clock transition frequency of 6.8GHz. [0pt] We would like to acknowledge funding from NIST, DARPA, and NRC.

  10. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Aldo; Meunier, Patrice; Cuevas, Sergio; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, "The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions," J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134-172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors.

  11. Large eddy simulation of the FDA benchmark nozzle for a Reynolds number of 6500.

    PubMed

    Janiga, Gábor

    2014-04-01

    This work investigates the flow in a benchmark nozzle model of an idealized medical device proposed by the FDA using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). It was in particular shown that a proper modeling of the transitional flow features is particularly challenging, leading to large discrepancies and inaccurate predictions from the different research groups using Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) modeling. In spite of the relatively simple, axisymmetric computational geometry, the resulting turbulent flow is fairly complex and non-axisymmetric, in particular due to the sudden expansion. The resulting flow cannot be well predicted with simple modeling approaches. Due to the varying diameters and flow velocities encountered in the nozzle, different typical flow regions and regimes can be distinguished, from laminar to transitional and to weakly turbulent. The purpose of the present work is to re-examine the FDA-CFD benchmark nozzle model at a Reynolds number of 6500 using large eddy simulation (LES). The LES results are compared with published experimental data obtained by Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) and an excellent agreement can be observed considering the temporally averaged flow velocities. Different flow regimes are characterized by computing the temporal energy spectra at different locations along the main axis. PMID:24561349

  12. Two-position IR zoom lens with low f-number and large format

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, James W.; Garner, Michael S.; Freniere, Edward R.; Stern, Ronald D.; Armstrong, Karen L.

    1992-09-01

    We describe the optical, mechanical and servo designs for a motorized, two-FOV (field of view) IR objective lens for use in the 8 - 12 micrometers spectral band. The FOV is changed by moving lenses axially instead of the more traditional approach which is to add and remove lenses. The advantages of this approach include: simple mechanics, since a single mechanism can be used for both adjusting focus and changing FOV; only one lens group need be moved; no stow space is needed for removed lenses; and fewer total lenses are needed (four elements). The lens is used with a low-cost, uncooled focal plane array. This dictates relatively fast F- number, large image format (F/1.1, 7.8 degree(s) narrow FOV, 155-mm narrow-field focal length), and low cost. This combination of wide field and large collecting aperture pose a difficult optical design challenge. The lens meets a range of military environmental requirements including immersion in one meter of water. We describe how the requirements were met. We have fabricated and tested five lenses and we describe the assembly and testing process and present a summary of test results.

  13. Optimum Guidance Law and Information Management for a Large Number of Formation Flying Spacecrafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuda, Yuichi; Nakasuka, Shinichi

    In recent years, formation flying technique is recognized as one of the most important technologies for deep space and orbital missions that involve multiple spacecraft operations. Formation flying mission improves simultaneous observability over a wide area, redundancy and reconfigurability of the system with relatively small and low cost spacecrafts compared with the conventional single spacecraft mission. From the viewpoint of guidance and control, realizing formation flying mission usually requires tight maintenance and control of the relative distances, speeds and orientations between the member satellites. This paper studies a practical architecture for formation flight missions focusing mainly on guidance and control, and describes a new guidance algorithm for changing and keeping the relative positions and speeds of the satellites in formation. The resulting algorithm is suitable for onboard processing and gives the optimum impulsive trajectory for satellites flying closely around a certain reference orbit, that can be elliptic, parabolic or hyperbolic. Based on this guidance algorithm, this study introduces an information management methodology between the member spacecrafts which is suitable for a large formation flight architecture. Routing and multicast communication based on the wireless local area network technology are introduced. Some mathematical analyses and computer simulations will be shown in the presentation to reveal the feasibility of the proposed formation flight architecture, especially when a very large number of satellites join the formation.

  14. Chaotic advection at large Péclet number: Electromagnetically driven experiments, numerical simulations, and theoretical predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Aldo; Meunier, Patrice; Villermaux, Emmanuel; Cuevas, Sergio; Ramos, Eduardo

    2014-01-15

    We present a combination of experiment, theory, and modelling on laminar mixing at large Péclet number. The flow is produced by oscillating electromagnetic forces in a thin electrolytic fluid layer, leading to oscillating dipoles, quadrupoles, octopoles, and disordered flows. The numerical simulations are based on the Diffusive Strip Method (DSM) which was recently introduced (P. Meunier and E. Villermaux, “The diffusive strip method for scalar mixing in two-dimensions,” J. Fluid Mech. 662, 134–172 (2010)) to solve the advection-diffusion problem by combining Lagrangian techniques and theoretical modelling of the diffusion. Numerical simulations obtained with the DSM are in reasonable agreement with quantitative dye visualization experiments of the scalar fields. A theoretical model based on log-normal Probability Density Functions (PDFs) of stretching factors, characteristic of homogeneous turbulence in the Batchelor regime, allows to predict the PDFs of scalar in agreement with numerical and experimental results. This model also indicates that the PDFs of scalar are asymptotically close to log-normal at late stages, except for the large concentration levels which correspond to low stretching factors.

  15. MHC variability supports dog domestication from a large number of wolves: high diversity in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Niskanen, A K; Hagström, E; Lohi, H; Ruokonen, M; Esparza-Salas, R; Aspi, J; Savolainen, P

    2013-01-01

    The process of dog domestication is still somewhat unresolved. Earlier studies indicate that domestic dogs from all over the world have a common origin in Asia. So far, major histocompatibility complex (MHC) diversity has not been studied in detail in Asian dogs, although high levels of genetic diversity are expected at the domestication locality. We sequenced the second exon of the canine MHC gene DLA–DRB1 from 128 Asian dogs and compared our data with a previously published large data set of MHC alleles, mostly from European dogs. Our results show that Asian dogs have a higher MHC diversity than European dogs. We also estimated that there is only a small probability that new alleles have arisen by mutation since domestication. Based on the assumption that all of the currently known 102 DLA–DRB1 alleles come from the founding wolf population, we simulated the number of founding wolf individuals. Our simulations indicate an effective population size of at least 500 founding wolves, suggesting that the founding wolf population was large or that backcrossing has taken place. PMID:23073392

  16. Using large clinical data sets to infer pathogenicity for rare copy number variants in autism cohorts

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-De-Luca, D; Sanders, S J; Willsey, A J; Mulle, J G; Lowe, J K; Geschwind, D H; State, M W; Martin, C L; Ledbetter, D H

    2013-01-01

    Copy number variants (CNVs) have a major role in the etiology of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and several of these have reached statistical significance in case–control analyses. Nevertheless, current ASD cohorts are not large enough to detect very rare CNVs that may be causative or contributory (that is, risk alleles). Here, we use a tiered approach, in which clinically significant CNVs are first identified in large clinical cohorts of neurodevelopmental disorders (including but not specific to ASD), after which these CNVs are then systematically identified within well-characterized ASD cohorts. We focused our initial analysis on 48 recurrent CNVs (segmental duplication-mediated ‘hotspots') from 24 loci in 31 516 published clinical cases with neurodevelopmental disorders and 13 696 published controls, which yielded a total of 19 deletion CNVs and 11 duplication CNVs that reached statistical significance. We then investigated the overlap of these 30 CNVs in a combined sample of 3955 well-characterized ASD cases from three published studies. We identified 73 deleterious recurrent CNVs, including 36 deletions from 11 loci and 37 duplications from seven loci, for a frequency of 1 in 54; had we considered the ASD cohorts alone, only 58 CNVs from eight loci (24 deletions from three loci and 34 duplications from five loci) would have reached statistical significance. In conclusion, until there are sufficiently large ASD research cohorts with enough power to detect very rare causative or contributory CNVs, data from larger clinical cohorts can be used to infer the likely clinical significance of CNVs in ASD. PMID:23044707

  17. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit 2 is essential for storage substance accumulation and subunit interactions in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Yue; You, Xiao-Man; Kong, Fei; Yan, Hai-Gang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Liang; Jin, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xin-Gang; Ma, Jing; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls a rate-limiting step in the starch biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. Here we isolated a shrunken rice mutant w24. Map-based cloning identified OsAGPL2, a large subunit of the cytosolic AGPase in rice endosperm, as the gene responsible for the w24 mutation. In addition to severe inhibition of starch synthesis and significant accumulation of sugar, the w24 endosperm showed obvious defects in compound granule formation and storage protein synthesis. The defect in OsAGPL2 enhanced the expression levels of the AGPase family. Meanwhile, the elevated activities of starch phosphorylase 1 and sucrose synthase in the w24 endosperm might possibly partly account for the residual starch content in the mutant seeds. Moreover, the expression of OsAGPL2 and its counterpart, OsAGPS2b, was highly coordinated in rice endosperm. Yeast two-hybrid and BiFC assays verified direct interactions between OsAGPL2 and OsAGPS2b as well as OsAGPL1 and OsAGPS1, supporting the model for spatiotemporal complex formation of AGPase isoforms in rice endosperm. Besides, our data provided no evidence for the self-binding of OsAGPS2b, implying that OsAGPS2b might not interact to form higher molecular mass aggregates in the absence of OsAGPL2. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of rice AGPase assembly might differ from that of Arabidopsis. PMID:27297991

  18. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  19. HPC-Colony: Services and Interfaces to Aupport Systems With Very Large Numbers of Processors

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T; Kale, L; Moreira, J; Mendes, C; Chakravorty, S; Tauferner, A; Inglett, T

    2007-01-31

    The HPC-Colony Project, a collaboration with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and IBM, is focused on services and interfaces for very large numbers of processors. Advances in parallel systems in the last decade have delivered phenomenal progress in the overall capability available to a single parallel application. Several systems with peak capability of over 100TF are already available and systems are expected to exceed 1PF within a few years. Despite these impressive advances in peak performance capability, the sustained performance of these systems continues to fall as a percentage of the peak capability. Initial analysis suggests that key architectural bottlenecks (in hardware and software) are responsible for the lower sustained performance and some architectural change of direction may be necessary to address the declining sustained performance. In this proposal we focus on addressing software architectural bottlenecks, in the areas of operating system and runtime systems. While the trend towards larger processor counts benefits application developers through more processing power, it also challenges application developers to harness ever-increasing numbers of processors for productive work. Much of the burden falls to operating systems and runtime systems that were originally designed for much smaller processor counts. Under the Colony project, we are researching and developing system software to enable general purpose operating and runtime systems for tens of thousands of processors. Difficulties in achieving a balanced partitioning and dynamically scheduling workloads can limit scaling for complex problems on large machines. Scientific simulations that span components of large machines require common operating system services, such as process scheduling, event notification, and job management to scale to large machines. Today, application programmers must explicitly manage these resources. We address

  20. Generation of Large Numbers of Antigen-Expressing Human Dendritic Cells Using CD14-ML Technology

    PubMed Central

    Imamura, Yuya; Haruta, Miwa; Tomita, Yusuke; Matsumura, Keiko; Ikeda, Tokunori; Yuno, Akira; Hirayama, Masatoshi; Nakayama, Hideki; Mizuta, Hiroshi; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Senju, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported a method to expand human monocytes through lentivirus-mediated introduction of cMYC and BMI1, and we named the monocyte-derived proliferating cells, CD14-ML. CD14-ML differentiated into functional DC (CD14-ML-DC) upon addition of IL-4, resulting in the generation of a large number of DC. One drawback of this method was the extensive donor-dependent variation in proliferation efficiency. In the current study, we found that introduction of BCL2 or LYL1 along with cMYC and BMI1 was beneficial. Using the improved method, we obtained CD14-ML from all samples, regardless of whether the donors were healthy individuals or cancer patients. In vitro stimulation of peripheral blood T cells with CD14-ML-DC that were loaded with cancer antigen-derived peptides led to the establishment of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lines that recognized the peptides. Since CD14-ML was propagated for more than 1 month, we could readily conduct genetic modification experiments. To generate CD14-ML-DC that expressed antigenic proteins, we introduced lentiviral antigen-expression vectors and subjected the cells to 2 weeks of culture for drug-selection and expansion. The resulting antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC successfully induced CD8+ T cell lines that were reactive to CMVpp65 or MART1/MelanA, suggesting an application in vaccination therapy. Thus, this improved method enables the generation of a sufficient number of DC for vaccination therapy from a small amount of peripheral blood from cancer patients. Information on T cell epitopes is not necessary in vaccination with cancer antigen-expressing CD14-ML-DC; therefore, all patients, irrespective of HLA type, will benefit from anti-cancer therapy based on this technology. PMID:27050553

  1. Large-Actuator-Number Horizontal Path Correction of Atmospheric Turbulence utilizing an Interferometric Phase Conjugate Engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K L; Stappaerts, E A; Gavel, D; Tucker, J; Silva, D A; Wilks, S C; Olivier, S S; Olsen, J

    2004-08-25

    An adaptive optical system used to correct horizontal beam propagation paths has been demonstrated. This system utilizes an interferometric wave-front sensor and a large-actuator-number MEMS-based spatial light modulator to correct the aberrations incurred by the beam after propagation along the path. Horizontal path correction presents a severe challenge to adaptive optics systems due to the short atmospheric transverse coherence length and the high degree of scintillation incurred by laser propagation along these paths. Unlike wave-front sensors that detect phase gradients, however, the interferometric wave-front sensor measures the wrapped phase directly. Because the system operates with nearly monochromatic light and uses a segmented spatial light modulator, it does not require that the phase be unwrapped to provide a correction and it also does not require a global reconstruction of the wave-front to determine the phase as required by gradient detecting wave-front sensors. As a result, issues with branch points are eliminated. Because the atmospheric probe beam is mixed with a large amplitude reference beam, it can be made to operate in a photon noise limited regime making its performance relatively unaffected by scintillation. The MEMS-based spatial light modulator in the system contains 1024 pixels and is controlled to speeds in excess of 800 Hz, enabling its use for correction of horizontal path beam propagation. In this article results are shown of both atmospheric characterization with the system and open loop horizontal path correction of a 1.53 micron laser by the system. To date Strehl ratios of greater than 0.5 have been achieved.

  2. Historical changes in the annual number of large floods in North America and Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, G. A.; Whitfield, P. H.; Hannaford, J.; Burn, D. H.; Renard, B.; Stahl, K.; Fleig, A.; Madsen, H.; Mediero, L.; Korhonen, J.; Murphy, C.; Crochet, P.; Wilson, D.

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have analyzed historical changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at a national or regional scale. However, the river basins used have often been influenced by human alterations such as reservoir regulation or urbanization. No known studies have analyzed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year return period) at a continental scale for minimally impacted basins. To fill this research gap, this study analyzed flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges in North America (United States and Canada) and Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Austria, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). RHNs are formally defined networks in several countries that comprise gauging stations with a natural or near-natural flow regime and provide good quality data. Selected RHN-like gauges were included following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status through consultation with local experts. Peak flows with recurrence intervals of 25, 50, and 100 years were estimated using consistent methods for over 1200 study gauges, and peak flows at each gauge that exceeded these flood thresholds in the last 40-100 years were compiled. Continental and regional trends over time in the annual number of large floods, with regions differentiated by type of hydrological regime (pluvial, nival, mixed), are being computed and will be presented at AGU. The unique dataset used for this study is an example of successful international collaboration on hydro-climatic data exchange, which is potentially a step towards establishing RHN or RHN-like networks on a global scale. Analysis of flows from such networks would make a valuable contribution to the understanding of historical global hydrological change and would help inform expected future hydrologic changes.

  3. Technical note: Computing options for genetic evaluation with a large number of genetic markers.

    PubMed

    Tsuruta, S; Misztal, I

    2008-07-01

    Two simulated data sets and one commercial data set were used to evaluate computing options for models in which the effects attributable to QTL were fit as covariables. The simulated data sets included records on 24,000 animals for 10 traits. Data sets 1 and 2 were simulated with low and high correlations among traits, respectively. The model included an overall mean, 160 covariables as effects attributable to QTL, the random animal genetic effect, and the random residual effect. A commercial data set included records on approximately 110,000 animals for 11 growth, reproduction, and other traits. The model included the effects usually fitted for these traits as well as 116 covariables as effects attributable to QTL; models including the number of covariables varied by trait. Initial computing was by the BLUP90IOD program, which applies iterations on data by using a preconditioned conjugate gradient algorithm with a diagonal preconditioner. Modifications included adding block preconditioners for effects attributable to QTL (BQ) and for traits (BT). With the simulated data sets and the original program, one-trait analyses without the covariables took 7 s, whereas the 10-trait analyses with the covariables took 15 min for a data set with low correlations and 1 h 40 m for a data set with high correlations. The BQ improved the convergence rate but increased the computing time. The BT decreased the computing time from 1.5 times (low correlations) to 7 times (high correlation) at a cost of greater memory requirements. For the commercial data and the complete model, computing took 10.3 h with the unmodified program and was reduced to 6 h with BT. Relative changes in computing time and convergence rate with the commercial data set were close to those of the simulated data set, with low correlations among the traits. The BQ decreased the number of rounds by less than expected. Genetic evaluation with a large number of effects attributable to QTL fit as covariables is

  4. Space Situational Awareness of Large Numbers of Payloads From a Single Deployment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segerman, A.; Byers, J.; Emmert, J.; Nicholas, A.

    2014-09-01

    The nearly simultaneous deployment of a large number of payloads from a single vehicle presents a new challenge for space object catalog maintenance and space situational awareness (SSA). Following two cubesat deployments last November, it took five weeks to catalog the resulting 64 orbits. The upcoming Kicksat mission will present an even greater SSA challenge, with its deployment of 128 chip-sized picosats. Although all of these deployments are in short-lived orbits, future deployments will inevitably occur at higher altitudes, with a longer term threat of collision with active spacecraft. With such deployments, individual scientific payload operators require rapid precise knowledge of their satellites' locations. Following the first November launch, the cataloguing did not initially associate a payload with each orbit, leaving this to the satellite operators. For short duration missions, the time required to identify an experiment's specific orbit may easily be a large fraction of the spacecraft's lifetime. For a Kicksat-type deployment, present tracking cannot collect enough observations to catalog each small object. The current approach is to treat the chip cloud as a single catalog object. However, the cloud dissipates into multiple subclouds and, ultimately, tiny groups of untrackable chips. One response to this challenge may be to mandate installation of a transponder on each spacecraft. Directional transponder transmission detections could be used as angle observations for orbit cataloguing. Of course, such an approach would only be employable with cooperative spacecraft. In other cases, a probabilistic association approach may be useful, with the goal being to establish the probability of an element being at a given point in space. This would permit more reliable assessment of the probability of collision of active spacecraft with any cloud element. This paper surveys the cataloguing challenges presented by large scale deployments of small spacecraft

  5. A New Dynamic Accumulator for Batch Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peishun; Wang, Huaxiong; Pieprzyk, Josef

    A dynamic accumulator is an algorithm, which gathers together a large set of elements into a constant-size value such that for a given element accumulated, there is a witness confirming that the element was indeed included into the value, with a property that accumulated elements can be dynamically added and deleted into/from the original set such that the cost of an addition or deletion operation is independent of the number of accumulated elements. Although the first accumulator was presented ten years ago, there is still no standard formal definition of accumulators. In this paper, we generalize formal definitions for accumulators, formulate a security game for dynamic accumulators so-called Chosen Element Attack (CEA), and propose a new dynamic accumulator for batch updates based on the Paillier cryptosystem. Our construction makes a batch of update operations at unit cost. We prove its security under the extended strong RSA (es-RSA) assumption.

  6. An evidential approach to problem solving when a large number of knowledge systems is available

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dekorvin, Andre

    1989-01-01

    Some recent problems are no longer formulated in terms of imprecise facts, missing data or inadequate measuring devices. Instead, questions pertaining to knowledge and information itself arise and can be phrased independently of any particular area of knowledge. The problem considered in the present work is how to model a problem solver that is trying to find the answer to some query. The problem solver has access to a large number of knowledge systems that specialize in diverse features. In this context, feature means an indicator of what the possibilities for the answer are. The knowledge systems should not be accessed more than once, in order to have truly independent sources of information. Moreover, these systems are allowed to run in parallel. Since access might be expensive, it is necessary to construct a management policy for accessing these knowledge systems. To help in the access policy, some control knowledge systems are available. Control knowledge systems have knowledge about the performance parameters status of the knowledge systems. In order to carry out the double goal of estimating what units to access and to answer the given query, diverse pieces of evidence must be fused. The Dempster-Shafer Theory of Evidence is used to pool the knowledge bases.

  7. Dynamic non-equilibrium wall-modeling for large eddy simulation at high Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Soshi; Larsson, Johan

    2013-01-01

    A dynamic non-equilibrium wall-model for large-eddy simulation at arbitrarily high Reynolds numbers is proposed and validated on equilibrium boundary layers and a non-equilibrium shock/boundary-layer interaction problem. The proposed method builds on the prior non-equilibrium wall-models of Balaras et al. [AIAA J. 34, 1111-1119 (1996)], 10.2514/3.13200 and Wang and Moin [Phys. Fluids 14, 2043-2051 (2002)], 10.1063/1.1476668: the failure of these wall-models to accurately predict the skin friction in equilibrium boundary layers is shown and analyzed, and an improved wall-model that solves this issue is proposed. The improvement stems directly from reasoning about how the turbulence length scale changes with wall distance in the inertial sublayer, the grid resolution, and the resolution-characteristics of numerical methods. The proposed model yields accurate resolved turbulence, both in terms of structure and statistics for both the equilibrium and non-equilibrium flows without the use of ad hoc corrections. Crucially, the model accurately predicts the skin friction, something that existing non-equilibrium wall-models fail to do robustly.

  8. Porous capsules with a large number of active sites: nucleation/growth under confined conditions.

    PubMed

    Garai, Somenath; Rubčić, Mirta; Bögge, Hartmut; Gouzerh, Pierre; Müller, Achim

    2015-03-01

    This work deals with the generation of large numbers of active sites and with ensuing nucleation/ growth processes on the inside wall of the cavity of porous nanocapsules of the type (pentagon)12(linker)30≡{(Mo(VI))Mo(VI)5}12{Mo(V)2(ligand)}30. A first example refers to sulfur dioxide capture through displacement of acetate ligands, while the grafted sulfite ligands are able to trap {MoO3H}(+) units thereby forming unusual {(O2SO)3MoO3H}(5-) assemblies. A second example relates to the generation of open coordination sites through release of carbon dioxide upon mild acidification of a carbonate-type capsule. When the reaction is performed in the presence of heptamolybdate ions, MoO4(2-) ions enter the cavity where they bind to the inside wall while forming new types of polyoxomolybdate architectures, thereby extending the molybdenum oxide skeleton of the capsule. Parallels can be drawn with Mo-storage proteins and supported MoO3 catalysts, making the results relevant to molybdenum biochemistry and to catalysis. PMID:25653204

  9. An automated search of O'Connell effect for Large Numbers of Eclipsing Binaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papageorgiou, A.; Kleftogiannis, G.; Christopoulou, P. E.

    2013-09-01

    The O'Connell effect in eclipsing binary systems (unequally high maxima) has stood for many decades as one of the most perplexing challenges in binary studies. So far, this simple asymmetry has not been convincingly explained, but most theories attribute the effect to dynamic phenomena such as migrating star-spots or swirling circumstellar gas and dust. Nevertheless there has been no clear demonstration of a correlation between the assumptions of any one theory and the morphology of physical parameters of binary systems that exhibit O'Connell effect. We have developed an automated program that characterizes the morphology of light curves by depth of both minima, height of both maxima and curvature outside the eclipses. In terms of programming it is being developed in FORTRAN and PYTHON. This project results from realization of two needs, both related to recent discoveries of large number of contact binaries. Thus the first need is of a simple method to obtain essential parameters for these systems, without the necessity of full light-curve synthesis solution. The second is a statistical one: we would like to extract information from light curves with the use of coefficients that describe the asymmetry in the light curve maxima and the overall shape in the growing observational data of eclipsing binaries (OGLE, ASAS, KEPLER, GAIA). Before applying the automated program several complications must be addressed, as eccentricity, quality of data with many outlying points, limitations to the classification method already applied.

  10. Left-right symmetry and lepton number violation at the Large Hadron electron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, Manfred; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.; Rodejohann, Werner; Yaguna, Carlos E.

    2016-06-01

    We show that the proposed Large Hadron electron Collider (LHeC) will provide an opportunity to search for left-right symmetry and establish lepton number violation, complementing current and planned searches based on LHC data and neutrinoless double beta decay. We consider several plausible configurations for the LHeC — including different electron energies and polarizations, as well as distinct values for the charge misidentification rate. Within left-right symmetric theories we determine the values of right-handed neutrino and gauge boson masses that could be tested at the LHeC after one, five and ten years of operation. Our results indicate that this collider might probe, via the Δ L = 2 signal e - p → e + jjj, Majorana neutrino masses up to 1 TeV and W R masses up to ˜ 6 .5 TeV. Interestingly, part of this parameter space is beyond the expected reach of the LHC and of future neutrinoless double beta decay experiments.

  11. Analytical formulas for the performance scaling of quantum processors with a large number of defective gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nam, Y. S.; Blümel, R.

    2015-10-01

    Removing a single logical gate from a classical information processor renders this processor useless. This is not so for a quantum information processor. A large number of quantum gates may be removed without significantly affecting the processor's performance. In this paper, focusing on the quantum Fourier transform (QFT) and quantum adder, we show even more: Even if most of its gates are eliminated and the remaining gates are selected from a randomly generated set, the QFT, one of the most useful quantum processors, and the quantum adder, one of the most basic building blocks of a universal quantum computer, still operate with satisfactory success probability, comparable to that of a quantum computer constructed with perfect gates. We support these conclusions by first laying out a general analytical framework and then deriving analytical scaling relations, which are in excellent agreement with our numerical simulations. The demonstrated robustness of the QFT and quantum adder, to the point where randomly generated quantum gates take the place of the exact gates, is an important boon for the construction of quantum computers, since it shows that stringent gate error tolerances do not have to be met to obtain satisfactory performance of the corresponding quantum processors. Our analytical techniques are powerful enough to generate asymptotic scaling laws for any gate defect model of quantum information processors and we illustrate this point by explicitly computing asymptotic analytical scaling formulas for several other defect models as well.

  12. UGT2B17 copy number gain in a large ankylosing spondylitis multiplex family

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The primary objective of this study is to identify novel copy number variations (CNVs) associated with familial ankylosing spondylitis (AS). A customized genome-wide microarray was designed to detect CNVs and applied to a multiplex AS family with six (6) affected family members. CNVs were detected using the built-in DNA analytics aberration detection method-2 (ADM-2) algorithm. Gene enrichment analysis was performed to observe the segregation. Subsequent validation was performed using real time quantitative fluorescence polymerase reaction (QF-PCR). The frequency of copy number variation for the UGT2B17 gene was then performed on two well-defined AS cohorts. Fisher exact test was performed to quantify the association. Results Our family-based analysis revealed ten gene-enriched CNVs that segregate with all six family members affected with AS. Based on the proposed function and the polymorphic nature of the UGT2B17 gene, the UGT2B17 gene CNV was selected for validation using real time QF-PCR with full concordance. The frequency of two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.41 in the Newfoundland AS cases and 0.35 in the Newfoundland controls (OR = 1.26(0.99-1.59); p < 0.05)), whereas the frequency of two (2) copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV was 0.40 in the Alberta AS cases and 0.39 in the Alberta controls (OR = 1.05(95% CI: 0.83-1.33); p < 0.71)). Conclusions A genome-wide microarray interrogation of a large multiplex AS family revealed segregation of the UGT2B17 gene CNV among all affected family members. The association of the UGT2B17 CNV with AS is particularly interesting given the recent association of this CNV with osteoporosis and the proposed function as it encodes a key enzyme that inhibits androgens. However, two copies of the UGT2B17 gene CNV were only marginally significant in a uniplex AS cohort from Newfoundland but not in a uniplex AS cohort from Alberta. PMID:23927372

  13. Large-scale fluctuations in the number density of galaxies in independent surveys of deep fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirokov, S. I.; Lovyagin, N. Yu.; Baryshev, Yu. V.; Gorokhov, V. L.

    2016-06-01

    New arguments supporting the reality of large-scale fluctuations in the density of the visible matter in deep galaxy surveys are presented. A statistical analysis of the radial distributions of galaxies in the COSMOS and HDF-N deep fields is presented. Independent spectral and photometric surveys exist for each field, carried out in different wavelength ranges and using different observing methods. Catalogs of photometric redshifts in the optical (COSMOS-Zphot) and infrared (UltraVISTA) were used for the COSMOS field in the redshift interval 0.1 < z < 3.5, as well as the zCOSMOS (10kZ) spectroscopic survey and the XMM-COSMOS and ALHAMBRA-F4 photometric redshift surveys. The HDFN-Zphot and ALHAMBRA-F5 catalogs of photometric redshifts were used for the HDF-N field. The Pearson correlation coefficient for the fluctuations in the numbers of galaxies obtained for independent surveys of the same deep field reaches R = 0.70 ± 0.16. The presence of this positive correlation supports the reality of fluctuations in the density of visible matter with sizes of up to 1000 Mpc and amplitudes of up to 20% at redshifts z ~ 2. The absence of correlations between the fluctuations in different fields (the correlation coefficient between COSMOS and HDF-N is R = -0.20 ± 0.31) testifies to the independence of structures visible in different directions on the celestial sphere. This also indicates an absence of any influence from universal systematic errors (such as "spectral voids"), which could imitate the detection of correlated structures.

  14. Investigating the evolution of Shared Socioeconomic Pathways with a large number of scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweizer, V. J.; Guivarch, C.; Rozenberg, J.

    2013-12-01

    The new scenario framework for climate change research includes alternative possible trends for socioeconomic development called Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). The SSPs bear some similarities to other scenarios used for global change research, but they also have important differences. Like the IPCC Special Report on Emissions Scenarios or the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment, SSPs are defined by a scenario logic consisting of two axes. However, these axes define SSPs with respect to their location in an outcome space for challenges to mitigation and to adaptation rather than by their drivers. Open questions for the SSPs include what their drivers are and how the time dimension could be interpreted with the outcomes space. We present a new analytical approach for addressing both questions by studying large numbers of scenarios produced by an integrated assessment model, IMACLIM-R. We systematically generated 432 scenarios and used the SSP framework to classify them by typology. We then analyzed them dynamically, tracing their evolution through the SSP challenges space at annual time steps over the period 2010-2090. Through this approach, we found that many scenarios do not remain fixed to a particular SSP domain; they drift from one domain to another. In papers describing the framework for new scenarios, SSPs are envisioned as hypothetical (counter-factual) reference scenarios that remain fixed in one domain over some time period of interest. However, we conclude that it may be important to also research scenarios that shift across SSP domains. This is relevant for another open question, which is what scenarios are important to explore given their consequences. Through a data mining technique, we uncovered prominent drivers for scenarios that shift across SSP domains. Scenarios with different challenges for adaptation and mitigation (that is, mitigation and adaptation challenges that are not co-varying) were found to be the least stable, and the following

  15. Nonclassical light from a large number of independent single-photon emitters

    PubMed Central

    Lachman, Lukáš; Slodička, Lukáš; Filip, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical quantum effects gradually reach domains of physics of large systems previously considered as purely classical. We derive a hierarchy of operational criteria suitable for a reliable detection of nonclassicality of light from an arbitrarily large ensemble of independent single-photon emitters. We show, that such large ensemble can always emit nonclassical light without any phase reference and under realistic experimental conditions including incoherent background noise. The nonclassical light from the large ensemble of the emitters can be witnessed much better than light coming from a single or a few emitters. PMID:26813774

  16. Nonclassical light from a large number of independent single-photon emitters.

    PubMed

    Lachman, Lukáš; Slodička, Lukáš; Filip, Radim

    2016-01-01

    Nonclassical quantum effects gradually reach domains of physics of large systems previously considered as purely classical. We derive a hierarchy of operational criteria suitable for a reliable detection of nonclassicality of light from an arbitrarily large ensemble of independent single-photon emitters. We show, that such large ensemble can always emit nonclassical light without any phase reference and under realistic experimental conditions including incoherent background noise. The nonclassical light from the large ensemble of the emitters can be witnessed much better than light coming from a single or a few emitters. PMID:26813774

  17. Cognitive and structural neuroimaging characteristics of schizophrenia patients with large, rare copy number deletions.

    PubMed

    Kenneth Martin, Andrew; Robinson, Gail; Reutens, David; Mowry, Bryan

    2014-12-30

    Large (>500 Kb), rare (frequency <1%) deletions are associated with risk for schizophrenia. The aim of the study was to characterise patients with these deletions using measures of cognition, grey-matter volume and white-matter integrity. Patients with schizophrenia and large, rare deletions (SZ-del) (n=17) were assessed on a test of intelligence, the Wechsler Abbreviated Scale of Intelligence (WASI), and compared with age- and sex-matched schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions (SZ-nodel) (n=65), and healthy controls (HCs) (n=50). Regional grey-matter differences were investigated using voxel-based morphometry (SZ-del=9; SZ-nodel=26; HC=19). White-matter integrity was assessed using fractional anisotropy (SZ-del=9; SZ-nodel=24; HC=15). Compared with schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions, those with large, rare deletions had lower IQ; greater grey-matter volume in clusters with peaks in the left and right cerebellum, left hippocampus, and right rectal gyrus; and increased white-matter anisotropy in the body and genu of the corpus callosum. Compared with healthy controls, patients with large, rare deletions had reduced grey matter volume in the right calcarine gyrus. In sum, patients with large, rare deletions had structural profiles intermediate to those observed in healthy controls and schizophrenia patients without large, rare deletions, but had greater impairment in intelligence. PMID:25453991

  18. Investigation of the Turbulent Bursting Period over a Very Large Reynolds Number Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arce-Larreta, Enrique; Metzger, Meredith

    2008-11-01

    The present study examines Reynolds number scaling of the average bursting period, Tb, over a Reynolds number range spanning three orders of magnitude, using hot-wire anemometry measurements from combined wind tunnel and field experiments. Wind tunnel data were obtained from the study of Klewicki and Falco (1990) at Reynolds numbers based on momentum thickness of Reθ=1010, 2870, 4850; while the field data were acquired at the Surface Layer Turbulence and Environmental Test (SLTEST) facility at Reθ=5x10^6. Ejection events were detected from streamwise velocity time series using the U-Level algorithm of Lu and Wilmarth (1973). Events appearing in close succession were grouped into multiple event bursts using a statistical iterative approach based on pattern clustering. Four different Reynolds number scalings of Tb were investigated, namely: inner, outer, mixed, and intermediate. Data reveal that, of these four types of scalings, the Taylor microscale performs the best in removing Reynolds number dependencies in Tb. In addition, the present data reveal that outer scaled values of Tb decrease by two orders of magnitude over the range of Reynolds numbers; while inner scaled values of Tb increase by one order of magnitude.

  19. Experimental study of cold plume instability in large Prandtl number Czochralski melt: Parametric dependences and scaling laws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miroshnichenko, E.; Kit, E.; Gelfgat, A. Yu.

    2016-03-01

    A parametric experimental study of the cold plume instability that appears in the large-Prandtl-number Czochralski melt flows is reported. The critical temperature difference (the critical Grashof number) and the frequency of appearing oscillations were measured for varying Prandtl numbers, aspect ratios of the melt, and crystal/crucible radii ratio. The measurements were carried out by two independent and fully non-intrusive experimental techniques. The results are reported as dimensional and dimensionless parametric dependences, and then are joined into relatively simple empirical relations showing how the critical Grashof number and the frequency of emerging oscillations depend on other parameters.

  20. Comparison of jet Mach number decay data with a correlation and jet spreading contours for a large variety of nozzles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Groesbeck, D. E.; Huff, R. G.; Vonglahn, U. H.

    1977-01-01

    Small-scale circular, noncircular, single- and multi-element nozzles with flow areas as large as 122 sq cm were tested with cold airflow at exit Mach numbers from 0.28 to 1.15. The effects of multi-element nozzle shape and element spacing on jet Mach number decay were studied in an effort to reduce the noise caused by jet impingement on externally blown flap (EBF) STOL aircraft. The jet Mach number decay data are well represented by empirical relations. Jet spreading and Mach number decay contours are presented for all configurations tested.

  1. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  2. Practical quantum metrology with large precision gains in the low-photon-number regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knott, P. A.; Proctor, T. J.; Hayes, A. J.; Cooling, J. P.; Dunningham, J. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantum metrology exploits quantum correlations to make precise measurements with limited particle numbers. By utilizing inter- and intramode correlations in an optical interferometer, we find a state that combines entanglement and squeezing to give a sevenfold enhancement in the quantum Fisher information (QFI)—a metric related to the precision—over the shot-noise limit, for low photon numbers. Motivated by practicality we then look at the squeezed cat state, which has recently been made experimentally, and shows further precision gains over the shot-noise limit and a threefold improvement in the QFI over the optimal Gaussian state. We present a conceptually simple measurement scheme that saturates the QFI, and we demonstrate a robustness to loss for small photon numbers. The squeezed cat state can therefore give a significant precision enhancement in optical quantum metrology in practical and realistic conditions.

  3. Accumulation of microcystins in a dominant Chironomid Larvae (Tanypus chinensis) of a large, shallow and eutrophic Chinese lake, Lake Taihu

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Steinman, Alan D.; Cai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Yanyan; Xie, Liqiang

    2016-08-01

    Although there have been numerous studies on microcystin (MC) accumulation in aquatic organisms recently, the bioaccumulation of MCs in relatively small sized organisms, as well as potential influencing factors, has been rarely studied. Thus, in this study, we investigated the bioaccumulation of three MC congeners (-LR, -RR and -YR) in the chironomid larvae of Tanypus chinensis (an excellent food source for certain fishes), the potential sources of these MCs, and potentially relevant environmental parameters over the course of one year in Lake Taihu, China. MC concentrations in T. chinensis varied temporally with highest concentrations during the warmest months (except August 2013) and very low concentrations during the remaining months. Among the three potential MC sources, only intracellular MCs were significantly and positively correlated with MCs in T. chinensis. Although MC concentrations in T. chinensis significantly correlated with a series of physicochemical parameters of water column, cyanobacteria species explained the most variability of MC accumulation, with the rest primarily explained by extraMC-LR. These results indicated that ingestion of MC-producing algae of cyanobacteria accounted for most of the MC that accumulated in T. chinensis. The high MC concentrations in T. chinensis may pose a potential health threat to humans through trophic transfer.

  4. Accumulation of microcystins in a dominant Chironomid Larvae (Tanypus chinensis) of a large, shallow and eutrophic Chinese lake, Lake Taihu.

    PubMed

    Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Steinman, Alan D; Cai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Yanyan; Xie, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies on microcystin (MC) accumulation in aquatic organisms recently, the bioaccumulation of MCs in relatively small sized organisms, as well as potential influencing factors, has been rarely studied. Thus, in this study, we investigated the bioaccumulation of three MC congeners (-LR, -RR and -YR) in the chironomid larvae of Tanypus chinensis (an excellent food source for certain fishes), the potential sources of these MCs, and potentially relevant environmental parameters over the course of one year in Lake Taihu, China. MC concentrations in T. chinensis varied temporally with highest concentrations during the warmest months (except August 2013) and very low concentrations during the remaining months. Among the three potential MC sources, only intracellular MCs were significantly and positively correlated with MCs in T. chinensis. Although MC concentrations in T. chinensis significantly correlated with a series of physicochemical parameters of water column, cyanobacteria species explained the most variability of MC accumulation, with the rest primarily explained by extraMC-LR. These results indicated that ingestion of MC-producing algae of cyanobacteria accounted for most of the MC that accumulated in T. chinensis. The high MC concentrations in T. chinensis may pose a potential health threat to humans through trophic transfer. PMID:27499175

  5. Accumulation of microcystins in a dominant Chironomid Larvae (Tanypus chinensis) of a large, shallow and eutrophic Chinese lake, Lake Taihu

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Qingju; Su, Xiaomei; Steinman, Alan D.; Cai, Yongjiu; Zhao, Yanyan; Xie, Liqiang

    2016-01-01

    Although there have been numerous studies on microcystin (MC) accumulation in aquatic organisms recently, the bioaccumulation of MCs in relatively small sized organisms, as well as potential influencing factors, has been rarely studied. Thus, in this study, we investigated the bioaccumulation of three MC congeners (-LR, -RR and -YR) in the chironomid larvae of Tanypus chinensis (an excellent food source for certain fishes), the potential sources of these MCs, and potentially relevant environmental parameters over the course of one year in Lake Taihu, China. MC concentrations in T. chinensis varied temporally with highest concentrations during the warmest months (except August 2013) and very low concentrations during the remaining months. Among the three potential MC sources, only intracellular MCs were significantly and positively correlated with MCs in T. chinensis. Although MC concentrations in T. chinensis significantly correlated with a series of physicochemical parameters of water column, cyanobacteria species explained the most variability of MC accumulation, with the rest primarily explained by extraMC-LR. These results indicated that ingestion of MC-producing algae of cyanobacteria accounted for most of the MC that accumulated in T. chinensis. The high MC concentrations in T. chinensis may pose a potential health threat to humans through trophic transfer. PMID:27499175

  6. Large-Chern-number quantum anomalous Hall effect in thin-film topological crystalline insulators.

    PubMed

    Fang, Chen; Gilbert, Matthew J; Bernevig, B Andrei

    2014-01-31

    We theoretically predict that thin-film topological crystalline insulators can host various quantum anomalous Hall phases when doped by ferromagnetically ordered dopants. Any Chern number between ±4 can, in principle, be reached as a result of the interplay between (a) the induced Zeeman field, depending on the magnetic doping concentration, (b) the structural distortion, either intrinsic or induced by a piezoelectric material through the proximity effect, and (c) the thickness of the thin film. We propose a heterostructure to realize quantum anomalous Hall phases with Chern numbers that can be tuned by electric fields. PMID:24580476

  7. Distance graphs having large chromatic numbers and containing no cliques or cycles of a given size

    SciTech Connect

    Demekhin, Evgenii E; Raigorodskii, Andrei M; Rubanov, Oleg I

    2013-04-30

    It is established that there exist sequences of distance graphs G{sub n} subset of R{sup n}, with chromatic numbers which grow exponentially, but, at the same time, without cliques or cycles of a given size. Bibliography: 42 titles.

  8. A Treatment of Computational Precision, Number Representation, and Large Integers in an Introductory Fortran Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, William H., Jr.

    2006-01-01

    Computational precision is sometimes given short shrift in a first programming course. Treating this topic requires discussing integer and floating-point number representations and inaccuracies that may result from their use. An example of a moderately simple programming problem from elementary statistics was examined. It forced students to…

  9. Accelerated Modular Multiplication Algorithm of Large Word Length Numbers with a Fixed Module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardis, Nikolaos; Drigas, Athanasios; Markovskyy, Alexander; Vrettaros, John

    A new algorithm is proposed for the software implementation of modular multiplication, which uses pre-computations with a constant module. The developed modular multiplication algorithm provides high performance in comparison with the already known algorithms, and is oriented at the variable value of the module, especially with the software implementation on micro controllers and smart cards with a small number of bits.

  10. Characteristics of Turbulent Flow Past Passive Rectangular Cavity at Large Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ezhil Kumar, Perumal Kumaresan; Mishra, Debi Prasad

    2016-06-01

    In the present investigation, turbulent flow past passive rectangular cavity is investigated numerically for four mainstream Reynolds numbers namely Re ms = 20,000-50,000. Validation study reveals that the numerical models used in the present investigation predicts the data close to the existing experimental results. Further attempts are made to bring out the flow structure in terms of velocity profile, velocity gradients, shear layer growth rate, and turbulence characteristics. Numerical results are analyzed to bring out the variation in the velocity profile at different axial locations within the cavity. Also, the velocity gradient, turbulence level at the shear layer and the reverse flow velocity in the cavity are found to be sensitive to the mainstream Reynolds number. Finally, the cavity drag is estimated and its relation to the pressure drop across the cavity is brought out. These results reveal the nature of interaction between the passive cavity flow and mainstream flow.

  11. A comment on "bats killed in large numbers at United States wind energy facilities"

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huso, Manuela M.P.; Dalthorp, Dan

    2014-01-01

    Widespread reports of bat fatalities caused by wind turbines have raised concerns about the impacts of wind power development. Reliable estimates of the total number killed and the potential effects on populations are needed, but it is crucial that they be based on sound data. In a recent BioScience article, Hayes (2013) estimated that over 600,000 bats were killed at wind turbines in the United States in 2012. The scientific errors in the analysis are numerous, with the two most serious being that the included sites constituted a convenience sample, not a representative sample, and that the individual site estimates are derived from such different methodologies that they are inherently not comparable. This estimate is almost certainly inaccurate, but whether the actual number is much smaller, much larger, or about the same is uncertain. An accurate estimate of total bat fatality is not currently possible, given the shortcomings of the available data.

  12. Production of large numbers of size-controlled tumor spheroids using microwell plates.

    PubMed

    Razian, Golsa; Yu, Yang; Ungrin, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Tumor spheroids are increasingly recognized as an important in vitro model for the behavior of tumor cells in three dimensions. More physiologically relevant than conventional adherent-sheet cultures, they more accurately recapitulate the complexity and interactions present in real tumors. In order to harness this model to better assess tumor biology, or the efficacy of novel therapeutic agents, it is necessary to be able to generate spheroids reproducibly, in a controlled manner and in significant numbers. The AggreWell system consists of a high-density array of pyramid-shaped microwells, into which a suspension of single cells is centrifuged. The numbers of cells clustering at the bottom of each microwell, and the number and ratio of distinct cell types involved depend only on the properties of the suspension introduced by the experimenter. Thus, we are able to generate tumor spheroids of arbitrary size and composition without needing to modify the underlying platform technology. The hundreds of microwells per square centimeter of culture surface area in turn ensure that extremely high production levels may be attained via a straightforward, nonlabor-intensive process. We therefore expect that this protocol will be broadly useful to researchers in the tumor spheroid field. PMID:24300192

  13. Sequencing-based large-scale genomics approaches with small numbers of isolated maize meiocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dukowic-Schulze, Stefanie; Sundararajan, Anitha; Ramaraj, Thiruvarangan; Mudge, Joann; Chen, Changbin

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing has become the large-scale approach of choice to study global gene expression and the distribution of specific chromatin marks and features. However, the limited availability of large amounts of purified cells made it very challenging to apply sequencing-based techniques in plant meiosis research in the past. In this paper, we describe a method to isolate meiocytes from maize anthers and detailed protocols to successfully perform RNA-seq, smRNA-seq, H3K4me3-ChIP-seq, and DNA bisulfite conversion sequencing with 5000–30,000 isolated maize male meiotic cells. These methods can be adjusted for other flowering plant species as well. PMID:24611068

  14. Optimized arrays for 2-D resistivity survey lines with a large number of electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, M. H.; Wilkinson, P. B.; Chambers, J. E.; Uhlemann, S. S.; Sorensen, J. P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies show that optimized arrays generated using the 'Compare R' method have significantly better resolution than conventional arrays. This method determines the optimum set of arrays by selecting those that give the maximum model resolution. The number of possible arrays (the comprehensive data set) increases with the fourth power of the number of electrodes. The optimization method faces practical limitations for 2-D survey lines with more than 60 electrodes where the number of possible arrays exceeds a million. Several techniques are proposed to reduce the calculation time for such survey lines. A single-precision version of the 'Compare R' algorithm using a new ranking function reduces the calculation time by two to eight times while providing results similar to the double-precision version. Recent improvements in computer GPU technology can reduce the calculation time by about seven times. The calculation time is reduced by half by using the fact that arrays that are symmetrical about the center of the line produce identical changes in the model resolution values. It is further reduced by more than thirty times by calculating the Sherman-Morrison update for all the possible two-electrode combinations, which are then used to calculate the model resolution values for the four-electrode arrays. The calculation time is reduced by more then ten times by using a subset of the comprehensive data set consisting of only symmetrical arrays. Tests with a synthetic model and field data set show that optimized arrays derived from this subset produce inversion models with differences of less than 10% from those derived using the full comprehensive data set. The optimized data sets produced models that are more accurate than the Wenner-Schlumberger array data sets in all the tests.

  15. Large-Eddy Simulation of Conductive Flows at Low Magnetic Reynolds Number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knaepen, B.; Moin, P.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we study the LES method with dynamic procedure in the context of conductive flows subject to an applied external magnetic field at low magnetic Reynolds number R(sub m). These kind of flows are encountered in many industrial applications. For example, in the steel industry, applied magnetic fields can be used to damp turbulence in the casting process. In nuclear fusion devices (Tokamaks), liquid-lithium flows are used as coolant blankets and interact with the surrounding magnetic field that drives and confines the fusion plasma. Also, in experimental facilities investigating the dynamo effect, the flow consists of liquid-sodium for which the Prandtl number and, as a consequence, the magnetic Reynolds number is low. Our attention is focused here on the case of homogeneous (initially isotropic) decaying turbulence. The numerical simulations performed mimic the thought experiment described in Moffatt in which an initially homogeneous isotropic conductive flow is suddenly subjected to an applied magnetic field and freely decays without any forcing. Note that this flow was first studied numerically by Schumann. It is well known that in that case, extra damping of turbulence occurs due to the Joule effect and that the flow tends to become progressively independent of the coordinate along the direction of the magnetic field. Our comparison of filtered direct numerical simulation (DNS) predictions and LES predictions show that the dynamic Smagorinsky model enables one to capture successfully the flow with LES, and that it automatically incorporates the effect of the magnetic field on the turbulence. Our paper is organized as follows. In the next section we summarize the LES approach in the case of MHD turbulence at low R(sub m) and recall the definition of the dynamic Smagorinsky model. In Sec. 3 we describe the parameters of the numerical experiments performed and the code used. Section 4 is devoted to the comparison of filtered DNS results and LES results

  16. Laboratory Study of Magnetorotational Instability and Hydrodynamic Stability at Large Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ji, H.; Burin, M.; Schartman, E.; Goodman, J.; Liu, W.

    2006-01-01

    Two plausible mechanisms have been proposed to explain rapid angular momentum transport during accretion processes in astrophysical disks: nonlinear hydrodynamic instabilities and magnetorotational instability (MRI). A laboratory experiment in a short Taylor-Couette flow geometry has been constructed in Princeton to study both mechanisms, with novel features for better controls of the boundary-driven secondary flows (Ekman circulation). Initial results on hydrodynamic stability have shown negligible angular momentum transport in Keplerian-like flows with Reynolds numbers approaching one million, casting strong doubt on the viability of nonlinear hydrodynamic instability as a source for accretion disk turbulence.

  17. Experimental Investigation of Free-Convection Heat Transfer in Vertical Tube at Large Grashof Numbers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1955-01-01

    Report presents the results of an investigation conducted to study free-convection heat transfer in a stationary vertical tube closed at the bottom. The walls of the tube were heated, and heated air in the tube was continuously replaced by fresh cool air at the top. The tube was designed to provide a gravitational field with Grashof numbers of a magnitude comparable with those generated by the centrifugal field in rotating-blade coolant passages (10(8) to 10(13)). Local heat-transfer coefficients in the turbulent-flow range and the temperature field within the fluid were obtained.

  18. Using addition to solve large subtractions in the number domain up to 20.

    PubMed

    Peters, Greet; De Smedt, Bert; Torbeyns, Joke; Ghesquière, Pol; Verschaffel, Lieven

    2010-02-01

    This study examined 25 university students' use of addition to solve large single-digit subtractions by contrasting performance in the standard subtraction format (12-9=.) and in the addition format (9+.=12). In particular, we investigated the effect of the relative size of the subtrahend on performance in both formats. We found a significant interaction between format, the magnitude of the subtrahend (S) compared to the difference (D) (S>D vs. Slarge single-digit subtractions, but select either addition-based or subtraction-based strategies depending on the relative size of the subtrahend. PMID:19963199

  19. Large Eddy Simulation of Airfoil Self-Noise at High Reynolds Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocheemoolayil, Joseph; Lele, Sanjiva

    2015-11-01

    The trailing edge noise section (Category 1) of the Benchmark Problems for Airframe Noise Computations (BANC) workshop features five canonical problems. No first-principles based approach free of empiricism and tunable coefficients has successfully predicted trailing edge noise for the five configurations to date. Our simulations predict trailing edge noise accurately for all five configurations. The simulation database is described in detail, highlighting efforts undertaken to validate the results through systematic comparison with dedicated experiments and establish insensitivity to grid resolution, domain size, alleatory uncertainties such as the tripping mechanism used to force transition to turbulence and epistemic uncertainties such as models for unresolved near-wall turbulence. Ongoing efforts to extend the predictive capability to non-canonical configurations featuring flow separation are summarized. A novel, large-span calculation that predicts the flow past a wind turbine airfoil in deep stall with unprecedented accuracy is presented. The simulations predict airfoil noise in the near-stall regime accurately. While the post-stall noise predictions leave room for improvement, significant uncertainties in the experiment might preclude a fair comparison in this regime. We thank Cascade Technologies Inc. for providing access to the CharLES toolkit - a massively-parallel, unstructured large eddy simulation framework.

  20. Ecological specialization and rarity indices estimated for a large number of plant species in France

    PubMed Central

    Mobaied, Samira; Machon, Nathalie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    The biological diversity of the Earth is being rapidly depleted due to the direct and indirect consequences of human activities. Specialist or rare species are generally thought to be more extinction prone than generalist or common species. Testing this assumption however requires that the rarity and ecological specialization of the species are quantified. Many indices have been developed to classify species as generalists vs. specialists or as rare vs. common, but large data sets are needed to calculate these indices. Here, we present a list of specialization and rarity values for more than 2800 plant species of continental France, which were computed from the large botanical and ecological dataset SOPHY. Three specialization indices were calculated using species co-occurrence data. All three indices are based on (dis)similarity among plant communities containing a focal species, quantified either as beta diversity in an additive (Fridley et al., 2007 [6]) or multiplicative (Zeleny, 2008 [15]) partitioning of diversity or as the multiple site similarity of Baselga et al. (2007) [1]. Species rarity was calculated as the inverse of a species occurrence. PMID:26217738

  1. Electrically driving large magnetic Reynolds number flows on the Madison plasma dynamo experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David; Wallace, John; Peterson, Ethan; Endrezzi, Douglass; Forest, Cary B.; Desangles, Victor

    2015-11-01

    Electrically-driven plasma flows, predicted to excite a large-scale dynamo instability, have been generated in the Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX), at the Wisconsin Plasma Astrophysics Laboratory. Numerical simulations show that certain topologies of these simply-connected flows may be optimal for creating a plasma dynamo and predict critical thresholds as low as Rmcrit =μ0 σLV = 250 . MPDX plasmas are shown to exceed this critical Rm , generating large (L = 1 . 4 m), warm (Te > 10 eV), unmagnetized (MA > 1) plasmas where Rm < 600 . Plasma flow is driven using ten thermally emissive LaB6 cathodes which generate a J × B torque in Helium plasmas. Detailed Mach probe measurements of plasma velocity for two flow topologies will be presented: edge-localized drive using the multi-cusp boundary field, and volumetric drive using an axial Helmholtz field. Radial velocity profiles show that edge-driven flow is established via ion viscosity but is limited by a volumetric neutral drag force (χ ~ 1 / (ντin)), and measurements of velocity shear compare favorably to Braginskii transport theory. Volumetric flow drive is shown to produce stronger velocity shear, and is characterized by the radial potential gradient as determined by global charge balance.

  2. Large numbers of genetic variants considered to be pathogenic are common in asymptomatic individuals

    PubMed Central

    Cassa, Christopher A.; Tong, Mark Y.; Jordan, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    It is now affordable to order clinically interpreted whole genome sequence reports from clinical laboratories. One major component of these reports is derived from the knowledge base of previously identified pathogenic variants, including research articles, locus specific and other databases. While over 150,000 such pathogenic variants have been identified, many of these were originally discovered in small cohort studies of affected individuals, so their applicability to asymptomatic populations is unclear. We analyzed the prevalence of a large set of pathogenic variants from the medical and scientific literature in a large set of asymptomatic individuals (N=1,092) and found 8.5% of these pathogenic variants in at least one individual. In the average individual in the 1000 Genomes Project, previously identified pathogenic variants occur on average 294 times (σ= 25.5) in homozygous form and 942 times (σ = 68.2) in heterozygous form. We also find that many of these pathogenic variants are frequently occurring: there are 3,744 variants with MAF >= 0.01 (4.6%) and 2,837 variants with MAF >= 0.05 (3.5%). This indicates that many of these variants may be erroneous findings or have lower penetrance than previously expected. PMID:23818451

  3. Double large field stereoscopic PIV in a high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coudert, S.; Foucaut, J. M.; Kostas, J.; Stanislas, M.; Braud, P.; Fourment, C.; Delville, J.; Tutkun, M.; Mehdi, F.; Johansson, P.; George, W. K.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment on a flat plate turbulent boundary layer at high Reynolds number has been carried out in the Laboratoire de Mecanique de Lille (LML, UMR CNRS 8107) wind tunnel. This experiment was performed jointly with LEA (UMR CNRS 6609) in Poitiers (France) and Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden), in the frame of the WALLTURB European project. The simultaneous recording of 143 hot wires in one transverse plane and of two perpendicular stereoscopic PIV fields was performed successfully. The first SPIV plane is 1 cm upstream of the hot wire rake and the second is both orthogonal to the first one and to the wall. The first PIV results show a blockage effect which based on both statistical results (i.e. mean, RMS and spatial correlation) and a potential model does not seem to affect the turbulence organization.

  4. Exploring the feasibility of using copy number variants as genetic markers through large-scale whole genome sequencing experiments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Copy number variants (CNV) are large scale duplications or deletions of genomic sequence that are caused by a diverse set of molecular phenomena that are distinct from single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) formation. Due to their different mechanisms of formation, CNVs are often difficult to track us...

  5. [A Large Number of Circulating Tumor Cells(CTCs)Can Be Isolated from Samples Obtained by Using Leukapheresis Procedures].

    PubMed

    Soya, Ryoko; Taguchi, Jyunichi; Nagakawa, Yuichi; Takahashi, Osamu; Sandoh, Norimasa; Hosokawa, Yuichi; Kasuya, Kazuhiko; Umeda, Naoki; Okamoto, Masato; Tsujitani, Shunichi; Tsuchida, Akihiko

    2015-09-01

    We hypothesized that a large number of circulating tumor cells(CTCs)may be isolated from samples obtained by using the leukapheresis procedures that are utilized to collect peripheral blood mononuclear cells for dendritic cell vaccine therapy. We utilized the CellSearch System to determine the number of CTCs in samples obtained by using leukapheresis in 7 patients with colorectal cancer, 5 patients with breast cancer, and 3 patients with gastric cancer. In all patients, a large number of CTCs were isolated. The mean number of CTCs per tumor was 17.1(range 10-34)in colorectal cancer, 10.0(range 2-27)in breast cancer, and 24.0(range 2-42)in gastric cancer. We succeeded in culturing the isolated CTCs from 7 patients with colorectal cancer, 5 patients with breast cancer, and 3 patients with gastric cancer. In conclusion, compared to conventional methods, a large number of CTCs can be obtained by using leukapheresis procedures. The molecular analyses of the CTCs isolated by using this method should be promising in the development of personalized cancer treatments. PMID:26469161

  6. Unexpectedly large number of conserved noncoding regions within the ancestral chordate Hox cluster.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Anaya, Juan; D'Aniello, Salvatore; Garcia-Fernàndez, Jordi

    2008-12-01

    The single amphioxus Hox cluster contains 15 genes and may well resemble the ancestral chordate Hox cluster. We have sequenced the Hox genomic complement of the European amphioxus Branchiostoma lanceolatum and compared it to the American species, Branchiostoma floridae, by phylogenetic footprinting to gain insights into the evolution of Hox gene regulation in chordates. We found that Hox intergenic regions are largely conserved between the two amphioxus species, especially in the case of genes located at the 3' of the cluster, a trend previously observed in vertebrates. We further compared the amphioxus Hox cluster with the human HoxA, HoxB, HoxC, and HoxD clusters, finding several conserved noncoding regions, both in intergenic and intronic regions. This suggests that the regulation of Hox genes is highly conserved across chordates, consistent with the similar Hox expression patterns in vertebrates and amphioxus. PMID:18791732

  7. Large change in the predicted number of small halos due to a small amplitude oscillating inflaton potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Luiz Felippe S.; Opher, Reuven

    2010-07-01

    A smooth inflaton potential is generally assumed when calculating the primordial power spectrum, implicitly assuming that a very small oscillation in the inflaton potential creates a negligible change in the predicted halo mass function. We show that this is not true. We find that a small oscillating perturbation in the inflaton potential in the slow-roll regime can alter significantly the predicted number of small halos. A class of models derived from supergravity theories gives rise to inflaton potentials with a large number of steps and many trans-Planckian effects may generate oscillations in the primordial power spectrum. The potentials we study are the simple quadratic (chaotic inflation) potential with superimposed small oscillations for small field values. Without leaving the slow-roll regime, we find that for a wide choice of parameters, the predicted number of halos change appreciably. For the oscillations beginning in the 107-108M⊙ range, for example, we find that only a 5% change in the amplitude of the chaotic potential causes a 50% suppression of the number of halos for masses between 107-108M⊙ and an increase in the number of halos for masses <106M⊙ by factors ˜15-50. We suggest that this might be a solution to the problem of the lack of observed dwarf galaxies in the range 107-108M⊙. This might also be a solution to the reionization problem where a very large number of Population III stars in low mass halos are required.

  8. Transient high-Rayleigh-number thermal convection with large viscosity variations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davaille, Anne; Jaupart, Claude

    1993-08-01

    Results of laboratory studies of the characteristics of thermal convection in a fluid whose viscosity varies strongly with temperature are presented. The upper boundary of an isothermal layer of Golden Syrup is cooled rapidly and maintained at a fixed temperature. The fluid layer is insulated at the bottom and cools continuously. Rayleigh number calculated with the viscosity of the well-mixed interior are between 10 exp 6 and 10 exp 8, and viscosity contrasts are up to 10 exp 6. Thermal convection develops only in the lower part of the thermal boundary layer, and the upper part remains stagnant. At the onset of convection, the viscosity contrast across the unstable boundary layer has a value of about 3. In fully developed convection, this viscosity contrast is higher, with a typical value of 10. The heat flux through the top of the layer depends solely on local conditions in the unstable boundary layer. The magnitude of temperature fluctuations and the thickness of the stagnant lid are calculated to be in excellent agreement with the experimental data.

  9. High Reynolds Number Investigation of a Flush Mounted, S-Duct Inlet With Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a flush-mounted, S-duct inlet with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion has been conducted at Reynolds numbers up to full scale. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. In addition, a supplemental computational study on one of the inlet configurations was conducted using the Navier-Stokes flow solver, OVERFLOW. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on aerodynamic interface plane diameter) from 5.1 million to 13.9 million (full-scale value), and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.29 to 1.22, depending on Mach number. Results of the study indicated that increasing Mach number, increasing boundary layer thickness (relative to inlet height) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted profile decreased inlet performance. At Mach numbers above 0.4, increasing inlet airflow increased inlet pressure recovery but also increased distortion. Finally, inlet distortion was found to be relatively insensitive to Reynolds number, but pressure recovery increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number.This CD-ROM supplement contains inlet data including: Boundary layer data, Duct static pressure data, performance-AIP (fan face) data, Photos, Tunnel wall P-PTO data and definitions.

  10. High Reynolds Number Investigation of a Flush-Mounted, S-Duct Inlet With Large Amounts of Boundary Layer Ingestion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berrier, Bobby L.; Carter, Melissa B.; Allan, Brian G.

    2005-01-01

    An experimental investigation of a flush-mounted, S-duct inlet with large amounts of boundary layer ingestion has been conducted at Reynolds numbers up to full scale. The study was conducted in the NASA Langley Research Center 0.3-Meter Transonic Cryogenic Tunnel. In addition, a supplemental computational study on one of the inlet configurations was conducted using the Navier-Stokes flow solver, OVERFLOW. Tests were conducted at Mach numbers from 0.25 to 0.83, Reynolds numbers (based on aerodynamic interface plane diameter) from 5.1 million to 13.9 million (full-scale value), and inlet mass-flow ratios from 0.29 to 1.22, depending on Mach number. Results of the study indicated that increasing Mach number, increasing boundary layer thickness (relative to inlet height) or ingesting a boundary layer with a distorted profile decreased inlet performance. At Mach numbers above 0.4, increasing inlet airflow increased inlet pressure recovery but also increased distortion. Finally, inlet distortion was found to be relatively insensitive to Reynolds number, but pressure recovery increased slightly with increasing Reynolds number.

  11. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units.

    PubMed

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse. PMID:26764779

  12. Hard Numbers for Large Molecules: Toward Exact Energetics for Supramolecular Systems.

    PubMed

    Ambrosetti, Alberto; Alfè, Dario; DiStasio, Robert A; Tkatchenko, Alexandre

    2014-03-01

    Noncovalent interactions are ubiquitous in molecular and condensed-phase environments, and hence a reliable theoretical description of these fundamental interactions could pave the way toward a more complete understanding of the microscopic underpinnings for a diverse set of systems in chemistry and biology. In this work, we demonstrate that recent algorithmic advances coupled to the availability of large-scale computational resources make the stochastic quantum Monte Carlo approach to solving the Schrödinger equation an optimal contender for attaining "chemical accuracy" (1 kcal/mol) in the binding energies of supramolecular complexes of chemical relevance. To illustrate this point, we considered a select set of seven host-guest complexes, representing the spectrum of noncovalent interactions, including dispersion or van der Waals forces, π-π stacking, hydrogen bonding, hydrophobic interactions, and electrostatic (ion-dipole) attraction. A detailed analysis of the interaction energies reveals that a complete theoretical description necessitates treatment of terms well beyond the standard London and Axilrod-Teller contributions to the van der Waals dispersion energy. PMID:26274077

  13. Activation process in excitable systems with multiple noise sources: Large number of units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franović, Igor; Perc, Matjaž; Todorović, Kristina; Kostić, Srdjan; Burić, Nikola

    2015-12-01

    We study the activation process in large assemblies of type II excitable units whose dynamics is influenced by two independent noise terms. The mean-field approach is applied to explicitly demonstrate that the assembly of excitable units can itself exhibit macroscopic excitable behavior. In order to facilitate the comparison between the excitable dynamics of a single unit and an assembly, we introduce three distinct formulations of the assembly activation event. Each formulation treats different aspects of the relevant phenomena, including the thresholdlike behavior and the role of coherence of individual spikes. Statistical properties of the assembly activation process, such as the mean time-to-first pulse and the associated coefficient of variation, are found to be qualitatively analogous for all three formulations, as well as to resemble the results for a single unit. These analogies are shown to derive from the fact that global variables undergo a stochastic bifurcation from the stochastically stable fixed point to continuous oscillations. Local activation processes are analyzed in the light of the competition between the noise-led and the relaxation-driven dynamics. We also briefly report on a system-size antiresonant effect displayed by the mean time-to-first pulse.

  14. Tectonic stress field of China inferred from a large number of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1992-07-01

    Mean principal tress axes were inferred for China using 9621 P wave first motion polarity readings from 5054 small earthquakes (1<=ML<=5). The area studied was divided into 76 subregions. The mean P (compressive), B (intermediate), and T (relatively tensional) axes corresponding to composite focal mechanism solutions of multiple earthquakes for each subregion were determined by a grid test to all possible orientations of the P, B, and T axes with a step of 5° or 10°. In order to get a relatively homogeneous sampling in space we have avoided using the readings from spatially and temporally clustered earthquakes. We have rechecked most of the polarity readings by inspection of original seismograms. The focal mechanism solutions of large (M>=6) individual earthquakes are also presented for comparison. The results indicate the existence of an overall radial pattern of the present-day maximum horizontal stress orientations throughout the continental area of China. This pattern is thought to be closely related to indentor models of continental collision between the Indian Ocean and the Eurasian plate.

  15. Acceleration of large active earthflows triggered by massive snow accumulation events: evidences from monitoring the Corvara landslide in early 2014 (Dolomites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Alessandro; Mulas, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Chinellato, Giulia; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    In the Dolomites of Italy, snowfall during winter 2013/2014 was exceptionally abundant. Major snowfall events occurred from late December 2013 to mid-March 2014. Snow accumulation in Badia Valley peaked in early February: from 2 to 4 meters with a positive gradient respect to altimetry and accordingly to wind accumulation zones. Below 2000 m asl, due to the mild temperatures recorded before the onset of snowfall, the relatively dry snow cover was mostly deposited on top of unfrozen soils. The Corvara landslide is a large active earthflow located close to Corvara in Badia, at an elevation from 2000 to 1600 m. It's displacement rate before, during and after the exceptional snowfall period was monitored at high temporal frequency. Surface displacement was measured bi-weekly by differential GPS in several benchmarks in the source, track and accumulation zone. Deep displacement was monitored semi-continuously by two in-place inclinometers at 48 m depth in the accumulation zone, across the main deep-seated sliding surface. Results show an acceleration of movements, both at surface and at depth, soon after the massive snow accumulation event of 31st January to 2nd February 2014, which suddenly increased snow thickness from 1 to more than 2 metres. Short time lags between the onset of the acceleration of movements in the source, the track and the accumulation zones were also recorded. The landslide then maintained a relatively constant velocity during the high snow cover period extended to earlyApril and underwent a progressive deceleration during the snowmelt period that lasted until mid-June. The fact that the acceleration of the Corvara earthflow was triggered by a massive and rapid snow accumulation event, provides a quite different perspective from the generally adopted one that considers the destabilizing effect of snow only in relation to the increase of groundwater level during rapid snowmelt. A full explanation of the processes associated to the dynamics observed

  16. Three-dimensional structure of confined swirling jets at moderately large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanmiguel-Rojas, E.; Burgos, M. A.; del Pino, C.; Fernandez-Feria, R.

    2008-04-01

    We have performed a series of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations of the incompressible flow discharging from a rotating pipe into a coaxial static cylindrical container through a sudden expansion. We have considered several values of the Reynolds number based on the pipe flow rate ReQ between 50 and 300, and an expansion diameter ratio of 8, and have analyzed the emerging 3D flow structures in the swirling jet exiting from the rotating pipe as the swirl parameter S is increased. The results are compared to axisymmetric numerical simulations of the same problem. Three-dimensional, nonlinear instabilities are found in the swirling jet when ReQ≳98 above a critical value of S, which depends on ReQ, that obviously do not appear in the axisymmetric simulations. These nonlinear instabilities are initially triggered by the linear instabilities inside the rotating pipe, which are already present in the pipe from a much lower value of S, and are transformed in the jet. As S increases further, there exists another critical value above which the swirling jet undergoes vortex breakdown, producing a flow in the jet which is basically axisymmetric. This critical value of the swirl parameter for breakdown is significantly larger than that found in the axisymmetric simulations. Thus, one of the main results of the present work is that 3D instabilities delay the formation of vortex breakdown in the jet, in relation to the same axisymmetric flow, but once the vortex breakdown phenomenon occurs, the 3D instabilities coming from the rotating pipe appear to be suppressed in the jet, and the swirling flow becomes basically axisymmetric again. Finally, the axisymmetric simulations show that the jet becomes unstable to axisymmetric perturbations, when ReQ≳188, above another critical value of S. However, these axisymmetric instabilities do not appear in the 3D simulations because the flow becomes unstable to asymmetric perturbations at much lower values of S.

  17. Estimation of recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone based on seismic moment accumulation/release model.

    PubMed

    Ren, Junjie; Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 10¹⁷ N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region. PMID:23878524

  18. Estimation of Recurrence Interval of Large Earthquakes on the Central Longmen Shan Fault Zone Based on Seismic Moment Accumulation/Release Model

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Shimin

    2013-01-01

    Recurrence interval of large earthquake on an active fault zone is an important parameter in assessing seismic hazard. The 2008 Wenchuan earthquake (Mw 7.9) occurred on the central Longmen Shan fault zone and ruptured the Yingxiu-Beichuan fault (YBF) and the Guanxian-Jiangyou fault (GJF). However, there is a considerable discrepancy among recurrence intervals of large earthquake in preseismic and postseismic estimates based on slip rate and paleoseismologic results. Post-seismic trenches showed that the central Longmen Shan fault zone probably undertakes an event similar to the 2008 quake, suggesting a characteristic earthquake model. In this paper, we use the published seismogenic model of the 2008 earthquake based on Global Positioning System (GPS) and Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) data and construct a characteristic seismic moment accumulation/release model to estimate recurrence interval of large earthquakes on the central Longmen Shan fault zone. Our results show that the seismogenic zone accommodates a moment rate of (2.7 ± 0.3) × 1017 N m/yr, and a recurrence interval of 3900 ± 400 yrs is necessary for accumulation of strain energy equivalent to the 2008 earthquake. This study provides a preferred interval estimation of large earthquakes for seismic hazard analysis in the Longmen Shan region. PMID:23878524

  19. Detection of Large Numbers of Novel Sequences in the Metatranscriptomes of Complex Marine Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jack A.; Field, Dawn; Huang, Ying; Edwards, Rob; Li, Weizhong; Gilna, Paul; Joint, Ian

    2008-01-01

    Background Sequencing the expressed genetic information of an ecosystem (metatranscriptome) can provide information about the response of organisms to varying environmental conditions. Until recently, metatranscriptomics has been limited to microarray technology and random cloning methodologies. The application of high-throughput sequencing technology is now enabling access to both known and previously unknown transcripts in natural communities. Methodology/Principal Findings We present a study of a complex marine metatranscriptome obtained from random whole-community mRNA using the GS-FLX Pyrosequencing technology. Eight samples, four DNA and four mRNA, were processed from two time points in a controlled coastal ocean mesocosm study (Bergen, Norway) involving an induced phytoplankton bloom producing a total of 323,161,989 base pairs. Our study confirms the finding of the first published metatranscriptomic studies of marine and soil environments that metatranscriptomics targets highly expressed sequences which are frequently novel. Our alternative methodology increases the range of experimental options available for conducting such studies and is characterized by an exceptional enrichment of mRNA (99.92%) versus ribosomal RNA. Analysis of corresponding metagenomes confirms much higher levels of assembly in the metatranscriptomic samples and a far higher yield of large gene families with >100 members, ∼91% of which were novel. Conclusions/Significance This study provides further evidence that metatranscriptomic studies of natural microbial communities are not only feasible, but when paired with metagenomic data sets, offer an unprecedented opportunity to explore both structure and function of microbial communities – if we can overcome the challenges of elucidating the functions of so many never-seen-before gene families. PMID:18725995

  20. What caused a large number of fatalities in the Tohoku earthquake?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ando, M.; Ishida, M.; Nishikawa, Y.; Mizuki, C.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-04-01

    The Mw9.0 earthquake caused 20,000 deaths and missing persons in northeastern Japan. 115 years prior to this event, there were three historical tsunamis that struck the region, one of which is a "tsunami earthquake" resulted with a death toll of 22,000. Since then, numerous breakwaters were constructed along the entire northeastern coasts and tsunami evacuation drills were carried out and hazard maps were distributed to local residents on numerous communities. However, despite the constructions and preparedness efforts, the March 11 Tohoku earthquake caused numerous fatalities. The strong shaking lasted three minutes or longer, thus all residents recognized that this is the strongest and longest earthquake that they had been ever experienced in their lives. The tsunami inundated an enormous area at about 560km2 over 35 cities along the coast of northeast Japan. To find out the reasons behind the high number of fatalities due to the March 11 tsunami, we interviewed 150 tsunami survivors at public evacuation shelters in 7 cities mainly in Iwate prefecture in mid-April and early June 2011. Interviews were done for about 30min or longer focused on their evacuation behaviors and those that they had observed. On the basis of the interviews, we found that residents' decisions not to evacuate immediately were partly due to or influenced by earthquake science results. Below are some of the factors that affected residents' decisions. 1. Earthquake hazard assessments turned out to be incorrect. Expected earthquake magnitudes and resultant hazards in northeastern Japan assessed and publicized by the government were significantly smaller than the actual Tohoku earthquake. 2. Many residents did not receive accurate tsunami warnings. The first tsunami warning were too small compared with the actual tsunami heights. 3. The previous frequent warnings with overestimated tsunami height influenced the behavior of the residents. 4. Many local residents above 55 years old experienced

  1. Introducing a semi-automatic method to simulate large numbers of forensic fingermarks for research on fingerprint identification.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Crystal M; de Jongh, Arent; Meuwly, Didier

    2012-03-01

    Statistical research on fingerprint identification and the testing of automated fingerprint identification system (AFIS) performances require large numbers of forensic fingermarks. These fingermarks are rarely available. This study presents a semi-automatic method to create simulated fingermarks in large quantities that model minutiae features or images of forensic fingermarks. This method takes into account several aspects contributing to the variability of forensic fingermarks such as the number of minutiae, the finger region, and the elastic deformation of the skin. To investigate the applicability of the simulated fingermarks, fingermarks have been simulated with 5-12 minutiae originating from different finger regions for six fingers. An AFIS matching algorithm was used to obtain similarity scores for comparisons between the minutiae configurations of fingerprints and the minutiae configurations of simulated and forensic fingermarks. The results showed similar scores for both types of fingermarks suggesting that the simulated fingermarks are good substitutes for forensic fingermarks. PMID:22103733

  2. Large Sanjiang basin groups outside of the Songliao Basin Meso-Senozoic Tectonic-sediment evolution and hydrocarbon accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, M.; Wu, X.

    2015-12-01

    The basis geological problem is still the bottleneck of the exploration work of the lager Sanjiang basin groups. In general terms, the problems are including the prototype basins and basin forming mechanism of two aspects. In this paper, using the field geological survey and investigation, logging data analysis, seismic data interpretation technical means large Sanjiang basin groups and basin forming mechanism of the prototype are discussed. Main draw the following conclusions: 1. Sanjiang region group-level formation can be completely contrasted. 2. Tension faults, compressive faults, shear structure composition and structure combination of four kinds of compound fracture are mainly developed In the study area. The direction of their distribution can be divided into SN, EW, NNE, NEE, NNW, NWW to other groups of fracture. 3. Large Sanjiang basin has the SN and the EW two main directions of tectonic evolution. Cenozoic basins in Sanjiang region in group formation located the two tectonic domains of ancient Paleo-Asian Ocean and the Pacific Interchange. 4. Large Sanjiang basin has experienced in the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of two-stage and nine times. The first stage, developmental stage basement, they are ① Since the Mesozoic era and before the Jurassic; ② Early Jurassic period; The second stage, cap stage of development, they are ③ Late Jurassic depression developmental stages of compression; ④ Early Cretaceous rifting stage; ⑤ depression in mid-Early Cretaceous period; ⑥ tensile Early Cretaceous rifting stage; ⑦ inversion of Late Cretaceous tectonic compression stage; ⑧ Paleogene - Neogene; ⑨ After recently Ji Baoquan Sedimentary Ridge. 5. Large Sanjiang basin group is actually a residual basin structure, and Can be divided into left - superimposed (Founder, Tangyuan depression, Hulin Basin), residual - inherited type (Sanjiang basin), residual - reformed (Jixi, Boli, Hegang basin). there are two developed depression and the mechanism

  3. Study on the dynamic characteristics of flow over building cluster at high Reynolds number by large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, BoBin; Wang, ZhiShi; Cui, GuiXiang; Zhang, ZhaoShun

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, the dynamic characteristics of building clusters are simulated by large eddy simulation at high Reynolds number for both homogeneous and heterogeneous building clusters. To save the computational cost a channel-like flow model is applied to the urban canopy with free slip condition at the upper boundary. The results show that the domain height is an important parameter for correct evaluation of the dynamic characteristics. The domain height must be greater than 8 h ( h is the average building height) in order to obtain correct roughness height while displacement height and roughness sublayer are less sensitive to the domain height. The Reynolds number effects on the dynamic characteristics and flow patterns are investigated. The turbulence intensity is stronger inside building cluster at high Reynolds number while turbulence intensity is almost unchanged with Reynolds number above the building cluster. Roughness height increases monotonously with Reynolds number by 20% from Re*=103 to Re*=105 but displacement height is almost unchanged. Within the canopy layer of heterogeneous building clusters, flow structures vary between buildings and turbulence is more active at high Reynolds number.

  4. Digital genotyping of macrosatellites and multicopy genes reveals novel biological functions associated with copy number variation of large tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Brahmachary, Manisha; Guilmatre, Audrey; Quilez, Javier; Hasson, Dan; Borel, Christelle; Warburton, Peter; Sharp, Andrew J

    2014-06-01

    Tandem repeats are common in eukaryotic genomes, but due to difficulties in assaying them remain poorly studied. Here, we demonstrate the utility of Nanostring technology as a targeted approach to perform accurate measurement of tandem repeats even at extremely high copy number, and apply this technology to genotype 165 HapMap samples from three different populations and five species of non-human primates. We observed extreme variability in copy number of tandemly repeated genes, with many loci showing 5-10 fold variation in copy number among humans. Many of these loci show hallmarks of genome assembly errors, and the true copy number of many large tandem repeats is significantly under-represented even in the high quality 'finished' human reference assembly. Importantly, we demonstrate that most large tandem repeat variations are not tagged by nearby SNPs, and are therefore essentially invisible to SNP-based GWAS approaches. Using association analysis we identify many cis correlations of large tandem repeat variants with nearby gene expression and DNA methylation levels, indicating that variations of tandem repeat length are associated with functional effects on the local genomic environment. This includes an example where expansion of a macrosatellite repeat is associated with increased DNA methylation and suppression of nearby gene expression, suggesting a mechanism termed "repeat induced gene silencing", which has previously been observed only in transgenic organisms. We also observed multiple signatures consistent with altered selective pressures at tandemly repeated loci, suggesting important biological functions. Our studies show that tandemly repeated loci represent a highly variable fraction of the genome that have been systematically ignored by most previous studies, copy number variation of which can exert functionally significant effects. We suggest that future studies of tandem repeat loci will lead to many novel insights into their role in modulating

  5. Design and test of a natural laminar flow/large Reynolds number airfoil with a high design cruise lift coefficient

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolesar, C. E.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity on an airfoil designed for a large airplane capable of very long endurance times at a low Mach number of 0.22 is examined. Airplane mission objectives and design optimization resulted in requirements for a very high design lift coefficient and a large amount of laminar flow at high Reynolds number to increase the lift/drag ratio and reduce the loiter lift coefficient. Natural laminar flow was selected instead of distributed mechanical suction for the measurement technique. A design lift coefficient of 1.5 was identified as the highest which could be achieved with a large extent of laminar flow. A single element airfoil was designed using an inverse boundary layer solution and inverse airfoil design computer codes to create an airfoil section that would achieve performance goals. The design process and results, including airfoil shape, pressure distributions, and aerodynamic characteristics are presented. A two dimensional wind tunnel model was constructed and tested in a NASA Low Turbulence Pressure Tunnel which enabled testing at full scale design Reynolds number. A comparison is made between theoretical and measured results to establish accuracy and quality of the airfoil design technique.

  6. Deformation of leaky-dielectric fluid globules under strong electric fields: Boundary layers and jets at large Reynolds numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnitzer, Ory; Frankel, Itzchak; Yariv, Ehud

    2013-11-01

    In Taylor's theory of electrohydrodynamic drop deformation (Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, vol. 291, 1966, pp. 159-166), inertia is neglected at the outset, resulting in fluid velocity that scales as the square of the applied-field magnitude. For large drops, with increasing field strength the Reynolds number predicted by this scaling may actually become large, suggesting the need for a complementary large-Reynolds-number investigation. Balancing viscous stresses and electrical shear forces in this limit reveals a different velocity scaling, with the 4/3-power of the applied-field magnitude. We focus here on the flow over a gas bubble. It is essentially confined to two boundary layers propagating from the poles to the equator, where they collide to form a radial jet. At leading order in the Capillary number, the bubble deforms due to (i) Maxwell stresses; (ii) the hydrodynamic boundary-layer pressure associated with centripetal acceleration; and (iii) the intense pressure distribution acting over the narrow equatorial deflection zone, appearing as a concentrated load. Remarkably, the unique flow topology and associated scalings allow to obtain a closed-form expression for this deformation through application of integral mass and momentum balances. On the bubble scale, the concentrated pressure load is manifested in the appearance of a non-smooth equatorial dimple.

  7. Pharmaceutical quality evaluation of lipid emulsions containing PGE1: alteration in the number of large particles in infusion solutions.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Hiroko; Saito, Haruna; Yomota, Chikako; Kawanishi, Toru

    2009-08-13

    There are two generics of a parenteral lipid emulsion of prostaglandin E1 (PGE(1)) (Lipo-PGE(1)) in addition to two innovators. It was reported the change from innovator to generic in clinical practice caused the slowing of drip rate and formation of aggregates in the infusion line. Thus, we investigated the difference of pharmaceutical quality in these Lipo-PGE(1) formulations. After mixing with some infusion solutions, the mean diameter and number of large particles were determined. Although the mean diameter did not change in any infusion solutions, the number of large particles (diameter >1.0 microm) dramatically increased in generics with Hartmann's solution pH 8 or Lactec injection with 7% sodium bicarbonate. Next, we investigated the effect of these infusion solutions on the retention rate of PGE(1) in lipid particles. The retention rate of PGE(1) in these two infusion solutions decreased more quickly than that in normal saline. Nevertheless, there were no significant differences among the formulations tested. Our results suggest that there is no difference between innovators and generics except in mixing with these infusion solutions. Furthermore, that monitoring the number of large particles can be an effective means of evaluating pharmaceutical interactions and/or the stability of lipid emulsions. PMID:19465103

  8. Capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) treat small and large numbers of items similarly during a relative quantity judgment task.

    PubMed

    Beran, Michael J; Parrish, Audrey E

    2016-08-01

    A key issue in understanding the evolutionary and developmental emergence of numerical cognition is to learn what mechanism(s) support perception and representation of quantitative information. Two such systems have been proposed, one for dealing with approximate representation of sets of items across an extended numerical range and another for highly precise representation of only small numbers of items. Evidence for the first system is abundant across species and in many tests with human adults and children, whereas the second system is primarily evident in research with children and in some tests with non-human animals. A recent paper (Choo & Franconeri, Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 21, 93-99, 2014) with adult humans also reported "superprecise" representation of small sets of items in comparison to large sets of items, which would provide more support for the presence of a second system in human adults. We first presented capuchin monkeys with a test similar to that of Choo and Franconeri in which small or large sets with the same ratios had to be discriminated. We then presented the same monkeys with an expanded range of comparisons in the small number range (all comparisons of 1-9 items) and the large number range (all comparisons of 10-90 items in 10-item increments). Capuchin monkeys showed no increased precision for small over large sets in making these discriminations in either experiment. These data indicate a difference in the performance of monkeys to that of adult humans, and specifically that monkeys do not show improved discrimination performance for small sets relative to large sets when the relative numerical differences are held constant. PMID:26689808

  9. A comparison of three approaches to compute the effective Reynolds number of the implicit large-eddy simulations

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Zhou, Ye; Thornber, Ben

    2016-04-12

    Here, the implicit large-eddy simulation (ILES) has been utilized as an effective approach for calculating many complex flows at high Reynolds number flows. Richtmyer–Meshkov instability (RMI) induced flow can be viewed as a homogeneous decaying turbulence (HDT) after the passage of the shock. In this article, a critical evaluation of three methods for estimating the effective Reynolds number and the effective kinematic viscosity is undertaken utilizing high-resolution ILES data. Effective Reynolds numbers based on the vorticity and dissipation rate, or the integral and inner-viscous length scales, are found to be the most self-consistent when compared to the expected phenomenology andmore » wind tunnel experiments.« less

  10. Cooling Characteristics of Highly Viscous Liquids in a Channel with a Large Number of Right-Angled Bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyam, Masafumi; Li, Xiangyi; Harada, Eiji; Konno, Hirotaka

    An investigation was performed on the flow and cooling characteristics of highly viscous liquids in the channel with a large number of right-angled bends. The variation of flow pattern and temperature profile according to Reynolds number and Prandtl number were presented by solving numerically the Navier-Stokes equations with energy equation under the condition that the fluid properties were independent on temperature. Average heat transfer cofficient and friction factor were also calculated and compared with the experimental data regarding aqueous solutions of corn syrup. Through the comparison, the effect of the variable viscosity of the test fluid on the flow and heat transfer characteristics was considered in connection with the channel configuration.

  11. Large-s expansions for the low-energy parameters of the honeycomb-lattice Heisenberg antiferromagnet with spin quantum number s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, R. F.; Li, P. H. Y.

    2016-06-01

    The coupled cluster method (CCM) is employed to very high orders of approximation to study the ground-state (GS) properties of the spin-s Heisenberg antiferromagnet (with isotropic interactions, all of equal strength, between nearest-neighbour pairs only) on the honeycomb lattice. We calculate with high accuracy the complete set of GS parameters that fully describes the low-energy behaviour of the system, in terms of an effective magnon field theory, viz., the energy per spin, the magnetic order parameter (i.e., the sublattice magnetization), the spin stiffness and the zero-field (uniform, transverse) magnetic susceptibility, for all values of the spin quantum numbers in the range 1/2 ≤ s ≤ 9/2. The CCM data points are used to calculate the leading quantum corrections to the classical (s → ∞) values of these low-energy parameters, considered as large-s asymptotic expansions.

  12. Accumulation of aluminium and physiological status of tree foliage in the vicinity of a large aluminium smelter.

    PubMed

    Wannaz, E D; Rodriguez, J H; Wolfsberger, T; Carreras, H A; Pignata, M L; Fangmeier, A; Franzaring, J

    2012-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in tree foliage sampled in the vicinity of a large aluminium production facility in Patagonia (Argentina). Leaves of Eucalyptus rostrata, and Populus hybridus and different needle ages of Pinus spec. were collected and concentrations of aluminium (Al) and sulphur (S) as well as physiological parameters (chlorophyll and lipid oxidation products) were analyzed. Al and S concentrations indicate a steep pollution gradient in the study showing a relationship with the physiological parameters in particular membrane lipid oxidation products. The present study confirms that aluminium smelting results in high Al and sulphur deposition in the study area, and therefore further studies should be carried out taking into account potentially adverse effects of these compounds on human and ecosystem health. PMID:22654642

  13. Accumulation of Aluminium and Physiological Status of Tree Foliage in the Vicinity of a Large Aluminium Smelter

    PubMed Central

    Wannaz, E. D.; Rodriguez, J. H.; Wolfsberger, T.; Carreras, H. A.; Pignata, M. L.; Fangmeier, A.; Franzaring, J.

    2012-01-01

    A pollution gradient was observed in tree foliage sampled in the vicinity of a large aluminium production facility in Patagonia (Argentina). Leaves of Eucalyptus rostrata, and Populus hybridus and different needle ages of Pinus spec. were collected and concentrations of aluminium (Al) and sulphur (S) as well as physiological parameters (chlorophyll and lipid oxidation products) were analyzed. Al and S concentrations indicate a steep pollution gradient in the study showing a relationship with the physiological parameters in particular membrane lipid oxidation products. The present study confirms that aluminium smelting results in high Al and sulphur deposition in the study area, and therefore further studies should be carried out taking into account potentially adverse effects of these compounds on human and ecosystem health. PMID:22654642

  14. The number of patients with severe encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis is decreasing in a large referral center in Germany

    PubMed Central

    Kitterer, Daniel; Braun, Niko; Alscher, M Dominik; Segerer, Stephan; Latus, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Background Encapsulating peritoneal sclerosis (EPS) is the most severe complication associated with long-term peritoneal dialysis (PD). Previous studies noticed a sharp decline in new patients with severe EPS. We investigated the number of severe EPS patients in our large referral center over almost 20 years. Methods All late-stage EPS patients who underwent major surgery due to extensive symptoms caused by bowel obstruction (vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss) between March 1997 and end of December 2015 in our hospital were included in the present study. An index was calculated between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted PD catheters in our center. Results Between 1979 and 2015, a total of 745 PD catheters were implanted in our center, with a steady increase in the numbers between 2003 and 2015. First patient with severe EPS was treated in 1998, then a rise in the number of patients with EPS was present in 2005. The number of patients with EPS peaked in the period of 2010–2012 (15 patients within 3 years). Afterward, both the absolute numbers and the index between the number of patients with severe EPS and the implanted catheters demonstrated a prominent reduction in the next 3-year period from 2013 to 2015. Conclusion Our data support the hypothesis that there seems to be a decrease of late-stage EPS incidence over the last years, but data about milder or asymptomatic patients are lacking. This should be kept in mind while giving the patients information about different renal replacement therapies at start of dialysis. PMID:27540308

  15. Type I error robustness of ANOVA and ANOVA on ranks when the number of treatments is large.

    PubMed

    Brownie, C; Boos, D D

    1994-06-01

    Agricultural screening trials often involve a large number (t) of treatments in a complete block design with limited replication (b = 3 or 4 blocks). The null hypothesis of interest is that of no differences between treatments. For the commonly used analysis of variance (ANOVA) procedure, most texts do not discuss agreement between actual and nominal Type I error rates in the presence of nonnormality, in this small b, large t, situation. Similarly, for the Friedman and the increasingly popular "ANOVA on ranks" procedures, it is not easy to find results concerning null performance given b small and t large. In this article, we therefore present results, from two different bodies of theory, that provide useful insight concerning null performance of these ANOVA and rank procedures when t is large. The two types of theory are (i) the classical approach based on moment approximations to the permutation distribution, and (ii) central-limit-theory-based asymptotics in the nonstandard t--> infinity situation. Both approaches demonstrate the validity of standard ANOVA and of ANOVA on within-block ranks, under nonnormality when t is large. Choice of the procedure to be used on a given data set should therefore be based on consideration of power properties. In general, ANOVA on ranks will be superior to standard ANOVA for data with frequent extreme values. PMID:19405210

  16. A large-domain approach for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number

    SciTech Connect

    Tahara, Y.; Stern, F.

    1996-09-01

    A large-domain approach is developed for calculating ship boundary layers and wakes and wave fields for nonzero Froude number. The Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes and continuity equations are solved with the Baldwin-Lomax turbulence model, exact nonlinear kinematic and approximate dynamic free-surface boundary conditions, and a body/free-surface conforming grid. The results are validated through comparisons with data for the Series 60 C{sub B} = 0.6 ship model at low and high Froude numbers and results of a precursory interactive approach. Both approaches yield satisfactory results; however, the large-domain results indicate improved resolution of the flow close to the hull and wake centerplane and of the Froucle number differences due to near-wall turbulence modeling and non-linear free-surface boundary conditions. Additional evaluation is provided through discussion of the recent CFD Workshop Tokyo 1994, where both methods were among the best. Last, some concluding remarks are made. 20 refs., 7 figs.

  17. A Multilayer Secure Biomedical Data Management System for Remotely Managing a Very Large Number of Diverse Personal Healthcare Devices

    PubMed Central

    Park, KeeHyun; Lim, SeungHyeon

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a multilayer secure biomedical data management system for managing a very large number of diverse personal health devices is proposed. The system has the following characteristics: the system supports international standard communication protocols to achieve interoperability. The system is integrated in the sense that both a PHD communication system and a remote PHD management system work together as a single system. Finally, the system proposed in this paper provides user/message authentication processes to securely transmit biomedical data measured by PHDs based on the concept of a biomedical signature. Some experiments, including the stress test, have been conducted to show that the system proposed/constructed in this study performs very well even when a very large number of PHDs are used. For a stress test, up to 1,200 threads are made to represent the same number of PHD agents. The loss ratio of the ISO/IEEE 11073 messages in the normal system is as high as 14% when 1,200 PHD agents are connected. On the other hand, no message loss occurs in the multilayered system proposed in this study, which demonstrates the superiority of the multilayered system to the normal system with regard to heavy traffic. PMID:26247034

  18. On the variational computation of a large number of vibrational energy levels and wave functions for medium-sized molecules.

    PubMed

    Mátyus, Edit; Simunek, Ján; Császár, Attila G

    2009-08-21

    In a recent publication [J. Chem. Phys. 127, 084102 (2007)], the nearly variational DEWE approach (DEWE denotes Discrete variable representation of the Watson Hamiltonian using the Eckart frame and an Exact inclusion of a potential energy surface expressed in arbitrarily chosen coordinates) was developed to compute a large number of (ro)vibrational eigenpairs for medium-sized semirigid molecules having a single well-defined minimum. In this publication, memory, CPU, and hard disk usage requirements of DEWE, and thus of any DEWE-type approach, are carefully considered, analyzed, and optimized. Particular attention is paid to the sparse matrix-vector multiplication, the most expensive part of the computation, and to rate-determining steps in the iterative Lanczos eigensolver, including spectral transformation, reorthogonalization, and restart of the iteration. Algorithmic improvements are discussed in considerable detail. Numerical results are presented for the vibrational band origins of the (12)CH(4) and (12)CH(2)D(2) isotopologues of the methane molecule. The largest matrix handled on a personal computer during these computations is of the size of (4x10(8))x(4x10(8)). The best strategy for determining vibrational eigenpairs depends largely on the actual details of the required computation. Nevertheless, for a usual scenario requiring a large number of the lowest eigenpairs of the Hamiltonian matrix the combination of the thick-restart Lanczos method, shift-fold filtering, and periodic reorthogonalization appears to result in the computationally most feasible approach. PMID:19708731

  19. The 3D MHD code GOEMHD3 for astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers. Code description, verification, and computational performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, J.; Baruffa, F.; Büchner, J.; Rampp, M.

    2015-08-01

    Context. The numerical simulation of turbulence and flows in almost ideal astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers motivates the implementation of magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) computer codes with low resistivity. They need to be computationally efficient and scale well with large numbers of CPU cores, allow obtaining a high grid resolution over large simulation domains, and be easily and modularly extensible, for instance, to new initial and boundary conditions. Aims: Our aims are the implementation, optimization, and verification of a computationally efficient, highly scalable, and easily extensible low-dissipative MHD simulation code for the numerical investigation of the dynamics of astrophysical plasmas with large Reynolds numbers in three dimensions (3D). Methods: The new GOEMHD3 code discretizes the ideal part of the MHD equations using a fast and efficient leap-frog scheme that is second-order accurate in space and time and whose initial and boundary conditions can easily be modified. For the investigation of diffusive and dissipative processes the corresponding terms are discretized by a DuFort-Frankel scheme. To always fulfill the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy stability criterion, the time step of the code is adapted dynamically. Numerically induced local oscillations are suppressed by explicit, externally controlled diffusion terms. Non-equidistant grids are implemented, which enhance the spatial resolution, where needed. GOEMHD3 is parallelized based on the hybrid MPI-OpenMP programing paradigm, adopting a standard two-dimensional domain-decomposition approach. Results: The ideal part of the equation solver is verified by performing numerical tests of the evolution of the well-understood Kelvin-Helmholtz instability and of Orszag-Tang vortices. The accuracy of solving the (resistive) induction equation is tested by simulating the decay of a cylindrical current column. Furthermore, we show that the computational performance of the code scales very

  20. Theory of magnetospheric standing hydromagnetic waves with large azimuthal wave number. 1. Coupled magnetosonic and Alfven waves

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, A.D.M. )

    1987-09-01

    A new hydromagnetic theory is developed for describing compressional pulsations with azimuthal wave number. It is assumed that there are two plasma, one hot, in which pressure effects are important, and the other cold. The equations are derived in a general set of magnetic coordinates which allow realistic calculations including geometrical effects in the magnetosphere. The equations describe the three hydromagnetic modes which are coupled by the geometry. When the azimuthal wave number is large, the fast mode is strongly evanescent. This allows an expansion in 1/m in order to decouple the fast wave. The remaining equations describe the coupled transverse Alfven and magnetosonic modes. Some of the puzzling features of the observations of polarization are discussed.

  1. High-resolution copy number analysis of paired normal-tumor samples from diffuse large B cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Sebastián, Elena; Alcoceba, Miguel; Martín-García, David; Blanco, Óscar; Sanchez-Barba, Mercedes; Balanzategui, Ana; Marín, Luis; Montes-Moreno, Santiago; González-Barca, Eva; Pardal, Emilia; Jiménez, Cristina; García-Álvarez, María; Clot, Guillem; Carracedo, Ángel; Gutiérrez, Norma C; Sarasquete, M Eugenia; Chillón, Carmen; Corral, Rocío; Prieto-Conde, M Isabel; Caballero, M Dolores; Salaverria, Itziar; García-Sanz, Ramón; González, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    Copy number analysis can be useful for assessing prognosis in diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We analyzed copy number data from tumor samples of 60 patients diagnosed with DLBCL de novo and their matched normal samples. We detected 63 recurrent copy number alterations (CNAs), including 33 gains, 30 losses, and nine recurrent acquired copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity (CNN-LOH). Interestingly, 20 % of cases acquired CNN-LOH of 6p21 locus, which involves the HLA region. In normal cells, there were no CNAs but we observed CNN-LOH involving some key lymphoma regions such as 6p21 and 9p24.1 (5 %) and 17p13.1 (2.5 %) in DLBCL patients. Furthermore, a model with some specific CNA was able to predict the subtype of DLBCL, 1p36.32 and 10q23.31 losses being restricted to germinal center B cell-like (GCB) DLBCL. In contrast, 8p23.3 losses and 11q24.3 gains were strongly associated with the non-GCB subtype. A poor prognosis was associated with biallelic inactivation of TP53 or 18p11.32 losses, while prognosis was better in cases carrying 11q24.3 gains. In summary, CNA abnormalities identify specific DLBCL groups, and we describe CNN-LOH in germline cells from DLBCL patients that are associated with genes that probably play a key role in DLBCL development. PMID:26573278

  2. Multiplex titration RT-PCR: rapid determination of gene expression patterns for a large number of genes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nebenfuhr, A.; Lomax, T. L.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an improved method for determination of gene expression levels with RT-PCR. The procedure is rapid and does not require extensive optimization or densitometric analysis. Since the detection of individual transcripts is PCR-based, small amounts of tissue samples are sufficient for the analysis of expression patterns in large gene families. Using this method, we were able to rapidly screen nine members of the Aux/IAA family of auxin-responsive genes and identify those genes which vary in message abundance in a tissue- and light-specific manner. While not offering the accuracy of conventional semi-quantitative or competitive RT-PCR, our method allows quick screening of large numbers of genes in a wide range of RNA samples with just a thermal cycler and standard gel analysis equipment.

  3. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ng, K C; Heredia, K H; Kliewer, D

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10(-12) M level. Concentrations 10(-12)-10(-10) M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, ...) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution. PMID:22462973

  4. Note: A method to isolate and detect a large number of single molecules by microdroplet fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ng, K. C.; Heredia, K. H.; Kliewer, D.

    2012-03-01

    A laser induced fluorescence system, in combination with a glass-frit nebulizer and a photo-voltaic cell detector, is described for single molecule detection. The glass-frit nebulizer continuously generates a large number of droplets with an average droplet size of three micrometers in diameter. Rhodamine 6G molecules were detected at the 10-12 M level. Concentrations 10-12-10-10 M would provide mostly single molecules (0, 1, 2, 3, …) in the individual droplets, as determined by Poisson distribution.

  5. Atomic Number Dependence of Hadron Production at Large Transverse Momentum in 300 GeV Proton--Nucleus Collisions

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Cronin, J. W.; Frisch, H. J.; Shochet, M. J.; Boymond, J. P.; Mermod, R.; Piroue, P. A.; Sumner, R. L.

    1974-07-15

    In an experiment at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory we have compared the production of large transverse momentum hadrons from targets of W, Ti, and Be bombarded by 300 GeV protons. The hadron yields were measured at 90 degrees in the proton-nucleon c.m. system with a magnetic spectrometer equipped with 2 Cerenkov counters and a hadron calorimeter. The production cross-sections have a dependence on the atomic number A that grows with P{sub 1}, eventually leveling off proportional to A{sup 1.1}.

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  7. Experimental Surface Pressure Data Obtained on 65 deg Delta Wing Across Reynolds Number and Mach Number Ranges. Vol. 4: Large-radius leading edge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Julio; Luckring, James M.

    1996-01-01

    An experimental wind tunnel test of a 65 deg delta wing model with interchangeable leading edges was conducted in the Langley National Transonic Facility (NTF). The objective was to investigate the effects of Reynolds and Mach numbers on slender-wing leading-edge vortex flows with four values of wing leading-edge bluntness. Experimentally obtained pressure data are presented without analysis in tabulated and graphical formats across a Reynolds number range of 6 x 10(exp 6) to 120 x 10(exp 6) at a Mach number of 0.85 and across a Mach number range of 0.4 to 0.9 at Reynolds numbers of 6 x 10(exp 6) and 60 x 10(exp 6). Normal-force and pitching-moment coefficient plots for these Reynolds number and Mach number ranges are also presented.

  8. Arrangement of scale-interaction and large-scale modulation in high Reynolds number turbulent boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baars, Woutijn J.; Hutchins, Nicholas; Marusic, Ivan

    2015-11-01

    Interactions between small- and large-scale motions are inherent in the near-wall dynamics of wall-bounded flows. We here examine the scale-interaction embedded within the streamwise velocity component. Data were acquired using hot-wire anemometry in ZPG turbulent boundary layers, for Reynolds numbers ranging from Reτ ≡ δUτ / ν ~ 2800 to 22800. After first decomposing velocity signals into contributions from small- and large-scales, we then represent the time-varying small-scale energy with time series of its instantaneous amplitude and instantaneous frequency, via a wavelet-based method. Features of the scale-interaction are inferred from isocorrelation maps, formed by correlating the large-scale velocity with its concurrent small-scale amplitude and frequency. Below the onset of the log-region, the physics constitutes aspects of amplitude modulation and frequency modulation. Time shifts, associated with the correlation extrema--representing the lead/lag of the small-scale signatures relative to the large-scales--are shown to be governed by inner-scaling. Wall-normal trends of time shifts are explained by considering the arrangement of scales in the log- and intermittent-regions, and how they relate to stochastic top-down and bottom-up processes.

  9. A Genome-Wide Association Study in Large White and Landrace Pig Populations for Number Piglets Born Alive

    PubMed Central

    Bergfelder-Drüing, Sarah; Grosse-Brinkhaus, Christine; Lind, Bianca; Erbe, Malena; Schellander, Karl; Simianer, Henner; Tholen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The number of piglets born alive (NBA) per litter is one of the most important traits in pig breeding due to its influence on production efficiency. It is difficult to improve NBA because the heritability of the trait is low and it is governed by a high number of loci with low to moderate effects. To clarify the biological and genetic background of NBA, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed using 4,012 Large White and Landrace pigs from herdbook and commercial breeding companies in Germany (3), Austria (1) and Switzerland (1). The animals were genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Because of population stratifications within and between breeds, clusters were formed using the genetic distances between the populations. Five clusters for each breed were formed and analysed by GWAS approaches. In total, 17 different significant markers affecting NBA were found in regions with known effects on female reproduction. No overlapping significant chromosome areas or QTL between Large White and Landrace breed were detected. PMID:25781935

  10. A genome-wide association study in large white and landrace pig populations for number piglets born alive.

    PubMed

    Bergfelder-Drüing, Sarah; Grosse-Brinkhaus, Christine; Lind, Bianca; Erbe, Malena; Schellander, Karl; Simianer, Henner; Tholen, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The number of piglets born alive (NBA) per litter is one of the most important traits in pig breeding due to its influence on production efficiency. It is difficult to improve NBA because the heritability of the trait is low and it is governed by a high number of loci with low to moderate effects. To clarify the biological and genetic background of NBA, genome-wide association studies (GWAS) were performed using 4,012 Large White and Landrace pigs from herdbook and commercial breeding companies in Germany (3), Austria (1) and Switzerland (1). The animals were genotyped with the Illumina PorcineSNP60 BeadChip. Because of population stratifications within and between breeds, clusters were formed using the genetic distances between the populations. Five clusters for each breed were formed and analysed by GWAS approaches. In total, 17 different significant markers affecting NBA were found in regions with known effects on female reproduction. No overlapping significant chromosome areas or QTL between Large White and Landrace breed were detected. PMID:25781935

  11. Research on beam characteristics in a large-Fresnel-number unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator with parabolic mirrors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Yingxiong; Xiao, Yu; Zhong, Lijing; Wu, Chao; Wang, Zhen; Wan, Wen; Tang, Xiahui

    2016-07-20

    Large-Fresnel-number unstable-waveguide hybrid resonators employing spherical resonator mirrors suffer from spherical aberration, which adversely affects beam quality and alignment sensitivity. In this paper, we present experimental and numerical wave-optics simulations of the beam characteristics of a negative-branch hybrid resonator having parabolic mirrors with a large equivalent Fresnel number in the unstable direction. These results are compared with a resonator using spherical mirrors. Using parabolic mirrors, the output beam has a smaller beam spot size and higher power density at the focal plane. We found that the power extraction efficiency is 3.5% higher when compared with a resonator using spherical mirrors as the cavity length was varied between -1 and 1 mm from the ideal confocal resonator. In addition, the power extraction efficiency is 5.6% higher for mirror tilt angles varied between -6 and 6 mrad. Furthermore, the output propagating field is similar to a converging wave for a spherical mirror resonator and the output beam direction deviates 3.5 mrad from the optical axis. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:27463896

  12. Tracking a large number of closely spaced objects based on the particle probability hypothesis density filter via optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liangkui; Xu, Hui; An, Wei; Sheng, Weidong; Xu, Dan

    2011-11-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to tracking a large number of closely spaced objects (CSO) in image sequences that is based on the particle probability hypothesis density (PHD) filter and multiassignment data association. First, the particle PHD filter is adopted to eliminate most of the clutters and to estimate multitarget states. In the particle PHD filter, a noniterative multitarget estimation technique is introduced to reliably estimate multitarget states, and an improved birth particle sampling scheme is present to effectively acquire targets among clutters. Then, an integrated track management method is proposed to realize multitarget track continuity. The core of the track management is the track-to-estimation multiassignment association, which relaxes the traditional one-to-one data association restriction due to the unresolved focal plane CSO measurements. Meanwhile, a unified technique of multiple consecutive misses for track deletion is used jointly to cope with the sensitivity of the PHD filter to the missed detections and to eliminate false alarms further, as well as to initiate tracks of large numbers of CSO. Finally, results of two simulations and one experiment show that the proposed approach is feasible and efficient.

  13. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  14. Discovery and characterization of a large number of diagnostic markers to discriminate Oncorhynchus mykiss and O. clarkii.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, V L; Abadía-Cardoso, A; Garza, J C

    2012-09-01

    Hybridization of cutthroat trout and steelhead/rainbow trout is ubiquitous where they are sympatric, either naturally or owing to introductions. The ability to detect hybridization and introgression between the two species would be greatly improved by the development of more diagnostic markers validated across the two species' many phylogenetic lineages. Here, we describe 81 novel genetic markers and associated assays for discriminating the genomes of these sister species. These diagnostic nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered by sequencing of rainbow trout expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in a diverse panel of both cutthroat trout and steelhead/rainbow trout. The resulting markers were validated in a large number of lineages of both species, including all extant subspecies of cutthroat trout and most of the lineages of rainbow trout that are found in natural sympatry with cutthroat trout or used in stocking practices. Most of these markers (79%) distinguish genomic regions for all lineages of the two species, but a small number do not reliably diagnose coastal, westslope and/or other subspecies of cutthroat trout. Surveys of natural populations and hatchery strains of trout and steelhead found rare occurrences of the alternative allele, which may be due to either previous introgression or shared polymorphism. The availability of a large number of genetic markers for distinguishing genomic regions originating in these sister species will allow the detection of both recent and more distant hybridization events, facilitate the study of the evolutionary dynamics of hybridization and provide a powerful set of tools for the conservation and management of both species. PMID:22591214

  15. Computational Complexity of Coherent Vortex and Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations of Three-Dimensional Homogeneous Turbulence at High Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nejadmalayeri, Alireza; Vezolainen, Alexei; Vasilyev, Oleg V.

    2011-11-01

    With the recent development of parallel adaptive wavelet collocation method, adaptive numerical simulations of high Reynolds number turbulent flows have become feasible. The integration of turbulence modeling of different fidelity with adaptive wavelet methods results in a hierarchical approach for modeling and simulating turbulent flows in which all or most energetic parts of coherent eddies are dynamically resolved on self-adaptive computational grids, while modeling the effect of the unresolved incoherent or less energetic modes. This talk is the first attempt to estimate how spatial modes of both Coherent Vortex Simulations (CVS) and Stochastic Coherent Adaptive Large Eddy Simulations (SCALES) scale with Reynolds number. The computational complexity studies for both CVS and SCALES of linearly forced homogeneous turbulence are performed at effective non-adaptive resolutions of 2563, 5123, 10243, and 20483 corresponding to approximate Reλ of 70, 120, 190, 320. The details of the simulations are discussed and the results of compression achieved by CVS and SCALES as well as scalability studies of the parallel algorithm for the aforementioned Taylor micro-scale Reynolds numbers are presented. This work was supported by NSF under grant No. CBET-0756046.

  16. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device.

    PubMed

    Michael, C A; Tanaka, K; Vyacheslavov, L; Sanin, A; Kawahata, K

    2015-09-01

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO2 laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1. PMID:26429439

  17. Two-dimensional wave-number spectral analysis techniques for phase contrast imaging turbulence imaging data on large helical device

    SciTech Connect

    Michael, C. A.; Tanaka, K.; Kawahata, K.; Vyacheslavov, L.; Sanin, A.

    2015-09-15

    An analysis method for unfolding the spatially resolved wave-number spectrum and phase velocity from the 2D CO{sub 2} laser phase contrast imaging system on the large helical device is described. This is based on the magnetic shear technique which identifies propagation direction from 2D spatial Fourier analysis of images detected by a 6 × 8 detector array. Because the strongest modes have wave-number at the lower end of the instrumental k range, high resolution spectral techniques are necessary to clearly resolve the propagation direction and hence the spatial distribution of fluctuations along the probing laser beam. Multiple-spatial point cross-correlation averaging is applied before calculating the spatial power spectrum. Different methods are compared, and it is found that the maximum entropy method (MEM) gives best results. The possible generation of artifacts from the over-narrowing of spectra are investigated and found not to be a significant problem. The spatial resolution Δρ (normalized radius) around the peak wave-number, for conventional Fourier analysis, is ∼0.5, making physical interpretation difficult, while for MEM, Δρ ∼ 0.1.

  18. Numerical Investigation on Large Scale Eddy Structure in Unsteady Pipe Elbow Flow at High Reynolds Number Conditions with Large Eddy Simulation Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki

    Flow induced vibration in primary cooling system of the Japan Sodium cooled Fast Reactor (JSFR) has been investigated. The primary cooling system consists of a large diameter pipe and a pipe elbow with short curvature radius corresponding to its diameter (short-elbow). Flow-induced vibration by flow through the short-elbow is an important issue in design study of the JSFR, because it may affect to structural integrity of the piping. In this paper, numerical simulations for several pipe elbows with different pipe diameters and curvature radii in literature were conducted at Reynolds number conditions from Re=500 to 1.47x107 to investigate unsteady flow behavior through the short-elbow, including validation study of an in-house LES code (MUGTHES). Numerical results in each condition were compared with the experimental results in literature. Unsteady flow characteristics and pressure fluctuation generation mechanism in the short-elbow were clarified in relation to the large-scale eddy motion.

  19. Analysis of a large number of clinical studies for breast cancer radiotherapy: estimation of radiobiological parameters for treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, M.; Li, X. Allen

    2003-10-01

    Numerous studies of early-stage breast cancer treated with breast conserving surgery (BCS) and radiotherapy (RT) have been published in recent years. Both external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) and/or brachytherapy (BT) with different fractionation schemes are currently used. The present RT practice is largely based on empirical experience and it lacks a reliable modelling tool to compare different RT modalities or to design new treatment strategies. The purpose of this work is to derive a plausible set of radiobiological parameters that can be used for RT treatment planning. The derivation is based on existing clinical data and is consistent with the analysis of a large number of published clinical studies on early-stage breast cancer. A large number of published clinical studies on the treatment of early breast cancer with BCS plus RT (including whole breast EBRT with or without a boost to the tumour bed, whole breast EBRT alone, brachytherapy alone) and RT alone are compiled and analysed. The linear quadratic (LQ) model is used in the analysis. Three of these clinical studies are selected to derive a plausible set of LQ parameters. The potential doubling time is set a priori in the derivation according to in vitro measurements from the literature. The impact of considering lower or higher Tpot is investigated. The effects of inhomogeneous dose distributions are considered using clinically representative dose volume histograms. The derived LQ parameters are used to compare a large number of clinical studies using different regimes (e.g., RT modality and/or different fractionation schemes with different prescribed dose) in order to validate their applicability. The values of the equivalent uniform dose (EUD) and biologically effective dose (BED) are used as a common metric to compare the biological effectiveness of each treatment regime. We have obtained a plausible set of radiobiological parameters for breast cancer: agr = 0.3 Gy-1, agr/bgr = 10 Gy and sub

  20. Large-scale copy number variants (CNVs): Distribution in normal subjects and FISH/real-time qPCR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Ying; Liu, Xudong; Harvard, Chansonette; Nolin, Sarah L; Brown, W Ted; Koochek, Maryam; Holden, Jeanette JA; Lewis, ME Suzanne; Rajcan-Separovic, Evica

    2007-01-01

    Background Genomic copy number variants (CNVs) involving >1 kb of DNA have recently been found to be widely distributed throughout the human genome. They represent a newly recognized form of DNA variation in normal populations, discovered through screening of the human genome using high-throughput and high resolution methods such as array comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH). In order to understand their potential significance and to facilitate interpretation of array-CGH findings in constitutional disorders and cancers, we studied 27 normal individuals (9 Caucasian; 9 African American; 9 Hispanic) using commercially available 1 Mb resolution BAC array (Spectral Genomics). A selection of CNVs was further analyzed by FISH and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). Results A total of 42 different CNVs were detected in 27 normal subjects. Sixteen (38%) were not previously reported. Thirteen of the 42 CNVs (31%) contained 28 genes listed in OMIM. FISH analysis of 6 CNVs (4 previously reported and 2 novel CNVs) in normal subjects resulted in the confirmation of copy number changes for 1 of 2 novel CNVs and 2 of 4 known CNVs. Three CNVs tested by FISH were further validated by RT-qPCR and comparable data were obtained. This included the lack of copy number change by both RT-qPCR and FISH for clone RP11-100C24, one of the most common known copy number variants, as well as confirmation of deletions for clones RP11-89M16 and RP5-1011O17. Conclusion We have described 16 novel CNVs in 27 individuals. Further study of a small selection of CNVs indicated concordant and discordant array vs. FISH/RT-qPCR results. Although a large number of CNVs has been reported to date, quantification using independent methods and detailed cellular and/or molecular assessment has been performed on a very small number of CNVs. This information is, however, very much needed as it is currently common practice to consider CNVs reported in normal subjects as benign changes when detected in

  1. Large numbers of cold positronium atoms created in laser-selected Rydberg states using resonant charge exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConnell, R.; Gabrielse, G.; Kolthammer, W. S.; Richerme, P.; Müllers, A.; Walz, J.; Grzonka, D.; Zielinski, M.; Fitzakerley, D.; George, M. C.; Hessels, E. A.; Storry, C. H.; Weel, M.; ATRAP Collaboration

    2016-03-01

    Lasers are used to control the production of highly excited positronium atoms (Ps*). The laser light excites Cs atoms to Rydberg states that have a large cross section for resonant charge-exchange collisions with cold trapped positrons. For each trial with 30 million trapped positrons, more than 700 000 of the created Ps* have trajectories near the axis of the apparatus, and are detected using Stark ionization. This number of Ps* is 500 times higher than realized in an earlier proof-of-principle demonstration (2004 Phys. Lett. B 597 257). A second charge exchange of these near-axis Ps* with trapped antiprotons could be used to produce cold antihydrogen, and this antihydrogen production is expected to be increased by a similar factor.

  2. States of local stresses in the Sea of Marmara through the analysis of large numbers of small earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkusuz Öztürk, Yasemin; Meral Özel, Nurcan; Özbakir, Ali Değer

    2015-12-01

    We invert the present day states of stresses for five apparent earthquake clusters in the Northern branch of the North Anatolian Fault in the Sea of Marmara. As the center of the Sea of Marmara is prone to a devastating earthquake within a seismic gap between these selected clusters, sensitive analyses of the understanding of the stress and strain characteristics of the region are all-important. We use high quality P and S phases, and P-wave first motion polarities from 398 earthquakes with ML ≥ 1.5 using at least 10 P-wave first motion polarities (FMPs), and a maximum of 1 inconsistent station, obtained from a total of 105 seismic stations, including 5 continuous OBSs. We report here on large numbers of simultaneously determined individual fault plane solutions (FPSs), and orientations of principal stress axes, which previously have not been determined with any confidence from the basins of the Sea of Marmara and prominent fault branches. We find NE-SW trending transtensional stress structures, predominantly in the earthquake clusters of the Eastern Tekirdağ Basin, Eastern Çınarcık Basin, Yalova and Gemlik areas. We infer that a dextral strike-slip deformation exist in the Eastern Ganos Offshore cluster. Furthermore, we analyze FPSs of four ML ≥ 4.0 earthquakes, occurred in seismically quiet regions after 1999 Izmit earthquake. Stress tensor solutions from a cluster of small events that we have obtained, correlate with FPSs of these moderate size events as a demonstration of the effectiveness of the small earthquakes in the derivation of states of local stresses. Consequently, our analyses of seismicity and large numbers of FPSs using the densest seismic network of Turkey contribute to better understanding of the present states of the stresses and seismotectonics of the Sea of Marmara.

  3. Retrograde rotation of the large-scale flow in turbulent rotating Rayleigh-Benard convection with high Rossby number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Jin-Qiang; Li, Hui-Min; Wang, Xue-Ying

    2015-11-01

    We present measurements of the azimuthal orientation θ (t) of the large-scale circulation (LSC) for turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in the presence of week rotations Ω . Linear retrograde rotations of the LSC circulating plane are observed over the entire Rossby-number range (1 <= Ro <= 300) studied. When the Ro increases, the ratio of the retrograde rotation rate, γ = - < . θ > / Ω remains nearly a constant 0.12 in the range of (1 <= Ro <= 80) and starts to increases when Ro > 80 . When Ro ~= 300 , γ approaches a value of 0.36 close to the prediction from previous theoretical models. In a background of linear rotations, erratic changes in θ (t) accompanied by decreasing in the LSC amplitude δ are observed. These small- δ events give rise to the increasing γ with very high Ro numbers (80 <= Ro <= 300). In this range, the diffusivity of θ is proportional to δ-2 . Moreover, the occurrence frequency of the small- δ events, and their average duration are independent on Ro. We propose a model to include additional viscous damping for the LSC azimuthal motion due to turbulent viscosity and provide theoretical interpretations of the experimental results. Work supported by NSFC Grant No. 11202151.

  4. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications.

  5. Drug testing and flow cytometry analysis on a large number of uniform sized tumor spheroids using a microfluidic device

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) tumor spheroid possesses great potential as an in vitro model to improve predictive capacity for pre-clinical drug testing. In this paper, we combine advantages of flow cytometry and microfluidics to perform drug testing and analysis on a large number (5000) of uniform sized tumor spheroids. The spheroids are formed, cultured, and treated with drugs inside a microfluidic device. The spheroids can then be harvested from the device without tedious operation. Due to the ample cell numbers, the spheroids can be dissociated into single cells for flow cytometry analysis. Flow cytometry provides statistical information in single cell resolution that makes it feasible to better investigate drug functions on the cells in more in vivo-like 3D formation. In the experiments, human hepatocellular carcinoma cells (HepG2) are exploited to form tumor spheroids within the microfluidic device, and three anti-cancer drugs: Cisplatin, Resveratrol, and Tirapazamine (TPZ), and their combinations are tested on the tumor spheroids with two different sizes. The experimental results suggest the cell culture format (2D monolayer vs. 3D spheroid) and spheroid size play critical roles in drug responses, and also demonstrate the advantages of bridging the two techniques in pharmaceutical drug screening applications. PMID:26877244

  6. Large number of replacement polymorphisms in rapidly evolving genes of Drosophila. Implications for genome-wide surveys of DNA polymorphism.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, K J; Nigro, L; Aquadro, C F; Tautz, D

    1999-01-01

    We present a survey of nucleotide polymorphism of three novel, rapidly evolving genes in populations of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans. Levels of silent polymorphism are comparable to other loci, but the number of replacement polymorphisms is higher than that in most other genes surveyed in D. melanogaster and D. simulans. Tests of neutrality fail to reject neutral evolution with one exception. This concerns a gene located in a region of high recombination rate in D. simulans and in a region of low recombination rate in D. melanogaster, due to an inversion. In the latter case it shows a very low number of polymorphisms, presumably due to selective sweeps in the region. Patterns of nucleotide polymorphism suggest that most substitutions are neutral or nearly neutral and that weak (positive and purifying) selection plays a significant role in the evolution of these genes. At all three loci, purifying selection of slightly deleterious replacement mutations appears to be more efficient in D. simulans than in D. melanogaster, presumably due to different effective population sizes. Our analysis suggests that current knowledge about genome-wide patterns of nucleotide polymorphism is far from complete with respect to the types and range of nucleotide substitutions and that further analysis of differences between local populations will be required to understand the forces more completely. We note that rapidly diverging and nearly neutrally evolving genes cannot be expected only in the genome of Drosophila, but are likely to occur in large numbers also in other organisms and that their function and evolution are little understood so far. PMID:10581279

  7. Development and application of an optogenetic platform for controlling and imaging a large number of individual neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammed, Ali Ibrahim Ali

    The understanding and treatment of brain disorders as well as the development of intelligent machines is hampered by the lack of knowledge of how the brain fundamentally functions. Over the past century, we have learned much about how individual neurons and neural networks behave, however new tools are critically needed to interrogate how neural networks give rise to complex brain processes and disease conditions. Recent innovations in molecular techniques, such as optogenetics, have enabled neuroscientists unprecedented precision to excite, inhibit and record defined neurons. The impressive sensitivity of currently available optogenetic sensors and actuators has now enabled the possibility of analyzing a large number of individual neurons in the brains of behaving animals. To promote the use of these optogenetic tools, this thesis integrates cutting edge optogenetic molecular sensors which is ultrasensitive for imaging neuronal activity with custom wide field optical microscope to analyze a large number of individual neurons in living brains. Wide-field microscopy provides a large field of view and better spatial resolution approaching the Abbe diffraction limit of fluorescent microscope. To demonstrate the advantages of this optical platform, we imaged a deep brain structure, the Hippocampus, and tracked hundreds of neurons over time while mouse was performing a memory task to investigate how those individual neurons related to behavior. In addition, we tested our optical platform in investigating transient neural network changes upon mechanical perturbation related to blast injuries. In this experiment, all blasted mice show a consistent change in neural network. A small portion of neurons showed a sustained calcium increase for an extended period of time, whereas the majority lost their activities. Finally, using optogenetic silencer to control selective motor cortex neurons, we examined their contributions to the network pathology of basal ganglia related to

  8. Milk fat globule membrane coating of large lipid droplets in the diet of young mice prevents body fat accumulation in adulthood.

    PubMed

    Baars, Annemarie; Oosting, Annemarie; Engels, Eefje; Kegler, Diane; Kodde, Andrea; Schipper, Lidewij; Verkade, Henkjan J; van der Beek, Eline M

    2016-06-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated protective effects of breast-feeding on childhood obesity. Differences between human milk and infant milk formula (IMF) in dietary lipid structure may contribute to this effect. In our mouse model, feeding a diet containing large lipid droplets coated with phospholipids (PL) (Nuturis®; PL of milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) fraction origin) in early life protected against excessive body fat accumulation following a diet challenge in adult life. We now set out to determine the relevance of increased droplet size and/or MFGM lipid droplet coating to the observed anti-obesogenic effects in adult life. From day 16 to 42, male mouse pups were exposed to diets with small (S) or large (L) lipid droplets (0·3 v. 2·9 µm average mode diameter, respectively), either without MFGM or with MFGM coating around the lipid droplet, resulting in four groups: S (control diet), L, Scoating and Lcoating (Nuturis® IMF diet). Mice were subsequently challenged with a Western-style diet until dissection at postnatal day 98. A non-challenged group served as reference (REF). We repeatedly determined body composition between postnatal day 42 and 98. At day 98 plasma and gene expression measurements were performed. Only the Nuturis® IMF diet (Lcoating) in early life containing MFGM-coated large lipid droplets reduced body fat mass to a level comparable with the REF group. These data support the notion that the structural aspects of lipids in human milk, for example, both lipid droplet size as well as the MFGM coating, may contribute to its reported protective effect against obesity in later life. PMID:27040581

  9. Alterations in Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability to Large and Small Molecules and Leukocyte Accumulation after Traumatic Brain Injury: Effects of Post-Traumatic Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    Lotocki, George; de Rivero Vaccari, Juan Pablo; Perez, Enrique R.; Sanchez-Molano, Juliana; Furones-Alonso, Ofelia; Bramlett, Helen M.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract We investigated the temporal and regional profile of blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability to both large and small molecules after moderate fluid percussion (FP) brain injury in rats and determined the effects of post-traumatic modest hypothermia (33°C/4 h) on these vascular perturbations. The visible tracers biotin-dextrin-amine 3000 (BDA-3K, 3 kDa) and horseradish peroxidase (HRP, 44 kDa) were injected intravenously at 4 h or 3 or 7 days post-TBI. At 30 min after the tracer infusion, both small and large molecular weight tracers were detected in the contusion area as well as remote regions adjacent to the injury epicenter in both cortical and hippocampal structures. In areas adjacent to the contusion site, increased permeability to the small molecular weight tracer (BDA-3K) was evident at 4 h post-TBI and remained visible after 7 days survival. In contrast, the larger tracer molecule (HRP) appeared in these remote areas at acute permeable sites but was not detected at later post-traumatic time periods. A regionally specific relationship was documented at 3 days between the late-occurring permeability changes observed with BDA-3K and the accumulation of CD68-positive macrophages. Mild hypothermia initiated 30 min after TBI reduced permeability to both large and small tracers and the infiltration of CD68-positive cells. These results indicate that moderate brain injury produces temperature-sensitive acute, as well as more long-lasting vascular perturbations associated with secondary injury mechanisms. PMID:19558276

  10. Maintenance of Large Numbers of Virus Genomes in Human Cytomegalovirus-Infected T98G Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Ying-Liang; Ye, Han-Qing; Zavala, Anamaria G.; Yang, Cui-Qing; Miao, Ling-Feng; Fu, Bi-Shi; Seo, Keun Seok; Davrinche, Christian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT After infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) persists for life. Primary infections and reactivation of latent virus can both result in congenital infection, a leading cause of central nervous system birth defects. We previously reported long-term HCMV infection in the T98G glioblastoma cell line (1). HCMV infection has been further characterized in T98Gs, emphasizing the presence of HCMV DNA over an extended time frame. T98Gs were infected with either HCMV Towne or AD169-IE2-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) strains. Towne infections yielded mixed IE1 antigen-positive and -negative (Ag+/Ag−) populations. AD169-IE2-eGFP infections also yielded mixed populations, which were sorted to obtain an IE2− (Ag−) population. Viral gene expression over the course of infection was determined by immunofluorescent analysis (IFA) and reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR). The presence of HCMV genomes was determined by PCR, nested PCR (n-PCR), and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Compared to the HCMV latency model, THP-1, Towne-infected T98Gs expressed IE1 and latency-associated transcripts for longer periods, contained many more HCMV genomes during early passages, and carried genomes for a greatly extended period of passaging. Large numbers of HCMV genomes were also found in purified Ag− AD169-infected cells for the first several passages. Interestingly, latency transcripts were observed from very early times in the Towne-infected cells, even when IE1 was expressed at low levels. Although AD169-infected Ag− cells expressed no detectable levels of either IE1 or latency transcripts, they also maintained large numbers of genomes within the cell nuclei for several passages. These results identify HCMV-infected T98Gs as an attractive new model in the study of the long-term maintenance of virus genomes in the context of neural cell types. IMPORTANCE Our previous work showed that T98G glioblastoma cells were semipermissive to HCMV infection; virus

  11. An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver for three-dimensional flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y.; Shu, C.; Yang, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    An improved multiphase lattice Boltzmann flux solver (MLBFS) is proposed in this work for effective simulation of three-dimensional (3D) multiphase flows with large density ratio and high Reynolds number. As a finite volume scheme, the MLBFS originally proposed in [27] applies the finite volume method to solve for macroscopic flow variables directly. The fluxes are reconstructed locally at each cell interface by using the standard LBM solutions. Due to the modeling error of the standard LBM, the reconstructed fluxes deviate from those in the Navier-Stokes equations; and to compensate this error, a complex tensor is introduced in the original MLBFS. However, the computation of the tensor introduces additional complexity and usually needs a relatively thicker interface thickness to maintain numerical stability, which makes the solver be complex and inefficient in the 3D case. To remove this drawback, in this work, a theoretical analysis to the formulations obtained from the Chapman-Enskog expansion is conducted. It is shown that the modeling error can be effectively removed by modifying the computation of the equilibrium density distribution function. With this improvement, the proposed 3D MLBFS not only avoids the calculation of the compensation tensor but also is able to maintain numerical stability with very thin interface thickness. Several benchmark cases, including the challenging droplet impacting on a dry surface, head-on collisions of binary droplets and droplet splashing on a thin film with density ratio 1000 and Reynolds number up to 3000, are studied to validate the proposed solver. The obtained results agree well with the published data.

  12. Automated calculation of the evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of peatland sites using diurnal groundwater table fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Eike; Bechtold, Michel; Dettmann, Ullrich; Tiemeyer, Bärbel

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration is one of the main processes controlling peatland hydrology. Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from peatlands are in turn strongly controlled by the groundwater table. Through the increasing political and scientific interest to reduce GHG emissions, monitoring and modelling strategies to optimize re-wetting strategies and to quantify GHG emissions are needed. To achieve these aims, an accurate determination of the evapotranspiration as an essential part of the water balance is required. Many different approaches are known to determine the evapotranspiration. They are mostly either expensive or hard to parameterize. Plant specific crop coefficients (Kc-values) are an option to calculate plant-specific evapotranspiration but due to the lack of Kc-values for typical peatland vegetation types more data on evapotranspiration from peatlands in the temperate zone are required. Furthermore, simple methods to estimate evapotranspiration are needed especially for monitoring projects. Diurnal groundwater table fluctuations caused by root water uptake and groundwater inflow can be used to calculate daily evapotranspiration rates. This approach was first described by White (1932) who compared groundwater recovery rates at night to the decline during daytime. Besides the groundwater table data only the specific yield (Sy) is needed to calculate evapotranspiration. However, the method has some limitations because not all days can be evaluated which leads to data gaps during rainy and very dry or very wet periods. This study presents an automated method to calculate the specific yield, evapotranspiration and crop coefficients for a large number of sites covering all major peatland types and their typical land uses in Germany. As an input for our method, only groundwater level, precipitation and grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) data is required. In a first step, the groundwater level data was smoothed by a LOESS function. In a second step, site-specific SY

  13. Pursuing the plasma dynamo and MRI in the laboratory: Hydrodynamic studies of unmagnetized plasmas at large magnetic Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weisberg, David B.

    A new method for studying flow-driven MHD instabilities in the laboratory has been developed, using a highly conductive, low viscosity, spherical plasma. The confinement, heating, and stirring of this unmagnetized plasma has been demonstrated experimentally, laying the foundations for the laboratory studies of a diverse collection of astrophysically-relevant instabilities. Specifically, plasma flows conducive to studies of the dynamo effect and the magnetorotational instability (MRI) are measured using a wide array of plasma diagnostics, and compare favorably to hydrodynamic numerical models. The Madison plasma dynamo experiment (MPDX) uses a cylindrically symmetric spherical boundary ring cusp geometry built from strong permanent magnets to confine a large (R=1.5 m), warm (Te < 20eV), dense, unmagnetized plasma. Detailed probe measurements of plasma transport into the edge cusp have demonstrated that particle confinement follows an ambipolar diffusion model, wherein unmagnetized ions are the more mobile plasma species and total plasma transport is limited by the slow cross-field diffusion of magnetized electrons. Emissive discharge heating is shown to be an efficient method of plasma heating, but limitations caused by instabilities in the anode-plasma sheath are found to prohibit the desired access to the full dimensionless parameter space in Re and Rm. The plasma is stirred via J x B torques using current drawn from emissive LaB6 cathodes located at the magnetized plasma edge, which also ionize and heat the plasma via sizable discharge current injection. Combination Langmuir/Mach probes measure maximum velocities of 6 km/s and 3 km/s in helium and argon plasmas, respectively, and ion viscosity is shown to be an efficient mechanism for transporting momentum from the magnetized edge into the unmagnetized core. Momentum loss to neutral charge-exchange collisions serves as the main source of drag on the bulk plasma velocity, and ionization fraction (He ˜ 0.6, Ar

  14. A new general approach for the simultaneous chemical synthesis of large numbers of oligonucleotides: segmental solid supports.

    PubMed Central

    Frank, R; Heikens, W; Heisterberg-Moutsis, G; Blöcker, H

    1983-01-01

    A new approach is described which will allow the simultaneous synthesis of large numbers of pre-defined oligonucleotide chains. No machine aid is needed. The simultaneous syntheses can be performed by one person and do not require much more time than is currently needed for the synthesis of just one oligonucleotide in existing strategies. The general idea is the following: One uses noninterchangeable polymeric entities from each of which enough OD units can be isolated after completion of the syntheses. Whenever growing chains on different entities have to be elongated with the same building block these entities are gathered in the same reaction vessel. After such a common reaction cycle the entities are separated and now combined according to the next common building blocks etc. The practicability of this approach is demonstrated by the synthesis of d(T-A-A-T-A-T-T-A) and d(T-A-G-T-A-C-T-A) on cellulose filter disks following the phosphotriester approach. Images PMID:6306587

  15. Impact of prospective payments on a tertiary care center receiving large numbers of critically ill patients by aeromedical transport.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F; Larsen, K; Clemmer, T P; Burke, J P; Orme, J F; Napoli, M; Christison, E

    1986-03-01

    To determine the economic impact of federal prospective payments and the potential effect if private insurance payers were to implement similar prospective payments, we examined payments under Medicare diagnosis-related grouping (DRG) reimbursement policies for 105 Medicare and 357 non-Medicare patients admitted to a tertiary care center via air transport. Among the 105 Medicare patients, the average length of stay was 11.4 days and the mortality rate was 24%. Hospital charges exceeded DRG reimbursement for 74% of Medicare patients. A comparison of previous Medicare payment policies to current federal DRG reimbursement resulted in a revenue loss to the hospital of $667,229 ($6335 per patient). For the 357 non-Medicare patients, the average length of stay was 10.8 days, the mortality rate was 10%, and hospital charges exceeded Medicare DRG reimbursement for 78% of the patients. Implementation of DRG-like payments by non-Medicare insurers would create a hospital revenue loss of $2,493,048 ($6983 per patient). We conclude that unless current and planned prospective payment policies are modified, the use of aeromedical transport services to recruit large numbers of critically ill patients to tertiary care centers is economically prohibitive. PMID:3080276

  16. A Large Number of Hα Emission Stars and Herbig-Haro Objects in and around Bright-Rimmed Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogura, K.; Sugitani, K.

    We present the results of our Hα grism spectroscopy and narrow-band imaging observations of bright-rimmed clouds (BRCs) in search of candidate pre-main sequence stars of the T Tauri, Herbig Ae/Be and related types, and of Herbig-Haro (HH) objects. We have detected altogether 460 Hα emission stars down to about R = 20, around all but two of the 28 BRCs observed. The present study has, for the first time, reached down nearly to the faintest classical T Tauri stars in OB associations. Twelve new HH objects have also been found. Most are of small apparent size, emphasizing the need for deep searches at high spatial resolution. These stars and HH objects are concentrated near the tip of BRCs, thus supporting our hypothesis of ``small-scale sequential star formation''. The presence of such a large number of Hα emission stars around BRCs implies that second-generation formation of low-mass stars in HII regions is relatively extensive, and further supports the notion of cohabitation of high- and low-mass populations in OB associations.

  17. Theory of magnetospheric standing hydromagnetic waves with large azimuthal wave number 2. Eigenmodes of the magnetosonic and Alfven oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Taylor, J.P.H.; Walker, A.D.M. )

    1987-09-01

    When the azimuthal wave number is large, the equations describing standing hydromagnetic waves in the magnetosphere can be written as a set of coupled equations describing the couples magnetosonic and Alfven waves. These equations are decoupled when the filed lines are straight. The eigenfrequencies of the decoupled oscillations are computed. For typical conditions in the outer magnetosphere these give periods in the Pc 4-5 band or above. The longitudinal magnetosonic wave consists of oscillations in the plasma pressure, the longitudinal plasma drift velocity and the compressional magnetic field. Higher harmonics of the standing waves have nodes quite near the equator. These higher harmonics have larger fractional pressure perturbations at high latitudes. The compressional magnetic field for all modes, however, is substantially attenuated at higher latitudes, and the theory predicts that compressional oscillations of B are only likely to be seen near the equator. Conditions can be favorable for resonance to occur between the magnetosonic mode and the transverse Alfven mode. The computed results show periods of the right order of magnitude to explain observations of compressional pulsations. The theory has the potential to explain the polarization when coupling is fully taken into account.

  18. Numerical Study of Flow Over Two Circular Cylinders Arranged in Tandem at High Reynolds Numbers using Large Eddy Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Raymond; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2005-11-01

    Previously published exprimental data of the flow around two circular cylinders arranged in tandem have shown that for small spacings between the cylinders, the shear layer from the upstream cylinder reattaches to the downstream cylinder, hence creating a recirculation region in between the two cylinders. The experimental data was obtained at Re=65,000 and it was found that beyond a critical spacing (L/D ˜ 4.0), the upstream shear layer ceases to attach to the downstream cylinder, resulting in a dramatic change in the flow mechanisms. Previous numerical studies using two-dimensional RANS and URANS were unsatisfactory at predicting the length of the recirculation region of the upstream cylinder and consequently badly predicted the hydrodynamic forces between the two cylinders. In this study, Large Eddy Simulation with a dynamic Smagorinsky subgrid-scale model was used to investigate the flow around two circular cylinders arranged in tandem. Results from high Reynolds numbers simulations will be presented and practical considerations in using LES in such a flow configuration will be discussed.

  19. Meta-ethnography 25 years on: challenges and insights for synthesising a large number of qualitative studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Studies that systematically search for and synthesise qualitative research are becoming more evident in health care, and they can make an important contribution to patient care. Our team was funded to complete a meta-ethnography of patients’ experience of chronic musculoskeletal pain. It has been 25 years since Noblit and Hare published their core text on meta-ethnography, and the current health research environment brings additional challenges to researchers aiming to synthesise qualitative research. Noblit and Hare propose seven stages of meta-ethnography which take the researcher from formulating a research idea to expressing the findings. These stages are not discrete but form part of an iterative research process. We aimed to build on the methods of Noblit and Hare and explore the challenges of including a large number of qualitative studies into a qualitative systematic review. These challenges hinge upon epistemological and practical issues to be considered alongside expectations about what determines high quality research. This paper describes our method and explores these challenges. Central to our method was the process of collaborative interpretation of concepts and the decision to exclude original material where we could not decipher a concept. We use excerpts from our research team’s reflexive statements to illustrate the development of our methods. PMID:24951054

  20. Large Eddy Simulation study of the development of finite-channel lock-release currents at high Grashof numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, Seng-Keat

    2005-11-01

    Lock-exchange gravity current flows produced by the instantaneous release of a heavy fluid are investigated using 3-D well resolved Large Eddy Simulation simulations at Grashof numbers up to 8*10^9. It is found the 3-D simulations correctly predict a constant front velocity over the initial slumping phase and a front speed decrease proportional to t-1/3 (the time t is measured from the release) over the inviscid phase, in agreement with theory. The evolution of the current in the simulations is found to be similar to that observed experimentally by Hacker et al. (1996). The effect of the dynamic LES model on the solutions is discussed. The energy budget of the current is discussed and the contribution of the turbulent dissipation to the total dissipation is analyzed. The limitations of less expensive 2D simulations are discussed; in particular their failure to correctly predict the spatio-temporal distributions of the bed shear stresses which is important in determining the amount of sediment the gravity current can entrain in the case in advances of a loose bed.

  1. Experimental and model-based evaluation of the role of denitrifying polyphosphate accumulating organisms at two large scale WWTPs in northern Poland.

    PubMed

    Makinia, J; Rosenwinkel, K H; Swinarski, M; Dobiegala, E

    2006-01-01

    The capabilities of denitrifying Polyphosphate Accumulating Organisms (DPAOs) in two large-scale plants in northern Poland performing enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) were evaluated in this study. A series of batch tests with the process biomass aimed at the measurements of phosphate release (with artificial substrate and real wastewater) and subsequent phosphate uptake under anoxic/aerobic conditions. The process kinetics were predicted using ASM2d implemented in the GPS-X ver. 4.0.2 simulation package. The results from one experimental series (summer) were used for the model calibration, whereas the results from another series (spring) were used for the model validation. The model parameters were also accurately confirmed by predictions of the accompanying field measurements in the full-scale bioreactors. The experimental and simulation results revealed that a relatively small fraction of PAO could denitrify (eta(NO3,PAO) = 0.32). The denitrification rates associated with the anoxic storage of PP and the anoxic growth of PAO only constituted 16.0-21.0% of the denitrification rates associated with the anoxic activity of "ordinary" heterotrophs. PMID:17163015

  2. ADF95: Tool for automatic differentiation of a FORTRAN code designed for large numbers of independent variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Straka, Christian W.

    2005-06-01

    ADF95 is a tool to automatically calculate numerical first derivatives for any mathematical expression as a function of user defined independent variables. Accuracy of derivatives is achieved within machine precision. ADF95 may be applied to any FORTRAN 77/90/95 conforming code and requires minimal changes by the user. It provides a new derived data type that holds the value and derivatives and applies forward differencing by overloading all FORTRAN operators and intrinsic functions. An efficient indexing technique leads to a reduced memory usage and a substantially increased performance gain over other available tools with operator overloading. This gain is especially pronounced for sparse systems with large number of independent variables. A wide class of numerical simulations, e.g., those employing implicit solvers, can profit from ADF95. Program summaryTitle of program:ADF95 Catalogue identifier: ADVI Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVI Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed: all platforms with a FORTRAN 95 compiler Programming language used:FORTRAN 95 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3103 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 9862 Distribution format: tar.gz Nature of problem: In many areas in the computational sciences first order partial derivatives for large and complex sets of equations are needed with machine precision accuracy. For example, any implicit or semi-implicit solver requires the computation of the Jacobian matrix, which contains the first derivatives with respect to the independent variables. ADF95 is a software module to facilitate the automatic computation of the first partial derivatives of any arbitrarily complex mathematical FORTRAN expression. The program exploits the sparsity inherited by many set of equations thereby enabling faster computations compared to alternate

  3. Accumulation of Polyhydroxyalkanoic Acid Containing Large Amounts of Unsaturated Monomers in Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 Utilizing Saccharides and Its Inhibition by 2-Bromooctanoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Joo; Choi, Mun Hwan; Kim, Tae-Un; Yoon, Sung Chul

    2001-01-01

    A psychrotrophic bacterium, Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07, which is able to accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoic acid (PHA) containing large amounts of 3-hydroxy-cis-5-dodecenoate unit up to 35 mol% in the cell from unrelated substrates such as fructose, succinate, etc., was isolated from an activated sludge in a municipal wastewater treatment plant. When it was grown on heptanoic acid (C7) to hexadecanoic acid (C16) as the sole carbon source, the monomer compositional characteristics of the synthesized PHA were similar to those observed in other fluorescent pseudomonads belonging to rRNA homology group I. However, growth on stearic acid (C18) led to no PHA accumulation, but instead free stearic acid was stored in the cell. The existence of the linkage between fatty acid de novo synthesis and PHA synthesis was confirmed by using inhibitors such as acrylic acid and two other compounds, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid, which are known to inhibit β-oxidation enzymes in animal cells. Acrylic acid completely inhibited PHA synthesis at a concentration of 4 mM in 40 mM octanoate-grown cells, but no inhibition of PHA synthesis occurred in 70 mM fructose-grown cells in the presence of 1 to 5 mM acrylic acid. 2-Bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid were found to much inhibit PHA synthesis much more strongly in fructose-grown cells than in octanoate-grown cells over concentrations ranging from 1 to 5 mM. However, 2-bromooctanoic acid and 4-pentenoic acid did not inhibit cell growth at all in the fructose media. Especially, with the cells grown on fructose, 2-bromooctanoic acid exhibited a steep rise in the percent PHA synthesis inhibition over a small range of concentrations below 100 μM, a finding indicative of a very specific inhibition, whereas 4-pentenoic acid showed a broad, featureless concentration dependence, suggesting a rather nonspecific inhibition. The apparent inhibition constant Ki (the concentration for 50% inhibition of PHA synthesis) for 2

  4. Email-Based Informed Consent: Innovative Method for Reaching Large Numbers of Subjects for Data Mining Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Lesley R.; Mason, Sara S.; Babiak-Vazquez, Adriana; Ray, Stacie L.; Van Baalen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    Since the 2010 NASA authorization to make the Life Sciences Data Archive (LSDA) and Lifetime Surveillance of Astronaut Health (LSAH) data archives more accessible by the research and operational communities, demand for data has greatly increased. Correspondingly, both the number and scope of requests have increased, from 142 requests fulfilled in 2011 to 224 in 2014, and with some datasets comprising up to 1 million data points. To meet the demand, the LSAH and LSDA Repositories project was launched, which allows active and retired astronauts to authorize full, partial, or no access to their data for research without individual, study-specific informed consent. A one-on-one personal informed consent briefing is required to fully communicate the implications of the several tiers of consent. Due to the need for personal contact to conduct Repositories consent meetings, the rate of consenting has not kept up with demand for individualized, possibly attributable data. As a result, other methods had to be implemented to allow the release of large datasets, such as release of only de-identified data. However the compilation of large, de-identified data sets places a significant resource burden on LSAH and LSDA and may result in diminished scientific usefulness of the dataset. As a result, LSAH and LSDA worked with the JSC Institutional Review Board Chair, Astronaut Office physicians, and NASA Office of General Counsel personnel to develop a "Remote Consenting" process for retrospective data mining studies. This is particularly useful since the majority of the astronaut cohort is retired from the agency and living outside the Houston area. Originally planned as a method to send informed consent briefing slides and consent forms only by mail, Remote Consenting has evolved into a means to accept crewmember decisions on individual studies via their method of choice: email or paper copy by mail. To date, 100 emails have been sent to request participation in eight HRP

  5. Small on the Left, Large on the Right: Numbers Orient Visual Attention onto Space in Preverbal Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bulf, Hermann; de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2016-01-01

    Numbers are represented as ordered magnitudes along a spatially oriented number line. While culture and formal education modulate the direction of this number-space mapping, it is a matter of debate whether its emergence is entirely driven by cultural experience. By registering 8-9-month-old infants' eye movements, this study shows that numerical…

  6. Small on the left, large on the right: numbers orient visual attention onto space in preverbal infants.

    PubMed

    Bulf, Hermann; de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2016-05-01

    Numbers are represented as ordered magnitudes along a spatially oriented number line. While culture and formal education modulate the direction of this number-space mapping, it is a matter of debate whether its emergence is entirely driven by cultural experience. By registering 8-9-month-old infants' eye movements, this study shows that numerical cues are critical in orienting infants' visual attention towards a peripheral region of space that is congruent with the number's relative position on a left-to-right oriented representational continuum. This finding provides the first direct evidence that, in humans, the association between numbers and oriented spatial codes occurs before the acquisition of symbols or exposure to formal education, suggesting that the number line is not merely a product of human invention. PMID:26074348

  7. Intervention for First Graders with Limited Number Knowledge: Large-Scale Replication of a Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gersten, Russell; Rolfhus, Eric; Clarke, Ben; Decker, Lauren E.; Wilkins, Chuck; Dimino, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Replication studies are extremely rare in education. This randomized controlled trial (RCT) is a scale-up replication of Fuchs et al., which in a sample of 139 found a statistically significant positive impact for Number Rockets, a small-group intervention for at-risk first graders that focused on building understanding of number operations. The…

  8. Analysis of Fluctuating Static Pressure Measurements in a Large High Reynolds Number Transonic Cryogenic Wind Tunnel. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igoe, William B.

    1991-01-01

    Dynamic measurements of fluctuating static pressure levels were made using flush mounted high frequency response pressure transducers at eleven locations in the circuit of the National Transonic Facility (NTF) over the complete operating range of this wind tunnel. Measurements were made at test section Mach numbers from 0.2 to 1.2, at pressure from 1 to 8.6 atmospheres and at temperatures from ambient to -250 F, resulting in dynamic flow disturbance measurements at the highest Reynolds numbers available in a transonic ground test facility. Tests were also made independently at variable Mach number, variable Reynolds number, and variable drivepower, each time keeping the other two variables constant thus allowing for the first time, a distinct separation of these three important variables. A description of the NTF emphasizing its flow quality features, details on the calibration of the instrumentation, results of measurements with the test section slots covered, downstream choke, effects of liquid nitrogen injection and gaseous nitrogen venting, comparisons between air and nitrogen, isolation of the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and fan drive power, and identification of the sources of significant flow disturbances is included. The results indicate that primary sources of flow disturbance in the NTF may be edge-tones generated by test section sidewall re-entry flaps and the venting of nitrogen gas from the return leg of the tunnel circuit between turns 3 and 4 in the cryogenic mode of operation. The tests to isolate the effects of Mach number, Reynolds number, and drive power indicate that Mach number effects predominate. A comparison with other transonic wind tunnels shows that the NTF has low levels of test section fluctuating static pressure especially in the high subsonic Mach number range from 0.7 to 0.9.

  9. A Few Large Roads or Many Small Ones? How to Accommodate Growth in Vehicle Numbers to Minimise Impacts on Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Jonathan R.; Lunney, Daniel; Callaghan, John; McAlpine, Clive A.

    2014-01-01

    Roads and vehicular traffic are among the most pervasive of threats to biodiversity because they fragmenting habitat, increasing mortality and opening up new areas for the exploitation of natural resources. However, the number of vehicles on roads is increasing rapidly and this is likely to continue into the future, putting increased pressure on wildlife populations. Consequently, a major challenge is the planning of road networks to accommodate increased numbers of vehicles, while minimising impacts on wildlife. Nonetheless, we currently have few principles for guiding decisions on road network planning to reduce impacts on wildlife in real landscapes. We addressed this issue by developing an approach for quantifying the impact on wildlife mortality of two alternative mechanisms for accommodating growth in vehicle numbers: (1) increasing the number of roads, and (2) increasing traffic volumes on existing roads. We applied this approach to a koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population in eastern Australia and quantified the relative impact of each strategy on mortality. We show that, in most cases, accommodating growth in traffic through increases in volumes on existing roads has a lower impact than building new roads. An exception is where the existing road network has very low road density, but very high traffic volumes on each road. These findings have important implications for how we design road networks to reduce their impacts on biodiversity. PMID:24646891

  10. Weighting Omissions and Best Practices When Using Large-Scale Data in Educational Research. Professional File. Number 101, Fall 2006

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahs-Vaughn, Debbie L.

    2006-01-01

    Federal agencies conduct large, national studies that provide abundant data easily accessible to researchers. While these datasets provide access to rich data for analyzing a multitude of topics, certain skills are necessary for appropriate use. Specifically, over sampling and multistage cluster sampling must be accommodated in the analyses to…

  11. Community-Organizing Agent: An Artificial Intelligent System for Building Learning Communities among Large Numbers of Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Minjuan; Shen, Ruimin; Han, Peng

    2007-01-01

    Web-based (or online) learning provides an unprecedented flexibility and convenience to both learners and instructors. However, large online classes relying on instructor-centered presentations could tend to isolate many learners. The size of these classes and the wide dispersion of the learners make it challenging for instructors to interact with…

  12. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  13. [How large is the tocopherol accumulation capacity of organs? Long term trials with various high oral alpha-tocopherol doses administered to rats and guinea pigs].

    PubMed

    Elmadfa, I; Walter, A

    1981-01-01

    Accumulation of Tocopherol in Various Organs. 1. The influence of different doses of vitamin E on the absorption and accumulation of tocopherol in blood and various organs was studied in long time feeding experiments with male guinea pigs (Pirbright White W 58) and male Sprague Dawley rats. The experiment with guinea pigs lasted 32 weeks, that with rats 46 weeks. Three groups of 20 animals of each species were fed semisynthetic diets containing 0.003 g (Gr. I = control), 0.203 g (Gr. II) and 1.009 g (Gr. III) D, L-alpha-tocopherol acetate per 100 g diet. The ratio of tocopherol contents in the diets was 1:100:500. 2. The tocopherol excretion in the faeces increased significantly according to the vitamin E intake; the absorption rate of tocopherol behaves inversely proportional to the level of supply. 3. The tocopherol concentration in blood serum, liver, heart and adrenals of animals of the Groups II and III increased significantly in comparison with the control animals. The tocopherol accumulation in blood and the analysed organs depends on species and is organ specific: Organs of rats of the control group contain higher levels of alpha-tocopherol compared with those of the corresponding group of guinea pigs. According to the relative accumulation capacity of the organs for vitamin E (I:II:III) following sequences can be considered: Guinea pigs: adrenals and heart, liver, blood; rats: liver, heart, blood, adrenals. 4. The tocopherol accumulating organs are of limited capacity. The ratio of the tocopherol intake (1:100:500) could not be found in any of the analysed organs. PMID:7319728

  14. High-speed horizontal-path atmospheric turbulence correction using a large actuator-number MEMS spatial light modulator in an interferometric phase conjugation engine

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, K; Stappaerts, E; Gavel, D; Wilks, S; Tucker, J; Silva, D; Olsen, J; Olivier, S; Young, P; Kartz, M; Flath, L; Kruelivitch, P; Crawford, J; Azucena, O

    2004-03-04

    Atmospheric propagation results for a high-speed, large-actuator-number, adaptive optics system are presented. The system uses a MEMS-based spatial light modulator correction device with 1024 actuators. Tests over a 1.35 km path achieved correction speeds in excess of 800 Hz and Strehl ratios close to 0.5. The wave-front sensor was based on a quadrature interferometer that directly measures phase. This technique does not require global wave-front reconstruction, making it relatively insensitive to scintillation and phase residues. The results demonstrate the potential of large actuator number MEMS-based spatial light modulators to replace conventional deformable mirrors.

  15. Reanalysis of Very Large Telescope Data for M83 with Image Subtraction-Ninefold Increase in Number of Cepheids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonanos, A. Z.; Stanek, K. Z.

    2003-07-01

    We apply the image-subtraction method in order to reanalyze the ESO Very Large Telescope data on M83 (NGC 5236), obtained and analyzed by Thim et al. Whereas Thim et al. found 12 Cepheids with periods between 12 and 55 days, we find 112 Cepheids with periods ranging from 7 to 91 days as well as ~60 other variables. These include two candidate eclipsing binaries, which, if confirmed, would be the first optically discovered outside the Local Group. We thus demonstrate that the image-subtraction method is much more powerful for detecting variability, especially in crowded fields. However, Hubble Space Telescope observations are necessary to obtain a Cepheid period-luminosity distance not dominated by blending and crowding. We propose a ``hybrid'' approach, in which numerous Cepheids are discovered and characterized using large ground-based telescopes and then followed up with the Hubble Space Telescope to obtain precise distances.

  16. Recombination Can Initiate and Terminate at a Large Number of Sites within the Rosy Locus of Drosophila Melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Clark, S. H.; Hilliker, A. J.; Chovnick, A.

    1988-01-01

    This report presents the results of a recombination experiment designed to question the existence of special sites for the initiation or termination of a recombination heteroduplex within the region of the rosy locus. Intragenic recombination events were monitored between two physically separated rosy mutant alleles ry(301) and ry(2) utilizing DNA restriction site polymorphisms as genetic markers. Both ry(301) and ry(2) are known from previous studies to be associated with gene conversion frequencies an order of magnitude lower than single site mutations. The mutations are associated with large, well defined insertions located as internal sites within the locus in prior intragenic mapping studies. On the molecular map, they represent large insertions approximately 2.7 kb apart in the second and third exons, respectively, of the XDH coding region. The present study monitors intragenic recombination in a mutant heterozygous genotype in which DNA homology is disrupted by these large discontinuities, greater than the region of DNA homology and flanking both sides of the locus. If initiation/or termination requires separate sites at either end of the locus, then intragenic recombination within the rosy locus of the heterozygote should be eliminated. Contrary to expectation, significant recombination between these sites is seen. PMID:2834266

  17. Characterization of a large, stable, high-copy-number Streptomyces plasmid that requires stability and transfer functions for heterologous polyketide overproduction.

    PubMed

    Fong, Ryan; Vroom, Jonathan A; Hu, Zhihao; Hutchinson, C Richard; Huang, Jianqiang; Cohen, Stanley N; Cohen, Stanley; Kao, Camilla M; Kao, Camilla

    2007-02-01

    A major limitation to improving small-molecule pharmaceutical production in streptomycetes is the inability of high-copy-number plasmids to tolerate large biosynthetic gene cluster inserts. A recent finding has overcome this barrier. In 2003, Hu et al. discovered a stable, high-copy-number, 81-kb plasmid that significantly elevated production of the polyketide precursor to the antibiotic erythromycin in a heterologous Streptomyces host (J. Ind. Microbiol. Biotechnol. 30:516-522, 2003). Here, we have identified mechanisms by which this SCP2*-derived plasmid achieves increased levels of metabolite production and examined how the 45-bp deletion mutation in the plasmid replication origin increased plasmid copy number. A plasmid intramycelial transfer gene, spd, and a partition gene, parAB, enhance metabolite production by increasing the stable inheritance of large plasmids containing biosynthetic genes. Additionally, high product titers required both activator (actII-ORF4) and biosynthetic genes (eryA) at high copy numbers. DNA gel shift experiments revealed that the 45-bp deletion abolished replication protein (RepI) binding to a plasmid site which, in part, supports an iteron model for plasmid replication and copy number control. Using the new information, we constructed a large high-copy-number plasmid capable of overproducing the polyketide 6-deoxyerythronolide B. However, this plasmid was unstable over multiple culture generations, suggesting that other SCP2* genes may be required for long-term, stable plasmid inheritance. PMID:17142363

  18. Coherence of interacting bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with a large number of subbands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grygiel, B.; Patucha, K.; Zaleski, T. A.

    2016-05-01

    We study the behavior of interacting ultracold bosons in optical lattices in synthetic magnetic fields with wide range of in-cell fluxes α =p /q . The problem is similar to the one of an electron moving in a tight-binding scheme in the magnetic field and becomes difficult to tackle for a growing number of magnetic subbands, q . To overcome this, we focus on the interplay of the width, shape, and number of the subbands on the formation of the coherent state of cold bosons. Using the quantum rotor approach, which goes beyond the mean-field approximation, we are able to pinpoint the elements of the band structure, which are the most significant in a proper theoretical description of the synthetic magnetic field in a bosonic lattice system. As a result, we propose a method of reconstruction of the Hofstadter butterfly spectrum by replacing the magnetic subbands with renormalized bands of a square lattice. This allows us to effectively investigate the properties of the studied system for a wide range of magnetic fluxes and their impact on the Mott-insulator-superfluid transition.

  19. Large odd-numbered carbon clusters from fullerene-ozone reactions. (Reannouncement with new availability information). Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    McElvany, S.W.; Callahan, J.H.; Ross, M.M.; Lamb, L.D.; Huffman, D.R.

    1993-06-11

    The odd-numbered carbon clusters C119, C129 and C139 have been observed in the mass spectra of toluene extracts of fullerene soots and of the products of ozone-fullerene reactions. Specifically, ozone-C60 reactions yield C119, and ozone-C70 reactions yield C139, and ozone-(C60/C70) reactions produce C119, C129, and C139. These unexpected species correspond to dimers of C60, C60/C70, and C70, respectively, less one carbon atom, and are stable gas-phase ions with behavior similar to that of fullerenes. The results suggest a new route to functionalization and derivatization of fullerenes through controlled ozone-catalyzed cage-opening reactions.

  20. Instability and associated roll structure of Marangoni convection in high Prandtl number liquid bridge with large aspect ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Nishino, K.; Kawamura, H.; Ueno, I.; Matsumoto, S.

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the experimental results on the instability and associated roll structures (RSs) of Marangoni convection in liquid bridges formed under the microgravity environment on the International Space Station. The geometry of interest is high aspect ratio (AR = height/diameter ≥ 1.0) liquid bridges of high Prandtl number fluids (Pr = 67 and 207) suspended between coaxial disks heated differentially. The unsteady flow field and associated RSs were revealed with the three-dimensional particle tracking velocimetry. It is found that the flow field after the onset of instability exhibits oscillations with azimuthal mode number m = 1 and associated RSs traveling in the axial direction. The RSs travel in the same direction as the surface flow (co-flow direction) for 1.00 ≤ AR ≤ 1.25 while they travel in the opposite direction (counter-flow direction) for AR ≥ 1.50, thus showing the change of traveling directions with AR. This traveling direction for AR ≥ 1.50 is reversed to the co-flow direction when the temperature difference between the disks is increased to the condition far beyond the critical one. This change of traveling directions is accompanied by the increase of the oscillation frequency. The characteristics of the RSs for AR ≥ 1.50, such as the azimuthal mode of oscillation, the dimensionless oscillation frequency, and the traveling direction, are in reasonable agreement with those of the previous sounding rocket experiment for AR = 2.50 and those of the linear stability analysis of an infinite liquid bridge.

  1. Efficient Evaluation of Ranking Procedures when the Number of Units is Large, With Application to SNP Identification

    PubMed Central

    Louis, Thomas A.; Ruczinski, Ingo

    2009-01-01

    Summary Simulation-based assessment is a popular and frequently necessary approach to evaluation of statistical procedures. Sometimes overlooked is the ability to take advantage of underlying mathematical relations and we focus on this aspect. We show how to take advantage of large-sample theory when conducting a simulation using the analysis of genomic data as a motivating example. The approach uses convergence results to provide an approximation to smaller-sample results, results that are available only by simulation. We consider evaluating and comparing a variety of ranking-based methods for identifying the most highly associated SNPs in a genome-wide association study, derive integral equation representations of the pre-posterior distribution of percentiles produced by three ranking methods, and provide examples comparing performance. These results are of interest in their own right and set the framework for a more extensive set of comparisons. PMID:20131327

  2. DISCOVERY OF A LARGE NUMBER OF CANDIDATE PROTOCLUSTERS TRACED BY ∼15 Mpc-SCALE GALAXY OVERDENSITIES IN COSMOS

    SciTech Connect

    Chiang, Yi-Kuan; Gebhardt, Karl; Overzier, Roderik

    2014-02-10

    To demonstrate the feasibility of studying the epoch of massive galaxy cluster formation in a more systematic manner using current and future galaxy surveys, we report the discovery of a large sample of protocluster candidates in the 1.62 deg{sup 2} COSMOS/UltraVISTA field traced by optical/infrared selected galaxies using photometric redshifts. By comparing properly smoothed three-dimensional galaxy density maps of the observations and a set of matched simulations incorporating the dominant observational effects (galaxy selection and photometric redshift uncertainties), we first confirm that the observed ∼15 comoving Mpc-scale galaxy clustering is consistent with ΛCDM models. Using further the relation between high-z overdensity and the present day cluster mass calibrated in these matched simulations, we found 36 candidate structures at 1.6 < z < 3.1, showing overdensities consistent with the progenitors of M{sub z} {sub =} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 15} M {sub ☉} clusters. Taking into account the significant upward scattering of lower mass structures, the probabilities for the candidates to have at least M{sub z=} {sub 0} ∼ 10{sup 14} M {sub ☉} are ∼70%. For each structure, about 15%-40% of photometric galaxy candidates are expected to be true protocluster members that will merge into a cluster-scale halo by z = 0. With solely photometric redshifts, we successfully rediscover two spectroscopically confirmed structures in this field, suggesting that our algorithm is robust. This work generates a large sample of uniformly selected protocluster candidates, providing rich targets for spectroscopic follow-up and subsequent studies of cluster formation. Meanwhile, it demonstrates the potential for probing early cluster formation with upcoming redshift surveys such as the Hobby-Eberly Telescope Dark Energy Experiment and the Subaru Prime Focus Spectrograph survey.

  3. The Calibration of a Large Number of Scientific Instruments for the Auroral Spatial Structures Probe Sub-Orbital Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, A.; Miller, J.; Neilsen, T. L.; Fish, C. S.; Swenson, C.

    2014-12-01

    The Auroral Spatial Structures Probe (ASSP) is a NASA sounding rocket mission to be launched in the early January 2015 time frame from the Poker Flat Research Range. The primary scientific objective of this mission is to determine the contribution of small spatial and temporal scale fluctuations of the electric fields to the larger-scale processes during active aurora. This will be accomplished through the use of a constellation of six small payloads ejected at high velocity from a sounding rocket. The multiple baseline observations of the electric and magnetic fields will be used to observe variability of both the E-field and the Poynting flux. These observations will be placed in the context of available data, including winds, large scale E-fields, and proxy conductivity (airglow images) observations.Each sub-payload will carry a crossed pair of electric field double-probe sensors, a three-axis magnetometer, and a Langmuir probe. In total there are eight of each instrument type requireing calibration. Since the instruments need to be calibrated over temperature a full calibration of a single instrument is very time-consuming. The decision was made to automate the calibration process. Measurements were taken using a relay switch-box connecting the instruments to test sources. Calibration data were saved into a database. Using post-processing scripts on these databases a calibration for each instrument at each temperature point was made. This approach is a prototype process that might be used for calibrating a large constellation of CubeSats with similar instruments. In this poster we review the ASSP science and mission, and the results of the pre-flight calibration of the science instruments.

  4. Metabolome Analysis of Biosynthetic Mutants Reveals a Diversity of Metabolic Changes and Allows Identification of a Large Number of New Compounds in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Christoph; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Schmidt, Jürgen; Schmotz, Constanze; Neumann, Steffen; Scheel, Dierk; Clemens, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    Metabolomics is facing a major challenge: the lack of knowledge about metabolites present in a given biological system. Thus, large-scale discovery of metabolites is considered an essential step toward a better understanding of plant metabolism. We show here that the application of a metabolomics approach generating structural information for the analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants allows the efficient cataloging of metabolites. Fifty-six percent of the features that showed significant differences in abundance between seeds of wild-type, transparent testa4, and transparent testa5 plants could be annotated. Seventy-five compounds were structurally characterized, 21 of which could be identified. About 40 compounds had not been known from Arabidopsis before. Also, the high-resolution analysis revealed an unanticipated expansion of metabolic conversions upstream of biosynthetic blocks. Deficiency in chalcone synthase results in the increased seed-specific biosynthesis of a range of phenolic choline esters. Similarly, a lack of chalcone isomerase activity leads to the accumulation of various naringenin chalcone derivatives. Furthermore, our data provide insight into the connection between p-coumaroyl-coenzyme A-dependent pathways. Lack of flavonoid biosynthesis results in elevated synthesis not only of p-coumarate-derived choline esters but also of sinapate-derived metabolites. However, sinapoylcholine is not the only accumulating end product. Instead, we observed specific and sophisticated changes in the complex pattern of sinapate derivatives. PMID:18552234

  5. A LARGE NUMBER OF z > 6 GALAXIES AROUND A QSO AT z = 6.43: EVIDENCE FOR A PROTOCLUSTER?

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, Yousuke; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Miyazaki, Satoshi; Komiyama, Yutaka; Goto, Tomotsugu; Furusawa, Hisanori; Overzier, Roderik

    2010-10-01

    QSOs have been thought to be important for tracing highly biased regions in the early universe, from which the present-day massive galaxies and galaxy clusters formed. While overdensities of star-forming galaxies have been found around QSOs at 2 < z < 5, the case for excess galaxy clustering around QSOs at z > 6 is less clear. Previous studies with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have reported the detection of small excesses of faint dropout galaxies in some QSO fields, but these surveys probed a relatively small region surrounding the QSOs. To overcome this problem, we have observed the most distant QSO at z = 6.4 using the large field of view of the Suprime-Cam (34' x 27'). Newly installed red-sensitive fully depleted CCDs allowed us to select Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z {approx} 6.4 more efficiently. We found seven LBGs in the QSO field, whereas only one exists in a comparison field. The significance of this apparent excess is difficult to quantify without spectroscopic confirmation and additional control fields. The Poisson probability to find seven objects when one expects four is {approx}10%, while the probability to find seven objects in one field and only one in the other is less than 0.4%, suggesting that the QSO field is significantly overdense relative to the control field. These conclusions are supported by a comparison with a cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation which includes the higher order clustering of galaxies. We find some evidence that the LBGs are distributed in a ring-like shape centered on the QSO with a radius of {approx}3 Mpc. There are no candidate LBGs within 2 Mpc from the QSO, i.e., galaxies are clustered around the QSO but appear to avoid the very center. These results suggest that the QSO is embedded in an overdense region when defined on a sufficiently large scale (i.e., larger than an HST/ACS pointing). This suggests that the QSO was indeed born in a massive halo. The central deficit of galaxies may

  6. Genome Reduction Uncovers a Large Dispensable Genome and Adaptive Role for Copy Number Variation in Asexually Propagated Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Hardigan, Michael A; Crisovan, Emily; Hamilton, John P; Kim, Jeongwoon; Laimbeer, Parker; Leisner, Courtney P; Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C; Newton, Linsey; Pham, Gina M; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Yang, Xueming; Zeng, Zixian; Douches, David S; Jiang, Jiming; Veilleux, Richard E; Buell, C Robin

    2016-02-01

    Clonally reproducing plants have the potential to bear a significantly greater mutational load than sexually reproducing species. To investigate this possibility, we examined the breadth of genome-wide structural variation in a panel of monoploid/doubled monoploid clones generated from native populations of diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum), a highly heterozygous asexually propagated plant. As rare instances of purely homozygous clones, they provided an ideal set for determining the degree of structural variation tolerated by this species and deriving its minimal gene complement. Extensive copy number variation (CNV) was uncovered, impacting 219.8 Mb (30.2%) of the potato genome with nearly 30% of genes subject to at least partial duplication or deletion, revealing the highly heterogeneous nature of the potato genome. Dispensable genes (>7000) were associated with limited transcription and/or a recent evolutionary history, with lower deletion frequency observed in genes conserved across angiosperms. Association of CNV with plant adaptation was highlighted by enrichment in gene clusters encoding functions for environmental stress response, with gene duplication playing a part in species-specific expansions of stress-related gene families. This study revealed unique impacts of CNV in a species with asexual reproductive habits and how CNV may drive adaption through evolution of key stress pathways. PMID:26772996

  7. Molecular sexing of unusually large numbers of Spheniscus magellanicus (Spheniscidae) washed ashore along the Brazilian coast in 2008.

    PubMed

    Reis, E C; Aires, R M; Moura, J F; Matias, C A R; Tavares, M; Ott, P H; Siciliano, S; Lôbo-Hajdu, G

    2011-01-01

    There have been few studies on Magellanic penguins (Spheniscus magellanicus). In 2008, these penguins washed ashore along the Brazilian coast in unusually high numbers, some reaching as far as northeast Brazil. As Magellanic penguins show little sexual dimorphism, sex determination by morphological features is not accurate. Here, we tested a molecular procedure for sexing specimens of S. magellanicus washed ashore along the coasts of Sergipe, Rio de Janeiro and Rio Grande do Sul in 2008, comparing the sex ratio between these localities. Tissue samples were collected from 135 dead, beached specimens. We carried out total genomic DNA extraction and CHD-Z/CHD-W gene amplification by PCR using P2 and P8 primers. Amplicons were separated by 12% acrylamide gel electrophoresis. We found a greater proportion of females (70%). Sex could be determined because females have two intronic regions of CHD gene of different size in the sex chromosomes, visualized as two bands on the gel (380 and 400 bp approximately), while males have only one (400 bp). Therefore, this method proved to be effective and sensitive for sex determination of S. magellanicus individuals. Data on sex ratios are useful for understanding the dynamics and ecology of Magellanic penguin populations. PMID:22180075

  8. High resolution copy number analysis of IRF4 translocation-positive diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Salaverria, Itziar; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Burkhardt, Birgit; Kreuz, Markus; Zenz, Thorsten; Oschlies, Ilske; Arnold, Norbert; Baudis, Michael; Bens, Susanne; García-Orad, Africa; Lisfeld, Jasmin; Schwaenen, Carsten; Szczepanowski, Monika; Wessendorf, Swen; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Trümper, Lorenz; Klapper, Wolfram; Siebert, Reiner

    2013-02-01

    Translocations affecting chromosome subband 6p25.3 containing the IRF4 gene have been recently described as characteristic alterations in a molecularly distinct subset of germinal center B-cell-derived lymphomas. Secondary changes have yet only been described in few of these lymphomas. Here, we performed array-comparative genomic hybridization and molecular inversion probe microarray analyses on DNA from 12 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded and two fresh-frozen IRF4 translocation-positive lymphomas, which together with the previously published data on nine cases allowed the extension of copy number analyses to a total of 23 of these lymphomas. All except one case carried chromosomal imbalances, most frequently gains in Xq28, 11q22.3-qter, and 7q32.1-qter and losses in 6q13-16.1, 15q14-22.31, and 17p. No recurrent copy-neutral losses of heterozygosity were observed. TP53 point mutations were detected in three of six cases with loss of 17p. Overall this study unravels a recurrent pattern of secondary genetic alterations in IRF4 translocation-positive lymphomas. PMID:23073988

  9. A dynamic response model for pressure sensors in continuum and high Knudsen number flows with large temperature gradients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitmore, Stephen A.; Petersen, Brian J.; Scott, David D.

    1996-01-01

    This paper develops a dynamic model for pressure sensors in continuum and rarefied flows with longitudinal temperature gradients. The model was developed from the unsteady Navier-Stokes momentum, energy, and continuity equations and was linearized using small perturbations. The energy equation was decoupled from momentum and continuity assuming a polytropic flow process. Rarefied flow conditions were accounted for using a slip flow boundary condition at the tubing wall. The equations were radially averaged and solved assuming gas properties remain constant along a small tubing element. This fundamental solution was used as a building block for arbitrary geometries where fluid properties may also vary longitudinally in the tube. The problem was solved recursively starting at the transducer and working upstream in the tube. Dynamic frequency response tests were performed for continuum flow conditions in the presence of temperature gradients. These tests validated the recursive formulation of the model. Model steady-state behavior was analyzed using the final value theorem. Tests were performed for rarefied flow conditions and compared to the model steady-state response to evaluate the regime of applicability. Model comparisons were excellent for Knudsen numbers up to 0.6. Beyond this point, molecular affects caused model analyses to become inaccurate.

  10. EPIDEMIOLOGY OF SUBSTANCE-EXPOSED PREGNANCIES AT ONE GREAT LAKES HOSPITAL THAT SERVES A LARGE NUMBER OF AMERICAN INDIANS

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Jessica D.; Jensen, Jamie L.; Campbell, Kelly; Chaudhary, Kaushal Raj; Puumala, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this research was to determine the prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at a hospital in the Great Lakes region of the U.S. Method Data were collected via retrospective chart abstractions of patients who were seen for delivery at one Great Lakes region hospital during a 1-year period who were given at least one of the International Classification of Diseases codes related to substance use. Results A total of 342 medical records were included in the analysis, and, while much race/ethnicity data were missing, a large percentage of those in our analysis identified as American Indian. The prevalence of substance-exposed pregnancies at this hospital during a 1-year period was 34.5%. The majority (84.8%) were tobacco users, and many were found to have multiple substance exposures. Also, 48.5% were found to have a mental health diagnosis in addition to substance use. Conclusions Data from this project can be used in prevention efforts, including preconception care for women at risk for substance use and mental health issues. PMID:27536897

  11. The Mitochondrial Genome of the Leaf-Cutter Ant Atta laevigata: A Mitogenome with a Large Number of Intergenic Spacers

    PubMed Central

    Rodovalho, Cynara de Melo; Lyra, Mariana Lúcio; Ferro, Milene; Bacci, Maurício

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we describe the nearly complete mitochondrial genome of the leaf-cutter ant Atta laevigata, assembled using transcriptomic libraries from Sanger and Illumina next generation sequencing (NGS), and PCR products. This mitogenome was found to be very large (18,729 bp), given the presence of 30 non-coding intergenic spacers (IGS) spanning 3,808 bp. A portion of the putative control region remained unsequenced. The gene content and organization correspond to that inferred for the ancestral pancrustacea, except for two tRNA gene rearrangements that have been described previously in other ants. The IGS were highly variable in length and dispersed through the mitogenome. This pattern was also found for the other hymenopterans in particular for the monophyletic Apocrita. These spacers with unknown function may be valuable for characterizing genome evolution and distinguishing closely related species and individuals. NGS provided better coverage than Sanger sequencing, especially for tRNA and ribosomal subunit genes, thus facilitating efforts to fill in sequence gaps. The results obtained showed that data from transcriptomic libraries contain valuable information for assembling mitogenomes. The present data also provide a source of molecular markers that will be very important for improving our understanding of genomic evolutionary processes and phylogenetic relationships among hymenopterans. PMID:24828084

  12. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    SciTech Connect

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; Garaizar, Xabier; Klein, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling, the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.

  13. Efficient Screening of Climate Model Sensitivity to a Large Number of Perturbed Input Parameters [plus supporting information

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Covey, Curt; Lucas, Donald D.; Tannahill, John; Garaizar, Xabier; Klein, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Modern climate models contain numerous input parameters, each with a range of possible values. Since the volume of parameter space increases exponentially with the number of parameters N, it is generally impossible to directly evaluate a model throughout this space even if just 2-3 values are chosen for each parameter. Sensitivity screening algorithms, however, can identify input parameters having relatively little effect on a variety of output fields, either individually or in nonlinear combination.This can aid both model development and the uncertainty quantification (UQ) process. Here we report results from a parameter sensitivity screening algorithm hitherto untested in climate modeling,more » the Morris one-at-a-time (MOAT) method. This algorithm drastically reduces the computational cost of estimating sensitivities in a high dimensional parameter space because the sample size grows linearly rather than exponentially with N. It nevertheless samples over much of the N-dimensional volume and allows assessment of parameter interactions, unlike traditional elementary one-at-a-time (EOAT) parameter variation. We applied both EOAT and MOAT to the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM), assessing CAM’s behavior as a function of 27 uncertain input parameters related to the boundary layer, clouds, and other subgrid scale processes. For radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, EOAT and MOAT rank most input parameters similarly, but MOAT identifies a sensitivity that EOAT underplays for two convection parameters that operate nonlinearly in the model. MOAT’s ranking of input parameters is robust to modest algorithmic variations, and it is qualitatively consistent with model development experience. Supporting information is also provided at the end of the full text of the article.« less

  14. A Large Accumulation of Avian Eggs from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina) Reveals a Novel Nesting Strategy in Mesozoic Birds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariela S.; García, Rodolfo A.; Fiorelli, Lucas; Scolaro, Alejandro; Salvador, Rodrigo B.; Cotaro, Carlos N.; Kaiser, Gary W.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a nesting colony of Mesozoic birds on Gondwana: a fossil accumulation in Late Cretaceous rocks mapped and collected from within the campus of the National University of Comahue, Neuquén City, Patagonia (Argentina). Here, Cretaceous ornithothoracine birds, almost certainly Enanthiornithes, nested in an arid, shallow basinal environment among sand dunes close to an ephemeral water-course. We mapped and collected 65 complete, near-complete, and broken eggs across an area of more than 55 m2. These eggs were laid either singly, or occasionally in pairs, onto a sandy substrate. All eggs were found apparently in, or close to, their original nest site; they all occur within the same bedding plane and may represent the product of a single nesting season or a short series of nesting attempts. Although there is no evidence for nesting structures, all but one of the Comahue eggs were half-buried upright in the sand with their pointed end downwards, a position that would have exposed the pole containing the air cell and precluded egg turning. This egg position is not seen in living birds, with the exception of the basal galliform megapodes who place their eggs within mounds of vegetation or burrows. This accumulation reveals a novel nesting behaviour in Mesozoic Aves that was perhaps shared with the non-avian and phylogenetically more basal troodontid theropods. PMID:23613776

  15. SU-E-T-629: Feasibility Study of Treating Multiple Brain Tumors with Large Number of Noncoplanar IMRT Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Dong, P; Ma, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To study the feasibility of treating multiple brain tumors withlarge number of noncoplanar IMRT beams. Methods: Thirty beams are selected from 390 deliverable beams separated by six degree in 4pi space. Beam selection optimization is based on a column generation algorithm. MLC leaf size is 2 mm. Dose matrices are calculated with collapsed cone convolution and superposition method in a 2 mm by 2mm by 2 mm grid. Twelve brain tumors of various shapes, sizes and locations are used to generate four plans treating 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumors. The radiation dose was 20 Gy prescribed to the 100% isodose line. Dose Volume Histograms for tumor and brain were compared. Results: All results are based on a 2 mm by 2 mm by 2 mm CT grid. For 3, 6, 9 and 12 tumor plans, minimum tumor doses are all 20 Gy. Mean tumor dose are 20.0, 20.1, 20.1 and 20.1 Gy. Maximum tumor dose are 23.3, 23.6, 25.4 and 25.4 Gy. Mean ventricles dose are 0.7, 1.7, 2.4 and 3.1 Gy.Mean subventricular zone dose are 0.8, 1.3, 2.2 and 3.2 Gy. Average Equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values for tumor are 20.1, 20.1, 20.2 and 20.2 Gy. The conformity index (CI) values are close to 1 for all 4 plans. The gradient index (GI) values are 2.50, 2.05, 2.09 and 2.19. Conclusion: Compared with published Gamma Knife treatment studies, noncoplanar IMRT treatment plan is superior in terms of dose conformity. Due to maximum limit of beams per plan, Gamma knife has to treat multiple tumors separately in different plans. Noncoplanar IMRT plans theoretically can be delivered in a single plan on any modern linac with an automated couch and image guidance. This warrants further study of using noncoplanar IMRT as a viable treatment solution for multiple brain tumors.

  16. SVA retrotransposon insertion-associated deletion represents a novel mutational mechanism underlying large genomic copy number changes with non-recurrent breakpoints

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genomic disorders are caused by copy number changes that may exhibit recurrent breakpoints processed by nonallelic homologous recombination. However, region-specific disease-associated copy number changes have also been observed which exhibit non-recurrent breakpoints. The mechanisms underlying these non-recurrent copy number changes have not yet been fully elucidated. Results We analyze large NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints as a model to investigate the full spectrum of causative mechanisms, and observe that they are mediated by various DNA double strand break repair mechanisms, as well as aberrant replication. Further, two of the 17 NF1 deletions with non-recurrent breakpoints, identified in unrelated patients, occur in association with the concomitant insertion of SINE/variable number of tandem repeats/Alu (SVA) retrotransposons at the deletion breakpoints. The respective breakpoints are refractory to analysis by standard breakpoint-spanning PCRs and are only identified by means of optimized PCR protocols designed to amplify across GC-rich sequences. The SVA elements are integrated within SUZ12P intron 8 in both patients, and were mediated by target-primed reverse transcription of SVA mRNA intermediates derived from retrotranspositionally active source elements. Both SVA insertions occurred during early postzygotic development and are uniquely associated with large deletions of 1 Mb and 867 kb, respectively, at the insertion sites. Conclusions Since active SVA elements are abundant in the human genome and the retrotranspositional activity of many SVA source elements is high, SVA insertion-associated large genomic deletions encompassing many hundreds of kilobases could constitute a novel and as yet under-appreciated mechanism underlying large-scale copy number changes in the human genome. PMID:24958239

  17. Homogeneous crystal-rich vs. zoned crystal-poor ignimbrites: how much strain accumulates in large magma reservoirs between a new magma recharge and eruption? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, C.; Bachmann, O.; Dufek, J.; Manga, M.

    2010-12-01

    Silicic volcanic fields often display two different types of deposits: (1) crystal-rich dacitic magmas that display a striking homogeneity at the hand-sample scale and (2 dominantly crystal-poor, rhyolitic magmas that commonly grade into more mafic and more crystal-rich magmas towards the end of the eruption. An well-documented example of this dichotomy is the Central San Juan Volcanic Field (Colorado, USA), where, from the 9 major ignimbrites erupted during the climactic stage (~28.6 to 26.9 Ma), 4 occur as zoned crystal-poor to crystal-rich units and the remaining 5 form crystal-rich homogeneous deposits (make sure you explain what zoned means). In this presentation, we discuss different thermal and mechanical processes that influence the homogeneity of magmas as they evolve in shallow reservoirs. For magma bodies that are able to convect, we discuss the effect of stirring and introduce a new metric for their homogeneity for time-dependent convection. We show that the strain accumulated during 5-10 convective overturns is necessary to homogenize a magma to the hand-sample scale. In contrast, crystal-rich magmas do not experience any/enough stirring as they reach a rigid mush state. For these magmas, we discuss the effect of latent heat buffering as an agent for homogenization of temperature and crystallinity near the solidus. In order to become eruptible again, a crystal mush requires a reactivation event usually, usually attributed to the injection of new, hotter magma. We show that the time required to reactivate a mush, in every relevant case, greatly exceeds the time required to accumulate 5-10 overturns for the part of the mush that is able to convect. This difference in time-scales explains why reactivated mushes are inherently homogenous when they erupt. On the other hand, dominantly crystal-poor magmas do not need to be reactivated. Their homogeneity is governed by the competition between the time between the introduction of heterogeneities (for example

  18. Low frequency of broadly neutralizing HIV antibodies during chronic infection even in quaternary epitope targeting antibodies containing large numbers of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Hicar, Mark D; Chen, Xuemin; Kalams, Spyros A; Sojar, Hakimuddin; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Spearman, Paul; Crowe, James E

    2016-02-01

    Neutralizing antibodies (Abs) are thought to be a critical component of an appropriate HIV vaccine response. It has been proposed that Abs recognizing conformationally dependent quaternary epitopes on the HIV envelope (Env) trimer may be necessary to neutralize diverse HIV strains. A number of recently described broadly neutralizing monoclonal Abs (mAbs) recognize complex and quaternary epitopes. Generally, many such Abs exhibit extensive numbers of somatic mutations and unique structural characteristics. We sought to characterize the native antibody (Ab) response against circulating HIV focusing on such conformational responses, without a prior selection based on neutralization. Using a capture system based on VLPs incorporating cleaved envelope protein, we identified a selection of B cells that produce quaternary epitope targeting Abs (QtAbs). Similar to a number of broadly neutralizing Abs, the Ab genes encoding these QtAbs showed extensive numbers of somatic mutations. However, when expressed as recombinant molecules, these Abs failed to neutralize virus or mediate ADCVI activity. Molecular analysis showed unusually high numbers of mutations in the Ab heavy chain framework 3 region of the variable genes. The analysis suggests that large numbers of somatic mutations occur in Ab genes encoding HIV Abs in chronically infected individuals in a non-directed, stochastic, manner. PMID:26748387

  19. Large-Nc limit reduces the number of independent few-body parity-violating low-energy constants in pionless effective field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schindler, Matthias R.; Springer, Roxanne P.; Vanasse, Jared

    2016-02-01

    The symmetries of the standard model dictate that for very low energies, where nucleon dynamics can be described in terms of a pionless effective field theory ( EFT(π / ) ) , the leading-order parity-violating nucleon-nucleon Lagrangian contains five independent unknown low-energy constants (LECs). We find that imposing the approximate symmetry of QCD that appears when the number of colors Nc becomes large reduces the number of independent LECs to two at leading order in the combined EFT(π / ) and large-Nc expansions. We also find a relation between the two isoscalar LECs in the large-Nc limit. This has important implications for the number of experiments and/or lattice calculations necessary to confirm this description of physics. In particular, we find that a future measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in γ ⃗d →n p together with the existing result for parity-violating p ⃗p scattering would constrain all leading-order (in the combined expansion) LECs. This is a considerable improvement on the previous understanding of the system.

  20. Simulating inbreeding depression through the mutation accumulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sousa, A. O.; de Oliveira, S. Moss; Bernardes, Américo T.

    2000-04-01

    Using the Penna model for biological aging, which is based on the mutation accumulation theory, we show that the number of homozygous loci corresponding to deleterious mutations is higher in small populations than in large ones. This decrease of heterozygosity may drive small populations to extinction even when no drastic change of the environment occurs.

  1. The Two-Phase Method for Finding a Great Number of Eigenpairs of the Symmetric or Weakly Non-symmetric Large Eigenvalue Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dul, Franciszek A.; Arczewski, Krzysztof

    1994-03-01

    Although it has been stated that "an attempt to solve (very large problems) by subspace iterations seems futile" (H. G. Matthies, Comput. Struct.21 (1985), p. 324), we will show that the statement is not true, especially for extremely large eigenproblems. In this paper a new two-phase subspace iteration/Rayleigh quotient/conjugate gradient method for generalized, large, symmetric eigenproblems Ax = λBx is presented. It has the ability of solving extremely large eigenproblems, N = 216,000, for example, and finding a large number of leftmost or rightmost eigenpairs, up to 1000 or more. Multiple eigenpairs, even those with multiplicity 100, can be easily found. The use of the proposed method for solving the big full eigenproblems ( N ˜ 10 3), as well as for large weakly non-symmetric eigenproblems, have been considered also. The proposed method is fully iterative; thus the factorization of matrices is avoided. The key idea consists in joining two methods: subspace and Rayleigh quotient iterations. The systems of indefinite and almost singular linear equations ( A - σ B) x = By are solved by various iterative conjugate gradient/Lanczos methods. It will be shown that the standard conjugate gradient method can be used without danger of breaking down due to its property that may be called "self-correction towards the eigenvector," discovered recently by us. The use of various preconditioners (SSOR and IC) has also been considered. The main features of the proposed method have been analyzed in detail. Comparisons with other methods, such as, accelerated subspace iteration, Lanczos, Davidson, TLIME, TRACMN, and SRQMCG, are presented. The results of numerical tests for various physical problems (acoustic, vibrations of structures, quantum chemistry) are presented as well. The final conclusion is that our new method is usually much faster than other iterative methods, especially for very large eigenproblems arising from 3D elliptic or biharmonic problems defined on

  2. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  3. Aerodynamic Effects of High Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade With Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie B.; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of high inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. These results are compared to previous measurements made in a low turbulence environment. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The current study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Assessing the effects of turbulence at these large incidence and Reynolds number variations complements the existing database. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for 10 incidence angles ranging from +15.8deg to -51.0deg. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12×10(exp 5) to 2.12×10(exp 6) and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 8 to 15 percent for the current study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitch/yaw probe located in a survey plane 7 percent axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At

  4. Multiple-relaxation-time lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible miscible flow with large viscosity ratio and high Péclet number.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xuhui; Guo, Zhaoli

    2015-10-01

    A lattice Boltzmann model with a multiple-relaxation-time (MRT) collision operator is proposed for incompressible miscible flow with a large viscosity ratio as well as a high Péclet number in this paper. The equilibria in the present model are motivated by the lattice kinetic scheme previously developed by Inamuro et al. [Philos. Trans. R. Soc. London, Ser. A 360, 477 (2002)]. The fluid viscosity and diffusion coefficient depend on both the corresponding relaxation times and additional adjustable parameters in this model. As a result, the corresponding relaxation times can be adjusted in proper ranges to enhance the performance of the model. Numerical validations of the Poiseuille flow and a diffusion-reaction problem demonstrate that the proposed model has second-order accuracy in space. Thereafter, the model is used to simulate flow through a porous medium, and the results show that the proposed model has the advantage to obtain a viscosity-independent permeability, which makes it a robust method for simulating flow in porous media. Finally, a set of simulations are conducted on the viscous miscible displacement between two parallel plates. The results reveal that the present model can be used to simulate, to a high level of accuracy, flows with large viscosity ratios and/or high Péclet numbers. Moreover, the present model is shown to provide superior stability in the limit of high kinematic viscosity. In summary, the numerical results indicate that the present lattice Boltzmann model is an ideal numerical tool for simulating flow with a large viscosity ratio and/or a high Péclet number. PMID:26565362

  5. Targeted array comparative genomic hybridization--a new diagnostic tool for the detection of large copy number variations in nemaline myopathy-causing genes.

    PubMed

    Kiiski, K; Laari, L; Lehtokari, V-L; Lunkka-Hytönen, M; Angelini, C; Petty, R; Hackman, P; Wallgren-Pettersson, C; Pelin, K

    2013-01-01

    Nemaline myopathy (NM) constitutes a heterogeneous group of congenital myopathies. Mutations in the nebulin gene (NEB) are the main cause of recessively inherited NM. NEB is one of the most largest genes in human. To date, 68 NEB mutations, mainly small deletions or point mutations have been published. The only large mutation characterized is the 2.5 kb deletion of exon 55 in the Ashkenazi Jewish population. To investigate any copy number variations in this enormous gene, we designed a novel custom comparative genomic hybridization microarray, NM-CGH, targeted towards the seven known genes causative for NM. During the validation of the NM-CGH array we identified two novel deletions in two different families. The first is the largest deletion characterized in NEB to date, (∼53 kb) encompassing 24 exons. The second deletion (1 kb) covers two exons. In both families, the copy number change was the second mutation to be characterized and shown to have been inherited from one of the healthy carrier parents. In addition to these novel mutations, copy number variation was identified in four samples in three families in the triplicate region of NEB. We conclude that this method appears promising for the detection of copy number variations in NEB. PMID:23010307

  6. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  7. A phase field approach with a reaction pathways-based potential to model reconstructive martensitic transformations with a large number of variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denoual, C.; Vattré, A.

    2016-05-01

    A pathway tree is constructed by recursively duplicating a single reconstructive martensitic transformation path with respect to lattice symmetries and point-group rotations. An energy potential built on this pathway is implemented in a phase-field technique in large strain framework, with the transformational strain as the order parameter. A specific splitting between non-dissipative elastic behavior and the dissipative evolution of the order parameter allows for the modeling of acoustic waves during rapid transformations. A simple toy-model transition from hexa- to square-lattice successfully demonstrates the possibility to model reconstructive martensitic transformations for a large number of variants (more than one hundred). Pure traction applied to our toy-model shows that variants can nucleate into previously created variants, with a hierarchical nucleation of variants spanning over five levels of transformation.

  8. Electron density and transport in top-gated graphene nanoribbon devices: First-principles Green function algorithms for systems containing a large number of atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Areshkin, Denis A.; Nikolić, Branislav K.

    2010-04-01

    The recent fabrication of graphene nanoribbon (GNR) field-effect transistors poses a challenge for first-principles modeling of carbon nanoelectronics due to many thousand atoms present in the device. The state of the art quantum transport algorithms, based on the nonequilibrium Green function formalism combined with the density-functional theory (NEGF-DFT), were originally developed to calculate self-consistent electron density in equilibrium and at finite bias voltage (as a prerequisite to obtain conductance or current-voltage characteristics, respectively) for small molecules attached to metallic electrodes where only a few hundred atoms are typically simulated. Here we introduce combination of two numerically efficient algorithms which make it possible to extend the NEGF-DFT framework to device simulations involving large number of atoms. Our first algorithm offers an alternative to the usual evaluation of the equilibrium part of electron density via numerical contour integration of the retarded Green function in the upper complex half-plane. It is based on the replacement of the Fermi function f(E) with an analytic function f˜(E) coinciding with f(E) inside the integration range along the real axis, but decaying exponentially in the upper complex half-plane. Although f˜(E) has infinite number of poles, whose positions and residues are determined analytically, only a finite number of those poles have non-negligible residues. We also discuss how this algorithm can be extended to compute the nonequilibrium contribution to electron density, thereby evading cumbersome real-axis integration (within the bias voltage window) of NEGFs which is very difficult to converge for systems with large number of atoms while maintaining current conservation. Our second algorithm combines the recursive formulas with the geometrical partitioning of an arbitrary multiterminal device into nonuniform segments in order to reduce the computational complexity of the retarded Green

  9. Minimizing DNA microarrays to a single molecule per spot: using zero-mode waveguide technology to obtain kinetic data for a large number of short oligonucleotide hybridization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobek, Jens; Rehrauer, Hubert; Kuhn, Gerrit; Schlapbach, Ralph

    2016-03-01

    We have shown recently that the hybridization of short oligonucleotides can be studied in a zero-mode waveguide nanostructure (ZMW) chip using a modified DNA sequencer.[1] Here we present an extension of this method enabling the parallel measurement of kinetic constants of a large number of hybridization reactions on a single chip. This can be achieved by immobilization of a mixture of oligonucleotides, which leads to a statistical and random distribution of single molecules in the 150'000 ZMWs of a SMRT™ cell. This setup is comparable to a classical microarray with ZMWs in place of spots but unknown allocation of probes. The probe surface density is reduced by a factor of ~1010 allowing the study of hybridization in the absence of interactions with neighboring probes. Hybridization with a dye labelled oligonucleotide results in trains of fluorescence pulses from which interpulse durations (IPDs) and pulse widths (PWs) can be extracted. Since the identity of a probe in a ZMW is unknown, the immobilized oligonucleotide is sequenced in a subsequent step. After mapping the fluorescence traces to the sequence, the association and dissociation rate constant for each oligonucleotide can be calculated. By selecting suitable probes, the method can be used to determine rate constants of hybridization for a large number of mismatch oligonucleotides in a single measurement and at single-molecule level.

  10. The two-phase method for finding a great number of eigenpairs of the symmetric or weakly non-symmetric large eigenvalue problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arczewski, Krzysztof; Dul, Franciszek A.

    1994-03-01

    In this paper a new two-phase subspace iteration/Rayleigh quotient/conjugate gradient method for generalized, large, symmetric eigenproblems Ax = lambda Bx is presented. It has the ability of solving extremely large eigenproblems, N = 216,000, for example, and finding a large number of leftmost or rightmost eigenpairs, up to 1000 or more. Multiple eigenpairs, even those with multiplicity 100, can be easily found. The use of the proposed method for solving the big full eigenproblems N approximately 10(exp 3), as well as for large weakly non-symmetric eigenproblems, have been considered also. The proposed method is fully iterative; thus the factorization of matrices is avoided. The key idea consists in joining two methods: subspace and Rayleigh quotient iterations. The systems of indefinite and almost singular linear equations (A - sigma B)x = By are solved by various iterative conjugate gradient/Lanczos methods. It will be shown that the standard conjugate gradient method can be used without danger of breaking down due to its property that may be called 'self-correction towards the eigenvector,' discovered recently by us. The use of various preconditions (SSOR and IC) has also been considered. The main features of the proposed method have been analyzed in detail. Comparisons with other methods, such as, accelerated subspace iteration, Lanczos, Davidson, TLIME, TRACMN, and SRQMCG, are presented. The results of numerical tests for various physical problems (acoustic, vibrations of structures, quantum chemistry) are presented as well. The final conclusion is that our new method is usually much faster than other iterative methods, especially for very large eigenproblems arising from 3D elliptic or biharmonic problems defined on irregular, multiply-connected domains, discretized by the finite element (FEM) or finite difference (FDM) methods.

  11. Study of 3-D Dynamic Roughness Effects on Flow Over a NACA 0012 Airfoil Using Large Eddy Simulations at Low Reynolds Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guda, Venkata Subba Sai Satish

    There have been several advancements in the aerospace industry in areas of design such as aerodynamics, designs, controls and propulsion; all aimed at one common goal i.e. increasing efficiency --range and scope of operation with lesser fuel consumption. Several methods of flow control have been tried. Some were successful, some failed and many were termed as impractical. The low Reynolds number regime of 104 - 105 is a very interesting range. Flow physics in this range are quite different than those of higher Reynolds number range. Mid and high altitude UAV's, MAV's, sailplanes, jet engine fan blades, inboard helicopter rotor blades and wind turbine rotors are some of the aerodynamic applications that fall in this range. The current study deals with using dynamic roughness as a means of flow control over a NACA 0012 airfoil at low Reynolds numbers. Dynamic 3-D surface roughness elements on an airfoil placed near the leading edge aim at increasing the efficiency by suppressing the effects of leading edge separation like leading edge stall by delaying or totally eliminating flow separation. A numerical study of the above method has been carried out by means of a Large Eddy Simulation, a mathematical model for turbulence in Computational Fluid Dynamics, owing to the highly unsteady nature of the flow. A user defined function has been developed for the 3-D dynamic roughness element motion. Results from simulations have been compared to those from experimental PIV data. Large eddy simulations have relatively well captured the leading edge stall. For the clean cases, i.e. with the DR not actuated, the LES was able to reproduce experimental results in a reasonable fashion. However DR simulation results show that it fails to reattach the flow and suppress flow separation compared to experiments. Several novel techniques of grid design and hump creation are introduced through this study.

  12. Quantum state tomography of large nuclear spins in a semiconductor quantum well: Optimal robustness against errors as quantified by condition numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miranowicz, Adam; Ã-zdemir, Şahin K.; Bajer, Jiří; Yusa, Go; Imoto, Nobuyuki; Hirayama, Yoshiro; Nori, Franco

    2015-08-01

    We discuss methods of quantum state tomography for solid-state systems with a large nuclear spin I =3 /2 in nanometer-scale semiconductors devices based on a quantum well. Due to quadrupolar interactions, the Zeeman levels of these nuclear-spin devices become nonequidistant, forming a controllable four-level quantum system (known as quartit or ququart). The occupation of these levels can be selectively and coherently manipulated by multiphoton transitions using the techniques of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) [Yusa et al., Nature (London) 434, 1001 (2005), 10.1038/nature03456]. These methods are based on an unconventional approach to NMR, where the longitudinal magnetization Mz is directly measured. This is in contrast to the standard NMR experiments and tomographic methods, where the transverse magnetization Mx y is detected. The robustness against errors in the measured data is analyzed by using the condition number based on the spectral norm. We propose several methods with optimized sets of rotations yielding the highest robustness against errors, as described by the condition number equal to 1, assuming an ideal experimental detection. This robustness is only slightly deteriorated, as given by the condition number equal to 1.05, for a more realistic "noisy" Mz detection based on the standard cyclically ordered phase sequence (CYCLOPS) method.

  13. Historical changes in the annual number of large floods in near-natural catchments across North America and Europe, 1931-2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodgkins, Glenn; Whitfield, Paul; Hannaford, Jamie; Burn, Donald; Renard, Benjamin; Stahl, Kerstin; Fleig, Anne; Madsen, Henrik; Mediero, Luis; Korhonen, Johanna; Murphy, Conor; Crochet, Philippe; Wilson, Donna

    2014-05-01

    Previous investigations have analyzed historical changes in low magnitude floods, such as the annual peak flow, at regional or national scales. These investigations often use catchments where streamflows have been influenced by human alterations such as reservoir regulation or urbanization. No known studies have analyzed changes in large floods (greater than 25-year return period floods) at a continental scale for near-natural catchments. To fill this research gap, this study analyzed flood flows from reference hydrologic networks (RHNs) or RHN-like gauges in North America (United States and Canada) and Europe (United Kingdom, Ireland, France, Spain, Germany, Switzerland, Iceland, Norway, Denmark, Sweden, and Finland). RHNs are formally defined networks in several countries that comprise gauges with a natural or near-natural flow regime and that provide good quality data. Selected RHN-like gauges were included following a major effort to ensure RHN-like status through consultation with local experts. Some 1206 study gauges met near-natural and completeness criteria for 1961-2010 and 322 gauges met criteria for 1931-2010. Peak flows with recurrence intervals of 25, 50, and 100 years were estimated using the generalized extreme-value distribution and L-moments, and peak flows at each gauge that exceeded these flood thresholds in each year were compiled. Continental and regional trends over time in the annual number of large floods, including groups differentiated by catchment size and major Köppen-Geiger climate group, are being computed and will be presented at EGU. Plots will also show the decadal variability in the annual number of large floods. The unique dataset used for this study is an example of successful international collaboration on hydro-climatic data exchange, which is potentially a step towards establishing RHN or RHN-like networks and analyzing near-natural streamflows on a global scale.

  14. Ion-kinetic simulations of D-3He gas-filled inertial confinement fusion target implosions with moderate to large Knudsen number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larroche, O.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Atzeni, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Séguin, F. H.

    2016-01-01

    Experiments designed to investigate the transition to non-collisional behavior in D3He-gas inertial confinement fusion target implosions display increasingly large discrepancies with respect to simulations by standard hydrodynamics codes as the expected ion mean-free-paths λc increase with respect to the target radius R (i.e., when the Knudsen number NK=λc/R grows). To take properly into account large NK's, multi-ion-species Vlasov-Fokker-Planck computations of the inner gas in the capsules have been performed, for two different values of NK, one moderate and one large. The results, including nuclear yield, reactivity-weighted ion temperatures, nuclear emissivities, and surface brightness, have been compared with the experimental data and with the results of hydrodynamical simulations, some of which include an ad hoc modeling of kinetic effects. The experimental results are quite accurately rendered by the kinetic calculations in the smaller-NK case, much better than by the hydrodynamical calculations. The kinetic effects at play in this case are thus correctly understood. However, in the higher-NK case, the agreement is much worse. The remaining discrepancies are shown to arise from kinetic phenomena (e.g., inter-species diffusion) occurring at the gas-pusher interface, which should be investigated in the future work.

  15. Ion-kinetic simulations of D-3He gas-filled inertial confinement fusion target implosions with moderate to large Knudsen number

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Larroche, O.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Hoffman, N. M.; Atzeni, S.; Petrasso, R. D.; Amendt, P. A.; Seguin, F. H.

    2016-01-06

    Experiments designed to investigate the transition to non-collisional behavior in D3He-gas inertial confinement fusion target implosions display increasingly large discrepancies with respect to simulations by standard hydrodynamics codes as the expected ion mean-free-paths λc increase with respect to the target radius R (i.e., when the Knudsen number NK = λc/R grows). To take properly into account large NK's, multi-ion-species Vlasov-Fokker-Planck computations of the inner gas in the capsules have been performed, for two different values of NK, one moderate and one large. The results, including nuclear yield, reactivity-weighted ion temperatures, nuclear emissivities, and surface brightness, have been compared with themore » experimental data and with the results of hydrodynamical simulations, some of which include an ad hocmodeling of kinetic effects. The experimental results are quite accurately rendered by the kinetic calculations in the smaller-NK case, much better than by the hydrodynamical calculations. The kinetic effects at play in this case are thus correctly understood. However, in the higher-NK case, the agreement is much worse. Furthermore, the remaining discrepancies are shown to arise from kinetic phenomena (e.g., inter-species diffusion) occurring at the gas-pusher interface, which should be investigated in the future work.« less

  16. Large-eddy simulation of the flow and acoustic fields of a Reynolds number 105 subsonic jet with tripped exit boundary layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogey, Christophe; Marsden, Olivier; Bailly, Christophe

    2011-03-01

    Large-eddy simulations (LESs) of isothermal round jets at a Mach number of 0.9 and a diameter-based Reynolds number ReD of 105 originating from a pipe are performed using low-dissipation schemes in combination with relaxation filtering. The aim is to carefully examine the capability of LES to compute the flow and acoustic fields of initially nominally turbulent jets. As in experiments on laboratory-scale jets, the boundary layers inside the pipe are tripped in order to obtain laminar mean exit velocity profiles with high perturbation levels. At the pipe outlet, their momentum thickness is δθ(0)=0.018 times the jet radius, yielding a Reynolds number Reθ=900, and peak turbulence intensities are around 9% of the jet velocity. Two methods of boundary-layer tripping and five grids are considered. The results are found to vary negligibly with the tripping procedure but appreciably with the grid resolution. Based on analyses of the LES quality and on comparisons with measurements at high Reynolds numbers, fine discretizations appear necessary in the three coordinate directions over the entire jet flow. The final LES carried out using 252×106 points with minimum radial, azimuthal, and axial mesh spacings, respectively, of 0.20, 0.34, and 0.40×δθ(0) is also shown to provide shear-layer solutions that are practically grid converged and, more generally, results that can be regarded as numerically accurate as well as physically relevant. They suggest that the mixing-layer development in the present tripped jet, while exhibiting a wide range of turbulent scales, is characterized by persistent coherent vortex pairings.

  17. Long-Term Changes in Nutrients and Mussel Stocks Are Related to Numbers of Breeding Eiders Somateria mollissima at a Large Baltic Colony

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Karsten; Møller, Anders Pape

    2014-01-01

    Background The Baltic/Wadden Sea eider Somateria mollissima flyway population is decreasing, and this trend is also reflected in the large eider colony at Christiansø situated in the Baltic Sea. This colony showed a 15-fold increase from 1925 until the mid-1990's, followed by a rapid decline in recent years, although the causes of this trend remain unknown. Most birds from the colony winter in the Wadden Sea, from which environmental data and information on the size of the main diet, the mussel Mytilus edulis stock exists. We hypothesised that changes in nutrients and water temperature in the Wadden Sea had an effect on the ecosystem affecting the size of mussel stocks, the principal food item for eiders, thereby influencing the number of breeding eider in the Christiansø colony. Methodology/Principal Finding A positive relationship between the amount of fertilizer used by farmers and the concentration of phosphorus in the Wadden Sea (with a time lag of one year) allowed analysis of the predictions concerning effects of nutrients for the period 1925–2010. There was (1) increasing amounts of fertilizer used in agriculture and this increased the amount of nutrients in the marine environment thereby increasing the mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. (2) The number of eiders at Christiansø increased when the amount of fertilizer increased. Finally (3) the number of eiders in the colony at Christiansø increased with the amount of mussel stocks in the Wadden Sea. Conclusions/Significance The trend in the number of eiders at Christiansø is representative for the entire flyway population, and since nutrient reduction in the marine environment occurs in most parts of Northwest Europe, we hypothesize that this environmental candidate parameter is involved in the overall regulation of the Baltic/Wadden Sea eider population during recent decades. PMID:24781984

  18. Aerodynamic Effects of Turbulence Intensity on a Variable-Speed Power-Turbine Blade with Large Incidence and Reynolds Number Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flegel, Ashlie Brynn; Giel, Paul W.; Welch, Gerard E.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of inlet turbulence intensity on the aerodynamic performance of a variable speed power turbine blade are examined over large incidence and Reynolds number ranges. Both high and low turbulence studies were conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center Transonic Turbine Blade Cascade Facility. The purpose of the low inlet turbulence study was to examine the transitional flow effects that are anticipated at cruise Reynolds numbers. The high turbulence study extends this to LPT-relevant turbulence levels while perhaps sacrificing transitional flow effects. Downstream total pressure and exit angle data were acquired for ten incidence angles ranging from +15.8 to 51.0. For each incidence angle, data were obtained at five flow conditions with the exit Reynolds number ranging from 2.12105 to 2.12106 and at a design exit Mach number of 0.72. In order to achieve the lowest Reynolds number, the exit Mach number was reduced to 0.35 due to facility constraints. The inlet turbulence intensity, Tu, was measured using a single-wire hotwire located 0.415 axial-chord upstream of the blade row. The inlet turbulence levels ranged from 0.25 - 0.4 for the low Tu tests and 8- 15 for the high Tu study. Tu measurements were also made farther upstream so that turbulence decay rates could be calculated as needed for computational inlet boundary conditions. Downstream flow field measurements were obtained using a pneumatic five-hole pitchyaw probe located in a survey plane 7 axial chord aft of the blade trailing edge and covering three blade passages. Blade and endwall static pressures were acquired for each flow condition as well. The blade loading data show that the suction surface separation that was evident at many of the low Tu conditions has been eliminated. At the extreme positive and negative incidence angles, the data show substantial differences in the exit flow field. These differences are attributable to both the higher inlet Tu directly and to the thinner inlet endwall

  19. A study of the effectiveness of machine learning methods for classification of clinical interview fragments into a large number of categories.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mehedi; Kotov, Alexander; Idalski Carcone, April; Dong, Ming; Naar, Sylvie; Brogan Hartlieb, Kathryn

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of state-of-the-art supervised machine learning methods in conjunction with different feature types for the task of automatic annotation of fragments of clinical text based on codebooks with a large number of categories. We used a collection of motivational interview transcripts consisting of 11,353 utterances, which were manually annotated by two human coders as the gold standard, and experimented with state-of-art classifiers, including Naïve Bayes, J48 Decision Tree, Support Vector Machine (SVM), Random Forest (RF), AdaBoost, DiscLDA, Conditional Random Fields (CRF) and Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) in conjunction with lexical, contextual (label of the previous utterance) and semantic (distribution of words in the utterance across the Linguistic Inquiry and Word Count dictionaries) features. We found out that, when the number of classes is large, the performance of CNN and CRF is inferior to SVM. When only lexical features were used, interview transcripts were automatically annotated by SVM with the highest classification accuracy among all classifiers of 70.8%, 61% and 53.7% based on the codebooks consisting of 17, 20 and 41 codes, respectively. Using contextual and semantic features, as well as their combination, in addition to lexical ones, improved the accuracy of SVM for annotation of utterances in motivational interview transcripts with a codebook consisting of 17 classes to 71.5%, 74.2%, and 75.1%, respectively. Our results demonstrate the potential of using machine learning methods in conjunction with lexical, semantic and contextual features for automatic annotation of clinical interview transcripts with near-human accuracy. PMID:27185608

  20. Large copy number variations in combination with point mutations in the TYMP and SCO2 genes found in two patients with mitochondrial disorders

    PubMed Central

    Vondráčková, Alžběta; Veselá, Kateřina; Kratochvílová, Hana; Kučerová Vidrová, Vendula; Vinšová, Kamila; Stránecký, Viktor; Honzík, Tomáš; Hansíková, Hana; Zeman, Jiří; Tesařová, Markéta

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are caused by defects in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Although the existence of large deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is well known, deletions affecting whole genes are not commonly described in patients with mitochondrial disorders. Based on the results of whole-genome analyses, copy number variations (CNVs) occur frequently in the human genome and may overlap with many genes associated with clinical phenotypes. We report the discovery of two large heterozygous CNVs on 22q13.33 in two patients with mitochondrial disorders. The first patient harboured a novel point mutation c.667G>A (p.D223N) in the SCO2 gene in combination with a paternally inherited 87-kb deletion. As hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) was not documented in the patient, this observation prompted us to compare his clinical features with all 44 reported SCO2 patients in the literature. Surprisingly, the review shows that HCMP was present in only about 50% of the SCO2 patients with non-neonatal onset. In the second patient, who had mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE), a maternally inherited 175-kb deletion and the paternally inherited point mutation c.261G>T (p.E87D) in the TYMP gene were identified. PMID:23838601

  1. Large copy number variations in combination with point mutations in the TYMP and SCO2 genes found in two patients with mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Vondráčková, Alžběta; Veselá, Kateřina; Kratochvílová, Hana; Kučerová Vidrová, Vendula; Vinšová, Kamila; Stránecký, Viktor; Honzík, Tomáš; Hansíková, Hana; Zeman, Jiří; Tesařová, Markéta

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial disorders are caused by defects in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Although the existence of large deletions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is well known, deletions affecting whole genes are not commonly described in patients with mitochondrial disorders. Based on the results of whole-genome analyses, copy number variations (CNVs) occur frequently in the human genome and may overlap with many genes associated with clinical phenotypes. We report the discovery of two large heterozygous CNVs on 22q13.33 in two patients with mitochondrial disorders. The first patient harboured a novel point mutation c.667G>A (p.D223N) in the SCO2 gene in combination with a paternally inherited 87-kb deletion. As hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCMP) was not documented in the patient, this observation prompted us to compare his clinical features with all 44 reported SCO2 patients in the literature. Surprisingly, the review shows that HCMP was present in only about 50% of the SCO2 patients with non-neonatal onset. In the second patient, who had mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalopathy (MNGIE), a maternally inherited 175-kb deletion and the paternally inherited point mutation c.261G>T (p.E87D) in the TYMP gene were identified. PMID:23838601

  2. The radial transmission line as a broad-band shielded exposure system for microwave irradiation of large numbers of culture flasks.

    PubMed

    Moros, E G; Straube, W L; Pickard, W F

    1999-01-01

    The problem of simultaneously exposing large numbers of culture flasks at nominally equivalent incident power densities and with good thermal control is considered, and the radial transmission line (RTL) is proposed as a solution. The electromagnetic design of this structure is discussed, and an extensively bench-tested realization is described. Referred to 1 W of net forward power, the following specific absorption rate (SAR) data were obtained: at 835.62 MHz, 16.0+/-2.5 mW/kg (mean+/-SD) with range (11-22); at 2450 MHz, 245+/-50 mW/kg with range (130-323). Radio-frequency interference from an RTL driven at roughly 100 W is so low as to be compatible with a cellular base station only 500 m distant. To avoid potential confounding by temperature differences among as many as 144 T-75 flasks distributed over 9 RTLs (six irradiates and three shams), temperature within all flasks was controlled to 37.0+/-0.3 degrees C. Experience with over two years of trouble-free operation suggests that the RTL offers a robust, logistically friendly, and environmentally satisfactory solution to the problem of large-scale in vitro experiments in bioelectromagnetics. PMID:10029133

  3. Dynamics of Rear Stagnant Cap formation at the surface of spherical bubbles rising in surfactant solutions at large Reynolds numbers under conditions of small Marangoni number and slow sorption kinetics.

    PubMed

    Dukhin, S S; Kovalchuk, V I; Gochev, G G; Lotfi, M; Krzan, M; Malysa, K; Miller, R

    2015-08-01

    On the surface of bubbles rising in a surfactant solution the adsorption process proceeds and leads to the formation of a so called Rear Stagnant Cap (RSC). The larger this RSC is the stronger is the retardation of the rising velocity. The theory of a steady RSC and steady retarded rising velocity, which sets in after a transient stage, has been generally accepted. However, a non-steady process of bubble rising starting from the initial zero velocity represents an important portion of the trajectory of rising, characterized by a local velocity profile (LVP). As there is no theory of RSC growth for large Reynolds numbers Re » 1 so far, the interpretation of LVPs measured in this regime was impossible. It turned out, that an analytical theory for a quasi-steady growth of RSC is possible for small Marangoni numbers Ma « 1, i.e. when the RSC is almost completely compressed, which means a uniform surface concentration Γ(θ)=Γ(∞) within the RSC. Hence, the RSC angle ψ(t) is obtained as a function of the adsorption isotherm parameters and time t. From the steady velocity v(st)(ψ), the dependence of non-steady velocity on time is obtained by employing v(st)[ψ(t)] via a quasi-steady approximation. The measurement of LVP creates a promising new opportunity for investigation of the RSC dynamics and adsorption kinetics. While adsorption and desorption happen at the same localization in the classical methods, in rising bubble experiments desorption occurs mainly within RSC while adsorption on the mobile part of the bubble surface. The desorption flux from RSC is proportional to αΓ(∞), while it is usually αΓ. The adsorption flux at the mobile surface above RSC can be assumed proportional to βC0, while it is usually βC0(1-Γ/Γ(∞)). These simplifications may become favorable in investigations of the adsorption kinetics for larger molecules, in particular for globular proteins, which essentially stay at an interface once adsorbed. PMID:25455807

  4. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies With Relatively Old Stellar Populations at z Approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; vanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijin; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at z approx. 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H (4861 ),we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (4304 ),Mgi (5175 ), and Na i (5894 ). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approx. 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3+0.10.3 Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80 of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6+0.50.4 Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9+0.20.1 Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O iii] and H emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with LOiii = 1.7+/- 0.3 x 10(exp 40) erg/s, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  5. Quiescent Galaxies in the 3D-HST Survey: Spectroscopic Confirmation of a Large Number of Galaxies with Relatively Old Stellar Populations at Z approx. 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tease, Katherine Whitaker; VanDokkum, Pieter G.; Brammer, Gabriel; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Franx, Marijn; Kriek, Mariska; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Lundgren, Britt F.; Nelson, Erica J.; Patel, Shannon G.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-01-01

    Quiescent galaxies at zeta approximately 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 less than z less than 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H(Beta) (lambda 4861 Angstroms), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band (lambda 4304 Angstroms), Mg I (lambda 5175 Angstroms), and Na i (lambda 5894 Angstroms). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was approximately 3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3(+0.1/-0.3) Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6(+0.5/-0.4) Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9(+0.2/-0.1) Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and Hß emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L(sub OIII) = 1.7 +/- 0.3 × 10(exp 40 erg s-1, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  6. Integrated copy number and gene expression profiling analysis of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Heejei; Park, Sanghui; Ju, Hyunjeong; Ha, Sang Yun; Sohn, InSuk; Jo, Jisuk; Do, In-Gu; Min, Sookee; Kim, Seok Jin; Kim, Won Seog; Yoo, Hae Yong; Ko, Young Hyeh

    2015-06-01

    Viral oncogenes and host immunosenescence have been suggested as causes of Epstein-Barr virus-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (EBV + DLBCL) of the elderly. To investigate the molecular genetic basis of immune evasion and tumor outgrowth, we analyzed copy number alterations (CNAs) and gene expression profiles in EBV + DLBCL samples compared with EBV - DLBCL. There were relatively few genomic alterations in EBV + DLBCL compared with those detected in EBV-negative DLBCL. The most frequent CNAs (>30%) in EBV + DLBCLs were gains at 1q23.2-23.3, 1q23.3, 1q32.1, 5p15.3, 8q22.3, 8q24.1-24.2, and 9p24.1; losses at 6q27, 7q11.2, and 7q36.2-36.3 were also recurrent. A gene expression profile analysis identified the host immune response as a key molecular signature in EBV + DLBCL. Antiviral response genes, proinflammatory cytokines, and chemokines associated with the innate immune response were overexpressed, indicating the presence of a virusinduced inflammatory microenvironment. Genes associated with the B-cell receptor signaling pathway were downregulated. An integrated analysis indicated that SLAMF1 and PDL2 were key targets of the gains detected at 1q23.2-23.3 and 9p24.1. The chromosomal gain at 9p24.1 was associated with poor overall survival. Taken together, our results led to the identification of recurrent copy number alterations and distinct gene expression associated with the host immune response in EBV + DLBCL. We suggest that the upregulation of PDL2 on 9p24.1 promotes immune evasion and is associated with poor prognosis in EBV + DLBCL. PMID:25832818

  7. QUIESCENT GALAXIES IN THE 3D-HST SURVEY: SPECTROSCOPIC CONFIRMATION OF A LARGE NUMBER OF GALAXIES WITH RELATIVELY OLD STELLAR POPULATIONS AT z {approx} 2

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, Katherine E.; Van Dokkum, Pieter G.; Momcheva, Ivelina G.; Skelton, Rosalind; Nelson, Erica J.; Brammer, Gabriel; Franx, Marijn; Labbe, Ivo; Fumagalli, Mattia; Patel, Shannon G.; Kriek, Mariska; Lundgren, Britt F.; Rix, Hans-Walter

    2013-06-20

    Quiescent galaxies at z {approx} 2 have been identified in large numbers based on rest-frame colors, but only a small number of these galaxies have been spectroscopically confirmed to show that their rest-frame optical spectra show either strong Balmer or metal absorption lines. Here, we median stack the rest-frame optical spectra for 171 photometrically quiescent galaxies at 1.4 < z < 2.2 from the 3D-HST grism survey. In addition to H{beta} ({lambda}4861 A), we unambiguously identify metal absorption lines in the stacked spectrum, including the G band ({lambda}4304 A), Mg I ({lambda}5175 A), and Na I ({lambda}5894 A). This finding demonstrates that galaxies with relatively old stellar populations already existed when the universe was {approx}3 Gyr old, and that rest-frame color selection techniques can efficiently select them. We find an average age of 1.3{sup +0.1}{sub -0.3} Gyr when fitting a simple stellar population to the entire stack. We confirm our previous result from medium-band photometry that the stellar age varies with the colors of quiescent galaxies: the reddest 80% of galaxies are dominated by metal lines and have a relatively old mean age of 1.6{sup +0.5}{sub -0.4} Gyr, whereas the bluest (and brightest) galaxies have strong Balmer lines and a spectroscopic age of 0.9{sup +0.2}{sub -0.1} Gyr. Although the spectrum is dominated by an evolved stellar population, we also find [O III] and H{beta} emission. Interestingly, this emission is more centrally concentrated than the continuum with L{sub OIII}=1.7{+-}0.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 40} erg s{sup -1}, indicating residual central star formation or nuclear activity.

  8. Chorionicity and Heritability Estimates from Twin Studies: The Prenatal Environment of Twins and Their Resemblance Across a Large Number of Traits.

    PubMed

    van Beijsterveldt, C E M; Overbeek, L I H; Rozendaal, L; McMaster, M T B; Glasner, T J; Bartels, M; Vink, J M; Martin, N G; Dolan, C V; Boomsma, D I

    2016-05-01

    There are three types of monozygotic (MZ) twins. MZ twins can either share one chorion and one amnion, each twin can have its own amnion, or MZ twins can-like dizygotic twins-each have their own chorion and amnion. Sharing the same chorion may create a more similar/dissimilar prenatal environment and bias heritability estimates, but most twin studies do not distinguish between these three types of MZ twin pairs. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of chorion sharing on the similarity within MZ twin pairs for a large number of traits. Information on chorion status was obtained for the Netherlands twin register (NTR) by linkage to the records from the database of the dutch pathological anatomy national automated archive (PALGA). Record linkage was successful for over 9000 pairs. Effect of chorion type was tested by comparing the within-pair similarity between monochorionic (MC) and dichorionic (DC) MZ twins on 66 traits including weight, height, motor milestones, child problem behaviors, cognitive function, wellbeing and personality. For only 10 traits, within-pair similarity differed between MCMZ and DCMZ pairs. For traits influenced by birth weight (e.g. weight and height in young children) we expected that MC twins would be more discordant. This was found for 5 out of 13 measures. When looking at traits where blood supply is important, we saw MCMZ twins to be more concordant than DCMZ's for 3 traits. We conclude that the influence on the MZ twin correlation of the intra-uterine prenatal environment, as measured by sharing a chorion type, is small and limited to a few phenotypes. This implies that the assumption of equal prenatal environment of mono- and DC MZ twins, which characterizes the classical twin design, is largely tenable. PMID:26410687

  9. Studies of a Large Odd‐Numbered Odd‐Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8Mn

    PubMed Central

    Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J.; Barker, Claire; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U.; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J. L.; Möller, Johannes S.; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L.; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna‐Piggott, Philip L. W.; Vitorica‐Yrezabal, Iñigo J.; Timco, Grigore A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The spin dynamics of Cr8Mn, a nine‐membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8Mn is a rare example of a large odd‐membered AF ring, and has an odd‐number of 3d‐electrons present. Odd‐membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated‐spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground‐spin‐state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin‐pair correlations and scalar‐spin chirality, shows a non‐collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non‐planar states of opposite chiralities. PMID:26748964

  10. Correlation between the structural and cathodoluminescence properties in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with large number of quantum wells

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Jing; Zhao, Degang Jiang, Desheng; Chen, Ping; Zhu, Jianjun; Liu, Zongshun; Le, Lingcong; He, Xiaoguang; Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Hui; Yang, Hui; Jahn, Uwe

    2014-09-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics on 30-period InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) solar cell structures are investigated, revealing the relationship between optical and structural properties of the MQW structures with a large number of quantum wells. In the bottom MQW layers, a blueshift of CL peak along the growth direction is found and attributed to the decrease of indium content due to the compositional pulling effect. An obvious split of emission peak and a redshift of the main emission energy are found in the top MQW layers when the MQW grows above the critical layer thickness. They are attributed to the segregation of In-rich InGaN clusters rather than the increase of indium content in quantum well layer. The MQW structure is identified to consist of two regions: a strained one in the bottom, where the indium content is gradually decreased, and a partly relaxed one in the top with segregated In-rich InGaN clusters.

  11. Studies of a Large Odd-Numbered Odd-Electron Metal Ring: Inelastic Neutron Scattering and Muon Spin Relaxation Spectroscopy of Cr8 Mn.

    PubMed

    Baker, Michael L; Lancaster, Tom; Chiesa, Alessandro; Amoretti, Giuseppe; Baker, Peter J; Barker, Claire; Blundell, Stephen J; Carretta, Stefano; Collison, David; Güdel, Hans U; Guidi, Tatiana; McInnes, Eric J L; Möller, Johannes S; Mutka, Hannu; Ollivier, Jacques; Pratt, Francis L; Santini, Paolo; Tuna, Floriana; Tregenna-Piggott, Philip L W; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J; Timco, Grigore A; Winpenny, Richard E P

    2016-01-26

    The spin dynamics of Cr8 Mn, a nine-membered antiferromagnetic (AF) molecular nanomagnet, are investigated. Cr8 Mn is a rare example of a large odd-membered AF ring, and has an odd-number of 3d-electrons present. Odd-membered AF rings are unusual and of interest due to the presence of competing exchange interactions that result in frustrated-spin ground states. The chemical synthesis and structures of two Cr8 Mn variants that differ only in their crystal packing are reported. Evidence of spin frustration is investigated by inelastic neutron scattering (INS) and muon spin relaxation spectroscopy (μSR). From INS studies we accurately determine an appropriate microscopic spin Hamiltonian and we show that μSR is sensitive to the ground-spin-state crossing from S=1/2 to S=3/2 in Cr8 Mn. The estimated width of the muon asymmetry resonance is consistent with the presence of an avoided crossing. The investigation of the internal spin structure of the ground state, through the analysis of spin-pair correlations and scalar-spin chirality, shows a non-collinear spin structure that fluctuates between non-planar states of opposite chiralities. PMID:26748964

  12. Large number of putative chemoreception and pheromone biosynthesis genes revealed by analyzing transcriptome from ovipositor-pheromone glands of Chilo suppressalis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yi-Han; Zhang, Ya-Nan; Hou, Xiao-Qing; Li, Fei; Dong, Shuang-Lin

    2015-01-01

    The chemoreception role of moth ovipositor has long been suggested, but its molecular mechanism is mostly unknown. By transcriptomic analysis of the female ovipositor-pheromone glands (OV-PG) of Chilo suppressalis, we obtained 31 putative chemoreception genes (9 OBPs, 10 CSPs, 2 ORs, 1 SNMP, 8 CXEs and 1 AOX), in addition to 32 genes related to sex pheromone biosynthesis (1 FAS, 6 Dess, 10 FARs, 2 ACOs, 1 ACC, 4 FATPs, 3 ACBPs and 5 ELOs). Tissue expression profiles further revealed that CsupCSP2 and CsupCSP10 were OV-PG biased, while most chemoreception genes were highly and preferably expressed in antennae. This suggests that OV-PG employs mostly the same chemoreception proteins as in antennae, although the physiological roles of these proteins might be different in OV-PG. Of the 32 pheromone biosynthesis related genes, CsupDes4, CsupDes5 and CsupFAR2 are strongly OV-PG biased, and clustered with functionally validated genes from other moths, strongly indicating their involvement in specific step of the pheromone biosynthesis. Our study for the first time identified a large number of putative chemoreception genes, and provided an important basis for exploring the chemoreception mechanisms of OV-PG in C. suppressalis, as well as other moth species. PMID:25601555

  13. The use of mass spectrometry for analysing metabolite biomarkers in epidemiology: methodological and statistical considerations for application to large numbers of biological samples.

    PubMed

    Lind, Mads V; Savolainen, Otto I; Ross, Alastair B

    2016-08-01

    Data quality is critical for epidemiology, and as scientific understanding expands, the range of data available for epidemiological studies and the types of tools used for measurement have also expanded. It is essential for the epidemiologist to have a grasp of the issues involved with different measurement tools. One tool that is increasingly being used for measuring biomarkers in epidemiological cohorts is mass spectrometry (MS), because of the high specificity and sensitivity of MS-based methods and the expanding range of biomarkers that can be measured. Further, the ability of MS to quantify many biomarkers simultaneously is advantageously compared to single biomarker methods. However, as with all methods used to measure biomarkers, there are a number of pitfalls to consider which may have an impact on results when used in epidemiology. In this review we discuss the use of MS for biomarker analyses, focusing on metabolites and their application and potential issues related to large-scale epidemiology studies, the use of MS "omics" approaches for biomarker discovery and how MS-based results can be used for increasing biological knowledge gained from epidemiological studies. Better understanding of the possibilities and possible problems related to MS-based measurements will help the epidemiologist in their discussions with analytical chemists and lead to the use of the most appropriate statistical tools for these data. PMID:27230258

  14. The application of the central limit theorem and the law of large numbers to facial soft tissue depths: T-Table robustness and trends since 2008.

    PubMed

    Stephan, Carl N

    2014-03-01

    By pooling independent study means (x¯), the T-Tables use the central limit theorem and law of large numbers to average out study-specific sampling bias and instrument errors and, in turn, triangulate upon human population means (μ). Since their first publication in 2008, new data from >2660 adults have been collected (c.30% of the original sample) making a review of the T-Table's robustness timely. Updated grand means show that the new data have negligible impact on the previously published statistics: maximum change = 1.7 mm at gonion; and ≤1 mm at 93% of all landmarks measured. This confirms the utility of the 2008 T-Table as a proxy to soft tissue depth population means and, together with updated sample sizes (8851 individuals at pogonion), earmarks the 2013 T-Table as the premier mean facial soft tissue depth standard for craniofacial identification casework. The utility of the T-Table, in comparison with shorths and 75-shormaxes, is also discussed. PMID:24313424

  15. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle, and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, Michael F.; Anderson, Olof L.

    1989-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similiar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full-span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The primary objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality data base for the assessment of rotor passage heat transfer computational procedures. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large-scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. Heat transfer data were obtained using thermocouple and liquid-crystal techniques to measure temperature distributions on the thin, electrically-heated skin of the rotor passage model. Test data were obtained for various combinations of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and model surface roughness. The data are reported in the form of contour maps of Stanton number. These heat distribution maps revealed numerous local effects produced by the three-dimensional flows within the rotor passage. Of particular importance were regions of local enhancement produced on the airfoil suction surface by the main-passage and tip-leakage vortices and on the hub endwall by the leading-edge horseshoe vortex system. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis to the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating the a gas turbine passage. These cases include a 90 deg turning duct, a gas turbine cascade simulating a stator passage, and a gas turbine rotor passage including Coriolis forces. The calculated results were evaluated using experimental data of the three-dimensional velocity fields, wall static pressures, and wall heat transfer on the suction surface of the turbine airfoil and on the end wall. Particular attention was paid to an

  16. The design for off-axis multimirror optical system with large field and small F number using coaxial assembly of two mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hui; Yan, Shi-qiang; Pei, Yun-tian; Hu, Lei; Xu, Song

    2012-09-01

    The reflection optical system gets more and more attention nowadays owing to without chromatic aberration and small volume. The manufacturing and assembly/calibration technology for the coaxial reflection optical system is more mature relative to the other reflection optical systems. But the coaxial reflection optical system will obstruct the incidence ray especially when the field is large, which will reduce the energy entering the optical system and reduce the resolution. The off-axis Three-Mirror Optical Systems can conquer those disadvantages of the coaxial reflection optical system, however the manufacturing and assembly/calibration for the off-axis Optical Systems is very difficult which must use computer-aided technology. The manufacturing and assembly/calibration technology is the main bottleneck for the off-axis Optical Systems to the engineering application. The Author of this thesis researched the design theory of the Three-Mirror Optical System, and then schemed out off-axis Three-Mirror and Multi-Mirror Optical System smartly using coaxial two-mirror optical structure which conquers the disadvantage of small field and possesses of the all advantages of the coaxial reflection optical system. This new optical system has two mirrors, one of which is a parabolic mirror with high-order aspheric term and the other is a hyperboloid mirror with high-order aspheric term. The characteristics of this new optical system are as follows: the F Number is 1.25, the field of view is 2°×2° and the total length is only 115mm with coaxial assembly of the two mirrors.

  17. Array-Based Comparative Genomic Hybridization Analysis Reveals Chromosomal Copy Number Aberrations Associated with Clinical Outcome in Canine Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Bresolin, Silvia; Marconato, Laura; Comazzi, Stefano; Te Kronnie, Geertruy; Aresu, Luca

    2014-01-01

    Canine Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (cDLBCL) is an aggressive cancer with variable clinical response. Despite recent attempts by gene expression profiling to identify the dog as a potential animal model for human DLBCL, this tumor remains biologically heterogeneous with no prognostic biomarkers to predict prognosis. The aim of this work was to identify copy number aberrations (CNAs) by high-resolution array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) in 12 dogs with newly diagnosed DLBCL. In a subset of these dogs, the genetic profiles at the end of therapy and at relapse were also assessed. In primary DLBCLs, 90 different genomic imbalances were counted, consisting of 46 gains and 44 losses. Two gains in chr13 were significantly correlated with clinical stage. In addition, specific regions of gains and losses were significantly associated to duration of remission. In primary DLBCLs, individual variability was found, however 14 recurrent CNAs (>30%) were identified. Losses involving IGK, IGL and IGH were always found, and gains along the length of chr13 and chr31 were often observed (>41%). In these segments, MYC, LDHB, HSF1, KIT and PDGFRα are annotated. At the end of therapy, dogs in remission showed four new CNAs, whereas three new CNAs were observed in dogs at relapse compared with the previous profiles. One ex novo CNA, involving TCR, was present in dogs in remission after therapy, possibly induced by the autologous vaccine. Overall, aCGH identified small CNAs associated with outcome, which, along with future expression studies, may reveal target genes relevant to cDLBCL. PMID:25372838

  18. Reducing synuclein accumulation improves neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fogerson, Stephanie M; van Brummen, Alexandra J; Busch, David J; Allen, Scott R; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Banks, Susan M L; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Morgan, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury causes neuronal death, limiting subsequent regeneration and recovery. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for improving neuronal survival after injury. Relative to our understanding of axon regeneration, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote the survival of damaged neurons. To address this, we took advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal neurons whose large size permits detailed examination of post-injury molecular responses at the level of individual, identified cells. We report here that spinal cord injury caused a select subset of giant reticulospinal neurons to accumulate synuclein, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein best known for its atypical aggregation and causal role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and other diseases. Post-injury synuclein accumulation took the form of punctate aggregates throughout the somata and occurred selectively in dying neurons, but not in those that survived. In contrast, another synaptic vesicle protein, synaptotagmin, did not accumulate in response to injury. We further show that the post-injury synuclein accumulation was greatly attenuated after single dose application of either the "molecular tweezer" inhibitor, CLR01, or a translation-blocking synuclein morpholino. Consequently, reduction of synuclein accumulation not only improved neuronal survival, but also increased the number of axons in the spinal cord proximal and distal to the lesion. This study is the first to reveal that reducing synuclein accumulation is a novel strategy for improving neuronal survival after spinal cord injury. PMID:26854933

  19. On the calculation of line strengths, oscillator strengths and lifetimes for very large principal quantum numbers in hydrogenic atoms and ions by the McLean-Watson formula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hey, J. D.

    2014-08-01

    As a sequel to an earlier study (Hey 2009 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 42 125701), we consider further the application of the line strength formula derived by Watson (2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 L291) to transitions arising from states of very high principal quantum number in hydrogenic atoms and ions (Rydberg-Rydberg transitions, n > 1000). It is shown how apparent difficulties associated with the use of recurrence relations, derived (Hey 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 2641) by the ladder operator technique of Infeld and Hull (1951 Rev. Mod. Phys. 23 21), may be eliminated by a very simple numerical device, whereby this method may readily be applied up to n ≈ 10 000. Beyond this range, programming of the method may entail greater care and complexity. The use of the numerically efficient McLean-Watson formula for such cases is again illustrated by the determination of radiative lifetimes and comparison of present results with those from an asymptotic formula. The question of the influence on the results of the omission or inclusion of fine structure is considered by comparison with calculations based on the standard Condon-Shortley line strength formula. Interest in this work on the radial matrix elements for large n and n‧ is related to measurements of radio recombination lines from tenuous space plasmas, e.g. Stepkin et al (2007 Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 374 852), Bell et al (2011 Astrophys. Space Sci. 333 377), to the calculation of electron impact broadening parameters for such spectra (Watson 2006 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 39 1889) and comparison with other theoretical methods (Peach 2014 Adv. Space Res. in press), to the modelling of physical processes in H II regions (Roshi et al 2012 Astrophys. J. 749 49), and the evaluation bound-bound transitions from states of high n during primordial cosmological recombination (Grin and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 81 083005, Ali-Haïmoud and Hirata 2010 Phys. Rev. D 82 063521, Ali

  20. Directed evolution reveals the binding motif preference of the LC8/DYNLL hub protein and predicts large numbers of novel binders in the human proteome.

    PubMed

    Rapali, Péter; Radnai, László; Süveges, Dániel; Harmat, Veronika; Tölgyesi, Ferenc; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y; Katona, Gergely; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL) is a eukaryotic hub protein that is thought to function as a dimerization engine. Its interacting partners are involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In its dozens of hitherto identified binding partners DYNLL binds to a linear peptide segment. The known segments define a loosely characterized binding motif: [D/S](-4)K(-3)X(-2)[T/V/I](-1)Q(0)[T/V](1)[D/E](2). The motifs are localized in disordered segments of the DYNLL-binding proteins and are often flanked by coiled coil or other potential dimerization domains. Based on a directed evolution approach, here we provide the first quantitative characterization of the binding preference of the DYNLL binding site. We displayed on M13 phage a naïve peptide library with seven fully randomized positions around a fixed, naturally conserved glutamine. The peptides were presented in a bivalent manner fused to a leucine zipper mimicking the natural dimer to dimer binding stoichiometry of DYNLL-partner complexes. The phage-selected consensus sequence V(-5)S(-4)R(-3)G(-2)T(-1)Q(0)T(1)E(2) resembles the natural one, but is extended by an additional N-terminal valine, which increases the affinity of the monomeric peptide twentyfold. Leu-zipper dimerization increases the affinity into the subnanomolar range. By comparing crystal structures of an SRGTQTE-DYNLL and a dimeric VSRGTQTE-DYNLL complex we find that the affinity enhancing valine is accommodated in a binding pocket on DYNLL. Based on the in vitro evolved sequence pattern we predict a large number of novel DYNLL binding partners in the human proteome. Among these EML3, a microtubule-binding protein involved in mitosis contains an exact match of the phage-evolved consensus and binds to DYNLL with nanomolar affinity. These results significantly widen the scope of the human interactome around DYNLL and will certainly shed more light on the biological functions and organizing role of DYNLL in the human and other eukaryotic interactomes

  1. Directed Evolution Reveals the Binding Motif Preference of the LC8/DYNLL Hub Protein and Predicts Large Numbers of Novel Binders in the Human Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Rapali, Péter; Radnai, László; Süveges, Dániel; Harmat, Veronika; Tölgyesi, Ferenc; Wahlgren, Weixiao Y.; Katona, Gergely; Nyitray, László; Pál, Gábor

    2011-01-01

    LC8 dynein light chain (DYNLL) is a eukaryotic hub protein that is thought to function as a dimerization engine. Its interacting partners are involved in a wide range of cellular functions. In its dozens of hitherto identified binding partners DYNLL binds to a linear peptide segment. The known segments define a loosely characterized binding motif: [D/S]-4K-3X-2[T/V/I]-1Q0[T/V]1[D/E]2. The motifs are localized in disordered segments of the DYNLL-binding proteins and are often flanked by coiled coil or other potential dimerization domains. Based on a directed evolution approach, here we provide the first quantitative characterization of the binding preference of the DYNLL binding site. We displayed on M13 phage a naïve peptide library with seven fully randomized positions around a fixed, naturally conserved glutamine. The peptides were presented in a bivalent manner fused to a leucine zipper mimicking the natural dimer to dimer binding stoichiometry of DYNLL-partner complexes. The phage-selected consensus sequence V-5S-4R-3G-2T-1Q0T1E2 resembles the natural one, but is extended by an additional N-terminal valine, which increases the affinity of the monomeric peptide twentyfold. Leu-zipper dimerization increases the affinity into the subnanomolar range. By comparing crystal structures of an SRGTQTE-DYNLL and a dimeric VSRGTQTE-DYNLL complex we find that the affinity enhancing valine is accommodated in a binding pocket on DYNLL. Based on the in vitro evolved sequence pattern we predict a large number of novel DYNLL binding partners in the human proteome. Among these EML3, a microtubule-binding protein involved in mitosis contains an exact match of the phage-evolved consensus and binds to DYNLL with nanomolar affinity. These results significantly widen the scope of the human interactome around DYNLL and will certainly shed more light on the biological functions and organizing role of DYNLL in the human and other eukaryotic interactomes. PMID:21533121

  2. Nutrient-contaminant (Pu) plant accumulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A model was developed which simulates the movement and daily accumulation of nutrients and contaminants in crop plants resulting from known physiological processes in the plant. In the model, the daily contaminant accumulation is governed by daily increase in plant biomass derived from photosynthesis and by the specified thermodynamic activity of the bioavailable contaminant species in soil or hydroponic solutin. Total accumulation and resulting concentration in the plant's root, stem and branch, leaf, and reproductive compartments can be simulated any time during the growing season. Parameters were estimated from data on plutonium accumulation in soybeans and the model was calibrated against this same data set. The plutonium distribution in the plant was found to be most sensitive to parameters related to leaf accumulation. Contamination at different times during the growing season resulted in a large change in predicted leaf accumulation but very little change in predicted accumulation in other plant parts except when contamination occurred very late in the growing season.

  3. Sex Differences in the Spatial Representation of Number

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Rebecca; Cleland, Alexandra A.; Mitchell, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    There is a large body of accumulated evidence from behavioral and neuroimaging studies regarding how and where in the brain we represent basic numerical information. A number of these studies have considered how numerical representations may differ between individuals according to their age or level of mathematical ability, but one issue rarely…

  4. Tests of a mixed compression axisymmetric inlet with large transonic mass flow at Mach numbers 0.6 to 2.65

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, D. B.; Sorensen, N. E.

    1972-01-01

    A 38.8-cm (15.28-in.) capture diameter model of a mixed-compression axisymmetric inlet system with a translating cowl was designed and tested. The internal contours, designed for Mach number 2.65, provided a throat area of 59 percent of the capture area when the cowl was retracted for transonic operation. Other model features included a boundary-layer removal system, vortex generators, an engine airflow bypass system, cowl support struts, and rotating rakes at the engine face. All tunnel testing was conducted at a tunnel total pressure of about 1 atm (a unit Reynolds number of about 8.53 million/m at Mach number 2.65) at angles of attack from 0 deg to 4 deg. Results for the following were obtained: total-pressure recovery and distortion at the engine face as a function of bleed mass-flow ratio, the effect of bleed and vortex generator configurations on pressure recovery and distortion, inlet tolerance to unstart due to changes in angle of attack or Mach number, surface pressure distributions, boundary-layer profiles, and transonic additive drag. At Mach number 2.65 and with the best bleed configurations, maximum total pressure recovery at the engine face ranged from 91 to 94.5 percent with bleed mass-flow ratios from 4 to 9 percent, respectively, and total-pressure distortion was less than 10 percent. At off-design supersonic Mach numbers above 1.70, maximum total-pressure recoveries and corresponding bleed mass flows were about the same as at Mach number 2.65, with about 10 to 15 percent distortion. In the transonic Mach number range, total pressure recovery was high (above 96 percent) and distortion was low (less than 15 percent) only when the inlet mass-flow ration was reduced 0.02 to 0.06 from the maximum theoretical value (0.590 at Mach number 1.0).

  5. Do we really need a large number of particles to simulate bimolecular reactive transport with random walk methods? A kernel density estimation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahbaralam, Maryam; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel; Sanchez-Vila, Xavier

    2015-12-01

    Random walk particle tracking methods are a computationally efficient family of methods to solve reactive transport problems. While the number of particles in most realistic applications is in the order of 106-109, the number of reactive molecules even in diluted systems might be in the order of fractions of the Avogadro number. Thus, each particle actually represents a group of potentially reactive molecules. The use of a low number of particles may result not only in loss of accuracy, but also may lead to an improper reproduction of the mixing process, limited by diffusion. Recent works have used this effect as a proxy to model incomplete mixing in porous media. In this work, we propose using a Kernel Density Estimation (KDE) of the concentrations that allows getting the expected results for a well-mixed solution with a limited number of particles. The idea consists of treating each particle as a sample drawn from the pool of molecules that it represents; this way, the actual location of a tracked particle is seen as a sample drawn from the density function of the location of molecules represented by that given particle, rigorously represented by a kernel density function. The probability of reaction can be obtained by combining the kernels associated to two potentially reactive particles. We demonstrate that the observed deviation in the reaction vs time curves in numerical experiments reported in the literature could be attributed to the statistical method used to reconstruct concentrations (fixed particle support) from discrete particle distributions, and not to the occurrence of true incomplete mixing. We further explore the evolution of the kernel size with time, linking it to the diffusion process. Our results show that KDEs are powerful tools to improve computational efficiency and robustness in reactive transport simulations, and indicates that incomplete mixing in diluted systems should be modeled based on alternative mechanistic models and not on a

  6. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  7. Load Frequency Control by use of a Number of Both Heat Pump Water Heaters and Electric Vehicles in Power System with a Large Integration of Renewable Energy Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuta, Taisuke; Shimizu, Koichiro; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    In Japan, from the viewpoints of global warming countermeasures and energy security, it is expected to establish a smart grid as a power system into which a large amount of generation from renewable energy sources such as wind power generation and photovoltaic generation can be installed. Measures for the power system stability and reliability are necessary because a large integration of these renewable energy sources causes some problems in power systems, e.g. frequency fluctuation and distribution voltage rise, and Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) is one of effective solutions to these problems. Due to a high cost of the BESS, our research group has studied an application of controllable loads such as Heat Pump Water Heater (HPWH) and Electric Vehicle (EV) to the power system control for reduction of the required capacity of BESS. This paper proposes a new coordinated Load Frequency Control (LFC) method for the conventional power plants, the BESS, the HPWHs, and the EVs. The performance of the proposed LFC method is evaluated by the numerical simulations conducted on a power system model with a large integration of wind power generation and photovoltaic generation.

  8. Fast carry accumulator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Simple iterative accumulator combined with gated-carry, carry-completion detection, and skip-carry circuits produces three accumulators with decreased carry propagation times. Devices are used in machine control, measurement equipment, and computer applications to increase speed of binary addition. NAND gates are used in combining network.

  9. Experimental investigation of free-convection heat transfer in vertical tube at large Grashof numbers / E. R. G. Eckert, A. J. Diaguila

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckert, E R G; Diaguila, A J

    1952-01-01

    Local free-convection heat-transfer coefficients and temperature fields in the turbulent flow range were obtained within a vertical, stationary tube closed at the boom, heated along its walls, and having a length-to-diameter ratio of 5. Convective heat-transfer coefficients were correlated by the general relations for free-convection heat transfer. These coefficients, converted to dimensionless Nusselt numbers were 35 percent below known relations for vertical flat plates. Air temperature measurements within the tube indicated a thin boundary layer along the heated wall surface and unstable conditions in the air flow.

  10. Story Numbers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swafford, Jane; McGinty, Robert

    1978-01-01

    A concrete approach to prime numbers is presented using rectangles and triangles to construct a building for each number so that each story represents a pair of factors and the triangular-shaped roof represents the number. (MP)

  11. Laminar-to-turbulence and relaminarization zones detection by simulation of low Reynolds number turbulent blood flow in large stenosed arteries.

    PubMed

    Tabe, Reza; Ghalichi, Farzan; Hossainpour, Siamak; Ghasemzadeh, Kamran

    2016-08-12

    Laminar, turbulent, transitional, or combine areas of all three types of viscous flow can occur downstream of a stenosis depending upon the Reynolds number and constriction shape parameter. Neither laminar flow solver nor turbulent models for instance the k-ω (k-omega), k-ε (k-epsilon), RANS or LES are opportune for this type of flow. In the present study attention has been focused vigorously on the effect of the constriction in the flow field with a unique way. It means that the laminar solver was employed from entry up to the beginning of the turbulent shear flow. The turbulent model (k-ω SST Transitional Flows) was utilized from starting of turbulence to relaminarization zone while the laminar model was applied again with onset of the relaminarization district. Stenotic flows, with 50 and 75% cross-sectional area, were simulated at Reynolds numbers range from 500 to 2000 employing FLUENT (v6.3.17). The flow was considered to be steady, axisymmetric, and incompressible. Achieving results were reported as axial velocity, disturbance velocity, wall shear stress and the outcomes were compared with previously experimental and CFD computations. The analogy of axial velocity profiles shows that they are in acceptable compliance with the empirical data. As well as disturbance velocity and wall shear stresses anticipated by this new approach, part by part simulation, are reasonably valid with the acceptable experimental studies. PMID:27567769

  12. Solar and geomagnetic effects on the frequency of atmospheric circulation types over Europe: an analysis based on a large number of classifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Radan; Cahynová, Monika; Kyselý, Jan

    2010-05-01

    Recently, effects of the 11-year solar cycle on various aspects of tropospheric circulation in the Northern Hemisphere in winter have been recognized. One of our previous studies showed a significant solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types from the Hess-Brezowsky catalogue. Here, we use a large collection of varied classifications of circulation patterns, assembled within the COST733 Action "Harmonization and Applications of Weather Types Classifications for European Regions" to detect the solar effect on the frequency of synoptic types. The collection contains both objective and subjective classifications. The advantage of this multi-classification approach is that peculiarities or biases of any single classification (catalogue) that might influence the detected solar signal vanish once a large ensemble of classifications is used. We divide winter months (December to March) into three groups according to the mean monthly solar activity, quantified by the F10.7 flux. The three groups correspond to the minima of the 11-year solar cycle, a moderate solar activity, and solar maxima. Within each group, frequencies of occurrence of individual circulation types are calculated. Differences in the occurrence of individual classes between solar activity groups indicate the presence of a solar activity effect on atmospheric circulation over Europe. Statistical significance of these differences is estimated by a block resampling method. The research is supported by the Grant Agency of the Czech Academy of Sciences, project A300420805, and by the Ministry of Education, Youth, and Sports of the Czech Republic, contract OC115.

  13. Environmental parasitology: Parasites as accumulation bioindicators in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nachev, Milen; Sures, Bernd

    2016-07-01

    Parasites can be used as effective monitoring tools in environmental impact studies as they are able to accumulate certain pollutants (e.g. metals) at levels much higher than those of their ambient environment and of free-living sentinels. Thus, they provide valuable information not only about the chemical conditions of their and their hosts' environment but also deliver insights into the biological availability of allochthonous substances. While a large number of different freshwater parasites (mainly acanthocephalans and cestodes) were investigated in terms of pollutant bioaccumulation, studies based on marine host-parasites systems remain scarce. However, available data show that different marine parasite taxa such as nematodes, cestodes and acanthocephalans exhibit also an excellent metal accumulation capacity. The biological availability of metals and their uptake routes in marine biota and parasites differ from those of freshwater organisms. We assume that a large part of metals and other pollutants are also taken up via the digestive system of the host. Therefore, in addition to environmental conditions the physiology of the host also plays an important role for the accumulation process. Additionally, we highlight some advantages in using parasites as accumulation indicators in marine ecosystems. As parasites occur ubiquitously in marine food webs, the monitoring of metals in their tissues can deliver information about the spatial and trophic distribution of pollutants. Accordingly, parasites as indicators offer an ecological assessment on a broader scale, in contrast to established free-living marine indicators, which are mostly benthic invertebrates and therefore limited in habitat distribution. Globally distributed parasite taxa, which are highly abundant in a large number of host species, are suggested as worldwide applicable sentinels.

  14. A vectorized algorithm on the ETA 10-P for molecular dynamics simulation of large number of particles confined in a long cylinder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mościński, J.; Kitowski, J.; Rycerz, Z. A.; Jacobs, P. W. M.

    1989-04-01

    In this paper we describe an algorithm suitable for molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulation of particles confined in a cylinder and interacting by short-ranged forces. A procedure for determining neighbours is based on sorting the particles according to values of one coordinate along the axis of a cylinder and gathering the values of the other two coordinates due to indices of the sorted list. In addition to the classical cut-off distance an integer cut-off number is introduced. This and the organization of data structures make that the calculating forces loop is completely vectorized. The algorithm has been devised for the CYBER 205 and ETA 10 computers and is specially efficient for MD simulation in cylindrical micropores.

  15. A modification to linearized theory for prediction of pressure loadings on lifting surfaces at high supersonic Mach numbers and large angles of attack

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, H. W.

    1979-01-01

    A new linearized-theory pressure-coefficient formulation was studied. The new formulation is intended to provide more accurate estimates of detailed pressure loadings for improved stability analysis and for analysis of critical structural design conditions. The approach is based on the use of oblique-shock and Prandtl-Meyer expansion relationships for accurate representation of the variation of pressures with surface slopes in two-dimensional flow and linearized-theory perturbation velocities for evaluation of local three-dimensional aerodynamic interference effects. The applicability and limitations of the modification to linearized theory are illustrated through comparisons with experimental pressure distributions for delta wings covering a Mach number range from 1.45 to 4.60 and angles of attack from 0 to 25 degrees.

  16. High Frequency Design Considerations for the Large Detector Number and Small Form Factor Dual Electron Spectrometer of the Fast Plasma Investigation on NASA's Magnetospheric Multiscale Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kujawski, Joseph T.; Gliese, Ulrik B.; Cao, N. T.; Zeuch, M. A.; White, D.; Chornay, D. J; Lobell, J. V.; Avanov, L. A.; Barrie, A. C.; Mariano, A. J.; Tucker, C. J.; Piepgrass, B.; Auletti, C.; Weidner, S.; Jacques, A. D.; Pollock, C. J.

    2015-01-01

    Each half of the Dual Electron Spectrometer (DES) of the Fast Plasma Investigation (FPI) on NASA's Magnetospheric MultiScale (MMS) mission utilizes a microchannel plate Chevron stack feeding 16 separate detection channels each with a dedicated anode and amplifier/discriminator chip. The desire to detect events on a single channel with a temporal spacing of 100 ns and a fixed dead-time drove our decision to use an amplifier/discriminator with a very fast (GHz class) front end. Since the inherent frequency response of each pulse in the output of the DES microchannel plate system also has frequency components above a GHz, this produced a number of design constraints not normally expected in electronic systems operating at peak speeds of 10 MHz. Additional constraints are imposed by the geometry of the instrument requiring all 16 channels along with each anode and amplifier/discriminator to be packaged in a relatively small space. We developed an electrical model for board level interactions between the detector channels to allow us to design a board topology which gave us the best detection sensitivity and lowest channel to channel crosstalk. The amplifier/discriminator output was designed to prevent the outputs from one channel from producing triggers on the inputs of other channels. A number of Radio Frequency design techniques were then applied to prevent signals from other subsystems (e.g. the high voltage power supply, command and data handling board, and Ultraviolet stimulation for the MCP) from generating false events. These techniques enabled us to operate the board at its highest sensitivity when operated in isolation and at very high sensitivity when placed into the overall system.

  17. Universal logarithmic law of velocity distribution as applied to the investigation of boundary layer and drag of streamline bodies at large Reynolds number

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurjienko, G

    1937-01-01

    In the present paper we shall consider a figure of revolution, so that the formulas applicable to the more simple cases as, for example, a wing or flat plate will follow from our equations as corollaries. For checking the results of our theory, we made use of the data derived from the tests of Freeman on a 1/40-scale model of the airship "Akron" conducted in the large NACA wind tunnel. In the first part we shall derive the fundamental equation for a body of revolution according to the Karman theory in its original form, and in the second part we shall give all the comparisons of the results of tests with the modified theory.

  18. Predicting unknown species numbers using discovery curves

    PubMed Central

    Bebber, Daniel P; Marriott, Francis H.C; Gaston, Kevin J; Harris, Stephen A; Scotland, Robert W

    2007-01-01

    A common approach to estimating the total number of extant species in a taxonomic group is to extrapolate from the temporal pattern of known species descriptions. A formal statistical approach to this problem is provided. The approach is applied to a number of global datasets for birds, ants, mosses, lycophytes, monilophytes (ferns and horsetails), gymnosperms and also to New World grasses and UK flowering plants. Overall, our results suggest that unless the inventory of a group is nearly complete, estimating the total number of species is associated with very large margins of error. The strong influence of unpredictable variations in the discovery process on species accumulation curves makes these data unreliable in estimating total species numbers. PMID:17456460

  19. Correlation between the VITEK2 system and cefoxitin disk diffusion for the daily detection of oxacillin resistance in a large number of clinical Staphylococcus aureus isolates.

    PubMed

    Bemer, P; Juvin, M E; Le Gargasson, G; Drugeon, H; Reynaud, A; Corvec, S

    2010-06-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the performance of the new VITEK2 AST-P551 card with the cefoxitin disk diffusion method for the daily detection of methicillin resistance with a high number of Staphylococcus aureus clinical isolates. Detection of the PBP2a protein or mecA gene was performed for each discordant case. Seventy (3.3%) isolates out of 2,107 clinical strains showed discordant results, two very major errors, four major errors and 64 minor errors. Fifty-nine (84%) discordant results were resolved, with a final overall agreement of 99.5%. Eleven (0.5%) strains remained discordant (minor error [mE]). Four of 370 MRSA strains were misclassified as susceptible in daily practice by the cefoxitin disk diffusion method. All of these strains were resistant to aminoglycosides and/or fluoroquinolones. The VITEK2 system is highly reliable for methicillin resistance detection at the routine level. Oxacillin-susceptible classified clinical strains with associated resistance patterns required attention. PMID:20372955

  20. Genome Reduction Uncovers a Large Dispensable Genome and Adaptive Role for Copy Number Variation in Asexually Propagated Solanum tuberosum[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hardigan, Michael A.; Crisovan, Emily; Hamilton, John P.; Laimbeer, Parker; Leisner, Courtney P.; Manrique-Carpintero, Norma C.; Newton, Linsey; Pham, Gina M.; Vaillancourt, Brieanne; Zeng, Zixian; Jiang, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    Clonally reproducing plants have the potential to bear a significantly greater mutational load than sexually reproducing species. To investigate this possibility, we examined the breadth of genome-wide structural variation in a panel of monoploid/doubled monoploid clones generated from native populations of diploid potato (Solanum tuberosum), a highly heterozygous asexually propagated plant. As rare instances of purely homozygous clones, they provided an ideal set for determining the degree of structural variation tolerated by this species and deriving its minimal gene complement. Extensive copy number variation (CNV) was uncovered, impacting 219.8 Mb (30.2%) of the potato genome with nearly 30% of genes subject to at least partial duplication or deletion, revealing the highly heterogeneous nature of the potato genome. Dispensable genes (>7000) were associated with limited transcription and/or a recent evolutionary history, with lower deletion frequency observed in genes conserved across angiosperms. Association of CNV with plant adaptation was highlighted by enrichment in gene clusters encoding functions for environmental stress response, with gene duplication playing a part in species-specific expansions of stress-related gene families. This study revealed unique impacts of CNV in a species with asexual reproductive habits and how CNV may drive adaption through evolution of key stress pathways. PMID:26772996

  1. Diet selection variation of a large herbivore in a feeding experiment with increasing species numbers and different plant functional group combinations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ling; Wang, Deli; Liu, Jushan; Huang, Yue; Hodgkinson, Ken C.

    2011-05-01

    The grazing of domestic herbivores affects the biodiversity of rangeland. Knowledge on the feedback of changed plant diversity on diet selection by domestic herbivores is poor even though it is at the core of the effects of herbivores on biodiversity of rangeland. We investigated the influence of increasing species numbers and different plant functional group combinations on the dynamics of diet preference and foraging selectivity by sheep. Sheep were given 16 consecutive meals at each sequential level of plant species richness. Three combinations of species, selected for functional types, were presented to sheep. The results showed that sheep did not usually maintain stable diet preference patterns for the 16 consecutive meals of the plant species combinations offered. The magnitude of meal to meal variation in the preference index for each species increased significantly with plant species richness. There was no obvious effect of post-ingestive learning on the meal variation in diet preference. The magnitude of sheep foraging selectivity within each meal significantly reduced with plant species richness. These results indicated that, when plant diversity was high, the diet selection pattern of herbivore may be more beneficial to maintaining high plant diversity. Thus, there may be a weak positive feedback between plant species richness and herbivore foraging. We suggested that increasing plant diversity, especially for plant functional group diversity, can reduce herbivore selectivity and promote more uniform use of different plant species in rangeland.

  2. Design of an optical see-through head-mounted display with a low f-number and large field of view using a freeform prism.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Dewen; Wang, Yongtian; Hua, Hong; Talha, M M

    2009-05-10

    It has been a challenge to design an optical see-through head-mounted display (OST-HMD) that has a wide field of view (FOV) and low f-number (f/#) while maintaining a compact, lightweight, and nonintrusive form factor. In this paper, we present an OST-HMD design using a wedge-shaped freeform prism cemented with a freeform lens. The prism, consisting of three freeform surfaces (FFSs), serves as the near-eye viewing optics that magnifies the image displayed through a microdisplay, and the freeform lens is an auxiliary element attached to the prism in order to maintain a nondistorted see-through view of a real-world scene. Both the freeform prism and the lens utilize plastic materials to achieve light weight. The overall dimension of the optical system per eye is no larger than 25 mm by 22 mm by 12 mm, and the weight is 8 g. Based on a 0.61 in. microdisplay, our system demonstrates a diagonal FOV of 53.5 degrees and an f/# of 1.875, with an 8 mm exit pupil diameter and an 18.25 mm eye relief. PMID:19424386

  3. A Large Number of Nuclear Genes in the Human Parasite Blastocystis Require mRNA Polyadenylation to Create Functional Termination Codons

    PubMed Central

    Klimeš, Vladimír; Gentekaki, Eleni; Roger, Andrew J.; Eliáš, Marek

    2014-01-01

    Termination codons in mRNA molecules are typically specified directly by the sequence of the corresponding gene. However, in mitochondria of a few eukaryotic groups, some mRNAs contain the termination codon UAA deriving one or both adenosines from transcript polyadenylation. Here, we show that a similar phenomenon occurs for a substantial number of nuclear genes in Blastocystis spp., divergent unicellular eukaryote gut parasites. Our analyses of published genomic data from Blastocystis sp. subtype 7 revealed that polyadenylation-mediated creation of termination codons occurs in approximately 15% of all nuclear genes. As this phenomenon has not been noticed before, the procedure previously employed to annotate the Blastocystis nuclear genome sequence failed to correctly define the structure of the 3′-ends of hundreds of genes. From sequence data we have obtained from the distantly related Blastocystis sp. subtype 1 strain, we show that this phenomenon is widespread within the Blastocystis genus. Polyadenylation in Blastocystis appears to be directed by a conserved GU-rich element located four nucleotides downstream of the polyadenylation site. Thus, the highly precise positioning of the polyadenylation in Blastocystis has allowed reduction of the 3′-untranslated regions to the point that, in many genes, only one or two nucleotides of the termination codon are left. PMID:25015079

  4. The twofold difference in adult size between the red junglefowl and White Leghorn chickens is largely explained by a limited number of QTLs.

    PubMed

    Kerje, S; Carlborg, O; Jacobsson, L; Schütz, K; Hartmann, C; Jensen, P; Andersson, L

    2003-08-01

    A large intercross between the domestic White Leghorn chicken and the wild ancestor, the red junglefowl, has been used in a Quantitative Trait Loci (QTL) study of growth and egg production. The linkage map based on 105 marker loci was in good agreement with the chicken consensus map. The growth of the 851 F2 individuals was lower than both parental lines prior to 46 days of age and intermediate to the two parental lines thereafter. The QTL analysis of growth traits revealed 13 loci that showed genome-wide significance. The four major growth QTLs explained 50 and 80% of the difference in adult body weight between the founder populations for females and males, respectively. A major QTL for growth, located on chromosome 1 appears to have pleiotropic effects on feed consumption, egg production and behaviour. There was a strong positive correlation between adult body weight and average egg weight. However, three QTLs affecting average egg weight but not body weight were identified. An interesting observation was that the estimated effects for the four major growth QTLs all indicated a codominant inheritance. PMID:12873214

  5. Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 Form Nuclear Bodies and Repress a Large Number of Protein-Coding Genes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wanlu; Wang, Haifeng; Papikian, Ashot; Pastor, William A.; Moissiard, Guillaume; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Dangl, Jeffery L.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Jacobsen, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    The MORC family of GHKL ATPases are an enigmatic class of proteins with diverse chromatin related functions. In Arabidopsis, AtMORC1, AtMORC2, and AtMORC6 act together in heterodimeric complexes to mediate transcriptional silencing of methylated DNA elements. Here, we studied Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7. We found that, in contrast to AtMORC1,2,6, they act to suppress a wide set of non-methylated protein-coding genes that are enriched for those involved in pathogen response. Furthermore, atmorc4 atmorc7 double mutants show a pathogen response phenotype. We found that AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 form homomeric complexes in vivo and are concentrated in discrete nuclear bodies adjacent to chromocenters. Analysis of an atmorc1,2,4,5,6,7 hextuple mutant demonstrates that transcriptional de-repression is largely uncoupled from changes in DNA methylation in plants devoid of MORC function. However, we also uncover a requirement for MORC in both DNA methylation and silencing at a small but distinct subset of RNA-directed DNA methylation target loci. These regions are characterized by poised transcriptional potential and a low density of sites for symmetric cytosine methylation. These results provide insight into the biological function of MORC proteins in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27171361

  6. Colorimetric In Situ Hybridization Identifies MYC Gene Signal Clusters Correlating With Increased Copy Number, mRNA, and Protein in Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Valentino, Carlo; Kendrick, Samantha; Johnson, Nathalie; Gascoyne, Randy; Chan, Wing C.; Weisenburger, Dennis; Braziel, Rita; Cook, James R.; Tubbs, Raymond; Campo, Elias; Rosenwald, Andreas; Ott, German; Delabie, Jan; Jaffe, Elaine; Zhang, Wenjun; Brunhoeber, Patrick; Nitta, Hiro; Grogan, Tom; Rimsza, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Abnormalities of the MYC oncogene on chromosome 8 are characteristic of Burkitt lymphoma and other aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). We recently described a colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH) method for detecting extra copies of the MYC gene in DLBCL and the frequent occurrence of excess copies of discrete MYC signals in the context of diploidy or polyploidy of chromosome 8, which correlated with increased mRNA signals. We further observed enlarged MYC signals, which were counted as a single gene copy but, by their dimension and unusual shape, likely consisted of “clusters” of MYC genes. In this study, we sought to further characterize these clusters of MYC signals by determining whether the presence of these correlated with other genetic features, mRNA levels, protein, and overall survival. We found that MYC clusters correlated with an abnormal MYC locus and with increased mRNA. MYC mRNA correlated with protein levels, and both increased mRNA and protein correlated with poorer overall survival. MYC clusters were seen in both the germinal center and activated B-cell subtypes of DLBCL. Clusters of MYC signals may be an underappreciated, but clinically important, feature of aggressive B-cell lymphomas with potential prognostic and therapeutic relevance. PMID:23355209

  7. Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 Form Nuclear Bodies and Repress a Large Number of Protein-Coding Genes.

    PubMed

    Harris, C Jake; Husmann, Dylan; Liu, Wanlu; Kasmi, Farid El; Wang, Haifeng; Papikian, Ashot; Pastor, William A; Moissiard, Guillaume; Vashisht, Ajay A; Dangl, Jeffery L; Wohlschlegel, James A; Jacobsen, Steven E

    2016-05-01

    The MORC family of GHKL ATPases are an enigmatic class of proteins with diverse chromatin related functions. In Arabidopsis, AtMORC1, AtMORC2, and AtMORC6 act together in heterodimeric complexes to mediate transcriptional silencing of methylated DNA elements. Here, we studied Arabidopsis AtMORC4 and AtMORC7. We found that, in contrast to AtMORC1,2,6, they act to suppress a wide set of non-methylated protein-coding genes that are enriched for those involved in pathogen response. Furthermore, atmorc4 atmorc7 double mutants show a pathogen response phenotype. We found that AtMORC4 and AtMORC7 form homomeric complexes in vivo and are concentrated in discrete nuclear bodies adjacent to chromocenters. Analysis of an atmorc1,2,4,5,6,7 hextuple mutant demonstrates that transcriptional de-repression is largely uncoupled from changes in DNA methylation in plants devoid of MORC function. However, we also uncover a requirement for MORC in both DNA methylation and silencing at a small but distinct subset of RNA-directed DNA methylation target loci. These regions are characterized by poised transcriptional potential and a low density of sites for symmetric cytosine methylation. These results provide insight into the biological function of MORC proteins in higher eukaryotes. PMID:27171361

  8. The effects of Reynolds number, rotor incidence angle and surface roughness on the heat transfer distribution in a large-scale turbine rotor passage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blair, M. F.

    1991-01-01

    A combined experimental and computational program was conducted to examine the heat transfer distribution in a turbine rotor passage geometrically similar to the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) High Pressure Fuel Turbopump (HPFTP). Heat transfer was measured and computed for both the full span suction and pressure surfaces of the rotor airfoil as well as for the hub endwall surface. The objective of the program was to provide a benchmark-quality database for the assessment of rotor heat transfer computational techniques. The experimental portion of the study was conducted in a large scale, ambient temperature, rotating turbine model. The computational portion consisted of the application of a well-posed parabolized Navier-Stokes analysis of the calculation of the three-dimensional viscous flow through ducts simulating a gas turbine package. The results of this assessment indicate that the procedure has the potential to predict the aerodynamics and the heat transfer in a gas turbine passage and can be used to develop detailed three dimensional turbulence models for the prediction of skin friction and heat transfer in complex three dimensional flow passages.

  9. Aspergillus niger genome-wide analysis reveals a large number of novel alpha-glucan acting enzymes with unexpected expression profiles.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xiao-Lian; van der Kaaij, Rachel M; van den Hondel, Cees A M J J; Punt, Peter J; van der Maarel, Marc J E C; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Ram, Arthur F J

    2008-06-01

    The filamentous ascomycete Aspergillus niger is well known for its ability to produce a large variety of enzymes for the degradation of plant polysaccharide material. A major carbon and energy source for this soil fungus is starch, which can be degraded by the concerted action of alpha-amylase, glucoamylase and alpha-glucosidase enzymes, members of the glycoside hydrolase (GH) families 13, 15 and 31, respectively. In this study we have combined analysis of the genome sequence of A. niger CBS 513.88 with microarray experiments to identify novel enzymes from these families and to predict their physiological functions. We have identified 17 previously unknown family GH13, 15 and 31 enzymes in the A. niger genome, all of which have orthologues in other aspergilli. Only two of the newly identified enzymes, a putative alpha-glucosidase (AgdB) and an alpha-amylase (AmyC), were predicted to play a role in starch degradation. The expression of the majority of the genes identified was not induced by maltose as carbon source, and not dependent on the presence of AmyR, the transcriptional regulator for starch degrading enzymes. The possible physiological functions of the other predicted family GH13, GH15 and GH31 enzymes, including intracellular enzymes and cell wall associated proteins, in alternative alpha-glucan modifying processes are discussed. PMID:18320228

  10. Prediction using step-wise L1, L2 regularization and feature selection for small data sets with large number of features

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Machine learning methods are nowadays used for many biological prediction problems involving drugs, ligands or polypeptide segments of a protein. In order to build a prediction model a so called training data set of molecules with measured target properties is needed. For many such problems the size of the training data set is limited as measurements have to be performed in a wet lab. Furthermore, the considered problems are often complex, such that it is not clear which molecular descriptors (features) may be suitable to establish a strong correlation with the target property. In many applications all available descriptors are used. This can lead to difficult machine learning problems, when thousands of descriptors are considered and only few (e.g. below hundred) molecules are available for training. Results The CoEPrA contest provides four data sets, which are typical for biological regression problems (few molecules in the training data set and thousands of descriptors). We applied the same two-step training procedure for all four regression tasks. In the first stage, we used optimized L1 regularization to select the most relevant features. Thus, the initial set of more than 6,000 features was reduced to about 50. In the second stage, we used only the selected features from the preceding stage applying a milder L2 regularization, which generally yielded further improvement of prediction performance. Our linear model employed a soft loss function which minimizes the influence of outliers. Conclusions The proposed two-step method showed good results on all four CoEPrA regression tasks. Thus, it may be useful for many other biological prediction problems where for training only a small number of molecules are available, which are described by thousands of descriptors. PMID:22026913

  11. Suspect screening of large numbers of emerging contaminants in environmental waters using artificial neural networks for chromatographic retention time prediction and high resolution mass spectrometry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Bade, Richard; Bijlsma, Lubertus; Miller, Thomas H; Barron, Leon P; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Hernández, Felix

    2015-12-15

    The recent development of broad-scope high resolution mass spectrometry (HRMS) screening methods has resulted in a much improved capability for new compound identification in environmental samples. However, positive identifications at the ng/L concentration level rely on analytical reference standards for chromatographic retention time (tR) and mass spectral comparisons. Chromatographic tR prediction can play a role in increasing confidence in suspect screening efforts for new compounds in the environment, especially when standards are not available, but reliable methods are lacking. The current work focuses on the development of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for tR prediction in gradient reversed-phase liquid chromatography and applied along with HRMS data to suspect screening of wastewater and environmental surface water samples. Based on a compound tR dataset of >500 compounds, an optimized 4-layer back-propagation multi-layer perceptron model enabled predictions for 85% of all compounds to within 2min of their measured tR for training (n=344) and verification (n=100) datasets. To evaluate the ANN ability for generalization to new data, the model was further tested using 100 randomly selected compounds and revealed 95% prediction accuracy within the 2-minute elution interval. Given the increasing concern on the presence of drug metabolites and other transformation products (TPs) in the aquatic environment, the model was applied along with HRMS data for preliminary identification of pharmaceutically-related compounds in real samples. Examples of compounds where reference standards were subsequently acquired and later confirmed are also presented. To our knowledge, this work presents for the first time, the successful application of an accurate retention time predictor and HRMS data-mining using the largest number of compounds to preliminarily identify new or emerging contaminants in wastewater and surface waters. PMID:26363605

  12. Drivers of Holocene peatland carbon accumulation across a climate gradient in northeastern North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charman, Dan J.; Amesbury, Matthew J.; Hinchliffe, William; Hughes, Paul D. M.; Mallon, Gunnar; Blake, William H.; Daley, Tim J.; Gallego-Sala, Angela V.; Mauquoy, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    Peatlands are an important component of the Holocene global carbon (C) cycle and the rate of C sequestration and storage is driven by the balance between net primary productivity and decay. A number of studies now suggest that climate is a key driver of peatland C accumulation at large spatial scales and over long timescales, with warmer conditions associated with higher rates of C accumulation. However, other factors are also likely to play a significant role in determining local carbon accumulation rates and these may modify past, present and future peatland carbon sequestration. Here, we test the importance of climate as a driver of C accumulation, compared with hydrological change, fire, nitrogen content and vegetation type, from records of C accumulation at three sites in northeastern North America, across the N-S climate gradient of raised bog distribution. Radiocarbon age models, bulk density values and %C measurements from each site are used to construct C accumulation histories commencing between 11,200 and 8000 cal. years BP. The relationship between C accumulation and environmental variables (past water table depth, fire, peat forming vegetation and nitrogen content) is assessed with linear and multivariate regression analyses. Differences in long-term rates of carbon accumulation between sites support the contention that a warmer climate with longer growing seasons results in faster rates of long-term carbon accumulation. However, mid-late Holocene accumulation rates show divergent trends, decreasing in the north but rising in the south. We hypothesise that sites close to the moisture threshold for raised bog distribution increased their growth rate in response to a cooler climate with lower evapotranspiration in the late Holocene, but net primary productivity declined over the same period in northern areas causing a decrease in C accumulation. There was no clear relationship between C accumulation and hydrological change, vegetation, nitrogen content

  13. The combustion of large particles of char in bubbling fluidized beds: The dependence of Sherwood number and the rate of burning on particle diameter

    SciTech Connect

    Dennis, J.S.; Hayhurst, A.N.; Scott, S.A.

    2006-11-15

    Particles of char derived from a variety of fuels (e.g., biomass, sewage sludge, coal, or graphite), with diameters in excess of {approx}1.5mm, burn in fluidized bed combustors containing smaller particles of, e.g., sand, such that the rate is controlled by the diffusion both of O{sub 2} to the burning solid and of the products CO and CO{sub 2} away from it into the particulate phase. It is therefore important to characterize these mass transfer processes accurately. Measurements of the burning rate of char particles made from sewage sludge suggest that the Sherwood number, Sh, increases linearly with the diameter of the fuel particle, d{sub char} (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). This linear dependence of Sh on d{sub char} is expected from the basic equation Sh=2{epsilon}{sub mf}(1+d{sub char}/2{delta}{sub diff})/{tau}, provided the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer, {delta}{sub diff}, is constant in the region of interest (d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm). Such a dependence is not seen in the empirical equations currently used and based on the Frossling expression. It is found here that for chars made from sewage sludge (for d{sub char}>{approx}1.5mm), the thickness of the boundary layer for mass transfer in a fluidized bed, {delta}{sub diff}, is less than that predicted by empirical correlations based on the Frossling expression. In fact, {delta}{sub diff} is not more than the diameter of the fluidized sand particles. Finally, the experiments in this study indicate that models based on surface renewal theory should be rejected for a fluidized bed, because they give unrealistically short contact times for packets of fluidized particles at the surface of a burning sphere. The result is the new correlation Sh = 2{epsilon}{sub mf}/{tau} + (A{sub cush}/A{sub char})(d{sub char}/ {delta}{sub diff}) for the dependence of Sh on d{sub char}, the diameter of a burning char particle. This equation is based on there being a gas-cushion of fluidizing gas underneath a

  14. Number relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Philip

    Number relativity 1.Every equation of the relativity is just the way to understand through to solve one question of the math problem. We just add the hypothesis into the number. 2. Sequence of number is the machine physics for software(computer) as the number order is program equation as calculator. 3. When zero is denominator, it is not existing as it is doing something by nothing. So nothing means time as we put zero denominator into time. My personal physics imagine.

  15. Direct sequencing and expression analysis of a large number of miRNAs in Aedes aegypti and a multi-species survey of novel mosquito miRNAs

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a novel class of gene regulators whose biogenesis involves hairpin structures called precursor miRNAs, or pre-miRNAs. A pre-miRNA is processed to make a miRNA:miRNA* duplex, which is then separated to generate a mature miRNA and a miRNA*. The mature miRNAs play key regulatory roles during embryonic development as well as other cellular processes. They are also implicated in control of viral infection as well as innate immunity. Direct experimental evidence for mosquito miRNAs has been recently reported in anopheline mosquitoes based on small-scale cloning efforts. Results We obtained approximately 130, 000 small RNA sequences from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, by 454 sequencing of samples that were isolated from mixed-age embryos and midguts from sugar-fed and blood-fed females, respectively. We also performed bioinformatics analysis on the Ae. aegypti genome assembly to identify evidence for additional miRNAs. The combination of these approaches uncovered 98 different pre-miRNAs in Ae. aegypti which could produce 86 distinct miRNAs. Thirteen miRNAs, including eight novel miRNAs identified in this study, are currently only found in mosquitoes. We also identified five potential revisions to previously annotated miRNAs at the miRNA termini, two cases of highly abundant miRNA* sequences, 14 miRNA clusters, and 17 cases where more than one pre-miRNA hairpin produces the same or highly similar mature miRNAs. A number of miRNAs showed higher levels in midgut from blood-fed female than that from sugar-fed female, which was confirmed by northern blots on two of these miRNAs. Northern blots also revealed several miRNAs that showed stage-specific expression. Detailed expression analysis of eight of the 13 mosquito-specific miRNAs in four divergent mosquito genera identified cases of clearly conserved expression patterns and obvious differences. Four of the 13 miRNAs are specific to certain lineage(s) within mosquitoes. Conclusion

  16. Leftist Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Andrew

    2008-01-01

    The leftist number system consists of numbers with decimal digits arranged in strings to the left, instead of to the right. This system fails to be a field only because it contains zerodivisors. The same construction with prime base yields the p-adic numbers.

  17. Superharmonic numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Graeme L.

    2009-03-01

    Let tau(n) denote the number of positive divisors of a natural number n>1 and let sigma(n) denote their sum. Then n is superharmonic if sigma(n)mid n^ktau(n) for some positive integer k . We deduce numerous properties of superharmonic numbers and show in particular that the set of all superharmonic numbers is the first nontrivial example that has been given of an infinite set that contains all perfect numbers but for which it is difficult to determine whether there is an odd member.

  18. 40 CFR 273.35 - Accumulation time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 273.35 Accumulation time limits. (a) A large quantity handler of universal waste may accumulate... demonstrate the length of time that the universal waste has been accumulated from the date it becomes a waste... other method which clearly demonstrates the length of time that the universal waste has been...

  19. 40 CFR 273.35 - Accumulation time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 273.35 Accumulation time limits. (a) A large quantity handler of universal waste may accumulate... demonstrate the length of time that the universal waste has been accumulated from the date it becomes a waste... other method which clearly demonstrates the length of time that the universal waste has been...

  20. 40 CFR 273.35 - Accumulation time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 273.35 Accumulation time limits. (a) A large quantity handler of universal waste may accumulate... demonstrate the length of time that the universal waste has been accumulated from the date it becomes a waste... other method which clearly demonstrates the length of time that the universal waste has been...

  1. 40 CFR 273.35 - Accumulation time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 273.35 Accumulation time limits. (a) A large quantity handler of universal waste may accumulate... demonstrate the length of time that the universal waste has been accumulated from the date it becomes a waste... other method which clearly demonstrates the length of time that the universal waste has been...

  2. Measurement of Unsteady Blade Surface Pressure on a Single Rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-fan with Angular and Wake Inflow at Mach Numbers from 0.02 to 0.70

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, P.; Gruber, M.; Parzych, D.

    1988-01-01

    Unsteady blade surface pressure data for the Large-Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP) blade operation with angular inflow, wake inflow and uniform flow over a range of inflow Mach numbers of 0.02 to 0.70 is provided. The data are presented as Fourier coefficients for the first 35 harmonics of shaft rotational frequency. Also presented is a brief discussion of the unsteady blade response observed at takeoff and cruise conditions with angular and wake inflow.

  3. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  4. Active Hydrocarbon Biosynthesis and Accumulation in a Green Alga, Botryococcus braunii (Race A)

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Mana; Mukaida, Fukiko; Okada, Sigeru

    2013-01-01

    Among oleaginous microalgae, the colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii accumulates especially large quantities of hydrocarbons. This accumulation may be achieved more by storage of lipids in the extracellular space rather than in the cytoplasm, as is the case for all other examined oleaginous microalgae. The stage of hydrocarbon synthesis during the cell cycle was determined by autoradiography. The cell cycle of B. braunii race A was synchronized by aminouracil treatment, and cells were taken at various stages in the cell cycle and cultured in a medium containing [14C]acetate. Incorporation of 14C into hydrocarbons was detected. The highest labeling occurred just after septum formation, when it was about 2.6 times the rate during interphase. Fluorescent and electron microscopy revealed that new lipid accumulation on the cell surface occurred during at least two different growth stages and sites of cells. Lipid bodies in the cytoplasm were not prominent in interphase cells. These lipid bodies then increased in number, size, and inclusions, reaching maximum values just before the first lipid accumulation on the cell surface at the cell apex. Most of them disappeared from the cytoplasm concomitant with the second new accumulation at the basolateral region, where extracellular lipids continuously accumulated. The rough endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane is prominent in B. braunii, and the endoplasmic reticulum was often in contact with both a chloroplast and lipid bodies in cells with increasing numbers of lipid bodies. We discuss the transport pathway of precursors of extracellular hydrocarbons in race A. PMID:23794509

  5. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  6. Primordial nucleosynthesis and Dirac's large numbers hypothesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canuto, V.; Hsieh, S.-H.

    1980-01-01

    Consideration is given to the analysis of Falik (1979) which attempted to show that the cosmological model proposed by Canuto and Hsieh (1978) in which the gravitational constant varies with time contradicts observations of primordial helium. It is shown that the analysis was based on the assumptions that (1) the energy density of radiation in local thermodynamic equilibrium is approximately equal to the fourth power of the equilibrium temperature, where the product of the equilibrium temperature with the scale factor of the Robertson-Walker metric is constant, and (2) the gravitational constant is approximately equal to the inverse of the time even at early cosmological epochs. These assumptions are demonstrated to be invalid in the scale covariant theory of gravitation used to develop the model, thus negating the conclusion that the Canuto and Hsieh model excludes the primordial synthesis of helium.

  7. Gaming the Law of Large Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, Thomas R.; Snapp, Bart

    2012-01-01

    Many view mathematics as a rich and wonderfully elaborate game. In turn, games can be used to illustrate mathematical ideas. Fibber's Dice, an adaptation of the game Liar's Dice, is a fast-paced game that rewards gutsy moves and favors the underdog. It also brings to life concepts arising in the study of probability. In particular, Fibber's Dice…

  8. Number Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrera, Terese A.

    2004-01-01

    This article features Number Time, a site developed by the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) for young mathematics learners, located at www.bbc.co.uk/schools/numbertime. The site uses interactive animation to help children in pre-K through grade 2 understand and practice number basics. Users will find online games, videos that tell number…

  9. Multidecadal time series of satellite-detected accumulations of cyanobacteria in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, M.; Elmgren, R.

    2014-07-01

    Cyanobacteria, primarily of the species Nodularia spumigena, form extensive surface accumulations in the Baltic Sea in July and August, ranging from diffuse flakes to dense surface scums. The area of these accumulations can reach ~ 200 000 km2. We describe the compilation of a 35-year-long time series (1979-2013) of cyanobacteria surface accumulations in the Baltic Sea using multiple satellite sensors. This appears to be one of the longest satellite-based time series in biological oceanography. The satellite algorithm is based on remote sensing reflectance of the water in the red band, a measure of turbidity. Validation of the satellite algorithm using horizontal transects from a ship of opportunity showed the strongest relationship with phycocyanin fluorescence (an indicator of cyanobacteria), followed by turbidity and then by chlorophyll a fluorescence. The areal fraction with cyanobacteria accumulations (FCA) and the total accumulated area affected (TA) were used to characterize the intensity and extent of the accumulations. The fraction with cyanobacteria accumulations was calculated as the ratio of the number of detected accumulations to the number of cloud-free sea-surface views per pixel during the season (July-August). The total accumulated area affected was calculated by adding the area of pixels where accumulations were detected at least once during the season. The fraction with cyanobacteria accumulations and TA were correlated (R2 = 0.55) and both showed large interannual and decadal-scale variations. The average FCA was significantly higher for the second half of the time series (13.8%, 1997-2013) than for the first half (8.6%, 1979-1996). However, that does not seem to represent a long-term trend but decadal-scale oscillations. Cyanobacteria accumulations were common in the 1970s and early 1980s (FCA between 11-17%), but rare (FCA below 4%) during 1985-1990; they increased again starting in 1991 and particularly in 1999, reaching maxima in FCA (~ 25

  10. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  11. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  12. Genome-wide study refines the quantitative trait locus for number of ribs in a Large White × Minzhu intercross pig population and reveals a new candidate gene.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Long-Chao; Yue, Jing-Wei; Pu, Lei; Wang, Li-Gang; Liu, Xin; Liang, Jing; Yan, Hua; Zhao, Ke-Bin; Li, Na; Shi, Hui-Bi; Zhang, Yue-Bo; Wang, Li-Xian

    2016-10-01

    In China, sparerib is one of the most valuable parts of the pork carcass. As a result, candidate gene mining for number of ribs has become an interesting study focus. To examine the genetic basis for this major trait, we genotyped 596 individuals from an F2 Large White × Minzhu intercross pig population using the PorcineSNP60 Genotyping BeadChip. The genome-wide association study identified a locus for number of ribs in a 2.38-Mb region on Sus scrofa chromosome 7 (SSC7 of Sus scrofa genome assembly, Sscrofa10.2). We identified the top significant SNP ASGA0035536, which explained 16.51 % of the phenotypic variance. A previously reported candidate causal mutation (g.19034 A>C) in vertebrae development-associated gene VRTN explained 8.79 % of the phenotypic variation on number of ribs and had a much lower effect than ASGA0035536. Haplotype sharing analysis in F1 boars localized the rib number QTL to a 951-kb interval on SSC7. This interval encompassed 17 annotated genes in Sscrofa10.2, including the previously reported VRTN candidate gene. Of the 17 candidate genes, LTBP2, which encodes a latent transforming growth factor beta binding protein, was previously reported to indirectly regulate the activity of growth differentiation factor Gdf11, which has been shown to increase the number of ribs in knock-out mice. Thus, we propose LTBP2 as a good new candidate gene for number of ribs in the pig population. This finding advances our understanding of the genetic architecture of rib number in pigs. PMID:27307002

  13. Visual nesting impacts approximate number system estimation.

    PubMed

    Chesney, Dana L; Gelman, Rochel

    2012-08-01

    The approximate number system (ANS) allows people to quickly but inaccurately enumerate large sets without counting. One popular account of the ANS is known as the accumulator model. This model posits that the ANS acts analogously to a graduated cylinder to which one "cup" is added for each item in the set, with set numerosity read from the "height" of the cylinder. Under this model, one would predict that if all the to-be-enumerated items were not collected into the accumulator, either the sets would be underestimated, or the misses would need to be corrected by a subsequent process, leading to longer reaction times. In this experiment, we tested whether such miss effects occur. Fifty participants judged numerosities of briefly presented sets of circles. In some conditions, circles were arranged such that some were inside others. This circle nesting was expected to increase the miss rate, since previous research had indicated that items in nested configurations cannot be preattentively individuated in parallel. Logically, items in a set that cannot be simultaneously individuated cannot be simultaneously added to an accumulator. Participants' response times were longer and their estimations were lower for sets whose configurations yielded greater levels of nesting. The level of nesting in a display influenced estimation independently of the total number of items present. This indicates that miss effects, predicted by the accumulator model, are indeed seen in ANS estimation. We speculate that ANS biases might, in turn, influence cognition and behavior, perhaps by influencing which kinds of sets are spontaneously counted. PMID:22810562

  14. Templates, Numbers & Watercolors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clemesha, David J.

    1990-01-01

    Describes how a second-grade class used large templates to draw and paint five-digit numbers. The lesson integrated artistic knowledge and vocabulary with their mathematics lesson in place value. Students learned how draftspeople use templates, and they studied number paintings by Charles Demuth and Jasper Johns. (KM)

  15. Number Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sezin, Fatin

    2009-01-01

    It is instructive and interesting to find hidden numbers by using different positional numeration systems. Most of the present guessing techniques use the binary system expressed as less-than, greater-than or present-absent type information. This article describes how, by employing four cards having integers 1-64 written in different colours, one…

  16. Numbers, Please!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thelin, John R.

    2013-01-01

    What topic would you choose if you had the luxury of writing forever? In this article, John Thelin provides his response: He would opt to write about the history of higher education in a way that relies on quantitative data. "Numbers, please!" is his research request in taking on a longitudinal study of colleges and universities over…

  17. Numbers Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kathotia, Vinay

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on work undertaken by schools as part of Qualifications and Curriculum Authority's (QCA's) "Engaging mathematics for all learners" project. The goal was to use in the classroom, materials and approaches from a Royal Institution (Ri) Year 10 master-class, "Number Sense", which was inspired by examples from Michael Blastland and…

  18. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  19. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  20. Potassium accumulation and sodium efflux by Porphyra perforata tissues in lithium and magnesium sea water.

    PubMed

    EPPLEY, R W

    1959-09-01

    Cells of Porphyra perforata, a red marine alga, accumulate K in the absence of concomitant Na or Li extrusion while immersed in Li- or Mg-sea waters lacking Na. This suggests that the coupling observed between K and Na transport is facultative. No evidence is obtained for net extrusion of Li. Na efflux, with the concentration gradient, is facilitated by K and is proportional to the cellular Na content. Either Na efflux does not involve an ion carrier or the number of Na sites is large. Because K accumulation has been observed in the absence of Na extrusion, but not vice versa, it seems that K uptake is the primary secretory event, with Na extrusion a secondary process dependent upon K accumulation. PMID:13820476

  1. Update on the Argonne positron accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Borland, M.

    1993-07-01

    The injector for the Advanced Photon Source incorporates a 450-MeV positron accumulator ring (PAR) to decrease the filling time with the 2-Hz synchrotron. In addition to accumulating positrons from the linac, the PAR damps the beam and reduces the bunch length. The PAR lattice has been redesigned to use zero-gradient dipoles, while retaining essentially the same damping partition. Extensive simulations have been performed to set tolerances that will give high capture efficiency, in spite of the large momentum spread of the incoming positron beam.

  2. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and heavy metals in the tree foliage of Eucalyptus rostrata, Pinus radiata and Populus hybridus in the vicinity of a large aluminium smelter in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, J. H.; Wannaz, E. D.; Salazar, M. J.; Pignata, M. L.; Fangmeier, A.; Franzaring, J.

    2012-08-01

    A pollution gradient of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) was observed in tree foliage sampled in the vicinity of a large aluminium production facility in Patagonia (Argentina). Leaves of Eucalyptus rostrata, Populus hybridus and one-year-old needles of Pinus radiata were collected, and concentrations of 12 PAHs including the so-called EPA priority pollutants as well as heavy metals (Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn) were analysed. The PAH concentrations indicated a steep pollution gradient in the study area associated with the Al-industry, while the heavy metal content was unrelated to this activity. The present study confirms that aluminium smelting results in the deposition of PAH in the study area, and therefore further studies should be carried out taking into account the potentially adverse effects of these compounds on human and ecosystem health.

  3. Measurement of the steady surface pressure distribution on a single rotation large scale advanced prop-fan blade at Mach numbers from 0.03 to 0.78

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bushnell, Peter

    1988-01-01

    The aerodynamic pressure distribution was determined on a rotating Prop-Fan blade at the S1-MA wind tunnel facility operated by the Office National D'Etudes et de Recherches Aerospatiale (ONERA) in Modane, France. The pressure distributions were measured at thirteen radial stations on a single rotation Large Scale Advanced Prop-Fan (LAP/SR7) blade, for a sequence of operating conditions including inflow Mach numbers ranging from 0.03 to 0.78. Pressure distributions for more than one power coefficient and/or advanced ratio setting were measured for most of the inflow Mach numbers investigated. Due to facility power limitations the Prop-Fan test installation was a two bladed version of the eight design configuration. The power coefficient range investigated was therefore selected to cover typical power loading per blade conditions which occur within the Prop-Fan operating envelope. The experimental results provide an extensive source of information on the aerodynamic behavior of the swept Prop-Fan blade, including details which were elusive to current computational models and do not appear in the two-dimensional airfoil data.

  4. Reducing Unnecessary Accumulation of Incomplete Grades: A Quality Improvement Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Domocmat, Maria Carmela L.

    2015-01-01

    It has been noted that there is an increasing percentage of students accumulating incomplete (INC) grades. This paper aims to identify the factors that contribute to the accumulation of incomplete grades of students and, utilizing the best practices of various universities worldwide, it intends to recommend solutions in limiting the number of…

  5. Molecular interactions between the specialist herbivore Manduca sexta (Lepidoptera, Sphingidae) and its natural host Nicotiana attenuata. I. Large-scale changes in the accumulation of growth- and defense-related plant mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Hermsmeier, D; Schittko, U; Baldwin, I T

    2001-02-01

    Plants respond to herbivore attack with a dramatic functional reorganization that involves the activation of direct and indirect defenses and tolerance, which in turn make large demands on primary metabolism. Here we provide the first characterization of the transcriptional reorganization that occurs after insect attack in a model plant-herbivore system: Nicotiana attenuata Torr. ex Wats.-Manduca sexta. We used mRNA differential display to characterize one-twentieth of the insect-responsive transcriptome of N. attenuata and verified differential expression for 27 cDNAs. Northern analyses were used to study the effects of folivory and exposure to airborne methyl jasmonate and for kinetic analyses throughout a 16-h- light/8-h-dark cycle. Sequence similarity searches allowed putative functions to be assigned to 15 transcripts. Genes were related to photosynthesis, electron transport, cytoskeleton, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, signaling, and a group responding to stress, wounding, or invasion of pathogens. Overall, transcripts involved in photosynthesis were strongly down-regulated, whereas those responding to stress, wounding, and pathogens and involved in shifting carbon and nitrogen to defense were strongly up-regulated. The majority of transcripts responded similarly to airborne methyl jasmonate and folivory, and had tissue- and diurnal-specific patterns of expression. Transcripts encoding Thr deaminase (TD) and a putative retrotransposon were absent in control plants, but were strongly induced after herbivory. Full-length sequences were obtained for TD and the pathogen-inducible alpha-dioxygenase, PIOX. Effects of abiotic and biotic stimuli were investigated for transcripts encoding TD, importin alpha, PIOX, and a GAL83-like kinase cofactor. PMID:11161026

  6. 40 CFR 273.35 - Accumulation time limits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accumulation time limits. 273.35 Section 273.35 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) SOLID WASTES (CONTINUED) STANDARDS FOR UNIVERSAL WASTE MANAGEMENT Standards for Large Quantity Handlers of Universal Waste § 273.35 Accumulation time limits. (a) A...

  7. ITER helium ash accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hogan, J.T.; Hillis, D.L.; Galambos, J.; Uckan, N.A. ); Dippel, K.H.; Finken, K.H. . Inst. fuer Plasmaphysik); Hulse, R.A.; Budny, R.V. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    Many studies have shown the importance of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} in determining the level of He ash accumulation in future reactor systems. Results of the first tokamak He removal experiments have been analysed, and a first estimate of the ratio {upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E} to be expected for future reactor systems has been made. The experiments were carried out for neutral beam heated plasmas in the TEXTOR tokamak, at KFA/Julich. Helium was injected both as a short puff and continuously, and subsequently extracted with the Advanced Limiter Test-II pump limiter. The rate at which the He density decays has been determined with absolutely calibrated charge exchange spectroscopy, and compared with theoretical models, using the Multiple Impurity Species Transport (MIST) code. An analysis of energy confinement has been made with PPPL TRANSP code, to distinguish beam from thermal confinement, especially for low density cases. The ALT-II pump limiter system is found to exhaust the He with maximum exhaust efficiency (8 pumps) of {approximately}8%. We find 1<{upsilon}{sub He}/{upsilon}{sub E}<3.3 for the database of cases analysed to date. Analysis with the ITER TETRA systems code shows that these values would be adequate to achieve the required He concentration with the present ITER divertor He extraction system.

  8. Numbers in Action

    PubMed Central

    Rugani, Rosa; Sartori, Luisa

    2016-01-01

    Humans show a remarkable tendency to describe and think of numbers as being placed on a mental number line (MNL), with smaller numbers located on the left and larger ones on the right. Faster responses to small numbers are indeed performed on the left side of space, while responses to large numbers are facilitated on the right side of space (spatial-numerical association of response codes, SNARC effect). This phenomenon is considered the experimental demonstration of the MNL and has been extensively replicated throughout a variety of paradigms. Nevertheless, the majority of previous literature has mainly investigated this effect by means of response times and accuracy, whereas studies considering more subtle and automatic measures such as kinematic parameters are rare (e.g., in a reaching-to-grasp movement, the grip aperture is enlarged in responding to larger numbers than in responding to small numbers). In this brief review we suggest that numerical magnitude can also affect the what and how of action execution (i.e., temporal and spatial components of movement). This evidence could have large implications in the strongly debated issue concerning the effect of experience and culture on the orientation of MNL. PMID:27524965

  9. Computer-Based Reading Technology in the Classroom: The Affective Influence of Performance Contingent Point Accumulation on 4th Grade Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Putman, S. Michael

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship between the number of Accelerated Reader points accumulated by students and their level of self-efficacy and value of reading. The fourteen week study examined 68 fourth grade students who attended an elementary school in a suburban location near a large Midwestern city.…

  10. Heat accumulation effects in short-pulse multi-pass cutting of carbon fiber reinforced plastics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kononenko, T. V.; Freitag, C.; Komlenok, M. S.; Onuseit, V.; Weber, R.; Graf, T.; Konov, V. I.

    2015-09-01

    The formation of a matrix evaporation zone (MEZ) in carbon fiber reinforced plastics during multi-pass laser cutting with picosecond laser pulses is studied for a wide range of pulse frequencies (fp = 10-800 kHz) and feed rates (vf = 0.002-10 m/s). Three regimes of the formation of the MEZ are found and related with different heat accumulation effects: (i) small MEZ (<2 μm) with negligible heat accumulation, (ii) moderate-size MEZ (up to a few hundred microns) determined by heat accumulation between pulses, and (iii) large MEZ (up to a few millimeters) caused by heat accumulation between scans. The dependence of the size of the MEZ on the number of scans and the scan frequency was studied to distinguish the two heat accumulation effects (between pulses and between scans), which occur on different time-scales. A diagram to illustrate the boundaries between the three regimes of the formation of the MEZ as a function of feed rate and pulse frequency is proposed as a promising base for further studies and as a useful tool to optimize the processing parameters in practice.

  11. Neuronal and glial accumulation of alpha- and beta-synucleins in human lipidoses.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kyoko; Iseki, Eizo; Togo, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Akira; Katsuse, Omi; Katsuyama, Kayoko; Kanzaki, Seiichi; Shiozaki, Kazumasa; Kawanishi, Chiaki; Yamashita, Sumimasa; Tanaka, Yukichi; Yamanaka, Shoji; Hirayasu, Yoshio

    2007-11-01

    A number of the lysosomal storage diseases that have now been characterized are associated with intra-lysosomal accumulation of lipids, caused by defective lysosomal enzymes. We have previously reported neuronal accumulation of both alpha- and beta-synucleins in brain tissue of a GM2 gangliosidosis mouse model. Although alpha-synuclein has been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders including Parkinson's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and multiple system atrophy, its functions remain largely unclear. In our present study, we have examined a cohort of human lipidosis cases, including Sandhoff disease, Tay-Sachs disease, metachromatic leukodystrophy, beta-galactosialidosis and adrenoleukodystrophy, for the expression of alpha- and beta-synucleins and the associated lipid storage levels. The accumulation of alpha-synuclein was found in brain tissue in not only cases of lysosomal storage diseases, but also in instances of adrenoleukodystrophy, which is a peroxisomal disease. alpha-synuclein was detected in both neurons and glial cells of patients with these two disorders, although its distribution was found to be disease-dependent. In addition, alpha-synuclein-positive neurons were also found to be NeuN-positive, whereas NeuN-negative neurons did not show any accumulation of this protein. By comparison, the accumulation of beta-synuclein was detectable only in the pons of Sandhoff disease cases. This differential accumulation of alpha- and beta-synucleins in human lipidoses may be related to functional differences between these two proteins. In addition, the accumulation of alpha-synuclein may also be a condition that is common to lysosomal storage diseases and adrenoleukodystrophies that show an enhanced expression of this protein upon the elevation of stored lipids. PMID:17653558

  12. The impact of FLT3 internal tandem duplication mutant level, number, size, and interaction with NPM1 mutations in a large cohort of young adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gale, Rosemary E; Green, Claire; Allen, Christopher; Mead, Adam J; Burnett, Alan K; Hills, Robert K; Linch, David C

    2008-03-01

    An internal tandem duplication in the fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 gene (FLT3/ITD) is associated with poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but the impact of mutant level, size, and interaction with nucleophosmin 1 (NPM1) mutations remains controversial. We evaluated these characteristics in a large cohort of young adult AML patients. There was a highly significant trend for worsening in relapse risk (RR) and overall survival (OS) with increasing FLT3/ITD mutant level (P < .001 for both), and even in the low level mutant group (1%-24% of total FLT3 alleles), RR was significantly worse than in the FLT3 wild-type (WT) group (P < .001). In multivariate analysis, mutant level was the most powerful prognostic factor for RR. Mutant size and number had no significant impact on outcome. The beneficial impact of an NPM1 mutation on RR and OS was seen in FLT3/ITD(+) as well as FLT3/WT patients; both markers were highly significant independent predictors of outcome (P < .001). Stratification using both markers identified 3 prognostic groups: good (FLT3/ITD(-)NPM1(+)), intermediate (FLT3/ITD(-)NPM1(-) or FLT3/ITD(+)NPM1(+)), and poor (FLT3/ITD(+)NPM1(-)). Patients with high FLT3/ITD mutant level (greater than 50%) or FLT3/ITD(+) in the absence of an NPM1 mutation may be good candidates for more experimental therapeutic approaches. PMID:17957027

  13. Satellite detection of multi-decadal time series of cyanobacteria accumulations in the Baltic Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahru, M.; Elmgren, R.

    2014-02-01

    Cyanobacteria, primarily of the species Nodularia spumigena, form extensive surface accumulations in the Baltic Sea in July and August, ranging from diffuse flakes to dense surface scum. We describe the compilation of a 35 year (1979-2013) long time series of cyanobacteria surface accumulations in the Baltic Sea using multiple satellite sensors. This appears to be one of the longest satellite-based time series in biological oceanography. The satellite algorithm is based on increased remote sensing reflectance of the water in the red band, a measure of turbidity. Validation of the satellite algorithm using horizontal transects from a ship of opportunity showed the strongest relationship with phycocyanin fluorescence (an indicator of cyanobacteria), followed by turbidity and then by chlorophyll a fluorescence. The areal fraction with cyanobacteria accumulations (FCA) and the total accumulated area affected (TA) were used to characterize the intensity and extent of the accumulations. FCA was calculated as the ratio of the number of detected accumulations to the number of cloud free sea-surface views per pixel during the season (July-August). TA was calculated by adding the area of pixels where accumulations were detected at least once during the season. FCA and TA were correlated (R2 = 0.55) and both showed large interannual and decadal-scale variations. The average FCA was significantly higher for the 2nd half of the time series (13.8%, 1997-2013) than for the first half (8.6%, 1979-1996). However, that does not seem to represent a long-term trend but decadal-scale oscillations. Cyanobacteria accumulations were common in the 1970s and early 1980s (FCA between 11-17%), but rare (FCA below 4%) from 1985 to 1990; they increased again from 1991 and particularly from 1999, reaching maxima in FCA (~ 25%) and TA (~ 210 000 km2) in 2005 and 2008. After 2008 FCA declined to more moderate levels (6-17%). The timing of the accumulations has become earlier in the season, at a

  14. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  15. Plastic Accumulation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Cózar, Andrés; Sanz-Martín, Marina; Martí, Elisa; González-Gordillo, J. Ignacio; Ubeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Á.; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of floating plastic were measured throughout the Mediterranean Sea to assess whether this basin can be regarded as a great accumulation region of plastic debris. We found that the average density of plastic (1 item per 4 m2), as well as its frequency of occurrence (100% of the sites sampled), are comparable to the accumulation zones described for the five subtropical ocean gyres. Plastic debris in the Mediterranean surface waters was dominated by millimeter-sized fragments, but showed a higher proportion of large plastic objects than that present in oceanic gyres, reflecting the closer connection with pollution sources. The accumulation of floating plastic in the Mediterranean Sea (between 1,000 and 3,000 tons) is likely related to the high human pressure together with the hydrodynamics of this semi-enclosed basin, with outflow mainly occurring through a deep water layer. Given the biological richness and concentration of economic activities in the Mediterranean Sea, the affects of plastic pollution on marine and human life are expected to be particularly frequent in this plastic accumulation region. PMID:25831129

  16. Plastic accumulation in the Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Cózar, Andrés; Sanz-Martín, Marina; Martí, Elisa; González-Gordillo, J Ignacio; Ubeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Á; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of floating plastic were measured throughout the Mediterranean Sea to assess whether this basin can be regarded as a great accumulation region of plastic debris. We found that the average density of plastic (1 item per 4 m2), as well as its frequency of occurrence (100% of the sites sampled), are comparable to the accumulation zones described for the five subtropical ocean gyres. Plastic debris in the Mediterranean surface waters was dominated by millimeter-sized fragments, but showed a higher proportion of large plastic objects than that present in oceanic gyres, reflecting the closer connection with pollution sources. The accumulation of floating plastic in the Mediterranean Sea (between 1,000 and 3,000 tons) is likely related to the high human pressure together with the hydrodynamics of this semi-enclosed basin, with outflow mainly occurring through a deep water layer. Given the biological richness and concentration of economic activities in the Mediterranean Sea, the affects of plastic pollution on marine and human life are expected to be particularly frequent in this plastic accumulation region. PMID:25831129

  17. EXPERIMENTAL METHODS TO ESTIMATE ACCUMULATED SOLIDS IN NUCLEAR WASTE TANKS

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M.; Steeper, T.; Steimke, J.

    2012-12-10

    The Department of Energy has a large number of nuclear waste tanks. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles, e.g., plutonium containing, could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to remove most of the solids. Then the volume and shape of the residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for plutonium were measured. This paper discusses the overall test results, which indicated heavy solids only accumulate during the first few transfer cycles, along with the techniques and equipment designed and employed in the test. Those techniques include: Magnetic particle separator to remove stainless steel solids, the plutonium surrogate from a flowing stream; Magnetic wand used to manually remove stainless steel solids from samples and the tank heel; Photographs were used to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds by developing a composite of topographical areas; Laser rangefinders to determine the volume and shape of the solids mounds; Core sampler to determine the stainless steel solids distribution within the solids mounds; Computer driven positioner that placed the laser rangefinders and the core sampler over solids mounds that accumulated on the bottom of a scaled staging tank in locations where jet velocities were low. These

  18. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  19. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels.

    This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  20. Zinc Accumulation and Behavior in Tuyere Coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Zhengjian; Wang, Tianqiu; Ning, Xiaojun; Zhong, Jianbo; Xu, Runsheng; Wang, Guangwei; Ren, Shan; Yang, Tianjun

    2014-10-01

    A case study of zinc oxide, which represents the first report on the occurrence, crystalline features, formation mechanism, and influence of this mineral in tuyere coke, was conducted in this study. A number of zinc oxides, some of which were in hexagonal wurtzite habit, were observed to distribute mainly in coke pores, cracks, surfaces, and around coke minerals. The accumulation of zinc in tuyere coke may enhance the degradation of coke and increase the generation and accumulation of coke fine in a blast furnace, which would cause bad effect on blast furnace operation. Investigations into zinc behavior in tuyere coke can be important for further interpretations of coke degradation in the high temperature zone of a blast furnace.

  1. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  2. Evidence accumulation for spatial reasoning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsuyama, T.; Hwang, V. S. S.; Davis, L. S.

    1984-01-01

    The evidence accumulation proces of an image understanding system is described enabling the system to perform top-down(goal-oriented) picture processing as well as bottom-up verification of consistent spatial relations among objects.

  3. Heritability of Performance Deficit Accumulation During Acute Sleep Deprivation in Twins

    PubMed Central

    Kuna, Samuel T.; Maislin, Greg; Pack, Frances M.; Staley, Bethany; Hachadoorian, Robert; Coccaro, Emil F.; Pack, Allan I.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine if the large and highly reproducible interindividual differences in rates of performance deficit accumulation during sleep deprivation, as determined by the number of lapses on a sustained reaction time test, the Psychomotor Vigilance Task (PVT), arise from a heritable trait. Design: Prospective, observational cohort study. Setting: Academic medical center. Participants: There were 59 monozygotic (mean age 29.2 ± 6.8 [SD] yr; 15 male and 44 female pairs) and 41 dizygotic (mean age 26.6 ± 7.6 yr; 15 male and 26 female pairs) same-sex twin pairs with a normal polysomnogram. Interventions: Thirty-eight hr of monitored, continuous sleep deprivation. Measurements and Results: Patients performed the 10-min PVT every 2 hr during the sleep deprivation protocol. The primary outcome was change from baseline in square root transformed total lapses (response time ≥ 500 ms) per trial. Patient-specific linear rates of performance deficit accumulation were separated from circadian effects using multiple linear regression. Using the classic approach to assess heritability, the intraclass correlation coefficients for accumulating deficits resulted in a broad sense heritability (h2) estimate of 0.834. The mean within-pair and among-pair heritability estimates determined by analysis of variance-based methods was 0.715. When variance components of mixed-effect multilevel models were estimated by maximum likelihood estimation and used to determine the proportions of phenotypic variance explained by genetic and nongenetic factors, 51.1% (standard error = 8.4%, P < 0.0001) of twin variance was attributed to combined additive and dominance genetic effects. Conclusion: Genetic factors explain a large fraction of interindividual variance among rates of performance deficit accumulations on PVT during sleep deprivation. Citation: Kuna ST; Maislin G; Pack FM; Staley B; Hachadoorian R; Coccaro EF; Pack AI. Heritability of performance deficit accumulation

  4. Topics in Number Theory: The Number Game.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batra, Laj, Ed.; And Others

    This teacher's guide contains nine topics in number theory. Suggested questions for the teacher, short investigations, and possible exercises for the student are included. Chapter 1 is an introduction to sequences and series using geoboard activities involving triangular numbers, square numbers, rectangular numbers, and pentagonal numbers. The…

  5. Rare Copy Number Variants

    PubMed Central

    Grozeva, Detelina; Kirov, George; Ivanov, Dobril; Jones, Ian R.; Jones, Lisa; Green, Elaine K.; St Clair, David M.; Young, Allan H.; Ferrier, Nicol; Farmer, Anne E.; McGuffin, Peter; Holmans, Peter A.; Owen, Michael J.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Craddock, Nick

    2015-01-01

    Context Recent studies suggest that copy number variation in the human genome is extensive and may play an important role in susceptibility to disease, including neuropsychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia and autism. The possible involvement of copy number variants (CNVs) in bipolar disorder has received little attention to date. Objectives To determine whether large (>100 000 base pairs) and rare (found in <1% of the population) CNVs are associated with susceptibility to bipolar disorder and to compare with findings in schizophrenia. Design A genome-wide survey of large, rare CNVs in a case-control sample using a high-density microarray. Setting The Wellcome Trust Case Control Consortium. Participants There were 1697 cases of bipolar disorder and 2806 nonpsychiatric controls. All participants were white UK residents. Main Outcome Measures Overall load of CNVs and presence of rare CNVs. Results The burden of CNVs in bipolar disorder was not increased compared with controls and was significantly less than in schizophrenia cases. The CNVs previously implicated in the etiology of schizophrenia were not more common in cases with bipolar disorder. Conclusions Schizophrenia and bipolar disorder differ with respect to CNV burden in general and association with specific CNVs in particular. Our data are consistent with the possibility that possession of large, rare deletions may modify the phenotype in those at risk of psychosis: those possessing such events are more likely to be diagnosed as having schizophrenia, and those without them are more likely to be diagnosed as having bipolar disorder. PMID:20368508

  6. How Financial Literacy Affects Household Wealth Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Behrman, Jere R.; Mitchell, Olivia S.; Soo, Cindy K.; Bravo, David

    2012-01-01

    This study isolates the causal effects of financial literacy and schooling on wealth accumulation using a new household dataset and an instrumental variables (IV) approach. Financial literacy and schooling attainment are both strongly positively associated with wealth outcomes in linear regression models, whereas the IV estimates reveal even more potent effects of financial literacy. They also indicate that the schooling effect only becomes positive when interacted with financial literacy. Estimated impacts are substantial enough to imply that investments in financial literacy could have large wealth payoffs. PMID:23355747

  7. Maximum likelihood decoding analysis of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-Accumulate (RA) codes are the simplest turbo-like codes that achieve good performance. However, they cannot compete with Turbo codes or low-density parity check codes (LDPC) as far as performance is concerned. The Accumulate Repeat Accumulate (ARA) codes, as a subclass of LDPC codes, are obtained by adding a pre-coder in front of RA codes with puncturing where an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. These codes not only are very simple, but also achieve excellent performance with iterative decoding. In this paper, the performance of these codes with (ML) decoding are analyzed and compared to random codes by very tight bounds. The weight distribution of some simple ARA codes is obtained, and through existing tightest bounds we have shown the ML SNR threshold of ARA codes approaches very closely to the performance of random codes. We have shown that the use of precoder improves the SNR threshold but interleaving gain remains unchanged with respect to RA code with puncturing.

  8. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, W. Tyler Siebers, Jeffrey V.; Moore, Joseph A.; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated.

  9. Multiple anatomy optimization of accumulated dose

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, W. Tyler; Moore, Joseph A.; Gordon, James; Hugo, Geoffrey D.; Siebers, Jeffrey V.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the potential advantages of multiple anatomy optimization (MAO) for lung cancer radiation therapy compared to the internal target volume (ITV) approach. Methods: MAO aims to optimize a single fluence to be delivered under free-breathing conditions such that the accumulated dose meets the plan objectives, where accumulated dose is defined as the sum of deformably mapped doses computed on each phase of a single four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) dataset. Phantom and patient simulation studies were carried out to investigate potential advantages of MAO compared to ITV planning. Through simulated delivery of the ITV- and MAO-plans, target dose variations were also investigated. Results: By optimizing the accumulated dose, MAO shows the potential to ensure dose to the moving target meets plan objectives while simultaneously reducing dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared with ITV planning. While consistently superior to the ITV approach, MAO resulted in equivalent OAR dosimetry at planning objective dose levels to within 2% volume in 14/30 plans and to within 3% volume in 19/30 plans for each lung V20, esophagus V25, and heart V30. Despite large variations in per-fraction respiratory phase weights in simulated deliveries at high dose rates (e.g., treating 4/10 phases during single fraction beams) the cumulative clinical target volume (CTV) dose after 30 fractions and per-fraction dose were constant independent of planning technique. In one case considered, however, per-phase CTV dose varied from 74% to 117% of prescription implying the level of ITV-dose heterogeneity may not be appropriate with conventional, free-breathing delivery. Conclusions: MAO incorporates 4DCT information in an optimized dose distribution and can achieve a superior plan in terms of accumulated dose to the moving target and OAR sparing compared to ITV-plans. An appropriate level of dose heterogeneity in MAO plans must be further investigated. PMID:25370619

  10. Investigating the Randomness of Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pendleton, Kenn L.

    2009-01-01

    The use of random numbers is pervasive in today's world. Random numbers have practical applications in such far-flung arenas as computer simulations, cryptography, gambling, the legal system, statistical sampling, and even the war on terrorism. Evaluating the randomness of extremely large samples is a complex, intricate process. However, the…

  11. Information accumulation system by inheritance and diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. K.

    2009-09-01

    This paper suggests a new model, called as the IAS (Information Accumulation System), for the description of the dynamic process that people use to accumulate their information (knowledge or opinion) for specific issues. Using the concept of information, both the internal and the external mechanism of the opinion dynamics are treated on a unified frame. The information is quantified as a real number with fixed bounds. New concepts, such as inheritance and differential absorption, are incorporated in IAS in addition to the conventional diffusive interaction between people. Thus, the dynamics of the IAS are governed by following three factors: inheritance rate, diffusivity and absorption rate. The original set of equations was solved with an agent based modeling technique. In addition, the individual equations for each of the agents were assembled and transformed into a set of equations for the ensemble averages, which are greatly reduced in number and can be solved analytically. The example simulations showed interesting results such as the critical behavior with respect to diffusivity, the information polarization out of zero-sum news and the dependence of the solutions on the initial conditions alone. The results were speculated in relation to today’s modern society where the diffusivity of information has been greatly increased through the internet and mobile phones.

  12. Constant-Differential-Pressure Two-Fluid Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin; Dalton, Luke T.

    2010-01-01

    A two-fluid accumulator has been designed, built, and demonstrated to provide an acceptably close approximation to constant differential static pressure between two fluids over the full ranges of (1) accumulator stroke, (2) rates of flow of the fluids, and (3) common static pressure applied to the fluids. Prior differential- pressure two-fluid accumulators are generally not capable of maintaining acceptably close approximations to constant differential pressures. The inadequacies of a typical prior differential-pressure two-fluid accumulator can be summarized as follows: The static differential pressure is governed by the intrinsic spring rate (essentially, the stiffness) of an accumulator tank. The spring rate can be tailored through selection of the tank-wall thickness, selection of the number and/or shape of accumulator convolutions, and/or selection of accumulator material(s). Reliance on the intrinsic spring rate of the tank results in three severe limitations: (1) The spring rate and the expulsion efficiency tend to be inversely proportional to each other: that is to say, as the stiffness (and thus the differential pressure) is increased, the range of motion of the accumulator is reduced. (2) As the applied common static pressure increases, the differential pressure tends to decrease. An additional disadvantage, which may or may not be considered limiting, depending on the specific application, is that an increase in stiffness entails an increase in weight. (3) The additional weight required by a low expulsion efficiency accumulator eliminates the advantage given to such gas storage systems. The high expulsion efficiency provided by this two-fluid accumulator allows for a lightweight, tightly packaged system, which can be used in conjunction with a fuel cell-based system.

  13. Ecology: accumulating threats to life

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    The accumulating impacts of toxic materials like polychloridnated bephenyls (PCBs), acid rain, deforestation in the Amazon River Basin, and nuclear energy are examined as life-threatening actions that the public must recognize. Immediate action is needed to abandon destructive human activities and search out those life-supporting choices which will replace immediate gratification with long-range benefits. (DCK)

  14. Pensions and Household Wealth Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Gary V.; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Economists have long suggested that higher private pension benefits "crowd out" other sources of household wealth accumulation. We exploit detailed information on pensions and lifetime earnings for older workers in the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study and employ an instrumental-variable (IV) identification strategy to estimate…

  15. Numbers, Counting, and Infinity in Middle Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meconi, L. J.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the use of middle-school students' natural understanding of large numbers to introduce the concept of infinity. Presents activities that investigate infinite sets by demonstrating a one-to-one correspondence between the counting numbers and the given set. Examples include prime numbers, Fibonacci numbers, fractions, even and odd numbers,…

  16. The biochemistry of citric acid accumulation by Aspergillus niger.

    PubMed

    Karaffa, L; Sándor, E; Fekete, E; Szentirmai, A

    2001-01-01

    Fungi, in particular Aspergilli, are well known for their potential to overproduce a variety of organic acids. These microorganisms have an intrinsic ability to accumulate these substances and it is generally believed that this provides the fungi with an ecological advantage, since they grow rather well at pH 3 to 5, while some species even tolerate pH values as low as 1.5. Organic acid production can be stimulated and in a number of cases conditions have been found that result in almost quantitative conversion of carbon substrate into acid. This is exploited in large-scale production of a number of organic acids like citric-, gluconic- and itaconic acid. Both in production volume as well as in knowledge available, citrate is by far the major organic acid. Citric acid (2-hydroxy-propane-1,2,3-tricarboxylic acid) is a true bulk product with an estimated global production of over 900 thousand tons in the year 2000. Till the beginning of the 20th century, it was exclusively extracted from lemons. Since the global market was dominated by an Italian cartel, other means of production were sought. Chemical synthesis was possible, but not suitable due to expensive raw materials and a complicated process with low yield. The discovery of citrate accumulation by Aspergillus niger led to a rapid development of a fermentation process, which only a decade later accounted for a large part of the global production. The application of citric acid is based on three of its properties: (1) acidity and buffer capacity, (2) taste and flavour, and (3) chelation of metal ions. Because of its three acid groups with pKa values of 3.1, 4.7 and 6.4, citrate is able to produce a very low pH in solution, but is also useful as a buffer over a broad range of pH values (2 to 7). Citric acid has a pleasant acid taste which leaves little aftertaste. It sometimes enhances flavour, but is also able to mask sweetness, such as the aspartame taste in diet beverages. Chelation of metal ions is a very

  17. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes >8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time.

  18. Accumulation of Poly (beta-Hydroxybutyrate) by Halobacteria.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Castillo, R; Rodriguez-Valera, F; Gonzalez-Ramos, J; Ruiz-Berraquero, F

    1986-01-01

    Some species of extremely halophilic archaebacteria, Halobacteriaceae, have been shown to accumulate large amounts of poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate) under conditions of nitrogen limitation and abundant carbon source. The production of poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate), at least in large quantities, was restricted to two carbohydrate-utilizing species, Halobacterium mediterranei and H. volcanii. In addition to the nutrients in the media, the salt concentration also influenced poly (beta-hydroxybutyrate) accumulation, which was greater at lower salt concentrations. The possible application of these microorganisms for the production of biodegradable plastics is discussed. PMID:16346972

  19. Fun with Safronov Numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christian, Damian Joseph; Lund, M. B.

    2010-10-01

    A growing number (over 100!) of extra-solar planets (ESPs) have been discovered by transit photometry, and these systems are important because the transit strongly constrains their orbital inclination and allows accurate physical parameters for the planet to be derived, especially their radii. Their mass-radius relation allows us to probe their internal structure. In the present work we calculate Safronov numbers for the current sample of ESP and compare their masses and radii to current models with the goal of obtaining better constrains on their formation processes. Our calculation of Safronov numbers for the current TESP sample does show 2 classes, although about 20% lie above the formal Class I definition. These trends and recent results that argue against a useful distinction between Safronov classes are under further investigation. Mass-radius relations for the current sample of TESP are inconsistent with ESP models with very large core masses (> 100 M_Earth). Most TESP with radii near 1R_J are consistent with models with no core mass or core masses of 10 M_Earth. The inflated planets, with radii >1.2 R_J are not consistent with current ESP models, but may lie along the lower end of models for brown dwarfs. Although such models are nascent, it is important to establish trends for the current sample of ESP, which will further the understanding of their formation and evolution.

  20. Vocal Dose Measures: Quantifying Accumulated Vibration Exposure in Vocal Fold Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.; Švec, Jan G.; Popolo, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    To measure the exposure to self-induced tissue vibration in speech, three vocal doses were defined and described: distance dose, which accumulates the distance that tissue particles of the vocal folds travel in an oscillatory trajectory; energy dissipation dose, which accumulates the total amount of heat dissipated over a unit volume of vocal fold tissues; and time dose, which accumulates the total phonation time. These doses were compared to a previously used vocal dose measure, the vocal loading index, which accumulates the number of vibration cycles of the vocal folds. Empirical rules for viscosity and vocal fold deformation were used to calculate all the doses from the fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) values of speech. Six participants were asked to read in normal, monotone, and exaggerated speech and the doses associated with these vocalizations were calculated. The results showed that large F0 and SPL variations in speech affected the dose measures, suggesting that accumulation of phonation time alone is insufficient. The vibration exposure of the vocal folds in normal speech was related to the industrial limits for hand-transmitted vibration, in which the safe distance dose was derived to be about 500 m. This limit was found rather low for vocalization; it was related to a comparable time dose of about 17 min of continuous vocalization, or about 35 min of continuous reading with normal breathing and unvoiced segments. The voicing pauses in normal speech and dialogue effectively prolong the safe time dose. The derived safety limits for vocalization will likely require refinement based on a more detailed knowledge of the differences in hand and vocal fold tissue morphology and their response to vibrational stress, and on the effect of recovery of the vocal fold tissue during voicing pauses. PMID:12959470

  1. 3rd year final contractor report for: U.S. Department of Energy Stewardship Science Academic Alliances Program Project Title: Detailed Measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor Mixing at Large and Small Atwood Numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Malcolm J. Andrews

    2006-04-14

    This project had two major tasks: Task 1. The construction of a new air/helium facility to collect detailed measurements of Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) mixing at high Atwood number, and the distribution of these data to LLNL, LANL, and Alliance members for code validation and design purposes. Task 2. The collection of initial condition data from the new Air/Helium facility, for use with validation of RT simulation codes at LLNL and LANL. This report describes work done in the last twelve (12) months of the project, and also contains a summary of the complete work done over the three (3) life of the project. As of April 1, 2006, the air/helium facility (Task 1) is now complete and extensive testing and validation of diagnostics has been performed. Initial condition studies (Task 2) is also comp lete. Detailed experiments with air/helium with Atwood numbers up to 0.1 have been completed, and Atwood numbers of 0.25. Within the last three (3) months we have been able to successfully run the facility at Atwood numbers of 0.5. The progress matches the project plan, as does the budget. We have finished the initial condition studies using the water channel, and this work has been accepted for publication on the Journal of Fluid Mechanics (the top fluid mechanics journal). Mr. Nick Mueschke and Mr. Wayne Kraft are continuing with their studies to obtain PhDs in the same field, and will also continue their collaboration visits to LANL and LLNL. Over its three (3) year life the project has supported two(2) Ph.D.’s and three (3) MSc’s, and produced nine (9) international journal publications, twenty four (24) conference publications, and numerous other reports. The highlight of the project has been our close collaboration with LLNL (Dr. Oleg Schilling) and LANL (Drs. Dimonte, Ristorcelli, Gore, and Harlow).

  2. THE DESIGN OF AN RF ANTENNA FOR A LARGE-BORE, HIGH POWER, STEADY STATE PLASMA PROCESSING CHAMBER FOR MATERIAL SEPARATION - CRADA FINAL REPORT for CRADA Number ORNL00-0585

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, D. A.; Freeman, R. L.

    2001-11-07

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC, (Contractor), and Archimedes Technology Group, (Participant) is to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure. The project objectives are to evaluate the design of an RF antenna for a large-bore, high power, steady state plasma processing chamber for material separation. Criteria for optimization will be to maximize the power deposition in the plasma while operating at acceptable voltages and currents in the antenna structure.

  3. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired... fluid. Accumulators must meet the applicable requirements in § 54.01-5 (c)(3), (c)(4), and (d) of this chapter or the remaining requirements in part 54. (b) If the accumulator is of the gas and fluid...

  4. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired... fluid. Accumulators must meet the applicable requirements in § 54.01-5 (c)(3), (c)(4), and (d) of this chapter or the remaining requirements in part 54. (b) If the accumulator is of the gas and fluid...

  5. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired... fluid. Accumulators must meet the applicable requirements in § 54.01-5 (c)(3), (c)(4), and (d) of this chapter or the remaining requirements in part 54. (b) If the accumulator is of the gas and fluid...

  6. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired... fluid. Accumulators must meet the applicable requirements in § 54.01-5 (c)(3), (c)(4), and (d) of this chapter or the remaining requirements in part 54. (b) If the accumulator is of the gas and fluid...

  7. Number Concepts with "Number Worlds": Thickening Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liljedahl, Peter; Sinclair, Nathalie; Zazkis, Rina

    2006-01-01

    This study focuses on the nature of preservice elementary school teachers' understandings of several concepts in elementary number theory that are evoked by a computer-based microworld called "Number Worlds". In particular, the focus is on the concepts of factor, multiple and prime number. The notion of "thickness" is examined with respect to…

  8. Metal accumulating plants: Medium's role

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabier, J.; Prudent, P.; Szymanska, B.; Mevy, J.-P.

    2003-05-01

    To evaluate phytoremediation potentialities by metal accumulation in tolerant plants, trials are carried out using in vitro cultures. Organie compounds influence on metal accumulation is studied with metals supplemented media. The tested compounds on zinc and lead absorption by Brassica juncea, are chelating agents (EDTA, citric acid) and soluble organic fractions of compost. EDTA seems to enhance the transfer of lead in plant but it is the opposite in the case of zinc. Citric acid stimulates root absorption for both zinc and lead. For the aqueous extracts of compost, variable effects are obtained according to the origin of compost (green wastes and food wastes). In'all tested conditions of cultures, zinc is mainly exported towards shoot while lead is stored in root.

  9. Total carbon accumulation in a tropical forest landscape

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Regrowing tropical forests worldwide sequester important amounts of carbon and restore part of the C emissions emitted by deforestation. However, there are large uncertainties concerning the rates of carbon accumulation after the abandonment of agricultural and pasture land. We report here accumulation of total carbon stocks (TCS) in a chronosequence of secondary forests at a mid-elevation landscape (900-1200 m asl) in the Andean mountains of Colombia. Results We found positive accumulation rates for all ecosystem pools except soil carbon, which showed no significant trend of recovery after 36 years of secondary succession. We used these data to develop a simple model to predict accumulation of TCS over time. This model performed remarkably well predicting TCS at other chronosequences in the Americas (Root Mean Square Error < 40 Mg C ha-1), which provided an opportunity to explore different assumptions in the calculation of large-scale carbon budgets. Simulations of TCS with our empirical model were used to test three assumptions often made in carbon budgets: 1) the use of carbon accumulation in tree aboveground biomass as a surrogate for accumulation of TCS, 2) the implicit consideration of carbon legacies from previous land-use, and 3) the omission of landscape age in calculating accumulation rates of TCS. Conclusions Our simulations showed that in many situations carbon can be released from regrowing secondary forests depending on the amount of carbon legacies and the average age of the landscape. In most cases, the rates used to predict carbon accumulation in the Americas were above the rates predicted in our simulations. These biome level rates seemed to be realistic only in landscapes not affected by carbon legacies from previous land-use and mean ages of around 10 years. PMID:23249727

  10. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD. PMID:26819531

  11. Heat accumulation during sequential cortical bone drilling.

    PubMed

    Palmisano, Andrew C; Tai, Bruce L; Belmont, Barry; Irwin, Todd A; Shih, Albert; Holmes, James R

    2016-03-01

    Significant research exists regarding heat production during single-hole bone drilling. No published data exist regarding repetitive sequential drilling. This study elucidates the phenomenon of heat accumulation for sequential drilling with both Kirschner wires (K wires) and standard two-flute twist drills. It was hypothesized that cumulative heat would result in a higher temperature with each subsequent drill pass. Nine holes in a 3 × 3 array were drilled sequentially on moistened cadaveric tibia bone kept at body temperature (about 37 °C). Four thermocouples were placed at the center of four adjacent holes and 2 mm below the surface. A battery-driven hand drill guided by a servo-controlled motion system was used. Six samples were drilled with each tool (2.0 mm K wire and 2.0 and 2.5 mm standard drills). K wire drilling increased temperature from 5 °C at the first hole to 20 °C at holes 6 through 9. A similar trend was found in standard drills with less significant increments. The maximum temperatures of both tools increased from <0.5 °C to nearly 13 °C. The difference between drill sizes was found to be insignificant (P > 0.05). In conclusion, heat accumulated during sequential drilling, with size difference being insignificant. K wire produced more heat than its twist-drill counterparts. This study has demonstrated the heat accumulation phenomenon and its significant effect on temperature. Maximizing the drilling field and reducing the number of drill passes may decrease bone injury. PMID:26334198

  12. Developing Young Children's Multidigit Number Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diezmann, Carmel M.; English, Lyn D.

    2001-01-01

    This article describes a series of enrichment experiences designed to develop young (ages 5 to 8) gifted children's understanding of large numbers, central to their investigation of space travel. It describes activities designed to teach reading of large numbers and exploring numbers to a thousand and then a million. (Contains ten references.) (DB)

  13. Star Numbers and Constellations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Francis, Richard L.

    1993-01-01

    A number for which the number of digits categorizes the number is called a star number. A set of star numbers having a designated property is called a constellation. Discusses nature and cardinality of constellations made up of star square, star prime, star abundant, and star deficient numbers. Presents five related problems for exploration. (MDH)

  14. Promote Number Sense

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gurganus, Susan

    2004-01-01

    "Number sense" is "an intuition about numbers that is drawn from all varied meanings of number" (NCTM, 1989, p. 39). Students with number sense understand that numbers are representative of objects, magnitudes, relationships, and other attributes; that numbers can be operated on, compared, and used for communication. It is fundamental knowledge…

  15. All Square Chiliagonal Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    A?iru, Muniru A.

    2016-01-01

    A square chiliagonal number is a number which is simultaneously a chiliagonal number and a perfect square (just as the well-known square triangular number is both triangular and square). In this work, we determine which of the chiliagonal numbers are perfect squares and provide the indices of the corresponding chiliagonal numbers and square…

  16. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in acid sensitive lakes

    SciTech Connect

    Furlong, E.T.; Cessar, L.R.; Hites, R.A. )

    1987-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations and fluxes were measured in {sup 210}Pb dated sediment cores taken from nine lakes in four regions identified as susceptible to acidification. Calculated PAH accumulations were compared with historic S emissions, accumulation of sedimentary S, and anthropogenic metal accumulations to determine if PAH could be used as an indicator of combustion-derived sulfate deposition. Comparisons between regions indicated that the Adirondacks have a significantly higher burden of PAH than do northern New England, the northern Great Lakes States, and northern Florida. This difference likely results from significant upwind PAH sources to the Adirondack lakes. Detailed investigation of the largest lake in the study set, Big Moose Lake, indicates that PAH may serve as conservative, combustion indicators in large lakes. In this lake, PAH fluxes and concentrations were significantly correlated with historical S emission rates. These data suggest that PAH measured in sediment cores from large lakes can serve as indicators of past combustion production deposition.

  17. Accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in acid sensitive lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furlong, Edward T.; Cessar, Linda Roll; Hites, Ronald A.

    1987-11-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon concentrations and fluxes were measured in 210Pb dated sediment cores taken from nine lakes in four regions identified as susceptible to acidification. Calculated PAH accumulations were compared with historic S emissions, accumulation of sedimentary S and anthropogenic metal accumulations to determine if PAH could be used as an indicator of combustion-derived sulfate deposition. Comparisons between regions indicated that the Adirondacks have a significantly higher burden of PAH than do northern New England, the northern Great Lakes States and northern Florida. This difference likely results from significant upwind PAH sources to the Adirondack lakes. Detailed investigation of the largest lake in the study set, Big Moose Lake, indicates that PAH may serve as conservative, combustion indicators in large lakes. In this lake, PAH fluxes and concentrations were significantly correlated with historical S emission rates. These data suggest that PAH measured in sediment cores from large lakes can serve as indicators of past combustion product deposition.

  18. Nomogram for sunspot numbers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Upreti, U. C.

    1997-12-01

    Nomogram construction using the parabolic relationship f0F2 = a0+a1R12+a2R122 between monthly median f0F2 and running average sunspot number (RASSN) R12 values has been described; here a0, a1 and a2 are the best fit coefficients. The nomogram can give the required local effective sunspot number (LESSN) values corresponding to any observed value of f0F2. Transforming the f0F2-RASSN relation to the form R122+pR12+q = 0 [where p = a1/a2 and q = (a0-f0F2)/a2], a practical method for the preparation of a single nomogram for f0F2-RASSN has been described and the problem of very high and very low values of the variables has also been dealt with successfully. A single nomogram for a large range of variables, namely, f0F2, a0, a1, and a2 has been obtained so that one can easily find LESSN values at any location, season, and time. The nomogram tends to minimize the errors in LESSN calculations at all levels of solar activity.

  19. How Many Processed Pseudogenes Are Accumulated in a Gene Family?

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James Bruce

    1985-01-01

    A simple kinetic model is developed that describes the accumulation of processed pseudogenes in a functional gene family. Insertion of new pseudogenes occurs at rate ν per gene and is countered by spontaneous deletion (at rate δ per DNA segment) of segments containing processed pseudogenes. If there are k functional genes in a gene family, the equilibrium number of processed pseudogenes is k(ν/δ), and the percentage of functional genes in the gene family at equilibrium is 1/[1 + (ν/δ)]. ν/δ values estimated for five gene families ranged from 1.7 to 15. This fairly narrow range suggests that the rates of formation and deletion of processed pseudogenes may be positively correlated for these families. If δ is sufficiently large relative to the per nucleotide mutation rate µ (δ > 20µ), processed pseudogenes will show high homology with each other, even in the absence of gene conversion between pseudogenes. We argue that formation of processed pseudogenes may share common pathways with transposable elements and retroviruses, creating the potential for correlated responses in the evolution of processed pseudogenes due to direct selection for control of transposable elements and/or retroviruses. Finally, we discuss the nature of the selective forces that may act directly or indirectly to influence the evolution of processed pseudogenes. Anything produced by evolution is bound to be a bit of a mess—S. Brenner PMID:2408963

  20. Metabolic Adaptation in Transplastomic Plants Massively Accumulating Recombinant Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bally, Julia; Job, Claudette; Belghazi, Maya; Job, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Background Recombinant chloroplasts are endowed with an astonishing capacity to accumulate foreign proteins. However, knowledge about the impact on resident proteins of such high levels of recombinant protein accumulation is lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we used proteomics to characterize tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plastid transformants massively accumulating a p-hydroxyphenyl pyruvate dioxygenase (HPPD) or a green fluorescent protein (GFP). While under the conditions used no obvious modifications in plant phenotype could be observed, these proteins accumulated to even higher levels than ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), the most abundant protein on the planet. This accumulation occurred at the expense of a limited number of leaf proteins including Rubisco. In particular, enzymes involved in CO2 metabolism such as nuclear-encoded plastidial Calvin cycle enzymes and mitochondrial glycine decarboxylase were found to adjust their accumulation level to these novel physiological conditions. Conclusions/Significance The results document how protein synthetic capacity is limited in plant cells. They may provide new avenues to evaluate possible bottlenecks in recombinant protein technology and to maintain plant fitness in future studies aiming at producing recombinant proteins of interest through chloroplast transformation. PMID:21966485

  1. Antagonism of eosinophil accumulation in asthma.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Garry M

    2010-11-01

    There is considerable evidence that implicates eosinophils as important effector cells and immunomodulators in the inflammation characteristic of asthma. Numerous in vitro and animal studies have demonstrated essential roles for cell adhesion molecules in eosinophil adhesion and transendothelial migration including the selectins, ICAM-1, VCAM-1 together with many of the 1 and β2 integrins. A large body of evidence has also implicated several cytokines and chemokines in the selective recruitment of eosinophils to sites of asthmatic inflammation. Biopharmaceutical approaches have been used to identify inhibitory molecules that target key elements in the processes controlling eosinophil accumulation in asthma. This review will summarise, the problems and successes regarding recent patents and developments in adhesion-based therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing eosinophil-mediated inflammation in the asthmatic lung. PMID:20804449

  2. Visuospatial Priming of the Mental Number Line

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stoianov, Ivilin; Kramer, Peter; Umilta, Carlo; Zorzi, Marco

    2008-01-01

    It has been argued that numbers are spatially organized along a "mental number line" that facilitates left-hand responses to small numbers, and right-hand responses to large numbers. We hypothesized that whenever the representations of visual and numerical space are concurrently activated, interactions can occur between them, before response…

  3. A generalized sense of number

    PubMed Central

    Arrighi, Roberto; Togoli, Irene; Burr, David C.

    2014-01-01

    Much evidence has accumulated to suggest that many animals, including young human infants, possess an abstract sense of approximate quantity, a number sense. Most research has concentrated on apparent numerosity of spatial arrays of dots or other objects, but a truly abstract sense of number should be capable of encoding the numerosity of any set of discrete elements, however displayed and in whatever sensory modality. Here, we use the psychophysical technique of adaptation to study the sense of number for serially presented items. We show that numerosity of both auditory and visual sequences is greatly affected by prior adaptation to slow or rapid sequences of events. The adaptation to visual stimuli was spatially selective (in external, not retinal coordinates), pointing to a sensory rather than cognitive process. However, adaptation generalized across modalities, from auditory to visual and vice versa. Adaptation also generalized across formats: adapting to sequential streams of flashes affected the perceived numerosity of spatial arrays. All these results point to a perceptual system that transcends vision and audition to encode an abstract sense of number in space and in time. PMID:25377454

  4. Numbered nasal discs for waterfowl

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartonek, J.C.; Dane, C.W.

    1964-01-01

    Numbered nasal discs were successfully used in studies requiring large numbers of individually marked waterfowl. The procedure for constructing these discs is outlined. Blue-winged teal (Anas discors) with 5/8-inch discs, and canvasback (Aythya valisineria) and redhead (A. americana) with 3/4-inch discs can be individually identified up to 50 and 80 yards, respectively, with a gunstock-mounted, 20-power spotting scope. The particular value of these markers is their durability, the number of combinations possible, and the apparent absence of behavioral or mortality influence among such species as the blue-winged teal.

  5. Factorialsum Number Chains.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lamb, John, Jr.

    1989-01-01

    Describes several phenomena in which interesting properties of numbers are demonstrated. Includes discussions of amicable, perfect, and sociable numbers. Presents computer programs for conducting a number chain search. (RT)

  6. Numbers and Numerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, David Eugene; Ginsburg, Jekuthiel

    Counting, naming numbers, numerals, computation, and fractions are the topics covered in this pamphlet. Number lore and interesting number properties are noted; the derivation of some arithmetic terms is briefly discussed. (DT)

  7. Racial Differences in Patterns of Wealth Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittleman, Maury; Wolff, Edward N.

    2004-01-01

    The race differences in patterns of asset accumulations were examined using PSD data for 1984, 1989 and 1994. The results indicate that inheritances led to wealth accumulations among whites as compared to the African Americans.

  8. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  9. RF Curves for Extraction from the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, Dav; /Fermilab

    2002-03-10

    Since the start of Run IIa, the RF curves for the extraction process from the Accumulator have been based on an algorithm described in Pbar Note 636. There are a number of problems with this procedure that result in a dilution of the longitudinal phase space of the extracted beam. The procedure consists of a number of steps in which the frequency curve during each process is a linear time ramp. For a constant bend field, the synchronous phase angle is given as: {Lambda} = sin({phi}{sub s}) = -h/{eta} (1/f{sub rf}){sup 2}df{sub rf}/dt/qV/pc where h is the harmonic number of the RF. Equation (1) shows that if the frequency curve consists of a number of linear time ramps with different slopes, there will be discontinuities in the synchronous phase. These discontinuities in the synchronous phase will lead to dipole oscillations of the beam in the RF bucket. The discontinuities observed for the present RF curves are about 10 degrees. In the procedure outlined in Pbar Note 636, the RF bucket is formed on the high energy edge of the rectangular momentum distribution. As the RF bucket is pulled away from the core, it is also programmed to increase in area. If the distribution is not perfectly rectangular, or if the bucket is not formed at the edge of the distribution, the growing bucket will gather up more particles at the edges of the bucket resulting in a substantial increase of longitudinal emittance. Finally, it is fairly difficult to prepare a rectangular momentum distribution and keep it rectangular for extended periods of time. Once the rectangular distribution is prepared, the core momentum cooling must be turned off. If there is a delay in the extraction process, the sharp edges of the rectangular distribution will soon diffuse. With the momentum cooling disabled, the longitudinal emittance of the core will grow resulting in larger longitudinal emittances for the extracted beam.

  10. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accumulated depreciation. 32.3100 Section 32... Accumulated depreciation. (a) This account shall include the accumulated depreciation associated with the... with depreciation amounts concurrently charged to Account 6561, Depreciation...

  11. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accumulators. 58.30-25 Section 58.30-25 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING MAIN AND AUXILIARY MACHINERY AND RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired pressure vessel in which energy is...

  12. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Melanie A.; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up. PMID:26109571

  13. Ground-penetrating radar observations of winter snow accumulation on Alaska Glaciers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusmeroli, A.; Wolken, G. J.; Arendt, A. A.; Campbell, S. W.; O'Neel, S.; Marshall, H.

    2012-12-01

    Understanding the spatial variability of winter snow in glacierized watersheds is vital for estimating glacier changes, forecasting freshwater delivery to riverine and marine ecosystems and informing Earth loading models for studies of seasonal variations in crustal uplift. Accurately reproducing snow distribution within glacier-models still remains a challenge due to the difficulty obtaining in-situ measurements and large local or regional variability in snow thicknesses. Between March and July 2012, high frequency (200-500 MHz) Ground-Penetrating Radar (GPR) surveys designed to obtain spatially distributed measurements of snow accumulation, were collected on a number of different glaciers in south-central Alaska, USA. The surveys span a range of climatic zones including continental and maritime glaciers. Several modes of travel were employed, including helicopter-borne, snowmobile and ski-towed. Preliminary results from the Valdez Glacier suggest that the agreement between 200 MHz-GPR-derived snow-depth and 17 manually measured snow-depths is ± 10% using an estimated radar velocity of 0.22 m/ns, as one example. Additionally, GPR profiles in the accumulation areas showed firn-stratigraphy of previous summer surfaces, thus, making it possible to distinguish the elevation of the firn line and indicating that in the accumulation zone it may be possible to estimate annual net mass balance if density can be estimated. In this presentation we will illustrate the characteristics of snow accumulation on this suite of Alaska Glaciers as derived by GPR and discuss our results in terms of the usefulness and challenges associated with using GPR to determine the winter and annual mass balance of these glaciers.

  14. Chip integrated fuel cell accumulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, M.; Erdler, G.; Frerichs, H.-P.; Müller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    A unique new design of a chip integrated fuel cell accumulator is presented. The system combines an electrolyser and a self-breathing polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell with integrated palladium hydrogen storage on a silicon substrate. Outstanding advantages of this assembly are the fuel cell with integrated hydrogen storage, the possibility of refuelling it by electrolysis and the opportunity of simply refilling the electrolyte by adding water. By applying an electrical current, wiring the palladium hydrogen storage as cathode and the counter-electrode as anode, the electrolyser produces hydrogen at the palladium surface and oxygen at the electrolyser cell anode. The generated hydrogen is absorbed by the palladium electrode and the hydrogen storage is refilled consequently enabling the fuel cell to function.

  15. Processing, mechanical behavior and biocompatibility of ultrafine grained zirconium fabricated by accumulative roll bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ling

    The aim of this study is to produce large quantities of bulk zirconium with an ultrafine grained microstructure and with enhanced properties. Accumulative roll bonding (ARB), a severe plastic deformation technique based on rolling, is chosen due to its availability in industrial environment. The texture, microstructure and mechanical behavior of bulk ultrafine grained (ufg) Zr fabricated by accumulative roll bonding is investigated by electron backscatter diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and mechanical testing. A reasonably homogeneous and equiaxed ufg structure, with a large fraction of high angle boundaries (HABs, ˜70%), can be obtained in Zr after only two ARB cycles. The average grain size, counting only HABs (theta>15°), is 400 nm. (Sub)grain size is equal to 320 nm. The yield stress and ultimate tensile stress (UTS) values are nearly double those from conventionally processed Zr with only a slight loss of ductility. Optimum processing conditions include large thickness reductions per pass (˜75%), which enhance grain refinement, and a rolling temperature (T ˜ 0.3Tm) at which a sufficient number of slip modes are activated, with an absence of significant grain growth. Grain refinement takes place by geometrical thinning and grain subdivision by the formation of geometrically necessary boundaries. The formation of equiaxed grains by geometric dynamic recrystallization is facilitated by enhanced diffusion due to adabatic heating. Optical microscopy examination and shear testing suggest accepted bonding quality compared to that achieved in materials processed by diffusion bonding and that obtained in other ARB studies. Biocompatibility of ultrafine grained Zr processed by large strain rolling is studied by evaluating the behavior of human osteoblast cells. It is suggested that ultrafine grained Zr has a similar good biocompatibility as Ti6Al4V alloy and conventional Zr with a large grain size have. The improved mechanical properties together with

  16. Accumulation of hyporesponsive, calcium extruding memory T cells as a key feature of age-dependent immune dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Miller, R A

    1991-03-01

    In this review I propose a hypothesis with a number of testable predictions: that the age-dependent decline in T lymphocyte function is largely the result of the accumulation of memory T lymphocytes with over-active plasma membrane calcium pumps. This idea is consistent with much, though not all, of the currently available data. I will start by presenting the evidence that suggested and most clearly supports this idea, then discuss apparently contrary data (some of it still difficult to reconcile with the model), and lastly consider the implications of the model for our understanding of late life development of the T cell immune system. PMID:2001603

  17. Corrosion analysis of accumulative roll bonded aluminum 6016

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Searcy, Jacquelyn Alisha

    Accumulative Roll Bonding is a Severe Plastic Deformation Process that is used to strengthen a material and promote grain refinement. Accumulative Roll Bonded Aluminum 6016 samples were investigated to determine their corrosion properties. The tests performed consisted of standard techniques including Cyclic Polarization Potentials, Exfoliation Corrosion (EXCO), Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS), Light Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe Analysis. From these tests, it was determined that for Al 6016, the Ultra Fine Grained samples obtained by Accumulative Roll Bonding are in general more susceptible to corrosion than the coarse grained sample. The higher corrosion rate was caused by the additional cold work, which increased the number of grain boundaries and rolled-in debris. The advantage however was that the corrosion was parallel to the surface and rather than deep into the sample as with the as-received 6016.

  18. Building Numbers from Primes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burkhart, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Prime numbers are often described as the "building blocks" of natural numbers. This article shows how the author and his students took this idea literally by using prime factorizations to build numbers with blocks. In this activity, students explore many concepts of number theory, including the relationship between greatest common factors and…

  19. Enriching Number Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mack, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring number systems of other cultures can be an enjoyable learning experience that enriches students' knowledge of numbers and number systems in important ways. It helps students deepen mental computation fluency, knowledge of place value, and equivalent representations for numbers. This article describes how the author designed her…

  20. Are Numbers Gendered?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkie, James E. B.; Bodenhausen, Galen V.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the possibility that nonsocial, highly generic concepts are gendered. Specifically, we investigated the gender connotations of Arabic numerals. Across several experiments, we show that the number 1 and other odd numbers are associated with masculinity, whereas the number 2 and other even numbers are associated with femininity, in ways…

  1. Guidelines for Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set conditions for establishing and maintaining areas for the accumulation of hazardous waste at LBL. Areas designed for accumulation of these wastes in quantities greater than 100 kg (220 lb) per month of solid waste or 55 gallons per month of liquid waste are called Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs). Areas designed for accumulation of wastes in smaller amounts are called Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs). This document provides guidelines for employee and organizational responsibilities for WAAs; constructing a WAA; storing waste in a WAA; operating and maintaining a WAA, and responding to spills in a WAA. 4 figs.

  2. Surface roughness scattering in multisubband accumulation layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Han; Reich, K. V.; Shklovskii, B. I.

    2016-06-01

    Accumulation layers with very large concentrations of electrons where many subbands are filled became recently available due to ionic liquid and other new methods of gating. The low-temperature mobility in such layers is limited by the surface roughness scattering. However, theories of roughness scattering so far dealt only with the small-density single subband two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG). Here we develop a theory of roughness-scattering limited mobility for the multisubband large concentration case. We show that with growing 2D electron concentration n the surface dimensionless conductivity σ /(2 e2/h ) first decreases as ∝n-6 /5 and then saturates as ˜(d aB/Δ2)≫1 , where d and Δ are the characteristic length and height of the surface roughness and aB is the effective Bohr radius. This means that in spite of the shrinkage of the 2DEG thickness and the related increase of the scattering rate the 2DEG remains a good metal.

  3. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (<50 μm) fraction were on average 3-times higher than those (17-250 μg g-1) in the fine earth (<2 mm), the former containing almost all bromine (90 ± 5%). Inventories were between 148 and 314 g m-2, indicating a rather large variability in a small area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p < 0.01) with the age of the SOM for the last ∼12 ka. Partial least squares modeling indicates that bromine concentration depends on the amount of organic matter stabilized as aluminium-OM associations, and to a lesser extent on soil acidity (pH) and iron-OM associations. Thus, at scales of thousands of years, bromine accumulation in acidic soils is linked to the pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  4. Herpes simplex virus 2 infection impacts stress granule accumulation.

    PubMed

    Finnen, Renée L; Pangka, Kyle R; Banfield, Bruce W

    2012-08-01

    Interference with stress granule (SG) accumulation is gaining increased appreciation as a common strategy used by diverse viruses to facilitate their replication and to cope with translational arrest. Here, we examined the impact of infection by herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) on SG accumulation by monitoring the localization of the SG components T cell internal antigen 1 (TIA-1), Ras-GTPase-activating SH3-domain-binding protein (G3BP), and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP). Our results indicate that SGs do not accumulate in HSV-2-infected cells and that HSV-2 can interfere with arsenite-induced SG accumulation early after infection. Surprisingly, SG accumulation was inhibited despite increased phosphorylation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α), implying that HSV-2 encodes previously unrecognized activities designed to maintain translation initiation downstream of eIF2α. SG accumulation was not inhibited in HSV-2-infected cells treated with pateamine A, an inducer that works independently of eIF2α phosphorylation. The SGs that accumulated following pateamine A treatment of infected cells contained G3BP and PABP but were largely devoid of TIA-1. We also identified novel nuclear structures containing TIA-1 that form late in infection. These structures contain the RNA binding protein 68-kDa Src-associated in mitosis (Sam68) and were noticeably absent in infected cells treated with inhibitors of viral DNA replication, suggesting that they arise as a result of late events in the virus replicative cycle. PMID:22623775

  5. Anthropogenic Mercury Accumulation in Watersheds of the Northern Appalachian Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyer, E. W.; Drohan, P. J.; Lawler, D.; Grimm, J.; Grant, C.; Eklof, K. J.; Bennett, J.; Naber, M. D.

    2014-12-01

    Atmospheric deposition of mercury (Hg) is a critical environmental stress that affects ecosystems and human health. Mercury emissions to the atmosphere from coal-fired power plants and other sources such as waste incineration can be deposited over large geographic areas to downwind landscapes in precipitation and in dry fallout. The northern Appalachian Mountains are downwind of major atmospheric mercury emissions sources. Some mercury reaches watersheds and streams, where it can accumulate in sediments and biota. Human exposure to mercury occurs primarily through fish consumption, and currently mercury fish eating advisories are in place for many of the streams and lakes in the region. Here, we explored mercury accumulation in forested landscapes - in air, soils, water, and biota. To quantify atmospheric mercury deposition, we measured both wet and dry mercury deposition at 10 forested locations, from which we present variation in mercury deposition and initial assessments of factors affecting the patterns. To quantify mercury accumulation in terrestrial environments, we measured soil mercury concentrations within and surrounding 12 vernal pools spanning various physiographic settings in the region. Given that vernal pools have large inputs of water via precipitation yet do not have any stream discharge outflow, they are likely spots within the forested landscape to accumulate pollutants that enter via wet atmospheric deposition. To quantify mercury accumulation in aquatic environments, we sampled mercury concentrations in streams draining 35 forested watersheds, spanning gradients of atmospheric deposition, climate and geology. Mercury concentrations were measured in stream water under base-flow conditions, in streambed sediments, aquatic mosses, and in fish tissues from brook trout. Results indicate that wet and dry atmospheric deposition is a primary source of mercury that is accumulating in watersheds of the Northern Appalachian Mountains.

  6. Number Sense Made Simple Using Number Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Hui Fang Huang; Marinas, Carol; Furner, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    This article highlights investigating intriguing number patterns utilising an emerging technology called the Square Tool. Mathematics teachers of grades K-12 will find the Square Tool useful in making connections and bridging the gap from the concrete to the abstract. Pattern recognition helps students discover various mathematical concepts. With…

  7. Active transport and accumulation of bicarbonate by a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Miller, A G; Colman, B

    1980-09-01

    The rates of inorganic carbon accumulation and carbon fixation in light by the unicellular cyanobacterim Coccohloris peniocystis have been determined. Cells incubated in the light in medium containing H14CO3- were rapidly separated from the medium by centrifugation through silicone oil into a strongly basic terminating solution. Samples of these inactivated cells were assayed to determine total 14C accumulation, and acid-treated samples were assayed to determine 14C fixation. The rate of transport of inorganic into illuminated cells was faster than the rate of CO2 production in the medium from HCO3- dehydration. This evidence for HCO3- transport in these cells is in agreement with our previous results based upon measurements of photosynthetic O2 evolution. A substantial pool of inorganic carbon was bulit up within the cells presumably as HCO3- before the onset of the maximum rate of photosynthesis. Large accumulation ratios were observed, greater than 1,000 times the external HCO3- concentration. Accumulation did not occur in the dark and was greatly suppressed by the photosynthesis inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea and 3-chloro-carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone. These results indicate that the accumulation of inorganic carbon in these cells involves a light-dependent active transport process. PMID:6773925

  8. Kelvin wake pattern and wave resistance at large Froude numbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benzaquen, Michael; Darmon, Alexandre; Raphaël, Elie

    2015-03-01

    The modification of surfaces by coating with polymer brushes has attracted much interest in the past few years due to numerous potential applications in material and life science for the development of smart surfaces. They can be used as 3D matrices for the immobilization of nanoparticles, resulting in nanocomposite materials with interesting mechanical, optical, or catalytic properties with tailored functions. Studying the mutual influence of the brush matrix and the attached AuNPs on the structure of the resulting brush/AuNP hybrid will allow fine-tuning of the particle loading and distribution . this study, responsive poly-(N,N-dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate (PDMAEMA) and poly-(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM) brushes are used as a matrix for the attachment of spherical gold nanoparticles (AuNPs). We find that the uptake and distribution of nanoparticles in polymer brush matrices depends greatly on the brush thickness, brush grafting density, polymer chemistry, particle surface functionalization and particle size.

  9. The large Reynolds number - Asymptotic theory of turbulent boundary layers.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mellor, G. L.

    1972-01-01

    A self-consistent, asymptotic expansion of the one-point, mean turbulent equations of motion is obtained. Results such as the velocity defect law and the law of the wall evolve in a relatively rigorous manner, and a systematic ordering of the mean velocity boundary layer equations and their interaction with the main stream flow are obtained. The analysis is extended to the turbulent energy equation and to a treatment of the small scale equilibrium range of Kolmogoroff; in velocity correlation space the two-thirds power law is obtained. Thus, the two well-known 'laws' of turbulent flow are imbedded in an analysis which provides a great deal of other information.

  10. The small numbers of large Kuiper Belt objects

    SciTech Connect

    Schwamb, Megan E.; Brown, Michael E.; Fraser, Wesley C.

    2014-01-01

    We explore the brightness distribution of the largest and brightest (m(R) < 22) Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs). We construct a luminosity function of the dynamically excited or hot Kuiper Belt (orbits with inclinations >5°) from the very brightest to m(R) = 23. We find for m(R) ≲ 23, a single slope appears to describe the luminosity function. We estimate that ∼12 KBOs brighter than m(R) ∼ 19.5 are present in the Kuiper Belt today. With nine bodies already discovered this suggests that the inventory of bright KBOs is nearly complete.

  11. Medium power voltage multipliers with a large number of stages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrigill, W. T.; Myers, I. T.

    1978-01-01

    Voltage multiplier techniques are extended at medium power levels to larger multiplication ratios. A series of dc-dc converters were built, with from 20 to 45 stages and with power levels up to 100 watts. Maximum output voltages were about 10,000 volts.

  12. Large numbers hypothesis. IV - The cosmological constant and quantum physics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, P. J.

    1983-01-01

    In standard physics quantum field theory is based on a flat vacuum space-time. This quantum field theory predicts a nonzero cosmological constant. Hence the gravitational field equations do not admit a flat vacuum space-time. This dilemma is resolved using the units covariant gravitational field equations. This paper shows that the field equations admit a flat vacuum space-time with nonzero cosmological constant if and only if the canonical LNH is valid. This allows an interpretation of the LNH phenomena in terms of a time-dependent vacuum state. If this is correct then the cosmological constant must be positive.

  13. Large scale variation in DNA copy number in chicken breeds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background Detecting genetic variation is a critical step in elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic diversity. Until recently, such detection has mostly focused on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) because of the ease in screening complete genomes. Another type of variant, c...

  14. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  15. Sum-Difference Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shi, Yixun

    2010-01-01

    Starting with an interesting number game sometimes used by school teachers to demonstrate the factorization of integers, "sum-difference numbers" are defined. A positive integer n is a "sum-difference number" if there exist positive integers "x, y, w, z" such that n = xy = wz and x ? y = w + z. This paper characterizes all sum-difference numbers…

  16. Discovery: Prime Numbers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Mestre, Neville

    2008-01-01

    Prime numbers are important as the building blocks for the set of all natural numbers, because prime factorisation is an important and useful property of all natural numbers. Students can discover them by using the method known as the Sieve of Eratosthenes, named after the Greek geographer and astronomer who lived from c. 276-194 BC. Eratosthenes…

  17. The Remarkable Number "1"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, G. Donald

    2014-01-01

    In human history, the origin of the numbers came from definite practical needs. Indeed, there is strong evidence that numbers were created before writing. The number "1", dating back at least 20,000 years, was found as a counting symbol on a bone. The famous statement by the German mathematician Leopold Kronecker (1823-1891), "God…

  18. Number Relationships in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jung, Myoungwhon

    2011-01-01

    When a child understands number relationships, he or she comprehends the meaning of numbers by developing multiple, flexible ways of representing them. The importance of developing number relationships in the early years has been highlighted because it helps children build a good foundation for developing a more sophisticated understanding of…

  19. Large Print Bibliography, 1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Dakota State Library, Pierre.

    This bibliography lists materials that are available in large print format from the South Dakota State Library. The annotated entries are printed in large print and include the title of the material and its author, call number, publication date, and type of story or subject area covered. Some recorded items are included in the list. The entries…

  20. The impact of aeration on the competition between polyphosphate accumulating organisms and glycogen accumulating organisms.

    PubMed

    Carvalheira, Mónica; Oehmen, Adrian; Carvalho, Gilda; Eusébio, Mário; Reis, Maria A M

    2014-12-01

    In wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), aeration is the major energetic cost, thus its minimisation will improve the cost-effectiveness of the process. This study shows that both the dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration and aerobic hydraulic retention time (HRT) affect the competition between polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) and glycogen accumulating organisms (GAOs). At low DO levels, Accumulibacter PAOs were shown to have an advantage over Competibacter GAOs, as PAOs had a higher oxygen affinity and thus largely maintained their aerobic activity at low DO levels, while GAO activity decreased. Bioreactor operation at low DO levels was found to increase the PAO fraction of the sludge. Furthermore, an increase in aerobic HRT (at a DO level of 2 mg O2/L), promoted the proliferation of GAOs over PAOs, decreasing the EBPR efficiency. Overall, this study shows that low aeration can be beneficial for EBPR performance through selecting for PAOs over GAOs, which should be incorporated into WWTP models in order to minimise energetic costs and improve WWTP sustainability. PMID:25222333