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Sample records for accumulating evidence reveals

  1. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  2. Evidence Accumulation in the Magnitude System

    PubMed Central

    Lambrechts, Anna; Walsh, Vincent; van Wassenhove, Virginie

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual interferences in the estimation of quantities (time, space and numbers) have been interpreted as evidence for a common magnitude system. However, if duration estimation has appears sensitive to spatial and numerical interferences, space and number estimation tend to be resilient to temporal manipulations. These observations question the relative contribution of each quantity in the elaboration of a representation in a common mental metric. Here, we elaborated a task in which perceptual evidence accumulated over time for all tested quantities (space, time and number) in order to match the natural requirement for building a duration percept. For this, we used a bisection task. Experimental trials consisted of dynamic dots of different sizes appearing progressively on the screen. Participants were asked to judge the duration, the cumulative surface or the number of dots in the display while the two non-target dimensions varied independently. In a prospective experiment, participants were informed before the trial which dimension was the target; in a retrospective experiment, participants had to attend to all dimensions and were informed only after a given trial which dimension was the target. Surprisingly, we found that duration was resilient to spatial and numerical interferences whereas space and number estimation were affected by time. Specifically, and counter-intuitively, results revealed that longer durations lead to smaller number and space estimates whether participants knew before (prospectively) or after (retrospectively) a given trial which quantity they had to estimate. Altogether, our results support a magnitude system in which perceptual evidence for time, space and numbers integrate following Bayesian cue-combination rules. PMID:24339998

  3. Distinct relationships of parietal and prefrontal cortices to evidence accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hanks, Timothy; Kopec, Charles D.; Brunton, Bingni W.; Duan, Chunyu A.; Erlich, Jeffrey C.; Brody, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Gradual accumulation of evidence is thought to be fundamental for decision-making, and its neural correlates have been found in multiple brain regions1–8. Here we develop a generalizable method to measure tuning curves that specify the relationship between neural responses and mentally-accumulated evidence, and apply it to distinguish the encoding of decision variables in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) and prefrontal cortex (frontal orienting fields, FOF). We recorded the firing rates of neurons in PPC and FOF from rats performing a perceptual decision-making task. Classical analyses uncovered correlates of accumulating evidence, similar to previous observations in primates and also similar across the two regions. However, tuning curve assays revealed that while the PPC encodes a graded value of the accumulating evidence, the FOF has a more categorical encoding that indicates, throughout the trial, the decision provisionally favored by the evidence accumulated so far. Contrary to current views3,5,7–9, this suggests that premotor activity in frontal cortex does not play a role in the accumulation process, but instead has a more categorical function, such as transforming accumulated evidence into a discrete choice. To causally probe the role of FOF activity, we optogenetically silenced it during different timepoints of the trial. Consistent with a role in committing to a categorical choice at the end of the evidence accumulation process, but not consistent with a role during the accumulation itself, a behavioral effect was observed only when FOF silencing occurred at the end of the perceptual stimulus. Our results place important constraints on the circuit logic of brain regions involved in decision-making. PMID:25600270

  4. Evidence of aluminium accumulation in aluminium welders.

    PubMed Central

    Elinder, C G; Ahrengart, L; Lidums, V; Pettersson, E; Sjögren, B

    1991-01-01

    Using atomic absorption spectrometry the aluminium concentrations in blood and urine and in two iliac bone biopsies obtained from welders with long term exposure to fumes containing aluminium were measured. The urinary excretion of two workers who had welded for 20 and 21 years varied between 107 and 351 micrograms Al/l, more than 10 times the concentration found in persons without occupational exposure. Urinary aluminium excretion remained high many years after stopping exposure. Blood and bone aluminium concentrations (4-53 micrograms Al/l and 18-29 micrograms Al/g respectively) were also raised but not to the same extent as urine excretion. It is concluded that long term exposure to aluminium by inhalation gives rise to accumulation of aluminium in the body and skeleton of health persons, and that the elimination of retained aluminium is very slow, in the order of several years. PMID:1954151

  5. Evidence Accumulation and Choice Maintenance Are Dissociated in Human Perceptual Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mads Lund; Endestad, Tor; Biele, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual decision making in monkeys relies on decision neurons, which accumulate evidence and maintain choices until a response is given. In humans, several brain regions have been proposed to accumulate evidence, but it is unknown if these regions also maintain choices. To test if accumulator regions in humans also maintain decisions we compared delayed and self-paced responses during a face/house discrimination decision making task. Computational modeling and fMRI results revealed dissociated processes of evidence accumulation and decision maintenance, with potential accumulator activations found in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral insula. Potential maintenance activation spanned the frontal pole, temporal gyri, precuneus and the lateral occipital and frontal orbital cortices. Results of a quantitative reverse inference meta-analysis performed to differentiate the functions associated with the identified regions did not narrow down potential accumulation regions, but suggested that response-maintenance might rely on a verbalization of the response. PMID:26510176

  6. Evidence Accumulation and Choice Maintenance Are Dissociated in Human Perceptual Decision Making.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mads Lund; Endestad, Tor; Biele, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual decision making in monkeys relies on decision neurons, which accumulate evidence and maintain choices until a response is given. In humans, several brain regions have been proposed to accumulate evidence, but it is unknown if these regions also maintain choices. To test if accumulator regions in humans also maintain decisions we compared delayed and self-paced responses during a face/house discrimination decision making task. Computational modeling and fMRI results revealed dissociated processes of evidence accumulation and decision maintenance, with potential accumulator activations found in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex, right inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral insula. Potential maintenance activation spanned the frontal pole, temporal gyri, precuneus and the lateral occipital and frontal orbital cortices. Results of a quantitative reverse inference meta-analysis performed to differentiate the functions associated with the identified regions did not narrow down potential accumulation regions, but suggested that response-maintenance might rely on a verbalization of the response.

  7. Evidence accumulation as a model for lexical selection.

    PubMed

    Anders, R; Riès, S; van Maanen, L; Alario, F X

    2015-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate evidence accumulation as a plausible theoretical and/or empirical model for the lexical selection process of lexical retrieval. A number of current psycholinguistic theories consider lexical selection as a process related to selecting a lexical target from a number of alternatives, which each have varying activations (or signal supports), that are largely resultant of an initial stimulus recognition. We thoroughly present a case for how such a process may be theoretically explained by the evidence accumulation paradigm, and we demonstrate how this paradigm can be directly related or combined with conventional psycholinguistic theory and their simulatory instantiations (generally, neural network models). Then with a demonstrative application on a large new real data set, we establish how the empirical evidence accumulation approach is able to provide parameter results that are informative to leading psycholinguistic theory, and that motivate future theoretical development. PMID:26375509

  8. Neural evidence accumulation persists after choice to inform metacognitive judgments

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Peter R; Robertson, Ian H; Harty, Siobhán; O'Connell, Redmond G

    2015-01-01

    The ability to revise one’s certainty or confidence in a preceding choice is a critical feature of adaptive decision-making but the neural mechanisms underpinning this metacognitive process have yet to be characterized. In the present study, we demonstrate that the same build-to-threshold decision variable signal that triggers an initial choice continues to evolve after commitment, and determines the timing and accuracy of self-initiated error detection reports by selectively representing accumulated evidence that the preceding choice was incorrect. We also show that a peri-choice signal generated in medial frontal cortex provides a source of input to this post-decision accumulation process, indicating that metacognitive judgments are not solely based on the accumulation of feedforward sensory evidence. These findings impart novel insights into the generative mechanisms of metacognition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11946.001 PMID:26687008

  9. Conscious and Nonconscious Processes:Distinct Forms of Evidence Accumulation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehaene, Stanislas

    Among the many brain events evoked by a visual stimulus, which ones are associated specifically with conscious perception, and which merely reflect nonconscious processing? Understanding the neuronal mechanisms of consciousness is a major challenge for cognitive neuroscience. Recently, progress has been achieved by contrasting behavior and brain activation in minimally different experimental conditions, one of which leads to conscious perception whereas the other does not. This chapter reviews briefly this line of research and speculates on its theoretical interpretation. I propose to draw links between evidence accumulation models, which are highly successful in capturing elementary psychophysical decisions, and the conscious/nonconscious dichotomy. In this framework, conscious access would correspond to the crossing of a threshold in evidence accumulation within a distributed global workspace, a set of recurrently connected neurons with long axons that is able to integrate and broadcast back evidence from multiple brain processors. During nonconscious processing, evidence would be accumulated locally within specialized subcircuits, but would fail to reach the threshold needed for global ignition and, therefore, conscious reportability.

  10. Auditory Streaming as an Online Classification Process with Evidence Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Barniv, Dana; Nelken, Israel

    2015-01-01

    When human subjects hear a sequence of two alternating pure tones, they often perceive it in one of two ways: as one integrated sequence (a single "stream" consisting of the two tones), or as two segregated sequences, one sequence of low tones perceived separately from another sequence of high tones (two "streams"). Perception of this stimulus is thus bistable. Moreover, subjects report on-going switching between the two percepts: unless the frequency separation is large, initial perception tends to be of integration, followed by toggling between integration and segregation phases. The process of stream formation is loosely named “auditory streaming”. Auditory streaming is believed to be a manifestation of human ability to analyze an auditory scene, i.e. to attribute portions of the incoming sound sequence to distinct sound generating entities. Previous studies suggested that the durations of the successive integration and segregation phases are statistically independent. This independence plays an important role in current models of bistability. Contrary to this, we show here, by analyzing a large set of data, that subsequent phase durations are positively correlated. To account together for bistability and positive correlation between subsequent durations, we suggest that streaming is a consequence of an evidence accumulation process. Evidence for segregation is accumulated during the integration phase and vice versa; a switch to the opposite percept occurs stochastically based on this evidence. During a long phase, a large amount of evidence for the opposite percept is accumulated, resulting in a long subsequent phase. In contrast, a short phase is followed by another short phase. We implement these concepts using a probabilistic model that shows both bistability and correlations similar to those observed experimentally. PMID:26671774

  11. Auditory Streaming as an Online Classification Process with Evidence Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Barniv, Dana; Nelken, Israel

    2015-01-01

    When human subjects hear a sequence of two alternating pure tones, they often perceive it in one of two ways: as one integrated sequence (a single "stream" consisting of the two tones), or as two segregated sequences, one sequence of low tones perceived separately from another sequence of high tones (two "streams"). Perception of this stimulus is thus bistable. Moreover, subjects report on-going switching between the two percepts: unless the frequency separation is large, initial perception tends to be of integration, followed by toggling between integration and segregation phases. The process of stream formation is loosely named "auditory streaming". Auditory streaming is believed to be a manifestation of human ability to analyze an auditory scene, i.e. to attribute portions of the incoming sound sequence to distinct sound generating entities. Previous studies suggested that the durations of the successive integration and segregation phases are statistically independent. This independence plays an important role in current models of bistability. Contrary to this, we show here, by analyzing a large set of data, that subsequent phase durations are positively correlated. To account together for bistability and positive correlation between subsequent durations, we suggest that streaming is a consequence of an evidence accumulation process. Evidence for segregation is accumulated during the integration phase and vice versa; a switch to the opposite percept occurs stochastically based on this evidence. During a long phase, a large amount of evidence for the opposite percept is accumulated, resulting in a long subsequent phase. In contrast, a short phase is followed by another short phase. We implement these concepts using a probabilistic model that shows both bistability and correlations similar to those observed experimentally.

  12. Is There Neural Evidence for an Evidence Accumulation Process in Memory Decisions?

    PubMed Central

    van Vugt, Marieke K.; Beulen, Marijke A.; Taatgen, Niels A.

    2016-01-01

    Models of evidence accumulation have been very successful at describing human decision making behavior. Recent years have also seen the first reports of neural correlates of this accumulation process. However, these studies have mostly focused on perceptual decision making tasks, ignoring the role of additional cognitive processes like memory retrieval that are crucial in real-world decisions. In this study, we tried to find a neural signature of evidence accumulation during a recognition memory task. To do this, we applied a method we have successfully used to localize evidence accumulation in scalp EEG during a perceptual decision making task. This time, however, we applied it to intracranial EEG recordings, which provide a much higher spatial resolution. We identified several brain areas where activity ramps up over time, but these neural patterns do not appear to be modulated by behavioral variables such as the amount of available evidence or response time. This casts doubt on the idea of evidence accumulation as a general decision-making mechanism underlying different types of decisions. PMID:27014024

  13. What is value—accumulated reward or evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Friston, Karl; Adams, Rick; Montague, Read

    2012-01-01

    Why are you reading this abstract? In some sense, your answer will cast the exercise as valuable—but what is value? In what follows, we suggest that value is evidence or, more exactly, log Bayesian evidence. This implies that a sufficient explanation for valuable behavior is the accumulation of evidence for internal models of our world. This contrasts with normative models of optimal control and reinforcement learning, which assume the existence of a value function that explains behavior, where (somewhat tautologically) behavior maximizes value. In this paper, we consider an alternative formulation—active inference—that replaces policies in normative models with prior beliefs about the (future) states agents should occupy. This enables optimal behavior to be cast purely in terms of inference: where agents sample their sensorium to maximize the evidence for their generative model of hidden states in the world, and minimize their uncertainty about those states. Crucially, this formulation resolves the tautology inherent in normative models and allows one to consider how prior beliefs are themselves optimized in a hierarchical setting. We illustrate these points by showing that any optimal policy can be specified with prior beliefs in the context of Bayesian inference. We then show how these prior beliefs are themselves prescribed by an imperative to minimize uncertainty. This formulation explains the saccadic eye movements required to read this text and defines the value of the visual sensations you are soliciting. PMID:23133414

  14. What is value-accumulated reward or evidence?

    PubMed

    Friston, Karl; Adams, Rick; Montague, Read

    2012-01-01

    Why are you reading this abstract? In some sense, your answer will cast the exercise as valuable-but what is value? In what follows, we suggest that value is evidence or, more exactly, log Bayesian evidence. This implies that a sufficient explanation for valuable behavior is the accumulation of evidence for internal models of our world. This contrasts with normative models of optimal control and reinforcement learning, which assume the existence of a value function that explains behavior, where (somewhat tautologically) behavior maximizes value. In this paper, we consider an alternative formulation-active inference-that replaces policies in normative models with prior beliefs about the (future) states agents should occupy. This enables optimal behavior to be cast purely in terms of inference: where agents sample their sensorium to maximize the evidence for their generative model of hidden states in the world, and minimize their uncertainty about those states. Crucially, this formulation resolves the tautology inherent in normative models and allows one to consider how prior beliefs are themselves optimized in a hierarchical setting. We illustrate these points by showing that any optimal policy can be specified with prior beliefs in the context of Bayesian inference. We then show how these prior beliefs are themselves prescribed by an imperative to minimize uncertainty. This formulation explains the saccadic eye movements required to read this text and defines the value of the visual sensations you are soliciting.

  15. Loess is the accumulation of dust, not evidence for aridity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zech, Roland

    2013-04-01

    Loess-paleosol sequences (LPS) are valuable terrestrial archives for Quaternary climate and environmental changes. The famous sections on the Chinese Loess Plateau, for example, document the alternation of warm and humid interglacials (paleosols) and cold and more arid glacials (loess). This, at least partly, reflects the weakening of the monsoonal circulation during glacials and has led to the notion that loess in general documents more arid conditions. Paleosols, on the other hand, are often interpreted to document more humid conditions. We studied the LPS Crvenka in the Carpathian Basin, southeast Europe, which spans the full last glacial cycle, and obtained results that do not fit the above concept: (i) The analysis of plant-derived long-chain n-alkanes indicates the presence of deciduous trees and shrubs during glacials, i.e. sufficient precipitation for tree growth, whereas tree-less grass steppes seem to have prevailed during the Eemian, the last interglacial. (ii) Compound-specific deuterium analyses on the alkanes show only little changes on glacial-interglacial timescale. When compared with the isotopic enrichment of the Mediterranean Sea during the last glacial, this likely documents a combination of increased rainfall, reduced evapo-transpiration and reduced temperatures. (iii) Novel lipid biomarkers derived from soil bacteria (GDGTs, glycerol dialkyl glycerol tetraethers) also indicate humid glacials (BIT index close to 1) and more arid interglacials (BIT<0.8). Our results are in good agreement with modelling studies suggesting a southward shift of the westerlies during glacials, and aridization in the Mediterranean area in response to man-made global warming. More importantly, they remind us of an important fact: Loess is the accumulation of dust, but not (necessarily) evidence for aridity. Pedogenesis may simply not have been able to keep pace with high glacial dust accumulation rates related to intense glacial, periglacial and fluvial activity

  16. Ultrastructural evidence for iron accumulation within the tube of Vestimentiferan Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yao, Huiqiang; Li, Jiangtao; Wu, Zijun

    2009-10-01

    This study reports on the accumulation of iron within the tube wall of the deep sea vent macro invertebrate Vestimentiferan Ridgeia piscesae collected from Juan de Fuca ridge. Combining an array of approaches including environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), X-ray microanalysis (EDS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), we provide evidences for the influence of prokaryotic organisms on the accumulation of metals on and within the tube wall. Two types of iron-rich minerals such as iron oxides and framboidal pyrites are identified within or on the tube wall. Our results reveal the presence of prokaryotic organism is apparently responsible for the early accumulation of iron-rich minerals in the tube wall. The implications of the biomineralisation of iron in tube wall at hydrothermal vents are discussed. PMID:19199091

  17. Ultrastructural evidence for iron accumulation within the tube of Vestimentiferan Ridgeia piscesae.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaotong; Zhou, Huaiyang; Yao, Huiqiang; Li, Jiangtao; Wu, Zijun

    2009-10-01

    This study reports on the accumulation of iron within the tube wall of the deep sea vent macro invertebrate Vestimentiferan Ridgeia piscesae collected from Juan de Fuca ridge. Combining an array of approaches including environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM), electron probe micro-analysis (EPMA), X-ray microanalysis (EDS) and transmission electron microscope (TEM), we provide evidences for the influence of prokaryotic organisms on the accumulation of metals on and within the tube wall. Two types of iron-rich minerals such as iron oxides and framboidal pyrites are identified within or on the tube wall. Our results reveal the presence of prokaryotic organism is apparently responsible for the early accumulation of iron-rich minerals in the tube wall. The implications of the biomineralisation of iron in tube wall at hydrothermal vents are discussed.

  18. Oil Accumulation by the Oleaginous Diatom Fistulifera solaris as Revealed by the Genome and Transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Tanaka, Michihiro; Abida, Heni; Maréchal, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Muto, Masaki; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Fukuda, Yorikane; Nemoto, Michiko; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Wong, Pui Shan; Aburatani, Sachiyo; Fujibuchi, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Oleaginous photosynthetic organisms such as microalgae are promising sources for biofuel production through the generation of carbon-neutral sustainable energy. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving high-rate lipid production in these oleaginous organisms remain unclear, thus impeding efforts to improve productivity through genetic modifications. We analyzed the genome and transcriptome of the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580. Next-generation sequencing technology provided evidence of an allodiploid genome structure, suggesting unorthodox molecular evolutionary and genetic regulatory systems for reinforcing metabolic efficiencies. Although major metabolic pathways were shared with nonoleaginous diatoms, transcriptome analysis revealed unique expression patterns, such as concomitant upregulation of fatty acid/triacylglycerol biosynthesis and fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation) in concert with ATP production. This peculiar pattern of gene expression may account for the simultaneous growth and oil accumulation phenotype and may inspire novel biofuel production technology based on this oleaginous microalga. PMID:25634988

  19. Oil accumulation by the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris as revealed by the genome and transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tsuyoshi; Maeda, Yoshiaki; Veluchamy, Alaguraj; Tanaka, Michihiro; Abida, Heni; Maréchal, Eric; Bowler, Chris; Muto, Masaki; Sunaga, Yoshihiko; Tanaka, Masayoshi; Yoshino, Tomoko; Taniguchi, Takeaki; Fukuda, Yorikane; Nemoto, Michiko; Matsumoto, Mitsufumi; Wong, Pui Shan; Aburatani, Sachiyo; Fujibuchi, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Oleaginous photosynthetic organisms such as microalgae are promising sources for biofuel production through the generation of carbon-neutral sustainable energy. However, the metabolic mechanisms driving high-rate lipid production in these oleaginous organisms remain unclear, thus impeding efforts to improve productivity through genetic modifications. We analyzed the genome and transcriptome of the oleaginous diatom Fistulifera solaris JPCC DA0580. Next-generation sequencing technology provided evidence of an allodiploid genome structure, suggesting unorthodox molecular evolutionary and genetic regulatory systems for reinforcing metabolic efficiencies. Although major metabolic pathways were shared with nonoleaginous diatoms, transcriptome analysis revealed unique expression patterns, such as concomitant upregulation of fatty acid/triacylglycerol biosynthesis and fatty acid degradation (β-oxidation) in concert with ATP production. This peculiar pattern of gene expression may account for the simultaneous growth and oil accumulation phenotype and may inspire novel biofuel production technology based on this oleaginous microalga.

  20. The nitrogen legacy: emerging evidence of nitrogen accumulation in anthropogenic landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.; Veenstra, J. J.; Burras, C. L.

    2016-03-01

    Watershed and global-scale nitrogen (N) budgets indicate that the majority of the N surplus in anthropogenic landscapes does not reach the coastal oceans. While there is general consensus that this ‘missing’ N either exits the landscape via denitrification or is retained within watersheds as nitrate or organic N, the relative magnitudes of these pools and fluxes are subject to considerable uncertainty. Our study, for the first time, provides direct, large-scale evidence of N accumulation in the root zones of agricultural soils that may account for much of the ‘missing N’ identified in mass balance studies. We analyzed long-term soil data (1957-2010) from 2069 sites throughout the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) to reveal N accumulation in cropland of 25-70 kg ha-1 yr-1, a total of 3.8 ± 1.8 Mt yr-1 at the watershed scale. We then developed a simple modeling framework to capture N depletion and accumulation dynamics under intensive agriculture. Using the model, we show that the observed accumulation of soil organic N (SON) in the MRB over a 30 year period (142 Tg N) would lead to a biogeochemical lag time of 35 years for 99% of legacy SON, even with complete cessation of fertilizer application. By demonstrating that agricultural soils can act as a net N sink, the present work makes a critical contribution towards the closing of watershed N budgets.

  1. Action Planning and the Timescale of Evidence Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Pfeffer, Thomas; Jentgens, Pia; Donner, Tobias H

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual decisions are based on the temporal integration of sensory evidence for different states of the outside world. The timescale of this integration process varies widely across behavioral contexts and individuals, and it is diagnostic for the underlying neural mechanisms. In many situations, the decision-maker knows the required mapping between perceptual evidence and motor response (henceforth termed "sensory-motor contingency") before decision formation. Here, the integrated evidence can be directly translated into a motor plan and, indeed, neural signatures of the integration process are evident as build-up activity in premotor brain regions. In other situations, however, the sensory-motor contingencies are unknown at the time of decision formation. We used behavioral psychophysics and computational modeling to test if knowledge about sensory-motor contingencies affects the timescale of perceptual evidence integration. We asked human observers to perform the same motion discrimination task, with or without trial-to-trial variations of the mapping between perceptual choice and motor response. When the mapping varied, it was either instructed before or after the stimulus presentation. We quantified the timescale of evidence integration under these different sensory-motor mapping conditions by means of two approaches. First, we analyzed subjects' discrimination threshold as a function of stimulus duration. Second, we fitted a dynamical decision-making model to subjects' choice behavior. The results from both approaches indicated that observers (i) integrated motion information for several hundred ms, (ii) used a shorter than optimal integration timescale, and (iii) used the same integration timescale under all sensory-motor mappings. We conclude that the mechanisms limiting the timescale of perceptual decisions are largely independent from long-term learning (under fixed mapping) or rapid acquisition (under variable mapping) of sensory-motor contingencies

  2. The accumulated evidence on lung cancer and environmental tobacco smoke.

    PubMed Central

    Hackshaw, A. K.; Law, M. R.; Wald, N. J.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To estimate the risk of lung cancer in lifelong non-smokers exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. DESIGN: Analysis of 37 published epidemiological studies of the risk of lung cancer (4626 cases) in non-smokers who did and did not live with a smoker. The risk estimate was compared with that from linear extrapolation of the risk in smokers using seven studies of biochemical markers of tobacco smoke intake. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Relative risk of lung cancer in lifelong non-smokers according to whether the spouse currently smoked or had never smoked. RESULTS: The excess risk of lung cancer was 24% (95% confidence interval 13% to 36%) in non-smokers who lived with a smoker (P < 0.001). Adjustment for the effects of bias (positive and negative) and dietary confounding had little overall effect; the adjusted excess risk was 26% (7% to 47%). The dose-response relation of the risk of lung cancer with both the number of cigarettes smoked by the spouse and the duration of exposure was significant. The excess risk derived by linear extrapolation from that in smokers was 19%, similar to the direct estimate of 26%. CONCLUSION: The epidemiological and biochemical evidence on exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, with the supporting evidence of tobacco specific carcinogens in the blood and urine of non-smokers exposed to environmental tobacco smoke, provides compelling confirmation that breathing other people's tobacco smoke is a cause of lung cancer. PMID:9365295

  3. Perception as Evidence Accumulation and Bayesian Inference: Insights from Masked Priming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Dennis; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2008-01-01

    The authors argue that perception is Bayesian inference based on accumulation of noisy evidence and that, in masked priming, the perceptual system is tricked into treating the prime and the target as a single object. Of the 2 algorithms considered for formalizing how the evidence sampled from a prime and target is combined, only 1 was shown to be…

  4. Interference effects of choice on confidence: Quantum characteristics of evidence accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kvam, Peter D; Pleskac, Timothy J; Yu, Shuli; Busemeyer, Jerome R

    2015-08-25

    Decision-making relies on a process of evidence accumulation which generates support for possible hypotheses. Models of this process derived from classical stochastic theories assume that information accumulates by moving across definite levels of evidence, carving out a single trajectory across these levels over time. In contrast, quantum decision models assume that evidence develops over time in a superposition state analogous to a wavelike pattern and that judgments and decisions are constructed by a measurement process by which a definite state of evidence is created from this indefinite state. This constructive process implies that interference effects should arise when multiple responses (measurements) are elicited over time. We report such an interference effect during a motion direction discrimination task. Decisions during the task interfered with subsequent confidence judgments, resulting in less extreme and more accurate judgments than when no decision was elicited. These results provide qualitative and quantitative support for a quantum random walk model of evidence accumulation over the popular Markov random walk model. We discuss the cognitive and neural implications of modeling evidence accumulation as a quantum dynamic system. PMID:26261322

  5. Rhythmic fluctuations in evidence accumulation during decision making in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Wyart, Valentin; de Gardelle, Vincent; Scholl, Jacqueline; Summerfield, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Summary Categorical choices are preceded by the accumulation of sensory evidence in favour of one action or another. Current models describe evidence accumulation as a continuous process occurring at a constant rate, but this view is inconsistent with accounts of a psychological refractory period during sequential information processing. During multi-sample perceptual categorisation, we found that the neural encoding of momentary evidence in human electrical brain signals and its subsequent impact on choice fluctuated rhythmically according to the phase of ongoing parietal delta oscillations (1-3 Hz). By contrast, lateralised beta-band power (10-30 Hz) overlying human motor cortex encoded the integrated evidence as a response preparation signal. These findings draw a clear distinction between central and motor stages of perceptual decision making, with successive samples of sensory evidence competing to pass through a serial processing bottleneck before being mapped onto action. PMID:23177968

  6. Metabolic characteristics of a glycogen-accumulating organism in Defluviicoccus cluster II revealed by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Mao, Yanping; Xia, Yu; Zhang, Tong

    2014-11-01

    Glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) may compete with phosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) for short-chain fatty acids (VFAs) in anaerobic polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) synthesis, but no consequently aerobic polyphosphate accumulation in enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) process, thus deteriorating the EBPR process. They are detected frequently in the deteriorated EBPR process, but their metabolisms are still far from our comprehensions for there is seldom pure culture. In this study, a nearly complete draft genome of a GAOs in Defluviicoccus cluster II, GAO-HK, is recruited from the metagenome of activated sludge in a full-scale industrial anoxic/aerobic wastewater plant. Comparative genomics reveal similar metabolisms of PHA and glycogen in GAOs of GAO-HK, Defluviicoccus tetraformis TFO71 (TFO71) and Competibacter phosphatis clade IIA (CPIIA), and PAOs of Accumulibacter clade IIA UW-1 (UW-1) and Tetrasphaera elongata Lp2 (Lp2). Although there are similar gene cassettes related with polyphosphate metabolism in these GAOs and PAOs, especially for Defluviicoccus-relative bacteria and UW-1, ppk1 in GAOs are diverse from those in the identified PAOs, implying the difference of polyphosphate metabolism in GAOs and PAOs. Additionally, genes related to the dissimilatory denitrification are absent in TFO71 and GAO-HK, implying that additional nitrate or nitrite may favor PAOs over Defluviicoccus-relative GAOs. Therefore, PAOs suffering from competition of Defluviicoccus-relative GAOs might be rescued with the additional nitrate/nitrite, which is important to improve the stability of EBPR processes. PMID:24889288

  7. Error awareness as evidence accumulation: effects of speed-accuracy trade-off on error signaling

    PubMed Central

    Steinhauser, Marco; Yeung, Nick

    2012-01-01

    Errors in choice tasks have been shown to elicit a cascade of characteristic components in the human event-related potential (ERPs)—the error-related negativity (Ne/ERN) and the error positivity (Pe). Despite the large number of studies concerned with these components, it is still unclear how they relate to error awareness as measured by overt error signaling responses. In the present study, we considered error awareness as a decision process in which evidence for an error is accumulated until a decision criterion is reached, and hypothesized that the Pe is a correlate of the accumulated decision evidence. To test the prediction that the amplitude of the Pe varies as a function of the strength and latency of the accumulated evidence for an error, we manipulated the speed-accuracy trade-off (SAT) in a brightness discrimination task while participants signaled the occurrence of errors. Based on a previous modeling study, we predicted that lower speed pressure should be associated with weaker evidence for an error and, thus, with smaller Pe amplitudes. As predicted, average Pe amplitude was decreased and error signaling was impaired in a low speed pressure condition compared to a high speed pressure condition. In further analyses, we derived single-trial Pe amplitudes using a logistic regression approach. Single-trial amplitudes robustly predicted the occurrence of signaling responses on a trial-by-trial basis. These results confirm the predictions of the evidence accumulation account, supporting the notion that the Pe reflects accumulated evidence for an error and that this evidence drives the emergence of error awareness. PMID:22905027

  8. Stable metal isotopes reveal copper accumulation and loss dynamics in the freshwater bivalve Corbucula

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Croteau, M.-N.; Luoma, S.N.; Topping, B.R.; Lopez, C.B.

    2004-01-01

    Characterization of uptake and loss dynamics is critical to understanding risks associated with contaminant exposure in aquatic animals. Dynamics are especially important in addressing questions such as why coexisting species in nature accumulate different levels of a contaminant. Here we manipulated copper (Cu) stable isotopic ratios (as an alternative to radioisotopes) to describe for the first time Cu dynamics in a freshwater invertebrate, the bivalve Corbicula fluminea. In the laboratory, Corbicula uptake and loss rate constants were determined from an environmentally realistic waterborne exposure to 65Cu (5.7 ??g L-1). That is, we spiked deionized water with Cu that was 99.4% 65Cu. Net tracer uptake was detectable after 1 day and strongly evident after 4 days. Thus, short-term exposures necessary to determine uptake dynamics are feasible with stable isotopes of Cu. In Corbicula, 65Cu depuration was biphasic. An unusually low rate constant of loss (0.0038 d-1) characterized the slow component of efflux, explaining why Corbicula strongly accumulates copper in nature. We incorporated our estimates of rate constants for dissolved 65Cu uptake and physiological efflux into a bioaccumulation model and showed that dietary exposure to Cu is likely an important bioaccumulation pathway for Corbicula.

  9. GWA Mapping of Anthocyanin Accumulation Reveals Balancing Selection of MYB90 in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Bac-Molenaar, Johanna A.; Fradin, Emilie F.; Rienstra, Juriaan A.; Vreugdenhil, Dick; Keurentjes, Joost J. B.

    2015-01-01

    Induction of anthocyanin accumulation by osmotic stress was assessed in 360 accessions of Arabidopsis thaliana. A wide range of natural variation, with phenotypes ranging from green to completely red/purple rosettes, was observed. A genome wide association (GWA) mapping approach revealed that sequence diversity in a small 15 kb region on chromosome 1 explained 40% of the variation observed. Sequence and expression analyses of alleles of the candidate gene MYB90 identified a causal polymorphism at amino acid (AA) position 210 of this transcription factor of the anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway. This amino acid discriminates the two most frequent alleles of MYB90. Both alleles are present in a substantial part of the population, suggesting balancing selection between these two alleles. Analysis of the geographical origin of the studied accessions suggests that the macro climate is not the driving force behind positive or negative selection for anthocyanin accumulation. An important role for local climatic conditions is, therefore, suggested. This study emphasizes that GWA mapping is a powerful approach to identify alleles that are under balancing selection pressure in nature. PMID:26588092

  10. Tomography reveals buoyant asthenosphere accumulating beneath the Juan de Fuca plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, William B.; Allen, Richard M.; Richards, Mark A.

    2016-09-01

    The boundary between Earth’s strong lithospheric plates and the underlying mantle asthenosphere corresponds to an abrupt seismic velocity decrease and electrical conductivity increase with depth, perhaps indicating a thin, weak layer that may strongly influence plate motion dynamics. The behavior of such a layer at subduction zones remains unexplored. We present a tomographic model, derived from on- and offshore seismic experiments, that reveals a strong low-velocity feature beneath the subducting Juan de Fuca slab along the entire Cascadia subduction zone. Through simple geodynamic arguments, we propose that this low-velocity feature is the accumulation of material from a thin, weak, buoyant layer present beneath the entire oceanic lithosphere. The presence of this feature could have major implications for our understanding of the asthenosphere and subduction zone dynamics.

  11. Evidence accumulation in a complex task: Making choices about concurrent multiattribute stimuli under time pressure.

    PubMed

    Palada, Hector; Neal, Andrew; Vuckovic, Anita; Martin, Russell; Samuels, Kate; Heathcote, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Evidence accumulation models transform observed choices and associated response times into psychologically meaningful constructs such as the strength of evidence and the degree of caution. Standard versions of these models were developed for rapid (∼1 s) choices about simple stimuli, and have recently been elaborated to some degree to address more complex stimuli and response methods. However, these elaborations can be difficult to use with designs and measurements typically encountered in complex applied settings. We test the applicability of 2 standard accumulation models-the diffusion (Ratcliff & McKoon, 2008) and the linear ballistic accumulation (LBA) (Brown & Heathcote, 2008)-to data from a task representative of many applied situations: the detection of heterogeneous multiattribute targets in a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operator task. Despite responses taking more than 2 s and complications added by realistic features, such as a complex target classification rule, interruptions from a simultaneous UAV navigation task, and time pressured choices about several concurrently present potential targets, these models performed well descriptively. They also provided a coherent psychological explanation of the effects of decision uncertainty and workload manipulations. Our results support the wider application of standard evidence accumulation models to applied decision-making settings. PMID:26844369

  12. Evidence accumulation in a complex task: Making choices about concurrent multiattribute stimuli under time pressure.

    PubMed

    Palada, Hector; Neal, Andrew; Vuckovic, Anita; Martin, Russell; Samuels, Kate; Heathcote, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    Evidence accumulation models transform observed choices and associated response times into psychologically meaningful constructs such as the strength of evidence and the degree of caution. Standard versions of these models were developed for rapid (∼1 s) choices about simple stimuli, and have recently been elaborated to some degree to address more complex stimuli and response methods. However, these elaborations can be difficult to use with designs and measurements typically encountered in complex applied settings. We test the applicability of 2 standard accumulation models-the diffusion (Ratcliff & McKoon, 2008) and the linear ballistic accumulation (LBA) (Brown & Heathcote, 2008)-to data from a task representative of many applied situations: the detection of heterogeneous multiattribute targets in a simulated unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operator task. Despite responses taking more than 2 s and complications added by realistic features, such as a complex target classification rule, interruptions from a simultaneous UAV navigation task, and time pressured choices about several concurrently present potential targets, these models performed well descriptively. They also provided a coherent psychological explanation of the effects of decision uncertainty and workload manipulations. Our results support the wider application of standard evidence accumulation models to applied decision-making settings.

  13. Proteomic profiling of maize opaque endosperm mutants reveals selective accumulation of lysine-enriched proteins

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Kyla J.; Jia, Shangang; Zhang, Chi; Holding, David R.

    2016-01-01

    Reduced prolamin (zein) accumulation and defective endoplasmic reticulum (ER) body formation occurs in maize opaque endosperm mutants opaque2 (o2), floury2 (fl2), defective endosperm*B30 (DeB30), and Mucronate (Mc), whereas other opaque mutants such as opaque1 (o1) and floury1 (fl1) are normal in these regards. This suggests that other factors contribute to kernel texture. A liquid chromatography approach coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) proteomics was used to compare non-zein proteins of nearly isogenic opaque endosperm mutants. In total, 2762 proteins were identified that were enriched for biological processes such as protein transport and folding, amino acid biosynthesis, and proteolysis. Principal component analysis and pathway enrichment suggested that the mutants partitioned into three groups: (i) Mc, DeB30, fl2 and o2; (ii) o1; and (iii) fl1. Indicator species analysis revealed mutant-specific proteins, and highlighted ER secretory pathway components that were enriched in selected groups of mutants. The most significantly changed proteins were related to stress or defense and zein partitioning into the soluble fraction for Mc, DeB30, o1, and fl1 specifically. In silico dissection of the most significantly changed proteins revealed novel qualitative changes in lysine abundance contributing to the overall lysine increase and the nutritional rebalancing of the o2 and fl2 endosperm. PMID:26712829

  14. Stover Composition in Maize and Sorghum Reveals Remarkable Genetic Variation and Plasticity for Carbohydrate Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S; Breitzman, Matthew W; Silva, Renato R; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for non-structural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed in internodes of maize (11-24%) and sorghum (7-36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8-19%) and sorghum (9-27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9-21%) and sorghum (16-27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15-18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. Availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. PMID:27375668

  15. Stover composition in maize and sorghum reveals remarkable genetic variation and plasticity for carbohydrate accumulation

    DOE PAGES

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Breitzman, Matthew W.; Silva, Renato R.; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L.; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2016-06-08

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for nonstructural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed inmore » internodes of maize (11-24%) and sorghum (7-36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8-19%) and sorghum (9-27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9-21%) and sorghum (16-27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15-18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. In conclusion, availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops.« less

  16. Stover Composition in Maize and Sorghum Reveals Remarkable Genetic Variation and Plasticity for Carbohydrate Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Sekhon, Rajandeep S.; Breitzman, Matthew W.; Silva, Renato R.; Santoro, Nicholas; Rooney, William L.; de Leon, Natalia; Kaeppler, Shawn M.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates stored in vegetative organs, particularly stems, of grasses are a very important source of energy. We examined carbohydrate accumulation in adult sorghum and maize hybrids with distinct phenology and different end uses (grain, silage, sucrose or sweetness in stalk juice, and biomass). Remarkable variation was observed for non-structural carbohydrates and structural polysaccharides during three key developmental stages both between and within hybrids developed for distinct end use in both species. At the onset of the reproductive phase (average 65 days after planting, DAP), a wide range for accumulation of non-structural carbohydrates (free glucose and sucrose combined), was observed in internodes of maize (11–24%) and sorghum (7–36%) indicating substantial variation for transient storage of excess photosynthate during periods of low grain or vegetative sink strength. Remobilization of these reserves for supporting grain fill or vegetative growth was evident from lower amounts in maize (8–19%) and sorghum (9–27%) near the end of the reproductive period (average 95 DAP). At physiological maturity of grain hybrids (average 120 DAP), amounts of these carbohydrates were generally unchanged in maize (9–21%) and sorghum (16–27%) suggesting a loss of photosynthetic assimilation due to weakening sink demand. Nonetheless, high amounts of non-structural carbohydrates at maturity even in grain maize and sorghum (15–18%) highlight the potential for developing dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. For both species, the amounts of structural polysaccharides in the cell wall, measured as monomeric components (glucose and pentose), decreased during grain fill but remained unchanged thereafter with maize biomass possessing slightly higher amounts than sorghum. Availability of carbohydrates in maize and sorghum highlights the potential for developing energy-rich dedicated biofuel or dual-purpose (grain/stover) crops. PMID:27375668

  17. Sources of noise during accumulation of evidence in unrestrained and voluntarily head-restrained rats

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Benjamin B; Constantinople, Christine M; Erlich, Jeffrey C; Tank, David W; Brody, Carlos D

    2015-01-01

    Decision-making behavior is often characterized by substantial variability, but its source remains unclear. We developed a visual accumulation of evidence task designed to quantify sources of noise and to be performed during voluntary head restraint, enabling cellular resolution imaging in future studies. Rats accumulated discrete numbers of flashes presented to the left and right visual hemifields and indicated the side that had the greater number of flashes. Using a signal-detection theory-based model, we found that the standard deviation in their internal estimate of flash number scaled linearly with the number of flashes. This indicates a major source of noise that, surprisingly, is not consistent with the widely used 'drift-diffusion modeling' (DDM) approach but is instead closely related to proposed models of numerical cognition and counting. We speculate that this form of noise could be important in accumulation of evidence tasks generally. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11308.001 PMID:26673896

  18. Shallow magma accumulation at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i, revealed by microgravity surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Daniel J.; Eggers, Albert A.; Bagnardi, Marco; Battaglia, Maurizio; Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta

    2010-01-01

    Using microgravity data collected at Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai‘i (United States), between November 1975 and January 2008, we document significant mass increase beneath the east margin of Halema‘uma‘u Crater, within Kīlauea's summit caldera. Surprisingly, there was no sustained uplift accompanying the mass accumulation. We propose that the positive gravity residual in the absence of significant uplift is indicative of magma accumulation in void space (probably a network of interconnected cracks), which may have been created when magma withdrew from the summit in response to the 29 November 1975 M = 7.2 south flank earthquake. Subsequent refilling documented by gravity represents a gradual recovery from that earthquake. A new eruptive vent opened at the summit of Kīlauea in 2008 within a few hundred meters of the positive gravity residual maximum, probably tapping the reservoir that had been accumulating magma since the 1975 earthquake.

  19. Shallow magma accumulation at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, revealed by microgravity surveys

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, David J.; Eggers, Albert A.; Bagnardi, Marco; Battaglia, Maurizio; Poland, Michael P.; Miklius, Asta

    2010-01-01

    Using microgravity data collected at Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i (United States), between November 1975 and January 2008, we document significant mass increase beneath the east margin of Halema'uma'u Crater, within Kilauea's summit caldera. Surprisingly, there was no sustained uplift accompanying the mass accumulation. We propose that the positive gravity residual in the absence of significant uplift is indicative of magma accumulation in void space (probably a network of interconnected cracks), which may have been created when magma withdrew from the summit in response to the 29 November 1975 M = 7.2 south flank earthquake. Subsequent refilling documented by gravity represents a gradual recovery from that earthquake. A new eruptive vent opened at the summit of Kilauea in 2008 within a few hundred meters of the positive gravity residual maximum, probably tapping the reservoir that had been accumulating magma since the 1975 earthquake.

  20. Demystifying "free will": the role of contextual information and evidence accumulation for predictive brain activity.

    PubMed

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten; Soon, Chun Siong; Bode, Philipp; Stahl, Jutta; Smith, Philip L

    2014-11-01

    Novel multivariate pattern classification analyses have enabled the prediction of decision outcomes from brain activity prior to decision-makers' reported awareness. These findings are often discussed in relation to the philosophical concept of "free will". We argue that these studies demonstrate the role of unconscious processes in simple free choices, but they do not inform the philosophical debate. Moreover, these findings are difficult to relate to cognitive decision-making models, due to misleading assumptions about random choices. We review evidence suggesting that sequential-sampling models, which assume accumulation of evidence towards a decision threshold, can also be applied to free decisions. If external evidence is eliminated by the task instructions, decision-makers might use alternative, subtle contextual information as evidence, such as their choice history, that is not consciously monitored and usually concealed by the experimental design. We conclude that the investigation of neural activity patterns associated with free decisions should aim to investigate how decisions are jointly a function of internal and external contexts, rather than to resolve the philosophical "free will" debate.

  1. Distinct effects of prefrontal and parietal cortex inactivations on an accumulation of evidence task in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Erlich, Jeffrey C; Brunton, Bingni W; Duan, Chunyu A; Hanks, Timothy D; Brody, Carlos D

    2015-01-01

    Numerous brain regions have been shown to have neural correlates of gradually accumulating evidence for decision-making, but the causal roles of these regions in decisions driven by accumulation of evidence have yet to be determined. Here, in rats performing an auditory evidence accumulation task, we inactivated the frontal orienting fields (FOF) and posterior parietal cortex (PPC), two rat cortical regions that have neural correlates of accumulating evidence and that have been proposed as central to decision-making. We used a detailed model of the decision process to analyze the effect of inactivations. Inactivation of the FOF induced substantial performance impairments that were quantitatively best described as an impairment in the output pathway of an evidence accumulator with a long integration time constant (>240 ms). In contrast, we found a minimal role for PPC in decisions guided by accumulating auditory evidence, even while finding a strong role for PPC in internally-guided decisions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.05457.001 PMID:25869470

  2. Revealing basin and regional scale snow accumulation magnitude and variability on glaciers throughout Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, D.; Oneel, S.; Sass, L. C., III; Gusmeroli, A.; Arendt, A. A.; Wolken, G. J.; Kienholz, C.; McNeil, C.

    2014-12-01

    Mass loss from Alaskan glaciers (-50 ± 17 Gt/a, 2003-2009) constitutes one of the largest contributions to global sea level rise outside of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets. The largest process-related uncertainties in this calculation arise from the difficulty in accurately measuring accumulation on glaciers and from the large variability of accumulation over a range of spatio-temporal scales. Further, the physical processes governing snow distribution in complex terrain elude model parameterization. Using ground-penetrating radar, constrained with probe and pit observations, we quantify the magnitude and variability of snow accumulation at six prominent glaciers throughout Alaska at the end of 2013 winter. We find that total SWE magnitude and variability are strongly controlled by the large-scale climate system (i.e. distance from the coastal moisture source along prevailing storm track). On average, total SWE decreases by 0.33 m per 100 km from the coast, while the SWE elevation gradient decreases by 0.06 m / 100 m per 100 km from the coast. SWE variability over small spatial scales (<200 m) is similar at most sites, although two glaciers exhibit notably low and high variability, likely related to their respective climatic provenance. On individual glaciers, strong elevation gradients, increasing from 0.07 m SWE / 100 m at the interior Gulkana Glacier to 0.30 m SWE / 100 m at the coastal Scott Glacier, exert the primary control on accumulation. Results from multi-variable linear regression models (based on topographic variables) find wind exposure/shelter is the most frequent secondary control on accumulation variability. Finally, we find strong agreement (<10% difference) between the radar derived and stake derived total SWE estimates at two glaciers in the USGS Benchmark Glacier Program.

  3. Precision phenotyping of biomass accumulation in triticale reveals temporal genetic patterns of regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busemeyer, Lucas; Ruckelshausen, Arno; Möller, Kim; Melchinger, Albrecht E.; Alheit, Katharina V.; Maurer, Hans Peter; Hahn, Volker; Weissmann, Elmar A.; Reif, Jochen C.; Würschum, Tobias

    2013-08-01

    To extend agricultural productivity by knowledge-based breeding and tailor varieties adapted to specific environmental conditions, it is imperative to improve our ability to assess the dynamic changes of the phenome of crops under field conditions. To this end, we have developed a precision phenotyping platform that combines various sensors for a non-invasive, high-throughput and high-dimensional phenotyping of small grain cereals. This platform yielded high prediction accuracies and heritabilities for biomass of triticale. Genetic variation for biomass accumulation was dissected with 647 doubled haploid lines derived from four families. Employing a genome-wide association mapping approach, two major quantitative trait loci (QTL) for biomass were identified and the genetic architecture of biomass accumulation was found to be characterized by dynamic temporal patterns. Our findings highlight the potential of precision phenotyping to assess the dynamic genetics of complex traits, especially those not amenable to traditional phenotyping.

  4. Changes in vegetation, peat properties and peat accumulation in Swedish peatlands as revealed by archive data.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoning, Kristian; Sohlenius, Gustav

    2016-04-01

    In this investigation we have studied patterns in peat accumulation and changes in mire status since the early 1900s for two areas in Sweden. In the early 1900s the Geological Survey of Sweden collected a vast amount of peat and peatland data, including information on vegetation and land-use. We have used this archive data to evaluate changes in mire vegetation, mire wetness and surface peat properties, rates of peat accumulation, succession in young wetlands and the effects of cultivation on peatlands. In total 156 mires in an uplift area of eastern middle Sweden were included in the data-set, including both pristine mires and peatlands used for agricultural purposes. In this area new peatlands have continuously been formed during the past 7 000 years making it possible to evaluate changes in peat accumulation over time. The other study area is situated in the south Swedish Uplands where we have revisited some larger bogs. The results from our investigation show that many of the peatlands have underwent major changes since the early 1900s. In most of the small peatlands we have found important changes in vegetation where mire vegetation has been replaced by nutrient demanding and/or dry species flora while the tree stand on large mires in south Sweden have increased. In some mires humification has increased in the uppermost peat-layers and the mire surface have become drier compared to the early 1900s. In eastern middle Sweden there are indications that the peat accumulation is lower 0,5 mm/year in older peatlands compared with younger ones 1,2 mm/year, although the mire vegetation in the older peatlands is dominated by sphagnum. The peat depth of the cultivated mires in this area shows a mean decrease of 40 cm since the early 1900s.

  5. First evidence of accumulation in cyanobacteria of guanidinoacetate, a precursor of the toxin cylindrospermopsin.

    PubMed

    Barón-Sola, Ángel; Sanz-Alférez, Soledad; del Campo, Francisca F

    2015-01-01

    Guanidinoacetate (GAA) is one of the most extensively studied toxic guanidine compounds. Changes in GAA can affect the nervous system and induce hyperhomocysteinemia, representing a risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. In cyanobacteria, GAA is thought to be an intermediate in the synthesis of the toxin cylindrospermopsin (CYN), one of the most common known cyanotoxins that affects multiple organs and functions in animals and plants. In spite of the evidence supporting GAA toxicity and its role in CYN synthesis, no data have been reported on the accumulation of GAA in any cyanobacterium. We have analyzed and compared the content of GAA in cultures of diverse cyanobacteria types, both cylindrospermopsin producing (CYN(+)) and not producing (CYN(-)). The results obtained show that GAA accumulates in the majority of the strains tested, although the highest content was found in one of the CYN(+) strain, Aphanizomenon ovalisporum UAM-MAO. In this strain, both GAA and CYN can be located within and out the cells. In conclusion, GAA appears to be a general cyanobacterial metabolite that due to its proven toxic should be considered when studying and managing cyanobacteria toxicity.

  6. The Nitrogen Legacy: Evidence of Soil Nitrogen Accumulation in Anthropogenic Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Meter, K. J.; Basu, N. B.

    2013-12-01

    Human modification of the nitrogen (N) cycle has resulted in increased flows of reactive N, with some suggesting that planetary boundaries for maintaining human and ecosystem health have been exceeded. Persistence of large hypoxic zones in inland and coastal waters created by elevated concentrations of nitrate is one of the most significant impacts of such increased flows. While the need to manage these flows and their associated ecological impacts is recognized, best management practices to reduce stream N concentrations have had only limited success. Some have attributed this lack of success to an accumulation of legacy N stores from decades of fertilizer application. Nitrogen mass balance studies seem to suggest an ongoing retention of N within anthropogenic landscapes, but the exact form and location of this legacy N and the associated retention rates are subject to question. Here we introduce an unprecedented analysis of long-term soil data from the Mississippi River Basin (MRB) revealing significant increases in total N (TN) content. We show that TN accumulation for the MRB accounts for 49% of net anthropogenic N inputs (NANI), which complements previous work indicating that approximately 25% of net inputs are lost as riverine output. These findings significantly reduce the uncertainty associated with basin-level N retention. Further, our results demonstrate that, despite conventional wisdom of intensive agriculture leading to a depletion of TN, an accumulation of N is occurring in the deeper subsurface (25 - 100 cm) that compensates for depletion in the plow layer (0-25 cm). These legacy N stores may lead to time lags between changes in management practices and decreasing N concentrations in stream waters, thus resulting in multidecadal effects on water quality in agricultural watersheds.

  7. Desiderata or Dogma: What the Evidence Reveals About Physician Attire

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Physician–patient interactions are complex and depend on multiple factors including common cultural definitions and evolving social norms. The once purely philosophical debate over what constitutes appropriate physician attire can benefit from a growing evidence base in the literature. Discussion Although this literature is commonly regarded as supporting traditional attire, the data actually represent a more balanced distribution of opinions held by patients and by physicians. Perhaps interpretations favoring a conservative approach are expected given the history and tradition of the physician–patient relationship. Conclusion Nevertheless, in the age of evidence-based medicine, it is difficult to argue against scrutiny of the available literature. Evidence that challenges the importance of traditional physician attire is reviewed. PMID:18286342

  8. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides. PMID:26754912

  9. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides.

  10. Flavone synthases from Lonicera japonica and L. macranthoides reveal differential flavone accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie; Wang, Xiao-Chen; Liu, Yang; Du, Hui; Shu, Qing-Yan; Su, Shang; Wang, Li-Jin; Li, Shan-Shan; Wang, Liang-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Flavones are important secondary metabolites found in many plants. In Lonicera species, flavones contribute both physiological and pharmaceutical properties. However, flavone synthase (FNS), the key enzyme responsible for flavone biosynthesis, has not yet been characterized in Lonicera species. In this study, FNSII genes were identified from Lonicera japonica Thunb. and L. macranthoides Hand.-Mazz. In the presence of NADPH, the recombinant cytochrome P450 proteins encoded by LjFNSII-1.1, LjFNSII-2.1, and LmFNSII-1.1 converted eriodictyol, naringenin, and liquiritigenin to the corresponding flavones directly. The different catalytic properties between LjFNSII-2.1 and LjFNSII-1.1 were caused by a single amino acid substitution at position 242 (glutamic acid to lysine). A methionine at position 206 and a leucine at position 381 contributed considerably to the high catalytic activity of LjFNSII-1.1. In addition, LjFNSII-1.1&2.1 and LmFNSII-1.1 also biosynthesize flavones that were further modified by O-glycosylation in transgenic tobacco. The expression levels of the FNSII genes were consistent with flavone accumulation patterns in flower buds. Our findings suggested that the weak catalytic activity of LmFNSII-1.1 and the relatively low expression of LmFNSII-1.1 in flowers might be responsible for the low levels of flavone accumulation in flower buds of L. macranthoides. PMID:26754912

  11. Evidence accumulation in decision making: unifying the "take the best" and the "rational" models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael D; Cummins, Tarrant D R

    2004-04-01

    An evidence accumulation model of forced-choice decision making is proposed to unify the fast and frugal take the best (TTB) model and the alternative rational (RAT) model with which it is usually contrasted. The basic idea is to treat the TTB model as a sequential-sampling process that terminates as soon as any evidence in favor of a decision is found and the rational approach as a sequential-sampling process that terminates only when all available information has been assessed. The unified TTB and RAT models were tested in an experiment in which participants learned to make correct judgments for a set of real-world stimuli on the basis of feedback, and were then asked to make additional judgments without feedback for cases in which the TTB and the rational models made different predictions. The results show that, in both experiments, there was strong intraparticipant consistency in the use of either the TTB or the rational model but large interparticipant differences in which model was used. The unified model is shown to be able to capture the differences in decision making across participants in an interpretable way and is preferred by the minimum description length model selection criterion.

  12. ART-EMAP: A neural network architecture for object recognition by evidence accumulation.

    PubMed

    Carpenter, G A; Ross, W D

    1995-01-01

    A new neural network architecture is introduced for the recognition of pattern classes after supervised and unsupervised learning. Applications include spatio-temporal image understanding and prediction and 3D object recognition from a series of ambiguous 2D views. The architecture, called ART-EMAP, achieves a synthesis of adaptive resonance theory (ART) and spatial and temporal evidence integration for dynamic predictive mapping (EMAP). ART-EMAP extends the capabilities of fuzzy ARTMAP in four incremental stages. Stage 1 introduces distributed pattern representation at a view category field. Stage 2 adds a decision criterion to the mapping between view and object categories, delaying identification of ambiguous objects when faced with a low confidence prediction. Stage 3 augments the system with a field where evidence accumulates in medium-term memory. Stage 4 adds an unsupervised learning process to fine-tune performance after the limited initial period of supervised network training. Each ART-EMAP stage is illustrated with a benchmark simulation example, using both noisy and noise-free data. PMID:18263371

  13. Comparative genome analysis of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans reveals its potential applications in lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Chen, Yue; Jin, Danfeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Trichosporon fermentans CICC 1368, which has been shown to accumulate cellular lipids efficiently using industry-agricultural wastes, was subjected to preliminary genome analysis, yielding a genome size of 31.3 million bases and 12,702 predicted protein-coding genes. Our analysis also showed a high degree of gene duplications and unique genes compared with those observed in other oleaginous yeasts, with 3-4-fold more genes related to fatty acid elongation and degradation compared with those in Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11 and Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122. Phylogenetic analysis with other oleaginous microbes suggested that the lipogenic capacity of T. fermentans was obtained during evolution after the divergence of genera. Thus, our study provided the first draft genome and comparative analysis of T. fermentans, laying the foundation for its genetic improvement to facilitate cost-effective lipid production. PMID:27664738

  14. Comparative genome analysis of the oleaginous yeast Trichosporon fermentans reveals its potential applications in lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qi; Chen, Yue; Jin, Danfeng; Lin, Hui; Wang, Qun; Zhao, Yu-Hua

    2016-11-01

    In this work, Trichosporon fermentans CICC 1368, which has been shown to accumulate cellular lipids efficiently using industry-agricultural wastes, was subjected to preliminary genome analysis, yielding a genome size of 31.3 million bases and 12,702 predicted protein-coding genes. Our analysis also showed a high degree of gene duplications and unique genes compared with those observed in other oleaginous yeasts, with 3-4-fold more genes related to fatty acid elongation and degradation compared with those in Rhodosporidium toruloides NP11 and Yarrowia lipolytica CLIB122. Phylogenetic analysis with other oleaginous microbes suggested that the lipogenic capacity of T. fermentans was obtained during evolution after the divergence of genera. Thus, our study provided the first draft genome and comparative analysis of T. fermentans, laying the foundation for its genetic improvement to facilitate cost-effective lipid production.

  15. Evidence for gas accumulation associated with diapirism and gas hydrates at the head of the Cape Fear Slide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmuck, E.A.; Paull, C.K.

    1993-01-01

    Single-channel seismic reflection profiles show evidence for areas of significant gas accumulation at the head of the Cape Fear Slide on the continental rise off North Carolina. Gas accumulation appears to occur beneath a gas hydrate seal in landward-dipping strata and in domed strata associated with diapirism. In addition, gas venting may have occurred near diapirs located at the head of the slide. ?? 1993 Springer-Verlag.

  16. A mutation accumulation assay reveals a broad capacity for rapid evolution of gene expression.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Scott A; Houle, David; Kim, Junhyong; White, Kevin P

    2005-11-10

    Mutation is the ultimate source of biological diversity because it generates the variation that fuels evolution. Gene expression is the first step by which an organism translates genetic information into developmental change. Here we estimate the rate at which mutation produces new variation in gene expression by measuring transcript abundances across the genome during the onset of metamorphosis in 12 initially identical Drosophila melanogaster lines that independently accumulated mutations for 200 generations. We find statistically significant mutational variation for 39% of the genome and a wide range of variability across corresponding genes. As genes are upregulated in development their variability decreases, and as they are downregulated it increases, indicating that developmental context affects the evolution of gene expression. A strong correlation between mutational variance and environmental variance shows that there is the potential for widespread canalization. By comparing the evolutionary rates that we report here with differences between species, we conclude that gene expression does not evolve according to strictly neutral models. Although spontaneous mutations have the potential to generate abundant variation in gene expression, natural variation is relatively constrained.

  17. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase.

  18. Proteomic analysis reveals dynamic regulation of fruit development and sugar and acid accumulation in apple.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjun; Li, Dongxia; Feng, Fengjuan; Zhang, Sheng; Ma, Fengwang; Cheng, Lailiang

    2016-09-01

    Understanding the fruit developmental process is critical for fruit quality improvement. Here, we report a comprehensive proteomic analysis of apple fruit development over five growth stages, from young fruit to maturity, coupled with metabolomic profiling. A tandem mass tag (TMT)-based comparative proteomics approach led to the identification and quantification of 7098 and 6247 proteins, respectively. This large-scale proteomic dataset presents a global view of the critical pathways involved in fruit development and metabolism. When linked with metabolomics data, these results provide new insights into the modulation of fruit development, the metabolism and storage of sugars and organic acids (mainly malate), and events within the energy-related pathways for respiration and glycolysis. We suggest that the key steps identified here (e.g. those involving the FK2, TST, EDR6, SPS, mtME and mtMDH switches), can be further targeted to confirm their roles in accumulation and balance of fructose, sucrose and malate. Moreover, our findings imply that the primary reason for decreases in amino acid concentrations during fruit development is related to a reduction in substrate flux via glycolysis, which is mainly regulated by fructose-bisphosphate aldolase and bisphosphoglycerate mutase. PMID:27535992

  19. A Large Accumulation of Avian Eggs from the Late Cretaceous of Patagonia (Argentina) Reveals a Novel Nesting Strategy in Mesozoic Birds

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Mariela S.; García, Rodolfo A.; Fiorelli, Lucas; Scolaro, Alejandro; Salvador, Rodrigo B.; Cotaro, Carlos N.; Kaiser, Gary W.; Dyke, Gareth J.

    2013-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a nesting colony of Mesozoic birds on Gondwana: a fossil accumulation in Late Cretaceous rocks mapped and collected from within the campus of the National University of Comahue, Neuquén City, Patagonia (Argentina). Here, Cretaceous ornithothoracine birds, almost certainly Enanthiornithes, nested in an arid, shallow basinal environment among sand dunes close to an ephemeral water-course. We mapped and collected 65 complete, near-complete, and broken eggs across an area of more than 55 m2. These eggs were laid either singly, or occasionally in pairs, onto a sandy substrate. All eggs were found apparently in, or close to, their original nest site; they all occur within the same bedding plane and may represent the product of a single nesting season or a short series of nesting attempts. Although there is no evidence for nesting structures, all but one of the Comahue eggs were half-buried upright in the sand with their pointed end downwards, a position that would have exposed the pole containing the air cell and precluded egg turning. This egg position is not seen in living birds, with the exception of the basal galliform megapodes who place their eggs within mounds of vegetation or burrows. This accumulation reveals a novel nesting behaviour in Mesozoic Aves that was perhaps shared with the non-avian and phylogenetically more basal troodontid theropods. PMID:23613776

  20. A large accumulation of avian eggs from the late cretaceous of patagonia (Argentina) reveals a novel nesting strategy in mesozoic birds.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Mariela S; García, Rodolfo A; Fiorelli, Lucas; Scolaro, Alejandro; Salvador, Rodrigo B; Cotaro, Carlos N; Kaiser, Gary W; Dyke, Gareth J

    2013-01-01

    We report the first evidence for a nesting colony of mesozoic birds on Gondwana: a fossil accumulation in Late Cretaceous rocks mapped and collected from within the campus of the National University of Comahue, Neuquén City, Patagonia (Argentina). Here, Cretaceous ornithothoracine birds, almost certainly Enanthiornithes, nested in an arid, shallow basinal environment among sand dunes close to an ephemeral water-course. We mapped and collected 65 complete, near-complete, and broken eggs across an area of more than 55 m(2). These eggs were laid either singly, or occasionally in pairs, onto a sandy substrate. All eggs were found apparently in, or close to, their original nest site; they all occur within the same bedding plane and may represent the product of a single nesting season or a short series of nesting attempts. Although there is no evidence for nesting structures, all but one of the Comahue eggs were half-buried upright in the sand with their pointed end downwards, a position that would have exposed the pole containing the air cell and precluded egg turning. This egg position is not seen in living birds, with the exception of the basal galliform megapodes who place their eggs within mounds of vegetation or burrows. This accumulation reveals a novel nesting behaviour in Mesozoic Aves that was perhaps shared with the non-avian and phylogenetically more basal troodontid theropods.

  1. Precision and neuronal dynamics in the human posterior parietal cortex during evidence accumulation

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas H.B.; Moran, Rosalyn J.; Friston, Karl J.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2015-01-01

    Primate studies show slow ramping activity in posterior parietal cortex (PPC) neurons during perceptual decision-making. These findings have inspired a rich theoretical literature to account for this activity. These accounts are largely unrelated to Bayesian theories of perception and predictive coding, a related formulation of perceptual inference in the cortical hierarchy. Here, we tested a key prediction of such hierarchical inference, namely that the estimated precision (reliability) of information ascending the cortical hierarchy plays a key role in determining both the speed of decision-making and the rate of increase of PPC activity. Using dynamic causal modelling of magnetoencephalographic (MEG) evoked responses, recorded during a simple perceptual decision-making task, we recover ramping-activity from an anatomically and functionally plausible network of regions, including early visual cortex, the middle temporal area (MT) and PPC. Precision, as reflected by the gain on pyramidal cell activity, was strongly correlated with both the speed of decision making and the slope of PPC ramping activity. Our findings indicate that the dynamics of neuronal activity in the human PPC during perceptual decision-making recapitulate those observed in the macaque, and in so doing we link observations from primate electrophysiology and human choice behaviour. Moreover, the synaptic gain control modulating these dynamics is consistent with predictive coding formulations of evidence accumulation. PMID:25512038

  2. Silica uptake by Spartina—evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a critical role in plant functional ecology, protecting plants from multiple environmental stressors. While all terrestrial plants contain some Si, wetland grasses are frequently found to have the highest concentrations, although the mechanisms driving Si accumulation in wetland grasses remain in large part uncertain. For example, active Si accumulation is often assumed to be responsible for elevated Si concentrations found in wetland grasses. However, life stage and differences in Si availability in the surrounding environment also appear to be important variables controlling the Si concentrations of wetland grasses. Here we used original data from five North American salt marshes, as well as all known published literature values, to examine the primary drivers of Si accumulation in Spartina, a genus of prolific salt marsh grasses found worldwide. We found evidence of multiple modes of Si accumulation in Spartina, with passive accumulation observed in non-degraded marshes where Spartina was native, while rejective accumulation was found in regions where Spartina was invasive. Evidence of active accumulation was found in only one marsh where Spartina was native, but was also subjected to nutrient over-enrichment. We developed a conceptual model which hypothesizes that the mode of Si uptake by Spartina is dependent on local environmental factors and genetic origin, supporting the idea that plant species should be placed along a spectrum of Si accumulation. We hypothesize that Spartina exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic plasticity with regard to Si accumulation, allowing these plants to respond to changes in marsh condition. These results provide new insight regarding how salt marsh ecosystems regulate Si exchange at the land-sea interface. PMID:24904599

  3. Activity in Inferior Parietal and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Signals the Accumulation of Evidence in a Probability Learning Task

    PubMed Central

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Fornari, Eleonora; Bossaerts, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In an uncertain environment, probabilities are key to predicting future events and making adaptive choices. However, little is known about how humans learn such probabilities and where and how they are encoded in the brain, especially when they concern more than two outcomes. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), young adults learned the probabilities of uncertain stimuli through repetitive sampling. Stimuli represented payoffs and participants had to predict their occurrence to maximize their earnings. Choices indicated loss and risk aversion but unbiased estimation of probabilities. BOLD response in medial prefrontal cortex and angular gyri increased linearly with the probability of the currently observed stimulus, untainted by its value. Connectivity analyses during rest and task revealed that these regions belonged to the default mode network. The activation of past outcomes in memory is evoked as a possible mechanism to explain the engagement of the default mode network in probability learning. A BOLD response relating to value was detected only at decision time, mainly in striatum. It is concluded that activity in inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortex reflects the amount of evidence accumulated in favor of competing and uncertain outcomes. PMID:23401673

  4. Transcriptomic analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans reveals metabolic insights into triacylglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The lack of sequenced genomes for oleaginous microalgae limits our understanding of the mechanisms these organisms utilize to become enriched in triglycerides. Here we report the de novo transcriptome assembly and quantitative gene expression analysis of the oleaginous microalga Neochloris oleoabundans, with a focus on the complex interaction of pathways associated with the production of the triacylglycerol (TAG) biofuel precursor. Results After growth under nitrogen replete and nitrogen limiting conditions, we quantified the cellular content of major biomolecules including total lipids, triacylglycerides, starch, protein, and chlorophyll. Transcribed genes were sequenced, the transcriptome was assembled de novo, and the expression of major functional categories, relevant pathways, and important genes was quantified through the mapping of reads to the transcriptome. Over 87 million, 77 base pair high quality reads were produced on the Illumina HiSeq sequencing platform. Metabolite measurements supported by genes and pathway expression results indicated that under the nitrogen-limiting condition, carbon is partitioned toward triglyceride production, which increased fivefold over the nitrogen-replete control. In addition to the observed overexpression of the fatty acid synthesis pathway, TAG production during nitrogen limitation was bolstered by repression of the β-oxidation pathway, up-regulation of genes encoding for the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex which funnels acetyl-CoA to lipid biosynthesis, activation of the pentose phosphate pathway to supply reducing equivalents to inorganic nitrogen assimilation and fatty acid biosynthesis, and the up-regulation of lipases—presumably to reconstruct cell membranes in order to supply additional fatty acids for TAG biosynthesis. Conclusions Our quantitative transcriptome study reveals a broad overview of how nitrogen stress results in excess TAG production in N. oleoabundans, and provides a variety of genetic

  5. Ice core evidence for a recent increase in snow accumulation in coastal Dronning Maud Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philippe, Morgane; Tison, Jean-Louis; Fjøsne, Karen; Hubbard, Bryn; Kjær, Helle Astrid; Lenaerts, Jan; Sheldon, Simon Geoffrey; De Bondt, Kevin; Claeys, Philippe; Pattyn, Frank

    2016-04-01

    Ice cores provide temporal records of snow accumulation, a crucial component of Antarctic mass balance. Coastal areas are particularly under-represented in such records, despite their relatively high and sensitive accumulation rates. Here we present records from a 120 m ice core drilled on Derwael Ice Rise, coastal Dronning Maud Land (DML), East Antarctica in 2012. We date the ice core bottom back to 1745 ± 2 AD. δ18O and δD stratigraphy is supplemented by discontinuous major ion profiles, and verified independently by electrical conductivity measurements (ECM) to detect volcanic horizons. The resulting annual layer history is combined with the core density profile to calculate accumulation history, corrected for the influence of ice deformation. The mean long-term accumulation is 0.425 ± 0.035 m water equivalent (w.e.) a-1 (average corrected value). Reconstructed annual accumulation rates show an increase from 1955 onward to a mean value of 0.61 ± 0.02 m w.e. a-1 between 1955 and 2012. This trend is compared to other reported accumulation data in Antarctica, generally showing a high spatial variability. Applying the Community Earth System Model demonstrated that sea ice and atmosphere patterns largely explain the accumulation variability. This is the first and longest record from a coastal ice core in East Antarctica showing a steady increase during the 20th and 21st centuries, thereby confirming modelling predictions.

  6. Crustal strain accumulation on Southern Basin and Range Province faults modulated by distant plate boundary earthquakes? Evidence from geodesy, seismic imaging, and paleoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Shirzaei, M.; Broermann, J.; Spinler, J. C.; Holland, A. A.; Pearthree, P.

    2014-12-01

    GPS in Arizona reveals a change in the pattern of crustal strain accumulation in 2010 and based on viscoelastic modeling appears to be associated with the distant M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja California, Mexico. GPS data collected between 1999 and 2009 near the Santa Rita normal fault in SE Arizona reveal a narrow zone of crustal deformation coincident with the fault trace, delineated by W-NW facing Pleistocene fault scarps of heights 1 to 7 m. The apparent deformation zone is also seen in a preliminary InSAR interferogram. Total motion across the zone inferred using an elastic block model constrained by the pre-2010 GPS measurements is ~1 mm/yr in a sense consistent with normal fault motion. However, continuous GPS measurements throughout Arizona reveal pronounced changes in crustal velocity following the EMC earthquake, such that the relative motion across the Santa Rita fault post-2010 is negligible. Paleoseismic evidence indicates that mapped Santa Rita fault scarps were formed by two or more large magnitude (M6.7 to M7.6) surface rupturing normal-faulting earthquakes 60 to 100 kyrs ago. Seismic refraction and reflection data constrained by deep (~800 m) well log data provide evidence of progressive, possibly intermittent, displacement on the fault through time. The rate of strain accumulation observed geodetically prior to 2010, if constant over the past 60 to 100 kyrs, would imply an untenable minimum slip rate deficit of 60 to 100 m since the most recent earthquake. One explanation for the available geodetic, seismic, and paleoseismic evidence is that strain accumulation is modulated by viscoelastic relaxation associated with frequent large magnitude earthquakes in the Salton Trough region, episodically inhibiting the accumulation of elastic strain required to generate large earthquakes on the Santa Rita and possibly other faults in the Southern Basin and Range. An important question is thus for how long the postseismic velocity changes

  7. Experimental evidence for the accumulation of egg pigment in the brain cavities of Xenopus tadpoles.

    PubMed

    Kordylewski, L

    1983-07-01

    The origin and fate of darkly pigmented clusters of cells that float freely in the brain cavities of the tadpoles of Xenopus laevis have been experimentally investigated. The results point to the conclusion that the clusters are the sites of egg pigment accumulation, which remain within the brain cavities or at its walls until metamorphosis.

  8. Metabolomics analysis reveals 6‐benzylaminopurine as a stimulator for improving lipid and DHA accumulation of Aurantiochytriumsp.

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xin‐Jun; Sun, Jie; Zheng, Jian‐Yong; Sun, Ya‐Qi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract BACKGROUND Phytohormones are chemical messengers that have a positive effect on biodiesel production of microalgae at low concentrations. However, the effect of phytohormone 6‐benzylaminopurine on lipid and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) production in marine DHA‐producer Aurantiochytrium has never been reported. In this study, a GC‐MS‐based metabolomics method combined with a multivariate analysis is applied to reveal the metabolic mechanism of 6‐benzylaminopurine enhancing production of lipid and DHA in Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70. RESULTS In total, 71 metabolites were identified by GC‐MS. The PCA model revealed that 76.9% of metabolite variation was related to 6‐benzylaminopurine treatment, and overall metabolomics profiles between the 6‐benzylaminopurine and control groups were clearly discriminated. Forty‐six metabolites identified by the PLS‐DA model were responsible for responding to 6‐benzylaminopurine. Metabolic analysis showed that 6‐benzylaminopurine could accelerate the rate of utilization of glucose in Aurantiochytrium sp. YLH70, and the metabolic flux from glycolysis, TCA cycle and mevalonate pathway to fatty acids biosynthesis was promoted. Moreover, the anti‐stress mechanism in Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70 might be induced by 6‐benzylaminopurine. CONCLUSION Metabolomics is a suitable tool to discover the metabolic mechanism for improving lipid and DHA accumulation in a microorganism. 6‐benzylaminopurine has the potential to stimulate lipid and DHA production of Aurantiochytrium sp.YLH70 for industrial purposes. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Chemical Technology & Biotechnology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Society of Chemical Industry. PMID:27065509

  9. Analysis of storage lipid accumulation in Alcanivorax borkumensis: Evidence for alternative triacylglycerol biosynthesis routes in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kalscheuer, Rainer; Stöveken, Tim; Malkus, Ursula; Reichelt, Rudolf; Golyshin, Peter N; Sabirova, Julia S; Ferrer, Manuel; Timmis, Kenneth N; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2007-02-01

    Marine hydrocarbonoclastic bacteria, like Alcanivorax borkumensis, play a globally important role in bioremediation of petroleum oil contamination in marine ecosystems. Accumulation of storage lipids, serving as endogenous carbon and energy sources during starvation periods, might be a potential adaptation mechanism for coping with nutrient limitation, which is a frequent stress factor challenging those bacteria in their natural marine habitats. Here we report on the analysis of storage lipid biosynthesis in A. borkumensis strain SK2. Triacylglycerols (TAGs) and wax esters (WEs), but not poly(hydroxyalkanoic acids), are the principal storage lipids present in this and other hydrocarbonoclastic bacterial species. Although so far assumed to be a characteristic restricted to gram-positive actinomycetes, substantial accumulation of TAGs corresponding to a fatty acid content of more than 23% of the cellular dry weight is the first characteristic of large-scale de novo TAG biosynthesis in a gram-negative bacterium. The acyltransferase AtfA1 (ABO_2742) exhibiting wax ester synthase/acyl-coenzyme A:diacylglycerol acyltransferase (WS/DGAT) activity plays a key role in both TAG and WE biosynthesis, whereas AtfA2 (ABO_1804) was dispensable for storage lipid formation. However, reduced but still substantial residual TAG levels in atfA1 and atfA2 knockout mutants compellingly indicate the existence of a yet unknown WS/DGAT-independent alternative TAG biosynthesis route. Storage lipids of A. borkumensis were enriched in saturated fatty acids and accumulated as insoluble intracytoplasmic inclusions exhibiting great structural variety. Storage lipid accumulation provided only a slight growth advantage during short-term starvation periods but was not required for maintaining viability and long-term persistence during extended starvation phases. PMID:17122340

  10. Demise of reef-flat carbonate accumulation with late Holocene sea-level fall: Evidence from Molokai, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Engels, M.S.; Fletcher, C.H.; Field, M.; Conger, C.L.; Bochicchio, C.

    2008-01-01

    Twelve cores from the protected reef-flat of Molokai revealed that carbonate sediment accumulation, ranging from 3 mm year-1 to less than 1 mm year-1, ended on average 2,500 years ago. Modern sediment is present as a mobile surface veneer but is not trapped within the reef framework. This finding is consistent with the arrest of deposition at the end of the mid-Holocene highstand, known locally as the "Kapapa Stand of the Sea," ???2 m above the present datum ca. 3,500 years ago in the main Hawaiian Islands. Subsequent erosion, non-deposition, and/or a lack of rigid binding were probable factors leading to the lack of reef-flat accumulation during the late Holocene sea-level fall. Given anticipated climate changes, increased sedimentation of reef-flat environments is to be expected as a consequence of higher sea level. ?? 2008 Springer-Verlag.

  11. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  12. Evidence for accumulation of Synechococcus elongatus (Cyanobacteria: Cyanophyceae) in the tissues of the oyster Crassostrea gigas (Mollusca: Bivalvia).

    PubMed

    Avila-Poveda, Omar Hernando; Torres-Ariño, Alejandra; Girón-Cruz, Diego Ademir; Cuevas-Aguirre, Angel

    2014-10-01

    Cyanobacteria appear to have direct relations with mollusks in several aspects. This is the first time, distinguishing Gram-negative cyanoprokaryotic Synechococcus elongatus as bright yellow-gold autofluorescence by Lillie's and Hiss' staining methods on paraffin-embedded tissues of Crassostrea gigas. Three diets: cyanoprokaryotes, cyanoprokaryotes with microalgae, and only microalgae were evaluated. Cyanoprokaryotes were intact, densely bundled, and immersed in the cytosol of the digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad of C. gigas, revealing an accumulation systemic without tissue damage observed by histology. Unexpectedly, cyanoprokaryotes were slightly most accumulated with microalgae diet by each of the tissues of the C. gigas than with any other diets. Cyanoprokaryotes tend to be in mean slightly higher in the digestive gland than in any other tissues respectively for each diet, although these values are closely similar to connective tissue. A possible order of exposure of the oyster tissues to accumulation of cyanoprokaryotes was digestive gland, connective tissue, mantle, and gonad. Thereby, the digestive gland could be the major target tissue for the accumulation. Our observations provide a valuable insight regarding the ability of cyanoprokaryotes to penetrate, spread, and remain inside the oyster tissues, suggesting for S. elongatus: (1) a pre-accumulation in oyster tissues from the natural environment, (2) a phagocytosis and/or endocytosis process rather than ingestion and extracellular digestion, (3) an apparent cellular division in the cytosol of oyster tissues, (4) an apparent inter-tissue movement, and (5) a possible endosymbiosis between C. gigas and S. elongatus. Hereby, it is possible that S. elongatus have a well-developed host-endobiont relationship with oysters, and thereby support future work toward a description of the escape and spreading mechanisms of S. elongatus inside the tissues of mollusks, and put forward questions as

  13. Lifespan mercury accumulation pattern in Liza aurata : Evidence from two southern European estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavares, S.; Oliveira, H.; Coelho, J. P.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, A. C.; Pardal, M. A.

    2011-10-01

    Mercury accumulation throughout the lifespan of Liza aurata (Risso, 1810) was analysed in four tissues (muscle, gills, liver and brain) in two southern European coastal ecosystems with distinct mercury contamination. Specimens from four to five age classes were captured in two sampling sites in the Ria de Aveiro (Laranjo bay and Mira), a system historically contaminated by industrial mercury, and in one site in the Mondego estuary, assumed as a mercury-free ecosystem. Mercury concentration in all tissues was found to be significantly higher in the Ria de Aveiro (Laranjo bay) compared to the Mondego, in accordance with the environmental contamination (water, sediments and suspended particulate matter). Significant differences inside the Ria de Aveiro (between the Mira and Laranjo bay) were only detected in the liver. This tissue registered the highest levels of mercury (ranging from 0.11 to 4.2 μg g -1 ) in all sampling sites, followed by muscle, brain, and gills. In all sampling sites and tissues was denoted a mercury dilution pattern along the lifecycle (except in liver at the Mondego, the reference area where the concentrations are always very low). An exponential trend was found in the metal age variation patterns in Laranjo (the most contaminated area) and a linear trend in the Mira and the Mondego (the least contaminated areas). Organic mercury concentration in muscle generally accounted for over 95% of total mercury concentration, and followed the same accumulation pattern of total mercury. This fish species is of lesser importance in mercury transfer to adjacent coastal areas and although the consumption of fish from Laranjo may present some risk for the humans, this risk decreases with fish age/size.

  14. First evidence of accumulation of mega boulders on the Mediterranean rocky coast of Provence (southern France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vella, C.; Demory, F.; Canut, V.; Dussouillez, P.; Fleury, T. J.

    2011-03-01

    An accumulation of boulders was recently discovered along the rocky coast of the Gulf of Fos located in Provence, in an area exposed to a south-westerly wave regime. The coast around this locality forms the western extremity of the calcareous Nerthe range between Marseille and the Rhône Delta. Several mega blocks are scattered to a distance of 30 m behind the coast line. The largest block (33.5 tonnes) has been transported about 39 m inland, up to about 2 m a.s.l. On the Mediterranean coast, the origin of such blocks is often attributed to tsunami-generated waves, but in the case examined here, although the origin is unclear, the differences in surface state between boulders indicates several events generated by south-westerly storms. Radiocarbon dating on several different shells collected from seven different boulders yields a wide dispersion of ages ranging from 4000 BP to the Modern Period. The differences in surface appearance, as well as the differences of fauna conservation and surface coloration, in some cases in a very fresh state, along with the dispersion of radiocarbon ages, suggest that historic storm events have affected these megablocks.

  15. No Evidence of Elevated Germline Mutation Accumulation Under Oxidative Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Bean, Laura C.; Richardson, Heidi L.; Sammeli, Tammy; Baer, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in rates of molecular evolution has been attributed to numerous, interrelated causes, including metabolic rate, body size, and generation time. Speculation concerning the influence of metabolic rate on rates of evolution often invokes the putative mutagenic effects of oxidative stress. To isolate the effects of oxidative stress on the germline from the effects of metabolic rate, generation time, and other factors, we allowed mutations to accumulate under relaxed selection for 125 generations in two strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the canonical wild-type strain (N2) and a mutant strain with elevated steady-state oxidative stress (mev-1). Contrary to our expectation, the mutational decline in fitness did not differ between N2 and mev-1. This result suggests that the mutagenic effects of oxidative stress in C. elegans are minor relative to the effects of other types of mutations, such as errors during DNA replication. However, mev-1 MA lines did go extinct more frequently than wild-type lines; some possible explanations for the difference in extinction rate are discussed. PMID:21979932

  16. Eye-hand coordination during a double-step task: evidence for a common stochastic accumulator.

    PubMed

    Gopal, Atul; Murthy, Aditya

    2015-09-01

    Many studies of reaching and pointing have shown significant spatial and temporal correlations between eye and hand movements. Nevertheless, it remains unclear whether these correlations are incidental, arising from common inputs (independent model); whether these correlations represent an interaction between otherwise independent eye and hand systems (interactive model); or whether these correlations arise from a single dedicated eye-hand system (common command model). Subjects were instructed to redirect gaze and pointing movements in a double-step task in an attempt to decouple eye-hand movements and causally distinguish between the three architectures. We used a drift-diffusion framework in the context of a race model, which has been previously used to explain redirect behavior for eye and hand movements separately, to predict the pattern of eye-hand decoupling. We found that the common command architecture could best explain the observed frequency of different eye and hand response patterns to the target step. A common stochastic accumulator for eye-hand coordination also predicts comparable variances, despite significant difference in the means of the eye and hand reaction time (RT) distributions, which we tested. Consistent with this prediction, we observed that the variances of the eye and hand RTs were similar, despite much larger hand RTs (∼90 ms). Moreover, changes in mean eye RTs, which also increased eye RT variance, produced a similar increase in mean and variance of the associated hand RT. Taken together, these data suggest that a dedicated circuit underlies coordinated eye-hand planning.

  17. Error awareness revisited: accumulation of multimodal evidence from central and autonomic nervous systems.

    PubMed

    Wessel, Jan R; Danielmeier, Claudia; Ullsperger, Markus

    2011-10-01

    The differences between erroneous actions that are consciously perceived as errors and those that go unnoticed have recently become an issue in the field of performance monitoring. In EEG studies, error awareness has been suggested to influence the error positivity (Pe) of the response-locked event-related brain potential, a positive voltage deflection prominent approximately 300 msec after error commission, whereas the preceding error-related negativity (ERN) seemed to be unaffected by error awareness. Erroneous actions, in general, have been shown to promote several changes in ongoing autonomic nervous system (ANS) activity, yet such investigations have only rarely taken into account the question of subjective error awareness. In the first part of this study, heart rate, pupillometry, and EEG were recorded during an antisaccade task to measure autonomic arousal and activity of the CNS separately for perceived and unperceived errors. Contrary to our expectations, we observed differences in both Pe and ERN with respect to subjective error awareness. This was replicated in a second experiment, using a modified version of the same task. In line with our predictions, only perceived errors provoke the previously established post-error heart rate deceleration. Also, pupil size yields a more prominent dilatory effect after an erroneous saccade, which is also significantly larger for perceived than unperceived errors. On the basis of the ERP and ANS results as well as brain-behavior correlations, we suggest a novel interpretation of the implementation and emergence of error awareness in the brain. In our framework, several systems generate input signals (e.g., ERN, sensory input, proprioception) that influence the emergence of error awareness, which is then accumulated and presumably reflected in later potentials, such as the Pe.

  18. Using Time-Varying Evidence to Test Models of Decision Dynamics: Bounded Diffusion vs. the Leaky Competing Accumulator Model.

    PubMed

    Tsetsos, Konstantinos; Gao, Juan; McClelland, James L; Usher, Marius

    2012-01-01

    When people make decisions, do they give equal weight to evidence arriving at different times? A recent study (Kiani et al., 2008) using brief motion pulses (superimposed on a random moving dot display) reported a primacy effect: pulses presented early in a motion observation period had a stronger impact than pulses presented later. This observation was interpreted as supporting the bounded diffusion (BD) model and ruling out models in which evidence accumulation is subject to leakage or decay of early-arriving information. We use motion pulses and other manipulations of the timing of the perceptual evidence in new experiments and simulations that support the leaky competing accumulator (LCA) model as an alternative to the BD model. While the LCA does include leakage, we show that it can exhibit primacy as a result of competition between alternatives (implemented via mutual inhibition), when the inhibition is strong relative to the leak. Our experiments replicate the primacy effect when participants must be prepared to respond quickly at the end of a motion observation period. With less time pressure, however, the primacy effect is much weaker. For 2 (out of 10) participants, a primacy bias observed in trials where the motion observation period is short becomes weaker or reverses (becoming a recency effect) as the observation period lengthens. Our simulation studies show that primacy is equally consistent with the LCA or with BD. The transition from primacy-to-recency can also be captured by the LCA but not by BD. Individual differences and relations between the LCA and other models are discussed.

  19. Nitrogen starvation-induced accumulation of triacylglycerol in the green algae: evidence for a role for ROC40, a transcription factor involved in circadian rhythm.

    PubMed

    Goncalves, Elton C; Koh, Jin; Zhu, Ning; Yoo, Mi-Jeong; Chen, Sixue; Matsuo, Takuya; Johnson, Jodie V; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2016-03-01

    Microalgal triacylglycerol (TAG), a promising source of biofuel, is induced upon nitrogen starvation (-N), but the proteins and genes involved in this process are poorly known. We performed isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics to identify Chlorella proteins with modulated expression under short-term -N. Out of 1736 soluble proteins and 2187 membrane-associated proteins identified, 288 and 56, respectively, were differentially expressed under -N. Gene expression analysis on select genes confirmed the same direction of mRNA modulation for most proteins. The MYB-related transcription factor ROC40 was the most induced protein, with a 9.6-fold increase upon -N. In a previously generated Chlamydomonas mutant, gravimetric measurements of crude total lipids revealed that roc40 was impaired in its ability to increase the accumulation of TAG upon -N, and this phenotype was complemented when wild-type Roc40 was expressed. Results from radiotracer experiments were consistent with the roc40 mutant being comparable to the wild type in recycling membrane lipids to TAG but being impaired in additional de novo synthesis of TAG during -N stress. In this study we provide evidence to support the hypothesis that transcription factor ROC40 has a role in -N-induced lipid accumulation, and uncover multiple previously unknown proteins modulated by short-term -N in green algae. PMID:26920093

  20. Geochemical evidence for modern sediment accumulation on the continental shelf off southern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bothner, Michael H.; Spiker, E. C.; Johnson, P. P.; Rendigs, R. R.; Aruscavage, P. J.

    1981-01-01

    An area of fine-grained sediment approximately 170 km x 74 km in size, located in water depths between 60 m and 150 m, south of Martha's Vineyard, Mass., is a site of modern sediment deposition. The 14C ages systematically increase with sediment depth from about 1,300 years B.P. at the surface to 8,000-10,000 years B.P. at the depth of maximum core penetration. The old age for the surface sediments probably results from a combination of deposition of old carbon and faunal mixing. In the finest sediments, the sedimentation rates were approximately 130 cm/1,000 yrs when deposition began and have decreased to about 25 cm/1,000 yrs. The decreasing sedimentation rate reflects a diminishing source of fine sediments, which presumably came from the Georges Bank and Nantucket Shoals area. Inventories of excess 210Pb in undisturbed cores average 70 dpm/cm2 (disintegrations per minute per square centimeter), more than two times higher than the flux of 210Pb from the atmosphere and from 226Ra decay in the overlying water. This additional influx of 210Pb either must be with new fine-grained sediment material or from solutions that are stripped of their 210Pb by particulates in the bottom nepheloid layer. Stable Pb concentrations in surface sediments are about 28 ppm, as much as two times higher than concentrations at depth. The high accumulation rates, 210Pb inventories, and trace-metal profiles imply that this area is a modern sink for fine-grained sediments and for pollutants associated with particulate matter in the water column. To our knowledge, this is the only site of present-day natural deposition on the Continental Shelf off the eastern United States, exclusive of the Gulf of Maine. Because the net currents on the outer half of this Continental Shelf flow from northeast to southwest, this fine-grained deposit may receive its sediments and possible contaminants from the Nantucket Shoals and Georges Bank regions.

  1. Analysis of Strains Lacking Known Osmolyte Accumulation Mechanisms Reveals Contributions of Osmolytes and Transporters to Protection against Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Lindsay; Burke, Tangi; Coumoundouros, Chelsea; Culham, Doreen E.; Deutch, Charles E.; Ellinger, James; Kerr, Craig H.; Plater, Samantha M.; To, Eric; Wright, Geordie

    2014-01-01

    Osmolyte accumulation and release can protect cells from abiotic stresses. In Escherichia coli, known mechanisms mediate osmotic stress-induced accumulation of K+ glutamate, trehalose, or zwitterions like glycine betaine. Previous observations suggested that additional osmolyte accumulation mechanisms (OAMs) exist and their impacts may be abiotic stress specific. Derivatives of the uropathogenic strain CFT073 and the laboratory strain MG1655 lacking known OAMs were created. CFT073 grew without osmoprotectants in minimal medium with up to 0.9 M NaCl. CFT073 and its OAM-deficient derivative grew equally well in high- and low-osmolality urine pools. Urine-grown bacteria did not accumulate large amounts of known or novel osmolytes. Thus, CFT073 showed unusual osmotolerance and did not require osmolyte accumulation to grow in urine. Yeast extract and brain heart infusion stimulated growth of the OAM-deficient MG1655 derivative at high salinity. Neither known nor putative osmoprotectants did so. Glutamate and glutamine accumulated after growth with either organic mixture, and no novel osmolytes were detected. MG1655 derivatives retaining individual OAMs were created. Their abilities to mediate osmoprotection were compared at 15°C, 37°C without or with urea, and 42°C. Stress protection was not OAM specific, and variations in osmoprotectant effectiveness were similar under all conditions. Glycine betaine and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) were the most effective. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) was a weak osmoprotectant and a particularly effective urea protectant. The effectiveness of glycine betaine, TMAO, and proline as osmoprotectants correlated with their preferential exclusion from protein surfaces, not with their propensity to prevent protein denaturation. Thus, their effectiveness as stress protectants correlated with their ability to rehydrate the cytoplasm. PMID:24951793

  2. Target blood pressure in diabetes patients with hypertension--what is the accumulated evidence in 2011?

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Peter M

    2011-08-01

    There is overwhelming evidence that hypertension is an important risk factor for both macrovascular and microvascular complications in patients with diabetes, but the problem remains to identify appropriate goals for preventive therapies. A number of guidelines (the European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) 2007, the Joint National Committee (JNC)-VII 2003, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) 2011) have for example advocated a blood pressure goal of less than 130/80 mmHg, but this suggestion has been challenged by findings in recent trials and meta-analyses (2011). The European Society of Hypertension (ESH) therefore recommends a systolic blood pressure goal of "well below" 140 mmHg. Based on evidence from both randomized controlled trials (hypertension optimal treatment (HOT), action in diabetes and vascular disease: preterax and diamicron MR controlled evaluation (ADVANCE), action to control cardiovascular risk in diabetes (ACCORD)) and observational studies (ongoing telmisartan alone and in combination with ramipril global endpoint trial (ONTARGET), international verapamil-trandolapril study (INVEST), treat to new targets (TNT), and the National Diabetes Register (NDR)), it has been shown that the benefit for stroke reduction remains even at lower achieved blood pressure levels, but the risk of coronary events may be uninfluenced or even increased at lower systolic blood pressure levels. In a recent meta-analysis, it was therefore concluded that the new recommended goal should be 130-135 mmHg systolic blood pressure for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Other risk factors should also be controlled with a more ambitious strategy applied in the younger patients with shorter diabetes duration, but a more cautious approach in the elderly and frail patients with a number of vascular or non-vascular co-morbidities. In patients from East Asia, such as China, the stroke risk is relatively higher than the risk of

  3. Accumulating evidence supports a taste component for free fatty acids in humans.

    PubMed

    Mattes, Richard D

    2011-09-26

    The requisite criteria for what constitutes a taste primary have not been established. Recent advances in understanding of the mechanisms and functions of taste have prompted suggestions for an expanded list of unique taste sensations, including fat, or more specifically, free fatty acids (FFA). A set of criteria are proposed here and the data related to FFA are reviewed on each point. It is concluded that the data are moderate to strong that there are: A) adaptive advantages to FFA detection in the oral cavity; B) adequate concentrations of FFA to serve as taste stimuli; C) multiple complimentary putative FFA receptors on taste cells; D) signals generated by FFA that are conveyed by gustatory nerves; E) sensations generated by FFA that can be detected and scaled by psychophysical methods in humans when non-gustatory cues are masked; and F) physiological responses to oral fat/FFA exposure. On no point is there strong evidence challenging these observations. The reviewed findings are suggestive, albeit not definitive, that there is a taste component for FFA.

  4. Accumulating Evidence Supports a Taste Component for Free Fatty Acids in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Mattes, Richard D.

    2011-01-01

    The requisite criteria for what constitutes a taste primary have not been established. Recent advances in understanding of the mechanisms and functions of taste have prompted suggestions for an expanded list of unique taste sensations, including fat, or more specifically, free fatty acids (FFA). A set of criteria are proposed here and the data related to FFA are reviewed on each point. It is concluded that the data are moderate to strong that there are: A) adaptive advantages to FFA detection in the oral cavity; B) adequate concentrations of FFA to serve as taste stimuli; C) multiple complimentary putative FFA receptors on taste cells; D) signals generated by FFA that are conveyed by gustatory nerves; E) sensations generated by FFA that can be detected and scaled by psychophysical methods in humans when non-gustatory cues are masked; and F) physiological responses to oral fat/FFA exposure. On no point is there strong evidence challenging these observations. The reviewed findings are suggestive, albeit not definitive, that there is a taste component for FFA. PMID:21557960

  5. On the Dissociation of Word/Nonword Repetition Effects in Lexical Decision: An Evidence Accumulation Account.

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Marcet, Ana; Vergara-Martínez, Marta; Gomez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A number of models of visual-word recognition assume that the repetition of an item in a lexical decision experiment increases that item's familiarity/wordness. This would produce not only a facilitative repetition effect for words, but also an inhibitory effect for nonwords (i.e., more familiarity/wordness makes the negative decision slower). We conducted a two-block lexical decision experiment to examine word/nonword repetition effects in the framework of a leading "familiarity/wordness" model of the lexical decision task, namely, the diffusion model (Ratcliff et al., 2004). Results showed that while repeated words were responded to faster than the unrepeated words, repeated nonwords were responded to more slowly than the nonrepeated nonwords. Fits from the diffusion model revealed that the repetition effect for words/nonwords was mainly due to differences in the familiarity/wordness (drift rate) parameter. This word/nonword dissociation favors those accounts that posit that the previous presentation of an item increases its degree of familiarity/wordness.

  6. On the Dissociation of Word/Nonword Repetition Effects in Lexical Decision: An Evidence Accumulation Account

    PubMed Central

    Perea, Manuel; Marcet, Ana; Vergara-Martínez, Marta; Gomez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A number of models of visual-word recognition assume that the repetition of an item in a lexical decision experiment increases that item's familiarity/wordness. This would produce not only a facilitative repetition effect for words, but also an inhibitory effect for nonwords (i.e., more familiarity/wordness makes the negative decision slower). We conducted a two-block lexical decision experiment to examine word/nonword repetition effects in the framework of a leading “familiarity/wordness” model of the lexical decision task, namely, the diffusion model (Ratcliff et al., 2004). Results showed that while repeated words were responded to faster than the unrepeated words, repeated nonwords were responded to more slowly than the nonrepeated nonwords. Fits from the diffusion model revealed that the repetition effect for words/nonwords was mainly due to differences in the familiarity/wordness (drift rate) parameter. This word/nonword dissociation favors those accounts that posit that the previous presentation of an item increases its degree of familiarity/wordness. PMID:26925021

  7. On the Dissociation of Word/Nonword Repetition Effects in Lexical Decision: An Evidence Accumulation Account.

    PubMed

    Perea, Manuel; Marcet, Ana; Vergara-Martínez, Marta; Gomez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    A number of models of visual-word recognition assume that the repetition of an item in a lexical decision experiment increases that item's familiarity/wordness. This would produce not only a facilitative repetition effect for words, but also an inhibitory effect for nonwords (i.e., more familiarity/wordness makes the negative decision slower). We conducted a two-block lexical decision experiment to examine word/nonword repetition effects in the framework of a leading "familiarity/wordness" model of the lexical decision task, namely, the diffusion model (Ratcliff et al., 2004). Results showed that while repeated words were responded to faster than the unrepeated words, repeated nonwords were responded to more slowly than the nonrepeated nonwords. Fits from the diffusion model revealed that the repetition effect for words/nonwords was mainly due to differences in the familiarity/wordness (drift rate) parameter. This word/nonword dissociation favors those accounts that posit that the previous presentation of an item increases its degree of familiarity/wordness. PMID:26925021

  8. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent “Pimonidazole” in Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  9. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport–independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein–tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia. PMID:26631555

  10. Accumulation of polyunsaturated aldehydes in the gonads of the copepod Acartia tonsa revealed by tailored fluorescent probes.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Stefanie; Nejstgaard, Jens C; Pohnert, Georg

    2014-01-01

    Polyunsaturated aldehydes (PUAs) are released by several diatom species during predation. Besides other attributed activities, these oxylipins can interfere with the reproduction of copepods, important predators of diatoms. While intensive research has been carried out to document the effects of PUAs on copepod reproduction, little is known about the underlying mechanistic aspects of PUA action. Especially PUA uptake and accumulation in copepods has not been addressed to date. To investigate how PUAs are taken up and interfere with the reproduction in copepods we developed a fluorescent probe containing the α,β,γ,δ-unsaturated aldehyde structure element that is essential for the activity of PUAs as well as a set of control probes. We developed incubation and monitoring procedures for adult females of the calanoid copepod Acartia tonsa and show that the PUA derived fluorescent molecular probe selectively accumulates in the gonads of this copepod. In contrast, a saturated aldehyde derived probe of an inactive parent molecule was enriched in the lipid sac. This leads to a model for PUAs' teratogenic mode of action involving accumulation and covalent interaction with nucleophilic moieties in the copepod reproductive tissue. The teratogenic effect of PUAs can therefore be explained by a selective targeting of the molecules into the reproductive tissue of the herbivores, while more lipophilic but otherwise strongly related structures end up in lipid bodies.

  11. Imaging Mass Spectrometry Revealed the Accumulation Characteristics of the 2-Nitroimidazole-Based Agent "Pimonidazole" in Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Yukiko; Shimizu, Yoichi; Yoshioka, Takeshi; Feng, Fei; Zhao, Songji; Higashino, Kenichi; Numata, Yoshito; Kuge, Yuji

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia, or low oxygen concentration, is a key factor promoting tumor progression and angiogenesis and resistance of cancer to radiotherapy and chemotherapy. 2-Nitroimidazole-based agents have been widely used in pathological and nuclear medicine examinations to detect hypoxic regions in tumors; in particular, pimonidazole is used for histochemical staining of hypoxic regions. It is considered to accumulate in hypoxic cells via covalent binding with macromolecules or by forming reductive metabolites after reduction of its nitro group. However, the detailed mechanism of its accumulation remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the accumulation mechanism of pimonidazole in hypoxic tumor tissues in a mouse model by mass spectrometric analyses including imaging mass spectrometry (IMS). Pimonidazole and its reductive metabolites were observed in the tumor tissues. However, their locations in the tumor sections were not similar to the positively stained areas in pimonidazole-immunohistochemistry, an area considered hypoxic. The glutathione conjugate of reduced pimonidazole, a low-molecular-weight metabolite of pimonidazole, was found in tumor tissues by LC-MS analysis, and our IMS study determined that the intratumor localization of the glutathione conjugate was consistent with the area positively immunostained for pimonidazole. We also found complementary localization of the glutathione conjugate and reduced glutathione (GSH), implying that formation of the glutathione conjugate occurred in the tumor tissue. These results suggest that in hypoxic tumor cells, pimonidazole is reduced at its nitro group, followed by conjugation with GSH. PMID:27580239

  12. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus

  13. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder

    PubMed Central

    Handley, Ian M.; Brown, Elizabeth R.; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A.; Smith, Jessi L.

    2015-01-01

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women—or favoring men—within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women’s underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments—two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible. PMID:26460001

  14. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder.

    PubMed

    Handley, Ian M; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A; Smith, Jessi L

    2015-10-27

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women-or favoring men-within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women's underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments-two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible. PMID:26460001

  15. Quality of evidence revealing subtle gender biases in science is in the eye of the beholder.

    PubMed

    Handley, Ian M; Brown, Elizabeth R; Moss-Racusin, Corinne A; Smith, Jessi L

    2015-10-27

    Scientists are trained to evaluate and interpret evidence without bias or subjectivity. Thus, growing evidence revealing a gender bias against women-or favoring men-within science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) settings is provocative and raises questions about the extent to which gender bias may contribute to women's underrepresentation within STEM fields. To the extent that research illustrating gender bias in STEM is viewed as convincing, the culture of science can begin to address the bias. However, are men and women equally receptive to this type of experimental evidence? This question was tested with three randomized, double-blind experiments-two involving samples from the general public (n = 205 and 303, respectively) and one involving a sample of university STEM and non-STEM faculty (n = 205). In all experiments, participants read an actual journal abstract reporting gender bias in a STEM context (or an altered abstract reporting no gender bias in experiment 3) and evaluated the overall quality of the research. Results across experiments showed that men evaluate the gender-bias research less favorably than women, and, of concern, this gender difference was especially prominent among STEM faculty (experiment 2). These results suggest a relative reluctance among men, especially faculty men within STEM, to accept evidence of gender biases in STEM. This finding is problematic because broadening the participation of underrepresented people in STEM, including women, necessarily requires a widespread willingness (particularly by those in the majority) to acknowledge that bias exists before transformation is possible.

  16. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Aluminum-Tolerance Pathways in the Al-Accumulating Species Hydrangea macrophylla and Marker Identification

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Haixia; Lu, Changping; Jiang, Hui; Peng, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) is a well known Al-accumulating plant, showing a high level of aluminum (Al) tolerance and accumulation. Although the physiological mechanisms for detoxification of Al and the roles of Al in blue hydrangea sepals have been reported, the molecular mechanisms of Al tolerance and accumulation are poorly understood in hydrangea. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of Al-response genes in the roots and leaves of hydrangea by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The assembly of hydrangea transcriptome provides a rich source for gene identification and mining molecular markers, including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR). A total of 401,215 transcripts with an average length of 810.77bp were assembled, generating 256,127 unigenes. After annotation, 4,287 genes in the roots and 730 genes in the leaves were up-regulated by Al exposure, while 236 genes in the roots and 719 genes in the leaves were down-regulated, respectively. Many transporters, including MATE and ABC families, were involved in the process of Al-citrate complex transporting from the roots in hydrangea. A plasma membrane Al uptake transporter, Nramp aluminum transporter was up-regulated in roots and leaves under Al stress, indicating it may play an important role in Al tolerance by reducing the level of toxic Al. Although the exact roles of these candidate genes remain to be examined, these results provide a platform for further functional analysis of the process of detoxification of Al in hydrangea. PMID:26660093

  17. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals Distinct Aluminum-Tolerance Pathways in the Al-Accumulating Species Hydrangea macrophylla and Marker Identification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haixia; Lu, Changping; Jiang, Hui; Peng, Jinhui

    2015-01-01

    Hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) is a well known Al-accumulating plant, showing a high level of aluminum (Al) tolerance and accumulation. Although the physiological mechanisms for detoxification of Al and the roles of Al in blue hydrangea sepals have been reported, the molecular mechanisms of Al tolerance and accumulation are poorly understood in hydrangea. In this study, we conducted a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of Al-response genes in the roots and leaves of hydrangea by RNA sequencing (RNA-seq). The assembly of hydrangea transcriptome provides a rich source for gene identification and mining molecular markers, including single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR). A total of 401,215 transcripts with an average length of 810.77 bp were assembled, generating 256,127 unigenes. After annotation, 4,287 genes in the roots and 730 genes in the leaves were up-regulated by Al exposure, while 236 genes in the roots and 719 genes in the leaves were down-regulated, respectively. Many transporters, including MATE and ABC families, were involved in the process of Al-citrate complex transporting from the roots in hydrangea. A plasma membrane Al uptake transporter, Nramp aluminum transporter was up-regulated in roots and leaves under Al stress, indicating it may play an important role in Al tolerance by reducing the level of toxic Al. Although the exact roles of these candidate genes remain to be examined, these results provide a platform for further functional analysis of the process of detoxification of Al in hydrangea. PMID:26660093

  18. Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers: evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ockenden, Mary C; Deasy, Clare; Quinton, John N; Surridge, Ben; Stoate, Chris

    2014-03-15

    Intensification of agriculture has resulted in increased soil degradation and erosion, with associated pollution of surface waters. Small field wetlands, constructed along runoff pathways, offer one option for slowing down and storing runoff in order to allow more time for sedimentation and for nutrients to be taken up by plants or micro-organisms. This paper describes research to provide quantitative evidence for the effectiveness of small field wetlands in the UK landscape. Ten wetlands were built on four farms in Cumbria and Leicestershire, UK. Annual surveys of sediment and nutrient accumulation in 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated that most sediment was trapped at a sandy site (70 tonnes over 3 years), compared to a silty site (40 tonnes over 3 years) and a clay site (2 tonnes over 3 years). The timing of rainfall was more important than total annual rainfall for sediment accumulation, with most sediment transported in a few intense rainfall events, especially when these coincided with bare soil or poor crop cover. Nutrient concentration within sediments was inversely related to median particle size, but the total mass of nutrients trapped was dependent on the total mass of sediment trapped. Ratios of nutrient elements in the wetland sediments were consistent between sites, despite different catchment characteristics across the individual wetlands. The nutrient value of sediment collected from the wetlands was similar to that of soil in the surrounding fields; dredged sediment was considered to have value as soil replacement but not as fertiliser. Overall, small field wetlands can make a valuable contribution to keeping soil out of rivers.

  19. Keeping agricultural soil out of rivers: evidence of sediment and nutrient accumulation within field wetlands in the UK.

    PubMed

    Ockenden, Mary C; Deasy, Clare; Quinton, John N; Surridge, Ben; Stoate, Chris

    2014-03-15

    Intensification of agriculture has resulted in increased soil degradation and erosion, with associated pollution of surface waters. Small field wetlands, constructed along runoff pathways, offer one option for slowing down and storing runoff in order to allow more time for sedimentation and for nutrients to be taken up by plants or micro-organisms. This paper describes research to provide quantitative evidence for the effectiveness of small field wetlands in the UK landscape. Ten wetlands were built on four farms in Cumbria and Leicestershire, UK. Annual surveys of sediment and nutrient accumulation in 2010, 2011 and 2012 indicated that most sediment was trapped at a sandy site (70 tonnes over 3 years), compared to a silty site (40 tonnes over 3 years) and a clay site (2 tonnes over 3 years). The timing of rainfall was more important than total annual rainfall for sediment accumulation, with most sediment transported in a few intense rainfall events, especially when these coincided with bare soil or poor crop cover. Nutrient concentration within sediments was inversely related to median particle size, but the total mass of nutrients trapped was dependent on the total mass of sediment trapped. Ratios of nutrient elements in the wetland sediments were consistent between sites, despite different catchment characteristics across the individual wetlands. The nutrient value of sediment collected from the wetlands was similar to that of soil in the surrounding fields; dredged sediment was considered to have value as soil replacement but not as fertiliser. Overall, small field wetlands can make a valuable contribution to keeping soil out of rivers. PMID:24509365

  20. Mononuclear phagocyte accumulation in visceral tissue in HIV encephalitis: evidence for increased monocyte/macrophage trafficking and altered differentiation.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Tracy; Wyatt, Christina M; D'Agati, Vivette D; Croul, Sidney; McCourt, Laura; Morgello, Susan; Rappaport, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The invasion of circulating monocytes/macrophages (MΦ)s from the peripheral blood into the central nervous system (CNS) appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of HIV dementia (HIV-D), the most severe form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND), often confirmed histologically as HIV encephalitis (HIVE). In order to determine if trafficking of monocytes/MΦs is exclusive to the CNS or if it also occurs in organs outside of the brain, we have focused our investigation on visceral tissues of patients with HIVE. Liver, lymph node, spleen, and kidney autopsy tissues from the same HIVE cases investigated in earlier studies were examined by immunohistochemistry for the presence of CD14, CD16, CD68, Ki-67, and HIV-1 p24 expression. Here, we report a statistically significant increase in accumulation of MΦs in kidney, spleen, and lymph node tissues in specimens from patients with HIVE. In liver, we did not observe a significant increase in parenchymal macrophage accumulation, although perivascular macrophage accumulation was consistently observed with nodular lesions in 4 of 5 HIVE cases. We also observed an absence of CD14 expression on splenic MΦs in HIVE cases, which may implicate the spleen as a potential source of increased plasma soluble CD14 in HIV infection. HIV-1 p24 expression was observed in liver, lymph node and spleen but not kidney. Interestingly, renal pathology suggestive of chronic tubulointerstitial nephritis (possibly due to chronic pyelonephritis), including tubulointerstitial scarring, chronic interstitial inflammation and focal global glomerulosclerosis, without evidence of HIV-associated nephropathy (HIVAN), was seen in four of eight HIVE cases. Focal segmental and global glomerulosclerosis with tubular dilatation and prominent interstitial inflammation, consistent with HIVAN, was observed in two of the eight cases. Abundant cells expressing monocyte/MΦ cell surface markers, CD14 and CD68, were also CD16(+) and found

  1. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals control of reactive oxygen species accumulation and salt tolerance in tomato by γ-aminobutyric acid metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Bao, Hexigeduleng; Chen, Xianyang; Lv, Sulian; Jiang, Ping; Feng, Juanjuan; Fan, Pengxiang; Nie, Lingling; Li, Yinxin

    2015-03-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) accumulates in many plant species in response to environmental stress. However, the physiological function of GABA or its metabolic pathway (GABA shunt) in plants remains largely unclear. Here, the genes, including glutamate decarboxylases (SlGADs), GABA transaminases (SlGABA-Ts) and succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase (SlSSADH), controlling three steps of the metabolic pathway of GABA, were studied through virus-induced gene silencing approach in tomato. Silencing of SlGADs (GABA biosynthetic genes) and SlGABA-Ts (GABA catabolic genes) led to increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as well as salt sensitivity under 200 mm NaCl treatment. Targeted quantitative analysis of metabolites revealed that GABA decreased and increased in the SlGADs- and SlGABA-Ts-silenced plants, respectively, whereas succinate (the final product of GABA metabolism) decreased in both silenced plants. Contrarily, SlSSADH-silenced plants, also defective in GABA degradation process, showed dwarf phenotype, curled leaves and enhanced accumulation of ROS in normal conditions, suggesting the involvement of a bypath for succinic semialdehyde catabolism to γ-hydroxybutyrate as reported previously in Arabidopsis, were less sensitive to salt stress. These results suggest that GABA shunt is involved in salt tolerance of tomato, probably by affecting the homeostasis of metabolites such as succinate and γ-hydroxybutyrate and subsequent ROS accumulation under salt stress.

  2. Glomalin accumulated in seagrass sediments reveals past alterations in soil quality due to land-use change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Merino, Lourdes; Serrano, Oscar; Adame, María Fernanda; Mateo, Miguel Ángel; Martínez Cortizas, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), symbionts with most terrestrial plants, produce glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP), which plays a major role in soil structure and quality. Both fungi hyphae and protein production in soils are affected by perturbations related to land-use changes, implying that GRSP is a sensitive indicator of soil quality. Unfortunately, GRSP degrades within years to decades in oxic environments, preventing its use as palaeoecological proxy. However, GRSP is transported to marine, near-shore anoxic sediments, where it accumulates and remains non-degraded, enabling the assessment of its potential as a palaeoecological proxy for soil ecosystem's health. Exploiting this fact, we have obtained for the first time a long-term record (c. 1250 years) of GRSP content using a Posidonia oceanica seagrass mat sediment core from the Western Mediterranean (Portlligat Bay, Spain). The trends in GRSP content matched well with land-use changes related to agrarian activities reconstructed by pollen analysis. In periods of cultivation, GRSP accumulation in the mat decreased. Given the role played by GRSP, the results suggest that agrarian intensification may have resulted in perturbations to soil quality. Thus, GRSP in seagrass mat sediments can be used to assess long-term trends in continental soil quality induced by human activities. These findings open new possibilities in long-term ecology research, as other anoxic environments could be potentially valid too. Testing them would open the possibility to identify long-term patterns in soil quality and other environmental stressors that could also affect AMF and GRSP production in soils.

  3. Compositional characterization and imaging of "Wall-bound" acylesters of Populus trichocarpa Reveal Differential Accumulation of acyl Molecules in Normal and Reactive Woods

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, J.; Park, S; Yu, X; Liu, C

    2008-01-01

    Acylesterification is one of the common modifications of cell wall non-cellulosic polysaccharides and/or lignin primarily in monocot plants. We analyzed the cell-wall acylesters of black cottonwood (Populus trichocarpa Torr. & Gray) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS), Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared (IR) imaging facility. The results revealed that the cell wall of dicotyledonous poplar, as the walls of many monocot grasses, contains a considerable amount of acylesters, primarily acetyl and p-hydroxycinnamoyl molecules. The 'wall-bound' acetate and phenolics display a distinct tissue specific-, bending stress responsible- and developmental-accumulation pattern. The 'wall-bound' p-coumarate predominantly accumulated in young leaves and decreased in mature leaves, whereas acetate and ferulate mostly amassed in the cell wall of stems. Along the development of stem, the level of the 'wall-bound' ferulate gradually increased, while the basal level of p-coumarate further decreased. Induction of tension wood decreased the accumulation of the 'wall-bound' phenolics while the level of acetate remained constant. Synchrotron IR-mediated chemical compositional imaging revealed a close spatial distribution of acylesters with cell wall polysaccharides in poplar stem. These results indicate that different 'wall-bound' acylesters play distinct roles in poplar cell wall structural construction and/or metabolism of cell wall matrix components.

  4. The Physics of Decision Making:. Stochastic Differential Equations as Models for Neural Dynamics and Evidence Accumulation in Cortical Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Philip; Eckhoff, Philip; Wong-Lin, K. F.; Bogacz, Rafal; Zacksenhouse, Miriam; Cohen, Jonathan D.

    2010-03-01

    We describe how drift-diffusion (DD) processes - systems familiar in physics - can be used to model evidence accumulation and decision-making in two-alternative, forced choice tasks. We sketch the derivation of these stochastic differential equations from biophysically-detailed models of spiking neurons. DD processes are also continuum limits of the sequential probability ratio test and are therefore optimal in the sense that they deliver decisions of specified accuracy in the shortest possible time. This leaves open the critical balance of accuracy and speed. Using the DD model, we derive a speed-accuracy tradeoff that optimizes reward rate for a simple perceptual decision task, compare human performance with this benchmark, and discuss possible reasons for prevalent sub-optimality, focussing on the question of uncertain estimates of key parameters. We present an alternative theory of robust decisions that allows for uncertainty, and show that its predictions provide better fits to experimental data than a more prevalent account that emphasises a commitment to accuracy. The article illustrates how mathematical models can illuminate the neural basis of cognitive processes.

  5. Flower color diversity revealed by differential expression of flavonoid biosynthetic genes and flavonoid accumulation in herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Daqiu; Tao, Jun; Han, Chenxia; Ge, Jintao

    2012-12-01

    Herbaceous peony (Paeonia lactiflora Pall.) is an important ornamental plant which contains different flower colors. In this paper, eight genes encoding phenylalanine ammonialyase (PAL), chalcone synthase (CHS), chalcone isomerase (CHI), flavanone 3-hydroxylase (F3H), flavonoid 3'-hydroxylase (F3'H), dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR), anthocyanidin synthase (ANS), UDP-glucose: flavonoid 3-o-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) were isolated. Moreover, the expression patterns of these eight genes and UF5GT in the flowers were investigated in three cultivars, that is, 'Hongyanzhenghui', 'Yulouhongxing' and 'Huangjinlun' with purplish-red, white and yellow flower respectively. Furthermore, flavonoid accumulation in the flowers was also analyzed. The results showed that in different organs, most of genes expressed higher in flowers than in other organs. During the development of flowers, all genes could be divided into four groups. The first group (PlPAL) was highly expressed in S1 and S4. The second group (PlCHS and PlCHI) was at a high expression level throughout the whole developmental stages. The third group (PlF3H, PlF3'H, PlDFR, PlANS and PlUF5GT) gradually decreased with the development of flowers. The fourth group (PlUF3GT) gradually increased during the flower development. In addition, anthoxanthins and anthocyanins were detected in 'Hongyanzhenghui' and 'Yulouhongxing', chalcones and anthoxanthins were found in 'Huangjinlun'. When different color flowers were concerned, low expression level of PlCHI induced most of the substrate accumulation in the form of chalcones and displaying yellow, changing a small part of substrates to anthoxanthins, and there was no anthocyanin synthesis in 'Huangjinlun' because of low expression level of DFR. In 'Yulouhongxing', massive expressions of upstream genes and low expression of DFR caused synthesis of a great deal of anthoxanthins and a small amount of colorless anthocyanins. In 'Hongyanzhenghui', a large number of colored

  6. Genomewide analysis of Drosophila circular RNAs reveals their structural and sequence properties and age-dependent neural accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Westholm, Jakub O.; Miura, Pedro; Olson, Sara; Shenker, Sol; Joseph, Brian; Sanfilippo, Piero; Celniker, Susan E.; Graveley, Brenton R.; Lai, Eric C.

    2014-01-01

    Circularization was recently recognized to broadly expand transcriptome complexity. Here, we exploit massive Drosophila total RNA-sequencing data, >5 billion paired-end reads from >100 libraries covering diverse developmental stages, tissues and cultured cells, to rigorously annotate >2500 fruitfly circular RNAs. These mostly derive from back-splicing of protein-coding genes and lack poly(A) tails, and circularization of hundreds of genes is conserved across multiple Drosophila species. We elucidate structural and sequence properties of Drosophila circular RNAs, which exhibit commonalities and distinctions from mammalian circles. Notably, Drosophila circular RNAs harbor >1000 well-conserved canonical miRNA seed matches, especially within coding regions, and coding conserved miRNA sites reside preferentially within circularized exons. Finally, we analyze the developmental and tissue specificity of circular RNAs, and note their preferred derivation from neural genes and enhanced accumulation in neural tissues. Interestingly, circular isoforms increase dramatically relative to linear isoforms during CNS aging, and constitute a novel aging biomarker. PMID:25544350

  7. Evidence for gas accumulation beneath the surface crust driving cyclic rise and fall of the lava surface at Halema`uma`u, Kilauea Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patrick, M. R.; Orr, T. R.; Wilson, D.; Sutton, A. J.; Elias, T.; Fee, D.; Nadeau, P. A.

    2010-12-01

    The ongoing eruption in Halema`uma`u crater, at the summit of Kilauea Volcano, has surpassed the two-year mark and is characterized by lava lake activity in the vent. As of August 2010, the lava lake is about 70 m in diameter and 180 m below the rim of a narrow vent cavity. Although the explosive events that typified the first year of activity have abated, episodic rise and fall of the lava surface remains common. Cycles of rise and fall range from several minutes to eight hours in duration and are characterized by a quiescent rise phase and violent, gas-charged fall, spanning a height change of 20-30 m. Several models have been proposed to explain the cyclic rise and fall of lava surfaces at basaltic volcanoes, which in some cases is referred to as “gas pistoning”. In one model, episodic rise and fall is driven by the ascent of gas slugs from depth. In another, the cyclic behavior is driven by gas accumulation beneath the surface crust, with each cycle terminated by an abrupt failure of the crust, resulting in gas release. Seismic and infrasound data, as well as gas and webcam monitoring, at Halema`uma`u over the past two years strongly support the gas accumulation model, based on several lines of evidence. First, gas emission rates drop significantly below background levels during the rise phase, and increase dramatically during the fall phase, suggesting a process of gas buildup and release as opposed to slug flow. Second, the rise phases can last several hours, which is longer than reasonable slug ascent times. Third, the rise rate decreases over time, and in many cases plateaus, as the lava reaches its high stand, which is contrary to the exponential increase expected for gas slugs. Fourth, webcam video has captured numerous instances where rockfalls piercing the surface crust initiate gas release and lava level drop, suggestive of gas accumulation at shallow levels. Lastly, FTIR (Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy) data reveal changes in gas

  8. The free-radical damage theory: Accumulating evidence against a simple link of oxidative stress to ageing and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Selman, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Recent work on a small European cave salamander (Proteus anguinus) has revealed that it has exceptional longevity, yet it appears to have unexceptional defences against oxidative damage. This paper comes at the end of a string of other studies that are calling into question the free-radical damage theory of ageing. This theory rose to prominence in the 1990s as the dominant theory for why we age and die. Despite substantial correlative evidence to support it, studies in the last five years have raised doubts over its importance. In particular, these include studies of mice with the major antioxidant genes knocked out (both singly and in combination), which show the expected elevation in oxidative damage but no impact on lifespan. Combined, these findings raise fundamental questions over whether the free-radical damage theory remains useful for understanding the ageing process, and variation in lifespan and life histories.

  9. Flowery odor formation revealed by differential expression of monoterpene biosynthetic genes and monoterpene accumulation in rose (Rosa rugosa Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Liguo; Chen, Chen; Li, Tinglin; Wang, Meng; Tao, Jun; Zhao, Daqiu; Sheng, Lixia

    2014-02-01

    Rosa rugosa is an important ornamental and economical plant. In this paper, four genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), alcohol acyltransferase (AAT) and linalool synthase (LIS) involved in the monoterpene biosynthesis pathways were isolated from R. rugosa 'Tangzi', and the expression patterns of these genes in different flower development stages and different parts of floral organs were determined by real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis was carried out into the relationship between expression of four monoterpene synthesis genes and accumulation of main volatile monoterpenes and their acetic acid ester derivatives. The results showed that the genes RrDXS, RrDXR and RrLIS showed consistent expressions during the development process for R. rugosa flower from budding to withering stage, the overall expression levels of gene RrDXS and RrLIS were obviously lower as compared with those of gene RrDXR and RrAAT. Although the gene RrDXS, RrDXR, RrAAT and RrLIS were expressed in all parts of R. rugosa floral organs, the expression levels varied significantly. The variations in the constituent and content of volatile monoterpenes including citronellol, geraniol, nerol, linalool, citronellyl acetate, geranyl acetate and neryl acetate at different development stages and parts of floral organs were significantly different. On this basis, we concluded that the gene RrDXR and RrAAT might play a key role in the biosynthesis of volatile monoterpenes in R. rugosa flowers, and the two genes are important candidate genes for the regulation of secondary metabolism for rose aromatic components.

  10. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saxer, Gerda; Havlak, Paul; Fox, Sara A; Quance, Michael A; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA) experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9), with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9) - 9.5×10(-9), per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11), with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10), is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23056439

  11. Flowery odor formation revealed by differential expression of monoterpene biosynthetic genes and monoterpene accumulation in rose (Rosa rugosa Thunb.).

    PubMed

    Feng, Liguo; Chen, Chen; Li, Tinglin; Wang, Meng; Tao, Jun; Zhao, Daqiu; Sheng, Lixia

    2014-02-01

    Rosa rugosa is an important ornamental and economical plant. In this paper, four genes encoding 1-deoxy-D-xylulose-5-phosphate synthase (DXS), 1-deoxy-d-xylulose-5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), alcohol acyltransferase (AAT) and linalool synthase (LIS) involved in the monoterpene biosynthesis pathways were isolated from R. rugosa 'Tangzi', and the expression patterns of these genes in different flower development stages and different parts of floral organs were determined by real-time quantitative fluorescence PCR. Furthermore, a comprehensive analysis was carried out into the relationship between expression of four monoterpene synthesis genes and accumulation of main volatile monoterpenes and their acetic acid ester derivatives. The results showed that the genes RrDXS, RrDXR and RrLIS showed consistent expressions during the development process for R. rugosa flower from budding to withering stage, the overall expression levels of gene RrDXS and RrLIS were obviously lower as compared with those of gene RrDXR and RrAAT. Although the gene RrDXS, RrDXR, RrAAT and RrLIS were expressed in all parts of R. rugosa floral organs, the expression levels varied significantly. The variations in the constituent and content of volatile monoterpenes including citronellol, geraniol, nerol, linalool, citronellyl acetate, geranyl acetate and neryl acetate at different development stages and parts of floral organs were significantly different. On this basis, we concluded that the gene RrDXR and RrAAT might play a key role in the biosynthesis of volatile monoterpenes in R. rugosa flowers, and the two genes are important candidate genes for the regulation of secondary metabolism for rose aromatic components. PMID:24384414

  12. Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) Mitochondrial Population Genomics Reveals Structure, Divergence, and Evidence for Heteroplasmy.

    PubMed

    Halley, Yvette A; Oldeschulte, David L; Bhattarai, Eric K; Hill, Joshua; Metz, Richard P; Johnson, Charles D; Presley, Steven M; Ruzicka, Rebekah E; Rollins, Dale; Peterson, Markus J; Murphy, William J; Seabury, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the concordance of population inferences and conclusions resulting from the analysis of short mitochondrial fragments (i.e., partial or complete D-Loop nucleotide sequences) versus complete mitogenome sequences for 53 bobwhites representing six ecoregions across TX and OK (USA). Median joining (MJ) haplotype networks demonstrated that analyses performed using small mitochondrial fragments were insufficient for estimating the true (i.e., complete) mitogenome haplotype structure, corresponding levels of divergence, and maternal population history of our samples. Notably, discordant demographic inferences were observed when mismatch distributions of partial (i.e., partial D-Loop) versus complete mitogenome sequences were compared, with the reduction in mitochondrial genomic information content observed to encourage spurious inferences in our samples. A probabilistic approach to variant prediction for the complete bobwhite mitogenomes revealed 344 segregating sites corresponding to 347 total mutations, including 49 putative nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) distributed across 12 protein coding genes. Evidence of gross heteroplasmy was observed for 13 bobwhites, with 10 of the 13 heteroplasmies involving one moderate to high frequency SNV. Haplotype network and phylogenetic analyses for the complete bobwhite mitogenome sequences revealed two divergent maternal lineages (dXY = 0.00731; FST = 0.849; P < 0.05), thereby supporting the potential for two putative subspecies. However, the diverged lineage (n = 103 variants) almost exclusively involved bobwhites geographically classified as Colinus virginianus texanus, which is discordant with the expectations of previous geographic subspecies designations. Tests of adaptive evolution for functional divergence (MKT), frequency distribution tests (D, FS) and phylogenetic analyses (RAxML) provide no evidence for positive selection or hybridization with the sympatric scaled quail (Callipepla

  13. Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) Mitochondrial Population Genomics Reveals Structure, Divergence, and Evidence for Heteroplasmy

    PubMed Central

    Halley, Yvette A.; Oldeschulte, David L.; Bhattarai, Eric K.; Hill, Joshua; Metz, Richard P.; Johnson, Charles D.; Presley, Steven M.; Ruzicka, Rebekah E.; Rollins, Dale; Peterson, Markus J.; Murphy, William J.; Seabury, Christopher M.

    2015-01-01

    Herein, we evaluated the concordance of population inferences and conclusions resulting from the analysis of short mitochondrial fragments (i.e., partial or complete D-Loop nucleotide sequences) versus complete mitogenome sequences for 53 bobwhites representing six ecoregions across TX and OK (USA). Median joining (MJ) haplotype networks demonstrated that analyses performed using small mitochondrial fragments were insufficient for estimating the true (i.e., complete) mitogenome haplotype structure, corresponding levels of divergence, and maternal population history of our samples. Notably, discordant demographic inferences were observed when mismatch distributions of partial (i.e., partial D-Loop) versus complete mitogenome sequences were compared, with the reduction in mitochondrial genomic information content observed to encourage spurious inferences in our samples. A probabilistic approach to variant prediction for the complete bobwhite mitogenomes revealed 344 segregating sites corresponding to 347 total mutations, including 49 putative nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (SNVs) distributed across 12 protein coding genes. Evidence of gross heteroplasmy was observed for 13 bobwhites, with 10 of the 13 heteroplasmies involving one moderate to high frequency SNV. Haplotype network and phylogenetic analyses for the complete bobwhite mitogenome sequences revealed two divergent maternal lineages (dXY = 0.00731; FST = 0.849; P < 0.05), thereby supporting the potential for two putative subspecies. However, the diverged lineage (n = 103 variants) almost exclusively involved bobwhites geographically classified as Colinus virginianus texanus, which is discordant with the expectations of previous geographic subspecies designations. Tests of adaptive evolution for functional divergence (MKT), frequency distribution tests (D, FS) and phylogenetic analyses (RAxML) provide no evidence for positive selection or hybridization with the sympatric scaled quail (Callipepla

  14. Phylogenomics of the intracellular parasite Mikrocytos mackini reveals evidence for a mitosome in rhizaria.

    PubMed

    Burki, Fabien; Corradi, Nicolas; Sierra, Roberto; Pawlowski, Jan; Meyer, Gary R; Abbott, Cathryn L; Keeling, Patrick J

    2013-08-19

    Mikrocytos mackini is an intracellular protistan parasite of oysters whose position in the phylogenetic tree of eukaryotes has been a mystery for many years [1,2]. M. mackini is difficult to isolate, has not been cultured, and has no defining morphological feature. Furthermore, its only phylogenetic marker that has been successfully sequenced to date (the small subunit ribosomal RNA) is highly divergent and has failed to resolve its evolutionary position [2]. M. mackini is also one of the few eukaryotes that lacks mitochondria [1], making both its phylogenetic position and comparative analysis of mitochondrial function particularly important. Here, we have obtained transcriptomic data for M. mackini from enriched isolates and constructed a 119-gene phylogenomic data set. M. mackini proved to be among the fastest-evolving eukaryote lineages known to date, but, nevertheless, our analysis robustly placed it within Rhizaria. Searching the transcriptome for genetic evidence of a mitochondrion-related organelle (MRO) revealed only four mitochondrion-derived genes: IscS, IscU, mtHsp70, and FdxR. Interestingly, all four genes are involved in iron-sulfur cluster formation, a biochemical pathway common to other highly reduced "mitosomes" in unrelated MRO-containing lineages [7]. This is the first evidence of MRO in Rhizaria, and it suggests the parallel evolution of mitochondria to mitosomes in this supergroup.

  15. Diversification of Angraecum (Orchidaceae, Vandeae) in Madagascar: Revised Phylogeny Reveals Species Accumulation through Time Rather than Rapid Radiation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Angraecum. The macroevolutionary model-based phylogeny failed to detect shifts in diversification that could be associated directly with morphological diversification. Diversification in Angraecum resulted from gradual species accumulation through time rather than from rapid radiation, a diversification pattern often encountered in tropical rain forests. PMID:27669569

  16. System level analysis of cacao seed ripening reveals a sequential interplay of primary and secondary metabolism leading to polyphenol accumulation and preparation of stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Nägele, Thomas; Doerfler, Hannes; Fragner, Lena; Chaturvedi, Palak; Nukarinen, Ella; Bellaire, Anke; Huber, Werner; Weiszmann, Jakob; Engelmeier, Doris; Ramsak, Ziva; Gruden, Kristina; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Theobroma cacao and its popular product, chocolate, are attracting attention due to potential health benefits including antioxidative effects by polyphenols, anti-depressant effects by high serotonin levels, inhibition of platelet aggregation and prevention of obesity-dependent insulin resistance. The development of cacao seeds during fruit ripening is the most crucial process for the accumulation of these compounds. In this study, we analyzed the primary and the secondary metabolome as well as the proteome during Theobroma cacao cv. Forastero seed development by applying an integrative extraction protocol. The combination of multivariate statistics and mathematical modelling revealed a complex consecutive coordination of primary and secondary metabolism and corresponding pathways. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid metabolism dominated during the early developmental stages (stages 1 and 2; cell division and expansion phase). This was accompanied with a significant shift of proteins from phenylpropanoid metabolism to flavonoid biosynthesis. At stage 3 (reserve accumulation phase), metabolism of sucrose switched from hydrolysis into raffinose synthesis. Lipids as well as proteins involved in lipid metabolism increased whereas amino acids and N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids decreased. Purine alkaloids, polyphenols, and raffinose as well as proteins involved in abiotic and biotic stress accumulated at stage 4 (maturation phase) endowing cacao seeds the characteristic astringent taste and resistance to stress. In summary, metabolic key points of cacao seed development comprise the sequential coordination of primary metabolites, phenylpropanoid, N-phenylpropenoyl amino acid, serotonin, lipid and polyphenol metabolism thereby covering the major compound classes involved in cacao aroma and health benefits.

  17. Nuclear protein accumulation in cellular senescence and organismal aging revealed with a novel single-cell resolution fluorescence microscopy assay

    PubMed Central

    De Cecco, Marco; Jeyapalan, Jessie; Zhao, Xiaoai; Tamamori-Adachi, Mimi; Sedivy, John M.

    2011-01-01

    Replicative cellular senescence was discovered some 50 years ago. The phenotypes of senescent cells have been investigated extensively in cell culture, and found to affect essentially all aspects of cellular physiology. The relevance of cellular senescence in the context of age-associated pathologies as well as normal aging is a topic of active and ongoing interest. Considerable effort has been devoted to biomarker discovery to enable the microscopic detection of single senescent cells in tissues. One characteristic of senescent cells documented very early in cell culture studies was an increase in cell size and total protein content, but whether this occurs in vivo is not known. A limiting factor for studies of protein content and localization has been the lack of suitable fluorescence microscopy tools. We have developed an easy and flexible method, based on the merocyanine dye known as NanoOrange, to visualize and quantitatively measure total protein levels by high resolution fluorescence microscopy. NanoOrange staining can be combined with antibody-based immunofluorescence, thus providing both specific target and total protein information in the same specimen. These methods are optimally combined with automated image analysis platforms for high throughput analysis. We document here increasing protein content and density in nuclei of senescent human and mouse fibroblasts in vitro, and in liver nuclei of aged mice in vivo. Additionally, in aged liver nuclei NanoOrange revealed protein-dense foci that colocalize with centromeric heterochromatin. PMID:22006542

  18. Quantitative dynamics of triacylglycerol accumulation in microalgae populations at single-cell resolution revealed by Raman microspectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapid, real-time and label-free measurement of the cellular contents of biofuel molecules such as triacylglycerol (TAG) in populations at single-cell resolution are important for bioprocess control and understanding of the population heterogeneity. Raman microspectroscopy can directly detect the changes of metabolite profile in a cell and thus can potentially serve these purposes. Results Single-cell Raman spectra (SCRS) of the unicellular oleaginous microalgae Nannochloropsis oceanica from the cultures under nitrogen depletion (TAG-producing condition) and nitrogen repletion (non-TAG-producing condition) were sampled at eight time points during the first 96 hours upon the onset of nitrogen depletion. Single N. oceanica cells were captured by a 532-nm laser and the SCRS were acquired by the same laser within one second per cell. Using chemometric methods, the SCRS were able to discriminate cells between nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-depleted conditions at as early as 6 hours with >93.3% accuracy, and among the eight time points under nitrogen depletion with >90.4% accuracy. Quantitative prediction of TAG content in single cells was achieved and validated via SCRS and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) analysis at population level. SCRS revealed the dynamics of heterogeneity in TAG production among cells in each isogenic population. A significant negative correlation between TAG content and lipid unsaturation degree in individual microalgae cells was observed. Conclusions Our results show that SCRS can serve as a label-free and non-invasive proxy for quantitatively tracking and screening cellular TAG content in real-time at single-cell level. Phenotypic comparison of single cells via SCRS should also help investigating the mechanisms of functional heterogeneity within a cellular population. PMID:24716544

  19. Evidence of self organization in great Sumatra earthquake recurrence times: Implications for coupling of tidal forcing and tectonic stress accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, R. K.; Puli, K.

    2012-12-01

    We analyzed inter- event time series of earthquake activities (M≥ 5) of Sumatra region spanning over 1973 to 2009 using techniques of nonlinear dynamics. The earthquake data were taken from the USGS catalogue centered on latitude 3.240N and longitude 95.825E. As a first step, in our analyses we computed the rank order statistics which revealed mixed response of earthquake dynamics indicating distinct breaks in slope of the rank order. This suggests that earthquake dynamics in this region is partly unstable and partly "self-organized" with a random tail. Comparison of return maps of the earthquakes inter- event time series with those representing random, stochastic and chaotic processes shows a quasi-deterministic behavior of earthquake genesis in the region. We further assessed the dimensionality of earthquake-generating mechanisms using a nonlinear predictor technique on two dimensional phase portrait constructed by recurrence time series. The nonlinear forecasting analysis suggests that the earthquake processes in the Sumatra region evolve on a non-random low-dimensional chaotic plane. Further, "K2" Entropy revealed a coherent structure indicating the deterministic dynamical pattern. This analysis is consistent with "self-organized" processes which could be explained invoking earth's internal dynamics, where, impulsively derived interdependencies cascades through the stress generated by tectonic plate movement. Our results, however, do not preclude the role of coupling of the above self-organized system with tidal forcing. Evidence for such a coupling in this region exists as 'triggering force". Keywords: Sumatra Earthquakes, Quasi-deterministic, Stochastic, Chaotic, Self-organized, K2 entropy, Phase portrait.

  20. Molecular chaperone accumulation as a function of stress evidences adaptation to high hydrostatic pressure in the piezophilic archaeon Thermococcus barophilus

    PubMed Central

    Cario, Anaïs; Jebbar, Mohamed; Thiel, Axel; Kervarec, Nelly; Oger, Phil M.

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of mannosyl-glycerate (MG), the salinity stress response osmolyte of Thermococcales, was investigated as a function of hydrostatic pressure in Thermococcus barophilus strain MP, a hyperthermophilic, piezophilic archaeon isolated from the Snake Pit site (MAR), which grows optimally at 40 MPa. Strain MP accumulated MG primarily in response to salinity stress, but in contrast to other Thermococcales, MG was also accumulated in response to thermal stress. MG accumulation peaked for combined stresses. The accumulation of MG was drastically increased under sub-optimal hydrostatic pressure conditions, demonstrating that low pressure is perceived as a stress in this piezophile, and that the proteome of T. barophilus is low-pressure sensitive. MG accumulation was strongly reduced under supra-optimal pressure conditions clearly demonstrating the structural adaptation of this proteome to high hydrostatic pressure. The lack of MG synthesis only slightly altered the growth characteristics of two different MG synthesis deletion mutants. No shift to other osmolytes was observed. Altogether our observations suggest that the salinity stress response in T. barophilus is not essential and may be under negative selective pressure, similarly to what has been observed for its thermal stress response. PMID:27378270

  1. Genomic signatures reveal new evidences for selection of important traits in domestic cattle.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingyang; Bickhart, Derek M; Cole, John B; Schroeder, Steven G; Song, Jiuzhou; Tassell, Curtis P Van; Sonstegard, Tad S; Liu, George E

    2015-03-01

    We investigated diverse genomic selections using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism data of five distinct cattle breeds. Based on allele frequency differences, we detected hundreds of candidate regions under positive selection across Holstein, Angus, Charolais, Brahman, and N'Dama. In addition to well-known genes such as KIT, MC1R, ASIP, GHR, LCORL, NCAPG, WIF1, and ABCA12, we found evidence for a variety of novel and less-known genes under selection in cattle, such as LAP3, SAR1B, LRIG3, FGF5, and NUDCD3. Selective sweeps near LAP3 were then validated by next-generation sequencing. Genome-wide association analysis involving 26,362 Holsteins confirmed that LAP3 and SAR1B were related to milk production traits, suggesting that our candidate regions were likely functional. In addition, haplotype network analyses further revealed distinct selective pressures and evolution patterns across these five cattle breeds. Our results provided a glimpse into diverse genomic selection during cattle domestication, breed formation, and recent genetic improvement. These findings will facilitate genome-assisted breeding to improve animal production and health. PMID:25431480

  2. Genomic Signatures Reveal New Evidences for Selection of Important Traits in Domestic Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lingyang; Bickhart, Derek M.; Cole, John B.; Schroeder, Steven G.; Song, Jiuzhou; Tassell, Curtis P. Van; Sonstegard, Tad S.; Liu, George E.

    2015-01-01

    We investigated diverse genomic selections using high-density single nucleotide polymorphism data of five distinct cattle breeds. Based on allele frequency differences, we detected hundreds of candidate regions under positive selection across Holstein, Angus, Charolais, Brahman, and N'Dama. In addition to well-known genes such as KIT, MC1R, ASIP, GHR, LCORL, NCAPG, WIF1, and ABCA12, we found evidence for a variety of novel and less-known genes under selection in cattle, such as LAP3, SAR1B, LRIG3, FGF5, and NUDCD3. Selective sweeps near LAP3 were then validated by next-generation sequencing. Genome-wide association analysis involving 26,362 Holsteins confirmed that LAP3 and SAR1B were related to milk production traits, suggesting that our candidate regions were likely functional. In addition, haplotype network analyses further revealed distinct selective pressures and evolution patterns across these five cattle breeds. Our results provided a glimpse into diverse genomic selection during cattle domestication, breed formation, and recent genetic improvement. These findings will facilitate genome-assisted breeding to improve animal production and health. PMID:25431480

  3. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis of Two Brassica napus Near-Isogenic Lines Reveals a Network of Genes That Influences Seed Oil Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jingxue; Singh, Sanjay K.; Du, Chunfang; Li, Chen; Fan, Jianchun; Pattanaik, Sitakanta; Yuan, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Rapeseed (Brassica napus) is an important oil seed crop, providing more than 13% of the world’s supply of edible oils. An in-depth knowledge of the gene network involved in biosynthesis and accumulation of seed oil is critical for the improvement of B. napus. Using available genomic and transcriptomic resources, we identified 1,750 acyl-lipid metabolism (ALM) genes that are distributed over 19 chromosomes in the B. napus genome. B. rapa and B. oleracea, two diploid progenitors of B. napus, contributed almost equally to the ALM genes. Genome collinearity analysis demonstrated that the majority of the ALM genes have arisen due to genome duplication or segmental duplication events. In addition, we profiled the expression patterns of the ALM genes in four different developmental stages. Furthermore, we developed two B. napus near isogenic lines (NILs). The high oil NIL, YC13-559, accumulates significantly higher (∼10%) seed oil compared to the other, YC13-554. Comparative gene expression analysis revealed upregulation of lipid biosynthesis-related regulatory genes in YC13-559, including SHOOTMERISTEMLESS, LEAFY COTYLEDON 1 (LEC1), LEC2, FUSCA3, ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 3 (ABI3), ABI4, ABI5, and WRINKLED1, as well as structural genes, such as ACETYL-CoA CARBOXYLASE, ACYL-CoA DIACYLGLYCEROL ACYLTRANSFERASE, and LONG-CHAIN ACYL-CoA SYNTHETASES. We observed that several genes related to the phytohormones, gibberellins, jasmonate, and indole acetic acid, were differentially expressed in the NILs. Our findings provide a broad account of the numbers, distribution, and expression profiles of acyl-lipid metabolism genes, as well as gene networks that potentially control oil accumulation in B. napus seeds. The upregulation of key regulatory and structural genes related to lipid biosynthesis likely plays a major role for the increased seed oil in YC13-559. PMID:27746810

  4. Burkholderia phytofirmans Inoculation-Induced Changes on the Shoot Cell Anatomy and Iron Accumulation Reveal Novel Components of Arabidopsis-Endophyte Interaction that Can Benefit Downstream Biomass Deconstruction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Zeng, Yining; Tucker, Melvin P; Himmel, Michael E; Ding, Shi-You

    2016-01-01

    It is known that plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) elicit positive effects on plant growth and biomass yield. However, the actual mechanism behind the plant-PGPB interaction is poorly understood, and the literature is scarce regarding the thermochemical pretreatability and enzymatic degradability of biomass derived from PGPB-inoculated plants. Most recent transcriptional analyses of PGPB strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN inoculating potato in literature and Arabidopsis in our present study have revealed the expression of genes for ferritin and the biosynthesis and transport of siderophores (i.e., the molecules with high affinity for iron), respectively. The expression of such genes in the shoots of PsJN-inoculated plants prompted us to propose that PsJN-inoculation can improve the host plant's iron uptake and accumulation, which facilitates the downstream plant biomass pretreatment and conversion to simple sugars. In this study, we employed B. phytofirmans PsJN to inoculate the Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and conducted the first investigation for its effects on the biomass yield, the anatomical organization of stems, the iron accumulation, and the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of harvested biomass. The results showed that the strain PsJN stimulated plant growth in the earlier period of plant development and enlarged the cell size of stem piths, and it also indeed enhanced the essential metals uptake and accumulation in host plants. Moreover, we found that the PsJN-inoculated plant biomass released more glucose and xylose after hot water pretreatment and subsequent co-saccharification, which provided a novel insight into development of lignocellulosic biofuels from renewable biomass resources. PMID:26858740

  5. Burkholderia phytofirmans inoculation-induced changes on the shoot cell anatomy and iron accumulation reveal novel components of Arabidopsis-endophyte interaction that can benefit downstream biomass deconstruction

    DOE PAGES

    Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Lin, Chien -Yuan; Zeng, Yining; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi -You

    2016-01-29

    In this study, it is known that plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) elicit positive effects on plant growth and biomass yield. However, the actual mechanism behind the plant-PGPB interaction is poorly understood, and the literature is scarce regarding the thermochemical pretreatability and enzymatic degradability of biomass derived from PGPB-inoculated plants. Most recent transcriptional analyses of PGPB strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN inoculating potato in literature and Arabidopsis in our present study have revealed the expression of genes for ferritin and the biosynthesis and transport of siderophores (i.e., the molecules with high affinity for iron), respectively. The expression of such genes inmore » the shoots of PsJN-inoculated plants prompted us to propose that PsJN-inoculation can improve the host plant's iron uptake and accumulation, which facilitates the downstream plant biomass pretreatment and conversion to simple sugars. In this study, we employed B. phytofirmans PsJN to inoculate the Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and conducted the first investigation for its effects on the biomass yield, the anatomical organization of stems, the iron accumulation, and the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of harvested biomass. The results showed that the strain PsJN stimulated plant growth in the earlier period of plant development and enlarged the cell size of stem piths, and it also indeed enhanced the essential metals uptake and accumulation in host plants. Moreover, we found that the PsJN-inoculated plant biomass released more glucose and xylose after hot water pretreatment and subsequent co-saccharification, which provided a novel insight into development of lignocellulosic biofuels from renewable biomass resources.« less

  6. Burkholderia phytofirmans Inoculation-Induced Changes on the Shoot Cell Anatomy and Iron Accumulation Reveal Novel Components of Arabidopsis-Endophyte Interaction that Can Benefit Downstream Biomass Deconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shuai; Wei, Hui; Lin, Chien-Yuan; Zeng, Yining; Tucker, Melvin P.; Himmel, Michael E.; Ding, Shi-You

    2016-01-01

    It is known that plant growth promoting bacteria (PGPB) elicit positive effects on plant growth and biomass yield. However, the actual mechanism behind the plant-PGPB interaction is poorly understood, and the literature is scarce regarding the thermochemical pretreatability and enzymatic degradability of biomass derived from PGPB-inoculated plants. Most recent transcriptional analyses of PGPB strain Burkholderia phytofirmans PsJN inoculating potato in literature and Arabidopsis in our present study have revealed the expression of genes for ferritin and the biosynthesis and transport of siderophores (i.e., the molecules with high affinity for iron), respectively. The expression of such genes in the shoots of PsJN-inoculated plants prompted us to propose that PsJN-inoculation can improve the host plant's iron uptake and accumulation, which facilitates the downstream plant biomass pretreatment and conversion to simple sugars. In this study, we employed B. phytofirmans PsJN to inoculate the Arabidopsis thaliana plants, and conducted the first investigation for its effects on the biomass yield, the anatomical organization of stems, the iron accumulation, and the pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis of harvested biomass. The results showed that the strain PsJN stimulated plant growth in the earlier period of plant development and enlarged the cell size of stem piths, and it also indeed enhanced the essential metals uptake and accumulation in host plants. Moreover, we found that the PsJN-inoculated plant biomass released more glucose and xylose after hot water pretreatment and subsequent co-saccharification, which provided a novel insight into development of lignocellulosic biofuels from renewable biomass resources. PMID:26858740

  7. System level analysis of cacao seed ripening reveals a sequential interplay of primary and secondary metabolism leading to polyphenol accumulation and preparation of stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Nägele, Thomas; Doerfler, Hannes; Fragner, Lena; Chaturvedi, Palak; Nukarinen, Ella; Bellaire, Anke; Huber, Werner; Weiszmann, Jakob; Engelmeier, Doris; Ramsak, Ziva; Gruden, Kristina; Weckwerth, Wolfram

    2016-08-01

    Theobroma cacao and its popular product, chocolate, are attracting attention due to potential health benefits including antioxidative effects by polyphenols, anti-depressant effects by high serotonin levels, inhibition of platelet aggregation and prevention of obesity-dependent insulin resistance. The development of cacao seeds during fruit ripening is the most crucial process for the accumulation of these compounds. In this study, we analyzed the primary and the secondary metabolome as well as the proteome during Theobroma cacao cv. Forastero seed development by applying an integrative extraction protocol. The combination of multivariate statistics and mathematical modelling revealed a complex consecutive coordination of primary and secondary metabolism and corresponding pathways. Tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid metabolism dominated during the early developmental stages (stages 1 and 2; cell division and expansion phase). This was accompanied with a significant shift of proteins from phenylpropanoid metabolism to flavonoid biosynthesis. At stage 3 (reserve accumulation phase), metabolism of sucrose switched from hydrolysis into raffinose synthesis. Lipids as well as proteins involved in lipid metabolism increased whereas amino acids and N-phenylpropenoyl amino acids decreased. Purine alkaloids, polyphenols, and raffinose as well as proteins involved in abiotic and biotic stress accumulated at stage 4 (maturation phase) endowing cacao seeds the characteristic astringent taste and resistance to stress. In summary, metabolic key points of cacao seed development comprise the sequential coordination of primary metabolites, phenylpropanoid, N-phenylpropenoyl amino acid, serotonin, lipid and polyphenol metabolism thereby covering the major compound classes involved in cacao aroma and health benefits. PMID:27136060

  8. High Quality Maize Centromere 10 Sequence Reveals Evidence of Frequent Recombination Events

    PubMed Central

    Wolfgruber, Thomas K.; Nakashima, Megan M.; Schneider, Kevin L.; Sharma, Anupma; Xie, Zidian; Albert, Patrice S.; Xu, Ronghui; Bilinski, Paul; Dawe, R. Kelly; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Birchler, James A.; Presting, Gernot G.

    2016-01-01

    The ancestral centromeres of maize contain long stretches of the tandemly arranged CentC repeat. The abundance of tandem DNA repeats and centromeric retrotransposons (CR) has presented a significant challenge to completely assembling centromeres using traditional sequencing methods. Here, we report a nearly complete assembly of the 1.85 Mb maize centromere 10 from inbred B73 using PacBio technology and BACs from the reference genome project. The error rates estimated from overlapping BAC sequences are 7 × 10−6 and 5 × 10−5 for mismatches and indels, respectively. The number of gaps in the region covered by the reassembly was reduced from 140 in the reference genome to three. Three expressed genes are located between 92 and 477 kb from the inferred ancestral CentC cluster, which lies within the region of highest centromeric repeat density. The improved assembly increased the count of full-length CR from 5 to 55 and revealed a 22.7 kb segmental duplication that occurred approximately 121,000 years ago. Our analysis provides evidence of frequent recombination events in the form of partial retrotransposons, deletions within retrotransposons, chimeric retrotransposons, segmental duplications including higher order CentC repeats, a deleted CentC monomer, centromere-proximal inversions, and insertion of mitochondrial sequences. Double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair is the most plausible mechanism for these events and may be the major driver of centromere repeat evolution and diversity. In many cases examined here, DSB repair appears to be mediated by microhomology, suggesting that tandem repeats may have evolved to efficiently repair frequent DSBs in centromeres. PMID:27047500

  9. High Quality Maize Centromere 10 Sequence Reveals Evidence of Frequent Recombination Events.

    PubMed

    Wolfgruber, Thomas K; Nakashima, Megan M; Schneider, Kevin L; Sharma, Anupma; Xie, Zidian; Albert, Patrice S; Xu, Ronghui; Bilinski, Paul; Dawe, R Kelly; Ross-Ibarra, Jeffrey; Birchler, James A; Presting, Gernot G

    2016-01-01

    The ancestral centromeres of maize contain long stretches of the tandemly arranged CentC repeat. The abundance of tandem DNA repeats and centromeric retrotransposons (CR) has presented a significant challenge to completely assembling centromeres using traditional sequencing methods. Here, we report a nearly complete assembly of the 1.85 Mb maize centromere 10 from inbred B73 using PacBio technology and BACs from the reference genome project. The error rates estimated from overlapping BAC sequences are 7 × 10(-6) and 5 × 10(-5) for mismatches and indels, respectively. The number of gaps in the region covered by the reassembly was reduced from 140 in the reference genome to three. Three expressed genes are located between 92 and 477 kb from the inferred ancestral CentC cluster, which lies within the region of highest centromeric repeat density. The improved assembly increased the count of full-length CR from 5 to 55 and revealed a 22.7 kb segmental duplication that occurred approximately 121,000 years ago. Our analysis provides evidence of frequent recombination events in the form of partial retrotransposons, deletions within retrotransposons, chimeric retrotransposons, segmental duplications including higher order CentC repeats, a deleted CentC monomer, centromere-proximal inversions, and insertion of mitochondrial sequences. Double-strand DNA break (DSB) repair is the most plausible mechanism for these events and may be the major driver of centromere repeat evolution and diversity. In many cases examined here, DSB repair appears to be mediated by microhomology, suggesting that tandem repeats may have evolved to efficiently repair frequent DSBs in centromeres. PMID:27047500

  10. DNA sequence analyses reveal abundant diversity, endemism and evidence for Asian origin of the porcini mushrooms.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bang; Xu, Jianping; Wu, Gang; Hosen, Md Iqbal; Zeng, Nian-Kai; Li, Yan-Chun; Tolgor, Bau; Kost, Gerhard W; Yang, Zhu L

    2012-01-01

    The wild gourmet mushroom Boletus edulis and its close allies are of significant ecological and economic importance. They are found throughout the Northern Hemisphere, but despite their ubiquity there are still many unresolved issues with regard to the taxonomy, systematics and biogeography of this group of mushrooms. Most phylogenetic studies of Boletus so far have characterized samples from North America and Europe and little information is available on samples from other areas, including the ecologically and geographically diverse regions of China. Here we analyzed DNA sequence variation in three gene markers from samples of these mushrooms from across China and compared our findings with those from other representative regions. Our results revealed fifteen novel phylogenetic species (about one-third of the known species) and a newly identified lineage represented by Boletus sp. HKAS71346 from tropical Asia. The phylogenetic analyses support eastern Asia as the center of diversity for the porcini sensu stricto clade. Within this clade, B. edulis is the only known holarctic species. The majority of the other phylogenetic species are geographically restricted in their distributions. Furthermore, molecular dating and geological evidence suggest that this group of mushrooms originated during the Eocene in eastern Asia, followed by dispersal to and subsequent speciation in other parts of Asia, Europe, and the Americas from the middle Miocene through the early Pliocene. In contrast to the ancient dispersal of porcini in the strict sense in the Northern Hemisphere, the occurrence of B. reticulatus and B. edulis sensu lato in the Southern Hemisphere was probably due to recent human-mediated introductions.

  11. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  12. Excess 210Po in 2010 Eyjafjallajökull tephra (Iceland): Evidence for pre-eruptive gas accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, Olgeir; Condomines, Michel; Gauthier, Pierre-Jean

    2015-10-01

    Excess gas phase in magmas erupting explosively is well known worldwide. However, the origin of this gas phase, in excess of what can be dissolved in the erupting magma at depth, and the rate of gas accumulation is less well defined. The 2010 mildly explosive eruption at Eyjafjallajökull, Iceland, produced mingled tephra of benmoreitic and trachytic composition whereas alkali basalt was emitted during preceding flank eruption. Tephra of the first explosive phase are composed of three glass types, alkaline rhyolite, mixed benmoreite, and basalt, which suggests that the basaltic magma intruded a pre-existing rhyolitic magma chamber, and ultimately triggered the eruption. The mixed benmoreitic tephra (erupted on 15 and 17 April 2010) had large 210Po in excess of 210Pb [(210Po /210Pb) 0 = 1.88 ] at the time of eruption, and possibly a small 210Pb excess over its parent 226Ra. In contrast, the preceding flank eruption produced basalt with (210Po) 0 = 0, upon eruption, and the final trachyte had lost most of its 210Po during open-system degassing. The 210Po excess in the first erupted benmoreites is interpreted to result from 210Po degassing of basaltic magma and the accumulation of 210Po-enriched gas, either in the upper part of the basaltic intrusion, below the rhyolite-basalt interface, or in the pre-existing residual rhyolitic magma chamber. From a simple model of radon and polonium accumulation in the rhyolitic reservoir, the ratio of the mass of basalt magma degassing over the mass of magma accumulating the excess gas decreased from 20 to 15 over 2 days, implying zoned magma reservoir, with the uppermost and gas-richest part erupting first. The duration of pre-eruptive gas accumulation in this model is approximately one year. This corresponds closely to the initiation of a seismic swarm beneath Eyjafjallajökull, early June 2009, which was the first pre-eruptive signal detected. The coincidence between initiation of gas accumulation at relatively shallow depth and

  13. Character, paleoenvironment, rate of accumulation, and evidence for seismic triggering of Holocene turbidites, Canada Abyssal Plain, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Phillips, R.L.; Mullen, M.W.; Starratt, S.W.; Jones, Glenn A.; Naidu, A.S.; Finney, B.P.

    1996-01-01

    Four box cores and one piston core show that Holocene sedimentation on the southern Canada Abyssal Plain for the last 8010??120 yr has consisted of a continuing rain of pelagic organic and ice-rafted elastic sediment with a net accumulation rate during the late Holocene of ???10 mm/1000 yr, and episodically emplaced turbidites 1-5 m thick deposited at intervals of 830 to 3450 yr (average 2000 yr). The average net accumulation rate of the mixed sequence of turbidites and thin pelagite interbeds in the cores is about 1.2 m/1000 yr. Physiography suggests that the turbidites originated on the Mackenzie Delta or its clinoform, and ??13C values of -27 to - 25??? in the turbidites are compatible with a provenance on a delta. Extant displaced neritic and lower slope to basin plain calcareous benthic foraminifers coexist in the turbidite units. Their joint occurence indicates that the turbidites originated on the modern continental shelf and entrained sediment from the slope and rise enroute to their final resting place on the Canada Abyssal Plain. The presence of Middle Pleistocene diatoms in the turbidites suggests, in addition, that the turbidites may have originated in shallow submarine slides beneath the upper slope or outer shelf. Small but consistent differences in organic carbon content and ??13C values between the turbidite units suggest that they did not share an identical provenance, which is at least compatible with an origin in slope failures. The primary provenance of the ice-rafted component of the pelagic beds was the glaciated terrane of northwestern Canada; and the provenance of the turbidite units was Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary deposits on the outer continental shelf and upper slope of the Mackenzie Delta. Largely local derivation of the sediment of the Canada Abyssal Plain indicates that sediment accumulation rates in the Arctic Ocean are valid only for regions with similar depositional sources and processes, and that these rates cannot be

  14. AB-QTL analysis reveals new alleles associated to proline accumulation and leaf wilting under drought stress conditions in barley (Hordeum vulgare L.)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Land plants have evolved several measures to maintain their life against abiotic stresses. The accumulation of proline is the most generalized response of plants under drought, heat or salt stress conditions. It is known as an osmoprotectant which also acts as an instant source of energy during drought recovery process. But, both its role and genetic inheritance are poorly understood in agriculture crops. In the present work, advanced backcross quantitative trait locus (AB-QTL) analysis was performed to elucidate genetic mechanisms controlling proline accumulation and leaf wilting in barley under drought stress conditions. Results The analysis revealed eight QTL associated to proline content (PC) and leaf wilting (WS). QTL for PC were localized on chromosome 3H, 4H, 5H and 6H. The strongest QTL effect QPC.S42.5H was detected on chromosome 5H where drought inducible exotic allele was associated to increase PC by 54%. QTL effects QPC.S42.3H, QPC.S42.4H and QPC.S42.6H were responsible to heighten PC due to the preeminence of elite alleles over the exotic alleles which ranged from 26% to 43%. For WS, QTL have been localized on chromosome 1H, 2H, 3H and 4H. Among these, QWS.S42.1H and QWS.S42.4H were associated to decrease in WS due to the introgression of exotic alleles. In addition, two digenic epistatic interaction effects were detected for WS where the additive effect of exotic alleles imparted a favorable increase in the trait value. Conclusions The present data represents a first report on whole-genome mapping of proline accumulation and leaf wilting in barley. The detected QTL are linked to new alleles from both cultivated and wild accessions which bring out an initial insight on the genetic inheritance of PC and WS. These QTL alleles are fixed in the isogenic background of Scarlett, which will allow for positional cloning of underlying genes and to develop drought resilient barley cultivars. PMID:22817330

  15. Evidence that specific mtDNA point mutations may not accumulate in skeletal muscle during normal human aging.

    PubMed Central

    Pallotti, F.; Chen, X.; Bonilla, E.; Schon, E. A.

    1996-01-01

    It is unclear at present whether specific mtDNA point mutations accumulate during normal human aging. In order to address this question, we used quantitative PCR of total DNA isolated from skeletal muscle from normal individuals of various ages to search for the presence and amount of spontaneous mtDNA point mutations in two small regions of the human mitochondrial genome. We observed low levels of somatic mutations above background in both regions, but there was no correlation between the amount of mutation detected and the age of the subject. These results contrasted with our finding of an age-related increase in the amount of the mtDNA "common deletion" in these very samples. Thus, it appears that both somatic mtDNA point mutations and mtDNA deletions can arise at low frequency in normal individuals but that, unlike deletions, there is no preferential amplification or accumulation of specific point mutations in skeletal muscle over the course of the normal human life span. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8751860

  16. Microcystin accumulation in cladocerans: first evidence of MC uptake from aqueous extracts of a natural bloom sample.

    PubMed

    Ferrão-Filho, Aloysio S; Herrera, Natalia A; Echeverri, Luis Fernando

    2014-09-01

    Bioaccumulation of microcystins (MC) in zooplankton has been shown in several studies, mainly in field samples. A few studies, however, have demonstrated MC bioaccumulation in laboratory experiments. Although ingestion of cell-bound MC is considered the main route of MC accumulation, another important source is the MC from the dissolved fraction (DMC). This study reports the accumulation of DMC from aqueous extracts of natural bloom samples in three cladoceran species: Moina micrura, Daphnia laevis and Daphnia similis. Animals were exposed for 96 h to aqueous extracts of lyophilized matter from two bloom samples from Colombian reservoirs in different concentrations (25-1000 mg DW L(-1)). Analysis by HPLC-MS detected MC-LR in these samples at concentrations of 434-538 μg g(-1). For the analysis of MC in animal tissues the samples were homogenized and sonicated in methanol:water (75%) and analyzed by ELISA. Results showed that the animals uptake of MC increased with increasing exposure concentrations of aqueous extracts, with M. micrura and D. laevis clones presenting the highest MC concentrations in their tissues (up to 1170-1260 μg g(-1)) while D. similis the lowest (184 μg g(-1)). This study shows, for the first time, that MC uptake from dissolved fraction by zooplankton is possible, not only from the ingestion of seston or cell-bound MC as previously demonstrated. PMID:24880137

  17. Genome Wide Analyses Reveal Little Evidence for Adaptive Evolution in Many Plant Species

    PubMed Central

    Gossmann, Toni I.; Song, Bao-Hua; Windsor, Aaron J.; Mitchell-Olds, Thomas; Dixon, Christopher J.; Kapralov, Maxim V.; Filatov, Dmitry A.; Eyre-Walker, Adam

    2010-01-01

    The relative contribution of advantageous and neutral mutations to the evolutionary process is a central problem in evolutionary biology. Current estimates suggest that whereas Drosophila, mice, and bacteria have undergone extensive adaptive evolution, hominids show little or no evidence of adaptive evolution in protein-coding sequences. This may be a consequence of differences in effective population size. To study the matter further, we have investigated whether plants show evidence of adaptive evolution using an extension of the McDonald–Kreitman test that explicitly models slightly deleterious mutations by estimating the distribution of fitness effects of new mutations. We apply this method to data from nine pairs of species. Altogether more than 2,400 loci with an average length of ≈280 nucleotides were analyzed. We observe very similar results in all species; we find little evidence of adaptive amino acid substitution in any comparison except sunflowers. This may be because many plant species have modest effective population sizes. PMID:20299543

  18. Influence of Vegetation on Sediment Accumulation in Restored Tidal Saltmarshes: Field Evidence from the Blackwater Estuary, Essex, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, D.; French, J.; Burningham, H.

    2013-12-01

    Tidal saltmarshes in the UK, and especially in the estuaries of southeast England, have been subject to degradation and erosion over the last few decades, primarily caused by sea-level rise and coastal squeeze due to fixed coastal defences. This is of great concern to a range of coastal stakeholders due to the corresponding loss of functions and services associated with these systems. The coastal defence role that saltmarshes play is well established, and the importance of saltmarsh ecosystems as habitats for birds, fish, and other species is evidenced in the fact that a large proportion of saltmarsh in the southeast England is designated for its scientific and conservation significance. Sediment accumulation is critical for the maintenance of marsh elevation within the tidal frame and for delivery of the aforementioned functions and services. Although many studies have examined accumulation processes, key questions have yet to be fully tested through intensive field observations. One such question relates to the role of vegetation in mediating the retention of newly introduced sediment, as recent research has called into doubt the traditional view of halophytes significantly enhancing rates of sedimentation through wave dissipation. This study presents early results from a project designed to advance our understanding of the processes controlling sediment accumulation. The research focuses on the UK's first large-scale experimental managed flood defence realignment at Tollesbury, Blackwater estuary, Essex. The seawall protecting 21ha of reclaimed agricultural land was artificially breached in 1995 and saltmarsh has progressively developed as tidal exchange has introduced fine sediment into the site. Results from a 12 month monitoring campaign involving hierarchical two-week sediment trap deployments indicates that the role of vegetation in marsh development is less clear cut that previously thought. Gross sedimentation rates were generally higher in non

  19. Immunocytology on microwave-fixed cells reveals rapid and agonist-specific changes in subcellular accumulation patterns for cAMP or cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Barsony, J; Marx, S J

    1990-01-01

    We developed a method for cAMP and cGMP immunocytology based upon fixation by microwave irradiation. Fixation by microwave irradiation prevented three problems found with other fixation methods: nucleotide loss from cells, nucleotide diffusion within cells, and chemical modification of immunologic epitopes. Six agonists (four that stimulate adenylate cyclase and two that stimulate guanylate cyclase) produced cAMP or cGMP accumulation patterns that were agonist-specific, dose-dependent, detectable at physiologic concentrations of hormone, and time-dependent within 15 sec to 30 min. cAMP accumulation after 1 mM forskolin was greatest in the nucleus. Isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, or calcitonin caused initial accumulation of cAMP along the plasma membrane, but later accumulation was greater in the cytoplasm. With calcitonin the later accumulation of cAMP was selectively perinuclear and along the nuclear membrane. Sodium nitroprusside stimulated cGMP accumulation diffusely throughout the cytoplasm. Atrial natriuretic peptide initiated cGMP accumulation near the plasma membrane, and cGMP accumulation moved from there into the cytoplasm. In conclusion, microwave irradiation preserved cell structure and allowed visualization of expected as well as unsuspected changes in intracellular accumulation patterns of cAMP and cGMP. Images PMID:2153973

  20. Cosmic X-rays Reveal Evidence For New Form Of Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-04-01

    NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has found two stars -- one too small, one too cold -- that reveal cracks in our understanding of the structure of matter. These discoveries open a new window on nuclear physics, offering a link between the vast cosmos and its tiniest constituents. Chandra's observations of RX J1856.5-3754 and 3C58 suggest that the matter in these stars is even denser than nuclear matter found on Earth. This raises the possibility these stars are composed of pure quarks or contain crystals of sub-nuclear particles that normally have only a fleeting existence following high-energy collisions. By combining Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope data, astronomers found that RX J1856 radiates like a solid body with a temperature of 1.2 million degrees Fahrenheit (700,000 degrees Celsius) and has a diameter of about seven miles (11.3 kilometers). This size is too small to reconcile with standard models for neutron stars -- until now the most extreme form of matter known. "Taken at face value, the combined observational evidence points to a star composed not of neutrons, but of quarks in a form known as strange quark matter," said Jeremy Drake of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Mass., and lead author of a paper on RX J1856 to appear in the June 20, 2002, issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "Quarks, thought to be the fundamental constituents of nuclear particles, have never been seen outside a nucleus in Earth-bound laboratories." Observations by Chandra of 3C58 also yielded startling results. A team composed of Patrick Slane and Steven Murray, also of CfA, and David Helfand of Columbia University, New York, failed to detect the expected X-radiation from the hot surface of 3C58, a neutron star believed to have been created in an explosion witnessed by Chinese and Japanese astronomers in A.D. 1181. The team concluded that the star has a temperature of less than one million degrees Celsius, which is far below the predicted

  1. Footprints reveal direct evidence of group behavior and locomotion in Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Kevin G; Roach, Neil T; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Dingwall, Heather L; Villmoare, Brian A; Green, David J; Harris, John W K; Braun, David R; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Bipedalism is a defining feature of the human lineage. Despite evidence that walking on two feet dates back 6-7 Ma, reconstructing hominin gait evolution is complicated by a sparse fossil record and challenges in inferring biomechanical patterns from isolated and fragmentary bones. Similarly, patterns of social behavior that distinguish modern humans from other living primates likely played significant roles in our evolution, but it is exceedingly difficult to understand the social behaviors of fossil hominins directly from fossil data. Footprints preserve direct records of gait biomechanics and behavior but they have been rare in the early human fossil record. Here we present analyses of an unprecedented discovery of 1.5-million-year-old footprint assemblages, produced by 20+ Homo erectus individuals. These footprints provide the oldest direct evidence for modern human-like weight transfer and confirm the presence of an energy-saving longitudinally arched foot in H. erectus. Further, print size analyses suggest that these H. erectus individuals lived and moved in cooperative multi-male groups, offering direct evidence consistent with human-like social behaviors in H. erectus. PMID:27403790

  2. Footprints reveal direct evidence of group behavior and locomotion in Homo erectus

    PubMed Central

    Hatala, Kevin G.; Roach, Neil T.; Ostrofsky, Kelly R.; Wunderlich, Roshna E.; Dingwall, Heather L.; Villmoare, Brian A.; Green, David J.; Harris, John W. K.; Braun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Bipedalism is a defining feature of the human lineage. Despite evidence that walking on two feet dates back 6–7 Ma, reconstructing hominin gait evolution is complicated by a sparse fossil record and challenges in inferring biomechanical patterns from isolated and fragmentary bones. Similarly, patterns of social behavior that distinguish modern humans from other living primates likely played significant roles in our evolution, but it is exceedingly difficult to understand the social behaviors of fossil hominins directly from fossil data. Footprints preserve direct records of gait biomechanics and behavior but they have been rare in the early human fossil record. Here we present analyses of an unprecedented discovery of 1.5-million-year-old footprint assemblages, produced by 20+ Homo erectus individuals. These footprints provide the oldest direct evidence for modern human-like weight transfer and confirm the presence of an energy-saving longitudinally arched foot in H. erectus. Further, print size analyses suggest that these H. erectus individuals lived and moved in cooperative multi-male groups, offering direct evidence consistent with human-like social behaviors in H. erectus. PMID:27403790

  3. A label-free differential proteomics analysis reveals the effect of melatonin on promoting fruit ripening and anthocyanin accumulation upon postharvest in tomato.

    PubMed

    Sun, Qianqian; Zhang, Na; Wang, Jinfang; Cao, Yunyun; Li, Xingsheng; Zhang, Haijun; Zhang, Lei; Tan, Dun-Xian; Guo, Yang-Dong

    2016-09-01

    To better understand the function of melatonin in tomato fruit ripening and quality improvement, a label-free quantitation method was used to investigate the proteins that differ between the control (CK) and 50 μm melatonin treatment (M50) fruits. Proteomics data identified 241 proteins that were significantly influenced by melatonin. These proteins were involved in several ripening-related pathways, including cell wall metabolism, oxidative phosphorylation, carbohydrate, and fatty acid metabolism. Moreover, the application of exogenous melatonin increased eight proteins that are related to anthocyanin accumulation during fruit ripening. Additionally, the affected protein levels correlated with the corresponding gene transcript levels. Further, the total anthocyanin content from M50 increased by 52%, 48%, and 50% at 5, 8, and 13 DAT (day after melatonin treatment), respectively. The melatonin-mediated promotion of fruit ripening and quality might be due to the altered proteins involved in processes associated with ripening. In this work, we indicated that a senescence-related protein was downregulated in the M50 fruit, while a cell apoptosis inhibitor (API5) protein was upregulated. In addition, peroxidases (POD9, POD12, peroxidase p7-like) and catalase (CAT3) significantly increased in the M50 fruits. Based on the previous studies and our data, we inferred that melatonin might be positively related to fruit ripening but negatively related to fruit senescence. This research provides insights into the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying melatonin-mediated fruit ripening as well as the anthocyanin formation process in tomato fruit at the protein concentration level, and we reveal possible candidates for regulation of anthocyanin formation during fruit ripening.

  4. An Extraordinary Accumulation of (-)-Pinoresinol in Cell-Free Extracts of Forsythia intermedia: Evidence for Enantiospecific Reduction of (+)-Pinoresinol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katayama, Takeshi; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.

    1992-01-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalysis the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in greater than 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)- pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective syntheis of(+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  5. An extraordinary accumulation of (-)-pinoresinol in cell-free extracts of Forsythia intermedia: evidence for enantiospecific reduction of (+)-pinoresinol.

    PubMed

    Katayama, T; Davin, L B; Lewis, N G

    1992-11-01

    Stereoselective and enantiospecific transformation mechanisms in lignan biogenesis are only now yielding to scientific inquiry: it has been shown that soluble cell-free preparations from Forsythia intermedia catalyse the formation of the enantiomerically pure lignan, (-)-secoisolariciresinol, when incubated with coniferyl alcohol in the presence of NAD(P)H and H2O2. Surprisingly, (-)-pinoresinol also accumulates in this soluble cell-free assay mixture in > 96% enantiomeric excess, even though it is not the naturally occurring antipode present in Forsythia sp. But these soluble cell-free preparations do not engender stereoselective coupling; instead, racemic pinoresinols are first formed, catalysed by an H2O2-dependent peroxidase reaction. An enantiospecific NAD(P)H reductase then converts (+)-pinoresinol, and not the (-)-antipode, into (-)-secoisolariciresinol. Stereoselective synthesis [correction of syntheis] of (+)-pinoresinol from E-coniferyl alcohol is, however, catalysed by an insoluble enzyme preparation in F. suspensa, obtained following removal of readily soluble and ionically bound enzymes; no exogenously supplied cofactors were required other than oxygen, although the reaction was stimulated by NAD-malate addition. Thus, the overall biochemical pathway to enantiomerically pure (-)-secoisolariciresinol has been delineated.

  6. Ecophysiology of Thioploca ingrica as revealed by the complete genome sequence supplemented with proteomic evidence.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hisaya; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Yamamoto, Nozomi; Togashi, Tomoaki; Mori, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Tomohiro; Nemoto, Fumiko; Kurokawa, Ken; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Fukui, Manabu

    2015-05-01

    Large sulfur-oxidizing bacteria, which accumulate a high concentration of nitrate, are important constituents of aquatic sediment ecosystems. No representative of this group has been isolated in pure culture, and only fragmented draft genome sequences are available for these microorganisms. In this study, we successfully reconstituted the genome of Thioploca ingrica from metagenomic sequences, thereby generating the first complete genome sequence from this group. The Thioploca samples for the metagenomic analysis were obtained from a freshwater lake in Japan. A PCR-free paired-end library was constructed from the DNA extracted from the samples and was sequenced on the Illumina MiSeq platform. By closing gaps within and between the scaffolds, we obtained a circular chromosome and a plasmid-like element. The reconstituted chromosome was 4.8 Mbp in length with a 41.2% GC content. A sulfur oxidation pathway identical to that suggested for the closest relatives of Thioploca was deduced from the reconstituted genome. A full set of genes required for respiratory nitrate reduction to dinitrogen gas was also identified. We further performed a proteomic analysis of the Thioploca sample and detected many enzymes/proteins involved in sulfur oxidation, nitrate respiration and inorganic carbon fixation as major components of the protein extracts from the sample, suggesting that these metabolic activities are strongly associated with the physiology of T. ingrica in lake sediment.

  7. Comparative phylogeography and population genetics within Buteo lineatus reveals evidence of distinct evolutionary lineages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hull, J.M.; Strobel, Bradley N.; Boal, C.W.; Hull, A.C.; Dykstra, C.R.; Irish, A.M.; Fish, A.M.; Ernest, H.B.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional subspecies classifications may suggest phylogenetic relationships that are discordant with evolutionary history and mislead evolutionary inference. To more accurately describe evolutionary relationships and inform conservation efforts, we investigated the genetic relationships and demographic histories of Buteo lineatus subspecies in eastern and western North America using 21 nuclear microsatellite loci and 375-base pairs of mitochondrial control region sequence. Frequency based analyses of mitochondrial sequence data support significant population distinction between eastern (B. l. lineatus/alleni/texanus) and western (B. l. elegans) subspecies of B. lineatus. This distinction was further supported by frequency and Bayesian analyses of the microsatellite data. We found evidence of differing demographic histories between regions; among eastern sites, mitochondrial data suggested that rapid population expansion occurred following the end of the last glacial maximum, with B. l. texanus population expansion preceding that of B. l. lineatus/alleni. No evidence of post-glacial population expansion was detected among western samples (B. l. elegans). Rather, microsatellite data suggest that the western population has experienced a recent bottleneck, presumably associated with extensive anthropogenic habitat loss during the 19th and 20th centuries. Our data indicate that eastern and western populations of B. lineatus are genetically distinct lineages, have experienced very different demographic histories, and suggest management as separate conservation units may be warranted. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evolutionary bet-hedging in the real world: empirical evidence and challenges revealed by plants.

    PubMed

    Childs, Dylan Z; Metcalf, C J E; Rees, Mark

    2010-10-22

    Understanding the adaptations that allow species to live in temporally variable environments is essential for predicting how they may respond to future environmental change. Variation at the intergenerational scale can allow the evolution of bet-hedging strategies: a novel genotype may be favoured over an alternative with higher arithmetic mean fitness if the new genotype experiences a sufficiently large reduction in temporal fitness variation; the successful genotype is said to have traded off its mean and variance in fitness in order to 'hedge its evolutionary bets'. We review the evidence for bet-hedging in a range of simple plant systems that have proved particularly tractable for studying bet-hedging under natural conditions. We begin by outlining the essential theory, reiterating the important distinction between conservative and diversified bet-hedging strategies. We then examine the theory and empirical evidence for the canonical example of bet-hedging: diversification via dormant seeds in annual plants. We discuss the complications that arise when moving beyond this simple case to consider more complex life-history traits, such as flowering size in semelparous perennial plants. Finally, we outline a framework for accommodating these complications, emphasizing the central role that model-based approaches can play. PMID:20573624

  9. Rapid and frequent turbidite accumulation in the bottom of Izu-Ogasawara Trench: Chemical and radiochemical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozaki, Yoshiyuki; Ohta, Yoichi

    1993-12-01

    Two sediment cores (pilot gravity and piston) were obtained from the bottom of the Izu-Ogasawara Trench at 9750 m and analyzed for various elements and radioisotopes. The results showed a history of complex and frequent turbidite deposition: In the gravity core, eight layers rich in manganese were observed, of which five are enriched in Cu and Co as well. The other three are also enriched in Mo but no other heavy metals, suggesting the presence of at least two mechanisms of formation. Trapping of iron manganese micronodules can account for the enrichment of Mn, Cu and Co. The other three layers rich in Mn and Mo appear to be formed by a post-depositional diagenetic process of Mn mobilization and redeposition in the sediment column. A strong correlation between Ra-226 and Cu in the gravity core suggests that the Ra-226 was also carried into the bottom of the trench in turbidites in association with Mn micronodules. Little excess of Pb-210 over Ra-226 was found at the top but the excess was significant at mid-depths from 30 to 70 cm, indicating that those sediments were deposited within the last 200 y. In the piston core there is a sharp discontinuity of chemical and radiochemical composition around a depth of 250 cm. Below that depth the sediments appear to be dominated by materials derived from terrestrial sources, as compared with those in the upper layer which are of contemporary marine origin. Ra-226 is deficient relative to Th-230 throughout the sediment column down to about 6 m. This finding is consistent with the finding that the average rate of sediment accumulation is 1-2 orders of magnitude faster than that in the western North Pacific abyssal plain, suggesting the convergence of materials into the bottom of the trench.

  10. Molecular evidence of RNA polymerase II gene reveals the origin of worldwide cultivated barley

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yonggang; Ren, Xifeng; Sun, Dongfa; Sun, Genlou

    2016-01-01

    The origin and domestication of cultivated barley have long been under debate. A population-based resequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the single copy of RPB2 gene was used to address barley domestication, to explore genetic differentiation of barley populations on the worldwide scale, and to understand gene-pool exchanges during the spread and subsequent development of barley cultivation. Our results revealed significant genetic differentiation among three geographically distinct wild barley populations. Differences in haplotype composition among populations from different geographical regions revealed that modern cultivated barley originated from two major wild barley populations: one from the Near East Fertile Crescent and the other from the Tibetan Plateau, supporting polyphyletic origin of cultivated barley. The results of haplotype frequencies supported multiple domestications coupled with widespread introgression events that generated genetic admixture between divergent barley gene pools. Our results not only provide important insight into the domestication and evolution of cultivated barley, but also enhance our understanding of introgression and distinct selection pressures in different environments on shaping the genetic diversity of worldwide barley populations, thus further facilitating the effective use of the wild barley germplasm. PMID:27786300

  11. Pulvinar neurons reveal neurobiological evidence of past selection for rapid detection of snakes.

    PubMed

    Van Le, Quan; Isbell, Lynne A; Matsumoto, Jumpei; Nguyen, Minh; Hori, Etsuro; Maior, Rafael S; Tomaz, Carlos; Tran, Anh Hai; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2013-11-19

    Snakes and their relationships with humans and other primates have attracted broad attention from multiple fields of study, but not, surprisingly, from neuroscience, despite the involvement of the visual system and strong behavioral and physiological evidence that humans and other primates can detect snakes faster than innocuous objects. Here, we report the existence of neurons in the primate medial and dorsolateral pulvinar that respond selectively to visual images of snakes. Compared with three other categories of stimuli (monkey faces, monkey hands, and geometrical shapes), snakes elicited the strongest, fastest responses, and the responses were not reduced by low spatial filtering. These findings integrate neuroscience with evolutionary biology, anthropology, psychology, herpetology, and primatology by identifying a neurobiological basis for primates' heightened visual sensitivity to snakes, and adding a crucial component to the growing evolutionary perspective that snakes have long shaped our primate lineage.

  12. Further evidence reveals that okra mottle virus arose from a double recombination event.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, Leonardo C; Aranha, Silvia A; Fernandes, Fernanda R; Inoue-Nagata, Alice K

    2013-01-01

    As a result of surveys of okra begomoviruses (genus Begomovirus, family Geminiviridae) conducted over the last five years in Central Brazil, we report the complete genome sequence of an isolate of okra mottle virus (OMoV). The DNA-A and DNA-B components were 2660 and 2653 nucleotides (nt) long, respectively, and they were most closely related to the DNA-A (~99 % nt identity) and DNA-B (~98 % nt identity) components of an OMoV isolate from a soybean plant. A phylogenetic tree was generated based on these sequences, and it was shown that both of the OMoV DNA components were grouped in a branch with Brazilian begomoviruses known to infect weeds. By recombination analysis, strong evidence was observed that the OMoV genome may have been the product of a double inter-species recombination event.

  13. Hypertension and Dementia: Epidemiological and Experimental Evidence Revealing a Detrimental Relationship.

    PubMed

    Perrotta, Marialuisa; Lembo, Giuseppe; Carnevale, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension and dementia represent two major public health challenges worldwide, notably in the elderly population. Although these two conditions have classically been recognized as two distinct diseases, mounting epidemiological, clinical and experimental evidence suggest that hypertension and dementia are strictly intertwined. Here, we briefly report how hypertension profoundly affects brain homeostasis, both at the structural and functional level. Chronic high blood pressure modifies the cerebral vasculature, increasing the risk of Aβ clearance impairment. The latter, excluding genetic etiologies, is considered one of the main causes of Aβ deposition in the brain. Studies have shown that hypertension induces cerebral arterial stiffening and microvascular dysfunction, thus contributing to dementia pathophysiology. This review examines the existing and the updated literature which has attempted to explain and clarify the relationship between hypertension and dementia at the pathophysiological level. PMID:27005613

  14. Krebs cycle metabolon: structural evidence of substrate channeling revealed by cross-linking and mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fei; Minteer, Shelley

    2015-02-01

    It has been hypothesized that the high metabolic flux in the mitochondria is due to the self-assembly of enzyme supercomplexes (called metabolons) that channel substrates from one enzyme to another, but there has been no experimental confirmation of this structure or the channeling. A structural investigation of enzyme organization within the Krebs cycle metabolon was accomplished by in vivo cross-linking and mass spectrometry. Eight Krebs cycle enzyme components were isolated upon chemical fixation, and interfacial residues between mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase, citrate synthase, and aconitase were identified. Using constraint protein docking, a low-resolution structure for the three-enzyme complex was achieved, as well as the two-fold symmetric octamer. Surface analysis showed formation of electrostatic channeling upon protein-protein association, which is the first structural evidence of substrate channeling in the Krebs cycle metabolon.

  15. Bacterial diversity differences along an epigenic cave stream reveal evidence of community dynamics, succession, and stability

    PubMed Central

    Brannen-Donnelly, Kathleen; Engel, Annette S.

    2015-01-01

    Unchanging physicochemical conditions and nutrient sources over long periods of time in cave and karst subsurface habitats, particularly aquifers, can support stable ecosystems, termed autochthonous microbial endokarst communities (AMEC). AMEC existence is unknown for other karst settings, such as epigenic cave streams. Conceptually, AMEC should not form in streams due to faster turnover rates and seasonal disturbances that have the capacity to transport large quantities of water and sediment and to change allochthonous nutrient and organic matter sources. Our goal was to investigate whether AMEC could form and persist in hydrologically active, epigenic cave streams. We analyzed bacterial diversity from cave water, sediments, and artificial substrates (Bio-Traps®) placed in the cave at upstream and downstream locations. Distinct communities existed for the water, sediments, and Bio-Trap® samplers. Throughout the study period, a subset of community members persisted in the water, regardless of hydrological disturbances. Stable habitat conditions based on flow regimes resulted in more than one contemporaneous, stable community throughout the epigenic cave stream. However, evidence for AMEC was insufficient for the cave water or sediments. Community succession, specifically as predictable exogenous heterotrophic microbial community succession, was evident from decreases in community richness from the Bio-Traps®, a peak in Bio-Trap® community biomass, and from changes in the composition of Bio-Trap® communities. The planktonic community was compositionally similar to Bio-Trap® initial colonizers, but the downstream Bio-Trap® community became more similar to the sediment community at the same location. These results can help in understanding the diversity of planktonic and attached microbial communities from karst, as well as microbial community dynamics, stability, and succession during disturbance or contamination responses over time. PMID:26257715

  16. Stable Isotopes and Zooarchaeology at Teotihuacan, Mexico Reveal Earliest Evidence of Wild Carnivore Management in Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Nawa; Somerville, Andrew D; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    From Roman gladiatorial combat to Egyptian animal mummies, the capture and manipulation of carnivores was instrumental in helping to shape social hierarchies throughout the ancient world. This paper investigates the historical inflection point when humans began to control animals not only as alimental resources but as ritual symbols and social actors in the New World. At Teotihuacan (A.D. 1-550), one of the largest pre-Hispanic cities, animal remains were integral components of ritual caches expressing state ideology and militarism during the construction of the Moon and the Sun Pyramids. The caches contain the remains of nearly 200 carnivorous animals, human sacrificial victims and other symbolic artifacts. This paper argues the presence of skeletal pathologies of infectious disease and injuries manifest on the carnivore remains show direct evidence of captivity. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of bones and teeth confirms that some of these carnivores were consuming high levels of C4 foods, likely reflecting a maize-based anthropocentric food chain. These results push back the antiquity of keeping captive carnivores for ritualistic purposes nearly 1000 years before the Spanish conquistadors described Moctezuma's zoo at the Aztec capital. Mirroring these documents the results indicate a select group of carnivores at Teotihuacan may have been fed maize-eating omnivores, such as dogs and humans. Unlike historical records, the present study provides the earliest and direct archaeological evidence for this practice in Mesoamerica. It also represents the first systematic isotopic exploration of a population of archaeological eagles (n = 24) and felids (n = 29). PMID:26332042

  17. Stable Isotopes and Zooarchaeology at Teotihuacan, Mexico Reveal Earliest Evidence of Wild Carnivore Management in Mesoamerica

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Nawa; Somerville, Andrew D.; Schoeninger, Margaret J.

    2015-01-01

    From Roman gladiatorial combat to Egyptian animal mummies, the capture and manipulation of carnivores was instrumental in helping to shape social hierarchies throughout the ancient world. This paper investigates the historical inflection point when humans began to control animals not only as alimental resources but as ritual symbols and social actors in the New World. At Teotihuacan (A.D. 1–550), one of the largest pre-Hispanic cities, animal remains were integral components of ritual caches expressing state ideology and militarism during the construction of the Moon and the Sun Pyramids. The caches contain the remains of nearly 200 carnivorous animals, human sacrificial victims and other symbolic artifacts. This paper argues the presence of skeletal pathologies of infectious disease and injuries manifest on the carnivore remains show direct evidence of captivity. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of bones and teeth confirms that some of these carnivores were consuming high levels of C4 foods, likely reflecting a maize-based anthropocentric food chain. These results push back the antiquity of keeping captive carnivores for ritualistic purposes nearly 1000 years before the Spanish conquistadors described Moctezuma’s zoo at the Aztec capital. Mirroring these documents the results indicate a select group of carnivores at Teotihuacan may have been fed maize-eating omnivores, such as dogs and humans. Unlike historical records, the present study provides the earliest and direct archaeological evidence for this practice in Mesoamerica. It also represents the first systematic isotopic exploration of a population of archaeological eagles (n = 24) and felids (n = 29). PMID:26332042

  18. Stable Isotopes and Zooarchaeology at Teotihuacan, Mexico Reveal Earliest Evidence of Wild Carnivore Management in Mesoamerica.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Nawa; Somerville, Andrew D; Schoeninger, Margaret J

    2015-01-01

    From Roman gladiatorial combat to Egyptian animal mummies, the capture and manipulation of carnivores was instrumental in helping to shape social hierarchies throughout the ancient world. This paper investigates the historical inflection point when humans began to control animals not only as alimental resources but as ritual symbols and social actors in the New World. At Teotihuacan (A.D. 1-550), one of the largest pre-Hispanic cities, animal remains were integral components of ritual caches expressing state ideology and militarism during the construction of the Moon and the Sun Pyramids. The caches contain the remains of nearly 200 carnivorous animals, human sacrificial victims and other symbolic artifacts. This paper argues the presence of skeletal pathologies of infectious disease and injuries manifest on the carnivore remains show direct evidence of captivity. Stable isotope analysis (δ13C and δ15N) of bones and teeth confirms that some of these carnivores were consuming high levels of C4 foods, likely reflecting a maize-based anthropocentric food chain. These results push back the antiquity of keeping captive carnivores for ritualistic purposes nearly 1000 years before the Spanish conquistadors described Moctezuma's zoo at the Aztec capital. Mirroring these documents the results indicate a select group of carnivores at Teotihuacan may have been fed maize-eating omnivores, such as dogs and humans. Unlike historical records, the present study provides the earliest and direct archaeological evidence for this practice in Mesoamerica. It also represents the first systematic isotopic exploration of a population of archaeological eagles (n = 24) and felids (n = 29).

  19. Revealing natural antisense transcripts from Plasmodium vivax isolates: evidence of genome regulation in complicated malaria.

    PubMed

    Boopathi, P A; Subudhi, Amit Kumar; Garg, Shilpi; Middha, Sheetal; Acharya, Jyoti; Pakalapati, Deepak; Saxena, Vishal; Aiyaz, Mohammed; Chand, Bipin; Mugasimangalam, Raja C; Kochar, Sanjay K; Sirohi, Parmendra; Kochar, Dhanpat K; Das, Ashis

    2013-12-01

    Plasmodium vivax is the most geographically widespread human malaria parasite causing approximately 130-435 million infections annually. It is an economic burden in many parts of the world and poses a public health challenge along with the other Plasmodium sp. The biology of this parasite is less studied and poorly understood, in spite of these facts. Emerging evidence of severe complications due to infections by this parasite provides an impetus to focus research on the same. Investigating the parasite directly from infected patients is the best way to study its biology and pathogenic mechanisms. Gene expression studies of this parasite directly obtained from the patients has provided evidence of gene regulation resulting in varying amount of transcript levels in the different blood stages. The mechanisms regulating gene expression in malaria parasites are not well understood. Discovery of Natural Antisense Transcripts (NATs) in Plasmodium falciparum has suggested that these might play an important role in regulating gene expression. We report here the genome-wide occurrence of NATs in P. vivax parasites from patients with differing clinical symptoms. A total of 1348 NATs against annotated gene loci have been detected using a custom designed microarray with strand specific probes. Majority of NATs identified from this study shows positive correlation with the expression pattern of the sense (S) transcript. Our data also shows condition specific expression patterns of varying S and antisense (AS) transcript levels. Genes with AS transcripts enrich to various biological processes. To our knowledge this is the first report on the presence of NATs from P. vivax obtained from infected patients with different disease complications. The data suggests differential regulation of gene expression in diverse clinical conditions, as shown by differing sense/antisense ratios and would lead to future detailed investigations of gene regulation.

  20. Evidence of recent thrust faulting on the Moon revealed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera.

    PubMed

    Watters, Thomas R; Robinson, Mark S; Beyer, Ross A; Banks, Maria E; Bell, James F; Pritchard, Matthew E; Hiesinger, Harald; van der Bogert, Carolyn H; Thomas, Peter C; Turtle, Elizabeth P; Williams, Nathan R

    2010-08-20

    Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera images reveal previously undetected lobate thrust-fault scarps and associated meter-scale secondary tectonic landforms that include narrow extensional troughs or graben, splay faults, and multiple low-relief terraces. Lobate scarps are among the youngest landforms on the Moon, based on their generally crisp appearance, lack of superposed large-diameter impact craters, and the existence of crosscut small-diameter impact craters. Identification of previously known scarps was limited to high-resolution Apollo Panoramic Camera images confined to the equatorial zone. Fourteen lobate scarps were identified, seven of which are at latitudes greater than +/-60 degrees, indicating that the thrust faults are globally distributed. This detection, coupled with the very young apparent age of the faults, suggests global late-stage contraction of the Moon. PMID:20724632

  1. Evidence of liquid phase during laser-induced periodic surface structures formation induced by accumulative ultraviolet picosecond laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Huynh, T. T. D.; Petit, A.; Semmar, N.

    2015-11-09

    Laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) were formed on Cu/Si or Cu/glass thin films using Nd:YAG laser beam (40 ps, 10 Hz, and 30 mJ/cm{sup 2}). The study of ablation threshold is always achieved over melting when the variation of the number of pulses increases from 1 to 1000. But the incubation effect is leading to reduce the threshold of melting as increasing the number of laser pulse. Also, real time reflectivity signals exhibit typical behavior to stress the formation of a liquid phase during the laser-processing regime and helps to determine the threshold of soft ablation. Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) analyses have shown the topology of the micro-crater containing regular spikes with different height. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) allows finally to show three distinguished zones in the close region of isolated protrusions. The central zone is a typical crystallized area of few nanometers surrounded by a mixed poly-crystalline and amorphous area. Finally, in the region far from the protrusion zone, Cu film shows an amorphous structure. The real time reflectivity, AFM, and HR-TEM analyses evidence the formation of a liquid phase during the LIPSS formation in the picosecond regime.

  2. Synchrotron FTIR shows evidence of DNA damage and lipid accumulation in prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells following proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R.; Heraud, Phil; Hirschmugl, Carol; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Tobin, Mark J.; Vogel, Christian; Whelan, Donna; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of single human prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells, irradiated with a defined number of 2 MeV protons generated by a proton microbeam along with non-irradiated control cells, were analysed using multivariate methods. A number of different Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models were tested and the spectral ranges associated with nucleic acids, proteins and lipids were analysed separately. The results show a dose dependent shift of the Osbnd Psbnd O asymmetric stretching mode from 1234 cm-1 to 1237 cm-1, consistent with local disorder in the B-DNA conformation along with a change in intensity of the Osbnd Psbnd O symmetric stretching band at 1083 cm-1 indicative of chromatin fragmentation - the natural consequence of a high number of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs). 2D mapping of characteristic functional groups at the diffraction limit shows evidence of lipid deposition and chromatin condensation in cells exposed to protons indicative of cell apoptosis following irradiation. These studies lay the foundation for understanding the macromolecular changes that occur to cells in response to radiation therapy, which has important implications in the treatment of tumours.

  3. Gene profiling of postnatal Mfrprd6 mutant eyes reveals differential accumulation of Prss56, visual cycle and phototransduction mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Won, Jungyeon; Stearns, Timothy M; Charette, Jeremy R; Hicks, Wanda L; Collin, Gayle B; Naggert, Jürgen K; Krebs, Mark P; Nishina, Patsy M

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP/Mfrp) gene, specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and ciliary body, cause nanophthalmia or posterior microphthalmia with retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. To better understand MFRP function, microarray analysis was performed on eyes of homozygous Mfrprd6 and C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P) 0 and P14, prior to photoreceptor loss. Data analysis revealed no changes at P0 but significant differences in RPE and retina-specific transcripts at P14, suggesting a postnatal influence of the Mfrprd6 allele. A subset of these transcripts was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In Mfrprd6 eyes, a significant 1.5- to 2.0-fold decrease was observed among transcripts of genes linked to retinal degeneration, including those involved in visual cycle (Rpe65, Lrat, Rgr), phototransduction (Pde6a, Guca1b, Rgs9), and photoreceptor disc morphogenesis (Rpgrip1 and Fscn2). Levels of RPE65 were significantly decreased by 2.0-fold. Transcripts of Prss56, a gene associated with angle-closure glaucoma, posterior microphthalmia and myopia, were increased in Mfrprd6 eyes by 17-fold. Validation by qRT-PCR indicated a 3.5-, 14- and 70-fold accumulation of Prss56 transcripts relative to controls at P7, P14 and P21, respectively. This trend was not observed in other RPE or photoreceptor mutant mouse models with similar disease progression, suggesting that Prss56 upregulation is a specific attribute of the disruption of Mfrp. Prss56 and Glul in situ hybridization directly identified Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer as the cell type expressing Prss56. In summary, the Mfrprd6 allele causes significant postnatal changes in transcript and protein levels in the retina and RPE. The link between Mfrp deficiency and Prss56 up-regulation, together with the genetic association of human MFRP or PRSS56 variants and ocular size, raises the possibility that these genes

  4. Gene Profiling of Postnatal Mfrprd6 Mutant Eyes Reveals Differential Accumulation of Prss56, Visual Cycle and Phototransduction mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Won, Jungyeon; Stearns, Timothy M.; Charette, Jeremy R.; Hicks, Wanda L.; Collin, Gayle B.; Naggert, Jürgen K.; Krebs, Mark P.; Nishina, Patsy M.

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the membrane frizzled-related protein (MFRP/Mfrp) gene, specifically expressed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) and ciliary body, cause nanophthalmia or posterior microphthalmia with retinitis pigmentosa in humans, and photoreceptor degeneration in mice. To better understand MFRP function, microarray analysis was performed on eyes of homozygous Mfrprd6 and C57BL/6J mice at postnatal days (P) 0 and P14, prior to photoreceptor loss. Data analysis revealed no changes at P0 but significant differences in RPE and retina-specific transcripts at P14, suggesting a postnatal influence of the Mfrprd6 allele. A subset of these transcripts was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). In Mfrprd6 eyes, a significant 1.5- to 2.0-fold decrease was observed among transcripts of genes linked to retinal degeneration, including those involved in visual cycle (Rpe65, Lrat, Rgr), phototransduction (Pde6a, Guca1b, Rgs9), and photoreceptor disc morphogenesis (Rpgrip1 and Fscn2). Levels of RPE65 were significantly decreased by 2.0-fold. Transcripts of Prss56, a gene associated with angle-closure glaucoma, posterior microphthalmia and myopia, were increased in Mfrprd6 eyes by 17-fold. Validation by qRT-PCR indicated a 3.5-, 14- and 70-fold accumulation of Prss56 transcripts relative to controls at P7, P14 and P21, respectively. This trend was not observed in other RPE or photoreceptor mutant mouse models with similar disease progression, suggesting that Prss56 upregulation is a specific attribute of the disruption of Mfrp. Prss56 and Glul in situ hybridization directly identified Müller glia in the inner nuclear layer as the cell type expressing Prss56. In summary, the Mfrprd6 allele causes significant postnatal changes in transcript and protein levels in the retina and RPE. The link between Mfrp deficiency and Prss56 up-regulation, together with the genetic association of human MFRP or PRSS56 variants and ocular size, raises the possibility that these genes

  5. Archival search for historical atypical scrapie in sheep reveals evidence for mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Chong, Angela; Kennedy, Iain; Goldmann, Wilfred; Green, Andrew; González, Lorenzo; Jeffrey, Martin; Hunter, Nora

    2015-10-01

    Natural scrapie in sheep occurs in classical and atypical forms, which may be distinguished on the basis of the associated neuropathology and properties of the disease-associated prion protein on Western blots. First detected in 1998, atypical scrapie is known to have occurred in UK sheep since the 1980s. However, its aetiology remains unclear and it is often considered as a sporadic, non-contagious disease unlike classical scrapie which is naturally transmissible. Although atypical scrapie tends to occur in sheep of prion protein (PRNP) genotypes that are different from those found predominantly in classical scrapie, there is some overlap so that there are genotypes in which both scrapie forms can occur. In this search for early atypical scrapie cases, we made use of an archive of fixed and frozen sheep samples, from both scrapie-affected and healthy animals (∼1850 individuals), dating back to the 1960s. Using a selection process based primarily on PRNP genotyping, but also on contemporaneous records of unusual clinical signs or pathology, candidate sheep samples were screened by Western blot, immunohistochemistry and strain-typing methods using tg338 mice. We identified, from early time points in the archive, three atypical scrapie cases, including one sheep which died in 1972 and two which showed evidence of mixed infection with classical scrapie. Cases with both forms of scrapie in the same animal as recognizable entities suggest that mixed infections have been around for a long time and may potentially contribute to the variety of scrapie strains.

  6. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence

    PubMed Central

    Avitia, Morena; Escalante, Ana E.; Rebollar, Eria A.; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Eguiarte, Luis E.

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas) that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1) performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2) described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3) calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4) performed neutrality tests, and (5) conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes. PMID:25548732

  7. Molecular Evidence for a Natural Primary Triple Hybrid in Plants Revealed from Direct Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Zdenek; Fehrer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Molecular evidence for natural primary hybrids composed of three different plant species is very rarely reported. An investigation was therefore carried out into the origin and a possible scenario for the rise of a sterile plant clone showing a combination of diagnostic morphological features of three separate, well-defined Potamogeton species. Methods The combination of sequences from maternally inherited cytoplasmic (rpl20-rps12) and biparentally inherited nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS) was used to identify the exact identity of the putative triple hybrid. Key Results Direct sequencing showed ITS variants of three parental taxa, P. gramineus, P. lucens and P. perfoliatus, whereas chloroplast DNA identified P. perfoliatus as the female parent. A scenario for the rise of the triple hybrid through a fertile binary hybrid P. gramineus × P. lucens crossed with P. perfoliatus is described. Conclusions Even though the triple hybrid is sterile, it possesses an efficient strategy for its existence and became locally successful even in the parental environment, perhaps as a result of heterosis. The population investigated is the only one known of this hybrid, P. × torssanderi, worldwide. Isozyme analysis indicated the colony to be genetically uniform. The plants studied represented a single clone that seems to have persisted at this site for a long time. PMID:17478544

  8. Genome-wide Evidence Reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals Are Distinct Species.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Pollinger, John; Godinho, Raquel; Robinson, Jacqueline; Lea, Amanda; Hendricks, Sarah; Schweizer, Rena M; Thalmann, Olaf; Silva, Pedro; Fan, Zhenxin; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Dobrynin, Pavel; Makunin, Alexey; Cahill, James A; Shapiro, Beth; Álvares, Francisco; Brito, José C; Geffen, Eli; Leonard, Jennifer A; Helgen, Kristofer M; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Wayne, Robert K

    2015-08-17

    The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized phylogenetically distinct species despite a long history of taxonomic work on African canids. To test the distinct-species hypothesis and understand the evolutionary history that would account for this puzzling result, we analyzed extensive genomic data including mitochondrial genome sequences, sequences from 20 autosomal loci (17 introns and 3 exon segments), microsatellite loci, X- and Y-linked zinc-finger protein gene (ZFX and ZFY) sequences, and whole-genome nuclear sequences in African and Eurasian golden jackals and gray wolves. Our results provide consistent and robust evidence that populations of golden jackals from Africa and Eurasia represent distinct monophyletic lineages separated for more than one million years, sufficient to merit formal recognition as different species: C. anthus (African golden wolf) and C. aureus (Eurasian golden jackal). Using morphologic data, we demonstrate a striking morphologic similarity between East African and Eurasian golden jackals, suggesting parallelism, which may have misled taxonomists and likely reflects uniquely intense interspecific competition in the East African carnivore guild. Our study shows how ecology can confound taxonomy if interspecific competition constrains size diversification.

  9. Population expansions shared among coexisting bacterial lineages are revealed by genetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Avitia, Morena; Escalante, Ana E; Rebollar, Eria A; Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Eguiarte, Luis E; Souza, Valeria

    2014-01-01

    Comparative population studies can help elucidate the influence of historical events upon current patterns of biodiversity among taxa that coexist in a given geographic area. In particular, comparative assessments derived from population genetics and coalescent theory have been used to investigate population dynamics of bacterial pathogens in order to understand disease epidemics. In contrast, and despite the ecological relevance of non-host associated and naturally occurring bacteria, there is little understanding of the processes determining their diversity. Here we analyzed the patterns of genetic diversity in coexisting populations of three genera of bacteria (Bacillus, Exiguobacterium, and Pseudomonas) that are abundant in the aquatic systems of the Cuatro Cienegas Basin, Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that a common habitat leaves a signature upon the genetic variation present in bacterial populations, independent of phylogenetic relationships. We used multilocus markers to assess genetic diversity and (1) performed comparative phylogenetic analyses, (2) described the genetic structure of bacterial populations, (3) calculated descriptive parameters of genetic diversity, (4) performed neutrality tests, and (5) conducted coalescent-based historical reconstructions. Our results show a trend of synchronic expansions across most populations independent of both lineage and sampling site. Thus, we provide empirical evidence supporting the analysis of coexisting bacterial lineages in natural environments to advance our understanding of bacterial evolution beyond medical or health-related microbes. PMID:25548732

  10. The Palaeolithic occupation of Europe as revealed by evidence from the rivers: data from IGCP 449

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgland, David R.; Antoine, Pierre; Limondin-Lozouet, Nicole; Santisteban, Juan I.; Westaway, Rob; White, Mark J.

    2006-07-01

    IGCP 449 (2000-2004), seeking to correlate fluvial records globally, has compiled a dataset of archaeological records from Pleistocene fluvial sequences. Many terrace sequences can now be reliably dated and correlated with marine oxygen isotope stages (MIS), allowing potentially useful patterns in artefact distribution to be recognised. This review, based on evidence from northwest European and German sequences (Thames, Somme, Ilm, Neckar and Wipper), makes wider comparisons with rivers further east, particularly the Vltava, and with southern Europe, especially Iberia. The northwest and southern areas have early assemblages dominated by handaxes, in contrast with flake-core industries in Germany and further east. Fluvial sequences can provide frameworks for correlation, based on markers within the Palaeolithic record. In northwest Europe the first appearance of artefacts in terrace staircases, the earliest such marker, dates from the mid-late Cromerian Complex. Flake-core industries may have significantly preceded handaxe industries in southern Europe. An important technological innovation - Levallois technique - occurs at the Lower-Middle Palaeolithic boundary, correlated with MIS 9-8. Humans deserted northern Europe during MIS 6, apparently returning to central Germany and northern France (Somme valley) by MIS 5e but not reaching southern England until the appearance of Mousterian culture during MIS 4-3. Copyright

  11. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Dreier, Jes; Sørensen, Jens A.; Brewer, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers that transport their cargo directly through the skin barrier, but mainly burst and fuse with the outer lipid layers of the stratum corneum. It was also found that the flexible liposomes showed a greater delivery of the fluorophore into the stratum corneum, indicating that they functioned as chemical permeability enhancers. PMID:26751684

  12. Do Energy Efficiency Standards Improve Quality? Evidence from a Revealed Preference Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Houde, Sebastien; Spurlock, C. Anna

    2015-06-01

    Minimum energy efficiency standards have occupied a central role in U.S. energy policy for more than three decades, but little is known about their welfare effects. In this paper, we employ a revealed preference approach to quantify the impact of past revisions in energy efficiency standards on product quality. The micro-foundation of our approach is a discrete choice model that allows us to compute a price-adjusted index of vertical quality. Focusing on the appliance market, we show that several standard revisions during the period 2001-2011 have led to an increase in quality. We also show that these standards have had a modest effect on prices, and in some cases they even led to decreases in prices. For revision events where overall quality increases and prices decrease, the consumer welfare effect of tightening the standards is unambiguously positive. Finally, we show that after controlling for the effect of improvement in energy efficiency, standards have induced an expansion of quality in the non-energy dimension. We discuss how imperfect competition can rationalize these results.

  13. Superresolution and Fluorescence Dynamics Evidence Reveal That Intact Liposomes Do Not Cross the Human Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Dreier, Jes; Sørensen, Jens A; Brewer, Jonathan R

    2016-01-01

    In this study we use the combination of super resolution optical microscopy and raster image correlation spectroscopy (RICS) to study the mechanism of action of liposomes as transdermal drug delivery systems in human skin. Two different compositions of liposomes were applied to newly excised human skin, a POPC liposome and a more flexible liposome containing the surfactant sodium cholate. Stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED) images of intact skin and cryo-sections of skin treated with labeled liposomes were recorded displaying an optical resolution low enough to resolve the 100 nm liposomes in the skin. The images revealed that virtually none of the liposomes remained intact beneath the skin surface. RICS two color cross correlation diffusion measurements of double labeled liposomes confirmed these observations. Our results suggest that the liposomes do not act as carriers that transport their cargo directly through the skin barrier, but mainly burst and fuse with the outer lipid layers of the stratum corneum. It was also found that the flexible liposomes showed a greater delivery of the fluorophore into the stratum corneum, indicating that they functioned as chemical permeability enhancers.

  14. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  15. Genome-wide Evidence Reveals that African and Eurasian Golden Jackals Are Distinct Species.

    PubMed

    Koepfli, Klaus-Peter; Pollinger, John; Godinho, Raquel; Robinson, Jacqueline; Lea, Amanda; Hendricks, Sarah; Schweizer, Rena M; Thalmann, Olaf; Silva, Pedro; Fan, Zhenxin; Yurchenko, Andrey A; Dobrynin, Pavel; Makunin, Alexey; Cahill, James A; Shapiro, Beth; Álvares, Francisco; Brito, José C; Geffen, Eli; Leonard, Jennifer A; Helgen, Kristofer M; Johnson, Warren E; O'Brien, Stephen J; Van Valkenburgh, Blaire; Wayne, Robert K

    2015-08-17

    The golden jackal of Africa (Canis aureus) has long been considered a conspecific of jackals distributed throughout Eurasia, with the nearest source populations in the Middle East. However, two recent reports found that mitochondrial haplotypes of some African golden jackals aligned more closely to gray wolves (Canis lupus), which is surprising given the absence of gray wolves in Africa and the phenotypic divergence between the two species. Moreover, these results imply the existence of a previously unrecognized phylogenetically distinct species despite a long history of taxonomic work on African canids. To test the distinct-species hypothesis and understand the evolutionary history that would account for this puzzling result, we analyzed extensive genomic data including mitochondrial genome sequences, sequences from 20 autosomal loci (17 introns and 3 exon segments), microsatellite loci, X- and Y-linked zinc-finger protein gene (ZFX and ZFY) sequences, and whole-genome nuclear sequences in African and Eurasian golden jackals and gray wolves. Our results provide consistent and robust evidence that populations of golden jackals from Africa and Eurasia represent distinct monophyletic lineages separated for more than one million years, sufficient to merit formal recognition as different species: C. anthus (African golden wolf) and C. aureus (Eurasian golden jackal). Using morphologic data, we demonstrate a striking morphologic similarity between East African and Eurasian golden jackals, suggesting parallelism, which may have misled taxonomists and likely reflects uniquely intense interspecific competition in the East African carnivore guild. Our study shows how ecology can confound taxonomy if interspecific competition constrains size diversification. PMID:26234211

  16. Evidence of Viscoelastic Deformation following the 2011 Tohoku-oki Earthquake Revealed from Seafloor Geodetic Observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, S. I.; Sato, M.; Fujita, M.; Ishikawa, T.; Yokota, Y.; Ujihara, N.; Asada, A.

    2014-12-01

    The great Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9.0) occurred on 11th March, 2011 along the Japan Trench, off the Pacific coast of eastern Japan. The source region spreads over an area with a length of 500 km and a width of 200 km, almost all part of which is beneath the seafloor. We, the group of Japan Coast Guard (JCG), have continued repeated GPS-acoustic seafloor positioning after the Tohoku-oki earthquake at six seafloor sites in the offshore source region, the results of which are expected to provide information leading to better understandings of postseismic processes. In contrast to the coastal GNSS sites where trenchward-upward movements were reported, the offshore sites above the main rupture zone in the northern part of the source region exhibit landward displacements of tens of centimeters with significant subsidence from more than three years of repeated observations. At the sites above around the edge of the main rupture zone, smaller amount of trench-normal movements were found. Although the terrestrial movements were reasonably interpreted by afterslip beneath the coastal area, these offshore results are rather consistent with effects predicted from viscoelastic relaxation in the upper mantle, providing definitive evidence of its occurrence. On the other hand, a site in the southern part of the source region with relatively small coseismic slips shows not only trenchward movements with logarithmical decay with time but also significant subsidence, which imply superposition of effects from viscoelastic relaxation and afterslip. In this presentation, we report our latest observation results and discuss postseismic movements on the seafloor just above the source region for more than three years after the earthquake.

  17. Genomic Evidence Reveals Numerous Salmonella enterica Serovar Newport Reintroduction Events in Suwannee Watershed Irrigation Ponds

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Scott A.; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D.; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355–6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce. PMID:26386063

  18. Genomic evidence reveals numerous Salmonella enterica serovar Newport reintroduction events in Suwannee watershed irrigation ponds.

    PubMed

    Li, Baoguang; Jackson, Scott A; Gangiredla, Jayanthi; Wang, Weimin; Liu, Huanli; Tall, Ben D; Beaubrun, Junia Jean-Gilles; Jay-Russell, Michele; Vellidis, George; Elkins, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Our previous work indicated a predominance (56.8%) of Salmonella enterica serovar Newport among isolates recovered from irrigation ponds used in produce farms over a 2-year period (B. Li et al., Appl Environ Microbiol 80:6355-6365, http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/AEM.02063-14). This observation provided a valuable set of metrics to explore an underaddressed issue of environmental survival of Salmonella by DNA microarray. Microarray analysis correctly identified all the isolates (n = 53) and differentiated the S. Newport isolates into two phylogenetic lineages (S. Newport II and S. Newport III). Serovar distribution analysis showed no instances where the same serovar was recovered from a pond for more than a month. Furthermore, during the study, numerous isolates with an indistinguishable genotype were recovered from different ponds as far as 180 km apart for time intervals as long as 2 years. Although isolates within either lineage were phylogenetically related as determined by microarray analysis, subtle genotypic differences were detected within the lineages, suggesting that isolates in either lineage could have come from several unique hosts. For example, strains in four different subgroups (A, B, C, and D) possessed an indistinguishable genotype within their subgroups as measured by gene differences, suggesting that strains in each subgroup shared a common host. Based on this comparative genomic evidence and the spatial and temporal factors, we speculated that the presence of Salmonella in the ponds was likely due to numerous punctuated reintroduction events associated with several different but common hosts in the environment. These findings may have implications for the development of strategies for efficient and safe irrigation to minimize the risk of Salmonella outbreaks associated with fresh produce.

  19. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  20. Meteorological variation in daily travel behaviour: evidence from revealed preference data from the Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creemers, Lieve; Wets, Geert; Cools, Mario

    2015-04-01

    This study investigates the meteorological variation in revealed preference travel data. The main objective of this study is to investigate the impact of weather conditions on daily activity participation (trip motives) and daily modal choices in the Netherlands. To this end, data from the Dutch National Travel Household Survey of 2008 were matched to hourly weather data provided by the Royal Dutch Meteorological Institute and were complemented with thermal indices to indicate the level of thermal comfort and additional variables to indicate the seasonality of the weather conditions. Two multinomial logit-generalised estimation equations (MNL-GEE) models were constructed, one to assess the impact of weather conditions on trip motives and one to assess the effect of weather conditions on modal choice. The modelling results indicate that, depending on the travel attribute of concern, other factors might play a role. Nonetheless, the thermal component, as well as the aesthetical component and the physical component of weather play a significant role. Moreover, the parameter estimates indicate significant differences in the impact of weather conditions when different time scales are considered (e.g. daily versus hourly based). The fact that snow does not play any role at all was unexpected. This finding can be explained by the relatively low occurrence of this weather type in the study area. It is important to consider the effects of weather in travel demand modelling frameworks because this will help to achieve higher accuracy and more realistic traffic forecasts. These will in turn allow policy makers to make better long-term and short-term decisions to achieve various political goals, such as progress towards a sustainable transportation system. Further research in this respect should emphasise the role of weather conditions and activity-scheduling attributes.

  1. Comparative genomic analysis reveals evidence of two novel Vibrio species closely related to V. cholerae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In recent years genome sequencing has been used to characterize new bacterial species, a method of analysis available as a result of improved methodology and reduced cost. Included in a constantly expanding list of Vibrio species are several that have been reclassified as novel members of the Vibrionaceae. The description of two putative new Vibrio species, Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 for which we propose the names V. metecus and V. parilis, respectively, previously characterized as non-toxigenic environmental variants of V. cholerae is presented in this study. Results Based on results of whole-genome average nucleotide identity (ANI), average amino acid identity (AAI), rpoB similarity, MLSA, and phylogenetic analysis, the new species are concluded to be phylogenetically closely related to V. cholerae and V. mimicus. Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 demonstrate features characteristic of V. cholerae and V. mimicus, respectively, on differential and selective media, but their genomes show a 12 to 15% divergence (88 to 85% ANI and 92 to 91% AAI) compared to the sequences of V. cholerae and V. mimicus genomes (ANI <95% and AAI <96% indicative of separate species). Vibrio sp. RC341 and Vibrio sp. RC586 share 2104 ORFs (59%) and 2058 ORFs (56%) with the published core genome of V. cholerae and 2956 (82%) and 3048 ORFs (84%) with V. mimicus MB-451, respectively. The novel species share 2926 ORFs with each other (81% Vibrio sp. RC341 and 81% Vibrio sp. RC586). Virulence-associated factors and genomic islands of V. cholerae and V. mimicus, including VSP-I and II, were found in these environmental Vibrio spp. Conclusions Results of this analysis demonstrate these two environmental vibrios, previously characterized as variant V. cholerae strains, are new species which have evolved from ancestral lineages of the V. cholerae and V. mimicus clade. The presence of conserved integration loci for genomic islands as well as evidence of horizontal gene

  2. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  3. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement. PMID:26791570

  4. A bulk segregant transcriptome analysis reveals metabolic and cellular processes associated with melon orange allelic variation and fruit B-carotene accumulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Melon fruit flesh color is primarily controlled by the “golden” single nucleotide polymorhism of the “Orange” gene, CmOr, which dominantly triggers the accumulation of the pro-vitamin A molecule, B-carotene, in the fruit mesocarp. The mechanism by which CmOr operates is not fully underst...

  5. Proteomics Profiling Reveals Carbohydrate Metabolic Enzymes and 14-3-3 Proteins Play Important Roles for Starch Accumulation during Cassava Root Tuberization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuchu; Chang, Lili; Tong, Zheng; Wang, Dongyang; Yin, Qi; Wang, Dan; Jin, Xiang; Yang, Qian; Wang, Liming; Sun, Yong; Huang, Qixing; Guo, Anping; Peng, Ming

    2016-01-21

    Cassava is one of the most important root crops as a reliable source of food and carbohydrates. Carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation in cassava storage root is a cascade process that includes large amounts of proteins and cofactors. Here, comparative proteomics were conducted in cassava root at nine developmental stages. A total of 154 identified proteins were found to be differentially expressed during starch accumulation and root tuberization. Many enzymes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism were significantly up-regulated, and functional classification of the differentially expressed proteins demonstrated that the majority were binding-related enzymes. Many proteins were took part in carbohydrate metabolism to produce energy. Among them, three 14-3-3 isoforms were induced to be clearly phosphorylated during storage root enlargement. Overexpression of a cassava 14-3-3 gene in Arabidopsis thaliana confirmed that the older leaves of these transgenic plants contained higher sugar and starch contents than the wild-type leaves. The 14-3-3 proteins and their binding enzymes may play important roles in carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root tuberization. These results not only deepened our understanding of the tuberous root proteome, but also uncovered new insights into carbohydrate metabolism and starch accumulation during cassava root enlargement.

  6. Empirical evidence for musical syntax processing? Computer simulations reveal the contribution of auditory short-term memory.

    PubMed

    Bigand, Emmanuel; Delbé, Charles; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte; Leman, Marc; Tillmann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, it has been argued that (1) music processing involves syntactic representations similar to those observed in language, and (2) that music and language share similar syntactic-like processes and neural resources. This claim is important for understanding the origin of music and language abilities and, furthermore, it has clinical implications. The Western musical system, however, is rooted in psychoacoustic properties of sound, and this is not the case for linguistic syntax. Accordingly, musical syntax processing could be parsimoniously understood as an emergent property of auditory memory rather than a property of abstract processing similar to linguistic processing. To support this view, we simulated numerous empirical studies that investigated the processing of harmonic structures, using a model based on the accumulation of sensory information in auditory memory. The simulations revealed that most of the musical syntax manipulations used with behavioral and neurophysiological methods as well as with developmental and cross-cultural approaches can be accounted for by the auditory memory model. This led us to question whether current research on musical syntax can really be compared with linguistic processing. Our simulation also raises methodological and theoretical challenges to study musical syntax while disentangling the confounded low-level sensory influences. In order to investigate syntactic abilities in music comparable to language, research should preferentially use musical material with structures that circumvent the tonal effect exerted by psychoacoustic properties of sounds.

  7. Empirical evidence for musical syntax processing? Computer simulations reveal the contribution of auditory short-term memory

    PubMed Central

    Bigand, Emmanuel; Delbé, Charles; Poulin-Charronnat, Bénédicte; Leman, Marc; Tillmann, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, it has been argued that (1) music processing involves syntactic representations similar to those observed in language, and (2) that music and language share similar syntactic-like processes and neural resources. This claim is important for understanding the origin of music and language abilities and, furthermore, it has clinical implications. The Western musical system, however, is rooted in psychoacoustic properties of sound, and this is not the case for linguistic syntax. Accordingly, musical syntax processing could be parsimoniously understood as an emergent property of auditory memory rather than a property of abstract processing similar to linguistic processing. To support this view, we simulated numerous empirical studies that investigated the processing of harmonic structures, using a model based on the accumulation of sensory information in auditory memory. The simulations revealed that most of the musical syntax manipulations used with behavioral and neurophysiological methods as well as with developmental and cross-cultural approaches can be accounted for by the auditory memory model. This led us to question whether current research on musical syntax can really be compared with linguistic processing. Our simulation also raises methodological and theoretical challenges to study musical syntax while disentangling the confounded low-level sensory influences. In order to investigate syntactic abilities in music comparable to language, research should preferentially use musical material with structures that circumvent the tonal effect exerted by psychoacoustic properties of sounds. PMID:24936174

  8. Tissue-specific knockouts of ACAT2 reveal that intestinal depletion is sufficient to prevent diet-induced cholesterol accumulation in the liver and blood[S

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Kelley, Kathryn L.; Marshall, Stephanie M.; Davis, Matthew A.; Wilson, Martha D.; Sawyer, Janet K.; Farese, Robert V.; Brown, J. Mark; Rudel, Lawrence L.

    2012-01-01

    Acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) generates cholesterol esters (CE) for packaging into newly synthesized lipoproteins and thus is a major determinant of blood cholesterol levels. ACAT2 is expressed exclusively in the small intestine and liver, but the relative contributions of ACAT2 expression in these tissues to systemic cholesterol metabolism is unknown. We investigated whether CE derived from the intestine or liver would differentially affect hepatic and plasma cholesterol homeostasis. We generated liver-specific (ACAT2L−/L−) and intestine-specific (ACAT2SI−/SI−) ACAT2 knockout mice and studied dietary cholesterol-induced hepatic lipid accumulation and hypercholesterolemia. ACAT2SI−/SI− mice, in contrast to ACAT2L−/L− mice, had blunted cholesterol absorption. However, specific deletion of ACAT2 in the intestine generated essentially a phenocopy of the conditional knockout of ACAT2 in the liver, with reduced levels of plasma very low-density lipoprotein and hepatic CE, yet hepatic-free cholesterol does not build up after high cholesterol intake. ACAT2L−/L− and ACAT2SI−/SI− mice were equally protected from diet-induced hepatic CE accumulation and hypercholesterolemia. These results suggest that inhibition of intestinal or hepatic ACAT2 improves atherogenic hyperlipidemia and limits hepatic CE accumulation in mice and that depletion of intestinal ACAT2 is sufficient for most of the beneficial effects on cholesterol metabolism. Inhibitors of ACAT2 targeting either tissue likely would be beneficial for atheroprotection. PMID:22460046

  9. Affected-sib-pair analyses reveal support of prior evidence for a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder, on 21q

    SciTech Connect

    Detera-Wadleigh, S.D.; Badner, J.A.; Goldin, L.R.

    1996-06-01

    In 22 multiplex pedigrees screened for linkage to bipolar disorder, by use of 18 markers on chromosome 21q, single-locus affected-sib-pair (ASP) analysis detected a high proportion (57%-62%) of alleles shared identical by descent (IBD), with P values of .049-.0008 on nine marker loci. Multilocus ASP analyses revealed locus trios in the distal region between D21S270 and D21S171, with excess allele sharing (nominal P values <.01) under two affection-status models, ASM I (bipolars and schizoaffectives) and ASM II (ASM I plus recurrent unipolars). In addition, under ASM I, the proximal interval spanned by D21S1436 and D21S65 showed locus trios with excess allele sharing (nominal P values of .03-.0003). These findings support prior evidence that a susceptibility locus for bipolar disorder is on 21q. 38 refs., 4 tabs.

  10. The Undernourished Neonatal Mouse Metabolome Reveals Evidence of Liver and Biliary Dysfunction, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress123

    PubMed Central

    Preidis, Geoffrey A.; Keaton, Mignon A.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Bessard, Brooke C.; Conner, Margaret E.; Hotez, Peter J.

    2014-01-01

    Undernutrition contributes to half of all childhood deaths under the age of 5 y, and confers upon survivors a life-long predisposition to obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Mechanisms underlying the link between early nutrient deprivation and noncommunicable diseases are unknown. Using outbred CD1 neonatal mice, we measured metabolic profile differences between conventionally reared mice given unrestricted access to nursing, the control group, and undernourished mice subjected to protein-calorie deprivation through timed separation from lactating mothers. After 11 d of undernutrition, urine, plasma, liver, ileal fluid, cecal fluid, and stool were harvested from 8 pools of 4 neonatal mice per group. The metabolome was identified using a multiplatform mass spectrometry-based approach, and random forest metrics were used to identify the most important metabolites that distinguished the undernourished from the control group. Our data reveal striking metabolic changes in undernourished mice consistent with the known mammalian response to starvation, including evidence of muscle and fat catabolism and increased reliance on the tricarboxylic acid cycle for energy. However, we also revealed evidence of liver and biliary injury, anomalies in bile acid metabolism, oxidative stress and inflammation, accelerated heme breakdown, and altered regulation of DNA methylation. Among the metabolites that most strongly distinguished the 2 groups were 2-hydroxyisobutyrate, increased 3-fold in plasma of undernourished mice (P = 2.19 × 10−11); urobilinogen, increased 11-fold in urine of undernourished mice (P = 4.22 × 10−7); deoxycholate, decreased 94% in stool of undernourished mice (P = 3.0 × 10−4); and 12 different products of the enzyme γ-glutamyltransferase, increased in all 6 compartments of undernourished mice. This model of the undernourished neonatal metabolome illustrates the wide range of pathways disrupted by undernutrition in early development

  11. In-Depth Investigation of Archival and Prospectively Collected Samples Reveals No Evidence for XMRV Infection in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Deanna; Das Gupta, Jaydip; Gaughan, Christina; Steffen, Imke; Tang, Ning; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Qiu, Xiaoxing; Urisman, Anatoly; Fischer, Nicole; Molinaro, Ross; Broz, Miranda; Schochetman, Gerald; Klein, Eric A.; Ganem, Don; DeRisi, Joseph L.; Simmons, Graham; Hackett, John; Silverman, Robert H.; Chiu, Charles Y.

    2012-01-01

    XMRV, or xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus, is a novel gammaretrovirus originally identified in studies that analyzed tissue from prostate cancer patients in 2006 and blood from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in 2009. However, a large number of subsequent studies failed to confirm a link between XMRV infection and CFS or prostate cancer. On the contrary, recent evidence indicates that XMRV is a contaminant originating from the recombination of two mouse endogenous retroviruses during passaging of a prostate tumor xenograft (CWR22) in mice, generating laboratory-derived cell lines that are XMRV-infected. To confirm or refute an association between XMRV and prostate cancer, we analyzed prostate cancer tissues and plasma from a prospectively collected cohort of 39 patients as well as archival RNA and prostate tissue from the original 2006 study. Despite comprehensive microarray, PCR, FISH, and serological testing, XMRV was not detected in any of the newly collected samples or in archival tissue, although archival RNA remained XMRV-positive. Notably, archival VP62 prostate tissue, from which the prototype XMRV strain was derived, tested negative for XMRV on re-analysis. Analysis of viral genomic and human mitochondrial sequences revealed that all previously characterized XMRV strains are identical and that the archival RNA had been contaminated by an XMRV-infected laboratory cell line. These findings reveal no association between XMRV and prostate cancer, and underscore the conclusion that XMRV is not a naturally acquired human infection. PMID:23028701

  12. In-depth investigation of archival and prospectively collected samples reveals no evidence for XMRV infection in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Deanna; Das Gupta, Jaydip; Gaughan, Christina; Steffen, Imke; Tang, Ning; Luk, Ka-Cheung; Qiu, Xiaoxing; Urisman, Anatoly; Fischer, Nicole; Molinaro, Ross; Broz, Miranda; Schochetman, Gerald; Klein, Eric A; Ganem, Don; Derisi, Joseph L; Simmons, Graham; Hackett, John; Silverman, Robert H; Chiu, Charles Y

    2012-01-01

    XMRV, or xenotropic murine leukemia virus (MLV)-related virus, is a novel gammaretrovirus originally identified in studies that analyzed tissue from prostate cancer patients in 2006 and blood from patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) in 2009. However, a large number of subsequent studies failed to confirm a link between XMRV infection and CFS or prostate cancer. On the contrary, recent evidence indicates that XMRV is a contaminant originating from the recombination of two mouse endogenous retroviruses during passaging of a prostate tumor xenograft (CWR22) in mice, generating laboratory-derived cell lines that are XMRV-infected. To confirm or refute an association between XMRV and prostate cancer, we analyzed prostate cancer tissues and plasma from a prospectively collected cohort of 39 patients as well as archival RNA and prostate tissue from the original 2006 study. Despite comprehensive microarray, PCR, FISH, and serological testing, XMRV was not detected in any of the newly collected samples or in archival tissue, although archival RNA remained XMRV-positive. Notably, archival VP62 prostate tissue, from which the prototype XMRV strain was derived, tested negative for XMRV on re-analysis. Analysis of viral genomic and human mitochondrial sequences revealed that all previously characterized XMRV strains are identical and that the archival RNA had been contaminated by an XMRV-infected laboratory cell line. These findings reveal no association between XMRV and prostate cancer, and underscore the conclusion that XMRV is not a naturally acquired human infection.

  13. Metabolome Analysis Reveals Betaine Lipids as Major Source for Triglyceride Formation, and the Accumulation of Sedoheptulose during Nitrogen-Starvation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum

    PubMed Central

    Popko, Jennifer; Herrfurth, Cornelia; Feussner, Kirstin; Ischebeck, Till; Iven, Tim; Haslam, Richard; Hamilton, Mary; Sayanova, Olga; Napier, Jonathan; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna

    2016-01-01

    Oleaginous microalgae are considered as a promising resource for the production of biofuels. Especially diatoms arouse interest as biofuel producers since they are most productive in carbon fixation and very flexible to environmental changes in the nature. Naturally, triacylglycerol (TAG) accumulation in algae only occurs under stress conditions like nitrogen-limitation. We focused on Phaeodactylum strain Pt4 (UTEX 646), because of its ability to grow in medium with low salinity and therefore being suited when saline water is less available or for wastewater cultivation strategies. Our data show an increase in neutral lipids during nitrogen-depletion and predominantly 16:0 and 16:1(n-7) accumulated in the TAG fraction. The molecular species composition of TAG suggests a remodeling primarily from the betaine lipid diacylglyceroltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS), but a contribution of the chloroplast galactolipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG) cannot be excluded. Interestingly, the acyl-CoA pool is rich in 20:5(n-3) and 22:6(n-3) in all analyzed conditions, but these fatty acids are almost excluded from TAG. Other metabolites most obviously depleted under nitrogen-starvation were amino acids, lyso-phospholipids and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates, whereas sulfur-containing metabolites as dimethylsulfoniopropionate, dimethylsulfoniobutyrate and methylsulfate as well as short acyl chain carnitines, propanoyl-carnitine and butanoyl-carnitine increased upon nitrogen-starvation. Moreover, the Calvin cycle may be de-regulated since sedoheptulose accumulated after nitrogen-depletion. Together the data provide now the basis for new strategies to improve lipid production and storage in Phaeodactylum strain Pt4. PMID:27736949

  14. Characterization of Phosphofructokinase Activity in Mycobacterium tuberculosis Reveals That a Functional Glycolytic Carbon Flow Is Necessary to Limit the Accumulation of Toxic Metabolic Intermediates under Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Phong, Wai Yee; Lin, Wenwei; Rao, Srinivasa P. S.; Dick, Thomas; Alonso, Sylvie; Pethe, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    Metabolic versatility has been increasingly recognized as a major virulence mechanism that enables Mycobacterium tuberculosis to persist in many microenvironments encountered in its host. Glucose is one of the most abundant carbon sources that is exploited by many pathogenic bacteria in the human host. M. tuberculosis has an intact glycolytic pathway that is highly conserved in all clinical isolates sequenced to date suggesting that glucose may represent a non-negligible source of carbon and energy for this pathogen in vivo. Fructose-6-phosphate phosphorylation represents the key-committing step in glycolysis and is catalyzed by a phosphofructokinase (PFK) activity. Two genes, pfkA and pfkB have been annotated to encode putative PFK in M. tuberculosis. Here, we show that PFKA is the sole PFK enzyme in M. tuberculosis with no functional redundancy with PFKB. PFKA is required for growth on glucose as sole carbon source. In co-metabolism experiments, we report that disruption of the glycolytic pathway at the PFK step results in intracellular accumulation of sugar-phosphates that correlated with significant impairment of the cell viability. Concomitantly, we found that the presence of glucose is highly toxic for the long-term survival of hypoxic non-replicating mycobacteria, suggesting that accumulation of glucose-derived toxic metabolites does occur in the absence of sustained aerobic respiration. The culture medium traditionally used to study the physiology of hypoxic mycobacteria is supplemented with glucose. In this medium, M. tuberculosis can survive for only 7–10 days in a true non-replicating state before death is observed. By omitting glucose in the medium this period could be extended for up to at least 40 days without significant viability loss. Therefore, our study suggests that glycolysis leads to accumulation of glucose-derived toxic metabolites that limits long-term survival of hypoxic mycobacteria. Such toxic effect is exacerbated when the glycolytic

  15. Genome-wide RNA polymerase II profiles and RNA accumulation reveal kinetics of transcription and associated epigenetic changes during diurnal cycles.

    PubMed

    Le Martelot, Gwendal; Canella, Donatella; Symul, Laura; Migliavacca, Eugenia; Gilardi, Federica; Liechti, Robin; Martin, Olivier; Harshman, Keith; Delorenzi, Mauro; Desvergne, Béatrice; Herr, Winship; Deplancke, Bart; Schibler, Ueli; Rougemont, Jacques; Guex, Nicolas; Hernandez, Nouria; Naef, Felix

    2012-01-01

    Interactions of cell-autonomous circadian oscillators with diurnal cycles govern the temporal compartmentalization of cell physiology in mammals. To understand the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of diurnal rhythms in mouse liver genome-wide, we generated temporal DNA occupancy profiles by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) as well as profiles of the histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K36me3. We used these data to quantify the relationships of phases and amplitudes between different marks. We found that rhythmic Pol II recruitment at promoters rather than rhythmic transition from paused to productive elongation underlies diurnal gene transcription, a conclusion further supported by modeling. Moreover, Pol II occupancy preceded mRNA accumulation by 3 hours, consistent with mRNA half-lives. Both methylation marks showed that the epigenetic landscape is highly dynamic and globally remodeled during the 24-hour cycle. While promoters of transcribed genes had tri-methylated H3K4 even at their trough activity times, tri-methylation levels reached their peak, on average, 1 hour after Pol II. Meanwhile, rhythms in tri-methylation of H3K36 lagged transcription by 3 hours. Finally, modeling profiles of Pol II occupancy and mRNA accumulation identified three classes of genes: one showing rhythmicity both in transcriptional and mRNA accumulation, a second class with rhythmic transcription but flat mRNA levels, and a third with constant transcription but rhythmic mRNAs. The latter class emphasizes widespread temporally gated posttranscriptional regulation in the mouse liver.

  16. Differential regulation of grain sucrose accumulation and metabolism in Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) revealed through gene expression and enzyme activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Privat, Isabelle; Foucrier, Séverine; Prins, Anneke; Epalle, Thibaut; Eychenne, Magali; Kandalaft, Laurianne; Caillet, Victoria; Lin, Chenwei; Tanksley, Steve; Foyer, Christine; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    * Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) are the two main cultivated species used for coffee bean production. Arabica genotypes generally produce a higher coffee quality than Robusta genotypes. Understanding the genetic basis for sucrose accumulation during coffee grain maturation is an important goal because sucrose is an important coffee flavor precursor. * Nine new Coffea genes encoding sucrose metabolism enzymes have been identified: sucrose phosphate synthase (CcSPS1, CcSPS2), sucrose phosphate phosphatase (CcSP1), cytoplasmic (CaInv3) and cell wall (CcInv4) invertases and four invertase inhibitors (CcInvI1, 2, 3, 4). * Activities and mRNA abundance of the sucrose metabolism enzymes were compared at different developmental stages in Arabica and Robusta grains, characterized by different sucrose contents in mature grain. * It is concluded that Robusta accumulates less sucrose than Arabica for two reasons: Robusta has higher sucrose synthase and acid invertase activities early in grain development - the expression of CcSS1 and CcInv2 appears to be crucial at this stage and Robusta has a lower SPS activity and low CcSPS1 expression at the final stages of grain development and hence has less capacity for sucrose re-synthesis. Regulation of vacuolar invertase CcInv2 activity by invertase inhibitors CcInvI2 and/or CcInvI3 during Arabica grain development is considered. PMID:18384509

  17. MicroRNA profiling analysis throughout tomato fruit development and ripening reveals potential regulatory role of RIN on microRNAs accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Chao; Ju, Zheng; Cao, Dongyan; Zhai, Baiqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Zhu, Hongliang; Fu, Daqi; Luo, Yunbo; Zhu, Benzhong

    2015-04-01

    The development and ripening of tomato fruit are complex processes involving many gene regulatory pathways at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Ripening inhibitor (RIN) is a vital transcription factor, which targets numerous ripening-related genes at the transcriptional level during tomato fruit ripening. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of short noncoding RNAs that play important roles in post-transcriptional gene regulation. To elucidate the potential regulatory relationship between rin and miRNAs during fruit development and ripening, we identified known miRNAs and profiled their expression in wild-type tomato and rin mutant using a deep sequencing approach combined with quantitative RT-PCR. A total of 33 known miRNA families were identified, of which 14 miRNA families were differently accumulated. Subsequent promoter analysis showed that possible RIN-binding motifs (CArG-box) tended to occur frequently in the promoter regions of partial differently expressed miRNAs. In addition, ethylene may participate in the regulation of miRNAs accumulation during tomato fruit ripening. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and electrophoretic mobility shift assay confirmed the direct binding of RIN to the promoter of MIR172a. Collectively, these results showed a close correlation between miRNA expression and RIN as well as ethylene, which further elucidated the regulatory roles of miRNAs during fruit development and ripening and enriched the regulatory network of RIN in tomato fruit.

  18. Comparative proteomics of a lycopene-accumulating mutant reveals the important role of oxidative stress on carotenogenesis in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] osbeck).

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhiyong; Liu, Qing; Yun, Ze; Guan, Rui; Zeng, Wenfang; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2009-12-01

    A spontaneous sweet orange (Citrus sinenesis [L.] Osbeck) mutant 'Hong Anliu' is of high value due to lycopene accumulation in the pulp. In this study, we analyzed the proteomic alterations in the pulp of 'Hong Anliu' versus its wild type (WT) at four maturing stages by using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Among the 74 differentially expressed proteins identified, the majority are predicted to be involved in stress response, carbohydrate/energy metabolism and regulation, or protein fate, modification and degradation. Particularly, expression levels of six anti-oxidative enzymes were altered by the mutation; and assays of their respective enzymatic activities indicated an enhanced level of oxidative stress in 'Hong Anliu', implying a regulatory role of oxidative stress on carotenogenesis. This conclusion was further confirmed by our observation that treatment of fruit pulps with tert-butylhydroperoxide (a ROS progenitor) induced lycopene accumulation in 'Hong Anliu' only. Gene expression showed that genes predicted to function upstream of lycopene biosynthesis were generally upregulated in juice sacs, but downregulated in segment membranes in both 'Hong Anliu' and its WT. The result suggests an important role of post-transcriptional regulation on carotenogenesis since lycopene was induced in 'Hong Anliu' but not WT. The result also implies that carotenogenesis in juice sacs and segment membranes of citrus fruits may be regulated by different mechanisms.

  19. Chloride accumulation in the soil and groundwater under a downslope oak hedge reveals the impressive evapotranspiration of wooded linear structures below a temperate climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimaldi, C.; Thomas, Z.; Merot, Ph.

    2009-04-01

    Although it is an essential element in plants, Cl- is excluded to a large extent by roots during absorption of water and nutrients, and its concentration rises as a function of evapotranspiration. Compared to herbaceous vegetation, high transpiration rates are measured for hedgerow trees. This article deals with the influence of a tree hedge on the soil and groundwater Cl- concentrations and with the possibility to use Cl- as an indicator of transpiration and water movements in the hedge vicinity. Cl- concentrations were measured over one year at different depths in the unsaturated zone and in the groundwater along a transect intersecting a bottomland oak hedge in the North-West of France, under an oceanic wet temperate climate. We observed a strong spatial variation of Cl- concentrations, with very high values up to 2 g L-1 in the unsaturated zone and 1.2 g L-1 in the upper part of the groundwater. These concentrations contrasted with the low values measured in the unsaturated zone far from the hedge (10 mg L-1) and in the deepest part of the groundwater (60-70 mg L-1). Cl- accumulation in the unsaturated zone at the end of the growing season allowed us to identify the active root zone extension of trees. The root zone begins at the surface under the hedge and widens out at depth at an increasing distance from the hedge, extending laterally on at least 10 m on both sides of the hedge. While the root zone is deeper at the upslope side of the hedge, it is nearer the ground surface downslope, where the development of roots is limited by the water-table close to the surface. Cl- concentrations varied along the year. In winter, upslope of the hedge, downwards leaching partly renewed the soil solution, while under the hedge or farther downslope the lack of any significant water movement resulted in Cl- accumulation. For a bottomland hedge, the proximity of the water-table probably increases the water availability of water for tree transpiration. The measurement of Cl

  20. Uranium Bio-accumulation and Cycling as revealed by Uranium Isotopes in Naturally Reduced Sediments from the Upper Colorado River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefebvre, Pierre; Noël, Vincent; Jemison, Noah; Weaver, Karrie; Bargar, John; Maher, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Uranium (U) groundwater contamination following oxidized U(VI) releases from weathering of mine tailings is a major concern at numerous sites across the Upper Colorado River Basin (CRB), USA. Uranium(IV)-bearing solids accumulated within naturally reduced zones (NRZs) characterized by elevated organic carbon and iron sulfide compounds. Subsequent re-oxidation of U(IV)solid to U(VI)aqueous then controls the release to groundwater and surface water, resulting in plume persistence and raising public health concerns. Thus, understanding the extent of uranium oxidation and reduction within NRZs is critical for assessing the persistence of the groundwater contamination. In this study, we measured solid-phase uranium isotope fractionation (δ238/235U) of sedimentary core samples from four study sites (Shiprock, NM, Grand Junction, Rifle and Naturita, CO) using a multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (MC-ICP-MS). We observe a strong correlation between U accumulation and the extent of isotopic fractionation, with Δ238U up to +1.8 ‰ between uranium-enriched and low concentration zones. The enrichment in the heavy isotopes within the NRZs appears to be especially important in the vadose zone, which is subject to variations in water table depth. According to previous studies, this isotopic signature is consistent with biotic reduction processes associated with metal-reducing bacteria. Positive correlations between the amount of iron sulfides and the accumulation of reduced uranium underline the importance of sulfate-reducing conditions for U(IV) retention. Furthermore, the positive fractionation associated with U reduction observed across all sites despite some variations in magnitude due to site characteristics, shows a regional trend across the Colorado River Basin. The maximum extent of 238U enrichment observed in the NRZ proximal to the water table further suggests that the redox cycling of uranium, with net release of U(VI) to the groundwater by

  1. Comparative Analyses of Three Chlorella Species in Response to Light and Sugar Reveal Distinctive Lipid Accumulation Patterns in the Microalga C. sorokiniana

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Austin; Noel, Eric A.; Betenbaugh, Michael J.; Oyler, George A.

    2014-01-01

    While photosynthetic microalgae, such as Chlorella, serve as feedstocks for nutritional oils and biofuels, heterotrophic cultivation can augment growth rates, support high cell densities, and increase triacylglycerol (TAG) lipid content. However, these species differ significantly in their photoautotrophic and heterotrophic characteristics. In this study, the phylogeny of thirty Chlorella strains was determined in order to inform bioprospecting efforts and detailed physiological assessment of three species. The growth kinetics and lipid biochemistry of C. protothecoides UTEX 411, C. vulgaris UTEX 265, and C. sorokiniana UTEX 1230 were quantified during photoautotrophy in Bold's basal medium (BBM) and heterotrophy in BBM supplemented with glucose (10 g L−1). Heterotrophic growth rates of UTEX 411, 265, and 1230 were found to be 1.5-, 3.7-, and 5-fold higher than their respective autotrophic rates. With a rapid nine-hour heterotrophic doubling time, Chlorella sorokiniana UTEX 1230 maximally accumulated 39% total lipids by dry weight during heterotrophy compared to 18% autotrophically. Furthermore, the discrete fatty acid composition of each strain was examined in order to elucidate lipid accumulation patterns under the two trophic conditions. In both modes of growth, UTEX 411 and 265 produced 18∶1 as the principal fatty acid while UTEX 1230 exhibited a 2.5-fold enrichment in 18∶2 relative to 18∶1. Although the total lipid content was highest in UTEX 411 during heterotrophy, UTEX 1230 demonstrated a two-fold increase in its heterotrophic TAG fraction at a rate of 28.9 mg L−1 d−1 to reach 22% of the biomass, corresponding to as much as 90% of its total lipids. Interestingly, UTEX 1230 growth was restricted during mixotrophy and its TAG production rate was suppressed to 18.2 mg L−1 d−1. This constraint on carbon flow raises intriguing questions about the impact of sugar and light on the metabolic regulation of microalgal lipid biosynthesis. PMID:24699196

  2. Combined transcriptome and metabolite profiling reveals that IiPLR1 plays an important role in lariciresinol accumulation in Isatis indigotica.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Ji, Qian; Gao, Shouhong; Tan, Hexin; Chen, Ruibing; Li, Qing; Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Yingbo; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhengtao; Chen, Wansheng; Hu, Zhibi

    2015-10-01

    A lignan, lariciresinol, is an important efficacious compound for the antiviral effect of Isatis indigotica, a widely used herb for the treatment of colds, fever, and influenza. Although some rate-limiting steps of the lariciresinol biosynthetic pathway are well known, the specific roles of gene family members in I. indigotica in regulating lariciresinol production are poorly understood. In the present study, a correlation analysis between the RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) expression profile and lignan content by using I. indigotica hairy roots treated with methyl jamonate (0.5 μM) at different time points as a source implicated that I. indigotica pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase 1 (IiPLR1), but not IiPLR2 or IiPLR3, contributed greatly to lariciresinol accumulation. Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that IiPLR1 indeed influenced lariciresinol biosynthesis, whereas suppression of IiPLR2 or IiPLR3 did not change lariciresinol abundance significantly. IiPLR1 was thus further characterized; IiPLR1 was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of I. indigotica, with the highest expression in roots, and it responds to different stress treatments to various degrees. Recombinant IiPLR1 reduces both (±)-pinoresinol and (±)-lariciresinol efficiently, with comparative K cat/K m values. Furthermore, overexpression of IiPLR1 significantly enhanced lariciresinol accumulation in I. indigotica hairy roots, and the best line (ovx-2) produced 353.9 μg g(-1) lariciresinol, which was ~6.3-fold more than the wild type. This study sheds light on how to increase desired metabolites effectively by more accurate or appropriate genetic engineering strategies, and also provides an effective approach for the large-scale commercial production of pharmaceutically valuable lariciresinol by using hairy root culture systems as bioreactors.

  3. Combined transcriptome and metabolite profiling reveals that IiPLR1 plays an important role in lariciresinol accumulation in Isatis indigotica.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Ji, Qian; Gao, Shouhong; Tan, Hexin; Chen, Ruibing; Li, Qing; Chen, Junfeng; Yang, Yingbo; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Zhengtao; Chen, Wansheng; Hu, Zhibi

    2015-10-01

    A lignan, lariciresinol, is an important efficacious compound for the antiviral effect of Isatis indigotica, a widely used herb for the treatment of colds, fever, and influenza. Although some rate-limiting steps of the lariciresinol biosynthetic pathway are well known, the specific roles of gene family members in I. indigotica in regulating lariciresinol production are poorly understood. In the present study, a correlation analysis between the RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) expression profile and lignan content by using I. indigotica hairy roots treated with methyl jamonate (0.5 μM) at different time points as a source implicated that I. indigotica pinoresinol/lariciresinol reductase 1 (IiPLR1), but not IiPLR2 or IiPLR3, contributed greatly to lariciresinol accumulation. Gene silencing by RNA interference (RNAi) demonstrated that IiPLR1 indeed influenced lariciresinol biosynthesis, whereas suppression of IiPLR2 or IiPLR3 did not change lariciresinol abundance significantly. IiPLR1 was thus further characterized; IiPLR1 was constitutively expressed in roots, stems, leaves, and flowers of I. indigotica, with the highest expression in roots, and it responds to different stress treatments to various degrees. Recombinant IiPLR1 reduces both (±)-pinoresinol and (±)-lariciresinol efficiently, with comparative K cat/K m values. Furthermore, overexpression of IiPLR1 significantly enhanced lariciresinol accumulation in I. indigotica hairy roots, and the best line (ovx-2) produced 353.9 μg g(-1) lariciresinol, which was ~6.3-fold more than the wild type. This study sheds light on how to increase desired metabolites effectively by more accurate or appropriate genetic engineering strategies, and also provides an effective approach for the large-scale commercial production of pharmaceutically valuable lariciresinol by using hairy root culture systems as bioreactors. PMID:26163698

  4. Accumulation of 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate in illuminated plant leaves at supraoptimal temperatures reveals a bottleneck of the prokaryotic methylerythritol 4-phosphate pathway of isoprenoid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Rivasseau, Corinne; Seemann, Myriam; Boisson, Anne-Marie; Streb, Peter; Gout, Elisabeth; Douce, Roland; Rohmer, Michel; Bligny, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Metabolic profiling using phosphorus nuclear magnetic resonance ((31)P-NMR) revealed that the leaves of different herbs and trees accumulate 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 2,4-cyclodiphosphate (MEcDP), an intermediate of the methylerythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway, during bright and hot days. In spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves, its accumulation closely depended on irradiance and temperature. MEcDP was the only (31)P-NMR-detected MEP pathway intermediate. It remained in chloroplasts and was a sink for phosphate. The accumulation of MEcDP suggested that its conversion rate into 4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate, catalysed by (E)-4-hydroxy-3-methylbut-2-enyl diphosphate synthase (GcpE), was limiting under oxidative stress. Indeed, O(2) and ROS produced by photosynthesis damage this O(2)-hypersensitive [4Fe-4S]-protein. Nevertheless, as isoprenoid synthesis was not inhibited, damages were supposed to be continuously repaired. On the contrary, in the presence of cadmium that reinforced MEcDP accumulation, the MEP pathway was blocked. In vitro studies showed that Cd(2+) does not react directly with fully assembled GcpE, but interferes with its reconstitution from recombinant GcpE apoprotein and prosthetic group. Our results suggest that MEcDP accumulation in leaves may originate from both GcpE sensitivity to oxidative environment and limitations of its repair. We propose a model wherein GcpE turnover represents a bottleneck of the MEP pathway in plant leaves simultaneously exposed to high irradiance and hot temperature.

  5. Geomodel constructs of the Earth's crust for water continuation of the Korotaikha depression from gravity and magnetic data for revealing promising areas of oil and gas accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litvinova, Tamara; Kudryavtsev, Ivan

    2016-04-01

    The paper considers the results of re-interpretation of geophysical data within the water continuation of the Korotaikha depression. To solve the issue of identifying promising areas of oil and gas accumulation in the region, magnetic and gravity materials were reprocessed: digital maps of potential fields at 1: 500 000 scale were compiled on a frame network of seismic lines (3 lines on land and 3 lines in water area) made by reflection-CDP, density models to a depth of 20 km by solving the direct problem of gravity prospecting in GM-SYS module (Geosoft) in 2D formulation were constructed. Deep reflection-CDP seismic sections specified according to the deep wells were used as starting models. Correctness of the selected density models was controlled by comparing the theoretical curve with the values interpolated on the profile line from the digital model of gravity anomaly (Bouguer, density of the intermediate layer of 2.67 g/cm3). Magnetic modeling was performed using geometry of blocks from the obtained density models to a depth of 20 km and is based on selection of local anomaly sources in the upper section (in the Triassic strata). Blocks of the Precambrian basement were used as sources of regional magnetic anomalies in the considered models. Modeling constructs show the defining role of the topography of terrigenous and carbonate complex boundary within the Paleozoic section as a source of gravity anomalies for the region under study. These findings are confirmed by comparison of gravity and seismic data (maps of local gravity anomalies and structural maps of reflecting horizons) and additionally substantiated by analysis of the nature of local magnetic anomalies distribution. The latter are associated with the Triassic basalt horizons at the top of the terrigenous complex and thus also reflect structures of the sedimentary cover, which are registered independently by gravity data.

  6. Experimental and observational evidence reveals that predators in natural environments do not regulate their prey: They are passengers, not drivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, T. C. R.

    2013-11-01

    Among both ecologists and the wider community there is a tacit assumption that predators regulate populations of their prey. But there is evidence from a wide taxonomic and geographic range of studies that predators that are adapted to co-evolved prey generally do not regulate their prey. This is because predators either cannot reproduce as fast as their prey and/or are inefficient hunters unable to catch enough prey to sustain maximum reproduction. The greater capacity of herbivores to breed successfully is, however, normally restricted by a lack of enough food of sufficient quality to support reproduction. But whenever this shortage is alleviated by a large pulse of food, herbivores increase their numbers to outbreak levels. Their predators are unable to contain this increase, but their numbers, too, surge in response to this increase in food. Eventually both their populations will crash once the food supply runs out, first for the herbivores and then for the predators. Then an “over-run” of predators will further depress the already declining prey population, appearing to be controlling its abundance. This latter phenomenon has led many ecologists to conclude that predators are regulating the numbers of their prey. However, it is the same process that is revealed during outbreaks that limits populations of both predator and prey in “normal” times, although this is usually not readily apparent. Nevertheless, as all the diverse cases discussed here attest, the abundance of predators and their co-evolved prey are both limited by their food: the predators are passengers, not drivers.

  7. Argon, oxygen, and boron isotopic evidence documenting 40ArE accumulation in phengite during water-rich high-pressure subduction metasomatism of continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menold, Carrie A.; Grove, Marty; Sievers, Natalie E.; Manning, Craig E.; Yin, An; Young, Edward D.; Ziegler, Karen

    2016-07-01

    The Luliang Shan area of the North Qaidam high pressure (HP) to ultrahigh pressure (UHP) metamorphic terrane in northwestern China features thick, garnet- and phengite-rich metasomatic selvages that formed around gneiss-hosted mafic eclogite blocks during HP conditions. Here we present new 40Ar/39Ar, δ18 O, and δ11 B results from a previously studied 30 m, 18 sample traverse that extends from the host gneiss into a representative eclogite block. Previous thermobarometry and new mica-quartz oxygen isotope thermometry from the traverse reveal that the phengite-rich selvage formed at temperatures similar to those recorded by the eclogites at peak pressure. Quartz and white mica δ18 O data from the selvage cannot be explained by simple mixing of gneiss and eclogite, and indicate a fluid/rock ratio >1 during regional-scale infiltration of high δ18 O (ca. 14‰) fluids. Heavy δ18 O overgrowths of metamorphic zircon over lighter δ18 O detrital grains indicate that the gneiss was similarly affected. Starkly contrasting boron content and δ11 B compositions for the host gneiss and the selvage also cannot be explained by local-scale devolatilization of the gneiss to form the selvage. Instead, the boron systematics are best attributed to two distinct phases of fluid infiltration: (1) low-boron selvage phengite with δ11 B from -10 to -30‰ grew under HP conditions; and (2) tourmaline and boron-rich muscovite with generally positive δ11 B crystallized in the host gneiss under subsequent lower pressure epidote-amphibolite facies conditions as the Luliang Shan gneiss terrane was exhumed past shallower portions of the subduction channel. Consistent with observations made worldwide, we were able to identify uptake of excess argon (40ArE) in phengite as a high pressure phenomenon. Phengite 40Ar/39Ar ages from massive eclogite exceed the ca. 490 Ma zircon U-Pb age of eclogite metamorphism by a factor of 1.5. However, phengite ages from the more permeable schistose selvage

  8. Metabolomic analysis reveals that the accumulation of specific secondary metabolites in Echinacea angustifolia cells cultured in vitro can be controlled by light.

    PubMed

    Guarnerio, Chiara Francesca; Fraccaroli, Marica; Gonzo, Irene; Pressi, Giovanna; Dal Toso, Roberto; Guzzo, Flavia; Levi, Marisa

    2012-02-01

    Echinacea angustifolia cell suspension cultures are usually grown and maintained in the dark, but we also exposed cells to light for one culture cycle (14 days) and then compared the metabolomes of dark-grown and illuminated cells by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Among 256 signals, we putatively identified 159 molecules corresponding to 56 different metabolites plus their fragments, adducts and isotopologs. The E. angustifolia metabolome consisted mainly of caffeic acid derivatives, comprising (a) caffeic acid conjugated with tartaric, quinic and hexaric acids; and (b) caffeic acid conjugated with hydroxytyrosol glycosides (e.g., echinacoside, verbascoside and related molecules). Many of these metabolites have not been previously described in E. angustifolia, which currently lacks detailed metabolic profiles. Exposure to light significantly increased the levels of certain caffeic acid derivatives (particularly caffeoylquinic acids and hydroxytyrosol derivatives lacking rhamnose residues) and reduced the level of hydroxytyrosol derivatives with rhamnose residues, revealing that light specifically inhibits the rhamnosylation of caffeoyl phenylethanoid glycosides. These results are significant because they suggest that the metabolic profile of cell cultures can be manipulated by controlling simple environmental variables such as illumination to modulate the levels of potentially therapeutic compounds. PMID:22009052

  9. Decolonizing the Evidence-Based Education and Policy Movement: Revealing the Colonial Vestiges in Educational Policy, Research, and Neoliberal Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shahjahan, Riyad Ahmed

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing body of literature discussing evidence-based education, practice, policy, and decision-making from a critical perspective. In this article, drawing on the literature and policy documents related to evidence-based education in the USA, Britain, and Canada, I join this critique and offer an anticolonial perspective. I argue that…

  10. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  11. 3D Visualization of the Temporal and Spatial Spread of Tau Pathology Reveals Extensive Sites of Tau Accumulation Associated with Neuronal Loss and Recognition Memory Deficit in Aged Tau Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Hongjun; Hussaini, S. Abid; Wegmann, Susanne; Profaci, Caterina; Daniels, Jacob D.; Herman, Mathieu; Emrani, Sheina; Figueroa, Helen Y.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Davies, Peter; Duff, Karen E.

    2016-01-01

    3D volume imaging using iDISCO+ was applied to observe the spatial and temporal progression of tau pathology in deep structures of the brain of a mouse model that recapitulates the earliest stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Tau pathology was compared at four timepoints, up to 34 months as it spread through the hippocampal formation and out into the neocortex along an anatomically connected route. Tau pathology was associated with significant gliosis. No evidence for uptake and accumulation of tau by glia was observed. Neuronal cells did appear to have internalized tau, including in extrahippocampal areas as a small proportion of cells that had accumulated human tau protein did not express detectible levels of human tau mRNA. At the oldest timepoint, mature tau pathology in the entorhinal cortex (EC) was associated with significant cell loss. As in human AD, mature tau pathology in the EC and the presence of tau pathology in the neocortex correlated with cognitive impairment. 3D volume imaging is an ideal technique to easily monitor the spread of pathology over time in models of disease progression. PMID:27466814

  12. Acceleration of large active earthflows triggered by massive snow accumulation events: evidences from monitoring the Corvara landslide in early 2014 (Dolomites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Alessandro; Mulas, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Chinellato, Giulia; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    In the Dolomites of Italy, snowfall during winter 2013/2014 was exceptionally abundant. Major snowfall events occurred from late December 2013 to mid-March 2014. Snow accumulation in Badia Valley peaked in early February: from 2 to 4 meters with a positive gradient respect to altimetry and accordingly to wind accumulation zones. Below 2000 m asl, due to the mild temperatures recorded before the onset of snowfall, the relatively dry snow cover was mostly deposited on top of unfrozen soils. The Corvara landslide is a large active earthflow located close to Corvara in Badia, at an elevation from 2000 to 1600 m. It's displacement rate before, during and after the exceptional snowfall period was monitored at high temporal frequency. Surface displacement was measured bi-weekly by differential GPS in several benchmarks in the source, track and accumulation zone. Deep displacement was monitored semi-continuously by two in-place inclinometers at 48 m depth in the accumulation zone, across the main deep-seated sliding surface. Results show an acceleration of movements, both at surface and at depth, soon after the massive snow accumulation event of 31st January to 2nd February 2014, which suddenly increased snow thickness from 1 to more than 2 metres. Short time lags between the onset of the acceleration of movements in the source, the track and the accumulation zones were also recorded. The landslide then maintained a relatively constant velocity during the high snow cover period extended to earlyApril and underwent a progressive deceleration during the snowmelt period that lasted until mid-June. The fact that the acceleration of the Corvara earthflow was triggered by a massive and rapid snow accumulation event, provides a quite different perspective from the generally adopted one that considers the destabilizing effect of snow only in relation to the increase of groundwater level during rapid snowmelt. A full explanation of the processes associated to the dynamics observed

  13. Do Child Development Accounts Promote Account Holding, Saving, and Asset Accumulation for Children's Future? Evidence from a Statewide Randomized Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nam, Yunju; Kim, Youngmi; Clancy, Margaret; Zager, Robert; Sherraden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the impacts of Child Development Accounts (CDAs) on account holding, saving, and asset accumulation for children, using data from the SEED for Oklahoma Kids experiment (SEED OK). SEED OK, a policy test of universal and progressive CDAs, provides a 529 college savings plan account to every infant in the treatment group with…

  14. The search for early markers of plague: evidence for accumulation of soluble Yersinia pestis LcrV in bubonic and pneumonic mouse models of disease.

    PubMed

    Flashner, Yehuda; Fisher, Morly; Tidhar, Avital; Mechaly, Adva; Gur, David; Halperin, Gideon; Zahavy, Eran; Mamroud, Emanuelle; Cohen, Sara

    2010-07-01

    Markers of the early stages of plague, a rapidly progressing deadly disease, are crucial for enabling the onset of an effective treatment. Here, we show that V-antigen protein (LcrV) is accumulated in the serum of Yersinia pestis-infected mice before bacterial colonization of the spleen and dissemination to blood, in a model of bubonic plague. LcrV accumulation is detected earlier than that of F1 capsular antigen, an established marker of disease. In a mouse model of pneumonic plague, LcrV can be determined in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid somewhat later than F1, but before dissemination of Y. pestis to the blood. Thus, determination of soluble LcrV is suggested as a potential useful tool for monitoring disease progression in both bubonic and pneumonic plague. Moreover, it may be of particular advantage in cases of infections with F1 nonproducing strains.

  15. Regulation of myofibrillar accumulation in chick muscle cultures - Evidence for the involvement of calcium and lysosomes in non-uniform turnover of contractile proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silver, Geri; Etlinger, Joseph D.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of calcium on the synthesis and the degradation of individual myofibrillar proteins were investigated using primary chick-leg skeletal muscle cultures labeled with S-35-methionine (for protein accumulation experiments) or Ca(2+)-45 (for calcium efflux experiments). It was found that the turnover of individual contractile proteins is regulated nonuniformly by a calcium-dependent mechanism involving lysosomes. The results also indicate that contractile proteins are released from the myofibril before their breakdown to amino acids.

  16. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  17. Proton Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy and MRI Reveal No Evidence for Brain Mitochondrial Dysfunction in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corrigan, Neva M.; Shaw, Dennis. W. W.; Richards, Todd L.; Estes, Annette M.; Friedman, Seth D.; Petropoulos, Helen; Artru, Alan A.; Dager, Stephen R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain mitochondrial dysfunction has been proposed as an etiologic factor in autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging ([superscript 1]HMRS) and MRI were used to assess for evidence of brain mitochondrial dysfunction in longitudinal samples of children with ASD or developmental delay (DD), and cross-sectionally…

  18. What Does Children's Spatial Language Reveal about Spatial Concepts? Evidence from the Use of Containment Expressions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johanson, Megan; Papafragou, Anna

    2014-01-01

    Children's overextensions of spatial language are often taken to reveal spatial biases. However, it is unclear whether extension patterns should be attributed to children's overly general spatial concepts or to a narrower notion of conceptual similarity allowing metaphor-like extensions. We describe a previously unnoticed extension of…

  19. Young Infants' Actions Reveal Their Developing Knowledge of Support Variables: Converging Evidence for Violation-of-Expectation Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hespos, Susan J.; Baillargeon, Renee

    2008-01-01

    Violation-of-expectation (VOE) tasks have revealed substantial developments in young infants' knowledge about support events: by 5.5 months, infants expect an object to fall when released against but not on a surface; and by 6.5 months, infants expect an object to fall when released with 15% but not 100% of its bottom on a surface. Here we…

  20. Partial sequencing reveals the transposable element composition of Coffea genomes and provides evidence for distinct evolutionary stories.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Romain; Darré, Thibaud; Dupeyron, Mathilde; de Kochko, Alexandre; Hamon, Serge; Couturon, Emmanuel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Raharimalala, Nathalie E; Akaffou, Sélastique Doffou; Hamon, Perla

    2016-10-01

    The Coffea genus, 124 described species, has a natural distribution spreading from inter-tropical Africa, to Western Indian Ocean Islands, India, Asia and up to Australasia. Two cultivated species, C. arabica and C. canephora, are intensively studied while, the breeding potential and the genome composition of all the wild species remained poorly uncharacterized. Here, we report the characterization and comparison of the highly repeated transposable elements content of 11 Coffea species representatives of the natural biogeographic distribution. A total of 994 Mb from 454 reads were produced with a genome coverage ranging between 3.2 and 15.7 %. The analyses showed that highly repeated transposable elements, mainly LTR retrotransposons (LTR-RT), represent between 32 and 53 % of Coffea genomes depending on their biogeographic location and genome size. Species from West and Central Africa (Eucoffea) contained the highest LTR-RT content but with no strong variation relative to their genome size. At the opposite, for the insular species (Mascarocoffea), a strong variation of LTR-RT was observed suggesting differential dynamics of these elements in this group. Two LTR-RT lineages, SIRE and Del were clearly differentially accumulated between African and insular species, suggesting these lineages were associated to the genome divergence of Coffea species in Africa. Altogether, the information obtained in this study improves our knowledge and brings new data on the composition, the evolution and the divergence of wild Coffea genomes.

  1. Partial sequencing reveals the transposable element composition of Coffea genomes and provides evidence for distinct evolutionary stories.

    PubMed

    Guyot, Romain; Darré, Thibaud; Dupeyron, Mathilde; de Kochko, Alexandre; Hamon, Serge; Couturon, Emmanuel; Crouzillat, Dominique; Rigoreau, Michel; Rakotomalala, Jean-Jacques; Raharimalala, Nathalie E; Akaffou, Sélastique Doffou; Hamon, Perla

    2016-10-01

    The Coffea genus, 124 described species, has a natural distribution spreading from inter-tropical Africa, to Western Indian Ocean Islands, India, Asia and up to Australasia. Two cultivated species, C. arabica and C. canephora, are intensively studied while, the breeding potential and the genome composition of all the wild species remained poorly uncharacterized. Here, we report the characterization and comparison of the highly repeated transposable elements content of 11 Coffea species representatives of the natural biogeographic distribution. A total of 994 Mb from 454 reads were produced with a genome coverage ranging between 3.2 and 15.7 %. The analyses showed that highly repeated transposable elements, mainly LTR retrotransposons (LTR-RT), represent between 32 and 53 % of Coffea genomes depending on their biogeographic location and genome size. Species from West and Central Africa (Eucoffea) contained the highest LTR-RT content but with no strong variation relative to their genome size. At the opposite, for the insular species (Mascarocoffea), a strong variation of LTR-RT was observed suggesting differential dynamics of these elements in this group. Two LTR-RT lineages, SIRE and Del were clearly differentially accumulated between African and insular species, suggesting these lineages were associated to the genome divergence of Coffea species in Africa. Altogether, the information obtained in this study improves our knowledge and brings new data on the composition, the evolution and the divergence of wild Coffea genomes. PMID:27469896

  2. Mercury accumulation in sediment cores from three Washington state lakes: evidence for local deposition from a coal-fired power plant.

    PubMed

    Furl, Chad V; Meredith, Callie A

    2011-01-01

    Mercury accumulation rates measured in age-dated sediment cores were compared at three Washington state lakes. Offutt Lake and Lake St. Clair are located immediately downwind (18 and 28 km, respectively) of a coal-fired power plant and Lake Sammamish is located outside of the immediate area of the plant (110 km). The sites immediately downwind of the power plant were expected to receive increased mercury deposition from particulate and reactive mercury not deposited at Lake Sammamish. Mercury accumulation in cores was corrected for variable sedimentation, background, and sediment focusing to estimate the anthropogenic contribution (Hg(A,F)). Results indicated lakes immediately downwind of the power plant contained elevated Hg(A,F) levels with respect to the reference lake. Estimated fluxes to Lake Sammamish were compared to measured values from a nearby mercury wet deposition collector to gauge the efficacy of the core deconstruction techniques. Total deposition calculated through the sediment core (20.7 μg/m²/year) fell just outside of the upper estimate (18.9 μg/m²/year) of total deposition approximated from the wet deposition collector. PMID:20437040

  3. Evidence of various mechanisms of Cd sequestration in the hyperaccumulator Arabidopsis halleri, the non-accumulator Arabidopsis lyrata, and their progenies by combined synchrotron-based techniques.

    PubMed

    Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Huguet, Stéphanie; Meyer, Claire-Lise; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Testemale, Denis; Vantelon, Delphine; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre; Verbruggen, Nathalie; Sarret, Géraldine

    2015-06-01

    Arabidopsis halleri is a model plant for Zn and Cd hyperaccumulation. The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between the chemical forms of Cd, its distribution in leaves, and Cd accumulation and tolerance. An interspecific cross was carried out between A. halleri and the non-tolerant and non-hyperaccumulating relative A. lyrata providing progenies segregating for Cd tolerance and accumulation. Cd speciation and distribution were investigated using X-ray absorption spectroscopy and microfocused X-ray fluorescence. In A. lyrata and non-tolerant progenies, Cd was coordinated by S atoms only or with a small contribution of O groups. Interestingly, the proportion of O ligands increased in A. halleri and tolerant progenies, and they were predominant in most of them, while S ligands were still present. Therefore, the binding of Cd with O ligands was associated with Cd tolerance. In A. halleri, Cd was mainly located in the xylem, phloem, and mesophyll tissue, suggesting a reallocation process for Cd within the plant. The distribution of the metal at the cell level was further discussed. In A. lyrata, the vascular bundles were also Cd enriched, but the epidermis was richer in Cd as compared with the mesophyll. Cd was identified in trichomes of both species. This work demonstrated that both Cd speciation and localization were related to the tolerance character of the plant. PMID:25873676

  4. Neurochemical evidence that the metabolites accumulating in 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency induce oxidative damage in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Zanatta, Ângela; Moura, Alana Pimentel; Tonin, Anelise Miotti; Knebel, Lisiane Aurélio; Grings, Mateus; Lobato, Vannessa Araújo; Ribeiro, César Augusto João; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo; Leipnitz, Guilhian; Wajner, Moacir

    2013-01-01

    Isolated 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency (3MCCD) is an autosomal recessive disorder of leucine metabolism biochemically characterized by accumulation of 3-methylcrotonylglycine (3MCG), 3-methylcrotonic acid (3MCA) and 3-hydroxyisovaleric acid. A considerable number of affected individuals present neurological symptoms with or without precedent crises of metabolic decompensation and brain abnormalities whose pathogenesis is poorly known. We investigated the in vitro effects of 3MCG and 3MCA on important parameters of oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of young rats. 3MCG and 3MCA significantly increased TBA-RS and carbonyl formation, indicating that these compounds provoke lipid and protein oxidation, respectively. In contrast, nitric oxide production was not affected by 3MCG and 3MCA. Furthermore, 3MCG- and 3MCA-induced elevation of TBA-RS values was fully prevented by melatonin, trolox and reduced glutathione, but not by the nitric oxide inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester or the combination of catalase plus superoxide dismutase, indicating that reactive oxygen species were involved in the oxidative damage caused by these compounds. We also found that the activity of the antioxidant enzymes glutathione peroxidase, catalase, superoxide dismutase and glutathione reductase were not altered in vitro by 3MCG and 3MCA. It is therefore presumed that alterations of the cellular redox homeostasis caused by the major metabolites accumulating in 3MCCD may potentially be involved in the pathophysiology of the neurological dysfunction and structural brain alterations found in patients affected by this disorder.

  5. Structural Variant Detection by Large-scale Sequencing Reveals New Evolutionary Evidence on Breed Divergence between Chinese and European Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Pengju; Li, Junhui; Kang, Huimin; Wang, Haifei; Fan, Ziyao; Yin, Zongjun; Wang, Jiafu; Zhang, Qin; Wang, Zhiquan; Liu, Jian-Feng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we performed a genome-wide SV detection among the genomes of thirteen pigs from diverse Chinese and European originated breeds by next genetation sequencing, and constrcuted a single-nucleotide resolution map involving 56,930 putative SVs. We firstly identified a SV hotspot spanning 35 Mb region on the X chromosome specifically in the genomes of Chinese originated individuals. Further scrutinizing this region by large-scale sequencing data of extra 111 individuals, we obtained the confirmatory evidence on our initial finding. Moreover, thirty five SV-related genes within the hotspot region, being of importance for reproduction ability, rendered significant different evolution rates between Chinese and European originated breeds. The SV hotspot identified herein offers a novel evidence for assessing phylogenetic relationships, as well as likely explains the genetic difference of corresponding phenotypes and features, among Chinese and European pig breeds. Furthermore, we employed various SVs to infer genetic structure of individuls surveyed. We found SVs can clearly detect the difference of genetic background among individuals. This clues us that genome-wide SVs can capture majority of geneic variation and be applied into cladistic analyses. Characterizing whole genome SVs demonstrated that SVs are significantly enriched/depleted with various genomic features. PMID:26729041

  6. Fine-Scale Genetic Structure and Cryptic Associations Reveal Evidence of Kin-Based Sociality in the African Forest Elephant

    PubMed Central

    Schuttler, Stephanie G.; Philbrick, Jessica A.; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Eggert, Lori S.

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of relatedness within animal populations are important in the evolution of mating and social systems, and have the potential to reveal information on species that are difficult to observe in the wild. This study examines the fine-scale genetic structure and connectivity of groups within African forest elephants, Loxodonta cyclotis, which are often difficult to observe due to forest habitat. We tested the hypothesis that genetic similarity will decline with increasing geographic distance, as we expect kin to be in closer proximity, using spatial autocorrelation analyses and Tau Kr tests. Associations between individuals were investigated through a non-invasive genetic capture-recapture approach using network models, and were predicted to be more extensive than the small groups found in observational studies, similar to fission-fusion sociality found in African savanna (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) species. Dung samples were collected in Lopé National Park, Gabon in 2008 and 2010 and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci, genetically sexed, and sequenced at the mitochondrial DNA control region. We conducted analyses on samples collected at three different temporal scales: a day, within six-day sampling sessions, and within each year. Spatial autocorrelation and Tau Kr tests revealed genetic structure, but results were weak and inconsistent between sampling sessions. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in distance classes of 0–5 km, and was strongest for the single day session. Despite weak genetic structure, individuals within groups were significantly more related to each other than to individuals between groups. Social networks revealed some components to have large, extensive groups of up to 22 individuals, and most groups were composed of individuals of the same matriline. Although fine-scale population genetic structure was weak, forest elephants are typically found in groups consisting of kin and based on matrilines

  7. Fine-scale genetic structure and cryptic associations reveal evidence of kin-based sociality in the African forest elephant.

    PubMed

    Schuttler, Stephanie G; Philbrick, Jessica A; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Eggert, Lori S

    2014-01-01

    Spatial patterns of relatedness within animal populations are important in the evolution of mating and social systems, and have the potential to reveal information on species that are difficult to observe in the wild. This study examines the fine-scale genetic structure and connectivity of groups within African forest elephants, Loxodonta cyclotis, which are often difficult to observe due to forest habitat. We tested the hypothesis that genetic similarity will decline with increasing geographic distance, as we expect kin to be in closer proximity, using spatial autocorrelation analyses and Tau K(r) tests. Associations between individuals were investigated through a non-invasive genetic capture-recapture approach using network models, and were predicted to be more extensive than the small groups found in observational studies, similar to fission-fusion sociality found in African savanna (Loxodonta africana) and Asian (Elephas maximus) species. Dung samples were collected in Lopé National Park, Gabon in 2008 and 2010 and genotyped at 10 microsatellite loci, genetically sexed, and sequenced at the mitochondrial DNA control region. We conducted analyses on samples collected at three different temporal scales: a day, within six-day sampling sessions, and within each year. Spatial autocorrelation and Tau K(r) tests revealed genetic structure, but results were weak and inconsistent between sampling sessions. Positive spatial autocorrelation was found in distance classes of 0-5 km, and was strongest for the single day session. Despite weak genetic structure, individuals within groups were significantly more related to each other than to individuals between groups. Social networks revealed some components to have large, extensive groups of up to 22 individuals, and most groups were composed of individuals of the same matriline. Although fine-scale population genetic structure was weak, forest elephants are typically found in groups consisting of kin and based on matrilines

  8. Direct evidence of "damage accumulation" in cement mantles surrounding femoral hip stems retrieved at autopsy: cement damage correlates with duration of use and BMI.

    PubMed

    Race, A; Miller, M A; Izant, T H; Mann, K A

    2011-09-01

    The "damage accumulation" phenomenon has not been quantitatively demonstrated in clinical cement mantles surrounding femoral hip stems. We stained transverse sections of 11 postmortem retrieved femoral hip components fixed with cement using fluorescent dye-penetrant and quantified cement damage, voids, and cement-bone interface gaps in epifluorescence and white light micrographs. Crack density (Cr.Dn), crack length-density (Cr.Ln.Dn), porosity, and cement-bone interface gap fraction (c/b-gap%) were calculated, normalized by mantle area. Multiple regression tests showed that cement damage (Cr.Ln.Dn. & Cr.Dn.) was significantly positively correlated (r(2)=0.98, p<0.001) with "duration of use" and body mass index ("BMI") but not cement mantle "porosity". There were significant interactions: "duration of use"*"BMI" was strongly predictive (p<0.005) of Cr.Dn.; and "duration of use"*"porosity" was predictive (p=0.04) of Cr.Ln.Dn. Stem related cracks accounted for approximately one fifth of Cr.Dn and one third of Cr.Ln.Dn. The mean c/b-gap% was 13.8% but it did not correlate (r(2)=0.01, p=0.8) with duration of use. We concluded that duration-dependent fatigue damage accumulation occurred during in vivo use. BMI strongly influenced cement crack length and the rate of new crack formation over time. Voids did not increase the rate of crack initiation but appeared to have promoted crack growth over time. Although not progressive, substantial bone resorption at the cement-bone interface appeared to be common.

  9. Comparative proteomic analysis using 2DE-LC-MS/MS reveals the mechanism of Fuzhuan brick tea extract against hepatic fat accumulation in rats with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Lin, Yong; Zhang, Sheng; Wang, Die; Liang, Qionglin; Luo, Guoan

    2015-09-01

    Fuzhuan brick tea has received increasing attention in recent years owing to its benefits for nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and associated metabolic syndrome. For exploring the ameliorative mechanism, the liver proteomes from three groups of rats fed either a normal control diet (NCD), a high fat diet (HFD), or a HFD supplemented with high-dose Fuzhuan brick tea extract (FTE) (HFD + HFTE) were comprehensively compared by quantitative proteomics using 2DE-LC-MS/MS. This is the first study of the effects of tea aqueous extract on the liver proteome of rats suffering from metabolic syndrome. The results showed that 57 proteins displayed more than 1.5-fold differences in at least one of two comparisons of HFD versus NCD and HFD versus HFD + HFTE due to HFD feeding and FTE treatment, respectively. Of them, over 75% of proteins exhibited a similar tendency of expression in the two comparisons, meaning FTE was able to correct HFD effects on rat livers. By function analyses, an extensive list of proteins was involved in sugar and lipid metabolism. Compared with HFD-fed rats, the reduced lipogenesis and enhanced β-oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle and respiratory chain in HFD + HFTE-fed rats, which mainly contributed to ameliorate hepatic fat accumulation and associated NAFLD. Additionally, some putative drug targets were also revealed such as COX2, PGAM1, ACACB, FAS, and ECHS1.

  10. Looking at the evidence in visual world: eye-movements reveal how bilingual and monolingual Turkish speakers process grammatical evidentiality.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Seçkin; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Felser, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This study presents pioneering data on how adult early bilinguals (heritage speakers) and late bilingual speakers of Turkish and German process grammatical evidentiality in a visual world setting in comparison to monolingual speakers of Turkish. Turkish marks evidentiality, the linguistic reference to information source, through inflectional affixes signaling either direct (-DI) or indirect (-mIş) evidentiality. We conducted an eye-tracking-during-listening experiment where participants were given access to visual 'evidence' supporting the use of either a direct or indirect evidential form. The behavioral results indicate that the monolingual Turkish speakers comprehended direct and indirect evidential scenarios equally well. In contrast, both late and early bilinguals were less accurate and slower to respond to direct than to indirect evidentials. The behavioral results were also reflected in the proportions of looks data. That is, both late and early bilinguals fixated less frequently on the target picture in the direct than in the indirect evidential condition while the monolinguals showed no difference between these conditions. Taken together, our results indicate reduced sensitivity to the semantic and pragmatic function of direct evidential forms in both late and early bilingual speakers, suggesting a simplification of the Turkish evidentiality system in Turkish heritage grammars. We discuss our findings with regard to theories of incomplete acquisition and first language attrition. PMID:26441762

  11. Empirical Evidence Reveals Seasonally Dependent Reduction in Nitrification in Coastal Sediments Subjected to Near Future Ocean Acidification

    PubMed Central

    Braeckman, Ulrike; Van Colen, Carl; Guilini, Katja; Van Gansbeke, Dirk; Soetaert, Karline; Vincx, Magda; Vanaverbeke, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Research so far has provided little evidence that benthic biogeochemical cycling is affected by ocean acidification under realistic climate change scenarios. We measured nutrient exchange and sediment community oxygen consumption (SCOC) rates to estimate nitrification in natural coastal permeable and fine sandy sediments under pre-phytoplankton bloom and bloom conditions. Ocean acidification, as mimicked in the laboratory by a realistic pH decrease of 0.3, significantly reduced SCOC on average by 60% and benthic nitrification rates on average by 94% in both sediment types in February (pre-bloom period), but not in April (bloom period). No changes in macrofauna functional community (density, structural and functional diversity) were observed between ambient and acidified conditions, suggesting that changes in benthic biogeochemical cycling were predominantly mediated by changes in the activity of the microbial community during the short-term incubations (14 days), rather than by changes in engineering effects of bioturbating and bio-irrigating macrofauna. As benthic nitrification makes up the gross of ocean nitrification, a slowdown of this nitrogen cycling pathway in both permeable and fine sediments in winter, could therefore have global impacts on coupled nitrification-denitrification and hence eventually on pelagic nutrient availability. PMID:25329898

  12. Looking at the evidence in visual world: eye-movements reveal how bilingual and monolingual Turkish speakers process grammatical evidentiality.

    PubMed

    Arslan, Seçkin; Bastiaanse, Roelien; Felser, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This study presents pioneering data on how adult early bilinguals (heritage speakers) and late bilingual speakers of Turkish and German process grammatical evidentiality in a visual world setting in comparison to monolingual speakers of Turkish. Turkish marks evidentiality, the linguistic reference to information source, through inflectional affixes signaling either direct (-DI) or indirect (-mIş) evidentiality. We conducted an eye-tracking-during-listening experiment where participants were given access to visual 'evidence' supporting the use of either a direct or indirect evidential form. The behavioral results indicate that the monolingual Turkish speakers comprehended direct and indirect evidential scenarios equally well. In contrast, both late and early bilinguals were less accurate and slower to respond to direct than to indirect evidentials. The behavioral results were also reflected in the proportions of looks data. That is, both late and early bilinguals fixated less frequently on the target picture in the direct than in the indirect evidential condition while the monolinguals showed no difference between these conditions. Taken together, our results indicate reduced sensitivity to the semantic and pragmatic function of direct evidential forms in both late and early bilingual speakers, suggesting a simplification of the Turkish evidentiality system in Turkish heritage grammars. We discuss our findings with regard to theories of incomplete acquisition and first language attrition.

  13. Genetic, morphological, and acoustic evidence reveals lack of diversification in the colonization process in an island bird.

    PubMed

    Illera, Juan Carlos; Palmero, Ana M; Laiolo, Paola; Rodríguez, Felipe; Moreno, Ángel C; Navascués, Miguel

    2014-08-01

    Songbirds with recently (i.e., early Holocene) founded populations are suitable models for studying incipient differentiation in oceanic islands. On such systems each colonization event represents a different evolutionary episode that can be studied by addressing sets of diverging phenotypic and genetic traits. We investigate the process of early differentiation in the spectacled warbler (Sylvia conspicillata) in 14 populations separated by sea barriers from three Atlantic archipelagos and from continental regions spanning from tropical to temperate latitudes. Our approach involved the study of sexual acoustic signals, morphology, and genetic data. Mitochondrial DNA did not provide clear population structure. However, microsatellites analyses consistently identified two genetic groups, albeit without correspondence to subspecies classification and little correspondence to geography. Coalescent analyses showed significant evidence for gene flow between the two genetic groups. Discriminant analyses could not correctly assign morphological or acoustic traits to source populations. Therefore, although theory predicting that in isolated populations genetic, morphological, or acoustic traits can lead to radiation, we have strikingly failed to document differentiation on these attributes in a resident passerine throughout three oceanic archipelagos. PMID:24749863

  14. Fluids in the Palaeogene Formation of Gaoyou Sag in the Southern Part of North Jiangsu Basin, China: Evidence for Hydrocarbon Migration and Accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LI, M.; Lou, Z.; Zhu, R.; Jin, A.

    2013-12-01

    Gaoyou Sag, lying in the middle of the Dongtai Depression in the North Jiangsu basin, China, has a well developed fault system and is characterised by structurally complicated oil and gas fields. Its oil-water relationship is very complicated. In the present study, we present the distribution of formation water chemistry, crude oil density, formation pressures and fluid potential in the Palaeogene formation of the Gaoyou Sag . The purpose of this article is to: (1) analyse the cause of hydrochemical diversity; (2) identify the flow pattern and evolution; and (3) understand the interplay between the flow of formation water and hydrocarbon migration and accumulation. The results showed that large variances in formation water chemistry occur in different oilfields of the Gaoyou Sag (Figure 1) due to dilution by meteoric water recharge, concentration by membrane filtration and complexity of geological structure. The low salinity (mean values from 8.53 g/L to 9.67 g/L) of the formation water and heavy crude oil density (up to 0.94g/cm3) in the Xuchuang oilfield indicate influence from meteoric water infiltration; the deep depression areas are mainly of connate origin. Geofluids in the Xuchuang, Zhenwu and Yang'an oilfields mainly flow vertically through the Zhenwu and Hanliu faults, while geofluids in the Shanian oilfield mainly migrate laterally through the reservoirs and are adjusted vertically along some cutting faults. Palaeo-hydrodynamic evolution had an affinity with the generation, migration, accumulation and preservation of hydrocarbons. In the depositional stages of the Dainan and Sanduo formations, formation water was expelled outward and upward from lacustrine mudstones of the deep depression into shallow sands of nearby oilfields, driven by compaction and overpressure. Hydrocarbon migrated with formation water and gathered in appropriate traps, forming primary reservoirs. During the Zhenwu and Sanduo movements, there were tectonic uplifts and the strata

  15. The Effects of Revealed Information on Catastrophe Loss Projection Models' Characterization of Risk: Damage Vulnerability Evidence from Florida.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Bradley; Medders, Lorilee A; Maroney, Patrick F

    2016-06-01

    We examine whether the risk characterization estimated by catastrophic loss projection models is sensitive to the revelation of new information regarding risk type. We use commercial loss projection models from two widely employed modeling firms to estimate the expected hurricane losses of Florida Atlantic University's building stock, both including and excluding secondary information regarding hurricane mitigation features that influence damage vulnerability. We then compare the results of the models without and with this revealed information and find that the revelation of additional, secondary information influences modeled losses for the windstorm-exposed university building stock, primarily evidenced by meaningful percent differences in the loss exceedance output indicated after secondary modifiers are incorporated in the analysis. Secondary risk characteristics for the data set studied appear to have substantially greater impact on probable maximum loss estimates than on average annual loss estimates. While it may be intuitively expected for catastrophe models to indicate that secondary risk characteristics hold value for reducing modeled losses, the finding that the primary value of secondary risk characteristics is in reduction of losses in the "tail" (low probability, high severity) events is less intuitive, and therefore especially interesting. Further, we address the benefit-cost tradeoffs that commercial entities must consider when deciding whether to undergo the data collection necessary to include secondary information in modeling. Although we assert the long-term benefit-cost tradeoff is positive for virtually every entity, we acknowledge short-term disincentives to such an effort.

  16. Characterization of Lipooligosaccharide-Biosynthetic Loci of Campylobacter jejuni Reveals New Lipooligosaccharide Classes: Evidence of Mosaic Organizations▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Craig T.; Gilbert, Michel; Yuki, Nobuhiro; Endtz, Hubert P.; Mandrell, Robert E.

    2008-01-01

    The lipooligosaccharide (LOS) biosynthesis region is one of the more variable genomic regions between strains of Campylobacter jejuni. Indeed, eight classes of LOS biosynthesis loci have been established previously based on gene content and organization. In this study, we characterize additional classes of LOS biosynthesis loci and analyze various mechanisms that result in changes to LOS structures. To gain further insights into the genomic diversity of C. jejuni LOS biosynthesis region, we sequenced the LOS biosynthesis loci of 15 strains that possessed gene content that was distinct from the eight classes. This analysis identified 11 new classes of LOS loci that exhibited examples of deletions and insertions of genes and cassettes of genes found in other LOS classes or capsular biosynthesis loci leading to mosaic LOS loci. The sequence analysis also revealed both missense mutations leading to “allelic” glycosyltransferases and phase-variable and non-phase-variable gene inactivation by the deletion or insertion of bases. Specifically, we demonstrated that gene inactivation is an important mechanism for altering the LOS structures of strains possessing the same class of LOS biosynthesis locus. Together, these observations suggest that LOS biosynthesis region is a hotspot for genetic exchange and variability, often leading to changes in the LOS produced. PMID:18556784

  17. The Effects of Revealed Information on Catastrophe Loss Projection Models' Characterization of Risk: Damage Vulnerability Evidence from Florida.

    PubMed

    Karl, J Bradley; Medders, Lorilee A; Maroney, Patrick F

    2016-06-01

    We examine whether the risk characterization estimated by catastrophic loss projection models is sensitive to the revelation of new information regarding risk type. We use commercial loss projection models from two widely employed modeling firms to estimate the expected hurricane losses of Florida Atlantic University's building stock, both including and excluding secondary information regarding hurricane mitigation features that influence damage vulnerability. We then compare the results of the models without and with this revealed information and find that the revelation of additional, secondary information influences modeled losses for the windstorm-exposed university building stock, primarily evidenced by meaningful percent differences in the loss exceedance output indicated after secondary modifiers are incorporated in the analysis. Secondary risk characteristics for the data set studied appear to have substantially greater impact on probable maximum loss estimates than on average annual loss estimates. While it may be intuitively expected for catastrophe models to indicate that secondary risk characteristics hold value for reducing modeled losses, the finding that the primary value of secondary risk characteristics is in reduction of losses in the "tail" (low probability, high severity) events is less intuitive, and therefore especially interesting. Further, we address the benefit-cost tradeoffs that commercial entities must consider when deciding whether to undergo the data collection necessary to include secondary information in modeling. Although we assert the long-term benefit-cost tradeoff is positive for virtually every entity, we acknowledge short-term disincentives to such an effort. PMID:26720056

  18. Agonist-induced production of 1,2-diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid in intact resistance arteries. Evidence that accumulation of diacylglycerol is not a prerequisite for contraction.

    PubMed

    Ohanian, J; Ollerenshaw, J; Collins, P; Heagerty, A

    1990-05-25

    The production of total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol as well as those specifically derived from inositol lipid hydrolysis was studied in intact rat resistance arteries stimulated with either noradrenaline, vasopressin, or angiotensin II at 20 s when the onset of contraction would be nearing its maximum, and at 5 min during the sustained phase of contraction. Total amounts of 1,2-diacylglycerol were not altered by any agonist at 20 s, or at 5 min. However, arachidonate-containing species of 1,2-diacylglycerol were differentially influenced being increased at 5 min by noradrenaline, and decreased at 20 s and 5 min by vasopressin. Only angiotensin II produced substantial increases in this class of 1,2-diacylglycerol at both time points. In order to investigate the fate of this second messenger total and inositol lipid derived phosphatidic acids were then measured at both 20 s and 5 min. Noradrenaline induced a rise in both total and arachidonate-containing phosphatidic acid at both times as did vasopressin. Only small increases were induced by angiotensin II at 20 s. These data demonstrate that the accumulation of 1,2-diacylglycerol generated from inositol lipid breakdown is only observed with activation by angiotensin II. Other agonists produced phosphatidic acids with time and the rate of generation of these lipids is agonist-specific. Thus phosphatidic acid may play a more prominent role during the sustained phase of contraction than previously anticipated.

  19. A 10-year study reveals clinical and laboratory evidence for the ‘semi-invasive' properties of chronic pulmonary aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jasper Fuk-Woo; Lau, Susanna Kar-Pui; Wong, Sally Cheuk-Ying; To, Kelvin Kai-Wang; So, Simon Yung-Chun; Leung, Sally Sau-Man; Chan, Siu-Mang; Pang, Chiu-Mei; Xiao, Chenlu; Hung, Ivan Fan-Ngai; Cheng, Vincent Chi-Chung; Yuen, Kwok-Yung; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, infections caused by Aspergillus sp. have become an emerging focus of clinical microbiology and infectious disease, as the number of patients infected with Aspergillus sp. has increased markedly. Although chronic pulmonary aspergillosis (CPA) is considered a ‘semi-invasive' or ‘intermediate' disease, little data are available for the direct comparison of CPA with invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) and pulmonary aspergilloma (PA) to quantify invasiveness. In this study, we compared the characteristics of CPA with those of IPA and PA among hospitalized patients over a 10-year period. A total of 29, 51 and 31 cases of CPA, IPA and PA, respectively, were included. An increasing trend in galactomannan antigen seropositivity rate from PA (24.1%) to CPA (35.7%) to IPA (54.9%) and an opposite trend for anti-Aspergillus antibody (PA (71.0%) to CPA (45.8%) to IPA (7.1%)) were observed. Eight percent of CPA patients were infected with more than one Aspergillus sp. The survival rate of the CPA group also fell between the survival rate of PA and IPA, confirming the intermediate severity of CPA. The survival rate of the CPA group became significantly higher than that of the IPA group from day 180 onwards until 2 years after admission (P<0.05). The survival rate of the CPA group remained lower than that of the PA group from day 30 onwards until 2 years after admission. Poor prognostic factors for CPA included older age (P=0.019), higher total leukocyte count (P=0.011) and higher neutrophil count (P=0.012) on admission. This study provided clinical and laboratory evidence for the semi-invasive properties of CPA. PMID:27094904

  20. Strong evidence for the influence of solar cycles on a Late Miocene lake system revealed by biotic and abiotic proxies

    PubMed Central

    Kern, A.K.; Harzhauser, M.; Piller, W.E.; Mandic, O.; Soliman, A.

    2012-01-01

    The Late Miocene paleogeography of central Europe and its climatic history are well studied with a resolution of c. 106 years. Small-scale climatic variations are yet unresolved. Observing past climatic change of short periods, however, would encourage the understanding of the modern climatic system. Therefore, past climate archives require a resolution on a decadal to millennial scale. To detect such a short-term evolution, a continuous 6-m-core of the Paleo-Lake Pannon was analyzed in 1-cm-sample distance to provide information as precise and regular as possible. Measurements of the natural gamma radiation and magnetic susceptibility combined with the total abundance of ostracod shells were used as proxies to estimate millennial- to centennial scale environmental changes during the mid-Tortonian warm period. Patterns emerged, but no indisputable age model can be provided for the core, due to the lack of paleomagnetic reversals and the lack of minerals suitable for absolute dating. Therefore, herein we propose another method to determine a hypothetic time frame for these deposits. Based on statistical processes, including Lomb–Scargle and REDFIT periodograms along with Wavelet spectra, several distinct cyclicities could be detected. Calculations considering established off-shore sedimentation rates of the Tortonian Vienna Basin revealed patterns resembling Holocene solar-cycle-records well. The comparison of filtered data of Miocene and Holocene records displays highly similar patterns and comparable modulations. A best-fit adjustment of sedimentation rate results in signals which fit to the lower and upper Gleissberg cycle, the de Vries cycle, the unnamed 500-year- and 1000-year-cycles, as well as the Hallstatt cycle. Each of these cycles has a distinct and unique expression in the investigated environmental proxies, reflecting a complex forcing-system. Hence, a single-proxy-analysis, as often performed on Holocene records, should be considered cautiously as

  1. Evidence of Carbon Fixation Pathway in a Bacterium from Candidate Phylum SBR1093 Revealed with Genomic Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiping; Guo, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Tong

    2014-01-01

    Autotrophic CO2 fixation is the most important biotransformation process in the biosphere. Research focusing on the diversity and distribution of relevant autotrophs is significant to our comprehension of the biosphere. In this study, a draft genome of a bacterium from candidate phylum SBR1093 was reconstructed with the metagenome of an industrial activated sludge. Based on comparative genomics, this autotrophy may occur via a newly discovered carbon fixation path, the hydroxypropionate-hydroxybutyrate (HPHB) cycle, which was demonstrated in a previous work to be uniquely possessed by some genera from Archaea. This bacterium possesses all of the thirteen enzymes required for the HPHB cycle; these enzymes share 30∼50% identity with those in the autotrophic species of Archaea that undergo the HPHB cycle and 30∼80% identity with the corresponding enzymes of the mixotrophic species within Bradyrhizobiaceae. Thus, this bacterium might have an autotrophic growth mode in certain conditions. A phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene reveals that the phylotypes within candidate phylum SBR1093 are primarily clustered into 5 clades with a shallow branching pattern. This bacterium is clustered with phylotypes from organically contaminated environments, implying a demand for organics in heterotrophic metabolism. Considering the types of regulators, such as FnR, Fur, and ArsR, this bacterium might be a facultative aerobic mixotroph with potential multi-antibiotic and heavy metal resistances. This is the first report on Bacteria that may perform potential carbon fixation via the HPHB cycle, thus may expand our knowledge of the distribution and importance of the HPHB cycle in the biosphere. PMID:25310003

  2. Strong evidence for the influence of solar cycles on a Late Miocene lake system revealed by biotic and abiotic proxies.

    PubMed

    Kern, A K; Harzhauser, M; Piller, W E; Mandic, O; Soliman, A

    2012-04-15

    The Late Miocene paleogeography of central Europe and its climatic history are well studied with a resolution of c. 10(6) years. Small-scale climatic variations are yet unresolved. Observing past climatic change of short periods, however, would encourage the understanding of the modern climatic system. Therefore, past climate archives require a resolution on a decadal to millennial scale. To detect such a short-term evolution, a continuous 6-m-core of the Paleo-Lake Pannon was analyzed in 1-cm-sample distance to provide information as precise and regular as possible. Measurements of the natural gamma radiation and magnetic susceptibility combined with the total abundance of ostracod shells were used as proxies to estimate millennial- to centennial scale environmental changes during the mid-Tortonian warm period. Patterns emerged, but no indisputable age model can be provided for the core, due to the lack of paleomagnetic reversals and the lack of minerals suitable for absolute dating. Therefore, herein we propose another method to determine a hypothetic time frame for these deposits. Based on statistical processes, including Lomb-Scargle and REDFIT periodograms along with Wavelet spectra, several distinct cyclicities could be detected. Calculations considering established off-shore sedimentation rates of the Tortonian Vienna Basin revealed patterns resembling Holocene solar-cycle-records well. The comparison of filtered data of Miocene and Holocene records displays highly similar patterns and comparable modulations. A best-fit adjustment of sedimentation rate results in signals which fit to the lower and upper Gleissberg cycle, the de Vries cycle, the unnamed 500-year- and 1000-year-cycles, as well as the Hallstatt cycle. Each of these cycles has a distinct and unique expression in the investigated environmental proxies, reflecting a complex forcing-system. Hence, a single-proxy-analysis, as often performed on Holocene records, should be considered cautiously as

  3. A clonal analysis of neural progenitors during axolotl spinal cord regeneration reveals evidence for both spatially restricted and multipotent progenitors.

    PubMed

    McHedlishvili, Levan; Epperlein, Hans H; Telzerow, Anja; Tanaka, Elly M

    2007-06-01

    Complete regeneration of the spinal cord occurs after tail regeneration in urodele amphibians such as the axolotl. Little is known about how neural progenitor cells are recruited from the mature tail, how they populate the regenerating spinal cord, and whether the neural progenitor cells are multipotent. To address these issues we used three types of cell fate mapping. By grafting green fluorescent protein-positive (GFP(+)) spinal cord we show that a 500 microm region adjacent to the amputation plane generates the neural progenitors for regeneration. We further tracked single nuclear-GFP-labeled cells as they proliferated during regeneration, observing their spatial distribution, and ultimately their expression of the progenitor markers PAX7 and PAX6. Most progenitors generate descendents that expand along the anterior/posterior (A/P) axis, but remain close to the dorsal/ventral (D/V) location of the parent. A minority of clones spanned multiple D/V domains, taking up differing molecular identities, indicating that cells can execute multipotency in vivo. In parallel experiments, bulk labeling of dorsally or ventrally restricted progenitor cells revealed that ventral cells at the distal end of the regenerating spinal cord switch to dorsal cell fates. Analysis of PAX7 and PAX6 expression along the regenerating spinal cord indicated that these markers are expressed in dorsal and lateral domains all along the spinal cord except at the distal terminus. These results suggest that neural progenitor identity is destabilized or altered in the terminal vesicle region, from which clear migration of cells into the surrounding blastema is also observed. PMID:17507409

  4. Deep Sequencing Reveals Novel Genetic Variants in Children with Acute Liver Failure and Tissue Evidence of Impaired Energy Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Valencia, C. Alexander; Wang, Xinjian; Wang, Jin; Peters, Anna; Simmons, Julia R.; Moran, Molly C.; Mathur, Abhinav; Husami, Ammar; Qian, Yaping; Sheridan, Rachel; Bove, Kevin E.; Witte, David; Huang, Taosheng; Miethke, Alexander G.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The etiology of acute liver failure (ALF) remains elusive in almost half of affected children. We hypothesized that inherited mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation disorders were occult etiological factors in patients with idiopathic ALF and impaired energy metabolism. Methods Twelve patients with elevated blood molar lactate/pyruvate ratio and indeterminate etiology were selected from a retrospective cohort of 74 subjects with ALF because their fixed and frozen liver samples were available for histological, ultrastructural, molecular and biochemical analysis. Results A customized next-generation sequencing panel for 26 genes associated with mitochondrial and fatty acid oxidation defects revealed mutations and sequence variants in five subjects. Variants involved the genes ACAD9, POLG, POLG2, DGUOK, and RRM2B; the latter not previously reported in subjects with ALF. The explanted livers of the patients with heterozygous, truncating insertion mutations in RRM2B showed patchy micro- and macrovesicular steatosis, decreased mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content <30% of controls, and reduced respiratory chain complex activity; both patients had good post-transplant outcome. One infant with severe lactic acidosis was found to carry two heterozygous variants in ACAD9, which was associated with isolated complex I deficiency and diffuse hypergranular hepatocytes. The two subjects with heterozygous variants of unknown clinical significance in POLG and DGUOK developed ALF following drug exposure. Their hepatocytes displayed abnormal mitochondria by electron microscopy. Conclusion Targeted next generation sequencing and correlation with histological, ultrastructural and functional studies on liver tissue in children with elevated lactate/pyruvate ratio expand the spectrum of genes associated with pediatric ALF. PMID:27483465

  5. Evidence for early intracellular accumulation of volatile compounds during spadix development in Arum italicum L. and preliminary data on some tropical Aroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leguet, Aurélia; Gibernau, Marc; Shintu, Laetitia; Caldarelli, Stefano; Moja, Sandrine; Baudino, Sylvie; Caissard, Jean-Claude

    2014-08-01

    Staining and histochemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed at different inflorescence developmental stages on nine aroid species; one temperate, Arum italicum and eight tropical from the genera Caladium, Dieffenbachia and Philodendron. Moreover, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of VOCs constituting the scent of A. italicum, depending on the stage of development of inflorescences was also conducted. In all nine species, vesicles were observed in the conical cells of either the appendix or the stamens (thecae) and the staminodes. VOCs were localised in intracellular vesicles from the early stages of inflorescence development until their release during receptivity of gynoecium. This localisation was observed by the increase of both number and diameter of the vesicles during 1 week before receptivity. Afterwards, vesicles were fewer and smaller but rarely absent. In A. italicum, staining and gas chromatography analyses confirmed that the vesicles contained terpenes. The quantitatively most important ones were the sesquiterpenes, but monoterpenes were not negligible. Indeed, the quantities of terpenes matched the vesicles' size evolution during 1 week. Furthermore, VOCs from different biosynthetic pathways (sesquiterpenes and alkanes) were at their maximum quantity 2 days before gynoecium receptivity (sesquiterpenes and alkanes) or during receptivity (isobutylamine, monoterpenes, skatole and p-cresol). VOCs seemed to be emitted during gynoecium receptivity and/or during thermogenesis, and FADs are accumulated after thermogenesis in the spadix. These complex dynamics of the different VOCs could indicate specialisation of some VOCs and cell machinery to attract pollinators on the one hand and to repulse/protect against phytophagous organisms and pathogens after pollination on the other hand.

  6. Evidence for early intracellular accumulation of volatile compounds during spadix development in Arum italicum L. and preliminary data on some tropical Aroids.

    PubMed

    Leguet, Aurélia; Gibernau, Marc; Shintu, Laetitia; Caldarelli, Stefano; Moja, Sandrine; Baudino, Sylvie; Caissard, Jean-Claude

    2014-08-01

    Staining and histochemistry of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were performed at different inflorescence developmental stages on nine aroid species; one temperate, Arum italicum and eight tropical from the genera Caladium, Dieffenbachia and Philodendron. Moreover, a qualitative and quantitative analysis of VOCs constituting the scent of A. italicum, depending on the stage of development of inflorescences was also conducted. In all nine species, vesicles were observed in the conical cells of either the appendix or the stamens (thecae) and the staminodes. VOCs were localised in intracellular vesicles from the early stages of inflorescence development until their release during receptivity of gynoecium. This localisation was observed by the increase of both number and diameter of the vesicles during 1 week before receptivity. Afterwards, vesicles were fewer and smaller but rarely absent. In A. italicum, staining and gas chromatography analyses confirmed that the vesicles contained terpenes. The quantitatively most important ones were the sesquiterpenes, but monoterpenes were not negligible. Indeed, the quantities of terpenes matched the vesicles' size evolution during 1 week. Furthermore, VOCs from different biosynthetic pathways (sesquiterpenes and alkanes) were at their maximum quantity 2 days before gynoecium receptivity (sesquiterpenes and alkanes) or during receptivity (isobutylamine, monoterpenes, skatole and p-cresol). VOCs seemed to be emitted during gynoecium receptivity and/or during thermogenesis, and FADs are accumulated after thermogenesis in the spadix. These complex dynamics of the different VOCs could indicate specialisation of some VOCs and cell machinery to attract pollinators on the one hand and to repulse/protect against phytophagous organisms and pathogens after pollination on the other hand. PMID:24925357

  7. Diversity of the ectoines biosynthesis genes in the salt tolerant Streptomyces and evidence for inductive effect of ectoines on their accumulation.

    PubMed

    Sadeghi, Akram; Soltani, Bahram M; Nekouei, Mojtaba Khayam; Jouzani, Gholamreza Salehi; Mirzaei, Hossein Hadavand; Sadeghizadeh, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Streptomyces commonly produce ectoines as compatible solutes to prevent osmotic stresses. Fine structure of the genes producing ectoine (ectC) and hydroxyectoine (ectD) enzymes in Streptomyces rimosus C-2012 as a slightly halophilic bacterium is reported in this study. Deduced amino acid sequences of ectC and ectD genes from strain C-2012 and some other related species were compared and 72-90% and 13-81% identities were detected for ectC and ectD, respectively. High similarity of ectC between closely or distantly related Streptomyces to the strain C-2012 may indicate horizontal transfer of this gene. However, phylogenetic relationships of ectD were correlated with phylogenetic affiliation of the strains. It suggests that the ability of Streptomyces to produce hydroxyectoine has been the result of a vertical transfer event. HPLC analysis showed that strain C-2012 was able to produce ectoine and hydroxyectoine both in the presence and absence of external salinity (up to 0.45 M NaCl). Accordingly, reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) showed that ectABCD operon in this strain is positively affected by salt. Also, inductive effect of the salt was increased when it was applied with 1 mM of ectoines. Transcription level of ectC was increased 2.7- and 2.9-fold in the medium supplied with salt and ectoine and salt and hydroxyectoine, respectively. The effect of salinity with or without ectoines was more on ectD transcription level than that of ectC. In S. rimosus under salt stress, ectoine and hydroxyectoine biosynthesis primarily depends on the stimulation of ectABCD operon transcription. However, drastic accumulation of ectoine and hydroxyectoine without increase in ectC and ectD transcripts was observed in the medium supplied with salt and ectoines and that suggest there might be additional posttranscriptional level of control. Increases in ratio of some intracellular free amino acids in salt stressed to unstressed conditions were observed in cells grown with

  8. A Draft De Novo Genome Assembly for the Northern Bobwhite (Colinus virginianus) Reveals Evidence for a Rapid Decline in Effective Population Size Beginning in the Late Pleistocene

    PubMed Central

    Halley, Yvette A.; Dowd, Scot E.; Decker, Jared E.; Seabury, Paul M.; Bhattarai, Eric; Johnson, Charles D.; Rollins, Dale; Tizard, Ian R.; Brightsmith, Donald J.; Peterson, Markus J.; Taylor, Jeremy F.; Seabury, Christopher M.

    2014-01-01

    Wild populations of northern bobwhites (Colinus virginianus; hereafter bobwhite) have declined across nearly all of their U.S. range, and despite their importance as an experimental wildlife model for ecotoxicology studies, no bobwhite draft genome assembly currently exists. Herein, we present a bobwhite draft de novo genome assembly with annotation, comparative analyses including genome-wide analyses of divergence with the chicken (Gallus gallus) and zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) genomes, and coalescent modeling to reconstruct the demographic history of the bobwhite for comparison to other birds currently in decline (i.e., scarlet macaw; Ara macao). More than 90% of the assembled bobwhite genome was captured within <40,000 final scaffolds (N50 = 45.4 Kb) despite evidence for approximately 3.22 heterozygous polymorphisms per Kb, and three annotation analyses produced evidence for >14,000 unique genes and proteins. Bobwhite analyses of divergence with the chicken and zebra finch genomes revealed many extremely conserved gene sequences, and evidence for lineage-specific divergence of noncoding regions. Coalescent models for reconstructing the demographic history of the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw provided evidence for population bottlenecks which were temporally coincident with human colonization of the New World, the late Pleistocene collapse of the megafauna, and the last glacial maximum. Demographic trends predicted for the bobwhite and the scarlet macaw also were concordant with how opposing natural selection strategies (i.e., skewness in the r-/K-selection continuum) would be expected to shape genome diversity and the effective population sizes in these species, which is directly relevant to future conservation efforts. PMID:24621616

  9. Evidence for an anterior-posterior differentiation in the human hippocampal formation revealed by meta-analytic parcellation of fMRI coordinate maps: Focus on the subiculum

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Henry W.; Clos, Mareike; Dibble, Sofia; Fox, Peter; Grace, Anthony A.; Phillips, Mary L.; Eickhoff, Simon B.

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies, predominantly in experimental animals, have suggested the presence of a differentiation of function across the hippocampal formation. In rodents, ventral regions are thought to be involved in emotional behavior while dorsal regions mediate cognitive or spatial processes. Using a combination of modeling the co-occurrence of significant activations across thousands of neuroimaging experiments and subsequent data-driven clustering of these data we were able to provide evidence of distinct subregions within a region corresponding to the human subiculum, a critical hub within the hippocampal formation. This connectivity-based model consists of a bilateral anterior region, as well as separate posterior and intermediate regions on each hemisphere. Functional connectivity assessed both by meta-analytic and resting fMRI approaches revealed that more anterior regions were more strongly connected to the default mode network, and more posterior regions were more strongly connected to ‘task positive’ regions. In addition, our analysis revealed that the anterior subregion was functionally connected to the ventral striatum, midbrain and amygdala, a circuit that is central to models of stress and motivated behavior. Analysis of a behavioral taxonomy provided evidence for a role for each subregion in mnemonic processing, as well as implication of the anterior subregion in emotional and visual processing and the right posterior subregion in reward processing. These findings lend support to models which posit anterior-posterior differentiation of function within the human hippocampal formation and complement other early steps toward a comparative (cross-species) model of the region. PMID:25776219

  10. Deep sequencing reveals the complete genome and evidence for transcriptional activity of the first virus-like sequences identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry).

    PubMed

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F; Alzate, Juan F; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-04-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%-73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant. PMID:25855242

  11. Deep Sequencing Reveals the Complete Genome and Evidence for Transcriptional Activity of the First Virus-Like Sequences Identified in Aristotelia chilensis (Maqui Berry)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreses, Javier; Rojas-Herrera, Marcelo; Sánchez, Carolina; Hewstone, Nicole; Undurraga, Soledad F.; Alzate, Juan F.; Manque, Patricio; Maracaja-Coutinho, Vinicius; Polanco, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report the genome sequence and evidence for transcriptional activity of a virus-like element in the native Chilean berry tree Aristotelia chilensis. We propose to name the endogenous sequence as Aristotelia chilensis Virus 1 (AcV1). High-throughput sequencing of the genome of this tree uncovered an endogenous viral element, with a size of 7122 bp, corresponding to the complete genome of AcV1. Its sequence contains three open reading frames (ORFs): ORFs 1 and 2 shares 66%–73% amino acid similarity with members of the Caulimoviridae virus family, especially the Petunia vein clearing virus (PVCV), Petuvirus genus. ORF1 encodes a movement protein (MP); ORF2 a Reverse Transcriptase (RT) and a Ribonuclease H (RNase H) domain; and ORF3 showed no amino acid sequence similarity with any other known virus proteins. Analogous to other known endogenous pararetrovirus sequences (EPRVs), AcV1 is integrated in the genome of Maqui Berry and showed low viral transcriptional activity, which was detected by deep sequencing technology (DNA and RNA-seq). Phylogenetic analysis of AcV1 and other pararetroviruses revealed a closer resemblance with Petuvirus. Overall, our data suggests that AcV1 could be a new member of Caulimoviridae family, genus Petuvirus, and the first evidence of this kind of virus in a fruit plant. PMID:25855242

  12. Comprehensive evaluation of the Estrogen Receptor Alpha gene reveals further evidence for association with type 2 diabetes enriched for nephropathy in an African American population

    PubMed Central

    Keene, Keith L.; Mychaleckyj, Josyf C.; Smith, Shelly G.; Leak, Tennille S.; Perlegas, Peter S.; Langefeld, Carl D.; Herrington, David M.; Freedman, Barry I.; Rich, Stephen S.; Bowden, Donald W.; Sale, Michèle M.

    2009-01-01

    We previously investigated the estrogen receptor α gene (ESR1) as a positional candidate for type 2 diabetes (T2DM), and found evidence for association between the intron 1-intron 2 region of this gene and type 2 diabetes and/or nephropathy in an African American (AA) population. Our objective was to comprehensively evaluate variants across the entire ESR1 gene for association in AA with T2DM and End Stage Renal Disease (T2DM-ESRD). One hundred fifty SNPs in ESR1, spanning 476 kb, were genotyped in 577 AA individuals with T2DM-ESRD and 596 AA controls. Genotypic association tests for dominant, additive, and recessive models, and haplotypic association, were calculated using a χ2 statistic and corresponding P value. Thirty-one SNPs showed nominal evidence for association (P< 0.05) with T2DM-ESRD in one or more genotypic model. After correcting for multiple tests, promoter SNP rs11964281 (nominal P=0.000291, adjusted P=0.0289), and intron 4 SNPs rs1569788 (nominal P=0.000754, adjusted P=0.0278) and rs9340969 (nominal P=0.00109, adjusted P=0.0467) remained significant at experimentwise error rate (EER) P<0.05 for the dominant class of tests. Twenty-three of the thirty-one associated SNPs cluster within the intron 4-intron 6 region. Gender stratification revealed nominal evidence for association with 35 SNPs in females (352 cases; 306 controls) and seven SNPs in males (225 cases; 290 controls). We have identified a novel region of the ESR1 gene that may contain important functional polymorphisms in relation to susceptibility to T2DM and/or diabetic nephropathy. PMID:18305958

  13. Targeted gene disruption of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides reveals evidence that glycerol is a significant transferred nutrient from host plant to fungal pathogen.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yangdou; Shen, Wenyun; Dauk, Melanie; Wang, Feng; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Zou, Jitao

    2004-01-01

    Unidirectional transfer of nutrients from plant host to pathogen represents a most revealing aspect of the parasitic lifestyle of plant pathogens. Whereas much effort has been focused on sugars and amino acids, the identification of other significant metabolites is equally important for comprehensive characterization of metabolic interactions between plants and biotrophic fungal pathogens. Employing a strategy of targeted gene disruption, we generated a mutant strain (gpdhDelta) defective in glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a hemibiotrophic plant pathogen, Colletotrichum gloeosporioides f.sp. malvae. The gpdhDelta strain had severe defects in carbon utilization as it could use neither glucose nor amino acids for sustained growth. Although the mutant mycelia were able to grow on potato dextrose agar medium, they displayed arrhythmicity in growth and failure to conidiate. The metabolic defect of gpdhDelta could be entirely ameliorated by glycerol in chemically defined minimal medium. Furthermore, glycerol was the one and only metabolite that could restore rhythmic growth and conidiation of gpdhDelta. Despite the profound defects in carbon source utilization, in planta the gpdhDelta strain exhibited normal pathogenicity, proceeded normally in its life cycle, and produced abundant conidia. Analysis of plant tissues at the peripheral zone of fungal infection sites revealed a time-dependent reduction in glycerol content. This study provides strong evidence for a role of glycerol as a significant transferred metabolite from plant to fungal pathogen.

  14. Phylogeography of postglacial range expansion in Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae) reveals no evidence of bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity, or isolation by distance in the leading-edge populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Da-Yong; Bai, Wei-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The past studies of postglacial recolonization patterns in high latitude regions have revealed a significant role of dispersal capacity in shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of temperate trees. However, most of these studies have focused on species with long-distance dispersal followed by exponential population growth and were therefore unable to reveal the patterns in the case of a gradual expansion. Here we studied the impacts of postglacial range expansions on the distribution of genetic diversity in the Manchurian walnut (Juglans mandshurica), a common tree of East Asian cool-temperate deciduous forests that apparently lacks long-distance seed dispersal ability. The genetic diversity and structure of 19 natural walnut populations in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula were examined using 17 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Potential habitats under current and past climatic conditions were predicted using the ecological niche modelling (ENM) method. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed three groups, which were inferred to have diverged through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles in multiple refugia during the Quaternary Period. ENM estimated a southward range shift at the LGM, but high suitability scores still occurred in the western parts of the Changbai Mountains (Northeast China), the Korean peninsula and the exposed seafloor of the Yellow Sea. In contrast to most other cool-temperate trees co-occurring in the same region, the Manchurian walnut did not show any evidence of a population bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity or isolation by distance during the postglacial expansion. Our study clearly indicates that current northern populations originated from one glacial lineage and recolonization via a gradually advancing front due to the lack of a long-distance seed dispersal mechanism led to no latitudinal decrease in genetic diversity.

  15. Phylogeography of postglacial range expansion in Juglans mandshurica (Juglandaceae) reveals no evidence of bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity, or isolation by distance in the leading-edge populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Ting; Xu, Bing; Zhang, Da-Yong; Bai, Wei-Ning

    2016-09-01

    The past studies of postglacial recolonization patterns in high latitude regions have revealed a significant role of dispersal capacity in shaping the genetic diversity and population structure of temperate trees. However, most of these studies have focused on species with long-distance dispersal followed by exponential population growth and were therefore unable to reveal the patterns in the case of a gradual expansion. Here we studied the impacts of postglacial range expansions on the distribution of genetic diversity in the Manchurian walnut (Juglans mandshurica), a common tree of East Asian cool-temperate deciduous forests that apparently lacks long-distance seed dispersal ability. The genetic diversity and structure of 19 natural walnut populations in Northeast China and the Korean Peninsula were examined using 17 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci. Potential habitats under current and past climatic conditions were predicted using the ecological niche modelling (ENM) method. Bayesian clustering analysis revealed three groups, which were inferred to have diverged through multiple glacial-interglacial cycles in multiple refugia during the Quaternary Period. ENM estimated a southward range shift at the LGM, but high suitability scores still occurred in the western parts of the Changbai Mountains (Northeast China), the Korean peninsula and the exposed seafloor of the Yellow Sea. In contrast to most other cool-temperate trees co-occurring in the same region, the Manchurian walnut did not show any evidence of a population bottleneck, loss of genetic diversity or isolation by distance during the postglacial expansion. Our study clearly indicates that current northern populations originated from one glacial lineage and recolonization via a gradually advancing front due to the lack of a long-distance seed dispersal mechanism led to no latitudinal decrease in genetic diversity. PMID:27346642

  16. Thermal History of the Bandelier Magmatic System: Evidence for Magmatic Injection and Recharge at 1.61 Ma as Revealed by Cathodoluminescence and Titanium Geothermometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Hanson, J. B.; Minarik, W. G.; Stix, J.

    2009-12-01

    The rhyolitic Valles Caldera complex, New Mexico, is one of the type examples of resurgent calderas, and has experienced two well-studied caldera-forming eruptions. The first formed the Lower Bandelier Tuff (LBT) at 1.61 Ma, and the second emplaced the Upper Bandelier Tuff (UBT) at 1.22-1.26 Ma. During the time between the LBT and UBT, the much smaller-scale Cerro Toledo Rhyolite (CTR) was sporadically erupted. Quartz crystals from these stages of activity were imaged using cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, and growth zones in certain quartzes, due to varying Ti content, were revealed. Using a titanium-in-quartz geothermometer, crystallization temperatures were obtained. LBT quartzes are unzoned, with temperatures clustering between 660-715°C when a calculated aTiO2 of 0.4 is applied to the system. These near-solidus temperatures imply that the LBT magma chamber was highly crystalline at one point. However, the low crystal content and the widespread presence of resorption features on LBT crystals require that pervasive melting affected the LBT magma chamber at some point prior to eruption. This melting is hypothesized to result from a hot magmatic injection into the system, with the injection also being a likely trigger of the cataclysmic LBT volcanism. The earliest erupted CTR units contain many zoned quartz crystals. Inner zones are usually rounded and invariably reveal cold (~660-700°C) cores and hot (~750-825°C) rims. We interpret these results as thermal evidence of magmatic recharge, where new magma mixed vigorously with leftover magma, and high-temperature rims crystallized around low-temperature restitic quartz cores. Thermal data for the rest of the CTR record the continuing cooling and evolution of this mixture of magma, while results for the culminating UBT reveal generally unzoned quartz crystals with a roughly constant temperature of 685 to 725°C. Altogether, these results present an unprecedented glimpse into the thermal history of the

  17. Genome-wide set of SNPs reveals evidence for two glacial refugia and admixture from postglacial recolonization in an alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Zijian; Hall, Jocelyn C; Jex, Bill; Hegel, Troy M; Coltman, David W

    2016-08-01

    Past glaciation events have played a major role in shaping the genetic diversity and distribution of wild sheep in North America. The advancement of glaciers can isolate populations in ice-free refugia, where they can survive until the recession of ice sheets. The major Beringian refugium is thought to have held thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli) populations during times of glacial advance. While isolation in the major refugium can account for much of the genetic and morphological diversity seen in extant thinhorn sheep populations, mounting evidence suggests the persistence of populations in smaller minor refugia. We investigated the refugial origins of thinhorn sheep using ~10 000 SNPs obtained via a cross-species application of the domestic sheep ovine HD BeadChip to genotype 52 thinhorn sheep and five bighorn sheep (O. canadensis) samples. Phylogenetic inference revealed a distinct lineage of thinhorn sheep inhabiting British Columbia, which is consistent with the survival of a group of thinhorn sheep in a minor refugium separate from the Beringian refugium. Isolation in separate glacial refugia probably mediated the evolution of the two thinhorn sheep subspecies, the white Dall's sheep (O. d. dalli), which persisted in Beringia, and the dark Stone's sheep (O. d. stonei), which utilized the minor refugium. We also found the first genetic evidence for admixture between sheep from different glacial refugia in south-central Yukon as a consequence of post glacial expansion and recolonization. These results show that glaciation events can have a major role in the evolution of species inhabiting previously glaciated habitats and the need to look beyond established refugia when examining the evolutionary history of such species.

  18. Genome-wide set of SNPs reveals evidence for two glacial refugia and admixture from postglacial recolonization in an alpine ungulate.

    PubMed

    Sim, Zijian; Hall, Jocelyn C; Jex, Bill; Hegel, Troy M; Coltman, David W

    2016-08-01

    Past glaciation events have played a major role in shaping the genetic diversity and distribution of wild sheep in North America. The advancement of glaciers can isolate populations in ice-free refugia, where they can survive until the recession of ice sheets. The major Beringian refugium is thought to have held thinhorn sheep (Ovis dalli) populations during times of glacial advance. While isolation in the major refugium can account for much of the genetic and morphological diversity seen in extant thinhorn sheep populations, mounting evidence suggests the persistence of populations in smaller minor refugia. We investigated the refugial origins of thinhorn sheep using ~10 000 SNPs obtained via a cross-species application of the domestic sheep ovine HD BeadChip to genotype 52 thinhorn sheep and five bighorn sheep (O. canadensis) samples. Phylogenetic inference revealed a distinct lineage of thinhorn sheep inhabiting British Columbia, which is consistent with the survival of a group of thinhorn sheep in a minor refugium separate from the Beringian refugium. Isolation in separate glacial refugia probably mediated the evolution of the two thinhorn sheep subspecies, the white Dall's sheep (O. d. dalli), which persisted in Beringia, and the dark Stone's sheep (O. d. stonei), which utilized the minor refugium. We also found the first genetic evidence for admixture between sheep from different glacial refugia in south-central Yukon as a consequence of post glacial expansion and recolonization. These results show that glaciation events can have a major role in the evolution of species inhabiting previously glaciated habitats and the need to look beyond established refugia when examining the evolutionary history of such species. PMID:27272944

  19. Low-coverage exome sequencing screen in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tumors reveals evidence of exposure to carcinogenic aristolochic acid

    PubMed Central

    Castells, Xavier; Karanović, Sandra; Ardin, Maude; Tomić, Karla; Xylinas, Evanguelos; Durand, Geoffroy; Villar, Stephanie; Forey, Nathalie; Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Voegele, Catherine; Karlović, Krešimir; Mišić, Maja; Dittrich, Damir; Dolgalev, Igor; McKay, James; Shariat, Shahrokh F.; Sidorenko, Viktoria S.; Fernandes, Andrea; Heguy, Adriana; Dickman, Kathleen G.; Olivier, Magali; Grollman, Arthur P.; Jelaković, Bojan; Zavadil, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Background Dietary exposure to cytotoxic and carcinogenic aristolochic acid (AA) causes severe nephropathy typically associated with urological cancers. Monitoring of AA exposure uses biomarkers such as aristolactam-DNA adducts, detected by mass spectrometry in the kidney cortex, or the somatic A>T transversion pattern characteristic of exposure to AA, as revealed by previous DNA sequencing studies using fresh frozen tumors. Methods Here we report a low-coverage whole-exome sequencing method (LC-WES) optimized for multi-sample detection of the AA mutational signature, and demonstrate its utility in 17 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded urothelial tumors obtained from 15 patients with endemic nephropathy, an environmental form of aristolochic acid nephropathy. Results LC-WES identified the AA signature, alongside signatures of age and APOBEC enzyme activity, in 15 samples sequenced at the average per-base coverage of ~10x. Analysis at 3–9x coverage revealed the signature in 91% of the positive samples. The exome-wide distribution of the predominant A>T transversions exhibited a stochastic pattern whereas 83 cancer driver genes were enriched for recurrent non-synonymous A>T mutations. In two patients, pairs of tumors from different parts of the urinary tract, including the bladder, harbored overlapping mutation patterns, suggesting tumor dissemination via cell seeding. Conclusion LC-WES analysis of archived tumor tissues is a reliable method applicable to investigations of both the exposure to AA and its biologic effects in human carcinomas. Impact By detecting cancers associated with AA exposure in high-risk populations, LC-WES can support future molecular epidemiology studies and provide evidence-base for relevant preventive measures. PMID:26383547

  20. Mitochondrial coding genome analysis of tropical root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne) supports haplotype based diagnostics and reveals evidence of recent reticulate evolution

    PubMed Central

    Janssen, Toon; Karssen, Gerrit; Verhaeven, Myrtle; Coyne, Danny; Bert, Wim

    2016-01-01

    The polyphagous parthenogenetic root-knot nematodes of the genus Meloidogyne are considered to be the most significant nematode pest in sub-tropical and tropical agriculture. Despite the crucial need for correct diagnosis, identification of these pathogens remains problematic. The traditionally used diagnostic strategies, including morphometrics, host-range tests, biochemical and molecular techniques, now appear to be unreliable due to the recently-suggested hybrid origin of root-knot nematodes. In order to determine a suitable barcode region for these pathogens nine quickly-evolving mitochondrial coding genes were screened. Resulting haplotype networks revealed closely related lineages indicating a recent speciation, an anthropogenic-aided distribution through agricultural practices, and evidence for reticulate evolution within M. arenaria. Nonetheless, nucleotide polymorphisms harbor enough variation to distinguish these closely-related lineages. Furthermore, completeness of lineage sorting was verified by screening 80 populations from widespread geographical origins and variable hosts. Importantly, our results indicate that mitochondrial haplotypes are strongly linked and consistent with traditional esterase isozyme patterns, suggesting that different parthenogenetic lineages can be reliably identified using mitochondrial haplotypes. The study indicates that the barcode region Nad5 can reliably identify the major lineages of tropical root-knot nematodes. PMID:26940543

  1. Epoch-based likelihood models reveal no evidence for accelerated evolution of viviparity in squamate reptiles in response to cenozoic climate change.

    PubMed

    King, Benedict; Lee, Michael S Y

    2015-09-01

    A broad scale analysis of the evolution of viviparity across nearly 4,000 species of squamates revealed that origins increase in frequency toward the present, raising the question of whether rates of change have accelerated. We here use simulations to show that the increased frequency is within the range expected given that the number of squamate lineages also increases with time. Novel, epoch-based methods implemented in BEAST (which allow rates of discrete character evolution to vary across time-slices) also give congruent results, with recent epochs having very similar rates to older epochs. Thus, contrary to expectations, there was no accelerated burst of origins of viviparity in response to global cooling during the Cenozoic or glacial cycles during the Plio-Pleistocene. However, if one accepts the conventional view that viviparity is more likely to evolve than to be lost, and also the evidence here that viviparity has evolved with similar regularity throughout the last 200 Ma, then the absence of large, ancient clades of viviparous squamates (analogs to therian mammals) requires explanation. Viviparous squamate lineages might be more prone to extinction than are oviparous lineages, due to their prevalance at high elevations and latitudes and thus greater susceptibility to climate fluctuations. If so, the directional bias in character evolution would be offset by the bias in extinction rates.

  2. Proteomic analysis reveals differential accumulation of small heat shock proteins and late embryogenesis abundant proteins between ABA-deficient mutant vp5 seeds and wild-type Vp5 seeds in maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fangping; Yang, Le; Hu, Xiuli; Tai, Fuju; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    ABA is a major plant hormone that plays important roles during many phases of plant life cycle, including seed development, maturity and dormancy, and especially the acquisition of desiccation tolerance. Understanding of the molecular basis of ABA-mediated plant response to stress is of interest not only in basic research on plant adaptation but also in applied research on plant productivity. Maize mutant viviparous-5 (vp5), deficient in ABA biosynthesis in seeds, is a useful material for studying ABA-mediated response in maize. Due to carotenoid deficiency, vp5 endosperm is white, compared to yellow Vp5 endosperm. However, the background difference at proteome level between vp5 and Vp5 seeds is unclear. This study aimed to characterize proteome alterations of maize vp5 seeds and to identify ABA-dependent proteins during seed maturation. We compared the embryo and endosperm proteomes of vp5 and Vp5 seeds by gel-based proteomics. Up to 46 protein spots, most in embryos, were found to be differentially accumulated between vp5 and Vp5. The identified proteins included small heat shock proteins (sHSPs), late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, stress proteins, storage proteins and enzymes among others. However, EMB564, the most abundant LEA protein in maize embryo, accumulated in comparable levels between vp5 and Vp5 embryos, which contrasted to previously characterized, greatly lowered expression of emb564 mRNA in vp5 embryos. Moreover, LEA proteins and sHSPs displayed differential accumulations in vp5 embryos: six out of eight identified LEA proteins decreased while nine sHSPs increased in abundance. Finally, we discussed the possible causes of global proteome alterations, especially the observed differential accumulation of identified LEA proteins and sHSPs in vp5 embryos. The data derived from this study provides new insight into ABA-dependent proteins and ABA-mediated response during maize seed maturation. PMID:25653661

  3. Electromobility Shift Assay Reveals Evidence in Favor of Allele-Specific Binding of RUNX1 to the 5' Hypersensitive Site 4-Locus Control Region.

    PubMed

    Dehghani, Hossein; Ghobakhloo, Sepideh; Neishabury, Maryam

    2016-08-01

    In our previous studies on the Iranian β-thalassemia (β-thal) patients, we identified an association between the severity of the β-thal phenotype and the polymorphic palindromic site at the 5' hypersensitive site 4-locus control region (5'HS4-LCR) of the β-globin gene cluster. Furthermore, a linkage disequilibrium was observed between this region and XmnI-HBG2 in the patient population. Based on this data, it was suggested that the well-recognized phenotype-ameliorating role assigned to positive XmnI could be associated with its linked elements in the LCR. To investigate the functional significance of polymorphisms at the 5'HS4-LCR, we studied its influence on binding of transcription factors. Web-based predictions of transcription factor binding revealed a binding site for runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1), when the allele at the center of the palindrome (TGGGG(A/G)CCCCA) was A but not when it was G. Furthermore, electromobility shift assay (EMSA) presented evidence in support of allele-specific binding of RUNX1 to 5'HS4. Considering that RUNX1 is a well-known regulator of hematopoiesis, these preliminary data suggest the importance of further studies to confirm this interaction and consequently investigate its functional and phenotypical relevance. These studies could help us to understand the molecular mechanism behind the phenotype modifying role of the 5'HS4-LCR polymorphic palindromic region (rs16912979), which has been observed in previous studies. PMID:27492765

  4. Mobility of water ice on Callisto - Evidence and implications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Maloney, P. R.

    1984-01-01

    Voyager images of Callisto reveal evidence for the accumulation of a bright volatile, presumably water ice, on north-facing slopes in the north polar region. The geometry of these accumulations suggests that ice migration in Callistoan high latitudes is dominated by thermal sublimation, controlled by insolation-dependent surface temperature contrasts. Such sublimation-dominated migration may result in the cold-trapping of most of the surface ice in discrete high-albedo regions.

  5. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant.

    PubMed

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein-protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum.

  6. Re-analysis of protein data reveals the germination pathway and up accumulation mechanism of cell wall hydrolases during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum hexandrum- a high altitude plant

    PubMed Central

    Dogra, Vivek; Bagler, Ganesh; Sreenivasulu, Yelam

    2015-01-01

    Podophyllum hexandrum Royle is an important high-altitude plant of Himalayas with immense medicinal value. Earlier, it was reported that the cell wall hydrolases were up accumulated during radicle protrusion step of Podophyllum seed germination. In the present study, Podophyllum seed Germination protein interaction Network (PGN) was constructed by using the differentially accumulated protein (DAP) data set of Podophyllum during the radicle protrusion step of seed germination, with reference to Arabidopsis protein–protein interaction network (AtPIN). The developed PGN is comprised of a giant cluster with 1028 proteins having 10,519 interactions and a few small clusters with relevant gene ontological signatures. In this analysis, a germination pathway related cluster which is also central to the topology and information dynamics of PGN was obtained with a set of 60 key proteins. Among these, eight proteins which are known to be involved in signaling, metabolism, protein modification, cell wall modification, and cell cycle regulation processes were found commonly highlighted in both the proteomic and interactome analysis. The systems-level analysis of PGN identified the key proteins involved in radicle protrusion step of seed germination in Podophyllum. PMID:26579141

  7. Sexual selection and maintenance of sex: evidence from comparisons of rates of genomic accumulation of mutations and divergence of sex-related genes in sexual and hermaphroditic species of Caenorhabditis.

    PubMed

    Artieri, Carlo G; Haerty, Wilfried; Gupta, Bhagwati P; Singh, Rama S

    2008-05-01

    Several hypotheses have been proposed to explain the persistence of dioecy despite the reproductive advantages conferred to hermaphrodites, including greater efficiency at purging deleterious mutations in the former. Dioecy can benefit from both mutation purging and accelerated evolution by bringing together beneficial mutations in the same individual via recombination and shuffling of genotypes. In addition, mathematical treatment has shown that sexual selection is also capable of mitigating the cost of maintaining separate sexes by increasing the overall fitness of sexual populations, and genomic comparisons have shown that sexual selection can lead to accelerated evolution. Here, we examine the advantages of dioecy versus hermaphroditism by comparing the rate of evolution in sex-related genes and the rate of accumulation of deleterious mutations using a large number of orthologs (11,493) in the dioecious Caenorhabditis remanei and the hermaphroditic Caenorhabditis briggsae. We have used this data set to estimate the deleterious mutation rate per generation, U, in both species and find that although it is significantly higher in hermaphrodites, both species are at least 2 orders of magnitude lower than the value required to explain the persistence of sex by efficiency at purging deleterious mutations alone. We also find that genes expressed in sperm are evolving rapidly in both species; however, they show a greater increase in their rate of evolution relative to genes expressed in other tissues in C. remanei, suggesting stronger sexual selection pressure acting on these genes in dioecious species. Interestingly, the persistence of a signal of rapid evolution of sperm genes in C. briggsae suggests a recent evolutionary origin of hermaphrodism in this lineage. Our results provide empirical evidence of increased sexual selection pressure in dioecious animals, supporting the possibility that sexual selection may play an important role in the maintenance of sexual

  8. Lack of CAK complex accumulation at DNA damage sites in XP-B and XP-B/CS fibroblasts reveals differential regulation of CAK anchoring to core TFIIH by XPB and XPD helicases during nucleotide excision repair.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qianzheng; Wani, Gulzar; Sharma, Nidhi; Wani, Altaf

    2012-12-01

    Transcription factor II H (TFIIH) is composed of core TFIIH and Cdk-activating kinase (CAK) complexes. Besides transcription, TFIIH also participates in nucleotide excision repair (NER), verifying DNA lesions through its helicase components XPB and XPD. The assembly state of TFIIH is known to be affected by truncation mutations in xeroderma pigmentosum group G/Cockayne syndrome (XP-G/CS). Here, we showed that CAK component MAT1 was rapidly recruited to UV-induced DNA damage sites, co-localizing with core TFIIH component p62, and dispersed from the damage sites upon completion of DNA repair. While the core TFIIH-CAK association remained intact, MAT1 failed to accumulate at DNA damage sites in fibroblasts harboring XP-B or XP-B/CS mutations. Nevertheless, MAT1, XPD and XPC as well as XPG were able to accumulate at damage sites in XP-D fibroblasts, in which the core TFIIH-CAK association also remained intact. Interestingly, XPG recruitment was impaired in XP-B/CS fibroblasts derived from patients with mild phenotype, but persisted in XP-B/CS fibroblasts from severely affected patients resulting in a nonfunctional preincision complex. An examination of steady-state levels of RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) indicated that UV-induced RNAPII phosphorylation was dramatically reduced in XP-B/CS fibroblasts. These results demonstrated that the CAK rapidly disassociates from the core TFIIH upon assembly of nonfunctional preincision complex in XP-B and XP-B/CS cells. The persistency of nonfunctional preincision complex correlates with the severity exhibited by XP-B patients. The results suggest that XPB and XPD helicases differentially regulate the anchoring of CAK to core TFIIH during damage verification step of NER. PMID:23083890

  9. Investigation of a miRNA-Induced Gene Silencing Technique in Petunia Reveals Alterations in miR173 Precursor Processing and the Accumulation of Secondary siRNAs from Endogenous Genes

    PubMed Central

    Han, Yao; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Xiaoting; Li, Mingyang; Guo, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    MIGS (miRNA-induced gene silencing) is a straightforward and efficient gene silencing technique in Arabidopsis. It works by exploiting miR173 to trigger the production of phasiRNAs (phased small interfering RNAs). MIGS can be used in plant species other than Arabidopsis by co-expression of miR173 and target gene fragments fused to an upstream miR173 target site. However, the efficiency and technical mechanisms have not been thoroughly investigated in other plants. In this work, two vectors, pMIGS-chs and pMIGS-pds, were constructed and transformed into petunia plants. The transgenic plants showed CHS (chalcone synthase) and PDS (phytoene desaturase) gene-silencing phenotypes respectively, indicating that MIGS functions in petunia. MIGS-chs plants were used to investigate the mechanisms of this technique in petunia. Results of 5′- RACE showed that the miR173 target site was cleaved at the expected position and that endogenous CHS genes were cut at multiple positions. Small RNA deep sequencing analysis showed that the processing of Arabidopsis miR173 precursors in MIGS-chs transgenic petunia plants did not occur in exactly the same way as in Arabidopsis, suggesting differences in the machinery of miRNA processing between plant species. Small RNAs in-phase with the miR173 cleavage register were produced immediately downstream from the cleavage site and out-of-phase small RNAs were accumulated at relatively high levels from processing cycle 5 onwards. Secondary siRNAs were generated from multiple sites of endogenous CHS-A and CHS-J genes, indicating that miR173 cleavage induced siRNAs have the same ability to initiate siRNA transitivity as the siRNAs functioning in co-suppression and hpRNA silencing. On account of the simplicity of vector construction and the transitive amplification of signals from endogenous transcripts, MIGS is a good alternative gene silencing method for plants, especially for silencing a cluster of homologous genes with redundant functions. PMID

  10. Investigation of a miRNA-Induced Gene Silencing Technique in Petunia Reveals Alterations in miR173 Precursor Processing and the Accumulation of Secondary siRNAs from Endogenous Genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Xiaoting; Li, Mingyang; Guo, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    MIGS (miRNA-induced gene silencing) is a straightforward and efficient gene silencing technique in Arabidopsis. It works by exploiting miR173 to trigger the production of phasiRNAs (phased small interfering RNAs). MIGS can be used in plant species other than Arabidopsis by co-expression of miR173 and target gene fragments fused to an upstream miR173 target site. However, the efficiency and technical mechanisms have not been thoroughly investigated in other plants. In this work, two vectors, pMIGS-chs and pMIGS-pds, were constructed and transformed into petunia plants. The transgenic plants showed CHS (chalcone synthase) and PDS (phytoene desaturase) gene-silencing phenotypes respectively, indicating that MIGS functions in petunia. MIGS-chs plants were used to investigate the mechanisms of this technique in petunia. Results of 5'- RACE showed that the miR173 target site was cleaved at the expected position and that endogenous CHS genes were cut at multiple positions. Small RNA deep sequencing analysis showed that the processing of Arabidopsis miR173 precursors in MIGS-chs transgenic petunia plants did not occur in exactly the same way as in Arabidopsis, suggesting differences in the machinery of miRNA processing between plant species. Small RNAs in-phase with the miR173 cleavage register were produced immediately downstream from the cleavage site and out-of-phase small RNAs were accumulated at relatively high levels from processing cycle 5 onwards. Secondary siRNAs were generated from multiple sites of endogenous CHS-A and CHS-J genes, indicating that miR173 cleavage induced siRNAs have the same ability to initiate siRNA transitivity as the siRNAs functioning in co-suppression and hpRNA silencing. On account of the simplicity of vector construction and the transitive amplification of signals from endogenous transcripts, MIGS is a good alternative gene silencing method for plants, especially for silencing a cluster of homologous genes with redundant functions.

  11. Investigation of a miRNA-Induced Gene Silencing Technique in Petunia Reveals Alterations in miR173 Precursor Processing and the Accumulation of Secondary siRNAs from Endogenous Genes.

    PubMed

    Han, Yao; Zhang, Bin; Qin, Xiaoting; Li, Mingyang; Guo, Yulong

    2015-01-01

    MIGS (miRNA-induced gene silencing) is a straightforward and efficient gene silencing technique in Arabidopsis. It works by exploiting miR173 to trigger the production of phasiRNAs (phased small interfering RNAs). MIGS can be used in plant species other than Arabidopsis by co-expression of miR173 and target gene fragments fused to an upstream miR173 target site. However, the efficiency and technical mechanisms have not been thoroughly investigated in other plants. In this work, two vectors, pMIGS-chs and pMIGS-pds, were constructed and transformed into petunia plants. The transgenic plants showed CHS (chalcone synthase) and PDS (phytoene desaturase) gene-silencing phenotypes respectively, indicating that MIGS functions in petunia. MIGS-chs plants were used to investigate the mechanisms of this technique in petunia. Results of 5'- RACE showed that the miR173 target site was cleaved at the expected position and that endogenous CHS genes were cut at multiple positions. Small RNA deep sequencing analysis showed that the processing of Arabidopsis miR173 precursors in MIGS-chs transgenic petunia plants did not occur in exactly the same way as in Arabidopsis, suggesting differences in the machinery of miRNA processing between plant species. Small RNAs in-phase with the miR173 cleavage register were produced immediately downstream from the cleavage site and out-of-phase small RNAs were accumulated at relatively high levels from processing cycle 5 onwards. Secondary siRNAs were generated from multiple sites of endogenous CHS-A and CHS-J genes, indicating that miR173 cleavage induced siRNAs have the same ability to initiate siRNA transitivity as the siRNAs functioning in co-suppression and hpRNA silencing. On account of the simplicity of vector construction and the transitive amplification of signals from endogenous transcripts, MIGS is a good alternative gene silencing method for plants, especially for silencing a cluster of homologous genes with redundant functions. PMID

  12. Evidence that the hexose-to-sucrose ratio does not control the switch to storage product accumulation in oilseeds: analysis of tobacco seed development and effects of overexpressing apoplastic invertase.

    PubMed

    Tomlinson, Kim L; McHugh, Sylvia; Labbe, Helene; Grainger, John L; James, Lisa E; Pomeroy, Keith M; Mullin, John W; Miller, Shea S; Dennis, David T; Miki, Brian L A

    2004-10-01

    Wild-type tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) seed development was characterized with respect to architecture and carbohydrate metabolism. Tobacco seeds accumulate oil and protein in the embryo, cellular endosperm and inner layer of the seed coat. They have high cell wall invertase (INV) and hexoses in early development which is typical of seeds. INV and the ratio of hexose to sucrose decline during development, switching from high hex to high suc, but not until most oil and all protein accumulation has occurred. The oil synthesis which coincides with the switch is mostly within the embryo. INV activity is greater than sucrose synthase activity throughout development, and both activities exceed the demand for carbohydrate for dry matter accumulation. To investigate the role of INV-mediated suc metabolism in oilseeds, genes for yeast INV and/or hexokinase (HK) were expressed under a seed-specific napin promoter, targeting activity to the apoplast and cytosol, respectively. Manipulating the INV pathway in an oilseed could either increase oil accumulation and sink strength, or disrupt carbohydrate metabolism, possibly through sugar-sensing, and decrease the storage function. Neither effect was found: transgenics with INV and/or HK increased 30-fold and 10-fold above wild-type levels had normal seed size and composition. This contrasted with dramatic effects on sugar contents in the INV lines.

  13. Stress-induced accumulation of glycerol in the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata: evidence indicating anti-desiccant and cryoprotectant functions of this polyol and a role for the brain in coordinating the response.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Jay A; Benoit, Joshua B; Denlinger, David L; Rivers, David B

    2006-02-01

    Nondiapausing larvae of the flesh fly, Sarcophaga bullata, responded to several forms of short-term environmental stress (low temperature, anoxia and desiccation) by accumulating glycerol. Elevation of this polyol, regardless of the type of stress that induced accumulation, conferred cold resistance: larvae with high glycerol levels were 3-4 times more tolerant of a 2h exposure to -10 degrees C than unstressed larvae. Protection against low temperature injury, as well as dehydration, was also attained by injection of exogenous glycerol into third instar larvae. This artificially induced cold hardiness was only temporary: when glycerol-injected larvae were exposed to -10 degrees C immediately after injection, survival was high, but none survived if they were injected and then held at 25 degrees C for 2 days before the -10 degrees C exposure. Larvae ligated behind the brain immediately after low temperature exposure failed to accumulate glycerol, but glycerol did accumulate in larvae ligated 6-24h after cold treatment, thus implying a critical role for the brain in initiating glycerol production. Interestingly, a much shorter exposure (2h) to low temperature was sufficient to reduce the maximum rate of water loss. Collectively, these observations suggest that multiple pathways may be exploited in response to stress: one pathway is most likely associated with rapid cold hardening (RCH) which generates immediate protection, and a second pathway remains activated for a longer period to enhance the initial protection afforded by glycerol.

  14. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein promotes lipid accumulation in goat mammary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Shi, H B; Yu, K; Luo, J; Li, J; Tian, H B; Zhu, J J; Sun, Y T; Yao, D W; Xu, H F; Shi, H P; Loor, J J

    2015-10-01

    Milk fat originates from the secretion of cytosolic lipid droplets (CLD) synthesized within mammary epithelial cells. Adipocyte differentiation-related protein (ADRP; gene symbol PLIN2) is a CLD-binding protein that is crucial for synthesis of mature CLD. Our hypothesis was that ADRP regulates CLD production and metabolism in goat mammary epithelial cells (GMEC) and thus plays a role in determining milk fat content. To understand the role of ADRP in ruminant milk fat metabolism, ADRP (PLIN2) was overexpressed or knocked down in GMEC using an adenovirus system. Immunocytochemical staining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of CLD. Supplementation with oleic acid (OA) enhanced its colocalization with CLD surface and enhanced lipid accumulation. Overexpression of ADRP increased lipid accumulation and the concentration of triacylglycerol in GMEC. In contrast, morphological examination revealed that knockdown of ADRP decreased lipid accumulation even when OA was supplemented. This response was confirmed by the reduction in mass of cellular TG when ADRP was knocked down. The fact that knockdown of ADRP did not completely eliminate lipid accumulation at a morphological level in GMEC without OA suggests that some other compensatory factors may also aid in the process of CLD formation. The ADRP reversed the decrease of CLD accumulation induced by adipose triglyceride lipase. This is highly suggestive of ADRP promoting triacylglycerol stability within CLD by preventing access to adipose triglyceride lipase. Collectively, these data provide direct in vitro evidence that ADRP plays a key role in CLD formation and stability in GMEC. PMID:26298750

  15. Cytochrome b gene reveals panmixia among Japanese Threadfin Bream, Nemipterus japonicus (Bloch, 1791) populations along the coasts of Peninsular Malaysia and provides evidence of a cryptic species.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Chiun; Ahmad, Abu Talib; Nuruddin, Ahmad Adnan; Mohd Nor, Siti Azizah

    2016-01-01

    We evaluated genetic differentiation among ten presumed Japanese threadfin bream, Nemipterus japonicus populations along the coast of Peninsular Malaysia based on the partial sequence of the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene (982 bp). Genetic divergences (Kimura-2 parameter) ranged from 0.5% to 0.8% among nine of the ten populations while these nine populations were 4.4% to 4.6% diverged from the Kuala Besar population located at the Northeast coast. The constructed Neighbour Joining (NJ) phylogenetic trees based on haplotypes showed the Kuala Besar population forming an isolated cluster. The Analysis of Molecular Variance (AMOVA) of the ten populations a priori assigned into four regions, revealed that most of the variation occurred within population with a fairly low but significant level of regional differentiation (FST = 0.07, p < 0.05, FSC = 0.00, p > 0.05 and FCT = 0.07, p < 0.05) attributed to the Kuala Besar population. p Value after Bonferroni correction revealed that only pairwise FST values involving the Kuala Besar population with the other nine populations were significant. Thus, this study revealed that the N. japonicus populations off Peninsular Malaysia were panmictic. However, the Kuala Besar population, although morphologically identical was composed of a genetically discrete taxon from the rest. These findings are important contributions in formulating sustainable fishery management policies for this important fishery in Peninsular Malaysia.

  16. How awareness changes the relative weights of evidence during human decision-making.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Floris P; van Gaal, Simon; Lamme, Victor A F; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2011-11-01

    Human decisions are based on accumulating evidence over time for different options. Here we ask a simple question: How is the accumulation of evidence affected by the level of awareness of the information? We examined the influence of awareness on decision-making using combined behavioral methods and magneto-encephalography (MEG). Participants were required to make decisions by accumulating evidence over a series of visually presented arrow stimuli whose visibility was modulated by masking. Behavioral results showed that participants could accumulate evidence under both high and low visibility. However, a top-down strategic modulation of the flow of incoming evidence was only present for stimuli with high visibility: once enough evidence had been accrued, participants strategically reduced the impact of new incoming stimuli. Also, decision-making speed and confidence were strongly modulated by the strength of the evidence for high-visible but not low-visible evidence, even though direct priming effects were identical for both types of stimuli. Neural recordings revealed that, while initial perceptual processing was independent of visibility, there was stronger top-down amplification for stimuli with high visibility than low visibility. Furthermore, neural markers of evidence accumulation over occipito-parietal cortex showed a strategic bias only for highly visible sensory information, speeding up processing and reducing neural computations related to the decision process. Our results indicate that the level of awareness of information changes decision-making: while accumulation of evidence already exists under low visibility conditions, high visibility allows evidence to be accumulated up to a higher level, leading to important strategical top-down changes in decision-making. Our results therefore suggest a potential role of awareness in deploying flexible strategies for biasing information acquisition in line with one's expectations and goals. PMID:22131904

  17. Phylogenomic analyses of nuclear genes reveal the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade and the evidence of positive selection in Poaceae.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Lei; Zhang, Ning; Ma, Peng-Fei; Liu, Qi; Li, De-Zhu; Guo, Zhen-Hua

    2013-01-01

    BEP clade of the grass family (Poaceae) is composed of three subfamilies, i.e. Bambusoideae, Ehrhartoideae, and Pooideae. Controversies on the phylogenetic relationships among three subfamilies still persist in spite of great efforts. However, previous evidence was mainly provided from plastid genes with only a few nuclear genes utilized. Given different evolutionary histories recorded by plastid and nuclear genes, it is indispensable to uncover their relationships based on nuclear genes. Here, eleven species with whole-sequenced genome and six species with transcriptomic data were included in this study. A total of 121 one-to-one orthologous groups (OGs) were identified and phylogenetic trees were reconstructed by different tree-building methods. Genes which might have undergone positive selection and played important roles in adaptive evolution were also investigated from 314 and 173 one-to-one OGs in two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. Our results support the ((B, P) E) topology with high supporting values. Besides, our findings also indicate that 24 and nine orthologs with statistically significant evidence of positive selection are mainly involved in abiotic and biotic stress response, reproduction and development, plant metabolism and enzyme etc. from two bamboo species and 14 grass species, respectively. In summary, this study demonstrates the power of phylogenomic approach to shed lights on the evolutionary relationships within the BEP clade, and offers valuable insights into adaptive evolution of the grass family.

  18. Revealing Mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prockter, L. M.; Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.; Watters, T. R.; Murchie, S. L.; Robinson, M. S.; Chapman, C. R.; McNutt, R. L.

    2009-04-01

    The MErcury Surface, Space ENvironment, GEochemistry, and Ranging (MESSENGER) spacecraft, developed under NASA's Discovery Program, launched in August 2004. En route to insertion into orbit about Mercury in 2011, MESSENGER flies by Mercury three times. The first and second of these encounters were accomplished in January and October of 2008. These flybys viewed portions of Mercury's surface that were not observed by Mariner 10 during its reconnaissance of somewhat less than half of the planet in 1974-1975. All MESSENGER instruments operated during each flyby and returned a wealth of new data. Many of the new observations were focused on the planet's geology, including monochrome imaging at resolutions as high as 100 m/pixel, multispectral imaging in 11 filters at resolutions as high as 500 m/pixel, laser altimetry tracks extending over several thousands of kilometers, and high-resolution spectral measurements of several types of terrain. Here we present an overview of the first inferences on the global geology of Mercury from the MESSENGER observations. Whereas evidence for volcanism was equivocal from Mariner 10 data, the new MESSENGER images and altimetry provide compelling evidence that volcanism was widespread and protracted on Mercury. Color imaging reveals three common spectral units on the surface: a higher-reflectance, relatively red material occurring as a distinct class of smooth plains, typically with distinct embayment relationships interpreted to indicate volcanic emplacement; a lower-reflectance, relatively blue material typically excavated by impact craters and therefore inferred to be more common at depth; and a spectrally intermediate terrain that constitutes much of the uppermost crust. Three more minor spectral units are also seen: fresh crater ejecta, reddish material associated with rimless depressions interpreted to be volcanic centers, and high-reflectance deposits seen in some crater floors. Preliminary measurements of crater size

  19. Copper accumulation in the crayfish (Orconectes rusticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the crayfish, O. rusticus could fulfill Nehring's (1976) criteria for a good biological monitor of heavy metal pollution. Since there is some evidence that the cupric ion is the most toxic form of aqueous copper, crayfish-accumulated copper was compared to both total and cupric copper in the culture water.

  20. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y. W.; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10−7 mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10−8–1.12 × 10−6). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods. PMID:26510672

  1. Mechanistic evidence of Passiflora edulis (Passifloraceae) anxiolytic activity in relation to its metabolite fingerprint as revealed via LC-MS and chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Otify, Asmaa; George, Camilia; Elsayed, Aly; Farag, Mohamed A

    2015-12-01

    Passiflora edulis Sims F. flavicarpa along with several other plants belonging to the genus Passiflora have been reported as sedatives and for treatment or prevention of central disorders. This study evaluated the anxiolytic effect of P. edulis ethanol extract and its fractions (viz. chloroform, ethyl acetate and butanol) using the elevated plus-maze model of anxiety and assessment of γ-aminobutyric acid levels. The results revealed that butanol and chloroform extracts exhibit the strongest effect followed by ethyl acetate suggesting that a combination of different classes of metabolites is likely to mediate for P. edulis anxiolytic effect in these fractions. To further pinpoint bioactive agents in fractions, ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC) coupled to high resolution qTOF-MS was used for secondary metabolite profiling. A total of 65 metabolites were characterized including O-flavonoids, C-flavonoids, cyanogenic glycosides and fatty acids. Harman type alkaloids found in P. incarnata were not detected in P. edulis ethanol extract or any of its fractions suggesting that they do not mediate for its CNS modulating effects. Multivariate data analysis (PCA) was further applied to identify metabolite markers for fractions and revealed that enrichment of C-glycoside type flavonoids in chloroform/ethyl acetate fractions versus the exclusive presence of cyanogenic glycosides in its butanol fraction. PMID:26437270

  2. Mitogenomic analysis of a 50-generation chicken pedigree reveals a rapid rate of mitochondrial evolution and evidence for paternal mtDNA inheritance.

    PubMed

    Alexander, Michelle; Ho, Simon Y W; Molak, Martyna; Barnett, Ross; Carlborg, Örjan; Dorshorst, Ben; Honaker, Christa; Besnier, Francois; Wahlberg, Per; Dobney, Keith; Siegel, Paul; Andersson, Leif; Larson, Greger

    2015-10-01

    Mitochondrial genomes represent a valuable source of data for evolutionary research, but studies of their short-term evolution have typically been limited to invertebrates, humans and laboratory organisms. Here we present a detailed study of 12 mitochondrial genomes that span a total of 385 transmissions in a well-documented 50-generation pedigree in which two lineages of chickens were selected for low and high juvenile body weight. These data allowed us to test the hypothesis of time-dependent evolutionary rates and the assumption of strict maternal mitochondrial transmission, and to investigate the role of mitochondrial mutations in determining phenotype. The identification of a non-synonymous mutation in ND4L and a synonymous mutation in CYTB, both novel mutations in Gallus, allowed us to estimate a molecular rate of 3.13 × 10(-7) mutations/site/year (95% confidence interval 3.75 × 10(-8)-1.12 × 10(-6)). This is substantially higher than avian rate estimates based upon fossil calibrations. Ascertaining which of the two novel mutations was present in an additional 49 individuals also revealed an instance of paternal inheritance of mtDNA. Lastly, an association analysis demonstrated that neither of the point mutations was strongly associated with the phenotypic differences between the two selection lines. Together, these observations reveal the highly dynamic nature of mitochondrial evolution over short time periods.

  3. [Glial cells are involved in iron accumulation and degeneration of dopamine neurons in Parkinson's disease].

    PubMed

    Xu, Hua-Min; Wang, Jun; Song, Ning; Jiang, Hong; Xie, Jun-Xia

    2016-08-25

    A growing body of evidence suggests that glial cells play an important role in neural development, neural survival, nerve repair and regeneration, synaptic transmission and immune inflammation. As the highest number of cells in the central nervous system, the role of glial cells in Parkinson's disease (PD) has attracted more and more attention. It has been confirmed that nigral iron accumulation contributes to the death of dopamine (DA) neurons in PD. Until now, most researches on nigral iron deposition in PD are focusing on DA neurons, but in fact glial cells in the central nervous system also play an important role in the regulation of iron homeostasis. Therefore, this review describes the role of iron metabolism of glial cells in death of DA neurons in PD, which could provide evidence to reveal the mechanisms underlying nigral iron accumulation of DA neurons in PD and provide the basis for discovering new potential therapeutic targets for PD. PMID:27546505

  4. Learning from Philip Morris: Japan Tobacco's strategies regarding evidence of tobacco health harms as revealed in internal documents from the American tobacco industry.

    PubMed

    Iida, Kaori; Proctor, Robert N

    2004-05-29

    Japan is in the midst of a rapid increase in tobacco-related disease mortality, following the rapid growth of smoking after WWII. Stomach cancer was the country's leading cause of cancer death for most of the 20th century, until lung cancer took over this position in 1993. Cigarettes are the major cause of lung cancer in Japan, but the country's leading manufacturer, Japan Tobacco, two thirds of which is owned by the Japanese government, continues to question whether tobacco is a major cause of disease and death. Japanese courts do not have the power to subpoena a company's internal records, which has made it difficult to document Japan Tobacco's strategies concerning tobacco and health. Our interpretation of online archives of internal documents from American tobacco companies, however, is that Japan Tobacco has long known about the potential health risks involved in smoking and has sought to obstruct effective tobacco control. Beginning in the mid-1980s, these efforts were often co-ordinated with American tobacco manufacturers. The documentary evidence shows that cigarette manufacturer Philip Morris in particular assisted with and sometimes also supervised Japan Tobacco's actions and statements on smoking and health. In one instance, data gathered for an article published by the Japan Public Monopoly Corporation (Japan Tobacco's predecessor) were deliberately altered to lower the reported value of a hazard indicator (nicotine concentration in the air). International collaboration has made it easier for companies such as Japan Tobacco to develop effective anti-antismoking strategies. Evidence of such global industry collaborations might grow as lawsuits begin to be filed in other nations. PMID:15172783

  5. Live/Dead Comparisons of Ostracodes in Temperate Lakes Reveal Evidence of Human Impact and Provides a Tool to Measure the Progress of Remediation Efforts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spergel, J.; Kimball, K. C.; Fitzpatrick, S. A.; Michelson, A. V.; Leonard-Pingel, J.

    2015-12-01

    the progress of remediation efforts already underway. Further work will focus on dating the upper centimeter of sediment in these lakes to provide an estimate of how long it takes for death assemblages to accumulate and thus how long it will take to regain high live/dead fidelity in impacted lakes undergoing remediation.

  6. Evidences for high gas content beneath the Gorely volcano in Kamchatka (Russia) based on very low Vp/Vs ratio revealed from local earthquake tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koulakov, Ivan; Kuznetsov, Pavel; Ilyich Gordeev, Evgeny; Nikolaevich Chebrov, Viktor

    2015-04-01

    The Gorely volcano, which is located at distance of 70 km from Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky, is one of the most active volcanoes in Kamchatka. Nowadays, a large fumarole inside the volcano crater ejects approximately 11,000 tons of gases daily. During the last thousands years, eruptions in Gorely were mostly basaltic that determined the shield type of the volcano. However, a large caldera of ~20 km diameter dated at approximately 30,000 years indicates that the volcano has high explosive potential. To identify the feeding mechanisms and to assess the possibility of future large eruptions, scientists from IPGG, Novosibirsk, have deployed the first temporary seismic network on the Gorely volcano. This network consisted of 21 uniformly distributed seismic stations that operated for one year from August 2013 to July 2014. Most of the time during the observation period, dozens to hundreds events per day and frequent tremors were recorded which indicated significant activity inside the volcano. As a result of preliminary processing, almost 300 events were identified during only several weeks of recording. The available distributions of events and stations enables fairly high resolution in the derived seismic velocity models, as demonstrated by a number of synthetic tests. A striking feature of the tomographic inversion is an average ratio of Vp/Vs=1.53, which is an exceptionally low compared to other volcanic areas. We propose that this low Vp/Vs ratio is a signature of high content of gases beneath the volcano. Higher values of Vp/Vs beneath the crater below ~2 km depth might indicate some presence of liquid water, which comes from deeper sources and is transformed to the steam at shallower levels due to the decompression. It appears that Gorely is a kind of a huge steam boiler covered with a solid cover consisting of previously erupted basaltic layers. The fumarole inside the crater plays the role of safety valve which prevents the accumulation of excessive pressure inside

  7. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  8. Molecular and morphological evidence supports the species status of the Mahachai fighter Betta sp. Mahachai and reveals new species of Betta from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriwattanarothai, N; Steinke, D; Ruenwongsa, P; Hanner, R; Panijpan, B

    2010-08-01

    Two regions of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and 16S rRNA, were sequenced in nine species of Betta from Thailand and Indonesia. Most species showed little intraspecific COI variation (adjusted mean = 0.48%) including the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai, but one species (Betta smaragdina) included three lineages showing much greater divergence (7.03-13.48%) that probably represent overlooked species. These findings were confirmed by maximum likelihood analysis and Bayesian inference, which revealed well-supported corresponding monophyletic clades. Based on these results and morphological differences, the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai from central Thailand is a species distinct from other members of the B. splendens group and represents a new and hitherto undescribed species. Furthermore, this study also demonstrated the probable existence of two overlooked Betta species found in the Khorat plateau basin, illustrating the utility of mitochondrial genetic markers in the revelation of overlooked diversity.

  9. Molecular and morphological evidence supports the species status of the Mahachai fighter Betta sp. Mahachai and reveals new species of Betta from Thailand.

    PubMed

    Sriwattanarothai, N; Steinke, D; Ruenwongsa, P; Hanner, R; Panijpan, B

    2010-08-01

    Two regions of mitochondrial (mt) DNA, cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) and 16S rRNA, were sequenced in nine species of Betta from Thailand and Indonesia. Most species showed little intraspecific COI variation (adjusted mean = 0.48%) including the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai, but one species (Betta smaragdina) included three lineages showing much greater divergence (7.03-13.48%) that probably represent overlooked species. These findings were confirmed by maximum likelihood analysis and Bayesian inference, which revealed well-supported corresponding monophyletic clades. Based on these results and morphological differences, the putative species Betta sp. Mahachai from central Thailand is a species distinct from other members of the B. splendens group and represents a new and hitherto undescribed species. Furthermore, this study also demonstrated the probable existence of two overlooked Betta species found in the Khorat plateau basin, illustrating the utility of mitochondrial genetic markers in the revelation of overlooked diversity. PMID:20646165

  10. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  11. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  12. Evaluating the post-copulatory sexual selection hypothesis for genital evolution reveals evidence for pleiotropic harm exerted by the male genital spines of Drosophila ananassae.

    PubMed

    Grieshop, K; Polak, M

    2014-12-01

    The contemporary explanation for the rapid evolutionary diversification of animal genitalia is that such traits evolve by post-copulatory sexual selection. Here, we test the hypothesis that the male genital spines of Drosophila ananassae play an adaptive role in post-copulatory sexual selection. Whereas previous work on two Drosophila species shows that these spines function in precopulatory sexual selection to initiate genital coupling and promote male competitive copulation success, further research is needed to evaluate the potential for Drosophila genital spines to have a post-copulatory function. Using a precision micron-scale laser surgery technique, we test the effect of spine length reduction on copulation duration, male competitive fertilization success, female fecundity and female remating behaviour. We find no evidence that male genital spines in this species have a post-copulatory adaptive function. Instead, females mated to males with surgically reduced/blunted genital spines exhibited comparatively greater short-term fecundity relative to those mated by control males, indicating that the natural (i.e. unaltered) form of the trait may be harmful to females. In the absence of an effect of genital spine reduction on measured components of post-copulatory fitness, the harm seems to be a pleiotropic side effect rather than adaptive. Results are discussed in the context of sexual conflict mediating the evolution of male genital spines in this species and likely other Drosophila.

  13. Aberrant Classopollis pollen reveals evidence for unreduced (2n) pollen in the conifer family Cheirolepidiaceae during the Triassic-Jurassic transition.

    PubMed

    Kürschner, Wolfram M; Batenburg, Sietske J; Mander, Luke

    2013-10-01

    Polyploidy (or whole-genome doubling) is a key mechanism for plant speciation leading to new evolutionary lineages. Several lines of evidence show that most species among flowering plants had polyploidy ancestry, but it is virtually unknown for conifers. Here, we study variability in pollen tetrad morphology and the size of the conifer pollen type Classopollis extracted from sediments of the Triassic-Jurassic transition, 200 Ma. Classopollis producing Cheirolepidiaceae were one of the most dominant and diverse groups of conifers during the Mesozoic. We show that aberrant pollen Classopollis tetrads, triads and dyads, and the large variation in pollen size indicates the presence of unreduced (2n) pollen, which is one of the main mechanisms in modern polyploid formation. Polyploid speciation may explain the high variability of growth forms and adaptation of these conifers to different environments and their resistance to extreme growth conditions. We suggest that polyploidy may have also reduced the extinction risk of these conifers during the End-Triassic biotic crisis.

  14. Aberrant Classopollis pollen reveals evidence for unreduced (2n) pollen in the conifer family Cheirolepidiaceae during the Triassic–Jurassic transition

    PubMed Central

    Kürschner, Wolfram M.; Batenburg, Sietske J.; Mander, Luke

    2013-01-01

    Polyploidy (or whole-genome doubling) is a key mechanism for plant speciation leading to new evolutionary lineages. Several lines of evidence show that most species among flowering plants had polyploidy ancestry, but it is virtually unknown for conifers. Here, we study variability in pollen tetrad morphology and the size of the conifer pollen type Classopollis extracted from sediments of the Triassic–Jurassic transition, 200 Ma. Classopollis producing Cheirolepidiaceae were one of the most dominant and diverse groups of conifers during the Mesozoic. We show that aberrant pollen Classopollis tetrads, triads and dyads, and the large variation in pollen size indicates the presence of unreduced (2n) pollen, which is one of the main mechanisms in modern polyploid formation. Polyploid speciation may explain the high variability of growth forms and adaptation of these conifers to different environments and their resistance to extreme growth conditions. We suggest that polyploidy may have also reduced the extinction risk of these conifers during the End-Triassic biotic crisis. PMID:23926159

  15. Evidence for Niche Partitioning Revealed by the Distribution of Sulfur Oxidation Genes Collected from Areas of a Terrestrial Sulfidic Spring with Differing Geochemical Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Annette Summers

    2013-01-01

    The diversity and phylogenetic significance of bacterial genes in the environment has been well studied, but comparatively little attention has been devoted to understanding the functional significance of different variations of the same metabolic gene that occur in the same environment. We analyzed the geographic distribution of 16S rRNA pyrosequences and soxB genes along a geochemical gradient in a terrestrial sulfidic spring to identify how different taxonomic variations of the soxB gene were naturally distributed within the spring outflow channel and to identify possible evidence for altered SoxB enzyme function in nature. Distinct compositional differences between bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the Paracoccus sulfide oxidation pathway (e.g., Bradyrhizobium, Paracoccus, and Rhodovulum) and bacteria that utilize their SoxB enzyme in the branched pathway (e.g., Chlorobium, Thiothrix, Thiobacillus, Halothiobacillus, and Thiomonas) were identified. Different variations of the soxB genes were present at different locations within the spring outflow channel in a manner that significantly corresponded to geochemical conditions. The distribution of the different soxB gene sequence variations suggests that the enzymes encoded by these genes are functionally different and could be optimized to specific geochemical conditions that define niche space for bacteria capable of oxidizing reduced sulfur compounds. PMID:23220955

  16. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  17. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  18. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  19. Scanning tunneling spectroscopic evidence for a magnetic field-revealed microscopic order in the high-TC superconductor YBa2Cu3O7-δ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, A. D.; Grinolds, M. S.; Teague, M. L.; Yeh, N.-C.; Tajima, S.

    2009-03-01

    We present spatially resolved scanning tunneling spectroscopic measurements of YBa2Cu3O7-δ as a function of magnetic field and at T<reveals two sets of non-dispersive, field-enhanced conductance modulations with periods of 3.4+0.5 and 7.3+0.5 lattice constants. Energy histograms of QP spectra show a significant shift from SC to primarily PG-like spectra and a growing enhancement of spectral weight at δ' as magnetic field increases, implying a significant interplay between SC and a field-enhanced microscopic order. Ref.: Beyer, et.al. [arxiv:0808.3016].

  20. Profiling of 2′-O-Me in human rRNA reveals a subset of fractionally modified positions and provides evidence for ribosome heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Krogh, Nicolai; Jansson, Martin D.; Häfner, Sophia J.; Tehler, Disa; Birkedal, Ulf; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Mikkel; Lund, Anders H.; Nielsen, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Ribose methylation is one of the two most abundant modifications in human ribosomal RNA and is believed to be important for ribosome biogenesis, mRNA selectivity and translational fidelity. We have applied RiboMeth-seq to rRNA from HeLa cells for ribosome-wide, quantitative mapping of 2′-O-Me sites and obtained a comprehensive set of 106 sites, including two novel sites, and with plausible box C/D guide RNAs assigned to all but three sites. We find approximately two-thirds of the sites to be fully methylated and the remainder to be fractionally modified in support of ribosome heterogeneity at the level of RNA modifications. A comparison to HCT116 cells reveals similar 2′-O-Me profiles with distinct differences at several sites. This study constitutes the first comprehensive mapping of 2′-O-Me sites in human rRNA using a high throughput sequencing approach. It establishes the existence of a core of constitutively methylated positions and a subset of variable, potentially regulatory positions, and paves the way for experimental analyses of the role of variations in rRNA methylation under different physiological or pathological settings. PMID:27257078

  1. The global distribution of Banana bunchy top virus reveals little evidence for frequent recent, human-mediated long distance dispersal events

    PubMed Central

    Stainton, Daisy; Martin, Darren P.; Muhire, Brejnev M.; Lolohea, Samiuela; Halafihi, Mana’ia; Lepoint, Pascale; Blomme, Guy; Crew, Kathleen S.; Sharman, Murray; Kraberger, Simona; Dayaram, Anisha; Walters, Matthew; Collings, David A.; Mabvakure, Batsirai; Lemey, Philippe; Harkins, Gordon W.; Thomas, John E.; Varsani, Arvind

    2015-01-01

    Banana bunchy top virus (BBTV; family Nanoviridae, genus Babuvirus) is a multi-component single-stranded DNA virus, which infects banana plants in many regions of the world, often resulting in large-scale crop losses. We analyzed 171 banana leaf samples from fourteen countries and recovered, cloned, and sequenced 855 complete BBTV components including ninety-four full genomes. Importantly, full genomes were determined from eight countries, where previously no full genomes were available (Samoa, Burundi, Republic of Congo, Democratic Republic of Congo, Egypt, Indonesia, the Philippines, and the USA [HI]). Accounting for recombination and genome component reassortment, we examined the geographic structuring of global BBTV populations to reveal that BBTV likely originated in Southeast Asia, that the current global hotspots of BBTV diversity are Southeast Asia/Far East and India, and that BBTV populations circulating elsewhere in the world have all potentially originated from infrequent introductions. Most importantly, we find that rather than the current global BBTV distribution being due to increases in human-mediated movements of bananas over the past few decades, it is more consistent with a pattern of infrequent introductions of the virus to different parts of the world over the past 1,000 years. PMID:27774281

  2. Evidence for anthropophily in five species of phlebotomine sand flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from northern Colombia, revealed by molecular identification of bloodmeals.

    PubMed

    Paternina, Luís E; Verbel-Vergara, Daniel; Romero-Ricardo, Luís; Pérez-Doria, Alveiro; Paternina-Gómez, Margaret; Martínez, Lily; Bejarano, Eduar E

    2016-01-01

    Identification of the bloodmeal sources of phlebotomine sand flies is fundamental to determining which species are anthropophilic and understanding the transmission of Leishmania parasites in natural epidemiological settings. The objective of this study was to identify sand fly bloodmeals in the mixed leishmaniasis focus of the department of Sucre, northern Colombia. In all 141 engorged female sand flies were analyzed, after being captured in intradomiciliary, peridomiciliary and extradomiciliary habitats with Shannon and CDC traps and by active searching in diurnal resting sites. Bloodmeals were identified by sequencing and analysis of a 358bp fragment of the mitochondrial gene Cytochrome b (CYB) and a 330bp fragment of the nuclear gene prepronociceptin (PNOC). Using both genes 105 vertebrate bloodmeals were identified, with an efficiency of 72% for CYB but only 7% for PNOC. Ten species of vertebrates were identified as providing bloodmeal sources for 8 sand fly species: Homo sapiens (Lutzomyia evansi, Lutzomyia panamensis, Lutzomyia micropyga, Lutzomyia shannoni and Lutzomyia atroclavata), Equus caballus (L. evansi, L. panamensis and Lutzomyia cayennensis cayennensis), Equus asinus (L. evansi and L. panamensis), Bos taurus (L. evansi, L. panamensis and L. c. cayennensis), Tamandua mexicana (L. shannoni and Lutzomyia trinidadensis), Proechimys guyanensis (L. evansi, L. panamensis and L. c. cayennensis), Mabuya sp. (Lutzomyia micropyga), Anolissp. (L. micropyga), Sus scrofa (L. evansi and Lutzomyia gomezi) and Gallus gallus (L. evansi). Cattle, donkeys, humans and pigs were significantly more important than other animals (P=0.0001) as hosts of L. evansi, this being the most abundant sand fly species. The five Lutzomyia species in which blood samples of human origin were detected included L. micropyga and L. atroclavata, constituting the first evidence of anthropophily in both species.

  3. Functional domain organization of the potato α-glucan, water dikinase (GWD): evidence for separate site catalysis as revealed by limited proteolysis and deletion mutants

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    The potato tuber (Solanum tuberosum) GWD (α-glucan, water dikinase) catalyses the phosphorylation of starch by a dikinase-type reaction mechanism in which the β-phosphate of ATP is transferred to the glucosyl residue of amylopectin. GWD shows sequence similarity to bacterial pyruvate, water dikinase and PPDK (pyruvate, phosphate dikinase). In the present study, we examine the structure–function relationship of GWD. Analysis of proteolytic fragments of GWD, in conjunction with peptide microsequencing and the generation of deletion mutants, indicates that GWD is comprised of five discrete domains of 37, 24, 21, 36 and 38 kDa. The catalytic histidine, which mediates the phosphoryl group transfer from ATP to starch, is located on the 36 kDa fragment, whereas the 38 kDa C-terminal fragment contains the ATP-binding site. Binding of the glucan molecule appears to be confined to regions containing the three N-terminal domains. Deletion mutants were generated to investigate the functional interdependency of the putative ATP- and glucan-binding domains. A truncated form of GWD expressing the 36 and 38 kDa C-terminal domains was found to catalyse the E+ATP→E-P+AMP+Pi (where Pi stands for orthophosphate) partial reaction, but not the E-P+glucan→E+glucan-P partial reaction. CD experiments provided evidence for large structural changes on autophosphorylation of GWD, indicating that GWD employs a swivelling-domain mechanism for enzymic phosphotransfer similar to that seen for PPDK. PMID:15361065

  4. Evidence of a hybrid-zone in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in the Baltic and the Danish Belt Sea revealed by individual admixture analysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Einar E; Hansen, Michael M; Ruzzante, Daniel E; Meldrup, Dorte; Grønkjaer, Peter

    2003-06-01

    The study of hybrid zones is central to our understanding of the genetic basis of reproductive isolation and speciation, yet very little is known about the extent and significance of hybrid zones in marine fishes. We examined the population structure of cod in the transition area between the North Sea and the Baltic Sea employing nine microsatellite loci. Genetic differentiation between the North Sea sample and the rest increased along a transect to the Baltic proper, with a large increase in level of differentiation occurring in the Western Baltic area. Our objective was to determine whether this pattern was caused purely by varying degrees of mechanical mixing of North Sea and Baltic Sea cod or by interbreeding and formation of a hybrid swarm. Simulation studies revealed that traditional Hardy-Weinberg analysis did not have sufficient power for detection of a Wahlund effect. However, using a model-based clustering method for individual admixture analysis, we were able to demonstrate the existence of intermediate genotypes in all samples from the transition area. Accordingly, our data were explained best by a model of a hybrid swarm flanked by pure nonadmixed populations in the North Sea and the Baltic Sea proper. Significant correlation of gene identities across loci (gametic phase disequilibrium) was found only in a sample from the Western Baltic, suggesting this area as the centre of the apparent hybrid zone. A hybrid zone for cod in the ecotone between the high-saline North Sea and the low-saline Baltic Sea is discussed in relation to its possible origin and maintenance, and in relation to a classical study of haemoglobin variation in cod from the Baltic Sea/Danish Belt Sea, suggesting mixing of two divergent populations without interbreeding.

  5. Intact Flagellar Motor of Borrelia burgdorferi Revealed by Cryo-Electron Tomography: Evidence for Stator Ring Curvature and Rotor/C-Ring Assembly Flexion▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Lin, Tao; Botkin, Douglas J.; McCrum, Erin; Winkler, Hanspeter; Norris, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor is a remarkable nanomachine that provides motility through flagellar rotation. Prior structural studies have revealed the stunning complexity of the purified rotor and C-ring assemblies from flagellar motors. In this study, we used high-throughput cryo-electron tomography and image analysis of intact Borrelia burgdorferi to produce a three-dimensional (3-D) model of the in situ flagellar motor without imposing rotational symmetry. Structural details of B. burgdorferi, including a layer of outer surface proteins, were clearly visible in the resulting 3-D reconstructions. By averaging the 3-D images of ∼1,280 flagellar motors, a ∼3.5-nm-resolution model of the stator and rotor structures was obtained. flgI transposon mutants lacked a torus-shaped structure attached to the flagellar rod, establishing the structural location of the spirochetal P ring. Treatment of intact organisms with the nonionic detergent NP-40 resulted in dissolution of the outermost portion of the motor structure and the C ring, providing insight into the in situ arrangement of the stator and rotor structures. Structural elements associated with the stator followed the curvature of the cytoplasmic membrane. The rotor and the C ring also exhibited angular flexion, resulting in a slight narrowing of both structures in the direction perpendicular to the cell axis. These results indicate an inherent flexibility in the rotor-stator interaction. The FliG switching and energizing component likely provides much of the flexibility needed to maintain the interaction between the curved stator and the relatively symmetrical rotor/C-ring assembly during flagellar rotation. PMID:19429612

  6. Evidence of cumulative offset along the inland Itozawa fault possibly triggered by the past M9 Tohoku, Japan, megathrust earthquakes revealed from a borehole survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niwa, Y.; Toda, S.; Omata, M.; Mori, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The gigantic Mw 9.0 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake suddenly changed the overriding inland area from a compressional stress to an extensional stress regime and then triggered massive seismic swarms in the coastal Fukushima region. The Fukushima-ken-hamadori earthquake on 11 April 2011 (hereinafter, Iwaki earthquake), which was the largest inland off-fault aftershock of the Tohoku earthquake, ruptured the two previously mapped normal faults, the Yunodake fault and the Itozawa fault (Toda and Tsutsumi, BSSA, 2013). The Iwaki earthquake implies that the past gigantic megathrust earthquakes, if they exist, might have frequently triggered slip on similar normal faults including the Itozawa and Yunodake faults themselves. Ideally, collecting all the paleoseismic records from all the normal faults would give us the history of the past M9 class megathrust events and an average inter-event time. Among the series of surveys including paleoseismic trenches (e.g., Toda and Tsutsumi, 2013), we conducted a borehole survey across the central part of the Itozawa fault (Shionohira, Iwaki City), where the maximum vertical displacement 2.1 m was measured. In both upthrown and downthrown sides, extracted core samples expose bedrock conglomerate, fluvial sand and gravel deposits, and artificial fill, from lower to upper, in ascending order. Only in downthrown side, an organic-rich fine layer overlays fluvial deposit, indicating environmental changes from river channel to marsh or pond. We found evidence for cumulative vertical displacement on the top of pre-2011 artificial fill (1.7 m), river channel gravel layer (2.5 m), and bedrock (3.4 m). On the basis of sudden environmental changes from river to pond observed after the Iwaki earthquake due to subsided upstream area (Toda and Tsutsumi, 2013), we interpret that change in sedimentary facies from fluvial gravel to marsh or pond organic layer in the downthrown side corresponds to one of the past surface-rupturing earthquakes

  7. Eruptive History of Volcán Tepetiltic, Mexico: Evidence for Remelting of Silicic Ashflows Revealed by 40Ar/39Ar Geochronology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, H. M.; Lange, R. A.; Hall, C. M.; Nelson, S. A.; Granados, H. D.

    2004-12-01

    andesite dated from the caldera rim. The minimum age of the eruption is constrained by the occurrence of airfall from VT found underneath lava flows from the Amado Nervo shield volcano (220 ± 30 ka). Given these results, the Plinian eruption likely occurred ˜225 ± 40 kyrs ago. The two rhyolite obsidian domes on the eastern flanks of VT were dated at 307 ± 34 ka and 274 ± 52 ka and are thus similar in age or slightly older than the Plinian eruption. The >200 kyr hiatus between the construction of the andesite/dacite stratocone and the rhyolitic activity argues against crystal fractionation of the andesite to form the rhyolite. The upper crustal magma chamber feeding the main edifice ˜524 kyrs ago was likely short-lived (tens of kyrs), and may have crystallized to a granitoid. We suggest that the rhyolites formed ˜230 kyrs ago by partial melting of older shallow basement rhyolitic ashflows prevalent in the area. Evidence for this process is found in an unconsolidated pyroclastic flow from VT with pumiceous rhyolitic blocks and andesitic lithic fragments. Anorthoclase crystals in this deposit yield ages of 4.5 ± 0.34 Ma and 25.9 ± 0.24 Ma. Thus the rhyolites were likely produced by refusing of 4-5 Ma silicic ashflows and ashflows from the Sierra Madre Occidental province (20-35 Ma) and not crystal fractionation.

  8. 150,000 years of loess accumulation in central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Britta J. L.; Evans, Michael E.; Froese, Duane G.; Kravchinsky, Vadim A.

    2016-03-01

    The Halfway House site in interior Alaska is arguably the most studied loess deposit in northwestern North America. The site contains a complex paleomagnetic and paleoenvironmental record, but has lacked the robust chronologic control that would allow its full potential to be exploited. Detailed reexamination of stratigraphy, paleomagnetics and tephrostratigraphy reveals a relatively complete marine isotope stage (MIS) 6 to Holocene record constrained by the Old Crow (124 ± 10 ka), VT (106 ± 10 ka), Sheep Creek-Klondike (ca. 80 ka), Dominion Creek (77 ± 8 ka) and Dawson (ca. 30.2 cal ka BP) tephras. We show two well-developed paleosols formed during Marine Isotope Stages (MIS) 5e and 5a, while MIS 5c and 5b are either poorly represented or absent. The new tephrostratigraphy presented here is the most complete one to date for the late Pleistocene and indicates MIS 5 sediments are more common than previously recognized. A magnetic excursion within the sediments is identified as the post-Blake excursion (94.1 ± 7.8 ka), providing independent age control and adding to the increasing body of evidence that Alaskan loess is a detailed recorder of variations of the Earth's magnetic field over time. A high-resolution magnetic susceptibility profile placed into this new chronostratigraphic framework supports the hypothesis that wind-intensity is the main variable controlling fluctuations in susceptibility. Correlation of the susceptibility record to global marine δ18O records is complicated by highly variable accumulation rates. We find the lowest rates of accumulation during peak warm and cold stages, while abrupt increases are associated with periods of transition between marine isotope (sub)stages. Building on previous accumulation models for Alaska, surface roughness is likely a leading variable controlling loess accumulation rates during transitions and peak cold periods, but the negligible accumulation during MIS 5e and 5a suggests that loess production was

  9. Accumulator with preclosing preventer

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, R.R.; Rice, B.J.

    1981-11-24

    A guided-float accumulator suitable for use with a hydraulic system for an oil well blowout preventer is provided with a wing shut-off valve. Radially inwardly directed outlet parts are aimed at the bottom of the valve wing to generate unbalanced reaction forces which oppose the bernoulli effect forces caused by rapid movement of fluid through the chamber of the shut-off valve, thus preventing premature closing of the valve.

  10. Stimulation of strontium accumulation in linoleate-enriched Saacharomyces cerevisiae is a result of reduced Sr{sup 2+} efflux

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S.V.; Smith, S.L.; Ghazi, A.M.; Hoptroff, M.J.

    1999-03-01

    The influence of modified plasma membrane fatty acid composition on cellular strontium accumulation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. Growth of S. cerevisiae in the presence of 1 mM linoleate (18:2) yielded cells that accumulated Sr{sup 2+} intracellularly at approximately twice the rate of S. cerevisiae grown without a fatty acid supplement. This effect was evident over a wide range of external Sr{sup 2+} concentrations and increased with the extent of cellular 18:2 incorporation. Stimulation of Sr{sup 2+} accumulation was not evident following enrichment of S. cerevisiae with either palmitoleate (16:1), linolenate (18:3) (n-3 and n-6 isomers), or eicosadienoate (20:2) (n-6 and n-9 isomers). Competition experiments revealed that Ca{sup 2+}- and Mg{sup 2+}-induced inhibition of Sr{sup 2+} accumulation did not differ between unsupplemented and 18:2-supplemented cells. Treatment with trifluoperazine (TFP) (which can act as a calmodulin antagonist and Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase inhibitor), at a low concentration that precluded nonspecific K{sup +} efflux, increased intracellular Sr{sup 2+} accumulation by approximately 3.6- and 1.4-fold in unsupplemented and 18:2-supplemented cells, respectively. Thus, TFP abolished the enhanced Sr{sup 2+} accumulation ability of 18:2 supplemented cells. Moreover, the rate of Sr{sup 2+} release from Sr{sup 2+}-loaded fatty acid-unsupplemented cells was found to be at least twice as great as that from Sr{sup 2+}-loaded 18:2-enriched cells. The influence of enrichment with other fatty acids on Sr{sup 2+} efflux was variable. The results reveal an enhanced Sr{sup 2+} accumulation ability of S. cerevisiae following 18:2-enrichment, which is attributed to diminished Sr{sup 2+} efflux activity in these cells.

  11. Patterns of accumulation and flow of ice in the mid-latitudes of Mars during the Amazonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, James L.; Head, James W.; Fassett, Caleb I.

    2012-06-01

    Evidence has accumulated that non-polar portions of Mars have undergone significant periods of glaciation during the Amazonian Period. This evidence includes tropical mountain glacial deposits, lobate debris aprons, lineated valley fill, concentric crater fill, pedestal craters, and related landforms, some of which suggest that ice thicknesses exceeded a kilometer in many places. In some places, several lines of evidence suggest that ice is still preserved today in the form of relict debris-coved glaciers. The vast majority of deposit morphologies are analogous to those seen in cold-based glacial deposits on Earth, suggesting that little melting has taken place. Although these features have been broadly recognized, and their modes of ice accumulation and flow analyzed at several scales, they have not been analyzed and well-characterized globally despite their significance for understanding the evolution of the martian climate. A major outstanding question is the global extent of accumulation and flow of ice during periods of non-polar glaciation: As a mechanism to address this question, we outline two end-member scenarios to provide a framework for further discussion and analysis: (1) ice accumulation was mainly focused within individual craters and valleys and flow was largely local to regional in scale, and (2) ice accumulation was dominated by global latitudinal scale cold-based ice sheets, similar in scale to the Laurentide continental ice sheets on Earth. In order to assess these end members, we conducted a survey of ice-related features seen in Context Camera (CTX) images in each hemisphere and mapped evidence for flow directions within well-preserved craters in an effort to decipher orientation preferences that could help distinguish between these two hypotheses: regional/hemispheric glaciation or local accumulation and flow. These new crater data reveal a latitudinal-dependence on flow direction: at low latitudes in each hemisphere (<40-45°) cold, pole

  12. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  13. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C

    2008-08-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent's observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent's actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  14. How Are Preferences Revealed?

    PubMed Central

    Beshears, John; Choi, James J.; Laibson, David; Madrian, Brigitte C.

    2009-01-01

    Revealed preferences are tastes that rationalize an economic agent’s observed actions. Normative preferences represent the agent’s actual interests. It sometimes makes sense to assume that revealed preferences are identical to normative preferences. But there are many cases where this assumption is violated. We identify five factors that increase the likelihood of a disparity between revealed preferences and normative preferences: passive choice, complexity, limited personal experience, third-party marketing, and intertemporal choice. We then discuss six approaches that jointly contribute to the identification of normative preferences: structural estimation, active decisions, asymptotic choice, aggregated revealed preferences, reported preferences, and informed preferences. Each of these approaches uses consumer behavior to infer some property of normative preferences without equating revealed and normative preferences. We illustrate these issues with evidence from savings and investment outcomes. PMID:24761048

  15. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  16. Study of fluxes at low concentrations of l-tri-iodothyronine with rat liver cells and their plasma-membrane vesicles. Evidence for the accumulation of the hormone against a gradient

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Govind S.; Rao, Marie Luise; Thilmann, Astrid; Quednau, Hans D.

    1981-01-01

    1. Influx and efflux of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine with isolated rat liver parenchymal cells and their plasma-membrane vesicles were studied by a rapid centrifugation technique. 2. At 23°C and in the concentration range that included the concentration of free l-tri-iodothyronine in rat plasma (3–5pm) influx into cells was saturable; an apparent Kt value of 8.6±1.6pm was obtained. 3. At 5pm-l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine in the external medium the ratios of the concentrations inside to outside in cells and plasma-membrane vesicles were 38:1 and 366:1 respectively after 7s of incubation. At equilibrium (60s at 23°C) uptake of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine by cells was linear with the hormone concentration, whereas that by plasma-membrane vesicles exhibited an apparent saturation with a Kd value of 6.1±1.3pm. 4. Efflux of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine from cells equilibrated with the hormone (5–123pm) was constant up to 21 s; the amount that flowed out was 17.7±3.8% when cells were equilibrated with 5pm-hormone. When plasma-membrane vesicles were equilibrated with l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine (556–1226pm) 66.8±5.8% flowed out after 21 s. 5. From a consideration of the data on efflux from cells and binding of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine to the liver homogenate, as studied by the charcoal-adsorption and equilibrium-dialysis methods, it appears that 18–22% of the hormone exists in the free form in the cell. 6. Vinblastine and colchicine diminished the uptake of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine by cells but not by plasma-membrane vesicles; binding to the cytosol fraction was not affected. Phenylbutazone, 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil, methimazole and corticosterone diminished the uptake by cells, plasma-membrane vesicles and binding to the cytosol fraction to different extents. 7. These results suggest that at low concentrations of l-tri-[125I]iodothyronine rat liver cells and their plasma-membrane vesicles accumulated the hormone against an apparent gradient by a membrane-mediated process

  17. Apoptotic Debris Accumulates on Hematopoietic Cells and Promotes Disease in Murine and Human Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Kang, SunAh; Rogers, Jennifer L; Monteith, Andrew J; Jiang, Chuancang; Schmitz, John; Clarke, Stephen H; Tarrant, Teresa K; Truong, Young K; Diaz, Marilyn; Fedoriw, Yuri; Vilen, Barbara J

    2016-05-15

    Apoptotic debris, autoantibody, and IgG-immune complexes (ICs) have long been implicated in the inflammation associated with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); however, it remains unclear whether they initiate immune-mediated events that promote disease. In this study, we show that PBMCs from SLE patients experiencing active disease, and hematopoietic cells from lupus-prone MRL/lpr and NZM2410 mice accumulate markedly elevated levels of surface-bound nuclear self-antigens. On dendritic cells (DCs) and macrophages (MFs), the self-antigens are part of IgG-ICs that promote FcγRI-mediated signal transduction. Accumulation of IgG-ICs is evident on ex vivo myeloid cells from MRL/lpr mice by 10 wk of age and steadily increases prior to lupus nephritis. IgG and FcγRI play a critical role in disease pathology. Passive transfer of pathogenic IgG into IgG-deficient MRL/lpr mice promotes the accumulation of IgG-ICs prior to significant B cell expansion, BAFF secretion, and lupus nephritis. In contrast, diminishing the burden IgG-ICs in MRL/lpr mice through deficiency in FcγRI markedly improves these lupus pathologies. Taken together, our findings reveal a previously unappreciated role for the cell surface accumulation of IgG-ICs in human and murine lupus. PMID:27059595

  18. Sugar Accumulation in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Gayler, K. R.; Glasziou, K. T.

    1972-01-01

    The rate-limiting reaction for glucose uptake in storage tissue of sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L., appears to be the movement of glucose across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartments. The mechanism for uptake of glucose across this boundary has been studied using 3-O-methyl glucose, an analogue of glucose which is not metabolized by sugar-cane tissue. This analogue is taken up by sugarcane storage tissue at a similar rate to glucose. Its rate of uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Km = 1.9 mm, and it is competitively inhibited by glucose, Ki = 2 to 3 mm. Glucose uptake is similarly inhibited by 3-O-methyl glucose. Uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose is energy-dependent and does not appear to be the result of counterflow of glucose. It is concluded that glucose and 3-O-methyl glucose uptake across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartment in this tissue is mediated by an energy-dependent carrier system capable of accumulating the sugars against a concentration gradient. PMID:16658002

  19. TTX accumulation in pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been detected in a variety of animals. The finding of TTX in the trumpet shell Charonia sauliae strongly suggested that its origin was its food, a TTX-bearing starfish Astropecten polyacanthus. Since then, the food chain has been consistently implicated as the principal means of TTX intoxication. To identify the primary producer of TTX, intestinal bacteria isolated from several TTX-bearers were investigated for their TTX production. The results demonstrated that some of them could produce TTX. Thus the primary TTX producers in the sea are concluded to be marine bacteria. Subsequently, detritus feeders and zooplankton can be intoxicated with TTX through the food chain, or in conjunction with parasitism or symbiosis. The process followed by small carnivores, omnivores or scavengers, and by organisms higher up the food chain would result in the accumulation of higher concentrations of TTX. Finally, pufferfish at the top of the food chain are intoxicated with TTX. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that net cage and land cultures produce non-toxic pufferfish that can be made toxic by feeding with a TTX-containing diet.

  20. Molybdenum accumulation, tolerance and molybdenum-selenium-sulfur interactions in Astragalus selenium hyperaccumulator and nonaccumulator species.

    PubMed

    DeTar, Rachael Ann; Alford, Élan R; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A H

    2015-07-01

    Some species hyperaccumulate selenium (Se) upwards of 0.1% of dry weight. This study addressed whether Se hyperaccumulators also accumulate and tolerate more molybdenum (Mo). A field survey revealed on average 2-fold higher Mo levels in three hyperaccumulator Astragali compared to three nonaccumulator Astragali, which were not significantly different. Next, a controlled study was performed where hyperaccumulators Astragalus racemosus and Astragalus bisulcatus were compared with nonaccumulators Astragalus drummondii and Astragalus convallarius for Mo accumulation and tolerance, alone or in the presence of Se. When grown on agar media with 0, 12, 24 or 48 mg L(-1) molybdate and/or 0, 1.6 or 3.2 mg L(-1) selenate, all species decreased in biomass with increasing Mo supply. Selenium did not impact biomass at the supplied levels. All Astragali accumulated Mo upwards of 0.1% of dry weight. Selenium levels were up to 0.08% in Astragalus racemosus and 0.04% Se in the other species. Overall, there was no correlation between Se hyperaccumulation and Mo accumulation capacity. However, the hyperaccumulators and nonaccumulators differed in some respects. While none of the species had a higher tissue Mo to sulfur (S) ratio than the growth medium, nonaccumulators had a higher Mo/S ratio than hyperaccumulators. Also, while molybdate and selenate reduced S accumulation in nonaccumulators, it did not in hyperaccumulators. Furthermore, A. racemosus had a higher Se/S ratio than its medium, while the other species did not. Additionally, Mo and Se treatment affected S levels in nonaccumulators, but not in hyperaccumulators. In conclusion, there is no evidence of a link between Se and Mo accumulation and tolerance in Astragalus. Sulfate transporters in hyperaccumulating Astragali appear to have higher sulfate specificity over other oxyanions, compared to nonaccumulators, and A. racemosus may have a transporter with enhanced selenate specificity relative to sulfate or molybdate.

  1. Uptake, accumulation and metabolization of the antidepressant fluoxetine by Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Silva, Liliana J G; Martins, Margarida C; Pereira, André M P T; Meisel, Leonor M; Gonzalez-Rey, Maria; Bebianno, Maria João; Lino, Celeste M; Pena, Angelina

    2016-06-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressant, is among the most prescribed pharmaceutical active substances worldwide. This study aimed to assess its accumulation and metabolization in the mussel Mytillus galloprovincialis, considered an excellent sentinel species for traditional and emerging pollutants. Mussels were collected from Ria Formosa Lagoon, Portugal, and exposed to a nominal concentration of fluoxetine (75 ng L(-1)) for 15 days. Approximately 1 g of whole mussel soft tissues was extracted with acetonitrile:formic acid, loaded into an Oasis MCX cartridge, and fluoxetine analysed by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MSn). After 3 days of exposure, fluoxetine was accumulated in 70% of the samples, with a mean of 2.53 ng g(-1) dry weight (d.w.) and norfluoxetine was only detected in one sample (10%), at 3.06 ng g(-1) d.w. After 7 days of exposure, the accumulation of fluoxetine and norfluoxetine increased up to 80 and 50% respectively, and their mean accumulated levels in mussel tissues were up to 4.43 and 2.85 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively. By the end of the exposure period (15 days), both compounds were detected in 100% of the samples (mean of 9.31 and 11.65 ng g(-1) d.w., respectively). Statistical analysis revealed significant accumulation differences between the 3rd and 15th day of exposure for fluoxetine, and between the 3rd and 7th against the 15th day of exposure for norfluoxetine. These results suggest that the fluoxetine accumulated in mussel tissues is likely to be metabolised into norfluoxetine with the increase of the time of exposure, giving evidence that at these realistic environmental concentrations, toxic effects of fluoxetine in mussel tissues may occur.

  2. Genome-wide localization analysis of a complete set of Tafs reveals a specific effect of the taf1 mutation on Taf2 occupancy and provides indirect evidence for different TFIID conformations at different promoters.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Kazushige; Kasahara, Koji; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Kokubo, Tetsuro

    2010-04-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TFIID and SAGA principally mediate transcription of constitutive housekeeping genes and stress-inducible genes, respectively, by delivering TBP to the core promoter. Both are multi-protein complexes composed of 15 and 20 subunits, respectively, five of which are common and which may constitute a core sub-module in each complex. Although genome-wide gene expression studies have been conducted extensively in several TFIID and/or SAGA mutants, there are only a limited number of studies investigating genome-wide localization of the components of these two complexes. Specifically, there are no previous reports on localization of a complete set of Tafs and the effects of taf mutations on localization. Here, we examine the localization profiles of a complete set of Tafs, Gcn5, Bur6/Ncb2, Sua7, Tfa2, Tfg1, Tfb3 and Rpb1, on chromosomes III, IV and V by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip analysis in wild-type and taf1-T657K mutant strains. In addition, we conducted conventional and sequential ChIP analysis of several ribosomal protein genes (RPGs) and non-RPGs. Intriguingly, the results revealed a novel relationship between TFIIB and NC2, simultaneous co-localization of SAGA and TFIID on RPG promoters, specific effects of taf1 mutation on Taf2 occupancy, and an indirect evidence for the existence of different TFIID conformations. PMID:20026583

  3. Role of taurine accumulation in keratinocyte hydration.

    PubMed

    Janeke, Guido; Siefken, Wilfried; Carstensen, Stefanie; Springmann, Gunja; Bleck, Oliver; Steinhart, Hans; Höger, Peter; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Stäb, Franz; Sauermann, Gerhard; Schreiner, Volker; Doering, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are exposed to a low water concentration at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. When epithelial tissues are osmotically perturbed, cellular protection and cell volume regulation is mediated by accumulation of organic osmolytes such as taurine. Previous studies reported the presence of taurine in the epidermis of several animal species. Therefore, we analyzed human skin for the presence of the taurine transporter (TAUT) and studied the accumulation of taurine as one potential mechanism protecting epidermal keratinocytes from dehydration. According to our results, TAUT is expressed as a 69 kDa protein in human epidermis but not in the dermis. For the epidermis a gradient was evident with maximal levels of TAUT in the outermost granular keratinocyte layer and lower levels in the stratum spinosum. No TAUT was found in the basal layer or in the stratum corneum. Keratinocyte accumulation of taurine was induced by experimental induction of skin dryness via application of silica gel to human skin. Cultured human keratinocytes accumulated taurine in a concentration- and osmolarity-dependent manner. TAUT mRNA levels were increased after exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic culture medium, indicating osmosensitive TAUT mRNA expression as part of the adaptation of keratinocytes to hyperosmotic stress. Keratinocyte uptake of taurine was inhibited by beta-alanine but not by other osmolytes such as betaine, inositol, or sorbitol. Accumulation of taurine protected cultured human keratinocytes from both osmotically induced and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that taurine is an important epidermal osmolyte required to maintain keratinocyte hydration in a dry environment. PMID:12880428

  4. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  5. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  6. Accumulative Tritium Transfer from Water into Biosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertner, Franz

    2005-07-15

    The energy balance of hydrogen isotopes in H bonds of water and biomolecules results in accumulative tritium transfer from water into biomolecules. Tests of DNA dissolved in tritiated water and of maize or barley hydroponically grown in tritiated water confirm the increase. The primary hydration shell of DNA shows an accumulation factor of {approx}1.4, and the exchangeable hydrogens inside DNA show {approx}2. Logistic growth analyses of maize and barley reveal the intrinsic growth rates of tritium 1.3 and 1.2 times larger than that of hydrogen. The higher rate of tritium than hydrogen incorporation in solid biomatter is caused by the hydration shells, which constitute an intrinsic component of biomolecules.

  7. Accumulating evidence for nonstandard leptonic decays of Ds mesons.

    PubMed

    Dobrescu, Bogdan A; Kronfeld, Andreas S

    2008-06-20

    The measured rate for D{s}{+}-->l+nu decays, where l is a muon or tau, is larger than the standard model prediction, which relies on lattice QCD, at the 3.8sigma level. We discuss how robust the theoretical prediction is, and we show that the discrepancy with experiment may be explained by a charged Higgs boson or a leptoquark.

  8. Revealing Roosevelt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image mosaic from the microscopic imager aboard NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows detailed structure of a small fin-like structure dubbed 'Roosevelt,' which sticks out from the outcrop pavement at the edge of 'Erebus Crater.'

    Roosevelt lines a fracture in the local pavement and scientists hypothesize that it is a fracture fill, formed by water that percolated through the fracture. This would mean the feature is younger than surrounding rocks and, therefore, might provide evidence of water that was present some time after the formation of Meridiani Planum sedimentary rocks.

    The image shows fine laminations (layers about 1 millimeter or .04 inch thick) that run parallel to the axis of the fin. Some of the textures visible in the image likely indicate that minerals precipitated from the outcrop rocks, but sediment grains are also apparent.

    The three frames combined into this mosaic were taken during Opportunity's 727th Martian day, or sol (Feb. 8, 2006). In subsequent days, the rover completed textural and chemical inspection of Roosevelt to help the science team understand this structure's significance for Martian history.

  9. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  10. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  11. Linear Deterministic Accumulator Models of Simple Choice

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Andrew; Love, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    We examine theories of simple choice as a race among evidence accumulation processes. We focus on the class of deterministic race models, which assume that the effects of fluctuations in the parameters of the accumulation processes between-choice trials (between-choice noise) dominate the effects of fluctuations occurring while making a choice (within-choice noise) in behavioral data (i.e., response times and choices). The latter deterministic approximation, when combined with the assumption that accumulation is linear, leads to a class of models that can be readily applied to simple-choice behavior because they are computationally tractable. We develop a new and mathematically simple exemplar within the class of linear deterministic models, the Lognormal race (LNR). We then examine how the LNR, and another widely applied linear deterministic model, Brown and Heathcote’s (2008) LBA, account for a range of benchmark simple-choice effects in lexical-decision task data reported by Wagenmakers et al. (2008). Our results indicate that the LNR provides an accurate description of this data. Although the LBA model provides a slightly better account, both models support similar psychological conclusions. PMID:22936920

  12. How Financial Literacy Affects Household Wealth Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Behrman, Jere R.; Mitchell, Olivia S.; Soo, Cindy K.; Bravo, David

    2012-01-01

    This study isolates the causal effects of financial literacy and schooling on wealth accumulation using a new household dataset and an instrumental variables (IV) approach. Financial literacy and schooling attainment are both strongly positively associated with wealth outcomes in linear regression models, whereas the IV estimates reveal even more potent effects of financial literacy. They also indicate that the schooling effect only becomes positive when interacted with financial literacy. Estimated impacts are substantial enough to imply that investments in financial literacy could have large wealth payoffs. PMID:23355747

  13. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  14. Anion channels and the stimulation of anthocyanin accumulation by blue light in Arabidopsis seedlings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noh, B.; Spalding, E. P.; Evans, M. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Activation of anion channels by blue light begins within seconds of irradiation in seedlings and is related to the ensuing growth inhibition. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) is a potent, selective, and reversible blocker of these anion channels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that 20 microM NPPB blocked 72% of the blue-light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in seedlings. Feeding biosynthetic intermediates to wild-type and tt5 seedlings provided evidence that NPPB prevented blue light from up-regulating one or more steps between and including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and chalcone isomerase. NPPB was found to have no significant effect on the blue-light-induced increase in transcript levels of PAL1, CHS, CHI, or DFR, which are genes that encode anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Immunoblots revealed that NPPB also did not inhibit the accumulation of the chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, or flavanone-3-hydroxylase proteins. This is in contrast to the reduced anthocyanin accumulation displayed by a mutant lacking the HY4 blue-light receptor, as hy4 displayed reduced expression of the above enzymes. Taken together, the data indicate that blue light acting through HY4 leads to an increase in the amount of biosynthetic enzymes but blue light must also act through a separate, anion-channel-dependent system to create a fully functional biosynthetic pathway.

  15. The accumulation of genetic diversity within a canopy-stored seed bank.

    PubMed

    Ayre, David; O'Brien, Eleanor; Ottewell, Kym; Whelan, Rob

    2010-07-01

    Many plants regenerate after fire from a canopy-stored seed bank, in which seed are housed in fire resistant confructescences (cones) that remain on maternal plants. This strategy would be favoured if plants accumulate a sufficiently large and genetically diverse seed bank during interfire intervals. We use a 16-year demographic study and surveys of microsatellite variation to quantify and explain the rate of accumulation of genetic diversity within the canopy seed bank of the shrub Banksia spinulosa. Flowering and fruit set were highly variable. An initial sample in 1991 of 354 reproductively mature plants generated 426 cones over 16 years, of which only 55 cones from 40 maternal plants persisted until 2005. By genotyping seed from these 55 cones we demonstrated that genetic diversity accumulated rapidly within the seed bank. Resampling revealed that diversity was determined by the number, not the age, of cones. Cones were widely distributed among plants, outcrossing rates were high (mean t(m) = 1.00 +/- 0.04) and biparental inbreeding low. Adults displayed little evidence of isolation by distance and the genotypic diversity of seed cohorts was independent of the density of neighbouring potential sires. We therefore estimate that within at least 13 individual years the number of cones produced per year (14-63) would have contained 100% of the adult genetic diversity. We conclude that a highly outcrossed mating system and relatively widespread pollen dispersal ensure the rapid development of a genetically diverse and spatially and temporally homogeneous seed bank.

  16. Anion Channels and the Stimulation of Anthocyanin Accumulation by Blue Light in Arabidopsis Seedlings1

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Bosl; Spalding, Edgar P.

    1998-01-01

    Activation of anion channels by blue light begins within seconds of irradiation in seedlings and is related to the ensuing growth inhibition. 5-Nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB) is a potent, selective, and reversible blocker of these anion channels in Arabidopsis thaliana. Here we show that 20 μm NPPB blocked 72% of the blue-light-induced accumulation of anthocyanin pigments in seedlings. Feeding biosynthetic intermediates to wild-type and tt5 seedlings provided evidence that NPPB prevented blue light from up-regulating one or more steps between and including phenylalanine ammonia lyase and chalcone isomerase. NPPB was found to have no significant effect on the blue-light-induced increase in transcript levels of PAL1, CHS, CHI, or DFR, which are genes that encode anthocyanin-biosynthetic enzymes. Immunoblots revealed that NPPB also did not inhibit the accumulation of the chalcone synthase, chalcone isomerase, or flavanone-3-hydroxylase proteins. This is in contrast to the reduced anthocyanin accumulation displayed by a mutant lacking the HY4 blue-light receptor, as hy4 displayed reduced expression of the above enzymes. Taken together, the data indicate that blue light acting through HY4 leads to an increase in the amount of biosynthetic enzymes, but blue light must also act through a separate, anion-channel-dependent system to create a fully functional biosynthetic pathway. PMID:9489009

  17. Identification of multiple lipid genes with modifications in expression and sequence associated with the evolution of hydroxy fatty acid accumulation in Physaria fendleri.

    PubMed

    Horn, Patrick J; Liu, Jinjie; Cocuron, Jean-Christophe; McGlew, Kathleen; Thrower, Nicholas A; Larson, Matt; Lu, Chaofu; Alonso, Ana P; Ohlrogge, John

    2016-05-01

    Two Brassicaceae species, Physaria fendleri and Camelina sativa, are genetically very closely related to each other and to Arabidopsis thaliana. Physaria fendleri seeds contain over 50% hydroxy fatty acids (HFAs), while Camelina sativa and Arabidopsis do not accumulate HFAs. To better understand how plants evolved new biochemical pathways with the capacity to accumulate high levels of unusual fatty acids, transcript expression and protein sequences of developing seeds of Physaria fendleri, wild-type Camelina sativa, and Camelina sativa expressing a castor bean (Ricinus communis) hydroxylase were analyzed. A number of potential evolutionary adaptations within lipid metabolism that probably enhance HFA production and accumulation in Physaria fendleri, and, in their absence, limit accumulation in transgenic tissues were revealed. These adaptations occurred in at least 20 genes within several lipid pathways from the onset of fatty acid synthesis and its regulation to the assembly of triacylglycerols. Lipid genes of Physaria fendleri appear to have co-evolved through modulation of transcriptional abundances and alterations within protein sequences. Only a handful of genes showed evidence for sequence adaptation through gene duplication. Collectively, these evolutionary changes probably occurred to minimize deleterious effects of high HFA amounts and/or to enhance accumulation for physiological advantage. These results shed light on the evolution of pathways for novel fatty acid production in seeds, help explain some of the current limitations to accumulation of HFAs in transgenic plants, and may provide improved strategies for future engineering of their production.

  18. A record of Late Pleistocene and Holocene carbon accumulation and climate change from an equatorial peat bog (Kalimantan, Indonesia): implications for past, present and future carbon dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Page, S. E.; Wst, R. A. J.; Weiss, D.; Rieley, J. O.; Shotyk, W.; Limin, S. H.

    2004-10-01

    A 9.5 m core from an inland peatland in Kalimantan, Indonesia, reveals organic matter accumulation started around 26 000 cal. yr BP, providing the oldest reported initiation date for lowland ombrotrophic peat formation in SE Asia. The core shows clear evidence for differential rates of peat formation and carbon storage. A short period of initial accumulation is followed by a slow rate during the LGM, with fastest accumulation during the Holocene. Between 13 000 and 8000 cal. yr BP, > 450 cm of peat were deposited, with highest rates of peat (> 2 mm yr-1) and carbon (> 90 g C m-2yr-1) accumulation between 9530 and 8590cal.yrBP. These data suggest that Kalimantan peatlands acted as a large sink of atmospheric CO2 at this time. Slower rates of peat (0.15-0.38mmyr-1) and carbon (7.4-24.0gCm-2yr-1) accumulation between 8000 and 500cal.yrBP coincide with rapid peat formation in coastal locations elsewhere in SE Asia. The average LORCA (long-term apparent carbon accumulation rate) for the 9.5m core is 56gCm-2yr-1. These data suggest that studies of global carbon sources, sinks and their dynamics need to include information on the past and present sizeable peat deposits of the tropics. Copyright

  19. The Kallisti Limnes, carbon dioxide-accumulating subsea pools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2015-07-01

    Natural CO2 releases from shallow marine hydrothermal vents are assumed to mix into the water column, and not accumulate into stratified seafloor pools. We present newly discovered shallow subsea pools located within the Santorini volcanic caldera of the Southern Aegean Sea, Greece, that accumulate CO2 emissions from geologic reservoirs. This type of hydrothermal seafloor pool, containing highly concentrated CO2, provides direct evidence of shallow benthic CO2 accumulations originating from sub-seafloor releases. Samples taken from within these acidic pools are devoid of calcifying organisms, and channel structures among the pools indicate gravity driven flow, suggesting that seafloor release of CO2 at this site may preferentially impact benthic ecosystems. These naturally occurring seafloor pools may provide a diagnostic indicator of incipient volcanic activity and can serve as an analog for studying CO2 leakage and benthic accumulations from subsea carbon capture and storage sites.

  20. The Kallisti Limnes, carbon dioxide-accumulating subsea pools.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Escartín, Javier; Ridao, Pere; Mallios, Angelos; Kilias, Stephanos P; Argyraki, Ariadne

    2015-07-16

    Natural CO2 releases from shallow marine hydrothermal vents are assumed to mix into the water column, and not accumulate into stratified seafloor pools. We present newly discovered shallow subsea pools located within the Santorini volcanic caldera of the Southern Aegean Sea, Greece, that accumulate CO2 emissions from geologic reservoirs. This type of hydrothermal seafloor pool, containing highly concentrated CO2, provides direct evidence of shallow benthic CO2 accumulations originating from sub-seafloor releases. Samples taken from within these acidic pools are devoid of calcifying organisms, and channel structures among the pools indicate gravity driven flow, suggesting that seafloor release of CO2 at this site may preferentially impact benthic ecosystems. These naturally occurring seafloor pools may provide a diagnostic indicator of incipient volcanic activity and can serve as an analog for studying CO2 leakage and benthic accumulations from subsea carbon capture and storage sites.

  1. The Kallisti Limnes, carbon dioxide-accumulating subsea pools

    PubMed Central

    Camilli, Richard; Nomikou, Paraskevi; Escartín, Javier; Ridao, Pere; Mallios, Angelos; Kilias, Stephanos P.; Argyraki, Ariadne; Andreani, Muriel; Ballu, Valerie; Campos, Ricard; Deplus, Christine; Gabsi, Taoufic; Garcia, Rafael; Gracias, Nuno; Hurtós, Natàlia; Magí, Lluis; Mével, Catherine; Moreira, Manuel; Palomeras, Narcís; Pot, Olivier; Ribas, David; Ruzié, Lorraine; Sakellariou, Dimitris

    2015-01-01

    Natural CO2 releases from shallow marine hydrothermal vents are assumed to mix into the water column, and not accumulate into stratified seafloor pools. We present newly discovered shallow subsea pools located within the Santorini volcanic caldera of the Southern Aegean Sea, Greece, that accumulate CO2 emissions from geologic reservoirs. This type of hydrothermal seafloor pool, containing highly concentrated CO2, provides direct evidence of shallow benthic CO2 accumulations originating from sub-seafloor releases. Samples taken from within these acidic pools are devoid of calcifying organisms, and channel structures among the pools indicate gravity driven flow, suggesting that seafloor release of CO2 at this site may preferentially impact benthic ecosystems. These naturally occurring seafloor pools may provide a diagnostic indicator of incipient volcanic activity and can serve as an analog for studying CO2 leakage and benthic accumulations from subsea carbon capture and storage sites. PMID:26179858

  2. [Sweet syndrome revealing leukemia].

    PubMed

    Elleuch, E; Hammami, B; Smaoui, F; Maaloul, I; Turki, H; Elloumi, M; Ben Jemaa, M

    2011-09-01

    Sweet syndrome is a neutrophilic dermatosis that can lead to various inflammatory and neoplastic pathologies. We report a case of Sweet syndrome revealing acute leukemia at a 13-year-old girl, who had no history of illness. The diagnosis was made in spite of atypical skin lesions and was confirmed by the skin biopsy and the bone marrow examination. In spite of corticosteroid therapy and chemotherapy, the patient died. Sweet syndrome's diagnosis requires an exhaustive etiologic survey. If there is no evidence of underlying disease, patients must be regularly monitored.

  3. Metal accumulation capacity of five species of Sphagnum moss

    SciTech Connect

    Aulio, K.

    1985-10-01

    The present paper describes the first experimental evidence of the species-specific differences in the cation accumulation properties in Sphagnum mosses. Manganese was chosen for the object of the experiments because this element appears to show the greatest variability under natural conditions.

  4. Accelerated mutation accumulation in asexual lineages of a freshwater snail.

    PubMed

    Neiman, Maurine; Hehman, Gery; Miller, Joseph T; Logsdon, John M; Taylor, Douglas R

    2010-04-01

    Sexual reproduction is both extremely costly and widespread relative to asexual reproduction, meaning that it must also confer profound advantages in order to persist. One theorized benefit of sex is that it facilitates the clearance of harmful mutations, which would accumulate more rapidly in the absence of recombination. The extent to which ineffective purifying selection and mutation accumulation are direct consequences of asexuality and whether the accelerated buildup of harmful mutations in asexuals can occur rapidly enough to maintain sex within natural populations, however, remain as open questions. We addressed key components of these questions by estimating the rate of mutation accumulation in the mitochondrial genomes of multiple sexual and asexual representatives of Potamopyrgus antipodarum, a New Zealand snail characterized by mixed sexual/asexual populations. We found that increased mutation accumulation is associated with asexuality and occurs rapidly enough to be detected in recently derived asexual lineages of P. antipodarum. Our results demonstrate that increased mutation accumulation in asexuals can differentially affect coexisting and ecologically similar sexual and asexual lineages. The accelerated rate of mutation accumulation observed in asexual P. antipodarum provides some of the most direct evidence to date for a link between asexuality and mutation accumulation and implies that mutational buildup could be rapid enough to contribute to the short-term evolutionary mechanisms that favor sexual reproduction.

  5. HPLC-MS/MS Analyses Show That the Near-Starchless aps1 and pgm Leaves Accumulate Wild Type Levels of ADPglucose: Further Evidence for the Occurrence of Important ADPglucose Biosynthetic Pathway(s) Alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Francisco José; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; Montero, Manuel; Pujol, Pablo; Galarza, Regina; Kaneko, Kentaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Wada, Kaede; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a) involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM), ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and starch synthase (SS), and (b) is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI). This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT) and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a) there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b) pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c) the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low. PMID:25133777

  6. A lee-side eddy and its influence on snow accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerber, Franziska; Mott, Rebecca; Hoch, Sebastian W.; Lehning, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Knowledge of changes in seasonal mountain snow water resources is essential for e.g. hydropower companies. To successfully predict these changes a fundamental understanding of precipitation patterns and their changes in mountainous terrain is needed. Both, snow accumulation and ablation need to be investigated to make precise predictions of the amount of water stored in seasonal snow cover. Only if the processes governing snow accumulation and ablation are understood with sufficient quantitative accuracy, the evolution of snow water resources under a changing climate can be addressed. Additionally, knowledge of detailed snow accumulation patterns is essential to assess avalanche danger. In alpine terrain, snow accumulation is strongly dependent on the local wind field. Based on the concept of preferential deposition, reduced snow accumulation is expected on the upper windward slope of a mountain due to updrafts, while enhanced snow accumulation should occur through blocking at the windward foot or due to flow separation on the leeward side. However, the understanding of these processes is mainly based on numerical simulations, as they are hard to measure. A LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) campaign was conducted in October 2015 in the Dischma valley (Davos, CH) to investigate the local flow field in the lee of the Sattelhorn during a one-day snowfall event. The flow field was monitored using a plane position indicator (PPI) scan at 25/28° and a range height indicator (RHI) scan across the Sattelhorn. Additionally, snow height change measurements on the leeward side of the Sattelhorn were performed by terrestrial laser scanning (TLS). Analyses of the flow field in the framework of preferential deposition are in agreement with the concept of flow separation and preferred snow deposition on leeward slopes. A very persistent eddy that formed over the leeward slope of the Sattelhorn detached from the main flow became evident from the retrievals of the RHI scans. An

  7. Maximum likelihood decoding analysis of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-Accumulate (RA) codes are the simplest turbo-like codes that achieve good performance. However, they cannot compete with Turbo codes or low-density parity check codes (LDPC) as far as performance is concerned. The Accumulate Repeat Accumulate (ARA) codes, as a subclass of LDPC codes, are obtained by adding a pre-coder in front of RA codes with puncturing where an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. These codes not only are very simple, but also achieve excellent performance with iterative decoding. In this paper, the performance of these codes with (ML) decoding are analyzed and compared to random codes by very tight bounds. The weight distribution of some simple ARA codes is obtained, and through existing tightest bounds we have shown the ML SNR threshold of ARA codes approaches very closely to the performance of random codes. We have shown that the use of precoder improves the SNR threshold but interleaving gain remains unchanged with respect to RA code with puncturing.

  8. Comparative functional characterization of eugenol synthase from four different Ocimum species: Implications on eugenol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Atul; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Beedkar, Supriya D; Singh, Priyanka A; Joshi, Rakesh S; Mulani, Fayaj A; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Punekar, Sachin A; Gade, Wasudeo N; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-11-01

    Isoprenoids and phenylpropanoids are the major secondary metabolite constituents in Ocimum genus. Though enzymes from phenylpropanoid pathway have been characterized from few plants, limited information exists on how they modulate levels of secondary metabolites. Here, we performed phenylpropanoid profiling in different tissues from five Ocimum species, which revealed significant variations in secondary metabolites including eugenol, eugenol methyl ether, estragole and methyl cinnamate levels. Expression analysis of eugenol synthase (EGS) gene showed higher transcript levels especially in young leaves and inflorescence; and were positively correlated with eugenol contents. Additionally, transcript levels of coniferyl alcohol acyl transferase, a key enzyme diverting pool of substrate to phenylpropanoids, were in accordance with their abundance in respective species. In particular, eugenol methyl transferase expression positively correlated with higher levels of eugenol methyl ether in Ocimum tenuiflorum. Further, EGSs were functionally characterized from four Ocimum species varying in their eugenol contents. Kinetic and expression analyses indicated, higher enzyme turnover and transcripts levels, in species accumulating more eugenol. Moreover, biochemical and bioinformatics studies demonstrated that coniferyl acetate was the preferred substrate over coumaryl acetate when used, individually or together, in the enzyme assay. Overall, this study revealed the preliminary evidence for varied accumulation of eugenol and its abundance over chavicol in these Ocimum species. Current findings could potentially provide novel insights for metabolic modulations in medicinal and aromatic plants. PMID:27519164

  9. Comparative functional characterization of eugenol synthase from four different Ocimum species: Implications on eugenol accumulation.

    PubMed

    Anand, Atul; Jayaramaiah, Ramesha H; Beedkar, Supriya D; Singh, Priyanka A; Joshi, Rakesh S; Mulani, Fayaj A; Dholakia, Bhushan B; Punekar, Sachin A; Gade, Wasudeo N; Thulasiram, Hirekodathakallu V; Giri, Ashok P

    2016-11-01

    Isoprenoids and phenylpropanoids are the major secondary metabolite constituents in Ocimum genus. Though enzymes from phenylpropanoid pathway have been characterized from few plants, limited information exists on how they modulate levels of secondary metabolites. Here, we performed phenylpropanoid profiling in different tissues from five Ocimum species, which revealed significant variations in secondary metabolites including eugenol, eugenol methyl ether, estragole and methyl cinnamate levels. Expression analysis of eugenol synthase (EGS) gene showed higher transcript levels especially in young leaves and inflorescence; and were positively correlated with eugenol contents. Additionally, transcript levels of coniferyl alcohol acyl transferase, a key enzyme diverting pool of substrate to phenylpropanoids, were in accordance with their abundance in respective species. In particular, eugenol methyl transferase expression positively correlated with higher levels of eugenol methyl ether in Ocimum tenuiflorum. Further, EGSs were functionally characterized from four Ocimum species varying in their eugenol contents. Kinetic and expression analyses indicated, higher enzyme turnover and transcripts levels, in species accumulating more eugenol. Moreover, biochemical and bioinformatics studies demonstrated that coniferyl acetate was the preferred substrate over coumaryl acetate when used, individually or together, in the enzyme assay. Overall, this study revealed the preliminary evidence for varied accumulation of eugenol and its abundance over chavicol in these Ocimum species. Current findings could potentially provide novel insights for metabolic modulations in medicinal and aromatic plants.

  10. Phytochelatin synthesis is essential for the detoxification of excess zinc and contributes significantly to the accumulation of zinc.

    PubMed

    Tennstedt, Pierre; Peisker, Daniel; Böttcher, Christoph; Trampczynska, Aleksandra; Clemens, Stephan

    2009-02-01

    The synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) is essential for the detoxification of nonessential metals and metalloids such as cadmium and arsenic in plants and a variety of other organisms. To our knowledge, no direct evidence for a role of PCs in essential metal homeostasis has been reported to date. Prompted by observations in Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Saccharomyces cerevisiae indicating a contribution of PC synthase expression to Zn2+ sequestration, we investigated a known PC-deficient Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutant, cad1-3, and a newly isolated second strong allele, cad1-6, with respect to zinc (Zn) homeostasis. We found that in a medium with low cation content PC-deficient mutants show pronounced Zn2+ hypersensitivity. This phenotype is of comparable strength to the well-documented Cd2+ hypersensitivity of cad1 mutants. PC deficiency also results in significant reduction in root Zn accumulation. To be able to sensitively measure PC accumulation, we established an assay using capillary liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry of derivatized extracts. Plants grown under control conditions consistently showed PC2 accumulation. Analysis of plants treated with same-effect concentrations revealed that Zn2+-elicited PC2 accumulation in roots reached about 30% of the level of Cd2+-elicited PC2 accumulation. We conclude from these data that PC formation is essential for Zn2+ tolerance and provides driving force for the accumulation of Zn. This function might also help explain the mysterious occurrence of PC synthase genes throughout the plant kingdom and in a wide range of other organisms.

  11. Pensions and Household Wealth Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Gary V.; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Economists have long suggested that higher private pension benefits "crowd out" other sources of household wealth accumulation. We exploit detailed information on pensions and lifetime earnings for older workers in the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study and employ an instrumental-variable (IV) identification strategy to estimate…

  12. Enhanced lipid accumulation of photoautotrophic microalgae by high-dose CO2 mimics a heterotrophic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Wu, Jun; He, Bing; Wang, Yuancong; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess higher photosynthetic efficiency and accumulate more neutral lipids when supplied with high-dose CO2. However, the nature of lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2 has not been fully elucidated so far. We now revealed that the enhanced lipid accumulation of Chlorella in high-dose CO2 was as efficient as under heterotrophic conditions and this may be attributed to the driving of enlarged carbon source. Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic cultures were established by using Chlorella sorokiniana CS-1. A series of changes in the carbon fixation, lipid accumulation, energy conversion, and carbon-lipid conversion under high-dose CO2 (1-10%) treatment were characterized subsequently. The daily carbon fixation rate of C. sorokiniana LS-2 in 10% CO2 aeration was significantly increased compared with air CO2. Correspondingly, double oil content (28%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, close to 32.3% produced under heterotrophic conditions. In addition, with 10% CO2 aeration, the overall energy yield (Ψ) in Chlorella reached 12.4 from 7.3% (with air aeration) because of the enhanced daily carbon fixation rates. This treatment also improved the energetic lipid yield (Ylipid/Es) with 4.7-fold, tending to the heterotrophic parameters. More significantly, 2.2 times of carbon-lipid conversion efficiency (ηClipid/Ctotal, 42.4%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, towards to 53.7% in heterotrophic cultures, suggesting that more fixed carbon might flow into lipid synthesis under both 10% CO2 aeration and heterotrophic conditions. Taken together, all our evidence showed that 10% CO2 may push photoautotrophic Chlorella to display heterotrophic-like efficiency at least in lipid production. It might bring us an efficient model of lipid production based on microalgal cells with high-dose CO2, which is essential to sustain biodiesel production at large scales. PMID:26712624

  13. Intertemporal choice as discounted value accumulation.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Christian A; Turner, Brandon M; McClure, Samuel M

    2014-01-01

    Two separate cognitive processes are involved in choosing between rewards available at different points in time. The first is temporal discounting, which consists of combining information about the size and delay of prospective rewards to represent subjective values. The second involves a comparison of available rewards to enable an eventual choice on the basis of these subjective values. While several mathematical models of temporal discounting have been developed, the reward selection process has been largely unexplored. To address this limitation, we evaluated the applicability of the Linear Ballistic Accumulator (LBA) model as a theory of the selection process in intertemporal choice. The LBA model formalizes the selection process as a sequential sampling algorithm in which information about different choice options is integrated until a decision criterion is reached. We compared several versions of the LBA model to demonstrate that choice outcomes and response times in intertemporal choice are well captured by the LBA process. The relationship between choice outcomes and response times that derives from the LBA model cannot be explained by temporal discounting alone. Moreover, the drift rates that drive evidence accumulation in the best-fitting LBA model are related to independently estimated subjective values derived from various temporal discounting models. These findings provide a quantitative framework for predicting dynamics of choice-related activity during the reward selection process in intertemporal choice and link intertemporal choice to other classes of decisions in which the LBA model has been applied.

  14. Accumulation of artificial radionuclides in agricultural plants in the area used for surface nuclear tests.

    PubMed

    Kozhakhanov, T E; Lukashenko, S N; Larionova, N V

    2014-11-01

    The paper reports on the study of artificial radionuclide accumulation in agricultural crops grown at the territory with high concentration of radionuclides, and first of all - with high concentration of transuranium elements. As a result of this work, peculiarities of accumulation and distribution of artificial radionuclides in the vegetative and generative organs of the studied plants have been revealed. Basic accumulation factors have been found for (137)Cs, (90)Sr, (239+240)Pu, and (241)Am in agricultural products. Accumulation factor dependence on type of planting was found for the investigated types of plants. It has been found that the vegetative organs accumulate radionuclides most of all.

  15. Sevoflurane Contamination: Water Accumulation in Sevoflurane Vaporizers Can Allow Bacterial Growth in the Vaporizer.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Arthur W

    2016-06-15

    Sevoflurane vaporizers (GE Tec 7) were difficult to fill with "slow flow" and a need to "burp." Evaluation of the bottle of sevoflurane (AbbVie Ultane) demonstrated a contaminant. Four of the facilities' 13 sevoflurane vaporizers had the contaminant. Unopened sevoflurane bottles did not have evidence of contamination. The contaminant was found to be water at pH 6.0 growing Staphylococcus epidermidis. Gas chromatography revealed the production of multiple metabolites of sevoflurane, including primarily urea and 1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (83% and 9.6% of volatiles) in addition to multiple other organic molecules. Sevoflurane contains water that can accumulate in vaporizers allowing bacterial growth.

  16. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis with low fluorodeoxyglucose accumulation in PET/computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Günay, Ersin; Özcan, Aysenaz; Günay, Sibel; Tatci, Ebru; Keyf, Atila Ihsan; Simsek, Cebrail

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is an uncommon lung disease characterized by accumulation of intraalveolar calcifications. The disease can be diagnosed based on the radiological findings. We present a 27-year-old women with five-year history of shortness of breath. She was diagnosed with PAM due to the presence of the characteristic chest X-ray and thorax computed tomography (CT) findings. We performed 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT imaging in order to detect any evidence of inflamation in the lung before deciding an anti-inflammatory treatment. The lung regions with dense calcifications revealed low FDG uptakes (SUVmax: 2.7) and the lung regions without calcifications showed lower FDG uptakes. No further treatment modality was planned besides inhaler salbutamol. Herein, we discuss this rare entity with literature search. PMID:21977072

  17. Chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui

    2013-11-15

    Chromoplasts are special organelles that possess superior ability to synthesize and store massive amounts of carotenoids. They are responsible for the distinctive colors found in fruits, flowers, and roots. Chromoplasts exhibit various morphologies and are derived from either pre-existing chloroplasts or other non-photosynthetic plastids such as proplastids, leucoplasts or amyloplasts. While little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast biogenesis, research progress along with proteomics study of chromoplast proteomes signifies various processes and factors important for chromoplast differentiation and development. Chromoplasts act as a metabolic sink that enables great biosynthesis and high storage capacity of carotenoids. The formation of chromoplasts enhances carotenoid metabolic sink strength and controls carotenoid accumulation in plants. The objective of this review is to provide an integrated view on our understanding of chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  18. Strain accumulation and rotation in the Eastern California Shear Zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Gan, Weijun; Svarc, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    Although the Eastern California Shear Zone (ECSZ) (strike ???N25??W) does not quite coincide with a small circle drawn about the Pacific-North America pole of rotation, trilateration and GPS measurements demonstrate that the motion within the zone corresponds to right-lateral simple shear across a vertical plane (strike N33??W??5??) roughly parallel to the tangent to that local small circle (strike ???N40??W). If the simple shear is released by slip on faults subparallel to the shear zone, the accumulated rotation is also released, leaving no secular rotation. South of the Garlock fault the principal faults (e.g., Calico-Blackwater fault) strike ???N40??W, close enough to the strike of the vertical plane across which maximum right-lateral shear accumulates to almost wholly accommodate that accumulation of both strain and rotation by right-lateral slip. North of the Garlock fault dip slip as well as strike slip on the principal faults (strike ???N20??W) is required to accommodate the simple shear accumulation. In both cases the accumulated rotation is released with the shear strain. The Garlock fault, which transects the ECSZ, is not offset by north-northwest striking faults nor, despite geological evidence for long-term left-lateral slip, does it appear at the present time to be accumulating left-lateral simple shear strain across the fault due to slip at depth. Rather the motion is explained by right-lateral simple shear across the orthogonal ECSZ. Left-lateral slip on the Garlock fault will release the shear strain accumulating there but would augment the accumulating rotation, resulting in a secular clockwise rotation rate ???80 nrad yr-1 (4.6?? Myr-1).

  19. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD. PMID:26819531

  20. Phophatidylinositol-3 kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin/p70S6K regulates contractile protein accumulation in airway myocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Halayko, Andrew J; Kartha, Sreedharan; Stelmack, Gerald L; McConville, John; Tam, John; Camoretti-Mercado, Blanca; Forsythe, Sean M; Hershenson, Marc B; Solway, Julian

    2004-09-01

    Increased airway smooth muscle in airway remodeling results from myocyte proliferation and hypertrophy. Skeletal and vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy is induced by phosphatidylinositide-3 kinase (PI(3) kinase) via mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and p70S6 kinase (p70S6K). We tested the hypothesis that this pathway regulates contractile protein accumulation in cultured canine airway myocytes acquiring an elongated contractile phenotype in serum-free culture. In vitro assays revealed a sustained activation of PI(3) kinase and p70S6K during serum deprivation up to 12 d, with concomitant accumulation of SM22 and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (smMHC) proteins. Immunocytochemistry revealed that activation of PI3K/mTOR/p70S6K occurred almost exclusively in myocytes that acquire the contractile phenotype. Inhibition of PI(3) kinase or mTOR with LY294002 or rapamycin blocked p70S6K activation, prevented formation of large elongated contractile phenotype myocytes, and blocked accumulation of SM22 and smMHC. Inhibition of MEK had no effect. Steady-state mRNA abundance for SM22 and smMHC was unaffected by blocking p70S6K activation. These studies provide primary evidence that PI(3) kinase and mTOR activate p70S6K in airway myocytes leading to the accumulation of contractile apparatus proteins, differentiation, and growth of large, elongated contractile phenotype airway smooth muscle cells. PMID:15105162

  1. Bacterial Swimming and Accumulation at the Fluid Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Micro-organisms often reside and thrive at the fluid boundaries. The tendency of accumulation is particularly strong for flagellated bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Vibro alginolyticus, and Caulobacter crescentus. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a solid surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on darkfield microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within micrometers from the surface, even though individual swimmers are not trapped long enough to display circular trajectories. We attributed this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed simulations based on this model, which reproduces the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. Our ongoing experimental effort also includes observation of similar phenomena at the interfaces of either water-oil or water-air, noting even stronger trapping of the swimming bacteria than near a solid surface. These studies reveal a rich range of fluid physics for further analysis.

  2. Reducing synuclein accumulation improves neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Fogerson, Stephanie M; van Brummen, Alexandra J; Busch, David J; Allen, Scott R; Roychaudhuri, Robin; Banks, Susan M L; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Bitan, Gal; Morgan, Jennifer R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal cord injury causes neuronal death, limiting subsequent regeneration and recovery. Thus, there is a need to develop strategies for improving neuronal survival after injury. Relative to our understanding of axon regeneration, comparatively little is known about the mechanisms that promote the survival of damaged neurons. To address this, we took advantage of lamprey giant reticulospinal neurons whose large size permits detailed examination of post-injury molecular responses at the level of individual, identified cells. We report here that spinal cord injury caused a select subset of giant reticulospinal neurons to accumulate synuclein, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein best known for its atypical aggregation and causal role in neurodegeneration in Parkinson's and other diseases. Post-injury synuclein accumulation took the form of punctate aggregates throughout the somata and occurred selectively in dying neurons, but not in those that survived. In contrast, another synaptic vesicle protein, synaptotagmin, did not accumulate in response to injury. We further show that the post-injury synuclein accumulation was greatly attenuated after single dose application of either the "molecular tweezer" inhibitor, CLR01, or a translation-blocking synuclein morpholino. Consequently, reduction of synuclein accumulation not only improved neuronal survival, but also increased the number of axons in the spinal cord proximal and distal to the lesion. This study is the first to reveal that reducing synuclein accumulation is a novel strategy for improving neuronal survival after spinal cord injury.

  3. Regulation of starch and lipid accumulation in a microalga Chlorella sorokiniana.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Gargouri, Mahmoud; Feng, Jie; Park, Jeong-Jin; Gao, Difeng; Miao, Chao; Dong, Tao; Gang, David R; Chen, Shulin

    2015-03-01

    Microalgae have attracted growing attention due to their potential in biofuel feedstock production. However, current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms for lipid biosynthesis and storage in microalgae is still limited. This study revealed that the microalga Chlorella sorokiniana showed sequential accumulation of starch and lipids. When nitrogen was replete and/or depleted over a short period, starch was the predominant carbon storage form with basal levels of lipid accumulation. After prolonged nitrogen depletion, lipid accumulation increased considerably, which was partially due to starch degradation, as well as the turnover of primary metabolites. Lipid accumulation is also strongly dependent on the linear electron flow of photosynthesis, peaking at lower light intensities. Collectively, this study reveals a relatively clear regulation pattern of starch and lipid accumulation that is basically controlled by nitrogen levels. The mixotrophic growth of C. sorokiniana shows promise for biofuel production in terms of lipid accumulation in the final biomass.

  4. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P.

    1992-01-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes >8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time.

  5. Rapid intraplate strain accumulation in the New Madrid seismic zone

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, L.; Zoback, M.D.; Segall, P. USGS, Menlo Park, CA )

    1992-09-01

    Remeasurement of a triangulation network in the southern part of the New Madrid seismic zone with the Global Positioning System has revealed rapid crustal strain accumulation since the 1950s. This area experienced three large (moment magnitudes greater than 8) earthquakes in 1811 to 1812. The orientation and sense of shear is consistent with right-lateral strike slip motion along a northeast-trending fault zone (as indicated by current seismicity). Detection of crustal strain accumulation may be a useful discriminant for identifying areas where potentially damaging intraplate earthquakes may occur despite the absence of large earthquakes during historic time. 34 refs.

  6. Evidence for Natural Killer Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Assaf; Raulet, David H.

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are generally considered part of the innate immune system. However, over the past few years, evidence has accumulated suggesting that NK cells have certain features characteristic of the adaptive immune system. NK cells reportedly respond in an antigen-specific manner to a variety of small molecules and certain viruses, and mediate enhanced responses to these antigens upon re-challenge. In infections with mouse cytomegalovirus (MCMV), MCMV-specific NK cells undergo clonal expansion, and display increased effector function after the resolution of the infection. In addition, inflammatory conditions resulting from exposure to certain cytokines seem to cause prolonged effector function in NK cells in an antigen non-specific fashion. Taken together, these studies reveal new aspects of NK biology, and suggest that NK cells, like T and B cells, may carry out memory responses, and may also exhibit greater capacity to distinguish antigens than was previously recognized. PMID:24028966

  7. The neural basis of value accumulation in intertemporal choice.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Christian A; Turner, Brandon M; Van Zandt, Trisha; McClure, Samuel M

    2015-09-01

    Making intertemporal choices (choosing between rewards available at different points in time) requires determining and comparing the subjective values of available rewards. Several studies have found converging evidence identifying the neural systems that encode subjective value in intertemporal choice. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for the process that produces intertemporal decisions on the basis of subjective values have not been investigated. Using model-based and connectivity analyses of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we investigated the neural mechanisms underlying the value-accumulation process by which subjective value guides intertemporal decisions. Our results show that the dorsomedial frontal cortex, bilateral posterior parietal cortex, and bilateral lateral prefrontal cortex are all involved in the accumulation of subjective value for the purpose of action selection. Our findings establish a mechanistic framework for understanding frontoparietal contributions to intertemporal choice and suggest that value-accumulation processes in the frontoparietal cortex may be a general mechanism for value-based choice. PMID:26179826

  8. Annual accumulation over the Greenland ice sheet interpolated from historical and newly compiled observation data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shen, Dayong; Liu, Yuling; Huang, Shengli

    2012-01-01

    The estimation of ice/snow accumulation is of great significance in quantifying the mass balance of ice sheets and variation in water resources. Improving the accuracy and reducing uncertainty has been a challenge for the estimation of annual accumulation over the Greenland ice sheet. In this study, we kriged and analyzed the spatial pattern of accumulation based on an observation data series including 315 points used in a recent research, plus 101 ice cores and snow pits and newly compiled 23 coastal weather station data. The estimated annual accumulation over the Greenland ice sheet is 31.2 g cm−2 yr−1, with a standard error of 0.9 g cm−2 yr−1. The main differences between the improved map developed in this study and the recently published accumulation maps are in the coastal areas, especially southeast and southwest regions. The analysis of accumulations versus elevation reveals the distribution patterns of accumulation over the Greenland ice sheet.

  9. Photomodulation of strigolactone biosynthesis and accumulation during sunflower seedling growth.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Niharika; Tripathi, Smita; Bhatla, Satish Chander

    2015-01-01

    Present investigations report the presence of strigolactones (SLs) and photomodulation of their biosynthesis in sunflower seedlings (roots, cotyledons and first pair of leaves) during early phase of seedling development. Qualitative analyses and characterization by HPLC, ESI-MS and FT-IR revealed the presence of more than one type of SLs. Orobanchyl acetate was detected both in roots and leaves. Five-deoxystrigol, sorgolactone and orobanchol were exclusively detected in seedling roots. Sorgomol was detectable only in leaves. HPLC eluted fraction from seedling roots and leaves co-chromatographing with GR24 (a synthetic SL) could also bring about germination in Orobanche cernua (a weed) seeds, which are established to exhibit SL - mediated germination, thereby indicating the SL identity of the eluates using this bioassay. SLs accumulation was always more in the roots of light-grown seedlings, it being maximum at 4 d stage. Although significant activity of carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase (CCD, the enzyme critical for SL biosynthesis) was detected in 2 d old seedling roots, SLs remained undetectable in cotyledons at all stages of development and also in the roots of 2 d old light and dark-grown seedlings. Roots of light-grown seedlings showed maximum CCD activity during early (2 d) stage of development, thereby confirming photomodulation of enzyme activity. These observations indicate the migration of a probable light-sensitized signaling molecule (yet to be identified) or a SL precursor from light exposed aerial parts to the seedling roots maintained in dark. Thus, a photomodulation and migration of SL precursor/s is evident from the present work. PMID:26252191

  10. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions.

  11. An ice core record of net snow accumulation and seasonal snow chemistry at Mt. Waddington, southwest British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, P. D.; Steig, E. J.; Clark, D. H.; McConnell, J. R.; Pettit, E. C.; Menounos, B.

    2011-12-01

    We recovered a 141 m ice core from Combatant Col (51.39°N, 125.22°W, 3000 m asl) on the flank of Mt. Waddington, southern Coast Mountains, British Columbia, Canada. Aerosols and other impurities in the ice show unambiguous seasonal variations, allowing for annual dating of the core. Clustered melt layers, originating from summer surface heating, also aid in the dating of the core. Seasonality in water stable isotopes is preserved throughout the record, showing little evidence of diffusion at depth, and serves as an independent verification of the timescale. The annual signal of deuterium excess is especially well preserved. The record of lead deposition in the core agrees with those of ice cores from Mt. Logan and from Greenland, with a sharp drop-off in concentration in the 1970s and early 1980s, further validating the timescales. Despite significant summertime melt at this mid-latitude site, these data collectively reveal a continuous and annually resolved 36-year record of snow accumulation. We derived an accumulation time series from the Mt. Waddington ice core, after correcting for ice flow. Years of anomalously high or low snow accumulation in the core correspond with extremes in precipitation data and geopotential height anomalies from reanalysis data that make physical sense. Specifically, anomalously high accumulation years at Mt. Waddington correlate with years where "Pineapple Express" atmospheric river events bring large amounts of moisture from the tropical Pacific to western North America. The Mt. Waddington accumulation record thus reflects regional-scale climate. These results demonstrate the potential of ice core records from temperate glaciers to provide meaningful paleoclimate information. A longer core to bedrock (250-300 m) at the Mt. Waddington site could yield ice with an age of several hundred to 1000 years.

  12. Accumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd by crabs and barnacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainbow, P. S.

    1985-11-01

    The crab Carcinus maenas (L.) and the barnacle Elminius modestus Darwin were exposed to a range of dissolved concentrations of Zn, Cu and Cd for 21 days in artificial seawater. Accumulation of Zn and Cu by crabs has been interpreted in terms of the presence of a regulation mechanism to maintain constant body concentrations (83·2 ± 19·4 μg Zn g -1 dry wt.; 39·8 ± 9·8 μg Cu g -1 dry wt.) under varying external dissolved metal levels, until a threshold dissolved metal concentration ( c. 400 μg Zn l -1; c. 170 μg Cu l -1) beyond which net accumulation of metal begins. Cadium appears to be accumulated by C. maenas at all exposures with no evidence for regulation of body cadmium concentrations. Exposure of E. modestus to Zn, Cu or Cd caused net accumulation of the respective metal in the bodies of the barnacles, with no evidence for regulation of body metal concentrations.

  13. Inhibition of Golgi function causes plastid starch accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Hummel, Eric; Osterrieder, Anne; Robinson, David G.; Hawes, Chris

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about possible interactions between chloroplasts and the Golgi apparatus, although there is increasing evidence for a direct Golgi to chloroplast transport pathway targeting proteins to their destinations within the membranes and stroma of plastids. Here data are presented showing that a blockage of secretion results in a significant increase of starch within plastids. Golgi disassembly promoted either by the secretory inhibitor brefeldin A or through an inducible Sar1-GTP system leads to dramatic starch accumulation in plastids, thus providing evidence for a direct interaction between plastids and Golgi activity. The possibility that starch accumulation is due either to elevated levels of cytosolic sugars because of loss of secretory Golgi activity or even to a blockage of amylase transport from the Golgi to the chloroplast is discussed. PMID:20423939

  14. Active transport and accumulation of bicarbonate by a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Miller, A G; Colman, B

    1980-09-01

    The rates of inorganic carbon accumulation and carbon fixation in light by the unicellular cyanobacterim Coccohloris peniocystis have been determined. Cells incubated in the light in medium containing H14CO3- were rapidly separated from the medium by centrifugation through silicone oil into a strongly basic terminating solution. Samples of these inactivated cells were assayed to determine total 14C accumulation, and acid-treated samples were assayed to determine 14C fixation. The rate of transport of inorganic into illuminated cells was faster than the rate of CO2 production in the medium from HCO3- dehydration. This evidence for HCO3- transport in these cells is in agreement with our previous results based upon measurements of photosynthetic O2 evolution. A substantial pool of inorganic carbon was bulit up within the cells presumably as HCO3- before the onset of the maximum rate of photosynthesis. Large accumulation ratios were observed, greater than 1,000 times the external HCO3- concentration. Accumulation did not occur in the dark and was greatly suppressed by the photosynthesis inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea and 3-chloro-carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone. These results indicate that the accumulation of inorganic carbon in these cells involves a light-dependent active transport process. PMID:6773925

  15. An experimental study of damage accumulation in cemented hip prostheses.

    PubMed

    McCormack, B A O; Prendergast, P J; Gallagher, D G

    1996-06-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a methodology to characterize the pattern of crack initiation and damage accumulation in intramedullary fixated cemented prostheses. DESIGN: An experimental physical model of intramedullary fixation was developed which both represents the implant structure and permits monitoring of fatigue crack growth. BACKGROUND: Many joint replacement prostheses are fixed into the medullary cavity of bones using a poly(methylmethacrylate) 'bone cement', which forms a mantle around the prosthesis and locks it to the bone. The endurance of the replacement is, to a great extent, determined by the mechanical durability of the cement and the implant interfaces under cyclic stresses generated by dynamic loading. The cement mantle is subjected to complex multiaxial stresses which vary in particular distribution depending on the prosthesis design. METHODS: Damage accumulation is reported in terms of the number of cracks, the location of cracks, and the rate of crack growth. RESULTS: The results clearly show the nature of damage accumulation in the cement mantle, and that many of the cracks which propagate within the cement mantle are related to cement porosity. CONCLUSION: This study gives experimental evidence to support the hypothesis of a damage accumulation failure scenario in cemented hip reconstructions. RELEVANCE: Cementing is the most popular technique for the fixation of joint replacement prosthesis. However, the sequence of events leading to the failure of cemented fixation is not fully understood. In this paper it is shown that damage accumulation can be directly monitored in an experimental model of cemented intramedullary fixation.

  16. Developmental accumulation of inorganic polyphosphate affects germination and energetic metabolism in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Livermore, Thomas Miles; Chubb, Jonathan Robert; Saiardi, Adolfo

    2016-01-01

    Inorganic polyphosphate (polyP) is composed of linear chains of phosphate groups linked by high-energy phosphoanhydride bonds. However, this simple, ubiquitous molecule remains poorly understood. The use of nonstandardized analytical methods has contributed to this lack of clarity. By using improved polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis we were able to visualize polyP extracted from Dictyostelium discoideum. We established that polyP is undetectable in cells lacking the polyphosphate kinase (DdPpk1). Generation of this ppk1 null strain revealed that polyP is important for the general fitness of the amoebae with the mutant strain displaying a substantial growth defect. We discovered an unprecedented accumulation of polyP during the developmental program, with polyP increasing more than 100-fold. The failure of ppk1 spores to accumulate polyP results in a germination defect. These phenotypes are underpinned by the ability of polyP to regulate basic energetic metabolism, demonstrated by a 2.5-fold decrease in the level of ATP in vegetative ppk1. Finally, the lack of polyP during the development of ppk1 mutant cells is partially offset by an increase of both ATP and inositol pyrophosphates, evidence for a model in which there is a functional interplay between inositol pyrophosphates, ATP, and polyP. PMID:26755590

  17. Intraneuronal amyloid beta accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2010-03-01

    In an analysis of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer disease, we used an in situ approach to identify amyloid-beta (Abeta) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal-specific antibodies directed against Abeta40 and Abeta42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Abeta42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Abeta-oligomer. In comparison to the Abeta42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Abeta42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r=- 0.61, p<0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Abeta peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Abeta may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

  18. Biogenesis of protein bodies during vicilin accumulation in Medicago truncatula immature seeds

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Grain legumes play a worldwide role as a source of plant proteins for feed and food. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, the organisation of protein storage vacuoles (PSV) in maturing seeds remains unknown. Findings The sub-cellular events accompanying the accumulation of vicilin (globulin7S) were analysed during seed mid-maturation. Immuno-detection of vicilin in light microscopy, allowed a semi-quantitative assessment of the protein body complement. The identified populations of vicilin-containing protein bodies are distinguished by their number and size which allowed to propose a model of their biogenesis. Two distributions were detected, enabling a separation of their processing at early and mid maturation stages. The largest protein bodies, at 16 and 20 days after pollination (DAP), were formed by the fusion of small bodies. They have probably attained their final size and correspond to mature vicilin aggregations. Electron microscopic observations revealed the association of the dense protein bodies with rough endoplasmic reticulum. The presence of a ribosome layer surrounding protein bodies, would support an endoplasmic reticulum–vacuole trafficking pathway. Conclusions The stastistic analysis may be useful for screening mutations of candidate genes governing protein content. The definitive evidence for an ER-storage vacuole pathway corresponds to a challenge, for the storage of post-translationally unstable proteins. It was proposed for the accumulation of one class of storage protein, the vicilins. This alternative pathway is a matter of controversy in dicotyledonous seeds. PMID:22862819

  19. Intraneuronal Amyloid β Accumulation and Oxidative Damage to Nucleic Acids in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George

    2010-01-01

    An in situ approach was used to identify amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal specific antibodies directed against Aβ40 and Aβ42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Aβ42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Aβ-oligomer. In comparison to the Aβ42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Aβ42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r = − 0.61, p < 0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Aβ peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Aβ may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease. PMID:20034567

  20. FACTORS INFLUENCING THE DESIGN OF BIOACCUMULATION FACTOR AND BIOTA-SEDIMENT ACCUMULATION FACTOR FIELD STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A series of modeling simulations were performed to develop an understanding of the underlying factors and principles involved in developing field sampling designs for measuring bioaccumulation factors (BAFs) and biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs. These simulations reveal...

  1. Evidence for sialylated type 1 blood group chains on human erythrocyte membranes revealed by agglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with Waldenström's macroglobulin IgMWOO and hybridoma antibody FC 10.2.

    PubMed

    Picard, J K; Loveday, D; Feizi, T

    1985-01-01

    Haemagglutination studies have been performed with untreated and neuraminidase-treated human erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types Le(a-b-), Le(a+b-) and Le(a-b+) using two monoclonal antibodies, IgMWOO and FC 10.2, which were previously shown to recognize the type 1 based blood group chains: Gal beta 1----3GlcNAc beta 1----3Gal beta 1----4Glc/GlcNAc (for explanation of abbreviations see table IV legend). Both antibodies behaved as cold agglutinins with neuraminidase-treated but not with untreated erythrocytes of the three Lewis antigen types. Neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of i antigen type were similarly agglutinated. This haemagglutination was specifically inhibited by the type 1 based milk oligosaccharide lacto-N-tetraose. Thus, there is strong evidence for the occurrence of sialylated type 1 chains on human erythrocyte membranes of I and i antigen types. In addition, evidence for the presence of type 1 chains which are both sialylated and fucosylated was obtained by (1) haemagglutination of Le(a+b-) erythrocytes with the monoclonal antibody 19.9; (2) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes with anti-H antibodies of Bombay serum; (3) increased haemagglutination of neuraminidase-treated Le(a+b-) cells with anti-Lea antibodies, and (4) the appearance of Lea antigen activity on neuraminidase-treated erythrocytes of Le(a-b+) type.

  2. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  3. Cooperative nutrient accumulation sustains growth of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Son, Sungmin; Stevens, Mark M; Chao, Hui Xiao; Thoreen, Carson; Hosios, Aaron M; Schweitzer, Lawrence D; Weng, Yaochung; Wood, Kris; Sabatini, David; Vander Heiden, Matthew G; Manalis, Scott

    2015-01-01

    The coordination of metabolic processes to allow increased nutrient uptake and utilization for macromolecular synthesis is central for cell growth. Although studies of bulk cell populations have revealed important metabolic and signaling requirements that impact cell growth on long time scales, whether the same regulation influences short-term cell growth remains an open question. Here we investigate cell growth by monitoring mass accumulation of mammalian cells while rapidly depleting particular nutrients. Within minutes following the depletion of glucose or glutamine, we observe a growth reduction that is larger than the mass accumulation rate of the nutrient. This indicates that if one particular nutrient is depleted, the cell rapidly adjusts the amount that other nutrients are accumulated, which is consistent with cooperative nutrient accumulation. Population measurements of nutrient sensing pathways involving mTOR, AKT, ERK, PKA, MST1, or AMPK, or pro-survival pathways involving autophagy suggest that they do not mediate this growth reduction. Furthermore, the protein synthesis rate does not change proportionally to the mass accumulation rate over these time scales, suggesting that intracellular metabolic pools buffer the growth response. Our findings demonstrate that cell growth can be regulated over much shorter time scales than previously appreciated. PMID:26620632

  4. Spatial and Temporal Characteristics of Insulator Contaminations Revealed by Daily Observations of Equivalent Salt Deposit Density

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Ling; Han, Ge; Zhu, Zhongmin; Zhang, Miao; Gong, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The accurate estimation of deposits adhering on insulators is of great significance to prevent pollution flashovers which cause huge costs worldwide. Researchers have developed sensors using different technologies to monitor insulator contamination on a fine time scale. However, there is lack of analysis of these data to reveal spatial and temporal characteristics of insulator contamination, and as a result the scheduling of periodical maintenance of power facilities is highly dependent on personal experience. Owing to the deployment of novel sensors, daily Equivalent Salt Deposit Density (ESDD) observations of over two years were collected and analyzed for the first time. Results from 16 sites distributed in four regions of Hubei demonstrated that spatial heterogeneity can be seen at both the fine and coarse geographical scales, suggesting that current polluted area maps are necessary but are not sufficient conditions to guide the maintenance of power facilities. Both the local emission and the regional air pollution condition exert evident influences on deposit accumulation. A relationship between ESDD and PM10 was revealed by using regression analysis, proving that air pollution exerts influence on pollution accumulations on insulators. Moreover, the seasonality of ESDD was discovered for the first time by means of time series analysis, which could help engineers select appropriate times to clean the contamination. Besides, the trend component shows that the ESDD increases in a negative exponential fashion with the accumulation date (ESDD = a − b × exp(−time)) at a long time scale in real environments. PMID:25643058

  5. Ectoine accumulation in Brevibacterium epidermis.

    PubMed

    Onraedt, Annelies; De Muynck, Cassandra; Walcarius, Bart; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2004-10-01

    As a halotolerant bacterial species, Brevibacterium epidermis DSM 20659 can grow at relatively high salinity, tolerating up to 2 M NaCl. It synthesizes ectoine and the intracellular content increases with the medium salinity, with a maximum of 0.14 g ectoine/g CDW at 1 M NaCl. Sugar-stressed cells do not synthesize ectoine. Ectoine synthesis is also affected by the presence of external osmolytes. Added betaine is taken up and completely replaced ectoine, while L-proline is only temporarily accumulated after which ectoine is synthesized. The strain can metabolize ectoine; L-glutamate is a better carbon source for ectoine synthesis than L-aspartate.

  6. Accumulations of Ca/P in the core of hairs from Taklamakan desert mummies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallégot, P.; Walter, P.; Cotte, M.; Audinot, J.-N.; Guillot, J.; Migeon, H.-N.; Tallarek, E.; Hagenhoff, B.

    2008-12-01

    Hairs from mummies discovered in the west China Taklamakan desert are investigated by NanoSIMS, ToF-SIMS, Auger and TEM. Intra-medullar accumulations of calcium and phosphorus are described. The present study is an attempt to understand the significance of these accumulations. Their possible exogenous or endogenous origin is debated. Moreover, TEM revealed a particular nature of the accumulation that decorates a fibrilar structure of the medullar. To what extent did molecular control govern the particle growth and does such an accumulation represent a step toward the mineralization of the keratinized fiber?

  7. Guidelines for Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set conditions for establishing and maintaining areas for the accumulation of hazardous waste at LBL. Areas designed for accumulation of these wastes in quantities greater than 100 kg (220 lb) per month of solid waste or 55 gallons per month of liquid waste are called Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs). Areas designed for accumulation of wastes in smaller amounts are called Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs). This document provides guidelines for employee and organizational responsibilities for WAAs; constructing a WAA; storing waste in a WAA; operating and maintaining a WAA, and responding to spills in a WAA. 4 figs.

  8. Accelerating Mutational Load Is Not Due to Synergistic Epistasis or Mutator Alleles in Mutation Accumulation Lines of Yeast.

    PubMed

    Jasmin, Jean-Nicolas; Lenormand, Thomas

    2016-02-01

    Much of our knowledge about the fitness effects of new mutations has been gained from mutation accumulation (MA) experiments. Yet the fitness effect of single mutations is rarely measured in MA experiments. This raises several issues, notably for inferring epistasis for fitness. The acceleration of fitness decline in MA lines has been taken as evidence for synergistic epistasis, but establishing the role of epistasis requires measuring the fitness of genotypes carrying known numbers of mutations. Otherwise, accelerating fitness loss could be explained by increased genetic mutation rates. Here we segregated mutations accumulated over 4800 generations in haploid and diploid MA lines of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found no correspondence between an accelerated fitness decline and synergistic epistasis among deleterious mutations in haploid lines. Pairs of mutations showed no overall epistasis. Furthermore, several lines of evidence indicate that genetic mutation rates did not increase in the MA lines. Crucially, segregant fitness analyses revealed that MA accelerated in both haploid and diploid lines, even though the fitness of diploid lines was nearly constant during the MA experiment. This suggests that the accelerated fitness decline in haploids was caused by cryptic environmental factors that increased mutation rates in all lines during the last third of the lines' transfers. In addition, we provide new estimates of deleterious mutation rates, including lethal mutations, and highlight that nearly all the mutational load we observed was due to one or two mutations having a large effect on fitness.

  9. Nutrient-contaminant (Pu) plant accumulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A model was developed which simulates the movement and daily accumulation of nutrients and contaminants in crop plants resulting from known physiological processes in the plant. In the model, the daily contaminant accumulation is governed by daily increase in plant biomass derived from photosynthesis and by the specified thermodynamic activity of the bioavailable contaminant species in soil or hydroponic solutin. Total accumulation and resulting concentration in the plant's root, stem and branch, leaf, and reproductive compartments can be simulated any time during the growing season. Parameters were estimated from data on plutonium accumulation in soybeans and the model was calibrated against this same data set. The plutonium distribution in the plant was found to be most sensitive to parameters related to leaf accumulation. Contamination at different times during the growing season resulted in a large change in predicted leaf accumulation but very little change in predicted accumulation in other plant parts except when contamination occurred very late in the growing season.

  10. Microstructural evidence for N S shortening in the Mount Isa Inlier (NW Queensland, Australia): the preservation of early W E-trending foliations in porphyroblasts revealed by independent 3D measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayab, Mohammad

    2005-08-01

    3D microstructural analyses of porphyroblast inclusion trails using both the 'asymmetry switch' method for determining foliation intersection axes preserved in porphyroblasts (FIAs) and the recently developed 'FitPitch' method, reveal W-E- and N-S-trending FIA sets in the White Blow Formation of the Mount Isa Inlier. Each method reveals two subsets of FIAs centered on each of these major trends. These were distinguished based on the relative timing, trend, and orientation of inclusion trail patterns. Thirty-six samples were analyzed using both techniques and produced very similar results. Pitches of the inclusion trails preserved within the porphyroblasts in vertically oriented thin-sections and trends in horizontal sections yield distinct near-orthogonal modal orientations from all the analyzed samples. This indicates that the porphyroblasts host successive fabrics as crenulation foliations and did not rotate with respect to geographical axes. W-E- and N-S-trending FIAs have been obtained from both garnet and staurolite porphyroblasts hosting differentiated crenulation cleavages. Garnet and staurolite growth during bulk north-south shortening recorded the development of multiple foliations and an associated succession of metamorphic events at middle-amphibolite facies conditions that predates the metamorphic history generally recognized in this terrain. This period of bulk shortening and associated metamorphism formed during a period of orogenesis called O 1. W-E shortening formed N-S striking foliations that preserve a period of orogenesis (O 2), and another succession of metamorphism involving more phases of porphyroblast growth preserving N-S-trending FIAs. Overprinting of successive FIA trends (WSW-ENE, WNW-ESE, NNW-SSE, and SSW-NNE) suggests a relative clockwise rotation of the bulk shortening direction through time as it switches from N-S to W-E overall, with a major 'tectonic break' or decompression between O 1 and O 2. The porphyroblast inclusion trail

  11. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  12. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  13. A Whole-Genome Scan and Fine-Mapping Linkage Study of Auditory-Visual Synesthesia Reveals Evidence of Linkage to Chromosomes 2q24, 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Julian E.; Lamb, Janine A.; Brocklebank, Denise; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Maestrini, Elena; Addis, Laura; Sen, Mallika; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Monaco, Anthony P.

    2009-01-01

    Synesthesia, a neurological condition affecting between 0.05%–1% of the population, is characterized by anomalous sensory perception and associated alterations in cognitive function due to interference from synesthetic percepts. A stimulus in one sensory modality triggers an automatic, consistent response in either another modality or a different aspect of the same modality. Familiality studies show evidence of a strong genetic predisposition; whereas initial pedigree analyses supported a single-gene X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with a skewed F:M ratio and a notable absence of male-to-male transmission, subsequent analyses in larger samples indicated that the mode of inheritance was likely to be more complex. Here, we report the results of a whole-genome linkage scan for auditory-visual synesthesia with 410 microsatellite markers at 9.05 cM density in 43 multiplex families (n = 196) with potential candidate regions fine-mapped at 5 cM density. Using NPL and HLOD analysis, we identified four candidate regions. Significant linkage at the genome-wide level was detected to chromosome 2q24 (HLOD = 3.025, empirical genome-wide p = 0.047). Suggestive linkage was found to chromosomes 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12. No support was found for linkage to the X chromosome; furthermore, we have identified two confirmed cases of male-to-male transmission of synesthesia. Our results demonstrate that auditory-visual synesthesia is likely to be an oligogenic disorder subject to multiple modes of inheritance and locus heterogeneity. This study comprises a significant step toward identifying the genetic substrates underlying synesthesia, with important implications for our understanding of the role of genes in human cognition and perception. PMID:19200526

  14. A whole-genome scan and fine-mapping linkage study of auditory-visual synesthesia reveals evidence of linkage to chromosomes 2q24, 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12.

    PubMed

    Asher, Julian E; Lamb, Janine A; Brocklebank, Denise; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; Maestrini, Elena; Addis, Laura; Sen, Mallika; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Monaco, Anthony P

    2009-02-01

    Synesthesia, a neurological condition affecting between 0.05%-1% of the population, is characterized by anomalous sensory perception and associated alterations in cognitive function due to interference from synesthetic percepts. A stimulus in one sensory modality triggers an automatic, consistent response in either another modality or a different aspect of the same modality. Familiality studies show evidence of a strong genetic predisposition; whereas initial pedigree analyses supported a single-gene X-linked dominant mode of inheritance with a skewed F:M ratio and a notable absence of male-to-male transmission, subsequent analyses in larger samples indicated that the mode of inheritance was likely to be more complex. Here, we report the results of a whole-genome linkage scan for auditory-visual synesthesia with 410 microsatellite markers at 9.05 cM density in 43 multiplex families (n = 196) with potential candidate regions fine-mapped at 5 cM density. Using NPL and HLOD analysis, we identified four candidate regions. Significant linkage at the genome-wide level was detected to chromosome 2q24 (HLOD = 3.025, empirical genome-wide p = 0.047). Suggestive linkage was found to chromosomes 5q33, 6p12, and 12p12. No support was found for linkage to the X chromosome; furthermore, we have identified two confirmed cases of male-to-male transmission of synesthesia. Our results demonstrate that auditory-visual synesthesia is likely to be an oligogenic disorder subject to multiple modes of inheritance and locus heterogeneity. This study comprises a significant step toward identifying the genetic substrates underlying synesthesia, with important implications for our understanding of the role of genes in human cognition and perception.

  15. Microbiological screening of Irish patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy reveals persistence of Candida albicans strains, gradual reduction in susceptibility to azoles, and incidences of clinical signs of oral candidiasis without culture evidence.

    PubMed

    McManus, Brenda A; McGovern, Eleanor; Moran, Gary P; Healy, Claire M; Nunn, June; Fleming, Pádraig; Costigan, Colm; Sullivan, Derek J; Coleman, David C

    2011-05-01

    Patients with autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED) are prone to chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, which is often treated with azoles. The purpose of this study was to characterize the oral Candida populations from 16 Irish APECED patients, who comprise approximately half the total number identified in Ireland, and to examine the effect of intermittent antifungal therapy on the azole susceptibility patterns of Candida isolates. Patients attended between one and four clinical evaluations over a 5-year period, providing oral rinses and/or oral swab samples each time. Candida was recovered from 14/16 patients, and Candida albicans was the only Candida species identified. Interestingly, clinical diagnosis of candidiasis did not correlate with microbiological evidence of Candida infection at 7/22 (32%) clinical assessments. Multilocus sequence typing analysis of C. albicans isolates recovered from the same patients on separate occasions identified the same sequence type each time. Fluconazole resistance was detected in isolates from one patient, and isolates exhibiting a progressive reduction in itraconazole and/or fluconazole susceptibility were identified in a further 3/16 patients, in each case correlating with the upregulation of CDR- and MDR-encoded efflux pumps. Mutations were also identified in the ERG11 and the TAC1 genes of isolates from these four patients; some of these mutations have previously been associated with azole resistance. The findings suggest that alternative Candida treatment options, other than azoles such as chlorhexidine, should be considered in APECED patients and that clinical diagnosis of oral candidiasis should be confirmed by culture prior to the commencement of anti-Candida therapy.

  16. Synoptic controls on precipitation pathways and snow delivery to high-accumulation ice core sites in the Ross Sea region, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, K. E.; Bertler, N. A. N.; Trompetter, W. J.

    2010-11-01

    Dominant storm tracks to two ice core sites on the western margin of the Ross Sea, Antarctica (Skinner Saddle (SKS) and Evans Piedmont Glacier), are investigated to establish key synoptic controls on snow accumulation. This is critical in terms of understanding the seasonality, source regions, and transport pathways of precipitation delivered to these sites. In situ snow depth and meteorological observations are used to identify major accumulation events in 2007-2008, which differ considerably between sites in terms of their magnitude and seasonal distribution. While snowfall at Evans Piedmont Glacier occurs almost exclusively during summer and spring, Skinner Saddle receives precipitation year round with a lull during the months of April and May. Cluster analysis of daily back trajectories reveals that the highest-accumulation days at both sites result from fast-moving air masses, associated with synoptic-scale low-pressure systems. There is evidence that short-duration pulses of snowfall at SKS also originate from mesocyclone development over the Ross Ice Shelf and local moisture sources. Changes in the frequency and seasonal distribution of these mechanisms of precipitation delivery will have a marked impact on annual accumulation over time and will therefore need careful consideration during the interpretation of stable isotope and geochemical records from these ice cores.

  17. Overexpression of a glycosyltransferase gene SrUGT74G1 from Stevia improved growth and yield of transgenic Arabidopsis by catechin accumulation.

    PubMed

    Guleria, Praveen; Yadav, Sudesh Kumar

    2014-03-01

    Steviol glycoside and gibberellin biosynthetic routes are known as divergent branches of a common origin in Stevia. A UDP-glycosyltransferase encoded by SrUGT74G1 catalyses the conversion of steviolbioside into stevioside in Stevia rebaudiana leaves. In the present study, transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana overexpressing SrUGT74G1 cDNA from Stevia were developed to check the probability of stevioside biosynthesis in them. However, stevioside accumulation was not evident in transgenics. Also, the transgenic Arabidopsis showed no change in GA3 content on SrUGT74G1 overexpression. Surprisingly, significant accumulation of catechin was noticed in transgenics. The transgenics showed a considerable increase in shoot length, root length and rosette area. An increase in free radical scavenging activity of transgenics was noticed. Moreover, the seed yield of transgenics was also increased by 6-15% than control. Additionally, variation in trichome branching pattern on leaf surface of transgenics was observed. The trichome branching pattern was also validated by exogenous catechin exposure (10, 50, 100 ng ml(-1)) to control plants. Hence, present study reports the probable role of SrUGT74G1 from Stevia in catechin accumulation of transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana. Thus, detailed study in present perspective has revealed the role of Stevia SrUGT74G1 gene in trichome branching pattern, improved vegetative growth, scavenging potential and seed yield by catechin accumulation in transgenic Arabidopsis.

  18. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  19. Topically applied ceramide accumulates in skin glyphs

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qihong; Flach, Carol R; Mendelsohn, Richard; Mao, Guangru; Pappas, Apostolos; Mack, M Catherine; Walters, Russel M; Southall, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Ceramides (CERs), structural components of the stratum corneum (SC), impart essential barrier properties to this thin outer layer of the epidermis. Variations in CER species within this layer have been linked to several skin diseases. A recent proliferation of CER-containing topical skin-care products warrants the elucidation of CER penetration profiles in both healthy and diseased skin. In the current study, the spatial distributions of CER concentration profiles, following topical application of two species of CER, were tracked using infrared imaging. Suspensions of single-chain perdeuterated sphingosine and phytosphingosine CER in oleic acid were applied, in separate experiments, to the surface of healthy intact ex vivo human skin using Franz diffusion cells. Following either a 24- or 48-hour incubation period at 34°C, infrared images were acquired from microtomed skin sections. Both CER species accumulated in glyph regions of the skin and penetrated into the SC, to a limited extent, only in these regions. The concentration profiles observed herein were independent of the CER species and incubation time utilized in the study. As a result, a very heterogeneous, sparse, spatial distribution of CERs in the SC was revealed. In contrast, oleic acid was found to be fairly homogeneously distributed throughout the SC and viable epidermis, albeit at lower concentrations in the latter. A more uniform, lateral distribution of CERs in the SC would likely be important for barrier efficacy or enhancement. PMID:26170709

  20. Vinpocetine attenuates lipid accumulation and atherosclerosis formation

    SciTech Connect

    Cai, Yujun; Li, Jian-Dong; Yan, Chen

    2013-05-10

    Highlights: •Vinpocetine attenuates hyperlipidemia-induced atherosclerosis in a mouse model. •Vinpocetine antagonizes ox-LDL uptake and accumulation in macrophages. •Vinpocetine blocks the induction of ox-LDL receptor LOX-1 in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Atherosclerosis, the major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke, is a chronic arterial disease characterized by lipid deposition and inflammation in the vessel wall. Cholesterol, in low-density lipoprotein (LDL), plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Vinpocetine, a derivative of the alkaloid vincamine, has long been used as a cerebral blood flow enhancer for treating cognitive impairment. Recent study indicated that vinpocetine is a potent anti-inflammatory agent. However, its role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis remains unexplored. In the present study, we show that vinpocetine significantly reduced atherosclerotic lesion formation in ApoE knockout mice fed with a high-fat diet. In cultured murine macrophage RAW264.7 cells, vinpocetine markedly attenuated oxidized LDL (ox-LDL) uptake and foam cell formation. Moreover, vinpocetine greatly blocked the induction of ox-LDL receptor 1 (LOX-1) in cultured macrophages as well as in the LOX-1 level in atherosclerotic lesions. Taken together, our data reveal a novel role of vinpocetine in reduction of pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, at least partially through suppressing LOX-1 signaling pathway. Given the excellent safety profile of vinpocetine, this study suggests vinpocetine may be a therapeutic candidate for treating atherosclerosis.

  1. Evaluation of Simultaneous Nutrient and COD Removal with Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) Accumulation Using Mixed Microbial Consortia under Anoxic Condition and Their Bioinformatics Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Jyotsnarani; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Anshuman; Pandey, Sony; Das, Trupti

    2015-01-01

    Simultaneous nitrate-N, phosphate and COD removal was evaluated from synthetic waste water using mixed microbial consortia in an anoxic environment under various initial carbon load (ICL) in a batch scale reactor system. Within 6 hours of incubation, enriched DNPAOs (Denitrifying Polyphosphate Accumulating Microorganisms) were able to remove maximum COD (87%) at 2g/L of ICL whereas maximum nitrate-N (97%) and phosphate (87%) removal along with PHB accumulation (49 mg/L) was achieved at 8 g/L of ICL. Exhaustion of nitrate-N, beyond 6 hours of incubation, had a detrimental effect on COD and phosphate removal rate. Fresh supply of nitrate-N to the reaction medium, beyond 6 hours, helped revive the removal rates of both COD and phosphate. Therefore, it was apparent that in spite of a high carbon load, maximum COD and nutrient removal can be maintained, with adequate nitrate-N availability. Denitrifying condition in the medium was evident from an increasing pH trend. PHB accumulation by the mixed culture was directly proportional to ICL; however the time taken for accumulation at higher ICL was more. Unlike conventional EBPR, PHB depletion did not support phosphate accumulation in this case. The unique aspect of all the batch studies were PHB accumulation was observed along with phosphate uptake and nitrate reduction under anoxic conditions. Bioinformatics analysis followed by pyrosequencing of the mixed culture DNA from the seed sludge revealed the dominance of denitrifying population, such as Corynebacterium, Rhodocyclus and Paraccocus (Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria). Rarefaction curve indicated complete bacterial population and corresponding number of OTUs through sequence analysis. Chao1 and Shannon index (H’) was used to study the diversity of sampling. “UCI95” and “LCI95” indicated 95% confidence level of upper and lower values of Chao1 for each distance. Values of Chao1 index supported the results of rarefaction curve. PMID:25689047

  2. Influence of cadmium on PCB congener accumulation in quail

    SciTech Connect

    Leonzio, C.; Marsili, L.; Focardi, S. )

    1992-11-01

    Technological development this century has led to an environmental input of synthetic chemical compounds totally extraneous to natural ecosystems such as Polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs), extensively used in agriculture and industry. These xenobiotics have a high fat/water repartition coefficient, making them easily accumulated by living organisms. Their persistence and low degradability means that they are now present throughout the global ecosystem. Ubiquitous environmental contaminants also include heavy metals like Hg, As, Pb, Cd and Cr, of which Cd, an element causing functional damage to the kidney and liver in which it preferentially accumulates, is of special ecotoxicological importance. The WHO has defined an accumulation of 60 mg/kg (fresh weight), beyond which damage occurs. Cd occurs [open quotes]naturally[close quotes] in high concentrations in certain animal species including molluscs. Birds and marine mammals feeding largely on cephalopods show high levels of this metal. Many monitoring studies have also revealed high concentrations of PCBs in the same animals. The vast majority of studies on contaminants in experimental animals consider the short-, medium- and long-term effects of a single pollutant. However, the presence of synergisms and antagonisms between compounds makes it necessary to adopt a more holistic approach to the problem of environmental pollution. In order to understand if the effect of xenobiotic compounds like PCBs may be potentiated by the natural presence of cadmium in bird population, we sought preliminary information on how the presence of cadmium in the diet may influence the accumulation and metabolization of PCB congeners. The influence of Cd on PCB accumulation was investigated in Japanese quail treated experimentally with Cd and PCBs. Particular attention was paid to final congener accumulation and qualitative differences in congener composition between controls and treated birds. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. [Job crisis and transformations in the new model of accumulation].

    PubMed

    Zerda-Sarmiento, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    The general and structural crisis capitalism is going through is the token of the difficulties accumulation model has been dealing with since 70's in developed countries. This model has been trying to settle down again on the basis of neoliberal principle and a new technical-economical paradigm. The new accumulation pattern has had a effect in employment sphere which have been made evident at all the elements that constitute work relationships. In Colombia, this model implementation has been partial and segmented. However, its consequences (and the long-term current crisis) have been evident in unemployment, precarious work, segmentation, informal work and restricted and private health insurance. Besides, financial accumulation makes labour profits flow at different levels. The economic model current government has aimed to implement leads to strengthening exports, so making population life conditions more difficult. In order to overcome the current state of affairs, the work sphere needs to become more creative. This creative approach should look for new schemes for expression and mobilization of work sphere's claims. This is supposed to be done by establishing a different economic model aimed to build a more inclusive future, with social justice. PMID:23258748

  4. [Job crisis and transformations in the new model of accumulation].

    PubMed

    Zerda-Sarmiento, Alvaro

    2012-06-01

    The general and structural crisis capitalism is going through is the token of the difficulties accumulation model has been dealing with since 70's in developed countries. This model has been trying to settle down again on the basis of neoliberal principle and a new technical-economical paradigm. The new accumulation pattern has had a effect in employment sphere which have been made evident at all the elements that constitute work relationships. In Colombia, this model implementation has been partial and segmented. However, its consequences (and the long-term current crisis) have been evident in unemployment, precarious work, segmentation, informal work and restricted and private health insurance. Besides, financial accumulation makes labour profits flow at different levels. The economic model current government has aimed to implement leads to strengthening exports, so making population life conditions more difficult. In order to overcome the current state of affairs, the work sphere needs to become more creative. This creative approach should look for new schemes for expression and mobilization of work sphere's claims. This is supposed to be done by establishing a different economic model aimed to build a more inclusive future, with social justice.

  5. Exercise for hepatic fat accumulation in type 2 diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Bacchi, Elisabetta; Moghetti, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes is characterized by frequent ectopic fat accumulation in several tissues and organs. In particular, a number of studies showed that these subjects frequently have hepatic fat accumulation, which may play a role in the metabolic abnormalities typical of diabetes and has been also linked to increased risk for cardiovascular disease. In the last decade, the effect of exercise on ectopic fat content of type 2 diabetic patients has raised growing interest. However, there are only a few small randomized controlled trials on this topic. Results from these intervention studies indicate that exercise training, independent of dietary modifications, may reduce hepatic fat content and serum transaminases in these patients, suggesting that exercise per se may be an effective strategy to be combined with the traditional dietary interventions. As regards the different training modalities, there is recent evidence that both aerobic and resistance exercise may equally reduce hepatic fat accumulation in type 2 diabetic subjects. However, information regarding the effect of exercise on liver histology and fat accumulation in other ectopic sites is still very limited.

  6. Spatial and temporal variability of snow chemical composition and accumulation rate at Talos Dome site (East Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Laura; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Giardi, Fabio; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2016-04-15

    Five snow pits and five firn cores were sampled during the 2003-2004 Italian Antarctic Campaign at Talos Dome (East Antarctica), where a deep ice core (TALDICE, TALos Dome Ice CorE, 1650m depth) was drilled in 2005-2008 and analyzed for ionic content. Particular attention is spent in applying decontamination procedures to the firn cores, as core sections were stored for approximately 10years before analysis. By considering the snow pit samples to be unperturbed, the comparison with firn core samples from the same location shows that ammonium, nitrate and MSA are affected by storage post-depositional losses. All the other measured ions are confirmed to be irreversibly deposited in the snow layer. The removal of the most external layers (few centimeters) from the firn core sections is proved to be an effective decontamination procedure. High-resolution profiles of seasonal markers (nitrate, sulfate and MSA) allow a reliable stratigraphic dating and a seasonal characterization of the samples. The calculated mean accumulation-rate values range from 70 to 85mmw.e.year(-1), in the period 2003-1973 with small differences between two sectors: 70-74mmw.e.year(-1) in the NNE sector (spanning 2003-1996years) and 81-92mmw.e.year(-1) in the SSW sector (spanning 2003-1980years). This evidence is interpreted as a coupled effect of wind-driven redistribution processes in accumulation/ablation areas. Statistical treatment applied to the concentration values of the snow pits and firn cores samples collected in different points reveals a larger temporal variability than spatial one both in terms of concentration of chemical markers and annual accumulation. The low spatial variability of the accumulation rate and chemical composition measured in the five sites demonstrates that the TALDICE ice core paleo-environmental and paleo-climatic stratigraphies can be considered as reliably representative for the Talos Dome area.

  7. Local proliferation initiates macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue during obesity.

    PubMed

    Zheng, C; Yang, Q; Cao, J; Xie, N; Liu, K; Shou, P; Qian, F; Wang, Y; Shi, Y

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-associated chronic inflammation is characterized by an accumulation of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). It is generally believed that those macrophages are derived from peripheral blood monocytes. However, recent studies suggest that local proliferation of macrophages is responsible for ATM accumulation. In the present study, we revealed that both migration and proliferation contribute to ATM accumulation during obesity development. We show that there is a significant increase in ATMs at the early stage of obesity, which is largely due to an enhanced in situ macrophage proliferation. This result was obtained by employing fat-shielded irradiation and bone marrow reconstitution. Additionally, the production of CCL2, a pivotal chemoattractant of monocytes, was not found to be increased at this stage, corroborating with a critical role of proliferation. Nonetheless, as obesity proceeds, the role of monocyte migration into adipose tissue becomes more significant and those new immigrants further proliferate locally. These proliferating ATMs mainly reside in crown-like structures formed by macrophages surrounding dead adipocytes. We further showed that IL-4/STAT6 is a driving force for ATM proliferation. Therefore, we demonstrated that local proliferation of resident macrophages contributes to ATM accumulation during obesity development and has a key role in obesity-associated inflammation. PMID:27031964

  8. Hydroponic screening of poplar for trace element tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Aude; Richaud, Pierre; Guinet, Frédéric; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Using the nutrient film technique, we screened 21 clones of poplar for growth in the presence of a mix of trace elements (TE) and for TE accumulation capacities. Poplar cuttings were exposed for four weeks to a multipollution solution consisting in 10 microM Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb, and 200 microM Zn. Plant biomass and TE accumulation patterns in leaves varied greatly between clones. The highest Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves were detected in P. trichocarpa and P. trichocarpa hybrids, with the clone Skado (P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii) accumulating up to 108 mg Cd kg(-1) DW and 1510 mg Zn kg(-1) DW when exposed to a multipollution context. Our data also confirm the importance of pH and multipollution, as these factors greatly affect TE accumulation in above ground biomass. The NFT technique applied here to a large range of poplar clones also revealed the potential of the Rochester, AFO662 and AFO678 poplar clones for use in phytostabilization programs and bioenergy production, where production of less contaminated above ground biomass is suitable.

  9. Conifer ovulate cones accumulate pollen principally by simple impaction

    PubMed Central

    Cresswell, James E.; Henning, Kevin; Pennel, Christophe; Lahoubi, Mohamed; Patrick, Michael A.; Young, Phillipe G.; Tabor, Gavin R.

    2007-01-01

    In many pine species (Family Pinaceae), ovulate cones structurally resemble a turbine, which has been widely interpreted as an adaptation for improving pollination by producing complex aerodynamic effects. We tested the turbine interpretation by quantifying patterns of pollen accumulation on ovulate cones in a wind tunnel and by using simulation models based on computational fluid dynamics. We used computer-aided design and computed tomography to create computational fluid dynamics model cones. We studied three species: Pinus radiata, Pinus sylvestris, and Cedrus libani. Irrespective of the approach or species studied, we found no evidence that turbine-like aerodynamics made a significant contribution to pollen accumulation, which instead occurred primarily by simple impaction. Consequently, we suggest alternative adaptive interpretations for the structure of ovulate cones. PMID:17986613

  10. Comment on "Single-trial spike trains in parietal cortex reveal discrete steps during decision-making".

    PubMed

    Shadlen, Michael N; Kiani, Roozbeh; Newsome, William T; Gold, Joshua I; Wolpert, Daniel M; Zylberberg, Ariel; Ditterich, Jochen; de Lafuente, Victor; Yang, Tianming; Roitman, Jamie

    2016-03-25

    Latimeret al (Reports, 10 July 2015, p. 184) claim that during perceptual decision formation, parietal neurons undergo one-time, discrete steps in firing rate instead of gradual changes that represent the accumulation of evidence. However, that conclusion rests on unsubstantiated assumptions about the time window of evidence accumulation, and their stepping model cannot explain existing data as effectively as evidence-accumulation models. PMID:27013723

  11. Greenland Ice Sheet Annually-resolved Accumulation Rates (1958-2007), a Spatially Calibrated Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, E. W.; Forster, R. R.; Box, J. W.; Smith, L. C.; Bromwich, D. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has responded dramatically to recent temperature increases, making it an important contributor to sea level rise. Accurate predictions of Greenland's future contribution to sea level will require a scrupulous understanding of the GIS system and refining our understanding of accumulation is a critical step towards this goal. The most accurate existing estimates of Greenland accumulation rates are multi-year averages; existing annual estimates contain poorly quantified uncertainties. This project developed a superior Greenland accumulation dataset that is spatially comprehensive, has annual resolution, is calibrated to field observations and contains sound uncertainty estimates. Accumulation output from a 1958- 2007 run of the Fifth Generation Mesoscale Model modified for polar climates (PMM5) was calibrated against 133 firn cores and coastal meteorological stations. PMM5 accumulation rate estimates contained spatially dependent systematic biases that were modeled and removed using spatial interpolation of zonally derived regressions. The calibrated accumulation dataset contains residual uncertainties exhibiting a strong spatial pattern that was modeled to estimate ice-sheet wide uncertainty. No significant 1958-2007 trends in Greenland accumulation are evident. Average annual accumulation rate is estimated at 0.339m.w.e. or 593km3 with an RMSE uncertainty of +/-83 km3 or +/-14%. The accumulation dataset will be made publicly available.

  12. Ultrastructural and flow cytometric analyses of lipid accumulation in microalgae

    SciTech Connect

    Solomon, J.A.; Hand, R.E. Jr.; Mann, R.C.

    1986-12-01

    Lipid accumulation in three species of microalgae was investigated with flow cytometry (FCM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Previous studies using batch cultures of a algae have led to the assumption that lipid accumulation in microalgae is a gradual process requiring at least several days for completion. However, FCM reveals, through changes in the chlorophyll:lipid ratio, that the time span required for individual cells to change metabolic state is short. Simultaneous FCM measurements of chlorophyll and nile red (neutral lipid) fluorescence in individual cells of nitrogen-deficient Isochrysis populations revealed a bimodal population distribution as one stage in the lipid accumulation process. The fact that two discrete populations exist, with few cells in an intermediate stage, suggests rapid response to a liqid trigger. Interpretations of light and electron microscopic observations are consistent with this hypothesis. The time required for an entire population to achieve maximum lipid content is considerably longer than that required for a single cell, due to the variation in response time among cells. In this study high lipid cultures were sometimes obtained by using FCM to separate high lipid cells from the remainder of the population. FCM holds much promise for strain enhancement but considerable developmental work, directed at providing more consistent results, remains to be done. 8 refs., 35 figs.

  13. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Palczewski, Grzegorz; Amengual, Jaume; Hoppel, Charles L.; von Lintig, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The critical role of retinoids (vitamin A and its derivatives) for vision, reproduction, and survival has been well established. Vitamin A is produced from dietary carotenoids such as β-carotene by centric cleavage via the enzyme BCO1. The biochemical and molecular identification of a second structurally related β-carotene metabolizing enzyme, BCO2, has led to a prolonged debate about its relevance in vitamin A biology. While BCO1 cleaves provitamin A carotenoids, BCO2 is more promiscuous and also metabolizes nonprovitamin A carotenoids such as zeaxanthin into long-chain apo-carotenoids. Herein we demonstrate, in cell lines, that human BCO2 is associated with the inner mitochondrial membrane. Different human BCO2 isoforms possess cleavable N-terminal leader sequences critical for mitochondrial import. Subfractionation of murine hepatic mitochondria confirmed the localization of BCO2 to the inner mitochondrial membrane. Studies in BCO2-knockout mice revealed that zeaxanthin accumulates in the inner mitochondrial membrane; in contrast, β-carotene is retained predominantly in the cytoplasm. Thus, we provide evidence for a compartmentalization of carotenoid metabolism that prevents competition between BCO1 and BCO2 for the provitamin and the production of noncanonical β-carotene metabolites.—Palczewski, G., Amengual, J., Hoppel, C. L., von Lintig, J. Evidence for compartmentalization of mammalian carotenoid metabolism. PMID:25002123

  14. Combined efficacy of cediranib and quinacrine in glioma is enhanced by hypoxia and causally linked to autophagic vacuole accumulation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Merryl R; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gillespie, G Yancey; Woltjer, Randall L; Pike, Martin M

    2014-01-01

    We have previously reported that the in vivo anti-glioma efficacy of the anti-angiogenic receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor cediranib is substantially enhanced via combination with the late-stage autophagy inhibitor quinacrine. The current study investigates the role of hypoxia and autophagy in combined cediranib/quinacrine efficacy. EF5 immunostaining revealed a prevalence of hypoxia in mouse intracranial 4C8 glioma, consistent with high-grade glioma. MTS cell viability assays using 4C8 glioma cells revealed that hypoxia potentiated the efficacy of combined cediranib/quinacrine: cell viability reductions induced by 1 µM cediranib +2.5 µM quinacrine were 78±7% (hypoxia) vs. 31±3% (normoxia), p<0.05. Apoptosis was markedly increased for cediranib/quinacrine/hypoxia versus all other groups. Autophagic vacuole biomarker LC3-II increased robustly in response to cediranib, quinacrine, or hypoxia. Combined cediranib/quinacrine increased LC3-II further, with the largest increases occurring with combined cediranib/quinacrine/hypoxia. Early stage autophagy inhibitor 3-MA prevented LC3-II accumulation with combined cediranib/quinacrine/hypoxia and substantially attenuated the associated reduction in cell viability. Combined efficacy of cediranib with bafilomycin A1, another late-stage autophagy inhibitor, was additive but lacked substantial potentiation by hypoxia. Substantially lower LC3-II accumulation was observed with bafilomycin A1 in comparison to quinacrine. Cediranib and quinacrine each strongly inhibited Akt phosphoryation, while bafilomycin A1 had no effect. Our results provide compelling evidence that autophagic vacuole accumulation plays a causal role in the anti-glioma cytotoxic efficacy of combined cediranib/quinacrine. Such accumulation is likely related to stimulation of autophagosome induction by hypoxia, which is prevalent in the glioma tumor microenvironment, as well as Akt signaling inhibition from both cediranib and quinacrine. Quinacrine's unique

  15. Monoclonal antibodies against accumulation-associated protein affect EPS biosynthesis and enhance bacterial accumulation of Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jian; Xu, Tao; Zhu, Tao; Lou, Qiang; Wang, Xueqin; Wu, Yang; Huang, Renzheng; Liu, Jingran; Liu, Huayong; Yu, Fangyou; Ding, Baixing; Huang, Yalin; Tong, Wenyan; Qu, Di

    2011-01-01

    Because there is no effective antibiotic to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilm infections that lead to the failure of medical device implantations, the development of anti-biofilm vaccines is necessary. Biofilm formation by S. epidermidis requires accumulation-associated protein (Aap) that contains sequence repeats known as G5 domains, which are responsible for the Zn(2+)-dependent dimerization of Aap to mediate intercellular adhesion. Antibodies against Aap have been reported to inhibit biofilm accumulation. In the present study, three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the Aap C-terminal single B-repeat construct followed by the 79-aa half repeat (AapBrpt1.5) were generated. MAb(18B6) inhibited biofilm formation by S. epidermidis RP62A to 60% of the maximum, while MAb(25C11) and MAb(20B9) enhanced biofilm accumulation. All three MAbs aggregated the planktonic bacteria to form visible cell clusters. Epitope mapping revealed that the epitope of MAb(18B6), which recognizes an identical area within AapBrpt constructs from S. epidermidis RP62A, was not shared by MAb(25C11) and MAb(20B9). Furthermore, all three MAbs were found to affect both Aap expression and extracellular polymeric substance (EPS, including extracellular DNA and PIA) biosynthesis in S. epidermidis and enhance the cell accumulation. These findings contribute to a better understanding of staphylococcal biofilm formation and will help to develop epitope-peptide vaccines against staphylococcal infections.

  16. Metal accumulation in wild-caught opossum.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, J Mitchell; Siddiqui, Samreen; Loughry, W J; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2016-06-01

    The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is widespread in the USA, ranging south through Latin America. The ecology of opossums is such that they are in frequent contact with soils, suggesting that they may function as a valuable bioindicator for chemical contamination in terrestrial environments. Surprisingly, there have been virtually no toxicology studies on opossums. Here, we provide the first analysis of metal contaminants in opossum liver tissues. Liver samples were obtained from 471 opossums, collected from 2003 to 2006, at four sites in North Florida and South Georgia, USA, and concentrations of copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and zinc were measured. We found little evidence of age differences in the concentration of any of the metals. However, there were at least some significant differences between years, males and females, and between sites for each metal, although the pattern of these differences was not always consistent across metals. Concentrations of metals in liver tissue were positively correlated with one another, primarily of each metal (except Pb) with zinc. Reference levels of metal contaminants are not available for opossums, but concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in our samples were for the most part significantly higher than those reported from liver tissues of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) collected at the same sites and in the same years. Data from other small mammals studied elsewhere further indicate that metal concentrations in opossums were high, but at this time, it is not possible to determine if these elevated levels generated toxicity. The substantial temporal and spatial variation we found in metal concentrations suggests that determination of baseline levels for opossums may not be straightforward. Nonetheless, this is the first study quantifying metal accumulation in the livers of Didelphis virginiana and, as such, provides an important starting point for future research. PMID:27138002

  17. Metal accumulation in wild-caught opossum.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, J Mitchell; Siddiqui, Samreen; Loughry, W J; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2016-06-01

    The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is widespread in the USA, ranging south through Latin America. The ecology of opossums is such that they are in frequent contact with soils, suggesting that they may function as a valuable bioindicator for chemical contamination in terrestrial environments. Surprisingly, there have been virtually no toxicology studies on opossums. Here, we provide the first analysis of metal contaminants in opossum liver tissues. Liver samples were obtained from 471 opossums, collected from 2003 to 2006, at four sites in North Florida and South Georgia, USA, and concentrations of copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and zinc were measured. We found little evidence of age differences in the concentration of any of the metals. However, there were at least some significant differences between years, males and females, and between sites for each metal, although the pattern of these differences was not always consistent across metals. Concentrations of metals in liver tissue were positively correlated with one another, primarily of each metal (except Pb) with zinc. Reference levels of metal contaminants are not available for opossums, but concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in our samples were for the most part significantly higher than those reported from liver tissues of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) collected at the same sites and in the same years. Data from other small mammals studied elsewhere further indicate that metal concentrations in opossums were high, but at this time, it is not possible to determine if these elevated levels generated toxicity. The substantial temporal and spatial variation we found in metal concentrations suggests that determination of baseline levels for opossums may not be straightforward. Nonetheless, this is the first study quantifying metal accumulation in the livers of Didelphis virginiana and, as such, provides an important starting point for future research.

  18. Acute Hypotensive Response to Continuous and Accumulated Isocaloric Aerobic Bouts.

    PubMed

    Cunha, F; Midgley, A W; Pescatello, L; Soares, P P; Farinatti, P

    2016-10-01

    Evidence indicates that chronic reductions in blood pressure (BP) due to aerobic exercise depend on the ability to induce post-exercise hypotension (PEH) after each training bout. The purpose of this study was to investigate PEH after isocaloric bouts of continuous and accumulated running. 10 healthy pre-hypertensive men (aged 27.6±3.5 years) performed the following bouts of exercise: a) A continuous bout (CONT) expending a total of 400 kcal; and b) An accumulated bout split into 2×200 kcal (INTER1 and INTER2) to total 400 kcal at 75% of oxygen uptake reserve. BP, mean arterial pressure (MAP) and heart rate variability were monitored 10 min before and 60 min after control and all exercise conditions. The decrease in MAP over time after continuous (400 kcal) and accumulated (2×200 kcal) bouts of exercise was more pronounced than during control (mean diff between 1.6 and 5.4 mmHg, P≤0.01), although the magnitude of change was similar between continuous and accumulated bouts (mean diff=0.1 mmHg, P=0.79). Concomitant to the PEH, sympathovagal balance was inversely related to changes in MAP after isocaloric bouts performed continuously and cumulatively (r=- 0.72 and-0.85, P=0.019 and 0.002, respectively). In conclusion, BP decreased to similar levels after continuous and accumulated acute aerobic exercise matched for total energy expenditure. Our findings also indicate that the recovery pattern of cardiac autonomic activity may have an important role in eliciting PEH. PMID:27551937

  19. Molecular analysis of polyphosphate accumulation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, A; Ohtake, H

    2000-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), its accumulation and disappearance, is the most striking aspect of polyP metabolism in bacteria. Imbalance between polyP synthesis and degradation results in fluctuations of polyP by 100- to 1000-fold. We here review recent results with respect to this polyP metabolism in bacteria. PolyP accumulation in response to amino acid starvation, accompanied by increased levels of stringent factors, has been observed in Escherichia coli. Inhibition by stringent factors of polyphosphatase interrupts the dynamic balance between the synthesis and degradation of polyP, accounting for polyP accumulation. Polyphosphate kinase is required for activation of intracellular protein degradation, which is required for adaptation at the onset of amino acid starvation. The adaptation to amino acid starvation is mediated by the network of stringent response and polyP metabolism. PolyP accumulation independent of stringent response has also been observed. Novobiocin, an inhibitor for DNA gyrase, stimulated accumulation of polyP but not that of stringent factors. However, a temperature-sensitive DNA gyrase mutant did not exhibit polyP accumulation at the non-permissive temperature. Antagonistic relationship of polyP to nucleic acid synthesis, explored by Harold, appears to be more complicated. We discuss relationship of Pi regulation to polyP accumulation in E. coli and Klebsiella aerogenes. A function of polyP as an in vivo phosphagen affecting polyP accumulation is also discussed.

  20. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired pressure vessel in which energy is stored under high pressure in the form of a gas or a gas and hydraulic... result in contamination of the hydraulic fluid and loss of gas through absorption. (c) Each...

  1. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired pressure vessel in which energy is stored under high pressure in the form of a gas or a gas and hydraulic... result in contamination of the hydraulic fluid and loss of gas through absorption. (c) Each...

  2. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs. PMID:18840258

  3. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs. PMID:18840258

  4. The clinical relevance of assessing advanced glycation endproducts accumulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Meerwaldt, Robbert; Links, Thera; Zeebregts, Clark; Tio, Rene; Hillebrands, Jan-Luuk; Smit, Andries

    2008-10-07

    Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes. There is increasing evidence that advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) play a pivotal role in atherosclerosis, in particular in diabetes. AGE accumulation is a measure of cumulative metabolic and oxidative stress, and may so represent the "metabolic memory". Furthermore, increased AGE accumulation is closely related to the development of cardiovascular complications in diabetes. This review article will focus on the clinical relevance of measuring AGE accumulation in diabetic patients by focusing on AGE formation, AGEs as predictors of long-term complications, and interventions against AGEs.

  5. Nuclear protein accumulation by facilitated transport and intranuclear binding.

    PubMed

    Paine, P L

    1993-10-01

    Nuclear proteins are transported from the cytoplasm into the nucleus via nuclear envelope pore complexes (NPCs). At the molecular level, the mechanisms responsible for this transport remain obscure. However, it is known that, for many proteins, the process requires ATP and proceeds against formidable nucleocytoplasmic concentration gradients. Therefore, the NPC is often thought of as an active transport site. In this article, Philip Paine presents the alternative hypothesis that, on current evidence, protein translocation across the nuclear envelope and accumulation in the nucleus can equally well be explained by facilitated transport through the NPC and subsequent intranuclear binding.

  6. Revealing ontological commitments by magic.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Thomas L

    2015-03-01

    Considering the appeal of different magical transformations exposes some systematic asymmetries. For example, it is more interesting to transform a vase into a rose than a rose into a vase. An experiment in which people judged how interesting they found different magic tricks showed that these asymmetries reflect the direction a transformation moves in an ontological hierarchy: transformations in the direction of animacy and intelligence are favored over the opposite. A second and third experiment demonstrated that judgments of the plausibility of machines that perform the same transformations do not show the same asymmetries, but judgments of the interestingness of such machines do. A formal argument relates this sense of interestingness to evidence for an alternative to our current physical theory, with magic tricks being a particularly pure source of such evidence. These results suggest that people's intuitions about magic tricks can reveal the ontological commitments that underlie human cognition.

  7. Accumulation, selection and covariation of amino acids in sieve tube sap of tansy (Tanacetum vulgare) and castor bean (Ricinus communis): evidence for the function of a basic amino acid transporter and the absence of a γ-amino butyric acid transporter.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Susanne N; Nowak, Heike; Keller, Frank; Kallarackal, Jose; Hajirezaei, Mohamad-Reza; Komor, Ewald

    2014-09-01

    Sieve tube sap was obtained from Tanacetum by aphid stylectomy and from Ricinus after apical bud decapitation. The amino acids in sieve tube sap were analyzed and compared with those from leaves. Arginine and lysine accumulated in the sieve tube sap of Tanacetum more than 10-fold compared to the leaf extracts and they were, together with asparagine and serine, preferably selected into the sieve tube sap, whereas glycine, methionine/tryptophan and γ-amino butyric acid were partially or completely excluded. The two basic amino acids also showed a close covariation in sieve tube sap. The acidic amino acids also grouped together, but antagonistic to the other amino acids. The accumulation ratios between sieve tube sap and leaf extracts were smaller in Ricinus than in Tanacetum. Arginine, histidine, lysine and glutamine were enriched and preferentially loaded into the phloem, together with isoleucine and valine. In contrast, glycine and methionine/tryptophan were partially and γ-amino butyric acid almost completely excluded from sieve tube sap. The covariation analysis grouped arginine together with several neutral amino acids. The acidic amino acids were loaded under competition with neutral amino acids. It is concluded from comparison with the substrate specificities of already characterized plant amino acid transporters, that an AtCAT1-like transporter functions in phloem loading of basic amino acids, whereas a transporter like AtGAT1 is absent in phloem. Although Tanacetum and Ricinus have different minor vein architecture, their phloem loading specificities for amino acids are relatively similar.

  8. Reserve nutrient substance accumulation in Brassica rapa L. seeds in microgravity conditions (STS-87).

    PubMed

    Popova, A; Kuang, A; McClure, G; Musgrave, M

    2002-07-01

    The results of study of Brassica embryo differentiation and reserve nutrient substance accumulation in the seeds were represented. Near resemblance of the spaceflight and around control embryo development was revealed. Different character of the reserve substance accumulation was noted, despite of the morphologic similarity in seeds produced in spaceflight and on the ground. It allows to consider spaceflight embryos morphologically more younger compared to the ground control.

  9. Gene limiting cadmium accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Daisei; Yamaji, Naoki; Kono, Izumi; Huang, Chao Feng; Ando, Tsuyu; Yano, Masahiro; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-09-21

    Intake of toxic cadmium (Cd) from rice caused Itai-itai disease in the past and it is still a threat for human health. Therefore, control of the accumulation of Cd from soil is an important food-safety issue, but the molecular mechanism for the control is unknown. Herein, we report a gene (OsHMA3) responsible for low Cd accumulation in rice that was isolated from a mapping population derived from a cross between a high and low Cd-accumulating cultivar. The gene encodes a transporter belonging to the P(1B)-type ATPase family, but shares low similarity with other members. Heterologous expression in yeast showed that the transporter from the low-Cd cultivar is functional, but the transporter from the high-Cd cultivar had lost its function, probably because of the single amino acid mutation. The transporter is mainly expressed in the tonoplast of root cells at a similar level in both the low and high Cd-accumulating cultivars. Overexpression of the functional gene from the low Cd-accumulating cultivar selectively decreased accumulation of Cd, but not other micronutrients in the grain. Our results indicated that OsHMA3 from the low Cd-accumulating cultivar limits translocation of Cd from the roots to the above-ground tissues by selectively sequestrating Cd into the root vacuoles.

  10. Biogeographical Evidences Help Revealing the Origin of Hainan Island

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Both the continental or island origin of Hainan, and the Indo-Malaysian or East Asian affinity of its flora, are debatable. In this study, 196 families, 1283 genera and 3894 species of Hainan plants were recognized. Patterns of seed plant distribution were quantified at the generic and the family levels. The floras of Vietnam, and the adjacent Guangxi and Guangdong provinces of mainland China, were compared with Hainan. The results showed that the flora of Hainan Island is dominated by families and genera with tropical distributions. Among its floristic elements, tropical Asian distributions make up 23.85% of the total flora, while East Asian distributions contribute only 3.74%. There are only 7 genera and c. 10% of species endemic to Hainan Island. The Hainan flora has strong similarities to the flora of Vietnam at the family and the generic levels, and also to the flora of Guangxi, but less with the adjacent Guangdong province. The main conclusions are: Hainan’s flora is tropical in nature with a strongly tropical Asian affinity, and it has very low endemism at the generic and species levels, which implies a continental origin. We conjecture that Hainan Island could have been adjacent to northern Vietnam and the Guangxi at least in Eocene. This suggestion is supported by palaeobotanical, palaeomagnetic and volcanism studies. PMID:27055236

  11. Sulfur-accumulating plants convert sulfate salts from soils into environmentally resilient biominerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robson, Thomas; Reid, Nathan; Stevens, Jason; Dixon, Kingsley

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur-accumulator plants (thiophores), which accumulate atypically high sulfur and calcium concentrations in their aerial biomass, may be suitable for revegetating and phytostabilising reactive sulfur-enriched substrates such as mine tailings, acid-sulfate soils and polluted soils. We present biogeochemical insights on thiophores from the Australian Great Sandy Desert, which accumulate up to 40 times as much sulfur (2-5 %S) versus comparator species. X-ray microanalyses revealed this accumulation relates to peculiar gypsum-like mineralisation throughout their foliage, illustrating a mechanism for sulfate removal from soils and sequestration as sparingly soluble biominerals. However, we did not know whether these species treat the excess Ca/S as a waste to be shed with senescent litter and, if so, how resilient these 'biominerals' are to photo-biodegradation once shed and so to what extent the accumulated elements are recycled back into the reactive/bioavailable sulfate reservoir. To address these questions, we sampled four foliage (phyllode) fractions from ten individuals of the thiophore, Acacia bivenosa: healthy mature phyllodes, senescent phyllodes on the branch, recently shed and older, more degraded ground litter. We selected two thiophores (A. bivenosa and A. robeorum) and a non-thiophore (A. ancistrocarpa) for detailed soil/regolith studies. Samples were collected from trenches bisected by each tree, taken from varying depth (20-500 mm) and distance from the stem (0.1-5 m). Dried foliage was cleaned, sectioned for SEM-EDXS examination and elemental compositions of foliage and soils were determined (microwave-assisted acid digestion + ICP-OES/MS). Each species generated a 'halo' of elevated S/Ca in the soil immediately beneath their crowns, although that of A. ancistrocarpa was of minor magnitude. These anomalies were confined to shallow soil (20-50 mm i.e. influenced by litter), suggesting limited S/Ca re-mobilisation from the litter. Foliar elemental

  12. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  13. EFFECT OF ACTIVE ACCUMULATION OF CALCIUM AND PHOSPHATE IONS ON THE STRUCTURE OF RAT LIVER MITOCHONDRIA.

    PubMed

    GREENAWALT, J W; ROSSI, C S; LEHNINGER, A L

    1964-10-01

    Rat liver mitochondria allowed to accumulate maximal amounts of Ca(++) and HPO(4) (=) ions from the suspending medium in vitro during respiration have a considerably higher specific gravity than normal mitochondria and may be easily separated from the latter by isopycnic centrifugation in density gradients of sucrose or cesium chloride. When the mitochondria are allowed to accumulate less than maximal amounts of Ca(++) and HPO(4) (=) from the medium, they have intermediate specific gravities which are roughly proportional to their content of calcium phosphate. Maximally "loaded" mitochondria are relatively homogeneous with respect to specific gravity. Correlated biochemical and electron microscopic studies show that Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria contain numerous dense granules, of which some 85 per cent are over 500 A in diameter. These granules are electron-opaque not only following fixation and staining with heavy metal reagents, but also following fixation with formaldehyde, demonstrating that the characteristic granules in Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria have intrinsic electron-opacity. The dense granules are almost always located within the inner compartment of the mitochondria and not in the space between the inner and outer membranes. They are frequently located at or near the cristae and they often show electron-transparent "cores." Such granules appear to be made up of clusters of smaller dense particles, but preliminary x-ray diffraction analysis and electron diffraction studies have revealed no evidence of crystallinity in the deposits. The electron-opaque granules decrease in number when the Ca(++)-loaded mitochondria are incubated with 2,4-dinitrophenol; simultaneously there is discharge of Ca(++) and phosphate from the mitochondria into the medium.

  14. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. PMID:26560353

  15. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. PMID:26560353

  16. Bacterial accumulation mediated by flow compression-expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miño, Gastón L.; Altshuler, Ernesto; Lindner, Anke; Stocker, Roman; Condat, Carlos A.; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Marconi, Veronica I.; Clément, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Swimming bacteria can be concentrated using a suitable microfluidic device. The combination of flow rate and surface shape can have significant impact on the microorganisms' behavior. In those processes rheotaxis, accumulation caused by ratchets and even attachment to surfaces leading biofilm formation can be observed. Under these conditions, the transport of the active suspension is deeply modified, and differs significantly from passive suspensions. In this work, we present experimental evidence of Escherichia coli suspension flowing in a straight channel with a funnel-like constriction in the middle. This constriction is characterized by the aperture (wf) and its angle (Θf). We explore how the modification of wf and Θf affects the accumulation of bacteria in the channel. Concentrations of bacteria passing the constriction were observed for all the cases. However, the range of the flow rate that produced such accumulation varied with the geometry. In order to obtain a better understanding of this phenomenon, experiments are compared with a simple phenomenological model.

  17. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads.

  18. Waste tank ventilation system waste material accumulations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This paper calculates the amount of material that accumulates in the ventilation systems of various Tank Waste Remediation System facilities and estimates the amount of material that could be released due to a rapid pressurization.

  19. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  20. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  1. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  2. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  3. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  4. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TF<1) at all levels of metal treatment. Among the 4 transgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  5. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  6. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  7. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  8. Induction of Nickel Accumulation in Response to Zinc Deficiency in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Sho; Kato, Aki; Tsuzuki, Chisato; Yoshida, Junko; Mizuno, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of nickel (Ni) can be toxic to plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the Fe2+ transporter, iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (IRT1), mediates Fe uptake and also implicates in Ni2+ uptake at roots; however, the underlying mechanism of Ni2+ uptake and accumulation remains unelucidated. In the present study, we found that zinc (Zn) deficient conditions resulted in increased accumulation of Ni in plants, particularly in roots, in A. thaliana. In order to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of Ni uptake correlating zinc condition, we traced 63Ni isotope in response to Zn and found that (i) Zn deficiency induces short-term Ni2+ absorption and (ii) Zn2+ inhibits Ni2+ uptake, suggesting competitive uptake between Ni and Zn. Furthermore, the Zrt/Irt-like protein 3 (ZIP3)-defective mutant with an elevated Zn-deficient response exhibited higher Ni accumulation than the wild type, further supporting that the response to Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation. Previously, expression profile study demonstrated that IRT1 expression is not inducible by Zn deficiency. In the present study, we found increased Ni accumulation in IRT1-null mutant under Zn deficiency in agar culture. These suggest that Zn deficiency induces Ni accumulation in an IRT1-independen manner. The present study revealed that Ni accumulation is inducible in response to Zn deficiency, which may be attributable to a Zn uptake transporter induced by Zn deficiency. PMID:25923075

  9. Biosynthesis and accumulation of osmoprotective compounds by halophytic plants of the genus Limonium

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, A.D.; Rathinasabapathi, B. ); Gage, D.A. )

    1991-05-01

    Analyses of quaternary ammonium compounds in leaf and root tissues of halophytic Limonium spp. using fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry revealed that only 3 out of 21 spp. accumulated glycine betaine, the common angiosperm osmolyte. The 18 other spp. accumulated {beta}-alanine betaine instead. However, all the Limonium spp. studied accumulated choline-O-sulfate and their leaf disks metabolized ({sup 14}C) choline to choline-O-sulfate. Only the glycine betaine accumulators oxidized ({sup 14}C) choline to glycine betaine and only {beta}-alanine betaine accumulators converted {beta}-({sup 14}C)alanine to {beta}-alanine betaine. When {beta}-alanine betaine and glycine betaine accumulators were salinized with NaCl, the levels of their respective betaines and of choline sulfate were closely correlated with solute potential. Glycine betaine accumulators had less choline-O-sulfate than {beta}-alanine betaine accumulators and increasing the SO{sub 4}{sup 2}/Cl ratio in the medium increased choline-O-sulfate and caused a matching decrease in glycine betaine. Thus, it appears that {beta}-alanine betaine has replaced glycine betaine in most members of this genus, eliminating a possible competition between glycine betaine and choline-O-sulfate for choline.

  10. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source. PMID:26463891

  11. Primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae accumulates storage glucan and triacylglycerol under nitrogen depletion.

    PubMed

    Takusagawa, Mari; Nakajima, Yohei; Saito, Takafumi; Misumi, Osami

    2016-07-14

    Most microalgae accumulate neutral lipids, including triacylglycerol (TAG), into spherical structures called lipid bodies (LBs) under environmental stress conditions such as nutrient depletion. In green algae, starch accumulation precedes TAG accumulation, and the starch is thought to be a substrate for TAG synthesis. However, the relationship between TAG synthesis and the starch content in red algae, as well as how TAG accumulation is regulated, is unclear. In this study, we cultured the primitive red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae under nitrogen-depleted conditions, and monitored the formation of starch granules (SGs) and LBs using microscopy. SGs stained with potassium iodide were observed at 24 h; however, LBs stained specifically with BODIPY 493/503 were observed after 48 h. Quantitative analysis of neutral sugar and cytomorphological semi-quantitative analysis of TAG accumulation also supported these results. Thus, the accumulation of starch occurred and preceded the accumulation of TAG in cells of C. merolae. However, TAG accumulation was not accompanied by a decrease in the starch content, suggesting that the starch is a major carbon storage sink, at least under nitrogen-depleted conditions. Quantitative real-time PCR revealed that the mRNA levels of genes involved in starch and TAG synthesis rarely changed during the culture period, suggesting that starch and TAG synthesis in C. merolae are not controlled through gene transcription but at other stages, such as translation and/or enzymatic activity. PMID:27181396

  12. Structure-property relationship for cellular accumulation of macrolones in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

    PubMed

    Munić Kos, Vesna; Koštrun, Sanja; Fajdetić, Andrea; Bosnar, Martina; Kelnerić, Željko; Stepanić, Višnja; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2013-05-13

    Macrolones are a new class of antimicrobial compounds consisting of a macrolide scaffold linked to a 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid moiety via C(4″) position of a macrolide. As macrolides are known to possess favorable pharmacokinetic properties by accumulating in inflammatory cells, in this study we determined the intensity of accumulation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of 57 compounds of the macrolone class and analyzed the relationship between the molecular structure and this cellular pharmacokinetic property. Accumulation of macrolones ranged from 0 to 5.5-fold higher than the standard macrolide azithromycin. Distinct structural features in all three considered molecule parts: the macrolide scaffold, quinolone moiety and the linker, affect cellular accumulation. Interestingly, while the parent macrolide, azithromycin, accumulates approximately 3-fold more than clarithromycin, among macrolones all clarithromycin derivatives accumulated in PMNs significantly more than their azithromycin counterparts. Modeling cellular accumulation of macrolones with simple molecular descriptors, as well as with the measured octanol-water distribution coefficient, revealed that the number of hydrogen bond donors and secondary amide groups negatively contribute to macrolone accumulation, while lipophilicity makes a positive contribution.

  13. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source.

  14. Metal accumulation by wood-decaying fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metal concentrations (Na, K, Rb, Mg, Ca, Sr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, Al, and Pb) in the sporophores of ten wood-decaying macromycete species were related to concentrations in the wood substrates. Manganese, Sr, Ca, and Pb were usually excluded by the fungi; K, Rb, and to a lower degree, Cd, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mg and Na were accumulated. Accumulation ratios are compared with similar ratios for soil and litter inhabiting species previously studied.

  15. Accumulation of atmospheric sulfur in some Costa Rican soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bern, Carleton R.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Sulfur is one of the macronutrient elements whose sources to terrestrial ecosystems should shift from dominance by rock-weathering to atmospheric deposition as soils and underlying substrate undergo progressive weathering and leaching. However, the nature and timing of this transition is not well known. We investigated sources of sulfur to tropical rain forests growing on basalt-derived soils in the Osa Peninsula region of Costa Rica. Sulfur sources were examined using stable isotope ratios (δ34S) and compared to chemical indices of soil development. The most weathered soils, and the forests they supported, are dominated by atmospheric sulfur, while a less weathered soil type contains both rock-derived and atmospheric sulfur. Patterns of increasing δ34S with increasing soil sulfur concentration across the landscape suggest atmospheric sulfur is accumulating, and little rock-derived sulfur has been retained. Soil sulfur, minus adsorbed sulfate, is correlated with carbon and nitrogen, implying that sulfur accumulation occurs as plants and microbes incorporate sulfur into organic matter. Only the lower depth increments of the more weathered soils contained significant adsorbed sulfate. The evidence suggests a pattern of soil development in which sulfur-bearing minerals in rock, such as sulfides, weather early relative to other minerals, and the released sulfate is leached away. Sulfur added via atmospheric deposition is retained as organic matter accumulates in the soil profile. Adsorbed sulfate accumulates later, driven by changes in soil chemistry and mineralogy. These aspects of sulfur behavior during pedogenesis in this environment may hasten the transition to dominance by atmospheric sources.

  16. Accumulation of atmospheric sulfur in some Costa Rican soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Carleton R.; Townsend, Alan R.

    2008-09-01

    Sulfur is one of the macronutrient elements whose sources to terrestrial ecosystems should shift from dominance by rock-weathering to atmospheric deposition as soils and underlying substrate undergo progressive weathering and leaching. However, the nature and timing of this transition is not well known. We investigated sources of sulfur to tropical rain forests growing on basalt-derived soils in the Osa Peninsula region of Costa Rica. Sulfur sources were examined using stable isotope ratios (δ34S) and compared to chemical indices of soil development. The most weathered soils, and the forests they supported, are dominated by atmospheric sulfur, while a less weathered soil type contains both rock-derived and atmospheric sulfur. Patterns of increasing δ34S with increasing soil sulfur concentration across the landscape suggest atmospheric sulfur is accumulating, and little rock-derived sulfur has been retained. Soil sulfur, minus adsorbed sulfate, is correlated with carbon and nitrogen, implying that sulfur accumulation occurs as plants and microbes incorporate sulfur into organic matter. Only the lower depth increments of the more weathered soils contained significant adsorbed sulfate. The evidence suggests a pattern of soil development in which sulfur-bearing minerals in rock, such as sulfides, weather early relative to other minerals, and the released sulfate is leached away. Sulfur added via atmospheric deposition is retained as organic matter accumulates in the soil profile. Adsorbed sulfate accumulates later, driven by changes in soil chemistry and mineralogy. These aspects of sulfur behavior during pedogenesis in this environment may hasten the transition to dominance by atmospheric sources.

  17. Naturally Ocurring Polyphosphate-accumulating Bacteria in Benthic Biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locke, N. A.; Saia, S. M.; Walter, M. T.; Carrick, H. J.; Buda, A. R.; Regan, J. M.

    2014-12-01

    Polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs), known to store excess phosphorus (P) as polyphosphate (poly-P), influence P transport in the environment. Enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR) from wastewater has long served as a basis to study bacterial PAOs, yet little research has genetically identified similar organisms in natural settings. Aerobic/anaerobic cycles, used to select for PAOs in EBPR, can result from changing environmental conditions such as night/day cycles for benthic biofilms. Benthic biofilms from eight Pennsylvanian streams were studied for naturally-occurring bacterial PAOs similar to those typically found in EBPR systems. PAOs were confirmed in the benthic biofilms by a characteristic yellow fluorescent emission from DAPI staining. Cells containing yellow fluorescence were separated from the rest of the sample using a flow cytometer, resulting in a physically enriched culture of PAOs from the benthic biofilms. Amplicon-based metagenomic sequencing will reveal the phylogeny of bacteria responsible for poly-P accumulation in these benthic biofilms. Sequencing data will be used to develop fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) probes, and hybridizations will be performed on DAPI-stained cells to confirm poly-P accumulation by targeted phylotypes. Identifying PAOs in natural settings is a critical step towards studying environments that support high concentrations of PAOs, serving as significant factors in the P cycle. PAOs can then be connected to P transport models to help understand and mitigate P pollution in agricultural watersheds.

  18. Sucrose induces vesicle accumulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Hiroko

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the treatment of mammalian cells with sucrose leads to vacuole accumulation associated with lysosomes and upregulation of lysosomal enzyme expression and activity. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostatic process by which cells deliver cytoplasmic material for degradation into lysosomes, thus it is probable that sucrose affects the autophagic activity. The role of sucrose in autophagy is unknown; however, another disaccharide, trehalose has been shown to induce autophagy. In the current study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate whether sucrose induces autophagy and whether vesicle formation is associated with autophagy. The results showed that sucrose induces autophagy while being accumulated within the endosomes/lysosomes. These vesicles were swollen and packed within the cytoplasm. Furthermore, trehalose and the trisaccharide raffinose, which are not hydrolyzed in mammalian cells, increased the rate of vesicles accumulation and LC3-II level (a protein marker of autophagy). However, fructose and maltose did not show the same effects. The correlation between the two processes, vesicle accumulation and autophagy induction, was confirmed by treatment of cells with sucrose plus invertase, or maltose plus acarbose-the α-glucosidase inhibitor-and by sucrose deprivation. Results also showed that vesicle accumulation was not affected by autophagy inhibition. Therefore, the data suggest that sucrose-induced autophagy through accumulation of sucrose-containing vesicles is caused by the absence of hydrolysis enzymes.

  19. Sodium accumulation in Atriplex. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.A.; Caldwell, M.M.; Richardson, S.G.

    1984-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the ecological significance and the significance to arid land reclamation of sodium accumulation and nonaccumulation in Atriplex. There was a continuum in the genetic tendency of Atriplex canescens to accumulate sodium, from populations which accumulated almost no sodium to populations which accumulated up to 7% in the leaves. There were also substantial differences in sodium uptake between populations of A. tridentata, A. falcata and A. gardneri, with some populations having less than 0.1% leaf sodium and other populations having up to 5 or 6%. In three experiments (a field study, a greenhouse pot study and a hydroponics study) there were no significant differences in salinity tolerance between sodium accumulating and nonaccumulating A. canescens: both genotypes were highly salt tolerant. There was a significant buildup of sodium in the soil beneath sodium accumulating Atriplex plants, both in natural populations and on revegetated oil shale study plots. The sodium buildup was not sufficient to be detrimental to the growth or establishment of most herbaceous species, but with older Atriplex plants or with more saline soil, the buildup could potentially be detrimental. 14 references, 42 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Sucrose induces vesicle accumulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Hiroko

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the treatment of mammalian cells with sucrose leads to vacuole accumulation associated with lysosomes and upregulation of lysosomal enzyme expression and activity. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostatic process by which cells deliver cytoplasmic material for degradation into lysosomes, thus it is probable that sucrose affects the autophagic activity. The role of sucrose in autophagy is unknown; however, another disaccharide, trehalose has been shown to induce autophagy. In the current study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate whether sucrose induces autophagy and whether vesicle formation is associated with autophagy. The results showed that sucrose induces autophagy while being accumulated within the endosomes/lysosomes. These vesicles were swollen and packed within the cytoplasm. Furthermore, trehalose and the trisaccharide raffinose, which are not hydrolyzed in mammalian cells, increased the rate of vesicles accumulation and LC3-II level (a protein marker of autophagy). However, fructose and maltose did not show the same effects. The correlation between the two processes, vesicle accumulation and autophagy induction, was confirmed by treatment of cells with sucrose plus invertase, or maltose plus acarbose-the α-glucosidase inhibitor-and by sucrose deprivation. Results also showed that vesicle accumulation was not affected by autophagy inhibition. Therefore, the data suggest that sucrose-induced autophagy through accumulation of sucrose-containing vesicles is caused by the absence of hydrolysis enzymes. PMID:25389129

  1. Neural evidence that human emotions share core affective properties.

    PubMed

    Wilson-Mendenhall, Christine D; Barrett, Lisa Feldman; Barsalou, Lawrence W

    2013-06-01

    Research on the "emotional brain" remains centered around the idea that emotions like fear, happiness, and sadness result from specialized and distinct neural circuitry. Accumulating behavioral and physiological evidence suggests, instead, that emotions are grounded in core affect--a person's fluctuating level of pleasant or unpleasant arousal. A neuroimaging study revealed that participants' subjective ratings of valence (i.e., pleasure/displeasure) and of arousal evoked by various fear, happiness, and sadness experiences correlated with neural activity in specific brain regions (orbitofrontal cortex and amygdala, respectively). We observed these correlations across diverse instances within each emotion category, as well as across instances from all three categories. Consistent with a psychological construction approach to emotion, the results suggest that neural circuitry realizes more basic processes across discrete emotions. The implicated brain regions regulate the body to deal with the world, producing the affective changes at the core of emotions and many other psychological phenomena.

  2. Accumulation, Speciation And Cellular Localization of Copper in 'Sesbania Drummondii'

    SciTech Connect

    Sahi, S.V.; Israr, M.; Srivastava, A.K.; Gardea-Torresdey, J.L.; Parsons, J.G.; /Western Kentucky U. /Texas U., El Paso

    2007-07-12

    Growth, accumulation and intracellular speciation and distribution of copper (Cu) in Sesbania drummondii was studied using scanning-electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). The growth of seedlings was assessed in terms of biomass accumulation. The growth of the seedling was enhanced by 73.5% at a low Cu concentration (50 mg l{sup -1}) compared to the control treatment. Additionally, seedling growth was inhibited by 18% at 300 mg l{sup -1} Cu with respect to the control. Copper concentration in roots and shoots was increased with increasing Cu concentration in the growth solution. The accumulation of Cu was found to be higher in roots than in the shoots. At a concentration of 300 mg l{sup -1} Cu, the roots accumulated 27,440 mg Cu kg{sup -1} dry weight (dw) while shoots accumulated 1282 mg Cu kg{sup -1} dw. Seedlings were assessed for photosynthetic activity by measuring chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters: Fv/Fm and Fv/F0 values. Photosynthetic integrity was not affected by any of the Cu treatments. The X-ray absorption spectroscopic (XAS) studies showed that Cu was predominantly present as Cu(II) in Sesbania tissue. In addition, from the XAS studies it was shown that the Cu exists in a mixture of different coordination states consisting of Cu bound to sugars and small organic acids with some possible precipitated copper oxide. From the EXAFS studies, the coordination of Cu was determined to have four equatorial oxygen(nitrogen) ligands at 1.96 angstroms and two axial oxygen ligands at 2.31 angstroms. Scanning-electron microscopy studies revealed the distribution of Cu within the seedlings tissues, predominantly accumulated in the cortical and vascular (xylem) regions of root tissues. In the stem, most of the Cu was found within the xylem tissue. However, the deposition of Cu within the leaf tissues was in the parenchyma. The present study demonstrates the mechanisms employed by

  3. Accumulation and breakdown of RNA-deficient intracellular virus particles in interferon-treated NIH 3T3 cells chronically producing Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Aboud, M; Hassan, Y

    1983-01-01

    Interferon treatment of NIH 3T3 cells chronically infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus inhibited about 95% of virus release. This inhibition was accompanied by a three- to twofold accumulation of intracellular virions. However, this accumulation could be demonstrated only be exogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay or radioactive labeling of the assembled viral proteins. It could not be shown by the endogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay, which depended on endogenous viral RNA, or by labeling the encapsidated viral RNA. It was therefore evident that most of the intracellular virions accumulated in interferon-treated cells were RNA deficient. Hybridization analysis revealed that these virions were deficient of genomic viral RNA, whereas size analysis by gel electrophoresis suggested that the deficiency of 4S RNA normally packaged in Moloney murine leukemia virus was even stronger. Our data also suggested that this RNA deficiency was not due to degradation of the encapsidated RNA, but more likely to a defect in virus assembly. RNA-lacking intracellular virions were unstable; they were found to collapse before being released. PMID:6187933

  4. Accumulation of heavy metals in the earthworm Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Collier, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conversion of waste-activated sludge into egesta by the earthworm Eisenia foetida resulted in neither an increase nor decrease of 0.1 N HCl-extractable cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, or zinc. The addition of 2500 ppM copper as copper sulfate to activated sludge caused 100% mortality whthin 1 week, though feeding upon nonamended activated sludges with up to 1500 ppM copper over several months was innocuous. Amendment of sludge with 10, 50, and 100 ppM Cd as CdSO/sub 4/ resulted in 3.90-, 2.04-, and 1.44-fold concentrations in the earthworm over the quantities present in the sludge, with a range of 118 to 170 ppM being found on exposure to the highest level for periods of 1 to 5 weeks at 25/sup 0/C. In field trials with nonamended sludge, however, containing 12 to 27 ppM Cd, biweekly sampling for 28 weeks revealed accumulations in E. foetida ranging from 8 to 46 ppM; control earthworms not exposed to culture media with easily measurable Cd levels contained 0.3 to 2 ppM Cd. Upwards to about 50 ppM Ni, 325 ppM Pb, and 250 ppM Zn accumulated from sludges amended with ionic soluble forms of these metals. In the field, where these metals ranged from 2 to 46, 1 to 53, and 68 to 210 ppM, respectively, an upper concentration of about 50 ppM Ni, 55 ppM Pb, and 250 ppM Zn were found in the earthworm. Distinctions were made between accumulable and concentratable and a discussion is provided to show that each of the most problematic heavy metals, Cd, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cu, may accumulate or concentrate in the earthworm.

  5. PCNA-dependent