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Sample records for accumulation chamber ac

  1. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion. PMID:24078269

  2. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion.

  3. Loss of ACS7 confers abiotic stress tolerance by modulating ABA sensitivity and accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Zhen, Zhiqin; Peng, Jinying; Chang, Li; Gong, Qingqiu; Wang, Ning Ning

    2011-10-01

    The phytohormones ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) play essential roles in the abiotic stress adaptation of plants, with both cross-talk of ethylene signalling and ABA biosynthesis and signalling reported. Any reciprocal effects on each other's biosynthesis, however, remain elusive. ACC synthase (ACS) acts as the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. A pilot study on changes in ACS promoter activities in response to abiotic stresses revealed the unique involvement in abiotic stress responses of the only type 3 ACC synthase, ACS7, among all nine ACSs of Arabidopsis. Hence an acs7 mutant was characterized and its abiotic stress responses were analysed. The acs7 mutant germinated slightly faster than the wild type and subsequently maintained a higher growth rate at the vegetative growth stage. Ethylene emission of acs7 was merely one-third of that of the wild type. acs7 exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt, osmotic, and heat stresses. Furthermore, acs7 seeds were hypersensitive to both ABA and glucose during germination. Transcript analyses revealed that acs7 had elevated transcript levels of the stress-responsive genes involved in the ABA-dependent pathway under salt stress. The ABA level was also higher in acs7 following salt treatment. Our data suggest that ACS7 acts as a negative regulator of ABA sensitivity and accumulation under stress and appears as a node in the cross-talk between ethylene and ABA.

  4. The ac and dc performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S. ); Cherney, E.A. ); Hackam, R. )

    1988-10-01

    The paper presents the results of the dc performance of polymeric insulating materials in a fog chamber. The materials evaluated in fog produced from low (250 ..mu..S/cm) and high (1000 ..mu..S/cm) conductivity water include cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of either alumina trihydrate (ATH) or silica fillers, or both. Comparison is made of material performance obtained with ac which was reported in an earlier study. In both low and high conductivity fog, the time to failure with ac and +dc was very similar, but a reduction by a factor of about four was observed in the time to failure with -dc. For both ac and dc, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples in low conductivity fog, while the order of performance was reversed in high conductivity fog. A theoretical model to determine the effect of dry band discharges on material is presented. Good agreement of the predicted behavior of materials with the experimental findings is shown.

  5. Short-term macroinvertebrate recruitment and sediment accumulation: a novel field chamber approach.

    PubMed

    Kochersberger, Jon P; Burton, G Allen; Custer, Kevin W

    2012-05-01

    Stream-deposited sediment is one of the major stressors affecting stream biota. Several methods exist to quantify stream sediment embeddedness, but they are relatively qualitative and operationally defined. The authors developed a short-term in situ embeddedness chamber method to measure aquatic insect recruitment and associated sediment accumulation in a more quantitative, better replicated manner. With sediment accumulation and aquatic insect recruitment as endpoints, three exposure periods were evaluated (4, 7, and 14 d) on a low-order stream (Honey Creek, New Carlisle, Ohio, USA) and a medium-order stream (Stillwater River, Covington, Ohio, USA). Chamber results show significant positive correlations between newly deposited fine sediment and insect recruitment. Embeddedness was also measured using the more conventional techniques of the Burns method and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program method. This in situ chamber method allows for increased experimental options for assessing the stress of embeddedness and siltation on benthic communities and may prove useful for investigating the resilience of benthic communities after disturbances. PMID:22447442

  6. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  7. Development of a corneal tissue phantom for anterior chamber optical coherence tomography (AC-OCT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, T. Scott; Zawadzki, Robert J.

    2013-02-01

    We document our latest work in developing a new eye model with a solid-state cornea and liquid filled anterior chamber designed for demonstrating, validating and comparing anterior chamber ophthalmic Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) instruments, corneal topographers, and Scheimpflug cameras. Anterior chamber eye model (ACEM) phantoms can serve a variety of purposes, including demonstrating instrument functionality and performance in both the clinic and exhibit hall, validating corneal layer thickness measurements from different commercial instruments and as an aide for the R and D engineer and field service technician in the development and repair of instruments, respectively. The ideal eye model for OCT, the optical cross-sectional imaging modality, would have a volumetric morphology and scattering and absorption properties similar to that of normal human cornea. These include a multi-layered structure of equivalent thickness to nominal human corneal layers, including an epithelium layer, a stroma with appropriate backscattering properties, and an endothelium. A filled and sealed tissue phantom relieves the user of constant cleaning and maintenance associated with the more common water bath model eyes. Novel processes have been developed to create corneal layers that closely mimic the reflectance and scattering coefficients of the real layers of the cornea, as imaged by spectral bandwidth of OCT.

  8. ChAcNLS, a Novel Modification to Antibody-Conjugates Permitting Target Cell-Specific Endosomal Escape, Localization to the Nucleus, and Enhanced Total Intracellular Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Beaudoin, Simon; Rondeau, Andreanne; Martel, Olivier; Bonin, Marc-Andre; van Lier, Johan E; Leyton, Jeffrey V

    2016-06-01

    The design of antibody-conjugates (ACs) for delivering molecules for targeted applications in humans has sufficiently progressed to demonstrate clinical efficacy in certain malignancies and reduced systemic toxicity that occurs with standard nontargeted therapies. One area that can advance clinical success for ACs will be to increase their intracellular accumulation. However, entrapment and degradation in the endosomal-lysosomal pathway, on which ACs are reliant for the depositing of their molecular payload inside target cells, leads to reduced intracellular accumulation. Innovative approaches that can manipulate this pathway may provide a strategy for increasing accumulation. We hypothesized that escape from entrapment inside the endosomal-lysosomal pathway and redirected trafficking to the nucleus could be an effective approach to increase intracellular AC accumulation in target cells. Cholic acid (ChAc) was coupled to the peptide CGYGPKKKRKVGG containing the nuclear localization sequence (NLS) from SV-40 large T-antigen, which is termed ChAcNLS. ChAcNLS was conjugated to the mAb 7G3 (7G3-ChAcNLS), which has nanomolar affinity for the cell-surface leukemic antigen interleukin-3 receptor-α (IL-3Rα). Our aim was to determine whether 7G3-ChAcNLS increased intracellular accumulation while retaining nanomolar affinity and IL-3Rα-positive cell selectivity. Competition ELISA and cell treatment assays were performed. Cell fractionation, confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and Western blot techniques were used to determine the level of antibody accumulation inside cells and in corresponding nuclei. In addition, the radioisotope copper-64 ((64)Cu) was also utilized as a surrogate molecular cargo to evaluate nuclear and intracellular accumulation by radioactivity counting. 7G3-ChAcNLS effectively escaped endosome entrapment and degradation resulting in a unique intracellular distribution pattern. mAb modification with ChAcNLS maintained 7G3 nM affinity and produced high

  9. SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FOR TIN COATING ON THE STAINLESS STEEL OF SNS ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.HSEUH,H.C.TODD,R.J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    BNL is responsible for the design and construction of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating on the stainless steel vacuum chamber of the SNS accumulator ring is needed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the undesirable resonant multiplication of electrons. The total SEY of TiN coated stainless steel material has been measured after coating samples were exposed to air and after electron and ion bombardment. We report here about TiN coating system setup at BNL and SEY measurements results at CERN, SLAC and KEK. We also present some simulation results of SNS accumulator ring electron-cloud effects using different SEY values.

  10. On the calibration of a radon exhalation monitor based on the electrostatic collection method and accumulation chamber.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Tokonami, Shinji; Hosoda, Masahiro

    2015-06-01

    The radon exhalation rate can be obtained quickly and easily from the evolution of radon concentration over time in the accumulation chamber. Radon monitoring based on the electrostatic collection method is not interfered with by (220)Rn. In this paper, we propose that the difference between radon and (218)Po concentrations in the measurement cell of this kind of radon exhalation monitor is the main system error, and it changes with time and different effective decay constants. Based on the results of simulation experiments, we propose that the calibration factor obtained from the suitable experiment cannot completely correct the system error, even if it is useful to reduce the measurement error. The better way for reducing measurement error is to use the new measurement model which we have proposed in recent years.

  11. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  12. Magma Accumulation throughout the Antilles ArcCrust: Insights from Integrating Petrology, Tomography and Chamber Growth Modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Annen, C.; Melekhova, E.; Paulatto, M.; Blundy, J.; Minshull, T. A.; Sparks, S. S.

    2012-12-01

    Magmas stall at several levels within the crust, from the Moho to the Earth's surface, where volcanic edifices can be considered as the ultimate stage of magmatic products accumulation. Crustal growth and differentiation are determined by the rate at which magmas transfer and accumulate within the crust. At each level, emplacement rates control the magma thermal evolution and its ability to form magma reservoirs. Tomography experiments reveal a seismic low velocity volume at depth 5-8 km beneath Soufrière Hills, the currently active volcano of Montserrat. We numerically simulated the accumulation of andesitic sills at different rates and produced synthetic velocity images that were compared with Soufrière Hills tomography. Fits were found for magma chambers that grew over more than 4000 yrs up to 100,000 yrs by accretion of sills at rates of at least 25 mm/yr corresponding to volumetric fluxes of the order 10-3km3/yr. The crystal residence times inferred from diffusion profiles are less than 320 yrs (Zellmer et al, 2003a) but our results favour an older chamber, which suggests that only the most recently emplaced magma is erupting. In contrast, U-Th ages are more than 350,000 yrs and much older than the shallow chamber, which can be explained by protracted magma residence in deep hot zones (Zellmer et al, 2003b). Because of the absence of large volumes of cumulates in the upper crust, most magma differentiation is likely to happen in deep hot zones at the base or within the lower crust. Petrological experiment data obtained by melting a basalt from St Vincent were integrated in deep hot zone numerical simulations. The distribution of melt fractions in a hot zone depends both on the initial H2O content of the parental basalt and on the maturity of the hot zone. We estimated the distribution of melt fractions of St Vincent volcanic products using the rock concentration in incompatible elements. This distribution fits modelled distributions if the melt was produced

  13. Observations of dust trapping phenomena in the TRISTAN accumulation ring and a study of dust removal in a beam chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Momose, Takashi; Ishimaru, Hajime

    1991-04-01

    of dust particles given through the photoelectric effect in the TRISTAN accumulation ring are 100 times and 104-106 times higher than those of the simulated experiments, respectively. In the ring, the attractive force caused with the average electric field and with the expected charge is 10-103 times larger than that of the simulated experiments. Therefore, a dust particle (less than 2 mm) can be trapped sufficiently. An electrostatic dust collector using an electron beam and an electrostatic force are effective in removing all of the sample dust particles in the test chamber for the simulated experiments. A method to remove trapped dust particles using electrostatic electrodes is also discussed. It is expected that such electrodes can be useful for trapped dust particles moving in a longitudinal direction.

  14. Construction of the Vinalhaven Intrusive Complex, Maine, USA: the Plutonic Record of Evolving Magma Chambers Affected by Multiple Episodes of Replenishment, Rejuvenation, Crystal Accumulation and Eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.; Hawkins, D. P.

    2004-12-01

    stratigraphic section that records magma chamber evolution during the early growth of the Vinalhaven intrusion. Near the base of this section, mafic sheets flowed across almost the entire width of intrusion. The large volume and comparable extent of country rock blocks at this level suggest a major collapse of the roof of a large tabular chamber, and this collapse probably records a major eruption of silicic magma from the chamber. At higher levels of this section, mafic sheets and country rock blocks gradually become restricted to the eastern third of the complex and are entirely absent in the upper half of the intrusion. The less extensive layers of country rock blocks may record smaller eruptions from more restricted chambers. The lower western and entire upper parts of the complex lack mafic rocks and consist of homogeneous, cg granite with a wide variety of schlieren structures that demonstrate granite formed largely by crystal accumulation on a chamber floor. Preliminary measurements of schlieren orientations suggest that the evolving chamber floors were highly irregular and consisted of basin forms with diameters that were much smaller than the width of the plutonic complex - perhaps as little as 1 to 2 km. Although the granite appears homogeneous and to lack any sharp internal contacts, it may have accumulated largely in small, semi-isolated chambers that waxed and waned due to crystallization, replenishment, rejuvenation and accumulation.

  15. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates.

    PubMed

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias D J; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos L V; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H G M; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies.

  16. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias DJ; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos LV; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Koopman, Werner JH; Willems, Peter HGM; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies. PMID:25996284

  17. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  18. Simultaneous determination of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates from building materials used in Central Italy with accumulation chambers and a continuous solid state alpha detector: influence of particle size, humidity and precursors concentration.

    PubMed

    Tuccimei, P; Moroni, M; Norcia, D

    2006-02-01

    A method to determine simultaneously the rates of 222Rn and 220Rn released from building materials quarried in Central Italy is presented. The method makes use of a continuous monitor equipped with a solid state alpha detector, in-line connected to a small accumulation chamber. The effects of chamber leakage and back diffusion on 222Rn free exhalation rate is evaluated. The influence of available exhalation surface, humidity content and precursors concentration on radon and thoron exhalation rates is investigated.

  19. Inverse relationship between heat stable enterotoxin-b induced fluid accumulation and adherence of F4ac-positive enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli in ligated jejunal loops of F4ab/ac fimbria receptor-positive swine.

    PubMed

    Erume, Joseph; Wijemanne, Prageeth; Berberov, Emil M; Kachman, Stephen D; Oestmann, Daniel J; Francis, David H; Moxley, Rodney A

    2013-01-25

    Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) produced by enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) increases bacterial adherence to porcine enterocytes in vitro and enhances small intestinal colonization in swine. Heat-stable enterotoxin-b (STb) is not known to affect colonization; however, through an induction of net fluid accumulation it might reduce bacterial adherence. The relationship between fluid accumulation and bacterial adherence in jejunal loops inoculated with ETEC strains that produce LT, STb, both, or neither toxin was studied. Ligated jejunal loops were constructed in weaned Yorkshire pigs in two independent experiments (Exp. 1, n=5, 8-week-old; Exp. 2, n=6, 6-8-week-old). Each pig was inoculated with six F4ac(+)E. coli strains: (1) LT(+), STb(+) parent (WAM2317); (2) STb(-) (ΔestB) mutant (MUN297); (3) MUN297 complemented with STb (MUN298); (4) LT(-) STb(-) (ΔeltAB ΔestB) mutant (MUN300); (5) MUN300 complemented with LT (MUN301); and (6) 1836-2 (non-enterotoxigenic, wild-type). Pigs were confirmed to be K88 (F4)ab/ac receptor-positive in Exp. 2 by testing for intestinal mucin-type glycoproteins and inferred to be receptor-positive in both Exp. 1 and 2 based on histopathologic evidence of bacterial adherence. Strains that produced STb induced marked fluid accumulation with the response (ml/cm) to WAM2317 and MUN298 significantly greater than that to the other strains (P<0.0001). Conversely, bacterial adherence scores based on immunohistochemistry and CFU/g of washed mucosa were both lowest in the strains that expressed STb and highest in those that did not. For the two experiments combined, the Pearson correlation coefficient (R) between fluid volume (ml/cm) and log CFU per gram was -0.57021 (P<0.0001); R(2)=0.3521 (n=197). These results support the hypothesis that enterotoxin-induced fluid accumulation flushes progeny organisms into the lumen of the bowel, thereby increasing the likelihood of fecal shedding and transmission of the pathogen to new hosts. PMID

  20. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  1. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  2. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  3. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  4. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  5. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  6. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  7. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  8. Chamber propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Langdon, B.

    1991-01-16

    Propagation of a heavy ion beam to the target appears possible under conditions thought to be realizable by several reactor designs. Beam quality at the lens is believed to provide adequate intensity at the target -- but the beam must pass through chamber debris and its self fields along the way. This paper reviews present consensus on propagation modes and presents recent results on the effects of photoionization of the beam ions by thermal x-rays from the heated target. Ballistic propagation through very low densities is a conservative mode. The more-speculative self-pinched mode, at 1 to 10 Torr, offers reactor advantages and is being re-examined by others. 13 refs.

  9. Chamber transport

    SciTech Connect

    OLSON,CRAIG L.

    2000-05-17

    Heavy ion beam transport through the containment chamber plays a crucial role in all heavy ion fusion (HIF) scenarios. Here, several parameters are used to characterize the operating space for HIF beams; transport modes are assessed in relation to evolving target/accelerator requirements; results of recent relevant experiments and simulations of HIF transport are summarized; and relevant instabilities are reviewed. All transport options still exist, including (1) vacuum ballistic transport, (2) neutralized ballistic transport, and (3) channel-like transport. Presently, the European HIF program favors vacuum ballistic transport, while the US HIF program favors neutralized ballistic transport with channel-like transport as an alternate approach. Further transport research is needed to clearly guide selection of the most attractive, integrated HIF system.

  10. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  11. Portable Hyperbaric Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, William C. (Inventor); Locke, James P. (Inventor); DeLaFuente, Horacio (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A portable, collapsible hyperbaric chamber was developed. A toroidal inflatable skeleton provides initial structural support for the chamber, allowing the attendant and/or patient to enter the chamber. Oval hatches mate against bulkhead rings, and the hyperbaric chamber is pressurized. The hatches seal against an o-ring, and the internal pressure of the chamber provides the required pressure against the hatch to maintain an airtight seal. In the preferred embodiment, the hyperbaric chamber has an airlock to allow the attendant to enter and exit the patient chamber during treatment. Visual communication is provided through portholes in the patient and/or airlock chamber. Life monitoring and support systems are in communication with the interior of the hyperbaric chamber and/or airlock chamber through conduits and/or sealed feed-through connectors into the hyperbaric chamber.

  12. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  13. Accumulator with preclosing preventer

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, R.R.; Rice, B.J.

    1981-11-24

    A guided-float accumulator suitable for use with a hydraulic system for an oil well blowout preventer is provided with a wing shut-off valve. Radially inwardly directed outlet parts are aimed at the bottom of the valve wing to generate unbalanced reaction forces which oppose the bernoulli effect forces caused by rapid movement of fluid through the chamber of the shut-off valve, thus preventing premature closing of the valve.

  14. CONTINUOUS ROTATION SCATTERING CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Verba, J.W.; Hawrylak, R.A.

    1963-08-01

    An evacuated scattering chamber for use in observing nuclear reaction products produced therein over a wide range of scattering angles from an incoming horizontal beam that bombards a target in the chamber is described. A helically moving member that couples the chamber to a detector permits a rapid and broad change of observation angles without breaching the vacuum in the chamber. Also, small inlet and outlet openings are provided whose size remains substantially constant. (auth)

  15. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  16. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  17. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  18. Stove with multiple chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Black, A.

    1987-04-21

    A stove is described for burning a solid fuel such as wood. The wall means defines a main air inlet, a combustion gas outlet, and four chambers through which gas passes sequentially from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet. The chambers comprises a pre-heat plenum chamber into which the main air inlet opens. A main combustion chamber contains solid fuel to be burned into which gas passes from the pre-heat plenum chamber, a second combustion chamber which is downstream of the main combustion chamber with respect to the flow of gas from the main air inlet to the combustion gas outlet, and a third combustion chamber from which the combustion gas outlet opens. The stove also comprises a plate having a restricted opening for providing communication between the second and third combustion chambers. And a catalytic converter comprises a body of solid material formed with passageways, the body of solid material being fitted in the restricted opening so that gas passes from the second combustion chamber to the third combustion chamber by way of the passageways in the body.

  19. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  20. Expandable Purge Chambers Would Protect Cryogenic Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2004-01-01

    Expandable ice-prevention and cleanliness-preservation (EIP-CP) chambers have been proposed to prevent the accumulation of ice or airborne particles on quick-disconnect (QD) fittings, or on ducts or tubes that contain cryogenic fluids. In the original application for which the EIP-CP chambers were conceived, there is a requirement to be able to disconnect and reconnect the QD fittings in rapid succession. If ice were to form on the fittings by condensation and freezing of airborne water vapor on the cold fitting surfaces, the ice could interfere with proper mating of the fittings, making it necessary to wait an unacceptably long time for the ice to thaw before attempting reconnection. By keeping water vapor away from the cold fitting surfaces, the EIP-CP chambers would prevent accumulation of ice, preserving the ability to reconnect as soon as required. Basically, the role of an EIP-CP chamber would be to serve as an enclosure for a flow of dry nitrogen gas that would keep ambient air away from QD cryogenic fittings. An EIP-CP chamber would be an inflatable device made of a fabriclike material. The chamber would be attached to an umbilical plate holding a cryogenic QD fitting.

  1. The electrical performance of polymeric insulating materials under accelerated aging in a fog chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gorur, R.S.; Cherney, E.A.; Hackam, R. ); Orbeck, T. )

    1988-07-01

    A comparative study of the ac (60 Hz) surface aging in a fog chamber is reported on cylindrical rod samples of high temperature vulcanized (HTV) silicone rubber and ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) rubber containing various amounts of alumina trihydrate (ATH) and/or silica fillers. In low conductivity (250 ..mu..S/cm) fog, silicone rubber performed better than EPDM samples whereas in high conductivity (1000 ..mu..S/cm) fog, the order of performance was reversed. The mechanisms by which fillers impart tracking and erosion resistance to materials is discussed as influenced by the experimental conditions of the accelerated aging tests. Surface studies by ESCA (Electron Spectroscopy for Chemical Analysis) demonstrate that the hydrophobicity of silicone rubber, despite the accumulation of surface contamination, can be attributed to migration of low molecular weight polymer chains and/or mobile fluids, such as silicone oil.

  2. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  3. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  4. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  5. A soundproof pressure chamber.

    PubMed

    Kitahara, M; Kodama, A; Ozawa, H; Inoue, S

    1994-01-01

    For neurotological research we designed a soundproof pressure chamber in which pressure can be adjusted +/- 1000 mmH2O at the rate of less than 100 mmH2O per second. Noise in the chamber can be maintained under 30-35 dB while pressure is kept at a given level.

  6. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  7. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Method for measuring anterior chamber volume by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Gaoshou; Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Ruichang; Wang, Bingsong; Wang, Ningli

    2007-12-01

    Anterior chamber volume (ACV) is very important for an oculist to make rational pathological diagnosis as to patients who have some optic diseases such as glaucoma and etc., yet it is always difficult to be measured accurately. In this paper, a method is devised to measure anterior chamber volumes based on JPEG-formatted image files that have been transformed from medical images using the anterior-chamber optical coherence tomographer (AC-OCT) and corresponding image-processing software. The corresponding algorithms for image analysis and ACV calculation are implemented in VC++ and a series of anterior chamber images of typical patients are analyzed, while anterior chamber volumes are calculated and are verified that they are in accord with clinical observation. It shows that the measurement method is effective and feasible and it has potential to improve accuracy of ACV calculation. Meanwhile, some measures should be taken to simplify the handcraft preprocess working as to images.

  9. Spontaneous Scleral Perforation of an Anterior Chamber Intraocular Lens.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Oriel; O'Brien, Terrence P

    2016-01-01

    A routine eye examination of a 69-year-old man revealed a scleral perforation of one of the haptics of the anterior chamber intraocular lens (AC IOL) which had been implanted many years ago. The patient was asymptomatic with good visual acuity. His history was negative for any trauma, eye rubbing, topical corticosteroid use, or autoimmune disease. The horizontal and vertical white-to-white diameters of the cornea in the right eye were 11.5 and 10.5 mm, respectively. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed the anterior chamber length to be 12.28 mm horizontally and 10.63 mm vertically. The patient underwent an IOL exchange, and the length of the explanted AC IOL was measured to be 12 mm. We speculate that the AC IOL, which was vertically aligned, was oversized. This case demonstrates the need for proper sizing and positioning of an AC IOL. In complex cases where AC IOL may be used, measuring the horizontal and vertical lengths of the anterior chamber by anterior segment optical coherence tomography prior to surgery may be useful.

  10. Spontaneous Scleral Perforation of an Anterior Chamber Intraocular Lens.

    PubMed

    Spierer, Oriel; O'Brien, Terrence P

    2016-01-01

    A routine eye examination of a 69-year-old man revealed a scleral perforation of one of the haptics of the anterior chamber intraocular lens (AC IOL) which had been implanted many years ago. The patient was asymptomatic with good visual acuity. His history was negative for any trauma, eye rubbing, topical corticosteroid use, or autoimmune disease. The horizontal and vertical white-to-white diameters of the cornea in the right eye were 11.5 and 10.5 mm, respectively. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed the anterior chamber length to be 12.28 mm horizontally and 10.63 mm vertically. The patient underwent an IOL exchange, and the length of the explanted AC IOL was measured to be 12 mm. We speculate that the AC IOL, which was vertically aligned, was oversized. This case demonstrates the need for proper sizing and positioning of an AC IOL. In complex cases where AC IOL may be used, measuring the horizontal and vertical lengths of the anterior chamber by anterior segment optical coherence tomography prior to surgery may be useful. PMID:27462251

  11. Spontaneous Scleral Perforation of an Anterior Chamber Intraocular Lens

    PubMed Central

    Spierer, Oriel; O'Brien, Terrence P.

    2016-01-01

    A routine eye examination of a 69-year-old man revealed a scleral perforation of one of the haptics of the anterior chamber intraocular lens (AC IOL) which had been implanted many years ago. The patient was asymptomatic with good visual acuity. His history was negative for any trauma, eye rubbing, topical corticosteroid use, or autoimmune disease. The horizontal and vertical white-to-white diameters of the cornea in the right eye were 11.5 and 10.5 mm, respectively. Anterior segment optical coherence tomography showed the anterior chamber length to be 12.28 mm horizontally and 10.63 mm vertically. The patient underwent an IOL exchange, and the length of the explanted AC IOL was measured to be 12 mm. We speculate that the AC IOL, which was vertically aligned, was oversized. This case demonstrates the need for proper sizing and positioning of an AC IOL. In complex cases where AC IOL may be used, measuring the horizontal and vertical lengths of the anterior chamber by anterior segment optical coherence tomography prior to surgery may be useful. PMID:27462251

  12. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  13. Acoustic-Levitation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    Uncontaminated environments for highly-pure material processing provided within completely sealed levitation chamber that suspends particles by acoustic excitation. Technique ideally suited for material processing in low gravity environment of space.

  14. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  15. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  16. ACS: ALMA Common Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiozzi, Gianluca; Šekoranja, Matej

    2013-02-01

    ALMA Common Software (ACS) provides a software infrastructure common to all ALMA partners and consists of a documented collection of common patterns and components which implement those patterns. The heart of ACS is based on a distributed Component-Container model, with ACS Components implemented as CORBA objects in any of the supported programming languages. ACS provides common CORBA-based services such as logging, error and alarm management, configuration database and lifecycle management. Although designed for ALMA, ACS can and is being used in other control systems and distributed software projects, since it implements proven design patterns using state of the art, reliable technology. It also allows, through the use of well-known standard constructs and components, that other team members whom are not authors of ACS easily understand the architecture of software modules, making maintenance affordable even on a very large project.

  17. Aging effect in the BESIII drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ming-Yi; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Qin, Zhong-Hua; Shen, Pin; An, Fen-Fen; Ju, Xu-Dong; Liu, Yi; Zhu, Kai; Qun, Ou-Yang; Chen, Yuan-Bo

    2016-01-01

    As the main tracking detector of BESIII, the drift chamber provides accurate measurements of the position and the momentum of the charged particles produced in e+e- collisions at BEPCII. After six years of operation, the drift chamber is suffering from aging problems due to huge beam-related background. The gains of the cells in the first ten layers show an obvious decrease, reaching a maximum decrease of about 29% for the first layer cells. Two calculation methods for the gain change (Bhabha events and accumulated charges with 0.3% aging ratio for inner chamber cells) give almost the same results. For the Malter effect encountered by the inner drift chamber in January 2012, about 0.2% water vapor was added to the MDC gas mixture to solve this cathode aging problem. These results provide an important reference for MDC operating high voltage settings and the upgrade of the inner drift chamber. Supported by the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  18. Solar thermal plasma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonometti, Joseph; Buchele, Donald R.; Castle, Charles H.; Gregory, Don A.

    2001-11-01

    A unique solar thermal chamber has been designed and fabricated to produce the maximum concentration of solar energy and highest temperature possible. Its primary purpose was for solar plasma propulsion experiments and related material specimen testing above 3000 Kelvin. The design not only maximized solar concentration, but also, minimized infrared heat loss. This paper provides the underlining theory and operation of the chamber and initial optical correlation to the actual fabricated hardware. The chamber is placed at the focal point of an existing primary concentrator with a 2.74-meter (9 foot) focal length. A quartz lens focuses a smaller sun image at the inlet hole of the mirrored cavity. The lens focuses two image planes at prescribed positions; the sun at the cavity's entrance hole, and the primary concentrator at the junction plane of two surfaces that form the cavity chamber. The back half is an ellipsoid reflector that produces a 1.27 cm diameter final sun image. The image is 'suspended in space' 7.1cm away from the nearest cavity surface, to minimize thermal and contaminate damage to the mirror surfaces. A hemisphere mirror makes up the front chamber and has its center of curvature at the target image, where rays leaving the target are reflected back upon themselves, minimizing radiation losses.

  19. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  20. Drift Chamber Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walenta, A. H.; ćonka Nurdan, T.

    2003-07-01

    This paper describes a laboratory course held at ICFA 2002 Regional Instrumentation School in Morelia, Mexico. This course intends to introduce drift chambers, which play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. The experimental setup consists of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber, a plastic scintillator detector and a collimated 90Sr source. The measurements on the drift velocity of electrons, its change as a function of a drift field, gas gain and diffusion are performed at this laboratory course.

  1. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  2. Internal combustion chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitz, D.L.

    1988-03-08

    In combination with a high-powered reciprocating piston internal combustion engine, an internal combustion cylinder assembly is described comprising: a cylinder head made of weldable material; a cylinder liner for containing and guiding a reciprocating piston of the engine, a coolant jacket adapted to receive a cooling fluid, mounted on and surrounding the cylinder liner, the jacket being attached to the cylinder head and detachably supported by the cylinder liner, and forming a cooling chamber around the cylinder liner; means to supply the cooling fluid to the cooling chamber and to discharge the cooling fluid therefrom.

  3. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  4. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  5. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  6. Expression characteristics of CS-ACS1, CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3, three members of the 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase gene family in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit under carbon dioxide stress.

    PubMed

    Mathooko, F M; Mwaniki, M W; Nakatsuka, A; Shiomi, S; Kubo, Y; Inaba, A; Nakamura, R

    1999-02-01

    We investigated the expression pattern of three 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) synthase genes, CS-ACS1, CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3 in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) fruit under CO2 stress. CO2 stress-induced ethylene production paralleled the accumulation of only CS-ACS1 transcripts which disappeared upon withdrawal of CO2. Cycloheximide inhibited the CO2 stress-induced ethylene production but superinduced the accumulation of CS-ACS1 transcript. At higher concentrations, cycloheximide also induced the accumulation of CS-ACS2 and CS-ACS3 transcripts. In the presence of CO2 and cycloheximide, the accumulation of CS-ACS2 transcript occurred within 1 h, disappeared after 3 h and increased greatly upon withdrawal of CO2. Inhibitors of protein kinase and types 1 and 2A protein phosphatases which inhibited and stimulated, respectively, CO2 stress-induced ethylene production had little effect on the expression of these genes. The results presented here identify CS-ACS1 as the main ACC synthase gene responsible for the increased ethylene biosynthesis in cucumber fruit under CO2 stress and suggest that this gene is a primary response gene and its expression is under negative control since it is expressed by treatment with cycloheximide. The results further suggest that the regulation of CO2 stress-induced ethylene biosynthesis by reversible protein phosphorylation does not result from enhanced ACC synthase transcription. PMID:10202812

  7. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  8. Flame-Test Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bjorklund, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Experimental chamber provides controlled environment for observation and measurement of flames propagating in expanding plume of flammable air/fuel mixture under atmospheric conditions. Designed to evaluate quenching capability of screen-type flame arresters in atmospheric vents of fuel cargo tanks aboard marine cargo vessels.

  9. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  10. Review of straw chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Toki, W.H.

    1990-03-01

    This is a review of straw chambers used in the HRS, MAC, Mark III, CLEO, AMY, and TPC e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} experiments. The straws are 6--8 mm in diameter, operate at 1--4 atmospheres and obtain resolutions of 45--100 microns. The designs and constructions are summarized and possible improvements discussed.

  11. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  12. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOEpatents

    Krulevitch, Peter; Ackler, Harold D.; Becker, Frederick; Boser, Bernhard E.; Eldredge, Adam B.; Fuller, Christopher K.; Gascoyne, Peter R. C.; Hamilton, Julie K.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Wang, Xiao-Bo

    2002-01-01

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  13. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  14. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  15. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  16. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  17. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  18. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  19. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  20. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  1. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  2. AC magnetohydrodynamic microfluidic switch

    SciTech Connect

    Lemoff, A V; Lee, A P

    2000-03-02

    A microfluidic switch has been demonstrated using an AC Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) pumping mechanism in which the Lorentz force is used to pump an electrolytic solution. By integrating two AC MHD pumps into different arms of a Y-shaped fluidic circuit, flow can be switched between the two arms. This type of switch can be used to produce complex fluidic routing, which may have multiple applications in {micro}TAS.

  3. Three chamber negative ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Ehlers, Kenneth W.; Hiskes, John R.

    1985-01-01

    A negative ion vessel is divided into an excitation chamber, a negative ionization chamber and an extraction chamber by two magnetic filters. Input means introduces neutral molecules into a first chamber where a first electron discharge means vibrationally excites the molecules which migrate to a second chamber. In the second chamber a second electron discharge means ionizes the molecules, producing negative ions which are extracted into or by a third chamber. A first magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the negative ionization chamber from the excitation chamber. A second magnetic filter prevents high energy electrons from entering the extraction chamber from the negative ionizing chamber. An extraction grid at the end of the negative ion vessel attracts negative ions into the third chamber and accelerates them. Another grid, located adjacent to the extraction grid, carries a small positive voltage in order to inhibit positive ions from migrating into the extraction chamber and contour the plasma potential. Additional electrons can be suppressed from the output flux using ExB forces provided by magnetic field means and the extractor grid electric potential.

  4. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  5. CONTINUOUSLY SENSITIVE BUBBLE CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Good, R.H.

    1959-08-18

    A radiation detector of the bubble chamber class is described which is continuously sensitive and which does not require the complex pressure cycling equipment characteristic of prior forms of the chamber. The radiation sensitive element is a gas-saturated liquid and means are provided for establishing a thermal gradient across a region of the liquid. The gradient has a temperature range including both the saturation temperature of the liquid and more elevated temperatures. Thus a supersaturated zone is created in which ionizing radiations may give rise to visible gas bubbles indicative of the passage of the radiation through the liquid. Additional means are provided for replenishing the supply of gas-saturated liquid to maintaincontinuous sensitivity.

  6. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  7. Electrostatic Levitator Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical prots ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), poisitioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  8. Electrostatic Levitator Vaccum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Optical ports ring the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber to admit light from the heating laser (the beam passes through the window at left), positioning lasers (one port is at center), and lamps (such as the deuterium arc lamp at right), and to allow diagnostic instruments to view the sample. The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 2-3 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber while a laser heats the sample until it melts. This lets scientists record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contacting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. The Electrostatic Levitator is one of several tools used in NASA's microgravity materials science program.

  9. Isolation of sequences flanking Ac insertion sites by Ac casting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dafang; Peterson, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Localizing Ac insertions is a fundamental task in studying Ac-induced mutation and chromosomal rearrangements involving Ac elements. Researchers may sometimes be faced with the situation in which the sequence flanking one side of an Ac/Ds element is known, but the other flank is unknown. Or, a researcher may have a small sequence surrounding the Ac/Ds insertion site and needs to obtain additional flanking genomic sequences. One way to rapidly clone unknown Ac/Ds flanking sequences is via a PCR-based method termed Ac casting. This approach utilizes the somatic transposition activity of Ac during plant development, and provides an efficient means for short-range genome walking. Here we describe the principle of Ac casting, and show how it can be applied to isolate Ac macrotransposon insertion sites.

  10. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  11. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  12. Vertical two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1999-03-16

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is disclosed. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  13. Vibrating-chamber levitation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Granett, D.; Lee, M. C.

    1985-10-01

    Systems are described for the acoustic levitation of objects, which enable the use of a sealed rigid chamber to avoid contamination of the levitated object. The apparatus includes a housing forming a substantially closed chamber, and means for vibrating the entire housing at a frequency that produces an acoustic standing wave pattern within the chamber.

  14. Multi-anode ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Bolotnikov, Aleksey E.; Smith, Graham; Mahler, George J.; Vanier, Peter E.

    2010-12-28

    The present invention includes a high-energy detector having a cathode chamber, a support member, and anode segments. The cathode chamber extends along a longitudinal axis. The support member is fixed within the cathode chamber and extends from the first end of the cathode chamber to the second end of the cathode chamber. The anode segments are supported by the support member and are spaced along the longitudinal surface of the support member. The anode segments are configured to generate at least a first electrical signal in response to electrons impinging thereon.

  15. Ionization chamber dosimeter

    DOEpatents

    Renner, Tim R.; Nyman, Mark A.; Stradtner, Ronald

    1991-01-01

    A method for fabricating an ion chamber dosimeter collecting array of the type utilizing plural discrete elements formed on a uniform collecting surface which includes forming a thin insulating layer over an aperture in a frame having surfaces, forming a predetermined pattern of through holes in the layer, plating both surfaces of the layer and simultaneously tilting and rotating the frame for uniform plate-through of the holes between surfaces. Aligned masking and patterned etching of the surfaces provides interconnects between the through holes and copper leads provided to external circuitry.

  16. Review of wire chamber aging

    SciTech Connect

    Va'Vra, J.

    1986-02-01

    This paper makes an overview of the wire chamber aging problems as a function of various chamber design parameters. It emphasizes the chemistry point of view and many examples are drawn from the plasma chemistry field as a guidance for a possible effort in the wire chamber field. The paper emphasizes the necessity of variable tuning, the importance of purity of the wire chamber environment, as well as it provides a practical list of presently known recommendations. In addition, several models of the wire chamber aging are qualitatively discussed. The paper is based on a summary talk given at the Wire Chamber Aging Workshop held at LBL, Berkeley on January 16-17, 1986. Presented also at Wire Chamber Conference, Vienna, February 25-28, 1986. 74 refs., 18 figs., 11 tabs.

  17. Tevatron AC dipole system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is an oscillating dipole magnet which can induce large amplitude oscillations without the emittance growth and decoherence. These properties make it a good tool to measure optics of a hadron synchrotron. The vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is powered by an inexpensive high power audio amplifier since its operating frequency is approximately 20 kHz. The magnet is incorporated into a parallel resonant system to maximize the current. The use of a vertical pinger magnet which has been installed in the Tevatron made the cost relatively inexpensive. Recently, the initial system was upgraded with a more powerful amplifier and oscillation amplitudes up to 2-3{sigma} were achieved with the 980 GeV proton beam. This paper discusses details of the Tevatron AC dipole system and also shows its test results.

  18. AC-3 audio coder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todd, Craig

    1995-12-01

    AC-3 is a system for coding up to 5.1 channels of audio into a low bit-rate data stream. High quality may be obtained with compression ratios approaching 12-1 for multichannel audio programs. The high compression ratio is achieved by methods which do not increase decoder memory, and thus cost. The methods employed include: the transmission of a high frequency resolution spectral envelope; and a novel forward/backward adaptive bit allocation algorithm. In order to satisfy practical requirements of an emissions coder, the AC-3 syntax includes a number of features useful to broadcasters and consumers. These features include: loudness uniformity between programs; dynamic range control; and broadcaster control of downmix coefficients. The AC-3 coder has been formally selected for inclusion of the U.S. HDTV broadcast standard, and has been informally selected for several additional applications.

  19. ac bidirectional motor controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schreiner, K.

    1988-01-01

    Test data are presented and the design of a high-efficiency motor/generator controller at NASA-Lewis for use with the Space Station power system testbed is described. The bidirectional motor driver is a 20 kHz to variable frequency three-phase ac converter that operates from the high-frequency ac bus being designed for the Space Station. A zero-voltage-switching pulse-density-modulation technique is used in the converter to shape the low-frequency output waveform.

  20. Chamber for Aerosol Deposition of Bioparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger; Kirschner, Larry

    2008-01-01

    accumulation of electric charge on them, they are spray-coated with an anti-static material. During use, the base plate and the sides and top of the chamber are grounded as a further measure to minimize the buildup of electric charge.

  1. AC/RF Superconductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ciovati, Gianluigi

    2015-02-01

    This contribution provides a brief introduction to AC/RF superconductivity, with an emphasis on application to accelerators. The topics covered include the surface impedance of normal conductors and superconductors, the residual resistance, the field dependence of the surface resistance, and the superheating field.

  2. Biocontrol activity of Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 against Pseudomonas syringae and its interaction with Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Hong, Chi Eun; Kwon, Suk Yoon; Park, Jeong Mee

    2016-04-01

    Paenibacillus polymyxa AC-1 (AC-1) is a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) that has been used as a soil inoculant for biocontrol of plant pathogenic fungi and to promote plant growth. In this study, we examine the effects of AC-1 on the bacterial phytopathogen Pseudomonas syringae and internal colonization of AC-1 by counting bacterial populations that colonize plants. AC-1 inhibited the growth of both P. syringae pv. tomato DC3000 (Pst) and P. syringae pv. tabaci (Pta) in a concentration-dependent manner in in vitro assays. Upon treatment of AC-1 dropping at root tip of axenically grown Arabidopsis, we found that most of the AC-1 was detected in interior of leaves of Arabidiopsis plants rather than roots after 5 days post infection, indicating systemic spreading of AC-1 occur. We examined further AC-1 colonization patterns in Arabidopsis mutants deficient in phytohormone signaling pathways. These results indicated that abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) signaling pathways positively and negatively contributed, respectively, to AC-1 colonization of leaves, whereas epiphytic accumulation of AC-1 around root tissues was not affected. This study shows that AC-1 is an effective biocontrol agent to suppress P. syringae growth, possibly owing to its colonization patterns as a leaf-inhabiting endophyte. The results showed in this work will help to expand our understanding of the mode of action of AC-1 as a biological control agent and consequently, its application in agriculture.

  3. Aging in the large CDF axial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Allspach, D.; Ambrose, D.; Binkley, M.; Bromberg, C.; Burkett, K.; Kephart, R.; Madrak, R.; Miao, T.; Mukherjee, A.; Roser, R.; Wagner, R.L. /Fermilab

    2004-12-01

    The Central Outer Tracker (COT) is a large axial drift chamber in the Collider Detector at Fermilab operating with a gas mixture that is 50/50 argon/ethane with an admixture of 1.7% isopropanol. In its first two years of operation the COT showed unexpected aging with the worst parts of the chamber experiencing a gain loss of {approx}50% for an accumulated charge of {approx}35 mC/cm. By monitoring the pulse height of hits on good tracks, it was possible to determine the gain as a function of time and location in the chamber. In addition, the currents of the high voltage supplies gave another monitor of chamber gain and its dependence on the charge deposition rate. The aging was worse on the exhaust end of the chamber consistent with polymer buildup as the gas flows through the chamber. The distribution in azimuth suggests that aging is enhanced at lower temperatures, but other factors such as gas flow patterns may be involved. Elemental and molecular analysis of the sense wires found a coating that is mostly carbon and hydrogen with a small amount of oxygen; no silicon or other contaminants were identified. High resolution electron microscope pictures of the wire surface show that the coating is smooth with small sub-micron nodules. In the course of working with the chamber gas system, we discovered a small amount of O{sub 2} is enough to reverse the aging. Operating the chamber with {approx}100 ppm of O{sub 2} reversed almost two years of gain loss in less than 10 days while accumulating {le} 2 mC/cm.

  4. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  5. Mush Column Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsh, B. D.

    2002-12-01

    Magma chambers are a necessary concept in understanding the chemical and physical evolution of magma. The concept may well be similar to a transfer function in circuit or time series analysis. It does what needs to be done to transform source magma into eruptible magma. In gravity and geodetic interpretations the causative body is (usually of necessity) geometrically simple and of limited vertical extent; it is clearly difficult to `see' through the uppermost manifestation of the concentrated magma. The presence of plutons in the upper crust has reinforced the view that magma chambers are large pots of magma, but as in the physical representation of a transfer function, actual magma chambers are clearly distinct from virtual magma chambers. Two key features to understanding magmatic systems are that they are vertically integrated over large distances (e.g., 30-100 km), and that all local magmatic processes are controlled by solidification fronts. Heat transfer considerations show that any viable volcanic system must be supported by a vertically extensive plumbing system. Field and geophysical studies point to a common theme of an interconnected stack of sill-like structures extending to great depth. This is a magmatic Mush Column. The large-scale (10s of km) structure resembles the vertical structure inferred at large volcanic centers like Hawaii (e.g., Ryan et al.), and the fine scale (10s to 100s of m) structure is exemplified by ophiolites and deeply eroded sill complexes like the Ferrar dolerites of the McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The local length scales of the sill reservoirs and interconnecting conduits produce a rich spectrum of crystallization environments with distinct solidification time scales. Extensive horizontal and vertical mushy walls provide conditions conducive to specific processes of differentiation from solidification front instability to sidewall porous flow and wall rock slumping. The size, strength, and time series of eruptive behavior

  6. Environmental calibration chamber operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lester, D. L.

    1988-01-01

    Thermal vacuum capabilities are provided for the development, calibration, and functional operation checks of flight sensors, sources, and laboratory and field instruments. Two systems are available. The first is a 46 cm diameter diffusion pumped vacuum chambler of the bell jar variety. It has an internal thermal shroud, LN2 old trap, two viewing ports, and various electrical and fluid feedthroughs. The other, also an oil diffusion pumped system, consists of a 1.8 m diameter by 2.5 m long stainless steel vacuum tank, associated pumping and control equipment, a liquid nitrogen storage and transfer system and internal IR/visible calibration sources. This is a two story system with the chamber located on one floor and the pumping/cryogenic systems located on the floor below.

  7. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gosset, J.

    1984-02-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  8. Basaltic injections into floored silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.

    Recent studies have provided compelling evidence that many large accumulations of silicic volcanic rocks erupted from long-lasting, floored chambers of silicic magma that were repeatedly injected by basaltic magma. These basaltic infusions are commonly thought to play an important role in the evolution of the silicic systems: they have been proposed as a cause for explosive silicic eruptions [Sparks and Sigurdsson, 1977], compositional variation in ash-flow sheets [Smith, 1979], mafic magmatic inclusions in silicic volcanic rocks [Bacon, 1986], and mixing of mafic and silicic magmas [Anderson, 1976; Eichelberger, 1978]. If, as seems likely, floored silicic magma chambers have frequently been invaded by basalt, then plutonic bodies should provide records of these events. Although plutonic evidence for mixing and commingling of mafic and silicic magmas has been recognized for many years, it has been established only recently that some intrusive complex originated through multiple basaltic injections into floored chambers of silicic magma [e.g., Wiebe, 1974; Michael, 1991; Chapman and Rhodes, 1992].

  9. Experimental investigation of sound absorption of acoustic wedges for anechoic chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyaev, I. V.; Golubev, A. Yu.; Zverev, A. Ya.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Sobolev, A. F.; Chernykh, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    The results of measuring the sound absorption by acoustic wedges, which were performed in AC-3 and AC-11 reverberation chambers at the Central Aerohydrodynamic Institute (TsAGI), are presented. Wedges of different densities manufactured from superfine basaltic and thin mineral fibers were investigated. The results of tests of these wedges were compared to the sound absorption of wedges of the operating AC-2 anechoic facility at TsAGI. It is shown that basaltic-fiber wedges have better sound-absorption characteristics than the investigated analogs and can be recommended for facing anechoic facilities under construction.

  10. HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HATCH CONNECTING TEMPERED AIR CHAMBER AND HOT AIR CHAMBER OF PLENUM WITH ATTACHED DRAFT REGULATOR. - Hot Springs National Park, Bathhouse Row, Superior Bathhouse: Mechanical & Piping Systems, State Highway 7, 1 mile north of U.S. Highway 70, Hot Springs, Garland County, AR

  11. AC power systems handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Whitaker, J.

    1991-01-01

    Transient disturbances are what headaches are made of. Whatever you call them-spikes, surges, are power bumps-they can take your equipment down and leave you with a complicated and expensive repair job. Protection against transient disturbances is a science that demands attention to detail. This book explains how the power distribution system works, what can go wrong with it, and how to protect a facility against abnormalities. system grounding and shielding are covered in detail. Each major method of transient protection is analyzed and its relative merits discussed. The book provides a complete look at the critical elements of the ac power system. Provides a complete look at the ac power system from generation to consumption. Discusses the mechanisms that produce transient disturbances and how to protect against them. Presents diagrams to facilitate system design. Covers new areas, such as the extent of the transient disturbance problem, transient protection options, and stand-by power systems.

  12. Increased Ac excision (iae): Arabidopsis thaliana mutations affecting Ac transposition.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, P; Belzile, F; Page, T; Dean, C

    1997-05-01

    The maize transposable element Ac is highly active in the heterologous hosts tobacco and tomato, but shows very much reduced levels of activity in Arabidopsis. A mutagenesis experiment was undertaken with the aim of identifying Arabidopsis host factors responsible for the observed low levels of Ac activity. Seed from a line carrying a single copy of the Ac element inserted into the streptomycin phosphotransferase (SPT) reporter fusion, and which displayed typically low levels of Ac activity, were mutagenized using gamma rays. Nineteen mutants displaying high levels of somatic Ac activity, as judged by their highly variegated phenotypes, were isolated after screening the M2 generation on streptomycin-containing medium. The mutations fall into two complementation groups, iae1 and iae2, are unlinked to the SPT::Ac locus and segregate in a Mendelian fashion. The iae1 mutation is recessive and the iae2 mutation is semi-dominant. The iae1 and iae2 mutants show 550- and 70-fold increases, respectively, in the average number of Ac excision sectors per cotyledon. The IAE1 locus maps to chromosome 2, whereas the SPT::Ac reporter maps to chromosome 3. A molecular study of Ac activity in the iae1 mutant confirmed the very high levels of Ac excision predicted using the phenotypic assay, but revealed only low levels of Ac re-insertion. Analyses of germinal transposition in the iae1 mutant demonstrated an average germinal excision frequency of 3% and a frequency of independent Ac re-insertions following germinal excision of 22%. The iae mutants represents a possible means of improving the efficiency of Ac/Ds transposon tagging systems in Arabidopsis, and will enable the dissection of host involvement in Ac transposition and the mechanisms employed for controlling transposable element activity.

  13. LRL 25-inch Bubble Chamber

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Alvarez, L. W.; Gow, J. D.; Barrera, F.; Eckman, G.; Shand, J.; Watt, R.; Norgren, D.; Hernandez, H. P.

    1964-07-08

    The recently completed 25-inch hydrogen bubble chamber combines excellent picture quality with a fast operating cycle. The chamber has a unique optical system and is designed to take several pictures each Bevatron pulse, in conjunction with the Bevatron rapid beam ejection system.

  14. Fast-response cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fogal, G. L.

    1977-01-01

    Wall structure keeps chambers at constant, uniform temperature, yet allows them to be cooled rapidly if necessary. Wall structure, used in fast-response cloud chamber, has surface heater and coolant shell separated by foam insulation. It is lightweight and requires relatively little power.

  15. Chamber Music: Skills and Teamwork.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Villarrubia, Charles

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the benefits of participating in chamber music ensembles, such as the development of a heightened level of awareness, and considers the role of the music educator/conductor. Provides tools and exercises that teachers can introduce to chamber music players to improve their rehearsals and performances. (CMK)

  16. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Chao; Li Zhaofei Wu Wenbi; Li Lingling; Yuan Meijin; Pan Lijing; Yang Kai Pang Yi

    2008-12-05

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP}) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc{sup ac53KO-PH-GFP} could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  17. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus ac53 plays a role in nucleocapsid assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Li, Zhaofei; Wu, Wenbi; Li, Lingling; Yuan, Meijin; Pan, Lijing; Yang, Kai; Pang, Yi

    2008-12-01

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) orf53 (ac53) is a highly conserved gene existing in all sequenced Lepidoptera and Hymenoptera baculoviruses, but its function remains unknown. To investigate its role in the baculovirus life cycle, an ac53 deletion virus (vAc(ac53KO-PH-GFP)) was generated through homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Fluorescence and light microscopy and titration analysis revealed that vAc(ac53KO-PH-GFP) could not produce infectious budded virus in infected Sf9 cells. Real-time PCR demonstrated that the ac53 deletion did not affect the levels of viral DNA replication. Electron microscopy showed that many lucent tubular shells devoid of the nucleoprotein core are present in the virogenic stroma and ring zone, indicating that the ac53 knockout affected nucleocapsid assembly. With a recombinant virus expressing an Ac53-GFP fusion protein, we observed that Ac53 was distributed within the cytoplasm and nucleus at 24 h post-infection, but afterwards accumulated predominantly near the nucleus-cytoplasm boundary. These data demonstrate that ac53 is involved in nucleocapsid assembly and is an essential gene for virus production.

  18. National Ignition Facility Target Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

    2000-10-05

    On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was

  19. Ion chamber based neutron detectors

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S; Galambos, Paul C; Renzi, Ronald F

    2014-12-16

    A neutron detector with monolithically integrated readout circuitry, including: a bonded semiconductor die; an ion chamber formed in the bonded semiconductor die; a first electrode and a second electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; and the readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the first and second electrodes. The bonded semiconductor die includes an etched semiconductor substrate bonded to an active semiconductor substrate. The readout circuitry is formed in a portion of the active semiconductor substrate. The ion chamber has a substantially planar first surface on which the first electrode is formed and a substantially planar second surface, parallel to the first surface, on which the second electrode is formed. The distance between the first electrode and the second electrode may be equal to or less than the 50% attenuation length for neutrons in the neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber.

  20. SUMMARY ON TITANIUM NITRIDE COATING OF SNS RING VACUUM CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    TODD, R.; HE, P.; HSEUH, H.C.; WEISS, D.

    2005-05-16

    The inner surfaces of the 248 m Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring vacuum chambers are coated with {approx}100nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) of the chamber walls. There are approximately 135 chambers and kicker modules, some up to 5m in length and 36cm in diameter, coated with TiN. The coating is deposited by means of reactive DC magnetron sputtering -using a - cylindrical cathode with internal permanent magnets. This cathode configuration generates a deposition-rate sufficient to meet the required production schedule and produces stoichiometric films with good adhesion, low SEY and acceptable outgassing. Moreover, the cathode magnet configuration allows for simple changes in length and has been adapted to coat the wide variety of chambers and components contained within the arcs, injection, extraction, collimation and RF straight sections. Chamber types and quantities as well as the cathode configurations are presented herein. The unique coating requirements of the injection kicker ceramic chambers and the extraction kicker ferrite surface will be emphasized. A brief summary of the salient coating properties is given including the interdependence of SEY as a function of surface roughness and its effect on outgassing.

  1. Starting a High School Chamber Music Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutkowski, Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Presents ideas on how to begin a chamber music ensemble. Discusses how to find time to accomplish chamber music playing in and around the school day. Presents short descriptions of chamber music that can be used with ensembles. Includes chamber music resources and additional chamber works. (CMK)

  2. Neutron detection via bubble chambers.

    PubMed

    Jordan, D V; Ely, J H; Peurrung, A J; Bond, L J; Collar, J I; Flake, M; Knopf, M A; Pitts, W K; Shaver, M; Sonnenschein, A; Smart, J E; Todd, L C

    2005-01-01

    Research investigating the application of pressure-cycled bubble chambers to fast neutron detection is described. Experiments with a Halon-filled chamber showed clear sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to a (137)Cs gamma source. Bubble formation was documented using high-speed photography, and a ceramic piezo-electric transducer element registered the acoustic signature of bubble formation. In a second set of experiments, the bubble nucleation response of a Freon-134a chamber to an AmBe neutron source was documented with high-speed photography.

  3. Detection of radioactive accumulations within an incinerator

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenig, F.C. Jr.; Grossman, L.N.

    1986-03-25

    This patent describes an incinerator for burning combustible material contaminated by radiation. This incinerator has a combustion chamber having containment walls of high density refractory brick provided with at least one window opening through the high density refractory brick containment walls. The window consists of a low density body of ceramic fibers. Any radiation from residual radioactive ash within the incinerator containment and inhibited by the high density refractory brick can penetrate outward through the window of low density fiber to beyond the incinerator containment walls. A radiation detector is mounted outside the incinerator containment walls adjacent to the window of low density ceramic fiber for measuring any radiation passing out from the combustion chamber through the low density window. The amount of retained radioactive ash accumulated in the incinerator combustion chamber is indicated on the detector.

  4. AC resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, P.J.

    1983-10-04

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument. 8 figs.

  5. AC Resistance measuring instrument

    DOEpatents

    Hof, Peter J.

    1983-01-01

    An auto-ranging AC resistance measuring instrument for remote measurement of the resistance of an electrical device or circuit connected to the instrument includes a signal generator which generates an AC excitation signal for application to a load, including the device and the transmission line, a monitoring circuit which provides a digitally encoded signal representing the voltage across the load, and a microprocessor which operates under program control to provide an auto-ranging function by which range resistance is connected in circuit with the load to limit the load voltage to an acceptable range for the instrument, and an auto-compensating function by which compensating capacitance is connected in shunt with the range resistance to compensate for the effects of line capacitance. After the auto-ranging and auto-compensation functions are complete, the microprocessor calculates the resistance of the load from the selected range resistance, the excitation signal, and the load voltage signal, and displays of the measured resistance on a digital display of the instrument.

  6. IRIS Leaves Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows the transportation of the IRIS observatory from the thermal vacuum chamber back to the clean tent for final testing and preparations for delivery to the launch site at Vandenberg A...

  7. The multigap resistive plate chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Zeballos, E. Cerron; Crotty, I.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Valverde, J. Lamas; Neupane, S.; Williams, M. C. S.; Zichichi, A.

    2015-02-03

    The paper describes the multigap resistive plate chamber (RPC). This is a variant of the wide gap RPC. However it has much improved time resolution, while keeping all the other advantages of the wide gap RPC design.

  8. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  9. Identification of /sup 233/Ac

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1983-09-01

    We report in this paper identification of the new isotope /sup 233/Ac. Uranium targets were irradiated with 28 GeV protons; after rapid retrieval of the target and separation of actinium from thorium, /sup 233/Ac was allowed to decay into the known /sup 233/Th daughter. Exhaustive chemical purification was employed to permit the identification of /sup 233/Th via its characteristic ..gamma.. radiations. The half-life derived for /sup 233/Ac from several experiments is 2.3 +- 0.3 min. The production cross section for /sup 233/Ac is 100 ..mu..b.

  10. AC and DC power transmission

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    The technical and economic assessment of AC and DC transmission systems; long distance transmission, cable transmission, system inter-connection, voltage support, reactive compensation, stabilisation of systems; parallel operation of DC links with AC systems; comparison between alternatives for particular schemes. Design and application equipment: design, testing and application of equipment for HVDC, series and shunt static compensated AC schemes, including associated controls. Installations: overall design of stations and conductor arrangements for HVDC, series and shunt static AC schemes including insulation co-ordination. System analysis and modelling.

  11. Correlation between anterior chamber characteristics and laser flare photometry immediately after femtosecond laser treatment before phacoemulsification.

    PubMed

    Pahlitzsch, M; Torun, N; Pahlitzsch, M L; Klamann, M K J; Gonnermann, J; Bertelmann, E; Pahlitzsch, T

    2016-08-01

    PurposeTo assess the anterior chamber (AC) characteristics and its correlation to laser flare photometry immediately after femtosecond laser-assisted capsulotomy and photodisruption.Patients and methodsThe study included 97 cataract eyes (n=97, mean age 68.6 years) undergoing femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS). Three cohorts were analysed relating to the flare photometry directly post femtosecond laser treatment (flare <100 n=28, 69.6±7 years; flare 100-249 n=47, 67.7±8 years; flare >249 photon counts per ms cohort n=22, 68.5±10 years). Flare photometry (KOWA FM-700), corneal topography (Oculus Pentacam, Germany: AC depth, volume, angle, pachymetry), axial length, pupil diameter, and endothelial cells were assessed before FLACS, immediately after femtosecond laser treatment and 1 day postoperative (LenSx Alcon, USA). Statistical data were analysed by SPSS v19.0, Inc.ResultsThe AC depth, AC volume, AC angle, central and thinnest corneal thickness showed a significant difference between flare <100 vs flare 100-249 10 min post femtosecond laser procedure (P=0.002, P=0.023, P=0.007, P=0.003, P=0.011, respectively). The AC depth, AC volume, and AC angle were significantly larger (P=0.001, P=0.007, P=0.003, respectively) in the flare <100 vs flare >249 cohort 10 min post femtosecond laser treatment.ConclusionsA flat AC, low AC volume, and a narrow AC angle were parameters associated with higher intraocular inflammation. These criteria could be used for patient selection in FLACS to reduce postoperative intraocular inflammation.

  12. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer. 24 figs.

  13. Digital ac monitor

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.

    1987-06-09

    An apparatus and method is provided for monitoring a plurality of analog ac circuits by sampling the voltage and current waveform in each circuit at predetermined intervals, converting the analog current and voltage samples to digital format, storing the digitized current and voltage samples and using the stored digitized current and voltage samples to calculate a variety of electrical parameters; some of which are derived from the stored samples. The non-derived quantities are repeatedly calculated and stored over many separate cycles then averaged. The derived quantities are then calculated at the end of an averaging period. This produces a more accurate reading, especially when averaging over a period in which the power varies over a wide dynamic range. Frequency is measured by timing three cycles of the voltage waveform using the upward zero crossover point as a starting point for a digital timer.

  14. Cooling Floor AC Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Lu; Hao, Ding; Hong, Zhang; Ce, Gao Dian

    The present HVAC equipments for the residential buildings in the Hot-summer-and-Cold-winter climate region are still at a high energy consuming level. So that the high efficiency HVAC system is an urgently need for achieving the preset government energy saving goal. With its advantage of highly sanitary, highly comfortable and uniform of temperature field, the hot-water resource floor radiation heating system has been widely accepted. This paper has put forward a new way in air-conditioning, which combines the fresh-air supply unit and such floor radiation system for the dehumidification and cooling in summer or heating in winter. By analyze its advantages and limitations, we found that this so called Cooling/ Heating Floor AC System can improve the IAQ of residential building while keep high efficiency quality. We also recommend a methodology for the HVAC system designing, which will ensure the reduction of energy cost of users.

  15. Anterior chamber angle in the exfoliation syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, P K; Spaeth, G L; Poryzees, E M

    1985-01-01

    The gonioscopic findings of 76 patients with the exfoliation syndrome were reviewed. A high frequency of narrowness of the anterior chamber (AC) angle was found (32%). 18% had angles considered occludable, and 14% had obvious angle-closure glaucoma as shown by the presence of peripheral anterior synechias (PAS). Increased pigmentation of the posterior trabecular meshwork (PTM) was noted in all cases. When this pigmentation was markedly asymmetrical, unilateral exfoliation with glaucoma was common in the more pigmented eye. In addition heavy angle pigmentation in the absence of exfoliation was noted in the fellow eye of patients with characteristic exfoliated material in the other eye. Increased pigmentation of the PTM may be the earliest detectable sign of the exfoliation syndrome (ES). The clinical significance of our estimating PTM pigmentation at the 12 o'clock position is discussed. In view of the accelerated optic nerve damage associated with the development of glaucoma secondary to ES, routine estimation of the pigmentation of the PTM at 12 o'clock is recommended in the hope of early detection of cases of otherwise inapparent ES. Images PMID:3966996

  16. A recording chamber for small volume slice electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Dondzillo, Anna; Quinn, Kevin D; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I; Reisdorph, Nichole; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2015-09-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from brain slices are typically performed in small recording chambers that allow for the superfusion of the tissue with artificial extracellular solution (ECS), while the chamber holding the tissue is mounted in the optical path of a microscope to image neurons in the tissue. ECS itself is inexpensive, and thus superfusion rates and volumes of ECS consumed during an experiment using standard ECS are not critical. However, some experiments require the addition of expensive pharmacological agents or other chemical compounds to the ECS, creating a need to build superfusion systems that operate on small volumes while still delivering appropriate amounts of oxygen and other nutrients to the tissue. We developed a closed circulation tissue chamber for slice recordings that operates with small volumes of bath solution in the range of 1.0 to 2.6 ml and a constant oxygen/carbon dioxide delivery to the solution in the bath. In our chamber, the ECS is oxygenated and recirculated directly in the recording chamber, eliminating the need for tubes and external bottles/containers to recirculate and bubble ECS and greatly reducing the total ECS volume required for superfusion. At the same time, the efficiency of tissue oxygenation and health of the section are comparable to standard superfusion methods. We also determined that the small volume of ECS contains a sufficient amount of nutrients to support the health of a standard brain slice for several hours without concern for either depletion of nutrients or accumulation of waste products. PMID:26203105

  17. A recording chamber for small volume slice electrophysiology.

    PubMed

    Dondzillo, Anna; Quinn, Kevin D; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I; Reisdorph, Nichole; Lei, Tim C; Klug, Achim

    2015-09-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from brain slices are typically performed in small recording chambers that allow for the superfusion of the tissue with artificial extracellular solution (ECS), while the chamber holding the tissue is mounted in the optical path of a microscope to image neurons in the tissue. ECS itself is inexpensive, and thus superfusion rates and volumes of ECS consumed during an experiment using standard ECS are not critical. However, some experiments require the addition of expensive pharmacological agents or other chemical compounds to the ECS, creating a need to build superfusion systems that operate on small volumes while still delivering appropriate amounts of oxygen and other nutrients to the tissue. We developed a closed circulation tissue chamber for slice recordings that operates with small volumes of bath solution in the range of 1.0 to 2.6 ml and a constant oxygen/carbon dioxide delivery to the solution in the bath. In our chamber, the ECS is oxygenated and recirculated directly in the recording chamber, eliminating the need for tubes and external bottles/containers to recirculate and bubble ECS and greatly reducing the total ECS volume required for superfusion. At the same time, the efficiency of tissue oxygenation and health of the section are comparable to standard superfusion methods. We also determined that the small volume of ECS contains a sufficient amount of nutrients to support the health of a standard brain slice for several hours without concern for either depletion of nutrients or accumulation of waste products.

  18. A recording chamber for small volume slice electrophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Kevin D.; Cruickshank-Quinn, Charmion I.; Reisdorph, Nichole; Lei, Tim C.; Klug, Achim

    2015-01-01

    Electrophysiological recordings from brain slices are typically performed in small recording chambers that allow for the superfusion of the tissue with artificial extracellular solution (ECS), while the chamber holding the tissue is mounted in the optical path of a microscope to image neurons in the tissue. ECS itself is inexpensive, and thus superfusion rates and volumes of ECS consumed during an experiment using standard ECS are not critical. However, some experiments require the addition of expensive pharmacological agents or other chemical compounds to the ECS, creating a need to build superfusion systems that operate on small volumes while still delivering appropriate amounts of oxygen and other nutrients to the tissue. We developed a closed circulation tissue chamber for slice recordings that operates with small volumes of bath solution in the range of 1.0 to 2.6 ml and a constant oxygen/carbon dioxide delivery to the solution in the bath. In our chamber, the ECS is oxygenated and recirculated directly in the recording chamber, eliminating the need for tubes and external bottles/containers to recirculate and bubble ECS and greatly reducing the total ECS volume required for superfusion. At the same time, the efficiency of tissue oxygenation and health of the section are comparable to standard superfusion methods. We also determined that the small volume of ECS contains a sufficient amount of nutrients to support the health of a standard brain slice for several hours without concern for either depletion of nutrients or accumulation of waste products. PMID:26203105

  19. 63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. Interior view, kitchen chamber, north elevation. The kitchen chamber was completed in the first stages of phase III construction. The paneled wall to the fireplace's right displays a phase III molding profile. The mark between the cabinet doors and on the large lower panel indicates the former position of a partition wall. The chimney-breast paneling bears a phase I profile and might have been moved to the room when the fireplace mass in the hall was reduced. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  20. Plant growth chamber M design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M.

    1986-01-01

    Crop production is just one of the many processes involved in establishing long term survival of man in space. The benefits of integrating higher plants into the overall plan was recognized early by NASA through the Closed Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) program. The first step is to design, construct, and operate a sealed (gas, liquid, and solid) plant growth chamber. A 3.6 m diameter by 6.7 m high closed cylinder (previously used as a hypobaric vessel during the Mercury program) is being modified for this purpose. The chamber is mounted on legs with the central axis vertical. Entrance to the chamber is through an airlock. This chamber will be devoted entirely to higher plant experimentation. Any waste treatment, food processing or product storage studies will be carried on outside of this chamber. Its primary purpose is to provide input and output data on solids, liquids, and gases for single crop species and multiple species production using different nutrient delivery systems.

  1. Emulsion Chamber Technology Experiment (ECT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki

    1996-01-01

    The experimental objective of Emulsion Chamber Technology (ECT) was to develop space-borne emulsion chamber technology so that cosmic rays and nuclear interactions may subsequently be studied at extremely high energies with long exposures in space. A small emulsion chamber was built and flown on flight STS-62 of the Columbia in March 1994. Analysis of the several hundred layers of radiation-sensitive material has shown excellent post-flight condition and suitability for cosmic ray physics analysis at much longer exposures. Temperature control of the stack was 20 +/-1 C throughout the active control period and no significant deviations of temperature or pressure in the chamber were observed over the entire mission operations period. The unfortunate flight attitude of the orbiter (almost 90% Earth viewing) prevented any significant number of heavy particles (Z greater than or equal to 10) reaching the stack and the inverted flow of shower particles in the calorimeter has not allowed evaluation of absolute primary cosmic ray-detection efficiency nor of the practical time limits of useful exposure of these calorimeters in space to the level of detail originally planned. Nevertheless, analysis of the observed backgrounds and quality of the processed photographic and plastic materials after the flight show that productive exposures of emulsion chambers are feasible in low orbit for periods of up to one year or longer. The engineering approaches taken in the ECT program were proven effective and no major environmental obstacles to prolonged flight are evident.

  2. Neutron Detection via Bubble Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, David V.; Ely, James H.; Peurrung, Anthony J.; Bond, Leonard J.; Collar, J. I.; Flake, Matthew; Knopf, Michael A.; Pitts, W. K.; Shaver, Mark W.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Smart, John E.; Todd, Lindsay C.

    2005-10-06

    The results of a Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) exploratory research project investigating the feasibility of fast neutron detection using a suitably prepared and operated, pressure-cycled bubble chamber are described. The research was conducted along two parallel paths. Experiments with a slow pressure-release Halon chamber at the Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago showed clear bubble nucleation sensitivity to an AmBe neutron source and insensitivity to the 662 keV gammas from a 137Cs source. Bubble formation was documented via high-speed (1000 frames/sec) photography, and the acoustic signature of bubble formation was detected using a piezo-electric transducer element mounted on the base of the chamber. The chamber’s neutron sensitivity as a function of working fluid temperature was mapped out. The second research path consisted of the design, fabrication, and testing of a fast pressure-release Freon-134a chamber at PNNL. The project concluded with successful demonstrations of the PNNL chamber’s AmBe neutron source sensitivity and 137Cs gamma insensitivity. The source response tests of the PNNL chamber were documented with high-speed photography.

  3. Plasma chemistry in wire chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Wise, J.

    1990-05-01

    The phenomenology of wire chamber aging is discussed and fundamentals of proportional counters are presented. Free-radical polymerization and plasma polymerization are discussed. The chemistry of wire aging is reviewed. Similarities between wire chamber plasma (>1 atm dc-discharge) and low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas, which have been more widely studied, are suggested. Construction and use of a system to allow study of the plasma reactions occurring in wire chambers is reported. A proportional tube irradiated by an {sup 55}Fe source is used as a model wire chamber. Condensable species in the proportional tube effluent are concentrated in a cryotrap and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Several different wire chamber gases (methane, argon/methane, ethane, argon/ethane, propane, argon/isobutane) are tested and their reaction products qualitatively identified. For all gases tested except those containing methane, use of hygroscopic filters to remove trace water and oxygen contaminants from the gas resulted in an increase in the average molecular weight of the products, consistent with results from low-pressure rf-discharge plasmas. It is suggested that because water and oxygen inhibit polymer growth in the gas phase that they may also reduce polymer deposition in proportional tubes and therefore retard wire aging processes. Mechanistic implications of the plasma reactions of hydrocarbons with oxygen are suggested. Unresolved issues in this work and proposals for further study are discussed.

  4. Iridium-Coated Rhenium Combustion Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J.; Tuffias, Robert H.; Rosenberg, Sanders D.

    1994-01-01

    Iridium-coated rhenium combustion chamber withstands operating temperatures up to 2,200 degrees C. Chamber designed to replace older silicide-coated combustion chamber in small rocket engine. Modified versions of newer chamber could be designed for use on Earth in gas turbines, ramjets, and scramjets.

  5. Theory of the ac spin-valve effect.

    PubMed

    Kochan, Denis; Gmitra, Martin; Fabian, Jaroslav

    2011-10-21

    The spin-valve complex magnetoimpedance of symmetric ferromagnet-normal-metal-ferromagnet junctions is investigated within the drift-diffusion (standard) model of spin injection. The ac magnetoresistance-the real part difference of the impedances of the parallel and antiparallel magnetization configurations-exhibits an overall damped oscillatory behavior, as an interplay of the diffusion and spin relaxation times. In wide junctions the ac magnetoresistance oscillates between positive and negative values, reflecting resonant amplification and depletion of the spin accumulation, while the line shape for thin tunnel junctions is predicted to be purely Lorentzian. The ac spin-valve effect could be a technique to extract spin transport and spin relaxation parameters in the absence of a magnetic field and for a fixed sample size. PMID:22107552

  6. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  7. Impedances of Laminated Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Burov, A.; Lebedev, V.; /Fermilab

    2011-06-22

    First publications on impedance of laminated vacuum chambers are related to early 70s: those are of S. C. Snowdon [1] and of A. G. Ruggiero [2]; fifteen years later, a revision paper of R. Gluckstern appeared [3]. All the publications were presented as Fermilab preprints, and there is no surprise in that: the Fermilab Booster has its laminated magnets open to the beam. Being in a reasonable mutual agreement, these publications were all devoted to the longitudinal impedance of round vacuum chambers. The transverse impedance and the flat geometry case were addressed in more recent paper of K. Y. Ng [4]. The latest calculations of A. Macridin et al. [5] revealed some disagreement with Ref. [4]; this fact stimulated us to get our own results on that matter. Longitudinal and transverse impendances are derived for round and flat laminated vacuum chambers. Results of this paper agree with Ref. [5].

  8. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargusingh, Miriam M.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications, including the treatment of medical conditions. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, hyperbaric oxygen therapy is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system that will provide controlled pressurization of the system, and provide adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the

  9. Open-chamber combustion study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyers, D. P.; Meyer, R. C.

    1994-04-01

    The test program was undertaken to research trade-offs between engine design and operational parameters on open-chamber, premixed spark-ignited gas engines, with a primary focus on combustion effects. This included combustion chamber designs which are conceptually diametrically opposed -- a high squish design typical of diesel engines and a virtually quiescent design. The reader should note that these data are somewhat abstract compared to conventional engines, because the Labeco test engine has exceptionally high friction and the lean-burn data were run unboosted.

  10. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  11. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  12. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  13. Annular-Cross-Section CFE Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Proposed continuous-flow-electrophoresis (CFE) chamber of annular cross section offers advantages over conventional CFE chamber, and wedge-cross-section chamber described in "Increasing Sensitivity in Continuous-Flow Electrophoresis" (MFS-26176). In comparison with wedge-shaped chamber, chamber of annular cross section virtually eliminates such wall effects as electro-osmosis and transverse gradients of velocity. Sensitivity enhanced by incorporating gradient maker and radial (collateral) flow.

  14. Operation Method for AC Motor Control during Power Interruption in Direct AC/AC Converter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizu, Keiichiro; Azuma, Satoshi

    Direct AC/AC converters have been studied due to their potential use in power converters with no DC-link capacitor, which can contribute to the miniaturization of power converters. However, the absence of a DC-link capacitor makes it difficult to control the AC motor during power interruption. First, this paper proposes a system that realizes AC motor control during power interruption by utilizing a clamp capacitor. In general, direct AC/AC converters have a clamp circuit consisting of a rectifier diode(s) and a clamp capacitor in order to avoid over-voltages. In the proposed system, there is an additional semiconductor switch reverse-parallel to the rectifier diode(s), and the clamp capacitor voltage can be utilized for AC motor control by turning on the additional switch. Second, this paper discusses an operation method for AC motor control and clamp capacitor voltage control during power interruption. In the proposed method “DC-link voltage control”, the kinetic energy in the AC motor is transformed into electrical energy and stored in the clamp capacitor; the clamp capacitor is therefore charged and the capacitor voltage is controlled to remain constant at an instruction value. Third, this paper discusses a switching operation during power interruption. A dead-time is introduced between the operation of turning off all switches on the rectifier side and the operation of turning on the additional switch, which prevents the occurrence of a short circuit between the interrupted power source and the clamp capacitor. Finally, experimental results are presented. During power interruptions, an output current was continuously obtained and the clamp capacitor voltage was maintained to be equal to the instruction value of the capacitor voltage. These results indicate that both AC motor control and capacitor voltage control were successfully achieved by using the proposed system.

  15. ACS CCD Stability Monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grogin, Norman

    2012-10-01

    A moderately crowded stellar field in the cluster 47 Tuc {6 arcmin West of the cluster core} is observed every four months with the WFC. The first visit exercises the full suite of broad and narrow band imaging filters and sub-array modes; following visits observe with only the six most popular Cycle 18 filters in full-frame mode. The positions and magnitudes of objects will be used to monitor local and large scale variations in the plate scale and the sensitivity of the detectors and to derive an independent measure of the detector CTE. One exposure in each sub-array mode with the WFC will allow us to verify that photometry obtained in full-frame and in sub-array modes are repeatable to better than 1%. This test is important for the ACS Photometric Cross-Calibration program, which uses sub-array exposures. This program may receive additional orbits to investigate ORIENT-dependent geometric distortion, which motivates the ORIENT and BETWEEN requirement on the first visit.

  16. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, Sandra K.; Lee, Jonathan; Holmes, Richard; Zimmerman, Frank; Effinger, Mike; Turner, James E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has successfully applied new materials and fabrication techniques to create actively cooled thrust chambers that operate 200-400 degrees hotter and weigh 50% lighter than conventional designs. In some vehicles, thrust assemblies account for as much as 20% of the engine weight. So, reducing the weight of these components and increasing their operating range will benefit many engines and vehicle designs, including Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) concepts. Obviously, copper and steel alloys have been used successfully for many years in the chamber components of thrust assemblies. Yet, by replacing the steel alloys with Polymer Matrix Composite (PMC) and/or Metal Matrix Composite (MMC) materials, design weights can be drastically reduced. In addition, replacing the traditional copper alloys with a Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) or an advanced copper alloy (Cu-8Cr-4Nb, also known as GRCop-84) significantly increases allowable operating temperatures. Several small MMC and PMC demonstration chambers have recently been fabricated with promising results. Each of these designs included GRCop-84 for the cooled chamber liner. These units successfully verified that designs over 50% lighter are feasible. New fabrication processes, including advanced casting technology and a low cost vacuum plasma spray (VPS) process, were also demonstrated with these units. Hot-fire testing at MSFC is currently being conducted on the chambers to verify increased operating temperatures available with the GRCop-84 liner. Unique CMC chamber liners were also successfully fabricated and prepared for hot-fire testing. Yet, early results indicate these CMC liners need significantly more development in order to use them in required chamber designs. Based on the successful efforts with the MMC and PMC concepts, two full size "lightweight" chambers are currently being designed and fabricated for hot

  17. The Antiproton Accumulator and Collector and the discovery of the W & Z intermediate vector bosons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chohan, Vinod; Maury, Stephan

    The following sections are included: * Preface * Brief outline of the overall scheme for antiprotons of the SPS as a collider * Antiproton production and accumulation * The AA and AC storage rings * Stochastic cooling and stacking * Post-acceleration of antiprotons and beams for SPS Collider * Proton test beams for the AA and AC from the PS * The W and Z discoveries and the Nobel Prize * Accumulator performance * Acknowledgements and conclusions * References

  18. AC photovoltaic module magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect

    Jennings, C.; Chang, G.J.; Reyes, A.B.; Whitaker, C.M.

    1997-12-31

    Implementation of alternating current (AC) photovoltaic (PV) modules, particularly for distributed applications such as PV rooftops and facades, may be slowed by public concern about electric and magnetic fields (EMF). This paper documents magnetic field measurements on an AC PV module, complementing EMF research on direct-current PV modules conducted by PG and E in 1993. Although not comprehensive, the PV EMF data indicate that 60 Hz magnetic fields (the EMF type of greatest public concern) from PV modules are comparable to, or significantly less than, those from household appliances. Given the present EMF research knowledge, AC PV module EMF may not merit considerable concern.

  19. Copper and cobalt mobility in soil and accumulation in a metallophyte as influenced by experimental manipulation of soil chemical factors.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bastien; Pourret, Olivier; Meerts, Pierre; Jitaru, Petru; Cancès, Benjamin; Grison, Claude; Faucon, Michel-Pierre

    2016-03-01

    The influence of Fe oxides, Mn oxides and organic matter (OM) on the Cu and Co mobility in soil and accumulation in the metallophyte Anisopappus chinensis (Ac), as compared with Helianthus annuus (Ha), was experimentally investigated. Growth and accumulation response when increasing the exchangeable Cu and Co concentrations in soil were also investigated. Plants were cultivated on soil where concentrations of Cu, Co, Fe oxides, Mn oxides and OM content were varied according to 36 treatments. The OM supply decreased the Cu mobility and increased the Co mobility, resulting in decreasing the foliar Cu of Ac and increasing the foliar Co of Ha. The Fe oxides supply could increase the Cu accumulation for Ac, but was not verified for Ha. Compared with Ha, Ac increasingly accumulated Cu and Co without negative effect on plant growth while increasing Cu and Co mobility to phytotoxic concentrations. The results revealed promising perspectives for the use of Ac in Cu-contaminated environment phytoremediation applications. PMID:26706934

  20. Simulation of Layered Magma Chambers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cawthorn, Richard Grant

    1991-01-01

    The principles of magma addition and liquid layering in magma chambers can be demonstrated by dissolving colored crystals. The concepts of density stratification and apparent lack of mixing of miscible liquids is convincingly illustrated with hydrous solutions at room temperature. The behavior of interstitial liquids in "cumulus" piles can be…

  1. Nondestructive test of regenerative chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.; Stauffis, R.; Wood, R.

    1972-01-01

    Flat panels simulating internally cooled regenerative thrust chamber walls were fabricated by electroforming, brazing and diffusion bonding to evaluate the feasibility of nondestructive evaluation techniques to detect bonds of various strength integrities. Ultrasonics, holography, and acoustic emission were investigated and found to yield useful and informative data regarding the presence of bond defects in these structures.

  2. Chamber Music for Every Instrumentalist.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latten, James E.

    2001-01-01

    Discusses why students who play musical instruments should participate in a chamber music ensemble. Provides rationale for using small ensembles in the high school band curriculum. Focuses on the topic of scheduling, illustrating how to insert small ensembles into the lesson schedule, and how to set up a new schedule. (CMK)

  3. Chamber Music for Better Bands.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Michael R.

    1998-01-01

    Considers why students should participate in a chamber music ensemble: (1) students develop a sense of collegiality and self-worth; (2) ensembles encourage practice time; and (3) ensembles provide flexible performance opportunities. Highlights the different aspects of creating an ensemble from the availability of faculty to selecting challenging…

  4. Chamber Clearing First Principles Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Loosmore, G

    2009-06-09

    LIFE fusion is designed to generate 37.5 MJ of energy per shot, at 13.3 Hz, for a total average fusion power of 500 MW. The energy from each shot is partitioned among neutrons ({approx}78%), x-rays ({approx}12%), and ions ({approx}10%). First wall heating is dominated by x-rays and debris because the neutron mean free path is much longer than the wall thickness. Ion implantation in the first wall also causes damage such as blistering if not prevented. To moderate the peak-pulse heating, the LIFE fusion chamber is filled with a gas (such as xenon) to reduce the peak-pulse heat load. The debris ions and majority of the x-rays stop in the gas, which re-radiates this energy over a longer timescale (allowing time for heat conduction to cool the first wall sufficiently to avoid damage). After a shot, because of the x-ray and ion deposition, the chamber fill gas is hot and turbulent and contains debris ions. The debris needs to be removed. The ions increase the gas density, may cluster or form aerosols, and can interfere with the propagation of the laser beams to the target for the next shot. Moreover, the tritium and high-Z hohlraum debris needs to be recovered for reuse. Additionally, the cryogenic target needs to survive transport through the gas mixture to the chamber center. Hence, it will be necessary to clear the chamber of the hot contaminated gas mixture and refill it with a cool, clean gas between shots. The refilling process may create density gradients that could interfere with beam propagation, so the fluid dynamics must be studied carefully. This paper describes an analytic modeling effort to study the clearing and refilling process for the LIFE fusion chamber. The models used here are derived from first principles and balances of mass and energy, with the intent of providing a first estimate of clearing rates, clearing times, fractional removal of ions, equilibrated chamber temperatures, and equilibrated ion concentrations for the chamber. These can be used

  5. On line high dose static position monitoring by ionization chamber detector for industrial gamma irradiators.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Ary A; Vieira, Jose M; Hamada, Margarida M

    2010-01-01

    A 1 cm(3) cylindrical ionization chamber was developed to measure high doses on line during the sample irradiation in static position, in a (60)Co industrial plant. The developed ionization chamber showed to be suitable for use as a dosimeter on line. A good linearity of the detector was found between the dose and the accumulated charge, independently of the different dose rates caused by absorbing materials.

  6. Hydrostatic Hyperbaric Chamber Ventilation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sarguisingh, Miriam J.

    2012-01-01

    The hydrostatic hyperbaric chamber (HHC) represents the merger of several technologies in development for NASA aerospace applications, harnessed to directly benefit global health. NASA has significant experience developing composite hyperbaric chambers for a variety of applications. NASA also has researched the application of water-filled vessels to increase tolerance of acceleration forces. The combination of these two applications has resulted in the hydrostatic chamber, which has been conceived as a safe, affordable means of making hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT) available in the developing world for the treatment of a variety of medical conditions. Specifically, HBOT is highly-desired as a possibly curative treatment for Buruli Ulcer, an infectious condition that afflicts children in sub-Saharan Africa. HBOT is simply too expensive and too dangerous to implement in the developing world using standard equipment. The HHC technology changes the paradigm. The HHC differs from standard hyperbaric chambers in that the majority of its volume is filled with water which is pressurized by oxygen being supplied in the portion of the chamber containing the patient s head. This greatly reduces the amount of oxygen required to sustain a hyperbaric atmosphere, thereby making the system more safe and economical to operate. An effort was taken to develop an HHC system to apply HBOT to children that is simple and robust enough to support transport, assembly, maintenance and operation in developing countries. This paper details the concept for an HHC ventilation and pressurization system to provide controlled pressurization and adequate washout of carbon dioxide while the subject is enclosed in the confined space during the administration of the medical treatment. The concept took into consideration operational complexity, safety to the patient and operating personnel, and physiological considerations. The simple schematic, comprised of easily acquired commercial hardware

  7. Some effects of thermal-cycle-induced deformation in rocket thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannum, N. P.; Price, R. G., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The deformation process observed in the hot gas side wall of rocket combustion chambers was investigaged for three different liner materials. Five thrust chambers were cycled to failure by using hydrogen and oxygen as propellants at a chamber pressure of 4.14 MN/cu m. The deformation was observed nondestructively at midlife points and destructively after failure occurred. The cyclic life results are presented with an accompanying discussion about the problems of life prediction associated with the types of failures encountered in the present work. Data indicating the deformation of the thrust chamber liner as cycles are accumulated are presented for each of the test thrust chambers. From these deformation data and observation of the failure sites it is evident that modeling the failure process as classic low cycle thermal fatigue is inadequate as a life prediction method.

  8. Reduced Toxicity Fuel Satellite Propulsion System Including Axial Thruster and ACS Thruster Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Steven J. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A reduced toxicity fuel satellite propulsion system including a reduced toxicity propellant supply for consumption in an axial class thruster and an ACS class thruster. The system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to the ACS decomposing element of an ACS thruster. The ACS decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot propulsive gases. In addition the system includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying the reduced toxicity propellant to an axial decomposing element of the axial thruster. The axial decomposing element is operative to decompose the reduced toxicity propellant into hot gases. The system further includes suitable valves and conduits for supplying a second propellant to a combustion chamber of the axial thruster, whereby the hot gases and the second propellant auto-ignite and begin the combustion process for producing thrust.

  9. Cadmium-induced ethylene production and responses in Arabidopsis thaliana rely on ACS2 and ACS6 gene expression

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Anthropogenic activities cause metal pollution worldwide. Plants can absorb and accumulate these metals through their root system, inducing stress as a result of excess metal concentrations inside the plant. Ethylene is a regulator of multiple plant processes, and is affected by many biotic and abiotic stresses. Increased ethylene levels have been observed after exposure to excess metals but it remains unclear how the increased ethylene levels are achieved at the molecular level. In this study, the effects of cadmium (Cd) exposure on the production of ethylene and its precursor 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), and on the expression of the ACC Synthase (ACS) and ACC Oxidase (ACO) multigene families were investigated in Arabidopsis thaliana. Results Increased ethylene release after Cd exposure was directly measurable in a system using rockwool-cultivated plants; enhanced levels of the ethylene precursor ACC together with higher mRNA levels of ethylene responsive genes: ACO2, ETR2 and ERF1 also indicated increased ethylene production in hydroponic culture. Regarding underlying mechanisms, it was found that the transcript levels of ACO2 and ACO4, the most abundantly expressed members of the ACO multigene family, were increased upon Cd exposure. ACC synthesis is the rate-limiting step in ethylene biosynthesis, and transcript levels of both ACS2 and ACS6 showed the highest increase and became the most abundant isoforms after Cd exposure, suggesting their importance in the Cd-induced increase of ethylene production. Conclusions Cadmium induced the biosynthesis of ACC and ethylene in Arabidopsis thaliana plants mainly via the increased expression of ACS2 and ACS6. This was confirmed in the acs2-1acs6-1 double knockout mutants, which showed a decreased ethylene production, positively affecting leaf biomass and resulting in a delayed induction of ethylene responsive gene expressions without significant differences in Cd contents between wild-type and

  10. Chamber dynamic research with pulsed power

    SciTech Connect

    PETERSON,ROBERT R.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; RENK,TIMOTHY J.; ROCHAU,GARY E.; SWEENEY,MARY ANN

    2000-05-15

    In Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE), Target Chamber Dynamics (TCD) is an integral part of the target chamber design and performance. TCD includes target output deposition of target x-rays, ions and neutrons in target chamber gases and structures, vaporization and melting of target chamber materials, radiation-hydrodynamics in target chamber vapors and gases, and chamber conditions at the time of target and beam injections. Pulsed power provides a unique environment for IFE-TCD validation experiments in two important ways: they do not require the very clean conditions which lasers need and they currently provide large x-ray and ion energies.

  11. An H2A Histone Isotype, H2ac, Associates with Telomere and Maintains Telomere Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Tzeng, Tsai-Yu; Lin, I-Hsuan; Hsu, Ming-Ta

    2016-01-01

    Telomeres are capped at the ends of eukaryotic chromosomes and are composed of TTAGGG repeats bound to the shelterin complex. Here we report that a replication-dependent histone H2A isotype, H2ac, was associated with telomeres in human cells and co-immunoprecipitates with telomere repeat factor 2 (TRF2) and protection of telomeres protein 1 (POT1), whereas other histone H2A isotypes and mutations of H2ac did not bind to telomeres or these two proteins. The amino terminal basic domain of TRF2 was necessary for the association with H2ac and for the recruitment of H2ac to telomeres. Depletion of H2ac led to loss of telomeric repeat sequences, the appearance of dysfunctional telomeres, and chromosomal instability, including chromosomal breaks and anaphase bridges, as well as accumulation of telomere-associated DNA damage factors in H2ac depleted cells. Additionally, knockdown of H2ac elicits an ATM-dependent DNA damage response at telomeres and depletion of XPF protects telomeres against H2ac-deficiency-induced G-strand overhangs loss and DNA damage response, and prevents chromosomal instability. These findings suggest that the H2A isotype, H2ac, plays an essential role in maintaining telomere functional integrity. PMID:27228173

  12. METALLIZATION OF SNS RING INJECTION KICKER CERAMIC CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; TODD,R.J.

    2002-06-03

    Ceramic chambers will be used in the pulsed kicker magnets for the injection of H{sup -} into the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring, to avoid shielding of a fast-changing external magnetic field by metallic chamber walls and to reduce eddy current heating. The inner surfaces of the ceramic chambers will be coated with a conductive layer, possibly titanium (Ti) or copper (Cu) with a titanium nitride (TiN) overlayer, to reduce the beam coupling impedance, provide passage for beam image current and to reduce the secondary electron yields. This paper describes the development of sputtering method for the 0.83m long 16cm inner diameter (ID) ceramic chambers. Coatings of Ti, Cu and TiN with thickness up to 10 {micro}m were produced by means of DC magnetron sputtering. The difficulty of coating insulators was overcome with the introduction of an anode screen. Films with good adhesion, uniform longitudinal thickness, and conductivity were produced.

  13. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael D. (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  14. Anaerobic biodegradability and digestion in accumulation systems for concentrated black water and kitchen organic-wastes.

    PubMed

    Elmitwalli, T A; van Leeuwen, M; Kujawa-Roeleveld, K; Sanders, W; Zeeman, G

    2006-01-01

    The feasibility of two accumulation-systems (AC) for anaerobic digestion and storage of concentrated black water with (AC1) or without (AC2) urine + kitchen organic-wastes was investigated. The waste(water) was collected by two vacuum toilet/transport systems. The influent-total COD of the AC2 (53,000 mg/L) was more concentrated by four times than that of the AC1. The suspended COD represented the major part (71-73%) of influent total COD of the two systems. The batch-experiments results showed a high anaerobic biodegradability of the waste(water) (> 85%). The AC systems demonstrated stable performance. There was no inhibition effect of NH4 and VFA concentration decreased in time. Total COD removal of 58% was achieved in both systems, after 105 days at 20 degrees C. Moreover, if only the supernatant in AC1 is withdrawn and the settled sludge stays for the next runs, only 20% of the influent total COD will be in the supernatant. In AC2, 74% of influent ortho-P was removed by precipitation. Therefore, the settled sludge in the AC2 had a high total-P concentration of 1,300 mg/L. The C:N:P ratios of the supernatant and the sludge were 26:13:1 and 35:4.5:1, respectively, in the AC1, and were 28:14:1 and 32:2.4:1, respectively, in AC2.

  15. Space Chambers for Crop Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Vacuum chambers, operated by McDonnell Douglas Corporation to test spacecraft, can also be used to dry water-soaked records. The drying temperature is low enough to allow paper to dry without curling or charging. Agricultural crops may also be dried using a spinoff system called MIVAC, which has proven effective in drying rice, wheat, soybeans, corn, etc. The system is energy efficient and can incorporate a sanitation process for destroying insects without contamination.

  16. The STAR Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Retiere, F.; STAR Collaboration

    2002-01-11

    The STAR Time Projection Chamber was successfully operated during the first RHIC run in 2000. Most of the STAR contributions reported in these proceedings are based on the analysis of data from the TPC. In this article, we show that the performance achieved by the TPC, in terms of track reconstruction, position resolution, and particle identification are well suited for measuring precise and reliable physics observables.

  17. MPS II drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Platner, E.D.

    1982-01-01

    The MPS II detectors are narrow drift space chambers designed for high position resolution in a magnetic field and in a very high particle flux environment. Central to this implementation was the development of 3 multi-channel custom IC's and one multi-channel hybrid. The system is deadtimeless and requires no corrections on an anode-to-anode basis. Operational experience and relevance to ISABELLE detectors is discussed.

  18. The crop growth research chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wagenbach, Kimberly

    1993-01-01

    The Crop Growth Research Chamber (CGRC) has been defined by CELSS principle investigators and science advisory panels as a necessary ground-based tool in the development of a regenerative life support system. The focus of CGRC research will be on the biomass production component of the CELSS system. The ground-based Crop Growth Research Chamber is for the study of plant growth and development under stringently controlled environments isolated from the external environment. The chamber has importance in three areas of CELSS activities: (1) crop research; (2) system control and integration, and (3) flight hardware design and experimentation. The laboratory size of the CGRC will be small enough to allow duplication of the unit, the conducting of controlled experiments, and replication of experiments, but large enough to provide information representative of larger plant communities. Experiments will focus on plant growth in a wide variety of environments and the effects of those environments on plant production of food, water, oxygen, toxins, and microbes. To study these effects in a closed system, tight control of the environment is necessary.

  19. Rocket Engine Thrust Chamber Assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelius, Charles S. (Inventor); Counts, Richard H. (Inventor); Myers, W. Neill (Inventor); Lackey, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Peters, Warren (Inventor); Shadoan, Michael (Inventor); Sparks, David L. (Inventor); Lawrence, Timothy W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A thrust chamber assembly for liquid fueled rocket engines and the method of making it wherein a two-piece mandrel having the configuration of an assembly having a combustion chamber portion connected to a nozzle portion through a throat portion is wrapped with a silica tape saturated with a phenolic resin, the tape extending along the mandrel and covering the combustion chamber portion of the mandrel to the throat portion. The width of the tape is positioned at an angle of 30 to 50 deg. to the axis of the mandrel such that one edge of the tape contacts the mandrel while the other edge is spaced from the mandrel. The phenolic in the tape is cured and the end of the wrap is machined to provide a frusto-conical surface extending at an angle of 15 to 30 deg. with respect to the axis of the mandrel for starting a second wrap on the mandrel to cover the throat portion. The remainder of the mandrel is wrapped with a third silica tape having its width positioned at a angle of 5 to 20 deg. from the axis of the mandrel. The resin in the third tape is cured and the assembly is machined to provide a smooth outer surface. The entire assembly is then wrapped with a tow of graphite fibers wetted with an epoxy resin and, after the epoxy resin is cured, the graphite is machined to final dimensions.

  20. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... than atmospheric pressure. This device does not include topical oxygen chambers for extremities (§ 878... hyperbaric chamber is a device that is intended to increase the environmental oxygen pressure to promote...

  1. Sensorineural deafness due to compression chamber noise.

    PubMed

    Hughes, K B

    1976-05-01

    A case of unilateral sensorineural deafness following exposure to compression chamber noise is described. A review of the current literature concerning the otological hazards of compression chambers is made. The possible pathological basis is discussed.

  2. Enhanced acetyl-CoA production is associated with increased triglyceride accumulation in the green alga Chlorella desiccata.

    PubMed

    Avidan, Omri; Brandis, Alexander; Rogachev, Ilana; Pick, Uri

    2015-07-01

    Triglycerides (TAGs) from microalgae can be utilized as food supplements and for biodiesel production, but little is known about the regulation of their biosynthesis. This work aimed to test the relationship between acetyl-CoA (Ac-CoA) levels and TAG biosynthesis in green algae under nitrogen deprivation. A novel, highly sensitive liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) technique enabled us to determine the levels of Ac-CoA, malonyl-CoA, and unacetylated (free) CoA in green microalgae. A comparative study of three algal species that differ in TAG accumulation levels shows that during N starvation, Ac-CoA levels rapidly rise, preceding TAG accumulation in all tested species. The levels of Ac-CoA in the high TAG accumulator Chlorella desiccata exceed the levels in the moderate TAG accumulators Dunaliella tertiolecta and Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Similarly, malonyl-CoA and free CoA levels also increase, but to lower extents. Calculated cellular concentrations of Ac-CoA are far lower than reported K mAc-CoA values of plastidic Ac-CoA carboxylase (ptACCase) in plants. Transcript level analysis of plastidic pyruvate dehydrogenase (ptPDH), the major chloroplastic Ac-CoA producer, revealed rapid induction in parallel with Ac-CoA accumulation in C. desiccata, but not in D. tertiolecta or C. reinhardtii. It is proposed that the capacity to accumulate high TAG levels in green algae critically depends on their ability to divert carbon flow towards Ac-CoA. This requires elevation of the chloroplastic CoA pool level and enhancement of Ac-CoA biosynthesis. These conclusions may have important implications for future genetic manipulation to enhance TAG biosynthesis in green algae.

  3. A Comparison of Outgassing Measurements for Three Vacuum Chamber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Stutzman; P. Adderley; B. M. Poelker; M. Baylac; J. Clark; A. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; G. R. Myneni; P. M. Rutt; C. K. Sinclair

    2002-11-01

    Outgassing measurements of three UHV materials (304 Stainless Steel (SS), 316L SS and 6061T-6 aluminum) were made using the conductance and accumulation techniques as given in the AVS Recommended Practice for Outgassing Measurements [ ]. Measurement results indicate good agreement between the two techniques. This study was undertaken to help determine the vacuum limitations of the photoelectron guns used at Jefferson Lab and to aid in the choice of vacuum chamber materials that will be used in the construction of future photoelectron guns. The outgassing rate measured for all of the chamber materials, regardless of technique, was about 1 X 10{sup -12} Torr{sup -}l/s{sup -}cm{sup 2}.

  4. Making a fish tank cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Frances

    2012-05-01

    The cloud chambers described here are large, made from readily available parts, simple to set up and always work. With no source in the chamber, background radiation can be observed. A large chamber means that a long rod containing a weakly radioactive material can be introduced, increasing the chance of seeing decays. Details of equipment and construction are given.

  5. Uniform-Temperature Walls for Cloud Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fleischman, G.

    1985-01-01

    Flat heat pipes rapidly transfer heat to and from experimental volumes. Heat pipe vapor chamber carries heat to and from thermo electric modules. Critical surface acts as evaporator or condenser in cloud physics experiments. Used as walls of spaceborne atmospheric cloud chambers. On Earth, used as isothermal floors for environmental test chambers.

  6. Making a Fish Tank Cloud Chamber

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Frances

    2012-01-01

    The cloud chambers described here are large, made from readily available parts, simple to set up and always work. With no source in the chamber, background radiation can be observed. A large chamber means that a long rod containing a weakly radioactive material can be introduced, increasing the chance of seeing decays. Details of equipment and…

  7. Simple Cloud Chambers Using Gel Ice Packs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-01-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry…

  8. A Sensitive Cloud Chamber without Radioactive Sources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeze, Syoji; Itoh, Akio; Oyama, Ayu; Takahashi, Haruka

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitive diffusion cloud chamber which does not require any radioactive sources. A major difference from commonly used chambers is the use of a heat sink as its bottom plate. The result of a performance test of the chamber is given. (Contains 8 figures.)

  9. EPA GAS PHASE CHEMISTRY CHAMBER STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Gas-phase smog chamber experiments are being performed at EPA in order to evaluate a number of current chemical mechanisms for inclusion in EPA regulatory and research models. The smog chambers are 9000 L in volume and constructed of 2-mil teflon film. One of the chambers is co...

  10. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    SciTech Connect

    Maniscalco, J.A.; Meier, W.R.

    1982-08-17

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. Produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithiumceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  11. Chamber B Thermal/Vacuum Chamber: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Montz, Mike E.

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of Chamber B. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  12. First thin AC-coupled silicon strip sensors on 8-inch wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; König, A.; Hacker, J.; Bartl, U.

    2016-09-01

    The Institute of High Energy Physics (HEPHY) in Vienna and the semiconductor manufacturer Infineon Technologies Austria AG developed a production process for planar AC-coupled silicon strip sensors manufactured on 200 μm thick 8-inch p-type wafers. In late 2015, the first wafers were delivered featuring the world's largest AC-coupled silicon strip sensors. Detailed electrical measurements were carried out at HEPHY, where single strip and global parameters were measured. Mechanical studies were conducted and the long-term behavior was investigated using a climate chamber. Furthermore, the electrical properties of various test structures were investigated to validate the quality of the manufacturing process.

  13. Liquid argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Doe, P.J.; Mahler, H.J.; Chen, H.H.

    1984-01-01

    The principal features of the liquid argon TPC are outlined and the status of development efforts, particularly at UCI, are discussed. Technical problems associated with liquid TPC's are: the liquid must be maintained at a high level of purity to enable long distance drifting of ionization electrons, and the signal size is small due to the absence of practical charge multiplication as found in gas chambers. These problems have been largely resolved in studies using small (1 to 100 l) detectors, thus allowing a realistic consideration of the physics potential of such devices.

  14. Chamber propagation physics for heavy ion fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Callahan, D.A.

    1995-09-01

    Chamber transport is an important area of study for heavy ion fusion. Final focus and chamber-transport are high leverage areas providing opportunities to significantly decrease the cost of electricity from a heavy ion fusion power plant. Chamber transport in two basic regimes is under consideration. In the low chamber density regime ({approx_lt}0.003 torr), ballistic or nearly-ballistic transport is used. Partial beam neutralization has been studied to offset the effects of beam stripping. In the high chamber density regime ({approx_gt}.1 torr), two transport modes (pinched transport and channel transport) are under investigation. Both involve focusing the beam outside the chamber then transporting it at small radius ({approx} 2 mm). Both high chamber density modes relax the constraints on the beam quality needed from the accelerator which will reduce the driver cost and the cost of electricity.

  15. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-03-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  16. Thrust chamber material technology program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrus, J. S.; Bordeau, R. G.

    1989-01-01

    This report covers work performed at Pratt & Whitney on development of copper-based materials for long-life, reusable, regeneratively cooled rocket engine thrust chambers. The program approached the goal of enhanced cyclic life through the application of rapid solidification to alloy development, to introduce fine dispersions to strengthen and stabilize the alloys at elevated temperatures. After screening of alloy systems, copper-based alloys containing Cr, Co, Hf, Ag, Ti, and Zr were processed by rapid-solidification atomization in bulk quantities. Those bulk alloys showing the most promise were characterized by tensile testing, thermal conductivity testing, and elevated-temperature, low-cycle fatigue (LFC) testing. Characterization indicated that Cu- 1.1 percent Hf exhibited the greatest potential as an improved-life thrust chamber material, exhibiting LCF life about four times that of NASA-Z. Other alloys (Cu- 0.6 percent Zr, and Cu- 0.6 percent Zr- 1.0 percent Cr) exhibited promise for use in this application, but needed more development work to balance properties.

  17. The ac53, ac78, ac101, and ac103 Genes Are Newly Discovered Core Genes in the Family Baculoviridae

    PubMed Central

    Garavaglia, Matías Javier; Miele, Solange Ana Belén; Iserte, Javier Alonso; Belaich, Mariano Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    The family Baculoviridae is a large group of insect viruses containing circular double-stranded DNA genomes of 80 to 180 kbp, which have broad biotechnological applications. A key feature to understand and manipulate them is the recognition of orthology. However, the differences in gene contents and evolutionary distances among the known members of this family make it difficult to assign sequence orthology. In this study, the genome sequences of 58 baculoviruses were analyzed, with the aim to detect previously undescribed core genes because of their remote homology. A routine based on Multi PSI-Blast/tBlastN and Multi HaMStR allowed us to detect 31 of 33 accepted core genes and 4 orthologous sequences in the Baculoviridae which were not described previously. Our results show that the ac53, ac78, ac101 (p40), and ac103 (p48) genes have orthologs in all genomes and should be considered core genes. Accordingly, there are 37 orthologous genes in the family Baculoviridae. PMID:22933288

  18. Semiconductor ac static power switch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vrancik, J.

    1968-01-01

    Semiconductor ac static power switch has long life and high reliability, contains no moving parts, and operates satisfactorily in severe environments, including high vibration and shock conditions. Due to their resistance to shock and vibration, static switches are used where accidental switching caused by mechanical vibration or shock cannot be tolerated.

  19. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals

    PubMed Central

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L.; Barron, Megan E.; Roa, Jinae N.

    2014-01-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3−, and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3− sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3−-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H+ absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  20. Established and potential physiological roles of bicarbonate-sensing soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) in aquatic animals.

    PubMed

    Tresguerres, Martin; Barott, Katie L; Barron, Megan E; Roa, Jinae N

    2014-03-01

    Soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC) is a recently recognized source of the signaling molecule cyclic AMP (cAMP) that is genetically and biochemically distinct from the classic G-protein-regulated transmembrane adenylyl cyclases (tmACs). Mammalian sAC is distributed throughout the cytoplasm and it may be present in the nucleus and inside mitochondria. sAC activity is directly stimulated by HCO3(-), and sAC has been confirmed to be a HCO3(-) sensor in a variety of mammalian cell types. In addition, sAC can functionally associate with carbonic anhydrases to act as a de facto sensor of pH and CO2. The two catalytic domains of sAC are related to HCO3(-)-regulated adenylyl cyclases from cyanobacteria, suggesting the cAMP pathway is an evolutionarily conserved mechanism for sensing CO2 levels and/or acid/base conditions. Reports of sAC in aquatic animals are still limited but are rapidly accumulating. In shark gills, sAC senses blood alkalosis and triggers compensatory H(+) absorption. In the intestine of bony fishes, sAC modulates NaCl and water absorption. And in sea urchin sperm, sAC may participate in the initiation of flagellar movement and in the acrosome reaction. Bioinformatics and RT-PCR results reveal that sAC orthologs are present in most animal phyla. This review summarizes the current knowledge on the physiological roles of sAC in aquatic animals and suggests additional functions in which sAC may be involved. PMID:24574382

  1. Abscisic Acid Antagonizes Ethylene Production through the ABI4-Mediated Transcriptional Repression of ACS4 and ACS8 in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhijun; Yu, Yanwen; Li, Shenghui; Wang, Juan; Tang, Saijun; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidence has revealed that abscisic acid (ABA) negatively modulates ethylene biosynthesis, although the underlying mechanism remains unclear. To identify the factors involved, we conducted a screen for ABA-insensitive mutants with altered ethylene production in Arabidopsis. A dominant allele of ABI4, abi4-152, which produces a putative protein with a 16-amino-acid truncation at the C-terminus of ABI4, reduces ethylene production. By contrast, two recessive knockout alleles of ABI4, abi4-102 and abi4-103, result in increased ethylene evolution, indicating that ABI4 negatively regulates ethylene production. Further analyses showed that expression of the ethylene biosynthesis genes ACS4, ACS8, and ACO2 was significantly decreased in abi4-152 but increased in the knockout mutants, with partial dependence on ABA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR assays showed that ABI4 directly binds the promoters of these ethylene biosynthesis genes and that ABA enhances this interaction. A fusion protein containing the truncated ABI4-152 peptide accumulated to higher levels than its full-length counterpart in transgenic plants, suggesting that ABI4 is destabilized by its C terminus. Therefore, our results demonstrate that ABA negatively regulates ethylene production through ABI4-mediated transcriptional repression of the ethylene biosynthesis genes ACS4 and ACS8 in Arabidopsis.

  2. Seasonal accumulation of acetylated triacylglycerols by a freeze-tolerant insect.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katie E; Thomas, Raymond H; Roxin, Aron; Chen, Eric K Y; Brown, Jason C L; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Sinclair, Brent J

    2014-05-01

    Most animals store energy as long-chain triacylglycerols (lcTAGs). Trace amounts of acetylated triacylglycerols (acTAGs) have been reported in animals, but are not accumulated, likely because they have lower energy density than lcTAGs. Here we report that acTAGs comprise 36% of the neutral lipid pool of overwintering prepupae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, while only 17% of the neutral lipid pool is made up of typical lcTAGs. These high concentrations of acTAGs, present only during winter, appear to be synthesized by E. solidaginis and are not found in other freeze-tolerant insects, nor in the plant host. The mixture of acTAGs found in E. solidaginis has a significantly lower melting point than equivalent lcTAGs, and thus remains liquid at temperatures at which E. solidaginis is frozen in the field, and depresses the melting point of aqueous solutions in a manner unusual for neutral lipids. We note that accumulation of acTAGs coincides with preparation for overwintering and the seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance. This is the first observation of accumulation of acTAGs by an animal, and the first evidence of dynamic interconversion between acTAGs and lcTAGs during development and in response to stress.

  3. Seasonal accumulation of acetylated triacylglycerols by a freeze-tolerant insect.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katie E; Thomas, Raymond H; Roxin, Aron; Chen, Eric K Y; Brown, Jason C L; Gillies, Elizabeth R; Sinclair, Brent J

    2014-05-01

    Most animals store energy as long-chain triacylglycerols (lcTAGs). Trace amounts of acetylated triacylglycerols (acTAGs) have been reported in animals, but are not accumulated, likely because they have lower energy density than lcTAGs. Here we report that acTAGs comprise 36% of the neutral lipid pool of overwintering prepupae of the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, while only 17% of the neutral lipid pool is made up of typical lcTAGs. These high concentrations of acTAGs, present only during winter, appear to be synthesized by E. solidaginis and are not found in other freeze-tolerant insects, nor in the plant host. The mixture of acTAGs found in E. solidaginis has a significantly lower melting point than equivalent lcTAGs, and thus remains liquid at temperatures at which E. solidaginis is frozen in the field, and depresses the melting point of aqueous solutions in a manner unusual for neutral lipids. We note that accumulation of acTAGs coincides with preparation for overwintering and the seasonal acquisition of freeze tolerance. This is the first observation of accumulation of acTAGs by an animal, and the first evidence of dynamic interconversion between acTAGs and lcTAGs during development and in response to stress. PMID:24790101

  4. Modeling of E-Cloud Build-Up in Grooved Vacuum Chambers using POSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, Jean-Luc; Venturini, M.; Pivi, M.T.F.; /SLAC

    2008-01-23

    Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a way to limit electron cloud accumulation in the ILCDR. We report on simulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accounting for e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact with previous estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for grooved surfaces.

  5. Modelling of e-cloud build-up in grooved vacuum chambers usingPOSINST

    SciTech Connect

    Venturini, Marco; Celata, C.; Furman, Miguel; Vay, Jean-Luc; Pivi, Mauro

    2007-06-29

    Use of grooved vacuum chambers have been suggested as a wayto limitelectron cloud accumulation in the ILC-DR. We report onsimulations carried out using an augmented version of POSINST, accountingfor e-cloud dynamics in the presence of grooves, and make contact withprevious estimates of an effective secondary electron yield for groovedsurfaces.

  6. Dynamic flux chamber measurements of hydrogen sulfide emission rate from a quiescent surface--A computational evaluation.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ademir A; Santos, Jane M; Beghi, Sandra P; Fernandes, Isabella F; Vom Marttens, Lya L C; Pereira Neto, Leovegildo I; Martins, Ramon S; Reis, Neyval C; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Enclosure devices have been studied and used for research purposes and practical applications in order to measure the emission rate of odorous pollutants from quiescent liquid surfaces to atmosphere. However, important questions remain about the interference of these measuring devices on the actual emission rate. The main concern regarding the use of a flux chamber is the fact that odorous compounds can accumulate into the chamber and yield gas-phase concentration increase inside the equipment, which causes a reduction of the emission rate during the measurement and thus gives an inaccurate local emission rate. Furthermore, the fluid flow inside the chamber does not reproduce the atmospheric boundary layer flow. This study applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique in order to investigate the influence of the fluid flow features inside a flux chamber on the measured hydrogen sulfide emission rate at quiescent liquid surfaces. The flux chamber design and operational conditions are those supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The results show that the US EPA flux chamber presents a fairly well mixed air phase. However, a trend to stagnation and hydrogen sulfide accumulation near chamber walls was detected in the computational simulation, which also indicated that the positioning of the sampling tube in relation to the inlet orifices may lead to deviations in the measurement results. CFD results showed that the wall shear and concentration gradients spatially vary at the gas-liquid interface, and friction velocity inside the chamber does not match typical values of atmospheric flow. PMID:26741548

  7. The cathode strip chamber data acquisition electronics for CMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bylsma, B. G.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Ling, T. Y.; Rush, C.

    2009-03-01

    Data Acquisition (DAQ) electronics for Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) [CMS Collaboration, The Muon Project Technical Design Report, CERN/LHCC 97-32, CMS TDR3, 1997] in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) [CMS Collaboration, The Compact Muon Solenoid Technical Proposal, CERN/LHCC 94-38, 1994] experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) [The LHC study group, The Large Hadron Collider: Conceptual Design, CERN/AC 1995-05, 1995] is described. The CSC DAQ system [B. Bylsma, et al., in: Proceedings of the Topical Workshop on Electronics for Particle Physics, Prague, Czech Republic, CERN-2007-007, 2007, pp. 195-198] includes on-detector and off-detector electronics, encompassing five different types of custom circuit boards designed to handle the high event rate at the LHC. The on-detector electronics includes Cathode Front End Boards (CFEB) [R. Breedon, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 471 (2001) 340], which amplify, shape, store, and digitize chamber cathode signals; Anode Front End Boards (AFEB) [T. Ferguson, et al., Nucl. Instr. and Meth. A 539 (2005) 386], which amplify, shape and discriminate chamber anode signals; and Data Acquisition Motherboards (DAQMB), which controls the on-chamber electronics and the readout of the chamber. The off-detector electronics, located in the underground service cavern, includes Detector Dependent Unit (DDU) boards, which perform real time data error checking, electronics reset requests and data concentration; and Data Concentrator Card (DCC) boards, which further compact the data and send it to the CMS DAQ System [CMS Collaboration, The TriDAS Project Technical Design Report, Volume 2: Data Acquisition and High-level Trigger, CERN/LHCC 2002-26, 2002], and serve as an interface to the CMS Trigger Timing Control (TTC) [TTC system ] system. Application Specific Integrated Circuits (ASIC) are utilized for analogous signal processing on front end boards. Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA) are utilized

  8. ACS Expands Role In High School Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Describes some of the services and programs of special interests to high school chemistry teachers that are being provided by ACS, and meant to make ACS membership more attractive to the teachers. (GA)

  9. Numeric description of space charge in polyethylene under ac electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J.; Xu, Z.; Chen, G.; Lewin, P. L.

    2010-12-01

    Space charge in polyethylene-based insulation materials and its effect on the local electric field under a dc environment have been extensively examined over the last few decades while the behavior of space charge under ac stress has received less attention. Space charge phenomenon under ac electric fields becomes an important issue with increased operating field strength in many applications, such as next generation high voltage cables. In this paper, a bipolar charge transport model has been developed to simulate space charge in polymers under ac electric fields. Obtained simulation results show that there is a small quantity of phase-dependent bipolar charge accumulation in the vicinity of the electrodes that does not move into the bulk under ac stress. This causes a slight distortion of the local field in the bulk. However, at lower frequencies less than 1 Hz, there is increased charge accumulation and penetration. Comparison with available experimental data suggests that the model is capable of describing the underlying physics of charge behavior when a dielectric material is subjected to ac electric fields. Due to the weak charge movement in the bulk, the conduction current density is small and hence the displacement component dominates the total current density and this increases linearly with ac frequency.

  10. Characterization of the auxin-inducible SAUR-AC1 gene for use as a molecular genetic tool in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed Central

    Gil, P; Liu, Y; Orbović, V; Verkamp, E; Poff, K L; Green, P J

    1994-01-01

    The small auxin up RNA (SAUR) genes were originally characterized in soybean, where they encode a set of unstable transcripts that are rapidly induced by auxin. In this report, the isolation of a SAUR gene, designated SAUR-AC1, from Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. ecotype Columbia is described. The promoter of the SAUR-AC1 gene contains putative regulatory motifs conserved among soybean SAUR promoters, as well as sequences implicated in the regulation of other genes in response to auxin. The transcribed region is approximately 500 bp in length and contains no introns. Highly conserved sequences located within the SAUR-AC1 transcript include the central portion of the coding region and a putative mRNA instability sequence (DST) located in the 3' untranslated region. Accumulation of SAUR-AC1 mRNA is readily induced by natural and synthetic auxins and by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide. Moreover, several auxin- and gravity-response mutants of Arabidopsis exhibit decreased accumulation of the SAUR-AC1 mRNA in elongating etiolated seedlings. In particular, in the axr2-1 mutant the SAUR-AC1 transcript accumulates to less than 5% of wild-type levels. These studies indicate that SAUR-AC1 will be a useful probe of auxin-induced gene expression in Arabidopsis and will facilitate the functional analysis of both transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulatory elements. PMID:8159792

  11. Neutron-chamber detectors and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fehlau, P.E.; Atwater, H.F.; Coop, K.L.

    1990-01-01

    Detector applications in Nuclear Safeguards and Waste Management have included measuring neutrons from fission and (alpha,n) reactions with well-moderated neutron proportional counters, often embedded in a slab of polyethylene. Other less-moderated geometries are useful for detecting both bare and moderated fission-source neutrons with good efficiency. The neutron chamber is an undermoderated detector design comprising a large, hollow, polyethylene-walled chamber containing one or more proportional counters. Neutron-chamber detectors are relatively inexpensive; can have large apertures, usually through a thin chamber wall; and offer very good detection efficiency per dollar. Neutron-chamber detectors have also been used for monitoring vehicles and for assaying large crates of transuranic waste. Our Monte Carlo calculations for a new application (monitoring low-density waste for concealed plutonium) illustrate the advantages of the hollow-chamber design for detecting moderated fission sources. 9 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Sequential Notch activation regulates ventricular chamber development

    PubMed Central

    D'Amato, Gaetano; Luxán, Guillermo; del Monte-Nieto, Gonzalo; Martínez-Poveda, Beatriz; Torroja, Carlos; Walter, Wencke; Bochter, Matthew S.; Benedito, Rui; Cole, Susan; Martinez, Fernando; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina; Uemura, Akiyoshi; Jiménez-Borreguero, Luis J.; de la Pompa, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Ventricular chambers are essential for the rhythmic contraction and relaxation occurring in every heartbeat throughout life. Congenital abnormalities in ventricular chamber formation cause severe human heart defects. How the early trabecular meshwork of myocardial fibres forms and subsequently develops into mature chambers is poorly understood. We show that Notch signalling first connects chamber endocardium and myocardium to sustain trabeculation, and later coordinates ventricular patterning and compaction with coronary vessel development to generate the mature chamber, through a temporal sequence of ligand signalling determined by the glycosyltransferase manic fringe (MFng). Early endocardial expression of MFng promotes Dll4–Notch1 signalling, which induces trabeculation in the developing ventricle. Ventricular maturation and compaction require MFng and Dll4 downregulation in the endocardium, which allows myocardial Jag1 and Jag2 signalling to Notch1 in this tissue. Perturbation of this signalling equilibrium severely disrupts heart chamber formation. Our results open a new research avenue into the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathies. PMID:26641715

  13. Tests of anechoic chamber for aeroacoustics investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palchikovskiy, V. V.; Bersenev, Yu. V.; Makashov, S. Yu.; Belyaev, I. V.; Korin, I. A.; Sorokin, E. V.; Khramtsov, I. V.; Kustov, O. Yu.

    2016-10-01

    The paper presents the results of qualification tests in the new anechoic chamber of Perm National Research Polytechnic University (PNRPU) built in 2014-2015 and evaluation of the chamber quality in aeroacoustic experiments. It describes design features of the chamber and its sound-absorption lining. The qualification tests were carried out with tonal and broadband noise sources in the frequency range 100 Hz - 20 kHz for two different cases of the source arrangement. In every case, measurements were performed in three directions by traverse microphones. Qualification tests have determined that in the chamber there is a free acoustic field within radius of 2 m for tonal noise and 3 m for broadband noise. There was also evaluated acoustic quality of the chamber by measurements of the jet noise and vortex ring noise. The results of the experiments demonstrate that PNRPU anechoic chamber allows the aeroacoustic measurements to be performed to obtain quantitative results.

  14. An airborne isothermal haze chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hindman, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal gradient diffusion cloud chambers (TGDCC) are used to determine the concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) with critical supersaturations greater than or equal to about 0.2%. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than theoretically predicted by factors ranging between 7.9 and 9.0. The CCN concentrations measured with the airborne IHC were lower than the concentrations measured with the larger laboratory IHC's by factors ranging between 3.9 and 7.5. The bounds of the supersaturation ranges of the airborne IHC and the CSU-Mee TGDCC do not overlap. Nevertheless, the slopes of the interpolated data between the bounds agree favorably with the theoretical slopes.

  15. Drift chamber tracking with neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Lindsey, C.S.; Denby, B.; Haggerty, H.

    1992-10-01

    We discuss drift chamber tracking with a commercial log VLSI neural network chip. Voltages proportional to the drift times in a 4-layer drift chamber were presented to the Intel ETANN chip. The network was trained to provide the intercept and slope of straight tracks traversing the chamber. The outputs were recorded and later compared off line to conventional track fits. Two types of network architectures were studied. Applications of neural network tracking to high energy physics detector triggers is discussed.

  16. IFE Chamber Technology - Status and Future Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R; Raffrary, A R; Abdel-Khalik, S; Kulcinski, G; Latkowski, J F; Najmabadi, F; Olson, C L; Peterson, P F; Ying, A; Yoda, M

    2002-11-15

    Significant progress has been made on addressing critical issues for inertial fusion energy (IFE) chambers for heavy-ion, laser and Z-pinch drivers. A variety of chamber concepts are being investigated including dry-wall (currently favored for laser IFE), wetted-wall (applicable to both laser and ion drivers), and thick-liquid-wall favored by heavy ion and z-pinch drivers. Recent progress and remaining challenges in developing IFE chambers are reviewed.

  17. Free-Flow Open-Chamber Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    Free-flow open-chamber electrophoresis variant of free-flow electrophoresis performed in chamber with open ends and in which velocity of electro-osmotic flow adjusted equal to and opposite mean electrophoretic velocity of sample. Particles having electrophoretic mobilities greater than mean mobility of sample particles move toward cathode, those with mobilities less move toward anode. Technique applied to separation of components of mixtures of biologically important substances. Sensitivity enhanced by use of tapered chamber.

  18. Fluidized wall for protecting fusion chamber walls

    DOEpatents

    Maniscalco, James A.; Meier, Wayne R.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for protecting the inner wall of a fusion chamber from microexplosion debris, x-rays, neutrons, etc. produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) targets imploded within the fusion chamber. The apparatus utilizes a fluidized wall similar to a waterfall comprising liquid lithium or solid pellets of lithium-ceramic, the waterfall forming a blanket to prevent damage of the structural materials of the chamber.

  19. D0 central tracking chamber performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Pizzuto, D.

    1991-12-01

    The performance of the completed DO central tracking chamber was studied using cosmic rays at the State University of New York at Stony Brook. Also studied was a prototype tracking chamber identical in design to the completed DO tracking chamber. The prototype chamber was exposed to a collimated beam of 150 GeV pions at the Fermilab NWA test facility. Results indicate an R{Phi} tracking resolution compatible with the limitations imposed by physical considerations, excellent 2 track resolution, and a high track reconstruction efficiency along with a good rejection power against {gamma} {yields} e {sup +} e{sup {minus}} events.

  20. Engineering verification of the biomass production chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, R. P.; Knott, W. M., III; Sager, J. C.; Jones, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for life support systems, both biological and physical-chemical, for long-term human attended space missions are under serious study throughout NASA. The KSC 'breadboard' project has focused on biomass production using higher plants for atmospheric regeneration and food production in a special biomass production chamber. This chamber is designed to provide information on food crop growth rate, contaminants in the chamber that alter plant growth requirements for atmospheric regeneration, carbon dioxide consumption, oxygen production, and water utilization. The shape and size, mass, and energy requirements in relation to the overall integrity of the biomass production chamber are under constant study.

  1. Nine years of retained perfluoro-n-octane in the anterior chamber after retinal detachment repair with no signs of ocular toxicity.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Emad B; Al-Falah, M

    2014-01-01

    Perfluoro-n-octane (PFO) is commonly used in vitreoretinal surgery. In this case report, we present a 35-year-old patient with retained PFO up to 9 years after par plana vitrectomy. Post-operatively, PFO bubbles occupied 15% of the anterior chamber (AC). Follow-up over 9 years, consistently showed a quiet AC, normal intraocular pressure and endothelial cell counts remained stable. Until date, the patient has been under observation and there have been no ocular symptoms or side-effects. Residual PFO that inadvertently remains in the AC can be well- tolerated, without side-effects for up to 9 years.

  2. Efficiency of differentiation in the Skaergaard magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Lesher, C. E.; Holness, M. B.; Jakobsen, J. K.; Salmonsen, L.; Humphreys, M.; Thy, P.

    2011-12-01

    Although it is largely agreed that crystallization occurs inwardly in crystal mushes along the margins of magma chambers, the efficiency and mechanisms of differentiation are not well constrained. The fractionation paradigm hinges on mass exchange between the crystal mush and the main magma reservoir resulting in coarse-grained, refractory (cumulate) rocks of primary crystals, and complementary enrichment of incompatible elements in the main reservoir of magma. Diffusion, convection, liquid immiscibility and compaction have been proposed as mechanisms driving this mass exchange. Here we examine the efficiency of differentiation in basaltic crystal mushes in different regions of the Skaergaard magma chamber. The contents of incompatible elements such as phosphorus and calculated residual porosities are high in the lowermost cumulate rocks of the floor (47-30%) and decrease upsection, persisting at low values in the uppermost two-thirds of the floor rock stratigraphy (~5% residual porosity). The residual porosity is intermediate at the walls (~15%) and highest and more variable at the roof (10-100%). This is best explained by compaction and expulsion of interstitial liquid from the accumulating crystal mush at the floor and the inefficiency of these processes elsewhere in the intrusion. In addition, the roof data imply upwards infiltration of interstitial liquid. Remarkably uniform residual porosity of ~15% for cumulates formed along the walls suggest that their preservation is related to the rheological properties of the mush, i.e. at ≤ 15% porosity the mush is rigid enough to adhere to the wall, while at higher porosity it is easily swept away. We conclude that the efficiency of compaction and differentiation can be extremely variable along the margins of magma chambers. This should be taken into account in models of magma chamber evolution.

  3. Simultaneous distribution of AC and DC power

    DOEpatents

    Polese, Luigi Gentile

    2015-09-15

    A system and method for the transport and distribution of both AC (alternating current) power and DC (direct current) power over wiring infrastructure normally used for distributing AC power only, for example, residential and/or commercial buildings' electrical wires is disclosed and taught. The system and method permits the combining of AC and DC power sources and the simultaneous distribution of the resulting power over the same wiring. At the utilization site a complementary device permits the separation of the DC power from the AC power and their reconstruction, for use in conventional AC-only and DC-only devices.

  4. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L.; Smith, Gregory M.; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m2 with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today’s OLEDs in performance. PMID:27063414

  5. Achieving High Performance in AC-Field Driven Organic Light Sources.

    PubMed

    Xu, Junwei; Carroll, David L; Smith, Gregory M; Dun, Chaochao; Cui, Yue

    2016-04-11

    Charge balance in organic light emitting structures is essential to simultaneously achieving high brightness and high efficiency. In DC-driven organic light emitting devices (OLEDs), this is relatively straight forward. However, in the newly emerging, capacitive, field-activated AC-driven organic devices, charge balance can be a challenge. In this work we introduce the concept of gating the compensation charge in AC-driven organic devices and demonstrate that this can result in exceptional increases in device performance. To do this we replace the insulator layer in a typical field-activated organic light emitting device with a nanostructured, wide band gap semiconductor layer. This layer acts as a gate between the emitter layer and the voltage contact. Time resolved device characterization shows that, at high-frequencies (over 40 kHz), the semiconductor layer allows for charge accumulation in the forward bias, light generating part of the AC cycle and charge compensation in the negative, quiescent part of the AC cycle. Such gated AC organic devices can achieve a non-output coupled luminance of 25,900 cd/m(2) with power efficiencies that exceed both the insulator-based AC devices and OLEDs using the same emitters. This work clearly demonstrates that by realizing balanced management of charge, AC-driven organic light emitting devices may well be able to rival today's OLEDs in performance.

  6. Common Mechanisms for Calorie Restriction and AC5 Knockout Models of Longevity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Lin; Park, Ji Yeon; Dillinger, Jean-Guillaume; De Lorenzo, Mariana S.; Yuan, Chujun; Lai, Lo; Wang, Chunbo; Ho, David; Tian, Bin; Stanley, William C; Auwerx, Johan; Vatner, Dorothy E.; Vatner, Stephen F.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adenylyl cyclase type 5 knockout mice (AC5 KO) live longer and are stress resistant, similar to calorie restriction (CR). AC5 KO mice eat more, but actually weigh less and accumulate less fat compared to WT mice. CR applied to AC5 KO result in rapid decrease in body weight, metabolic deterioration and death. These data suggest that despite restricted food intake in CR, but augmented food intake in AC5 KO, the two models affect longevity and metabolism similarly. To determine shared molecular mechanisms, mRNA expression was examined genome-wide for brain, heart, skeletal muscle and liver. Significantly more genes were regulated commonly rather than oppositely in all the tissues in both models, indicating commonality between AC5 KO and CR. Gene Ontology analysis identified many significantly regulated, tissue-specific pathways shared by the two models, including sensory perception in heart and brain, muscle function in skeletal muscle, and lipid metabolism in liver. Moreover, when comparing gene expression changes in the heart under stress, the glutathione regulatory pathway was consistently upregulated in the longevity models but downregulated with stress. In addition, AC5 and CR shared changes in genes and proteins involved in the regulation of longevity and stress resistance, including Sirt1, ApoD and olfactory receptors in both young and intermediate age mice. Thus, the similarly regulated genes and pathways in AC5 KO and CR, particularly related to the metabolic phenotype, suggest a unified theory for longevity and stress resistance. PMID:23020244

  7. Lysosomal Cholesterol Accumulation Inhibits Subsequent Hydrolysis Of Lipoprotein Cholesteryl Ester

    PubMed Central

    Jerome, W. Gray; Cox, Brian E.; Griffin, Evelyn E.; Ullery, Jody C.

    2010-01-01

    Human macrophages incubated for prolonged periods with mildly oxidized LDL (oxLDL) or cholesteryl ester-rich lipid dispersions (DISP) accumulate free and esterified cholesterol within large, swollen lysosomes similar to those in foam cells of atherosclerosis. The cholesteryl ester (CE) accumulation is, in part, the result of inhibition of lysosomal hydrolysis due to increased lysosomal pH mediated by excessive lysosomal free cholesterol (FC). To determine if the inhibition of hydrolysis was long lived and further define the extent of the lysosomal defect, we incubated THP-1 macrophages with oxLDL or DISP to produce lysosome sterol engorgement and then chased with acetylated LDL (acLDL). Unlike oxLDL or DISP, CE from acLDL normally is hydrolyzed rapidly. Three days of incubation with oxLDL or DISP produced an excess of CE in lipid-engorged lysosomes, indicative of inhibition. After prolonged oxLDL or DISP pretreatment, subsequent hydrolysis of acLDL CE was inhibited. Coincident with the inhibition, the lipid-engorged lysosomes failed to maintain an acidic pH during both the initial pretreatment and subsequent acLDL incubation. This indicates that the alterations in lysosomes were general, long-lived and affected subsequent lipoprotein metabolism. This same phenomenon, occurring within atherosclerotic foam cells, could significantly affect lesion progression. PMID:18312718

  8. Evaluation of 225Ac for vascular targeted radioimmunotherapy of lung tumors.

    PubMed

    Kennel, S J; Chappell, L L; Dadachova, K; Brechbiel, M W; Lankford, T K; Davis, I A; Stabin, M; Mirzadeh, S

    2000-06-01

    Several alpha particle emitting radioisotopes have been studied for use in radioimmunotherapy. Ac-225 has the potential advantages of a relatively long half life of 10 days, and a yield of 4 alpha emissions in its decay chain with a total energy release of approximately 28 MeV. A new, 12 coordination site chelating ligand, HEHA, has been chemically modified for coupling to targeting proteins without loss of chelating ability. HEHA was coupled with MAb 201B which binds to thrombomodulin and accumulates efficiently in murine lung. Ac-225 was bound to the HEHA-MAb 201B conjugate and injected into BALB/c mice bearing lung tumor colonies of EMT-6 mammary carcinoma. Biodistribution data at 1 and 4 h postinjection indicated that, as expected, 225Ac was delivered to lung efficiently (> 300% ID/g). The 225Ac was slowly released from the lung with an initial t1/2 = 49 h, and the released 225Ac accumulated in the liver. Injection of free HEHA was only partially successful in scavenging free 225Ac. In addition to the slow release of 225Ac from the chelate, data indicated that decay daughters of 225Ac were also released from the lung. Immediately after organ harvest, the level of 213Bi, the third alpha-decay daughter, was found to be deficient in the lungs and to be in excess in the kidney, relative to equilibrium values. Injected doses of 225Ac MAb 201B of 1.0 microCi, delivering a minimum calculated absorbed dose of about 6 Gy to the lungs, was effective in killing lung tumors, but also proved acutely radiotoxic. Animals treated with 1.0 microCi or more of the 225Ac radioconjugate died of a wasting syndrome within days with a dose dependent relationship. We conclude that the potential for 225Ac as a radioimmunotherapeutic agent is compromised not only by the slow release of 225Ac from the HEHA chelator, but most importantly by the radiotoxicity associated with decay daughter radioisotopes released from the target organ.

  9. The impact of organic vapours on warm cloud formation; characterisation of chamber setup and first experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, Wiebke; Connolly, Paul; Dorsey, James; Hu, Dawei; Alfarra, Rami; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-04-01

    The Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber (MICC), consisting of a 10m high stainless steel tube and 1m in diameter, can be used to study cloud processes. MICC is housed in three separate cold rooms stacked on top of each other and warm pseudo-adiabatic expansion from controlled initial temperature and pressure is possible through chamber evacuation. Further details about the facility can be found at http://www.cas.manchester.ac.uk/restools/cloudchamber/index.html. MICC can be connected to the Manchester Aerosol Chamber (MAC, http://www.cas.manchester.ac.uk/restools/aerosolchamber/), which allows to inject specified aerosol particles into the cloud chamber for nucleation studies. The combination of MAC and MICC will be used in the CCN-Vol project, which seeks to bring the experimental evidence for co-condensation of organic and water vapour in cloud formation which leads to an increase in cloud particle numbers (see Topping et al., 2013, Nature Geoscience Letters, for details). Here, we will show a characterisation of the cloud and aerosol chamber coupling in regard to background aerosol particles and nucleation. Furthermore, we will show preliminary results from the warm CCN-Vol experiment, investigating the impact of co-condensation of organic vapours and water vapour on warm cloud droplet formation.

  10. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  11. Studying Phototropism Using a Small Growth Chamber.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Maryanna, F.; Llewellyn, Gerald C.

    1978-01-01

    Describes a simple and inexpensive way to construct two small growth chambers for studying phototropism in the science classroom. One chamber is designed to illustrate how plants grow around obstacles to reach light and the other to illustrate directional light responses. (HM)

  12. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification....

  13. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 868.5470 - Hyperbaric chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Hyperbaric chamber. 868.5470 Section 868.5470 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5470 Hyperbaric chamber. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  17. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  18. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  19. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  20. 21 CFR 866.2120 - Anaerobic chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anaerobic chamber. 866.2120 Section 866.2120 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices § 866.2120 Anaerobic chamber....

  1. Space Power Facility Reverberation Chamber Calibration Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Catherine C.; Dolesh, Robert J.; Garrett, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    This document describes the process and results of calibrating the Space Environmental Test EMI Test facility at NASA Plum Brook Space Power Facility according to the specifications of IEC61000-4-21 for susceptibility testing from 100 MHz to 40 GHz. The chamber passed the field uniformity test, in both the empty and loaded conditions, making it the world's largest Reverberation Chamber.

  2. Chamber Music's Lesson in Performing Confidence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stubbs, Darrel W.

    1983-01-01

    Chamber music has the advantage of offering the student maximum exposure as an individual performer. The absence of a conductor means that the student assumes the role of interpreter, thereby gaining musical maturity. For these reasons, curriculum hours should be more evenly divided between chamber music and larger ensembles. (CS)

  3. Creating Chamber Music Enthusiasts in High School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummiskey, Cynthia

    1999-01-01

    Describes the Fairfield High School Chamber Music Honors Program for students in grades nine through twelve in Fairfield (Connecticut). Explains that the program's goal is to provide students with a positive experience in chamber music. Highlights the creation and the first two years of the program. (CMK)

  4. Promoting "Minds-on" Chamber Music Rehearsals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berg, Margaret H.

    2008-01-01

    Chamber music provides myriad opportunities to develop students' ability to think like professional musicians while engaged in the authentic task of working closely with and learning from peers. However, the potential for musical growth inherent in chamber music participation is often unrealized due to either a lack of teacher guidance and support…

  5. Incinerator system arrangement with dual scrubbing chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Domnitch, I.

    1987-01-13

    An incinerator arrangement is described comprising: an incinerator housing located near the lowest point in a building, the housing containing incinerator elements therein; a chute-flue having a first end in communication with the incinerator housing, a second end at the top of the building for evacuation of combustion gases to the atmosphere therethrough, and at least one intermediately located waste disposal opening through which waste is dropped into the incinerator housing; the incinerator elements including: a main combustion chamber, an opening between the main combustion chamber and the first end of the chute-flue and a flue-damper covering the opening. The flue-damper is biased in a closed position and being operable by the weight of waste to admit the waste into the combustion chamber; a scrubbing chamber located exteriorly along the top of the combustion chamber and having a first opening into the combustion chamber and a second opening into the chute-flue; and water spraying means in the scrubbing chamber for directing a water spray at the combustion gases to wash particulate matter from the gases before the gases enter the chute-flue whereby the water spraying means which are located adjacent the combustion chamber are protected against freezing and the elements.

  6. The fate of eyes with anterior chamber intra-ocular lenses.

    PubMed

    David, R; Yagev, R; Schneck, M; Briscoe, D; Gilad, E; Yassur, Y

    1993-01-01

    A total of 143 anterior chamber (AC) intra-ocular lenses (IOL) of various designs were implanted in a five-year period and followed for 18 to 76 months. The lenses were inserted as a secondary implant after extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) complicated by vitrectomy, or after primary intra-capsular extraction. The complications (corneal edema, uveitis/glaucoma, extrusion/imbedding, cystoid macular edema), the final visual acuity and the need for removal of the IOL were analyzed. Only small differences were found between the different lenses but some association was found between complicated surgery (ECCE + vitrectomy) and a higher rate of complication, poorer visual outcome and more frequent need for IOL removal. Cystoid macular edema was encountered only in cases with complicated ECCE. A high percentage of other ocular pathologies was found among the cases, possibly implying that diseased eyes are more prone to surgical complications. An alternative to the AC-IOL in cases with a ruptured posterior capsule is the suture-supported posterior chamber IOL, but the flexible-loop AC-IOL may not yet be obsolete.

  7. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  8. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  9. Compact ion chamber based neutron detector

    DOEpatents

    Derzon, Mark S.; Galambos, Paul C.; Renzi, Ronald F.

    2015-10-27

    A directional neutron detector has an ion chamber formed in a dielectric material; a signal electrode and a ground electrode formed in the ion chamber; a neutron absorbing material filling the ion chamber; readout circuitry which is electrically coupled to the signal and ground electrodes; and a signal processor electrically coupled to the readout circuitry. The ion chamber has a pair of substantially planar electrode surfaces. The chamber pressure of the neutron absorbing material is selected such that the reaction particle ion trail length for neutrons absorbed by the neutron absorbing material is equal to or less than the distance between the electrode surfaces. The signal processor is adapted to determine a path angle for each absorbed neutron based on the rise time of the corresponding pulse in a time-varying detector signal.

  10. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  11. An atmospheric exposure chamber for small animals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaser, R. M.; Weiss, H. S.; Pitt, J. F.; Grimard, M.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to design a long-term environmental exposure chamber for small animals. This chamber is capable of producing hypoxic, normoxic and hyperoxic atmospheres which are closely regulated. The chamber, which is of the recycling type, is fashioned after clear plastic germ-free isolators. Oxygen concentration is set and controlled by a paramagnetic O2 analyzer and a 3-way solenoid valve. In this way either O2 or N2 may be provided to the system by way of negative O2 feedback. Relative humidity is maintained at 40-50 percent by a refrigeration type dryer. Carbon dioxide is absorbed by indicating soda lime. A diaphragm pump continuously circulates chamber gas at a high enough flow rate to prevent buildup of CO2 and humidity. This chamber has been used for numerous studies which involve prolonged exposure of small animals to various O2 concentrations.

  12. Note: Small anaerobic chamber for optical spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Chauvet, Adrien A. P. Chergui, Majed; Agarwal, Rachna; Cramer, William A.

    2015-10-15

    The study of oxygen-sensitive biological samples requires an effective control of the atmosphere in which they are housed. In this aim however, no commercial anaerobic chamber is adequate to solely enclose the sample and small enough to fit in a compact spectroscopic system with which analysis can be performed. Furthermore, spectroscopic analysis requires the probe beam to pass through the whole chamber, introducing a requirement for adequate windows. In response to these challenges, we present a 1 l anaerobic chamber that is suitable for broad-band spectroscopic analysis. This chamber has the advantage of (1) providing access, via a septum, to the sample and (2) allows the sample position to be adjusted while keeping the chamber fixed and hermetic during the experiment.

  13. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  14. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  15. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  16. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  17. A model for the origin of large silicic magma chambers: precursors of caldera-forming eruptions

    SciTech Connect

    Jellinek, A. Mark; DePaolo, Donald J.

    2002-01-02

    The relatively low rates of magma production in island arcs and continental extensional settings require that the volume of silicic magma involved in large catastrophic caldera-forming (CCF) eruptions must accumulate over periods of 10(5) to 10(6) years. We address the question of why buoyant and otherwise eruptible high silica magma should accumulate for long times in shallow chambers rather than erupt more continuously as magma is supplied from greater depths. Our hypothesis is that the viscoelastic behavior of magma chamber wall rocks may prevent an accumulation of overpressure sufficient to generate rhyolite dikes that can propagate to the surface and cause an eruption. The critical overpressure required for eruption is based on the model of Rubin (1995a). An approximate analytical model is used to evaluate the controls on magma overpressure for a continuously or episodically replenished spherical magma chamber contained in wall rocks with a Maxwell viscoelastic rheology. The governing parameters are the long-term magma supply, the magma chamber volume, and the effective viscosity of the wall rocks. The long-term magma supply, a parameter that is not typically incorporated into dike formation models, can be constrained from observations and melt generation models. For effective wall-rock viscosities in the range 10(18) to 10(20) Pa s(-1), dynamical regimes are identified that lead to the suppression of dikes capable of propagating to the surface. Frequent small eruptions that relieve magma chamber overpressure are favored when the chamber volume is small relative to the magma supply and when the wall rocks are cool. Magma storage, leading to conditions suitable for a CCF eruption, is favored for larger magma chambers (>10(2) km(3)) with warm wall rocks that have a low effective viscosity. Magma storage is further enhanced by regional tectonic extension, high magma crystal contents, and if the effective wall-rock viscosity is lowered by microfracturing, fluid

  18. Small-Signal ac Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jagielski, James M.; Chen, Jess

    1987-01-01

    Program simulates power circuits and systems. Small Signal A.C. Analysis program (SSAC) valuable tool for design and analysis of electrical-power-system circuits. By combining "black box" power-system components operating in specified manner, user characterizes system modeled. Menu-driven program proved simple and cost effective in development and modification of arbitrary power-system configurations. Package includes sample data from Dynamic Explorer satellite family. Results compared favorable to calculations from such general circuit-analysis programs as SPICE. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  19. Analysis of genomic DNA of DcACS1, a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase gene, expressed in senescing petals of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) and its orthologous genes in D. superbus var. longicalycinus.

    PubMed

    Harada, Taro; Murakoshi, Yuino; Torii, Yuka; Tanase, Koji; Onozaki, Takashi; Morita, Shigeto; Masumura, Takehiro; Satoh, Shigeru

    2011-04-01

    Carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus) flowers exhibit climacteric ethylene production followed by petal wilting, a senescence symptom. DcACS1, which encodes 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS), is a gene involved in this phenomenon. We determined the genomic DNA structure of DcACS1 by genomic PCR. In the genome of 'Light Pink Barbara', we found two distinct nucleotide sequences: one corresponding to the gene previously shown as DcACS1, designated here as DcACS1a, and the other novel one designated as DcACS1b. It was revealed that both DcACS1a and DcACS1b have five exons and four introns. These two genes had almost identical nucleotide sequences in exons, but not in some introns and 3'-UTR. Analysis of transcript accumulation revealed that DcACS1b is expressed in senescing petals as well as DcACS1a. Genomic PCR analysis of 32 carnation cultivars showed that most cultivars have only DcACS1a and some have both DcACS1a and DcACS1b. Moreover, we found two DcACS1 orthologous genes with different nucleotide sequences from D. superbus var. longicalycinus, and designated them as DsuACS1a and DsuACS1b. Petals of D. superbus var. longicalycinus produced ethylene in response to exogenous ethylene, accompanying accumulation of DsuACS1 transcripts. These data suggest that climacteric ethylene production in flowers was genetically established before the cultivation of carnation.

  20. The emulsion chamber technology experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, John C.

    1992-01-01

    Photographic emulsion has the unique property of recording tracks of ionizing particles with a spatial precision of 1 micron, while also being capable of deployment over detector areas of square meters or 10's of square meters. Detectors are passive, their cost to fly in Space is a fraction of that of instruments of similar collecting. A major problem in their continued use has been the labor intensiveness of data retrieval by traditional microscope methods. Two factors changing the acceptability of emulsion technology in space are the astronomical costs of flying large electronic instruments such as ionization calorimeters in Space, and the power and low cost of computers, a small revolution in the laboratory microscope data-taking. Our group at UAH made measurements of the high energy composition and spectra of cosmic rays. The Marshall group has also specialized in space radiation dosimetry. Ionization calorimeters, using alternating layers of lead and photographic emulsion, to measure particle energies up to 10(exp 15) eV were developed. Ten balloon flights were performed with them. No such calorimeters have ever flown in orbit. In the ECT program, a small emulsion chamber was developed and will be flown on the Shuttle mission OAST-2 to resolve the principal technological questions concerning space exposures. These include assessments of: (1) pre-flight and orbital exposure to background radiation, including both self-shielding and secondary particle generation; the practical limit to exposure time in space can then be determined; (2) dynamics of stack to optimize design for launch and weightlessness; and (3) thermal and vacuum constraints on emulsion performance. All these effects are cumulative and affect our ability to perform scientific measurements but cannot be adequately predicted by available methods.

  1. Composition of fluid obtained from choroid plexus tissue isolated in a chamber in situ.

    PubMed

    Miner, L C; Reed, D J

    1972-12-01

    1. A method was developed for isolating a segment of the choroid plexus of the lateral ventricle of the cat brain in a chamber in situ.2. A comparison of electrolyte and protein concentrations in serum, ultrafiltrate of serum, cisterna magna fluid, fluid accumulated in the chamber and fluid collected from the choroid plexus by another technique, demonstrates that the chamber fluid is a secretory product of the choroid plexus.3. The rate of fluid formation in the chamber was 0.4 mul. min(-1) mg(-1) of tissue, a value in good agreement with reports in the literature.4. The observation that the concentration of K(+) in choroid plexus fluid was lower than that in the serum ultrafiltrate suggests that K(+) is regulated by an active transport process at the choroid plexus.5. Significant correlation was found between electrolyte values and the protein content of the chamber fluid. This suggests that plasma is the probable source of the protein in the chamber fluid and that K(+) and probably Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) in c.s.f. are subject to active homoeostatic regulation by the choroid plexus.6. The technique described provides a new opportunity to study in detail the functional characteristics of the choroid plexus.

  2. Effect of the magnetic material on AC losses in HTS conductors in AC magnetic field carrying AC transport current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Xing-Xing; Huang, Chen-Guang; Yong, Hua-Dong; Zhou, You-He

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents an investigation on the AC losses in several typical superconducting composite conductors using the H-formulation model. A single superconducting strip with ferromagnetic substrate or cores and a stack of coated conductors with ferromagnetic substrates are studied. We consider all the coated conductors carrying AC transport currents and simultaneously exposed to perpendicular AC magnetic fields. The influences of the amplitude, frequency, phase difference and ferromagnetic materials on the AC losses are investigated. The results show that the magnetization losses of single strip and stacked strips have similar characteristics. The ferromagnetic substrate can increase the magnetization loss at low magnetic field, and decrease the loss at high magnetic field. The ferromagnetic substrate can obviously increase the transport loss in stacked strips. The trends of total AC losses of single strip and stacked strips are similar when they are carrying current or exposed to a perpendicular magnetic field. The effect of the frequency on the total AC losses of single strip is related to the amplitude of magnetic field. The AC losses decrease with increasing frequency in low magnetic field region while increase in high magnetic field region. As the phase difference changes, there is a periodic variation for the AC losses. Moreover, when the strip is under only the transport current and magnetic field, the ferromagnetic cores will increase the AC losses for large transport current or field.

  3. Investigating 14CO2 chamber methodologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, J. E.; Phillips, C. L.; Nickerson, N. R.; Risk, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    The radiogenic isotope of carbon (14C) is an exceptionally useful tool in studying soil respired CO2, providing information about soil turnover rates, depths of production and the biological sources of production through partitioning. Unfortunately, little work has been done to thoroughly investigate the possibility of inherent biases in the current measurement techniques for 14CO2, caused by disturbances to the soil's natural diffusive regime, because of high costs and sampling logistics. Our aim in this study is to investigate the degree of bias present in the current sampling methodologies using a numerical model and laboratory calibration device. Four chamber techniques were tested numerically with varying fraction modern of production, δ13C of production, collar lengths, flux rates and diffusivities. Two of the chambers were then tested on the lab calibration device. One of these chambers, Iso-FD, has recently been tested for its use as a 13CO2 chamber and it does not induce gas transport fractionation biases present in other 13CO2 sampling methodologies. We then implemented it in the field to test its application as a 14CO2 chamber because of its excellent performance as a 13CO2chamber. Presented here are the results from the numerical modeling experiment, the laboratory calibration experiment and preliminary field results from the Iso-FD chamber.

  4. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2014-10-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be substantially underestimated owing to deposition of SOA-forming compounds to chamber walls. We present here an experimental protocol to constrain the nature of wall deposition of organic vapors in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. The dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αw,i), which can be correlated through its volatility (Ci*) with the number of carbons (nC) and oxygens (nO) in the molecule. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is approached by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and chamber walls. Gas-particle equilibrium partitioning is established relatively rapidly in the presence of perfect accommodation of organic vapors onto particles or when a sufficiently large concentration of suspended particles is present. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will be dominant for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber walls even with perfect particle accommodation.

  5. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  6. Vapor wall deposition in Teflon chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Schwantes, R. H.; McVay, R. C.; Lignell, H.; Coggon, M. M.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.

    2015-04-01

    Teflon chambers are ubiquitous in studies of atmospheric chemistry. Secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation can be underestimated, owing to deposition of SOA-forming vapors to the chamber wall. We present here an experimental protocol and a model framework to constrain the vapor-wall interactions in Teflon chambers. We measured the wall deposition rates of 25 oxidized organic compounds generated from the photooxidation of isoprene, toluene, α-pinene, and dodecane in two chambers that had been extensively used and in two new unused chambers. We found that the extent of prior use of the chamber did not significantly affect the sorption behavior of the Teflon films. Among the 25 compounds studied, the maximum wall deposition rate is exhibited by the most highly oxygenated and least volatile compounds. By optimizing the model output to the observed vapor decay profiles, we identified that the dominant parameter governing the extent of wall deposition of a compound is its wall accommodation coefficient (αwi), which can be correlated through its volatility with the number of carbons and oxygens in the molecule. By doing so, the wall-induced deposition rate of intermediate/semi-volatile organic vapors can be reasonably predicted based on their molecular constituency. The extent to which vapor wall deposition impacts measured SOA yields depends on the competition between uptake of organic vapors by suspended particles and the chamber wall. The timescale associated with vapor wall deposition can vary from minutes to hours depending on the value of αw,i. For volatile and intermediate volatility organic compounds (small αw,i), gas-particle partitioning will dominate wall deposition for typical particle number concentrations in chamber experiments. For compounds characterized by relatively large αw,i, vapor transport to particles is suppressed by competition with the chamber wall even with perfect particle accommodation.

  7. Making MUSIC: A multiple sampling ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shumard, B.; Henderson, D. J.; Rehm, K. E.; Tang, X. D.

    2007-08-01

    A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) was developed for use in conjunction with the Atlas scattering chamber (ATSCAT). This chamber was developed to study the (α, p) reaction in stable and radioactive beams. The gas filled ionization chamber is used as a target and detector for both particles in the outgoing channel (p + beam particles for elastic scattering or p + residual nucleus for (α, p) reactions). The MUSIC detector is followed by a Si array to provide a trigger for anode events. The anode events are gated by a gating grid so that only (α, p) reactions where the proton reaches the Si detector result in an anode event. The MUSIC detector is a segmented ionization chamber. The active length of the chamber is 11.95 in. and is divided into 16 equal anode segments (3.5 in. × 0.70 in. with 0.3 in. spacing between pads). The dead area of the chamber was reduced by the addition of a Delrin snout that extends 0.875 in. into the chamber from the front face, to which a mylar window is affixed. 0.5 in. above the anode is a Frisch grid that is held at ground potential. 0.5 in. above the Frisch grid is a gating grid. The gating grid functions as a drift electron barrier, effectively halting the gathering of signals. Setting two sets of alternating wires at differing potentials creates a lateral electric field which traps the drift electrons, stopping the collection of anode signals. The chamber also has a reinforced mylar exit window separating the Si array from the target gas. This allows protons from the (α, p) reaction to be detected. The detection of these protons opens the gating grid to allow the drift electrons released from the ionizing gas during the (α, p) reaction to reach the anode segment below the reaction.

  8. Particle Agglomeration in Bipolar Barb Agglomerator Under AC Electric Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao; Ma, Xiuqin; Sun, Youshan; Wang, Meiyan; Zhang, Changping; Lou, Yueya

    2015-04-01

    The development of an efficient technology for removing fine particles in flue gas is essential as the haze is becoming more and more serious. To improve agglomeration effectiveness of fine particles, a dual zone electric agglomeration device consisting of a charging chamber and an agglomeration chamber with bipolar barb electrodes was developed. The bipolar barb electric agglomerator with a polar distance of 200 mm demonstrates good agglomeration effectiveness for particles with a size less than 8.0 μm under applied AC electric field. An optimal condition for achieving better agglomeration effectiveness was found to be as follows: flue gas flow velocity of 3.00 m/s, particle concentration of 2.00 g/m3, output voltage of 35 kV and length of the barb of 16 mm. In addition, 4.0-6.0 μm particles have the best effectiveness with the variation of particle volume occupancy of -3.2. supported by the Key Technology R&D Program of Hebei, China (No. 13211207D)

  9. ac electroosmosis in rectangular microchannels.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Michele; Accoto, Dino; Dario, Paolo

    2005-11-22

    Motivated by the growing interest in ac electroosmosis as a reliable no moving parts strategy to control fluid motion in microfluidic devices for biomedical applications, such as lab-on-a-chip, we study transient and steady-state electrokinetic phenomena (electroosmosis and streaming currents) in infinitely extended rectangular charged microchannels. With the aid of Fourier series and Laplace transforms we provide a general formal solution of the problem, which is used to study the time-dependent response to sudden ac applied voltage differences in case of finite electric double layer. The Debye-Huckel approximation has been adopted to allow for an algebraic solution of the Poisson-Boltzmann problem in Fourier space. We obtain the expressions of flow velocity profiles, flow rates, streaming currents, as well as expressions of the complex hydraulic and electrokinetic conductances. We analyze in detail the dependence of the electrokinetic conductance on the extension of linear dimensions relative to the Debye length, with an eye on finite electric double layer effects. PMID:16351310

  10. APS Storage Ring vacuum chamber fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Goeppner, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    The 1104-m circumference Advanced Photon Source Storage Ring Vacuum System is composed of 240 individual sections, which are fabricated from a combination of aluminum extrusions and machined components. The vacuum chambers will have 3800 weld joints, each subject to strict vacuum requirements, as well as a variety of related design criteria. The vacuum criteria and chamber design are reviewed, including a discussion of the weld joint geometries. The critical fabrication process parameters for meeting the design requirements are discussed. The experiences of the prototype chamber fabrication program are presented. Finally, the required facilities preparation for construction activity is briefly described. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  12. Performance of NIRS Thoron Chamber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Tokonami, Shinji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Yosuke

    2008-08-01

    In order to carry out thoron sensitivity test for passive radon detectors, a thoron chamber system has been set up at NIRS, Japan. The thoron chamber system consists of four components: the exposure, monitoring, calibration, and humidity control systems, which was mounted in this study due to humidity dependence on the thoron concentration emanated from lantern mantles as the thoron source. The thoron concentration in the thoron chamber is controlled by humidity passed through the thoron source and the weight of the lantern mantle.

  13. Simple cloud chambers using gel ice packs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamata, Masahiro; Kubota, Miki

    2012-07-01

    Although cloud chambers are highly regarded as teaching aids for radiation education, school teachers have difficulty in using cloud chambers because they have to prepare dry ice or liquid nitrogen before the experiment. We developed a very simple and inexpensive cloud chamber that uses the contents of gel ice packs which can substitute for dry ice or liquid nitrogen. The gel can be frozen in normal domestic freezers, and can be used repeatedly by re-freezing. The tracks of alpha-ray particles can be observed continuously for about 20 min, and the operation is simple and easy.

  14. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers,...

  15. 30 CFR 77.305 - Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Access to drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. 77.305 Section 77.305 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY... drying chambers, hot gas inlet chambers and ductwork; installation and maintenance. Drying chambers,...

  16. Investigation of saccadic eye movement effects on the fluid dynamic in the anterior chamber.

    PubMed

    Abouali, Omid; Modareszadeh, Amirreza; Ghaffarieh, Alireza; Tu, Jiyuan

    2012-02-01

    The aqueous humor (AH) flow in the anterior chamber (AC) due to saccadic movements is investigated in this research. The continuity, Navier-Stokes and energy equations in 3D and unsteady forms are solved numerically and the saccadic motion was modeled by the dynamic mesh technique. Firstly, the numerical model was validated for the saccadic movement of a spherical cavity with analytic solutions and experimental data where excellent agreement was observed. Then, two types of periodic and realistic saccadic motions of the AC are simulated, whereby the flow field is computed for various saccade amplitudes and the results are reported for different times. The results show that the acting shear stress on the corneal endothelial cells from AH due to saccadic movements is much higher than that due to normal AH flow by buoyancy induced due to temperature gradient. This shear stress is higher on the central region of the cornea. The results also depict that eye saccade imposes a 3D complicated flow field in the AC consist of various vortex structures. Finally, the enchantment of heat transfer in the AC by AH mixing as a result of saccadic motion is investigated. PMID:22482669

  17. RHIC spin flipper AC dipole controller

    SciTech Connect

    Oddo, P.; Bai, M.; Dawson, C.; Gassner, D.; Harvey, M.; Hayes, T.; Mernick, K.; Minty, M.; Roser, T.; Severino, F.; Smith, K.

    2011-03-28

    The RHIC Spin Flipper's five high-Q AC dipoles which are driven by a swept frequency waveform require precise control of phase and amplitude during the sweep. This control is achieved using FPGA based feedback controllers. Multiple feedback loops are used to and dynamically tune the magnets. The current implementation and results will be presented. Work on a new spin flipper for RHIC (Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider) incorporating multiple dynamically tuned high-Q AC-dipoles has been developed for RHIC spin-physics experiments. A spin flipper is needed to cancel systematic errors by reversing the spin direction of the two colliding beams multiple times during a store. The spin flipper system consists of four DC-dipole magnets (spin rotators) and five AC-dipole magnets. Multiple AC-dipoles are needed to localize the driven coherent betatron oscillation inside the spin flipper. Operationally the AC-dipoles form two swept frequency bumps that minimize the effect of the AC-dipole dipoles outside of the spin flipper. Both AC bumps operate at the same frequency, but are phase shifted from each other. The AC-dipoles therefore require precise control over amplitude and phase making the implementation of the AC-dipole controller the central challenge.

  18. 11. Detail view west from airlock chamber of typical refrigerator ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Detail view west from airlock chamber of typical refrigerator door into Trophic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  19. DETAIL OF THE GROOVED RIM ON TOP FACE OF CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE GROOVED RIM ON TOP FACE OF CHAMBER SHELL, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. Glutathione preconditioning attenuates Ac-LDL-induced macrophage apoptosis via protein kinase C-dependent Ac-LDL trafficking.

    PubMed

    Rosenson-Schloss, Rene S; Chnari, Evangelia; Brieva, Thomas A; Dang, Anh; Moghe, Prabhas V

    2005-01-01

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) incorporation into intimally resident vascular cells via scavenger receptors marks one of the early steps in atherosclerosis. Cellular apoptotic damage results from two major serial intracellular events: the binding and scavenger receptor-mediated uptake of oxidizable lipoproteins and the intracellular oxidative responses of accumulated lipoproteins. Most molecular approaches to prevent apoptotic damage have focused on singular events within the cascade of lipoprotein trafficking. To identify a multifocal strategy against LDL-induced apoptosis, we evaluated the role of cellular preconditioning by glutathione-ethyl ester (GSH-Et), a native redox regulator, in the prevention of the uptake and apoptotic effects of an oxidizable scavenger receptor-specific ligand, acetylated low-density lipoprotein (Ac-LDL). Our results indicate that GSH-Et-mediated protein kinase C (PKC) pathway modulation regulates Ac-LDL binding and incorporation into GSH-Et preconditioned cells and subsequently delays reactive oxygen intermediate generation and apoptotic conversion. The GSH-Et protective effects on apoptosis and Ac-LDL binding were reversed by calphostin C, a PKC inhibitor, and were accompanied by an increase in PKC phosphorylation. However, the rate of reactive oxygen intermediate accumulation was not increased following calphostin C treatment, suggesting that GSH-Et may play an important nonreactive oxygen-intermediate-based protective role in regulating apoptotic dynamics. Overall, we report on the novel role for GSH-Et preconditioning as a molecular strategy to limit lipoprotein entry into the cells, which presents a proactive modality to prevent cellular apoptosis in contrast with the prevalent antioxidant approaches that treat damage retroactively. PMID:15618124

  1. Earthworms accumulate alanine in response to drought.

    PubMed

    Holmstrup, Martin; Slotsbo, Stine; Henriksen, Per G; Bayley, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Earthworms have ecologically significant functions in tropical and temperate ecosystems and it is therefore important to understand how these animals survive during drought. In order to explore the physiological responses to dry conditions, we simulated a natural drought incident in a laboratory trial exposing worms in slowly drying soil for about one month, and then analyzed the whole-body contents of free amino acids (FAAs). We investigated three species forming estivation chambers when soils dry out (Aporrectodea tuberculata, Aporrectodea icterica and Aporrectodea longa) and one species that does not estivate during drought (Lumbricus rubellus). Worms subjected to drought conditions (< -2MPa) substantially increased the concentration of FAAs and in particular alanine that was significantly upregulated in all tested species. Alanine was the most important FAA reaching 250-650μmolg(-1) dry weight in dehydrated Aporrectodea species and 300μmolg(-1) dry weight in L. rubellus. Proline was only weakly upregulated in some species as were a few other FAAs. Species forming estivation chambers (Aporrectodea spp.) did not show a better ability to conserve body water than the non-estivating species (L. rubellus) at the same drought level. These results suggest that the accumulation of alanine is an important adaptive trait in drought tolerance of earthworms in general. PMID:27107492

  2. LDCM TIRS: Cracking open the chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    Engineers at Goddard Space Flight Center inspect and move the Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) after two months of testing in the thermal vacuum chamber. TIRS completed its first round of thermal vac...

  3. Three dimensional thrust chamber life prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, W. H.; Brogren, E. W.

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to analytically determine the cyclic thermomechanical behavior and fatigue life of three configurations of a Plug Nozzle Thrust Chamber. This thrust chamber is a test model which represents the current trend in nozzle design calling for high performance coupled with weight and volume limitations as well as extended life for reusability. The study involved the use of different materials and material combinations to evaluate their application to the problem of low-cycle fatigue in the thrust chamber. The thermal and structural analyses were carried out on a three-dimensional basis. Results are presented which show plots of continuous temperature histories and temperature distributions at selected times during the operating cycle of the thrust chamber. Computed structural data show critical regions for low-cycle fatigue and the histories of strain within the regions for each operation cycle.

  4. Internal combustion engine with multiple combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Gruenwald, D.J.

    1992-05-26

    This patent describes a two-cycle compression ignition engine. It comprises one cylinder, a reciprocable piston moveable in the cylinder, a piston connecting rod, a crankshaft for operation of the piston connecting rod, a cylinder head enclosing the cylinder, the upper surface of the piston and the enclosing surface of the cylinder head defining a cylinder clearance volume, a first combustion chamber and a second combustion chamber located in the cylinder head. This patent describes improvement in means for isolating the combustion process for one full 360{degrees} rotation of the crankshaft; wherein the combustion chambers alternatively provide for expansion of combustion products in the respective chambers into the cylinder volume near top dead center upon each revolution of the crankshaft.

  5. HYLIFE-II reactor chamber design refinements

    SciTech Connect

    House, P.A.

    1994-06-01

    Mechanical design features of the reactor chamber for the HYLIFE-II inertial confinement fusion power plant are presented. A combination of oscillating and steady, molten salt streams (Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}) are used for shielding and blast protection of the chamber walls. The system is designed for a 6 Hz repetition rate. Beam path clearing, between shots, is accomplished with the oscillating flow. The mechanism for generating the oscillating streams is described. A design configuration of the vessel wall allows adequate cooling and provides extra shielding to reduce thermal stresses to tolerable levels. The bottom portion of the reactor chamber is designed to minimize splash back of the high velocity (>12 m/s) salt streams and also recover up to half of the dynamic head. Cost estimates for a 1 GWe and 2 GWe reactor chamber are presented.

  6. Developing Cloud Chambers with High School Students

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishizuka, Ryo; Tan, Nobuaki; Sato, Shoma; Zeze, Syoji

    The result and outcome of the cloud chamber project, which aims to develop a cloud chamber useful for science education is reported in detail. A project includes both three high school students and a teacher as a part of Super Science High School (SSH) program in our school. We develop a dry-ice-free cloud chamber using salt and ice (or snow). Technical details of the chamber are described. We also argue how the project have affected student's cognition, motivation, academic skills and behavior. The research project has taken steps of professional researchers, i.e., in planning research, applying fund, writing a paper and giving a talk in conferences. From interviews with students, we have learnt that such style of scientific activity is very effective in promoting student's motivation for learning science.

  7. Effectiveness of Chamber Music Ensemble Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorn, Jay D.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation was concerned with the effectiveness of chamber music ensemble experience for certain members of a ninth grade band and the evaluation of the effectiveness in terms of performing abilities, cognitive learnings, and attitude changes. (Author)

  8. Rocket Combustion Chambers Resist Thermal Fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazaroff, John M.; Jankovsky, Robert S.; Pavli, Albert J.

    1995-01-01

    Improved design concept developed for combustion chambers for rocket engines, described in three reports. Provides compliance allowing unrestrained thermal expansion in circumferential direction. Compliance lengthens life of rocket engine by reducing amount of thermal deformation caused by repeated firings.

  9. Comparison of the Changes in Corneal Endothelial Cells after Pars Plana and Anterior Chamber Ahmed Valve Implant

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Yeon; Nam, Dong Heun; Lee, Dae Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the changes in corneal endothelial cells after pars plana Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation with those after the anterior chamber AGV implantation for refractory glaucoma. Methods. The medical records of 18 eyes with pars plana implantation of AGV (ppAGV) were reviewed retrospectively and were compared with 18 eyes with the anterior chamber AGV (acAGV) implant. The preoperative and postoperative endothelial cells, intraocular pressure (IOP), and postoperative complications during the follow-up in both groups were compared. Results. The average follow-up was 18 months. The postoperative endothelial cells in the ppAGV and acAGV groups were 2044 ± 303 and 1904 ± 324, respectively (P = 0.25). The average percentage decrease in the endothelial cells in the ppAGV and acAGV groups at 18 months was 12.5% and 18.4%, respectively, and showed significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.01). No difference in IOP control and the number of postoperative glaucoma medications was observed between the 2 groups. Conclusions. Endothelial cell damage in the ppAGV group for refractory glaucoma appeared to be lower than that in the acAGV group. Therefore, pars plana implantation of AGV may be preferred as it may have lower level of endothelial cell damage while maintaining similar level of IOP control. PMID:25694824

  10. Comparison of the changes in corneal endothelial cells after pars plana and anterior chamber ahmed valve implant.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ji Won; Lee, Jong Yeon; Nam, Dong Heun; Lee, Dae Yeong

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the changes in corneal endothelial cells after pars plana Ahmed glaucoma valve (AGV) implantation with those after the anterior chamber AGV implantation for refractory glaucoma. Methods. The medical records of 18 eyes with pars plana implantation of AGV (ppAGV) were reviewed retrospectively and were compared with 18 eyes with the anterior chamber AGV (acAGV) implant. The preoperative and postoperative endothelial cells, intraocular pressure (IOP), and postoperative complications during the follow-up in both groups were compared. Results. The average follow-up was 18 months. The postoperative endothelial cells in the ppAGV and acAGV groups were 2044 ± 303 and 1904 ± 324, respectively (P = 0.25). The average percentage decrease in the endothelial cells in the ppAGV and acAGV groups at 18 months was 12.5% and 18.4%, respectively, and showed significant difference between the 2 groups (P = 0.01). No difference in IOP control and the number of postoperative glaucoma medications was observed between the 2 groups. Conclusions. Endothelial cell damage in the ppAGV group for refractory glaucoma appeared to be lower than that in the acAGV group. Therefore, pars plana implantation of AGV may be preferred as it may have lower level of endothelial cell damage while maintaining similar level of IOP control.

  11. Tracking with wire chambers at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.; Gundy, M.C.; Palounek, A.P.T.

    1989-07-01

    Limitations placed on wire chambers by radiation damage and rate requirements in the SSC environment are reviewed. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tacking systems that meet these requirements are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 13 refs., 11 fig., 1 tab.

  12. Cloud chamber visualization of primary cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Earl, James A.

    2013-02-07

    From 1948 until 1963, cloud chambers were carried to the top of the atmosphere by balloons. From these flights, which were begun by Edward P. Ney at the University of Minnesota, came the following results: discovery of heavy cosmic ray nuclei, development of scintillation and cherenkov detectors, discovery of cosmic ray electrons, and studies of solar proton events. The history of that era is illustrated here by cloud chamber photographs of primary cosmic rays.

  13. A model to forecast magma chamber rupture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, John; Drymoni, Kyriaki; Gudmundsson, Agust

    2016-04-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. Using continuum-mechanics and fracture-mechanics principles, we present a model to calculate the amount of magma contained at shallow depth beneath active volcanoes. Here we discuss our model in the context of Santorini volcano, Greece. We demonstrate through structural analysis of dykes exposed within the Santorini caldera, previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions, and geodetic measurements of the 2011-2012 unrest period, that the measured 0.02% increase in volume of Santorini's shallow magma chamber was associated with magmatic excess pressure increase of around 1.1 MPa. This excess pressure was high enough to bring the chamber roof close to rupture and dyke injection. For volcanoes with known typical extrusion and intrusion (dyke) volumes, the new methodology presented here makes it possible to forecast the conditions for magma-chamber failure and dyke injection at any geodetically well-monitored volcano.

  14. Robust Acoustic Transducers for Bubble Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wells, Jonathan

    2015-04-01

    The PICO collaboration utilizes bubble chambers filled with various superheated liquids as targets for dark matter. Acoustic sensors have proved able to distinguish nuclear recoils from radioactive background on an event-by-event basis. We have recently produced a more robust transducer which should be able to operate for years, rather than months, in the challenging environment of a heated high pressure hydraulic fluid outside these chambers. Indiana University South Bend.

  15. How does a bubble chamber work?

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinov, D.; Homsi, W.; Luzuriaga, J.; Su, C.K.; Weilert, M.A.; Maris, H.J.

    1998-11-01

    A charged particle passing through a bubble chamber produces a track of bubbles. The way in which these bubbles are produced has been a matter of some controversy. The authors consider the possibility that in helium and hydrogen bubble chambers the production of bubbles is primarily a mechanical process, rather than a thermal process as has often been assumed. The model the authors propose gives results which are in excellent agreement with experiment.

  16. Engine Knock and Combustion Chamber Form

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zinner, Karl

    1939-01-01

    The present report is confined to the effect of the combustion chamber shape on engine knock from three angles, namely: 1) The uniformity of flame-front movement as affected by chamber design and position of the spark plug; 2) The speed of advance of the flame as affected by turbulence and vibrations; 3) The reaction processes in the residual charge as affected by the walls.

  17. Tracking with wire chambers at high luminosities

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G. Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, CA )

    1989-12-01

    Radiation damage and rate limitations impose severe constraints on wire chambers at the SSC. Possible conceptual designs for wire chamber tracking systems that satisfy these constraints are discussed. Computer simulation studies of tracking in such systems are presented. Simulations of events from interesting physics at the SSC, including hits from minimum bias background events, are examined. Results of some preliminary pattern recognition studies are given. 11 refs., 10 figs.

  18. The GODDESS ionization chamber: developing robust windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Rose; Baugher, Travis; Cizewski, Jolie; Pain, Steven; Ratkiewicz, Andrew; Goddess Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    Reaction studies of nuclei far from stability require high-efficiency arrays of detectors and the ability to identify beam-like particles, especially when the beam is a cocktail beam. The Gammasphere ORRUBA Dual Detectors for Experimental Structure Studies (GODDESS) is made up of the Oak Ridge-Rutgers University Barrel Array (ORRUBA) of silicon detectors for charged particles inside of the gamma-ray detector array Gammasphere. A high-rate ionization chamber is being developed to identify beam-like particles. Consisting of twenty-one alternating anode and cathode grids, the ionization chamber sits downstream of the target chamber and is used to measure the energy loss of recoiling ions. A critical component of the system is a thin and robust mylar window which serves to separate the gas-filled ionization chamber from the vacuum of the target chamber with minimal energy loss. After construction, windows were tested to assure that they would not break below the required pressure, causing harm to the wire grids. This presentation will summarize the status of the ionization chamber and the results of the first tests with beams. This work is supported in part by the U.S. Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  19. Upright Imaging of Drosophila Egg Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis provides an ideal context for studying varied developmental processes since the ovary is relatively simple in architecture, is well-characterized, and is amenable to genetic analysis. Each egg chamber consists of germ-line cells surrounded by a single epithelial layer of somatic follicle cells. Subsets of follicle cells undergo differentiation during specific stages to become several different cell types. Standard techniques primarily allow for a lateral view of egg chambers, and therefore a limited view of follicle cell organization and identity. The upright imaging protocol describes a mounting technique that enables a novel, vertical view of egg chambers with a standard confocal microscope. Samples are first mounted between two layers of glycerin jelly in a lateral (horizontal) position on a glass microscope slide. The jelly with encased egg chambers is then cut into blocks, transferred to a coverslip, and flipped to position egg chambers upright. Mounted egg chambers can be imaged on either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope. This technique enables the study of follicle cell specification, organization, molecular markers, and egg development with new detail and from a new perspective. PMID:25867882

  20. Development of sputtered techniques for thrust chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullaly, J. R.; Hecht, R. J.; Schmid, T. E.; Torrey, C. T.

    1975-01-01

    Techniques and materials were developed and evaluated for the fabrication and coating of advanced, long life, regeneratively cooled thrust chambers. Materials were analyzed as fillers for sputter application of OFHC copper as a closeout layer to channeled inner structures; of the materials evaluated, aluminum was found to provide the highest bond strength and to be the most desirable for chamber fabrication. The structures and properties were investigated of thick sputtered OFHC copper, 0.15 Zr-Cu, Al2O3,-Cu, and SiC-Cu. Layered structures of OFHC copper and 0.15 Zr-Cu were investigated as means of improving chamber inner wall fatigue life. The evaluation of sputtered Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, NASA IIb-11, aluminum and Al2O3-Al alloys as high strength chamber outer jackets was performed. Techniques for refurbishing degraded thrust chambers with OFHC copper and coating thrust chambers with protective ZrO2 and graded ZrO2-copper thermal barrier coatings were developed.

  1. Chamber for Growing and Observing Fungi

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Molina, Thomas C.

    2005-01-01

    A chamber has been designed to enable growth and observation of microcolonies of fungi in isolation from the external environment. Unlike prior fungus-growing apparatuses, this chamber makes it possible to examine a fungus culture without disrupting it. Partly resembling a small picture frame, the chamber includes a metal plate having a rectangular through-thethickness opening with recesses for a top and a bottom cover glass, an inlet for air, and an inlet for water. The bottom cover glass is put in place and held there by clips, then a block of nutrient medium and a moisture pad are placed in the opening. The block is inoculated, then the top cover glass is put in place and held there by clips. Once growth is evident, the chamber can be sealed with tape. Little (if any) water evaporates past the edges of the cover glasses, and, hence there is little (if any) need to add water. A microscope can be used to observe the culture through either cover glass. Because the culture is sealed in the chamber, it is safe to examine the culture without risking contamination. The chamber can be sterilized and reused.

  2. Designing an Active Target Test Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koci, James; Tan Ahn Collaboration, Dr.; Nicolas Dixneuf Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    The development of instrumentation in nuclear physics is crucial for advancing our ability to measure the properties of exotic nuclei. One limitation of the use of exotic nuclei in experiment is their very low production intensities. Recently, detectors, called active-target dectectors, have been developed to address this issue. Active-target detectors use a gas medium to image charged-particle tracks that are emitted in nuclear reactions. Last semester, I designed a vacuum chamber to be used in developing Micro-Pattern Gas detectors that will upgrade the capabilities of an active-target detector called the Prototype AT-TPC. With the exterior of the chamber complete, I have now been using an electric field modeling program, Garfield, developed by CERN to design a field cage to be placed within the vacuum chamber. The field cage will be a box-like apparatus consisting of two parallel metal plates connected with a resistor chain and attached to wires wrapped between them. The cage will provide a uniform electric field within the chamber to drift electrons from nuclear reactions down to the detector in the bottom of the chamber. These signals are then amplified by a proportional counter, and the data is sent to a computer. For the long term, we would like to incorporate a Micro-Pattern Gas Detectors in the interior of the chamber and eventually use the AT-TPC to examine various nuclei. Dr. Ahn is my advising professor.

  3. The PEP Quark Search Proportional Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, S. I.; Harris, F.; Karliner, I.; Yount, D.; Ely, R.; Hamilton, R.; Pun, T.; Guryn, W.; Miller, D.; Fries, R.

    1981-04-01

    Proportional chambers are used in the PEP Free Quark Search to identify and remove possible background sources such as particles traversing the edges of counters, to permit geometric corrections to the dE/dx and TOF information from the scintillator and Cerenkov counters, and to look for possible high cross section quarks. The present beam pipe has a thickness of 0.007 interaction lengths (λi) and is followed in both arms (each with 45° <= θ <= 135°. Δphi = 90°) by 5 proportional chambers, each 0.0008 λi thick with 32 channels of pulse height readout, and by 3 thin scintillator planes, each 0.003 λi thick. Following this thin front end, each arm of the detector has 8 layers of scintillator (one with scintillating light pipes) interspersed with 4 proportional chambers and a layer of lucite Cerenkov counters. Both the calculated ion statistics and measurements using He-CH4 gas in a test chamber indicate that the chamber efficiencies should be > 98% for q = 1/3. The Landau spread measured in the test was equal to that observed for normal q = 1 traversals. One scintillator plane and thin chamber in each arm will have an extra set of ADC's with a wide gate bracketing the normal one so timing errors and tails of earlier pulses should not produce fake quarks.

  4. Upright imaging of Drosophila egg chambers.

    PubMed

    Manning, Lathiena; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2015-03-13

    Drosophila melanogaster oogenesis provides an ideal context for studying varied developmental processes since the ovary is relatively simple in architecture, is well-characterized, and is amenable to genetic analysis. Each egg chamber consists of germ-line cells surrounded by a single epithelial layer of somatic follicle cells. Subsets of follicle cells undergo differentiation during specific stages to become several different cell types. Standard techniques primarily allow for a lateral view of egg chambers, and therefore a limited view of follicle cell organization and identity. The upright imaging protocol describes a mounting technique that enables a novel, vertical view of egg chambers with a standard confocal microscope. Samples are first mounted between two layers of glycerin jelly in a lateral (horizontal) position on a glass microscope slide. The jelly with encased egg chambers is then cut into blocks, transferred to a coverslip, and flipped to position egg chambers upright. Mounted egg chambers can be imaged on either an upright or an inverted confocal microscope. This technique enables the study of follicle cell specification, organization, molecular markers, and egg development with new detail and from a new perspective.

  5. Cyclic fatigue analysis of rocket thrust chambers. Volume 1: OFHC copper chamber low cycle fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    A three-dimensional finite element elasto-plastic strain analysis was performed for the throat section of a regeneratively cooled rocket combustion chamber. The analysis employed the RETSCP finite element computer program. The analysis included thermal and pressure loads, and the effects of temperature dependent material properties, to determine the strain range corresponding to the chamber operating cycle. The analysis was performed for chamber configuration and operating conditions corresponding to a hydrogen-oxygen combustion chamber which was fatigue tested to failure. The computed strain range at typical chamber operating conditions was used in conjunction with oxygen-free, high-conductivity (OHFC) copper isothermal fatigue test data to predict chamber low-cycle fatigue life.

  6. 12. View north of Tropic Chamber. Natick Research & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. View north of Tropic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  7. 13. View south of Arctic Chamber. Natick Research & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. View south of Arctic Chamber. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  8. Measuring radon exhalation rate in two cycles avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2013-10-01

    This paper will present a simple method for measuring the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface in two cycles and also avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage. The method is based on a combination of the "accumulation chamber" technique and a radon monitor. The radon monitor performs the measurement of the radon concentration inside the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation rate can be obtained by simple calculation. For reducing the systematic error and the statistical uncertainty, too short of total measurement time is not appropriate, and the first cycle time should be about 70 % of the total measurement. The radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This simple method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for measuring radon exhalation rate.

  9. Multi-element accumulation near Rumex crispus roots under wetland and dryland conditions.

    PubMed

    Kissoon, La Toya T; Jacob, Donna L; Otte, Marinus L

    2010-05-01

    Rumex crispus was grown under wet and dry conditions in two-chamber columns such that the roots were confined to one chamber by a 21 mum nylon mesh, thus creating a soil-root interface ('rhizoplane'). Element concentrations at 3 mm intervals below the 'rhizoplane' were measured. The hypothesis was that metals accumulate near plant roots more under wetland than dryland conditions. Patterns in element distribution were different between the treatments. Under dryland conditions Al, Ba, Cu, Cr, Fe, K, La, Mg, Na, Sr, V, Y and Zn accumulated in soil closest to the roots, above the 'rhizoplane' only. Under wetland conditions Al, Fe, Cr, K, V and Zn accumulated above as well as 3 mm below the 'rhizoplane' whereas La, Sr and Y accumulated 3 mm below the 'rhizoplane' only. Plants on average produced 1.5 times more biomass and element uptake was 2.5 times greater under wetland compared to dryland conditions. PMID:19939528

  10. METALLIZATION OF CERAMIC VACUUM CHAMBERS FOR SNS RING INJECTION KICKER MAGNETS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; TODD,R.J.

    2002-04-22

    Ceramic chambers will be used in the pulsed kicker magnets for the injection of H{sup -} into the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. There are two reasons for using ceramic chambers in kickers: (1) to avoid shielding of a fast-changing external magnetic field by metallic chamber walls; and (2) to reduce heating due to eddy currents. The inner surfaces of the ceramic chambers will be coated with a conductive layer, possibly titanium (Ti) or copper with a titanium nitride (TiN) overlayer, to reduce the beam coupling impedance and provide passage for beam image current. This paper describes the development of sputtering method for the 0.83m long 16cm inner diameter ceramic chambers. Coatings of Ti, Cu and TiN with thicknesses up to 10 {micro}m were produced by means of DC magnetron sputtering. The difficulty of coating insulators was overcome with the introduction of an anode screen. Films with good adhesion, uniform longitudinal thickness, and conductivity were produced.

  11. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

  12. Modeling the Temporal Evolution of the Magma Chamber at Mount Hood (Oregon, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.; Cooper, K. M.; Kent, A. J.

    2014-12-01

    The evolution of shallow magma reservoirs is complex as new mass is added intermittently and phase proportions (crystals, melt and bubbles) vary because of cooling or mass removal (eruptions). One requirement for eruptions to occur is that the crystal content during storage is low enough (< 0.4-0.6) such that the magma is mobile. Thermal modeling and geochemical data suggest these chambers are mobile only a very small fraction of their lifetime. Data from uranium-series disequilibria, crystal size distributions, and zoning of trace elements in crystals collected at Mount Hood (Oregon, USA) provide constraints on the thermal evolution of this system over the past 21 kyrs years and suggest <10% of this time the magma was mobile. This system also produced at least 3 significant eruptions over the last 10 kyrs based on the stratigraphic record (~220 and ~1500, and ~7700 years ago). Here we investigate the physical conditions of an open-system magma chamber that are in agreement with the thermal history inferred from the crystal record and with the eruption sequence. What are the magma recharge fluxes that are required to keep a system such as Mount Hood active but predominantly crystal-rich over the last 21 kyrs and what combination of processes produces the observed eruption frequency? To answer these questions we use an idealized magma chamber model to solve for the evolution of the thermodynamical state of the chamber (pressure, temperature, gas and crystal content) as new magma is injected into the chamber. Heat is lost to the surrounding colder crust, which responds visco-elastically to the pressure accumulated during recharge and volatile exsolution. If the crystal volume fraction is lower than 0.5 and chamber overpressure reaches 20 MPa we assume an eruption occurs. We analyze what type of injection (constant, periodic, magma lensing), injection rate, and magma chamber volume yields trends consistent with the timescales found at Mount Hood.

  13. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined. PMID:26492154

  14. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined.

  15. Tuned Chamber Core Panel Acoustic Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Allen, Albert R.

    2016-01-01

    This report documents acoustic testing of tuned chamber core panels, which can be used to supplement the low-frequency performance of conventional acoustic treatment. The tuned chamber core concept incorporates low-frequency noise control directly within the primary structure and is applicable to sandwich constructions with a directional core, including corrugated-, truss-, and fluted-core designs. These types of sandwich structures have long, hollow channels (or chambers) in the core. By adding small holes through one of the facesheets, the hollow chambers can be utilized as an array of low-frequency acoustic resonators. These resonators can then be used to attenuate low-frequency noise (below 400 Hz) inside a vehicle compartment without increasing the weight or size of the structure. The results of this test program demonstrate that the tuned chamber core concept is effective when used in isolation or combined with acoustic foam treatments. Specifically, an array of acoustic resonators integrated within the core of the panels was shown to improve both the low-frequency absorption and transmission loss of the structure in targeted one-third octave bands.

  16. [Inhospital thrombolism of right cardiac chambers].

    PubMed

    Vasil'tseva, O Ia; Vorozhtsova, I N; Karpov, R S

    2013-01-01

    Veins of lower extremities are classic sources of pulmonary artery thromboembolism (PATE). But one should not underestimate presence of thrombi in other potential sources - veins of small pelvis, superior vena cava, and chambers of the heart. We analyzed 652 case histories and autopsy data of patients in whom PATE had been revealed at pathological anatomical investigation and selected 157 cases in which right heart chambers were sources of emboli (right atrium in 83.5% and right ventricle - in 13.7% of cases). According to autopsy data average mass of the heart was 512.5+/-36.1 g. In most patients it exceeded norm. Thrombi in both right and left cardiac chambers were found in 52.3% of cases. Eighty three patients had history of myocardial infarction or were treated for MI during last hospitalization; 52.3% of patients had atrial fibrillation. After detailed study of all anamnestic, clinical, instrumental, and pathologic-anatomic data we selected 69 factors which according to contemporary views could facilitate formation of thrombus in the right cardiac chambers. Using these factors and method of logistic regression we created a mathematical model for assessment of probability of the presence of thrombi in right cardiac chambers.

  17. Chamber, Target and Final Focus Integrated Design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W

    2000-03-22

    Liquid wall protection, which challenges chamber clearing, has such advantages it's Heavy Ion Fusion's (HIF) main line chamber design. Thin liquid protection from x rays is necessary to avoid erosion of structural surfaces and thick liquid makes structures behind 0.5 m of Flibe (7 mean free paths for 14 MeV neutrons), last the life of the plant. Liquid wall protection holds the promise of greatly increased economic competitiveness. Driver designers require {approx}200 beams to illuminate recent target designs from two sides. The illumination must be compatible with liquid wall protection. The ''best'' values for driver energy, gain, yield and pulse rate comes out of well-known trade-off studies. An integrated chamber design, yet to be made, depends on several key assumptions, which are to be proven before HIF can be shown to be feasible. The chamber R&D needed to reduce the unknowns and risks depend on resolving a few technical issues such as jet surface smoothness and rapid chamber clearing.

  18. Chamber, Target and Final Focus Integrated Design

    SciTech Connect

    Moir, R.W.

    2000-03-03

    Liquid wall protection, which challenges chamber clearing, has such advantages it's Heavy Ion Fusion's (HIF) main line chamber design. Thin liquid protection from x rays is necessary to avoid erosion of structural surfaces and thick liquid makes structures behind 0.5 m of Flibe (7 mean free paths for 14 MeV neutrons), last the life of the plant. Liquid wall protection holds the promise of greatly increased economic competitiveness. Driver designers require {approx}200 beams to illuminate recent target designs from two sides. The illumination must be compatible with liquid wall protection. The ''best'' values for driver energy, gain, yield and pulse rate comes out of well-known trade-off studies. The chamber design is based on several key assumptions, which are to be proven before HIF can be shown to be feasible. The chamber R&D needed to reduce the unknowns and risks depend on resolving a few technical issues such as jet surface smoothness and rapid chamber clearing.

  19. Geological and taphonomic context for the new hominin species Homo naledi from the Dinaledi Chamber, South Africa.

    PubMed

    Dirks, Paul H G M; Berger, Lee R; Roberts, Eric M; Kramers, Jan D; Hawks, John; Randolph-Quinney, Patrick S; Elliott, Marina; Musiba, Charles M; Churchill, Steven E; de Ruiter, Darryl J; Schmid, Peter; Backwell, Lucinda R; Belyanin, Georgy A; Boshoff, Pedro; Hunter, K Lindsay; Feuerriegel, Elen M; Gurtov, Alia; Harrison, James du G; Hunter, Rick; Kruger, Ashley; Morris, Hannah; Makhubela, Tebogo V; Peixotto, Becca; Tucker, Steven

    2015-01-01

    We describe the physical context of the Dinaledi Chamber within the Rising Star cave, South Africa, which contains the fossils of Homo naledi. Approximately 1550 specimens of hominin remains have been recovered from at least 15 individuals, representing a small portion of the total fossil content. Macro-vertebrate fossils are exclusively H. naledi, and occur within clay-rich sediments derived from in situ weathering, and exogenous clay and silt, which entered the chamber through fractures that prevented passage of coarser-grained material. The chamber was always in the dark zone, and not accessible to non-hominins. Bone taphonomy indicates that hominin individuals reached the chamber complete, with disarticulation occurring during/after deposition. Hominins accumulated over time as older laminated mudstone units and sediment along the cave floor were eroded. Preliminary evidence is consistent with deliberate body disposal in a single location, by a hominin species other than Homo sapiens, at an as-yet unknown date.

  20. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  1. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype.

  2. Negative hydrogen ion beam extraction from an AC heated cathode driven Bernas-type ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Okano, Y.; Miyamoto, N.; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M.

    2015-04-08

    A plasma grid structure was installed to a Bernas-type ion source used for ion implantation equipment. A negative hydrogen (H{sup −}) ion beam was extracted by an AC driven ion source by adjusting the bias to the plasma grid. The extracted electron current was reduced by positively biasing the plasma grid, while an optimum plasma grid bias voltage for negative ion beam extraction was found to be positive 3 V with respect to the arc chamber. Source operations with AC cathode heating show extraction characteristics almost identical to that with DC cathode heating, except a minute increase in H{sup −} current at higher frequency of cathode heating current.

  3. Differential AC chip calorimeter for in situ investigation of vapor deposited thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahrenberg, Mathias; Schick, Christoph; Huth, Heiko; Schoifet, Evgeni; Ediger, Mark; Whitaker, Katie

    2012-02-01

    Physical vapor deposition (PVD) can be used to produce thin films with particular material properties like extraordinarily stable glasses of organic molecules. We describe an AC chip calorimeter for in-situ heat capacity measurements of as-deposited nanometer thin films of organic glass formers. The calorimetric system is based on a differential AC chip calorimeter which is placed in the vacuum chamber for physical vapor deposition. The sample is directly deposited onto one calorimetric chip sensor while the other sensor is protected against deposition. The device and the temperature calibration procedure are described. The latter makes use of the phase transitions of cyclopentane and the frequency dependence of the dynamic glass transition of toluene and ethylbenzene. Sample thickness determination is based on a finite element modeling (FEM) of the sensor sample arrangement. A layer of toluene was added to the sample sensor and its thickness was varied in an iterative way until the model fits the experimental data.

  4. Three phase AC motor controller

    DOEpatents

    Vuckovich, Michael; Wright, Maynard K.; Burkett, John P.

    1984-03-20

    A motor controller for a three phase AC motor (10) which is adapted to operate bidirectionally from signals received either from a computer (30) or a manual control (32). The controller is comprised of digital logic circuit means which implement a forward and reverse command signal channel (27, 29) for the application of power through the forward and reverse power switching relays (16, 18, 20, 22). The digital logic elements are cross coupled to prevent activation of both channels simultaneously and each includes a plugging circuit (65, 67) for stopping the motor upon the removal of control signal applied to one of the two channels (27, 29) for a direction of rotation desired. Each plugging circuit (65, 67) includes a one-shot pulse signal generator (88, 102) which outputs a single pulse signal of predetermined pulsewidth which is adapted to inhibit further operation of the application of power in the channel which is being activated and to apply a reversal command signal to the other channel which provides a reversed phase application of power to the motor for a period defined by the pulse-width output of the one-shot signal generator to plug the motor (10) which will then be inoperative until another rotational command signal is applied to either of the two channels.

  5. Laboratory evaluation of a prototype photochemical chamber designed to investigate the health effects of fresh and aged vehicular exhaust emissions

    PubMed Central

    Papapostolou, Vasileios; Lawrence, Joy E.; Diaz, Edgar A.; Wolfson, Jack M.; Ferguson, Stephen T.; Long, Mark S.; Godleski, John J.; Koutrakis, Petros

    2013-01-01

    Laboratory experiments simulating atmospheric aging of motor vehicle exhaust emissions were conducted using a single vehicle and a photochemical chamber. A compact automobile was used as a source of emissions. The vehicle exhaust was diluted with ambient air to achieve carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations similar to those observed in an urban highway tunnel. With the car engine idling, it is expected that the CO concentration is a reasonable surrogate for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions. Varying the amount of dilution of the exhaust gas to produce different CO concentrations, allowed adjustment of the concentrations of VOCs in the chamber to optimize production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) needed for animal toxicological exposures. Photochemical reactions in the chamber resulted in nitric oxide (NO) depletion, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) formation, ozone (O3) accumulation, and SOA formation. A stable SOA concentration of approximately 40 µg m−3 at a chamber mean residence time of 30 min was achieved. This relatively short mean residence time provided adequate chamber flow output for both particle characterization and animal exposures. The chamber was operated as a continuous flow reactor for animal toxicological tests. SOA mass generated from the car exhaust diluted with ambient air was almost entirely in the ultrafine mode. Chamber performance was improved by using different types of seed aerosol to provide a surface for condensation of semivolatile reaction products, thus increasing the yield of SOA. Toxicological studies using Sprague-Dawley rats found significant increases of in vivo chemiluminescence in lungs following exposure to SOA. PMID:21689011

  6. Laboratory evaluation of a prototype photochemical chamber designed to investigate the health effects of fresh and aged vehicular exhaust emissions.

    PubMed

    Papapostolou, Vasileios; Lawrence, Joy E; Diaz, Edgar A; Wolfson, Jack M; Ferguson, Stephen T; Long, Mark S; Godleski, John J; Koutrakis, Petros

    2011-07-01

    Laboratory experiments simulating atmospheric aging of motor vehicle exhaust emissions were conducted using a single vehicle and a photochemical chamber. A compact automobile was used as a source of emissions. The vehicle exhaust was diluted with ambient air to achieve carbon monoxide (CO) concentrations similar to those observed in an urban highway tunnel. With the car engine idling, it is expected that the CO concentration is a reasonable surrogate for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emissions. Varying the amount of dilution of the exhaust gas to produce different CO concentrations, allowed adjustment of the concentrations of VOCs in the chamber to optimize production of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) needed for animal toxicological exposures. Photochemical reactions in the chamber resulted in nitric oxide (NO) depletion, nitrogen dioxide (NO₂) formation, ozone (O₃) accumulation, and SOA formation. A stable SOA concentration of approximately 40 μg m⁻³ at a chamber mean residence time of 30 min was achieved. This relatively short mean residence time provided adequate chamber flow output for both particle characterization and animal exposures. The chamber was operated as a continuous flow reactor for animal toxicological tests. SOA mass generated from the car exhaust diluted with ambient air was almost entirely in the ultrafine mode. Chamber performance was improved by using different types of seed aerosol to provide a surface for condensation of semivolatile reaction products, thus increasing the yield of SOA. Toxicological studies using Sprague-Dawley rats found significant increases of in vivo chemiluminescence in lungs following exposure to SOA.

  7. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested.

  8. Parameters characterization and optimization of activated carbon (AC) cathodes for microbial fuel cell application.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Babanova, Sofia; Atanassov, Plamen; Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Grattieri, Matteo; Cristiani, Pierangela; Trasatti, Stefano; Li, Baikun; Schuler, Andrew J

    2014-07-01

    Activated carbon (AC) is employed as a cost-effective catalyst for cathodic oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cells (MFC). The fabrication protocols of AC-based cathodes are conducted at different applied pressures (175-3500 psi) and treatment temperatures (25-343°C). The effects of those parameters along with changes in the surface morphology and chemistry on the cathode performances are comprehensively examined. The cathodes are tested in a three-electrode setup and explored in single chamber membraneless MFCs (SCMFCs). The results show that the best performance of the AC-based cathode is achieved when a pressure of 1400 psi is applied followed by heat treatment of 150-200°C for 1h. The influence of the applied pressure and the temperature of the heat treatment on the electrodes and SCMFCs is demonstrated as the result of the variation in the transfer resistance, the surface morphology and surface chemistry of the AC-based cathodes tested. PMID:24787317

  9. Chamber LIDAR measurements of aerosolized biological simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Siegrist, Karen M.; Baldwin, Kevin; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2009-05-01

    A chamber aerosol LIDAR is being developed to perform well-controlled tests of optical scattering characteristics of biological aerosols, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT), for validation of optical scattering models. The 1.064 μm, sub-nanosecond pulse LIDAR allows sub-meter measurement resolution of particle depolarization ratio or backscattering cross-section at a 1 kHz repetition rate. Automated data acquisition provides the capability for real-time analysis or recording. Tests administered within the refereed 1 cubic meter chamber can provide high quality near-field backscatter measurements devoid of interference from entrance and exit window reflections. Initial chamber measurements of BG depolarization ratio are presented.

  10. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael

    2016-01-01

    At the end of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) OTIS (Optical Telescope Element-OTE-Integrated Science Instrument Module-ISIM) cryogenic vacuum testing in NASA Johnson Space Centers (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are mooting the idea that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the ISIM interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This memo describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. These are strung together in tandem to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  11. Thermal Vacuum Chamber Repressurization with Instrument Purging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woronowicz, Michael S.

    2014-01-01

    At the conclusion of cryogenic vacuum testing of the James Webb Space Telescope Optical Telescope Element Integrated Science Instrument Module (JWST-OTIS) in NASA Johnson Space Center’s (JSCs) thermal vacuum (TV) Chamber A, contamination control (CC) engineers are postulating that chamber particulate material stirred up by the repressurization process may be kept from falling into the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) interior to some degree by activating instrument purge flows over some initial period before opening the chamber valves. This manuscript describes development of a series of models designed to describe this process. The models are strung together in tandem with a fictitious set of conditions to estimate overpressure evolution from which net outflow velocity behavior may be obtained. Creeping flow assumptions are then used to determine the maximum particle size that may be kept suspended above the ISIM aperture, keeping smaller particles from settling within the instrument module.

  12. High temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chazen, Melvin L. (Inventor); Mueller, Thomas J. (Inventor); Kruse, William D. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature thrust chamber for spacecraft (20) is provided herein. The high temperature thrust chamber comprises a hollow body member (12) having an outer surface and an internal surface (16) defining the high temperature chamber (10). The body member (12) is made substantially of rhenium. An alloy (18) consisting of iridium and at least alloying metal selected of the group consisting of rhodium, platinum and palladium is deposited on at least a portion of the internal surface (16) of the body member (12). The iridium and the alloying metal are electrodeposited onto the body member (12). A HIP cycle is performed upon the body member (12) to cause the coating of iridium and the alloying metal to form the alloy (18) which protects the body member (12) from oxidation.

  13. Simulation of BaBar Drift Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Rachel; /Wisconsin U., Eau Claire /SLAC

    2006-09-27

    The BaBar drift chamber (DCH) is used to measure the properties of charged particles created from e{sup +}e{sup -} collisions in the PEP-II asymmetric-energy storage rings by making precise measurements of position, momentum and ionization energy loss (dE/dx). In October of 2005, the PEP-II storage rings operated with a luminosity of 10 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}; the goal for 2007 is a luminosity of 20 x 10{sup 33} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, which will increase the readout dead time, causing uncertainty in drift chamber measurements to become more significant in physics results. The research described in this paper aims to reduce position and dE/dx uncertainties by improving our understanding of the BaBar drift chamber performance. A simulation program--called GARFIELD--is used to model the behavior of the drift chamber with adjustable parameters such as gas mixture, wire diameter, voltage, and magnetic field. By exploring the simulation options offered in GARFIELD, we successfully produced a simulation model of the BaBar drift chamber. We compared the time-to-distance calibration from BaBar to that calculated by GARFIELD to validate our model as well as check for discrepancies between the simulated and calibrated time-to-distance functions, and found that for a 0{sup o} entrance angle there is a very good match between calibrations, but at an entrance angle of 90{sup o} the calibration breaks down. Using this model, we also systematically varied the gas mixture to find one that would optimize chamber operation, which showed that the gas mixture of 80:20 Helium:isobutane is a good operating point, though more calculations need to be done to confirm that it is the optimal mixture.

  14. Lightweight Chambers for Thrust Cell Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elam, S.; Effinger, M.; Holmes, R.; Lee, J.; Jaskowiak, M.

    2000-01-01

    Traditional metals like steel and copper alloys have been used for many years to fabricate injector and chamber components of thruster assemblies. While the materials perform well, reducing engine weights would help existing and future vehicles gain performance and payload capability. It may now be possible to reduce current thruster weights up to 50% by applying composite materials. In this task, these materials are being applied to an existing thrust cell design to demonstrate new fabrication processes and potential weight savings. Two ceramic matrix composite (CMC) designs, three polymer matrix composite (PMC) designs, and two metal matrix composite (MMC) designs are being fabricated as small chamber demonstration units. In addition, a new alloy of copper, chrome, and niobium (Cu-8Cr-4Nb) is being investigated for thrust chamber liners since it offers higher strength and increased cycle life over traditional alloys. This new alloy is being used for the liner in each MMC and PMC demonstration unit. During June-August of 2000, hot-fire testing of each unit is planned to validate designs in an oxygen/hydrogen environment at chamber pressures around 850 psi. Although the weight savings using CMC materials is expected to be high, they have proven to be much harder to incorporate into chamber designs based on current fabrication efforts. However, the PMC & MMC concepts using the Cu-8Cr-4Nb liner are nearly complete and ready for testing. Additional efforts intend to use the PMC & MMC materials to fabricate a full size thrust chamber (60K lb(sub f) thrust class). The fabrication of this full size unit is expected to be complete by October 2000, followed by hot-fire testing in November-December 2000.

  15. Production Of Multi-magnetron Plasma By Using Polyphase Ac Glow Discharge In An Improved Multi-pole Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Kazunori; Motoki, Kentaro; Miyamoto, Masahiro; Uetani, Yasuhiro

    1998-10-01

    Effects of an improved multi-pole magnetic field on a plasma production generated by a polyphase ac glow discharge with multiple electrodes have been investigated. Conventional configuration of the multi-pole magnetic filed has been modified to suppress plasma losses at both ends of the chamber due to ExB drift motion. The modified multi-pole magnetic field has enabled us to produce a multiple magnetron-plasma at a considerably low pressure less than mTorr. The low temperature plasma has been widely used as the fine processing technology of a dry etching and as the thin film formation technology of a sputtering coating. Large-scale plasmas which can be generated at a low gas-pressure have been desired for more wider dry etching and greater sputter coating. The purpose of this study is to develop a large-scale and low-cost plasma generator by using a polyphase ac power source with the low frequency. In this session, we will present the experimental result as to a multiple magnetron-plasma generated in the modified twenty-four poles magnetic field by using the twenty-four-phase ac power source with the commercial electric power frequency of 60Hz. The ac power is supplied to twenty-four electrodes which are fixed to the water-cooled chamber-wall through sheet insulators so that the electrodes can be cooled indirectly.

  16. Superconductor coil geometry and ac losses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, T. V., Jr.; Zapata, R. N.

    1976-01-01

    An empirical relation is presented which allows simple computation of volume-averaged winding fields from central fields for coils of small rectangular cross sections. This relation suggests that, in certain applications, ac-loss minimization can be accomplished by use of low winding densities, provided that hysteresis losses are independent of winding density. The ac-loss measurements on coils wound of twisted multifilamentary composite superconductors show no significant dependence on ac losses on winding density, thus permitting the use of winding density as an independent design parameter in loss minimization.

  17. Sealed Plant-Growth Chamber For Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Christopher S.; Dreschel, Thomas W.

    1993-01-01

    Laboratory chamber for growing plants used to measure photosynthesis and respiration in simulated microgravity. Holds plant specimens while rotated on clinostat, see article, "Clinostat Delivers Power To Plant-Growth Cabinets" (KSC-11537). Provides way of comparing gas-exchange rates of plants rotated horizontally on clinostat with those of stationary or vertically rotated plants. Gas extracted for analysis without stopping clinostat. Chamber includes potlike base and cylindrical cover, both made of transparent acrylic pipe. Gasket forms seal between cover and bottom plate of base. Cover bolted to pot baseplate, which in turn bolted to clinostat.

  18. Almond test body. [for microwave anechoic chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Gilreath, Melvin C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is an almond shaped test body for use in measuring the performance characteristics of microwave anechoic chambers and for use as a support for components undergoing radar cross-section measurements. The novel aspect of this invention is its shape, which produces a large dynamic scattered field over large angular regions making the almond valuable for verifying the performance of microwave anechoic chambers. As a component mount, the almond exhibits a low return that does not perturb the measurement of the component and it simulates the backscatter characteristics of the component as if over an infinite ground plane.

  19. Quasi-Porous Plug With Vortex Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, J. V.

    1985-01-01

    Pressure-letdown valve combines quasi-porous-plug and vortex-chamber in one controllable unit. Valve useful in fossil-energy plants for reducing pressures in such erosive two-phase process streams as steam/water, coal slurries, or combustion gases with entrained particles. Quasi-Porous Plug consists of plenums separated by perforated plates. Number or size of perforations increases with each succeeding stage to compensate for expansion. In Vortex Chamber, control flow varies to control swirl and therefore difference between inlet and outlet pressures.

  20. ACCUMULATION OF ATMOSPHERIC MERCURY IN FOREST FOLIAGE. (R827622E02)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We used unique mesocosms to examine the role that plants play in accumulating and transforming atmospheric Hg. Several stands of quaking aspen were grown in large gas-exchange chambers in Hg-enriched soil (12.3±1.3 

  1. Sugar Accumulation in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Gayler, K. R.; Glasziou, K. T.

    1972-01-01

    The rate-limiting reaction for glucose uptake in storage tissue of sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L., appears to be the movement of glucose across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartments. The mechanism for uptake of glucose across this boundary has been studied using 3-O-methyl glucose, an analogue of glucose which is not metabolized by sugar-cane tissue. This analogue is taken up by sugarcane storage tissue at a similar rate to glucose. Its rate of uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Km = 1.9 mm, and it is competitively inhibited by glucose, Ki = 2 to 3 mm. Glucose uptake is similarly inhibited by 3-O-methyl glucose. Uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose is energy-dependent and does not appear to be the result of counterflow of glucose. It is concluded that glucose and 3-O-methyl glucose uptake across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartment in this tissue is mediated by an energy-dependent carrier system capable of accumulating the sugars against a concentration gradient. PMID:16658002

  2. TTX accumulation in pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been detected in a variety of animals. The finding of TTX in the trumpet shell Charonia sauliae strongly suggested that its origin was its food, a TTX-bearing starfish Astropecten polyacanthus. Since then, the food chain has been consistently implicated as the principal means of TTX intoxication. To identify the primary producer of TTX, intestinal bacteria isolated from several TTX-bearers were investigated for their TTX production. The results demonstrated that some of them could produce TTX. Thus the primary TTX producers in the sea are concluded to be marine bacteria. Subsequently, detritus feeders and zooplankton can be intoxicated with TTX through the food chain, or in conjunction with parasitism or symbiosis. The process followed by small carnivores, omnivores or scavengers, and by organisms higher up the food chain would result in the accumulation of higher concentrations of TTX. Finally, pufferfish at the top of the food chain are intoxicated with TTX. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that net cage and land cultures produce non-toxic pufferfish that can be made toxic by feeding with a TTX-containing diet.

  3. High School Teachers Win ACS Prizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Editorial Staff, Jce

    2009-07-01

    William E. Snyder is the 2009 winner of the ACS Division of Chemical Education Central Region Award for Excellence in High School Teaching; Sally Mitchell is the winner of the 2009 James Bryant Conant Award in High School Chemistry Teaching.

  4. Tevatron optics measurements using an AC dipole

    SciTech Connect

    Miyamoto, R.; Kopp, S.E.; Jansson, A.; Syphers, M.J.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The AC dipole is a device to study beam optics of hadron synchrotrons. It can produce sustained large amplitude oscillations with virtually no emittance growth. A vertical AC dipole for the Tevatron is recently implemented and a maximum oscillation amplitude of 2{sigma} (4{sigma}) at 980 GeV (150 GeV) is achieved [1]. When such large oscillations are measured with the BPM system of the Tevatron (20 {micro}m resolution), not only linear but even nonlinear optics can be directly measured. This paper shows how to measure {beta} function using an AC dipole and the result is compared to the other measurement. The paper also shows a test to detect optics changes when small changes are made in the Tevatron. Since an AC dipole is nondestructive, it allows frequent measurements of the optics which is necessary for such an test.

  5. The AC-120: The advanced commercial transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duran, David; Griffin, Ernest; Mendoza, Saul; Nguyen, Son; Pickett, Tim; Noernberg, Clemm

    1993-01-01

    The main objective of this design was to fulfill a need for a new airplane to replace the aging 100 to 150 passenger, 1500 nautical mile range aircraft such as the Douglas DC9 and Boeing 737-100 airplanes. After researching the future aircraft market, conducting extensive trade studies, and analysis on different configurations, the AC-120 Advanced Commercial Transport final design was achieved. The AC-120's main design features include the incorporation of a three lifting surface configuration which is powered by two turboprop engines. The AC-120 is an economically sensitive aircraft which meets the new FM Stage Three noise requirements, and has lower NO(x) emissions than current turbofan powered airplanes. The AC-120 also improves on its contemporaries in passenger comfort, manufacturing, and operating cost.

  6. SEPAC system test in NASDA space chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obayashi, T.; Kuriki, K.; Kawashima, N.; Nagatomo, M.; Kudo, I.; Ninomiya, K.; Ushirokawa, A.; Ejiri, M.; Sasaki, S.

    1980-01-01

    Test results of the second NASDA space chamber test using SEPAC (Space Experiment with Particle Acceleration) prototype models are reviewed. A safety level of electrical charge is determined, the electromagnetic interference effect caused by an electron beam and MPD arcjet firing is evaluated, and beam spread for EBA software mask design is measured.

  7. A reusable prepositioned ATP reaction chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, D. G.

    1972-01-01

    Luminescence biometer detects presence of life by means of light-emitting chemical reaction of luciferin and luciferase with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) that occurs in all living cells. Amount of light in reaction chamber is measured to determine presence and extent of life.

  8. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  9. Detecting dark matter with scintillating bubble chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianjie; Dahl, C. Eric; Jin, Miaotianzi; Baxter, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Threshold based direct WIMP dark matter detectors such as the superheated bubble chambers developed by the PICO experiment have demonstrated excellent electron-recoil and alpha discrimination, excellent scalability, ease of change of target fluid, and low cost. However, the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds have been a limiting factor in their dark matter sensitivity. We present a new type of detector, the scintillating bubble chamber, which reads out the scintillation pulse of the scattering events as well as the pressure, temperature, acoustic traces, and bubble images as a conventional bubble chamber does. The event energy provides additional handle to discriminate against the nuclear-recoil like backgrounds. Liquid xenon is chosen as the target fluid in our prototyping detector for its high scintillation yield and suitable vapor pressure which simplifies detector complexity. The detector can be used as an R&D tool to study the backgrounds present in the current PICO bubble chambers or as a prototype for standalone dark matter detectors in the future. Supported by DOE Grant DE-SC0012161.

  10. Miniature reaction chamber and devices incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mathies, Richard A.; Woolley, Adam T.

    2000-10-17

    The present invention generally relates to miniaturized devices for carrying out and controlling chemical reactions and analyses. In particular, the present invention provides devices which have miniature temperature controlled reaction chambers for carrying out a variety of synthetic and diagnostic applications, such as PCR amplification, nucleic acid hybridization, chemical labeling, nucleic acid fragmentation and the like.

  11. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Kagmeni, G; Cheuteu, R; Bilong, Y; Wiedemann, P

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  12. Acoustical-Levitation Chamber for Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, M. B.; Trinh, E.; Wang, T. G.; Elleman, D. D.; Jacobi, N.

    1983-01-01

    Sample moved to different positions for heating and quenching. Acoustical levitation chamber selectively excited in fundamental and second-harmonic longitudinal modes to hold sample at one of three stable postions: A, B, or C. Levitated object quickly moved from one of these positions to another by changing modes. Object rapidly quenched at A or C after heating in furnace region at B.

  13. Chamber transport for heavy ion fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Craig L.

    2014-01-01

    A brief review is given of research on chamber transport for HIF (heavy ion fusion) dating from the first HIF Workshop in 1976 to the present. Chamber transport modes are categorized into ballistic transport modes and channel-like modes. Four major HIF reactor studies are summarized (HIBALL-II, HYLIFE-II, Prometheus-H, OSIRIS), with emphasis on the chamber transport environment. In general, many beams are used to provide the required symmetry and to permit focusing to the required small spots. Target parameters are then discussed, with a summary of the individual heavy ion beam parameters required for HIF. The beam parameters are then classified as to their line charge density and perveance, with special emphasis on the perveance limits for radial space charge spreading, for the space charge limiting current, and for the magnetic (Alfven) limiting current. The major experiments on ballistic transport (SFFE, Sabre beamlets, GAMBLE II, NTX, NDCX) are summarized, with specific reference to the axial electron trapping limit for charge neutralization. The major experiments on channel-like transport (GAMBLE II channel, GAMBLE II self-pinch, LBNL channels, GSI channels) are discussed. The status of current research on HIF chamber transport is summarized, and the value of future NDCX-II transport experiments for the future of HIF is noted.

  14. Simple chamber facilitates chemiluminescent detection of bacteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marts, E. C.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1970-01-01

    Test chamber enables rapid estimation of bacteria in a test sample through the reaction of luminol and an oxidant with the cytochrome C portion of certain species of bacteria. Intensity of the light emitted in the reaction is a function of the specific bacteria in the test sample.

  15. Multiphysics Nuclear Thermal Rocket Thrust Chamber Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Ten-See

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this effort is t o develop an efficient and accurate thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical thrust chamber design and analysis. The current task scope is to perform multidimensional, multiphysics analysis of thrust performance and heat transfer analysis for a hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine including thrust chamber and nozzle. The multiphysics aspects of the model include: real fluid dynamics, chemical reactivity, turbulent flow, and conjugate heat transfer. The model will be designed to identify thermal, fluid, and hydrogen environments in all flow paths and materials. This model would then be used to perform non- nuclear reproduction of the flow element failures demonstrated in the Rover/NERVA testing, investigate performance of specific configurations and assess potential issues and enhancements. A two-pronged approach will be employed in this effort: a detailed analysis of a multi-channel, flow-element, and global modeling of the entire thrust chamber assembly with a porosity modeling technique. It is expected that the detailed analysis of a single flow element would provide detailed fluid, thermal, and hydrogen environments for stress analysis, while the global thrust chamber assembly analysis would promote understanding of the effects of hydrogen dissociation and heat transfer on thrust performance. These modeling activities will be validated as much as possible by testing performed by other related efforts.

  16. Anterior Chamber Live Loa loa: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kagmeni, G.; Cheuteu, R.; Bilong, Y.; Wiedemann, P.

    2016-01-01

    We reported a case of unusual intraocular Loa loa in a 27-year-old patient who presented with painful red eye. Biomicroscopy revealed a living and active adult worm in the anterior chamber of the right eye. After surgical extraction under local anesthesia, parasitological identification confirmed L. loa filariasis. PMID:27441005

  17. Presenting Chamber Music to Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Terry Fonda

    2011-01-01

    The number of professional ensembles and organizations with dedicated outreach concerts has been steadily increasing over the past decade. More recently, educational concerts pairing chamber music with young children have been documented. The work presented in this article is a study in the efficacy and feasibility of this format. Various music…

  18. Try Chamber Music--Here's How.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudaitis, Cheryl

    1995-01-01

    Profiles four middle school teachers maintaining early chamber music programs. The teachers advise varying degrees of musical competency before students begin the program, but all of them caution against starting too soon. They also stress the importance of purchasing early music scores and establishing rehearsal times. (MJP)

  19. Four chamber pacing in dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Cazeau, S; Ritter, P; Bakdach, S; Lazarus, A; Limousin, M; Henao, L; Mundler, O; Daubert, J C; Mugica, J

    1994-11-01

    A 54-year-old man received a four chamber pacing system for severe congestive heart failure (NYHA functional Class IV). His ECG showed a left bundle branch block (200-msec QRS duration) with 200-msec PR interval, normal QRS axis, and 90-msec interatrial interval. An acute hemodynamic study with insertion of four temporary leads was performed prior to the implant, which demonstrated a significant increase in cardiac output and decrease of pulmonary capillary wedge pressure. A permanent pacemaker was implanted based on the encouraging results of the acute study. The right chamber leads were introduced by cephalic and subclavian approaches. The left atrium was paced with a coronary sinus lead, Medtronic SP 2188-58 model. An epicardial Medtronic 5071 lead was placed on the LV free wall. The four leads were connected to a standard bipolar DDD pacemaker, Chorus 6234. The two atrial leads were connected via a Y-connector to the atrial channel of the pacemaker with a bipolar pacing configuration. The two ventricular leads were connected in a similar fashion to the ventricular channel of the device. The right chamber leads were connected to the distal poles. The left chamber leads were connected to the proximal poles of the pacemaker. Six weeks later, the patient's clinical status improved markedly with a weight loss of 17 kg and disappearance of peripheral edema. His functional class was reduced to NYHA II. Four chamber pacing is technically feasible. In patients with evidence of interventricular dyssynchrony, this original pacing mode probably provides a mechanical activation sequence closer to the natural one.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  20. Test plan pressure fed thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Glenn

    1990-01-01

    Aerojet is developing the technology for the design of a reliable, low cost, efficient, and lightweight LOX/RP-1 pressure fed engine. This technology program is a direct result of Aerojet's liquid rocket booster (LRB) study and previous NASA studies that identified liquid engines using high bulk density hydrocarbon fuels as very attractive for a space transportation system (STS). Previous large thrust LOX/RP-1 engine development programs were characterized by costly development problems due to combustion instability damage. The combustion stability solution was typically obtained through trial and error methods of minimizing instability damage by degrading engine performance. The approach to this program was to utilize existing and newly developed combustion analysis models and design methodology to create a thrust chamber design with features having the potential of producing reliable and efficient operation. This process resulted in an engine design with a unique high thrust-per-element OFO triplet injector utilizing a low cost modular approach. Cost efficient ablative materials are baselined for the injector face and chamber. Technology demonstration will be accomplished through a hot fire test program using appropriately sized subscale hardware. This subscale testing will provide a data base to supplement the current industry data bank and to anchor and validate the applied analysis models and design methodology. Once anchored and validated, these analysis models and design methodology can be applied with greatly increased confidence to design and characterize a large scale pressure fed LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. The objective of this test program is to generate a data base that can be used to anchor and validate existing analysis models and design methodologies and to provide early concept demonstration of a low cost, efficient LOX/RP-1 thrust chamber. Test conditions and hardware instrumentation were defined to provide data sufficient to characterize combustion

  1. Influence of frequency on the characteristics of VHF capacitively coupled plasmas in a 300 mm chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebner, G. A.; Barnat, E. V.; Miller, P. A.; Paterson, A.; Holland, J.; Lill, T.

    2004-09-01

    We have investigated the characteristics of VHF capacitively coupled plasmas produced in a modified Applied Materials chamber. The chamber had a 14-inch diameter upper electrode (source) that was driven at 10 to 160 MHz and a 300 mm diameter electrostatic chuck with a ceramic process kit that was driven at 13.56 MHz (bias). Diagnostics employed include a microwave interferometer to measure the line-integrated electron density, a hairpin microwave resonator to measure the spatially resolved electron density, absorption spectroscopy to determine the argon metastable temperature and density, laser induced fluorescence (LIF) to determine the spatial distribution of the excited species, and spatially resolved optical emission. We found that for constant source rf power, the electron density increased with rf frequency. The argon 1s5 metastable temperature was slightly above room temperature (300 - 400K), significantly cooler than our previous measurements in inductively coupled plasmas. The metastable density was not a strong function of source frequency or rf power. The metastable spatial distribution was always peaked in the center of the chamber and had a weak dependence on frequency. Scaling of the plasma parameters with frequency, power and pressure, and implications to energy deposition models will be discussed. This work was supported by Applied Materials and Sandia National Laboratories, a multiprogram laboratory operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company for the United States Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  2. Modeling, Calibration, and Verification of a Fission Chamber for ACRR Experimentersa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coburn, Jonathan; Luker, S. Michael; Parma, Edward J.; DePriest, K. Russell

    2016-02-01

    When performing research at a reactor facility, experimenters often need to determine the neutron fluence achieved during an operation. Facilities typically provide guidance in the form of neutron fluence per megajoule (MJ) or through passive dosimetry results. After experiment completion, there is sometimes a delay of several days (or weeks) before the passive dosimetry results are available. In the interim, an experimenter does not have confirmation that the desired irradiation levels were reached. Active dosimetry may provide an estimate of neutron fluxes, but few active detectors are available that have been calibrated to measure neutron fluxes obtained inside the Annular Core Research Reactor (ACRR) central cavity environment. For past experiments at the ACRR, the neutron fluence was calculated by integrating the response of a fission chamber rate detection signal and then normalizing this integral to fluence determined from passive dosimetry. An alternative method of directly measuring neutron flux is desired; the new methodology described provides a complete neutron flux profile after a reactor pulse, utilizing fission chamber physics in combination with a compensating ion chamber to extract and convert a current signal to neutron flux as a function of time. Work supported by the United States Department of Energy at Sandia National Laboratories. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  3. 78 FR 39345 - ACS Wireless, Inc.; Notice of Application

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ... COMMISSION ACS Wireless, Inc.; Notice of Application AGENCY: Securities and Exchange Commission (``Commission...''). Summary of Application: ACS Wireless, Inc. (``ACS Wireless'') seeks an order under section 3(b)(2) of the..., owning, holding or trading in securities. ACS Wireless is primarily engaged in providing...

  4. 21 CFR 888.1240 - AC-powered dynamometer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered dynamometer. 888.1240 Section 888.1240...) MEDICAL DEVICES ORTHOPEDIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 888.1240 AC-powered dynamometer. (a) Identification. An AC-powered dynamometer is an AC-powered device intended for medical purposes to...

  5. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  6. 21 CFR 886.1630 - AC-powered photostimulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered photostimulator. 886.1630 Section 886...) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1630 AC-powered photostimulator. (a) Identification. An AC-powered photostimulator is an AC-powered device intended to provide light stimulus...

  7. 21 CFR 886.1850 - AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. 886.1850... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 886.1850 AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope. (a) Identification. An AC-powered slitlamp biomicroscope is an AC-powered device that is...

  8. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  9. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  10. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  11. 21 CFR 886.4440 - AC-powered magnet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false AC-powered magnet. 886.4440 Section 886.4440 Food... DEVICES OPHTHALMIC DEVICES Surgical Devices § 886.4440 AC-powered magnet. (a) Identification. An AC-powered magnet is an AC-powered device that generates a magnetic field intended to find and...

  12. The membrane chamber: a new type of in vitro recording chamber.

    PubMed

    Hill, M R H; Greenfield, S A

    2011-01-30

    In vitro brain slice electrophysiology is a powerful and highly successful technique where a thin slice is cut from the brain and kept alive artificially in a recording chamber. The design of this recording chamber is pivotal to the success and the quality of such experiments. Most often one of two types of chambers is used today, the interface chamber or the submerged chamber. These chambers, however, have the disadvantage that they are limited in either their experimental or their physiological properties respectively. Here we present a new working principle for an in vitro chamber design which aims at combining the advantages of the classical designs whilst overcoming their disadvantages. This is achieved by using a semipermeable membrane on which the slice is placed. The membrane allows for a fast flow of artificial cerebrospinal fluid of up to at least 17 ml/min. Due to a Bernoulli effect, this high speed flow also causes a 64% increase in flow of solution across the membrane on which the slice rests. The fact that the membrane is transparent introduces the possibility of wide field inverted optical imaging to brain slice electrophysiology. The utility of this setup was demonstrated in the recording of local field potential, single cell and voltage sensitive dye imaging data simultaneously from an area smaller then 1/8mm(2). The combination of all these features in the membrane chamber make it a versatile and promising device for many current and future in vitro applications, especially in the regard to optical imaging. PMID:21075142

  13. A new plant chamber facility, PLUS, coupled to the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2016-03-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been built and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow-through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees is mixed with synthetic air and transferred to the SAPHIR chamber, where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important environmental parameters (e.g., temperature, photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), soil relative humidity (RH)) are well controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leaves of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to only fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 light-emitting diode (LED) panels, which have an emission strength up to 800 µmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light- and temperature- dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental setup and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  14. A new plant chamber facility PLUS coupled to the atmospheric simulation chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hohaus, T.; Kuhn, U.; Andres, S.; Kaminski, M.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.; Wegener, R.; Yu, Z.; Kiendler-Scharr, A.

    2015-11-01

    A new PLant chamber Unit for Simulation (PLUS) for use with the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR (Simulation of Atmospheric PHotochemistry In a large Reaction Chamber) has been build and characterized at the Forschungszentrum Jülich GmbH, Germany. The PLUS chamber is an environmentally controlled flow through plant chamber. Inside PLUS the natural blend of biogenic emissions of trees are mixed with synthetic air and are transferred to the SAPHIR chamber where the atmospheric chemistry and the impact of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOC) can be studied in detail. In PLUS all important enviromental parameters (e.g. temperature, PAR, soil RH etc.) are well-controlled. The gas exchange volume of 9.32 m3 which encloses the stem and the leafes of the plants is constructed such that gases are exposed to FEP Teflon film and other Teflon surfaces only to minimize any potential losses of BVOCs in the chamber. Solar radiation is simulated using 15 LED panels which have an emission strength up to 800 μmol m-2 s-1. Results of the initial characterization experiments are presented in detail. Background concentrations, mixing inside the gas exchange volume, and transfer rate of volatile organic compounds (VOC) through PLUS under different humidity conditions are explored. Typical plant characteristics such as light and temperature dependent BVOC emissions are studied using six Quercus Ilex trees and compared to previous studies. Results of an initial ozonolysis experiment of BVOC emissions from Quercus Ilex at typical atmospheric concentrations inside SAPHIR are presented to demonstrate a typical experimental set up and the utility of the newly added plant chamber.

  15. AC Electrokinetics of Physiological Fluids for Biomedical Applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yi; Liu, Tingting; Lamanda, Ariana C; Sin, Mandy L Y; Gau, Vincent; Liao, Joseph C; Wong, Pak Kin

    2015-12-01

    Alternating current (AC) electrokinetics is a collection of processes for manipulating bulk fluid mass and embedded objects with AC electric fields. The ability of AC electrokinetics to implement the major microfluidic operations, such as pumping, mixing, concentration, and separation, makes it possible to develop integrated systems for clinical diagnostics in nontraditional health care settings. The high conductivity of physiological fluids presents new challenges and opportunities for AC electrokinetics-based diagnostic systems. In this review, AC electrokinetic phenomena in conductive physiological fluids are described followed by a review of the basic microfluidic operations and the recent biomedical applications of AC electrokinetics. The future prospects of AC electrokinetics for clinical diagnostics are presented.

  16. Convective Regimes in Crystallizing Basaltic Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, A. J.; Neufeld, J. A.; Holness, M. B.

    2015-12-01

    Cooling through the chamber walls drives crystallisation in crustal magma chambers, resulting in a cumulate pile on the floor and mushy regions at the walls and roof. The liquid in many magma chambers, either the bulk magma or the interstitial liquid in the mushy regions, may convect, driven either thermally, due to cooling, or compositionally, due to fractional crystallization. We have constructed a regime diagram of the possible convective modes in a system containing a basal mushy layer. These modes depend on the large-scale buoyancy forcing characterised by a global Rayleigh number and the proportion of the chamber height constituting the basal mushy region. We have tested this regime diagram using an analogue experimental system composed of a fluid layer overlying a pile of almost neutrally buoyant inert particles. Convection in this system is driven thermally, simulating magma convection above and within a porous cumulate pile. We observe a range of possible convective regimes, enabling us to produce a regime diagram. In addition to modes characterised by convection of the bulk and interstitial fluid, we also observe a series of regimes where the crystal pile is mobilised by fluid motions. These regimes feature saltation and scouring of the crystal pile by convection in the bulk fluid at moderate Rayleigh numbers, and large crystal-rich fountains at high Rayleigh numbers. For even larger Rayleigh numbers the entire crystal pile is mobilised in what we call the snowglobe regime. The observed mobilisation regimes may be applicable to basaltic magma chambers. Plagioclase in basal cumulates crystallised from a dense magma may be a result of crystal mobilisation from a plagioclase-rich roof mush. Compositional convection within such a mush could result in disaggregation, enabling the buoyant plagioclase to be entrained in relatively dense descending liquid plumes and brought to the floor. The phenocryst load in porphyritic lavas is often interpreted as a

  17. Kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in maturing sugarcane culm tissue.

    PubMed

    Uys, Lafras; Botha, Frederik C; Hofmeyr, Jan-Hendrik S; Rohwer, Johann M

    2007-01-01

    Biochemically, it is not completely understood why or how commercial varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) are able to accumulate sucrose in high concentrations. Such concentrations are obtained despite the presence of sucrose synthesis/breakdown cycles (futile cycling) in the culm of the storage parenchyma. Given the complexity of the process, kinetic modelling may help to elucidate the factors governing sucrose accumulation or direct the design of experimental optimisation strategies. This paper describes the extension of an existing model of sucrose accumulation (Rohwer, J.M., Botha, F.C., 2001. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data. Biochem. J. 358, 437-445) to account for isoforms of sucrose synthase and fructokinase, carbon partitioning towards fibre formation, and the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent PFK and aldolase. Moreover, by including data on the maximal activity of the enzymes as measured in different internodes, a growth model was constructed that describes the metabolic behaviour as sugarcane parenchymal tissue matures from internodes 3-10. While there was some discrepancy between modelled and experimentally determined steady-state sucrose concentrations in the cytoplasm, steady-state fluxes showed a better fit. The model supports a hypothesis of vacuolar sucrose accumulation against a concentration gradient. A detailed metabolic control analysis of sucrose synthase showed that each isoform has a unique control profile. Fructose uptake by the cell and sucrose uptake by the vacuole had a negative control on the futile cycling of sucrose and a positive control on sucrose accumulation, while the control profile for neutral invertase was reversed. When the activities of these three enzymes were changed from their reference values, the effects on futile cycling and sucrose accumulation were amplified. The model can be run online at the JWS Online

  18. Field performance of self-siphon sediment cleansing set for sediment removal in deep CSO chamber.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongchao; Zhang, Yiping; Tang, Ping

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the self-siphon sediment cleansing set (SSCS), a system designed to remove sediment from the deep combined sewer overflow (CSO) chamber during dry-weather periods. In order to get a better understanding of the sediment removal effectiveness and operational conditions of the SSCS system, we carried out a full-scale field study and comparison analysis on the sediment depth changes in the deep CSO chambers under the conditions with and without the SSCS. The field investigation results demonstrated that the SSCS drains the dry-weather flow that accumulated for 50-57 min from the sewer channel to the intercepting system in about 10 min. It is estimated that the bed shear stress in the CSO chamber and sewer channel is improved almost 25 times on average. The SSCS acts to remove the near bed solids with high pollution load efficiently. Moreover, it cleans up not only the new sediment layer but also part of the previously accumulated sediment.

  19. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  20. A model for eruption frequency of upper crustal silicic magma chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.

    2014-10-01

    Whether a magma body is able to produce eruptions and at what frequency remains a challenging problem in volcanology as it involves the nonlinear interplay of different processes acting over different time scales. Due to their complexity these are often considered independently in spite of their coupled nature. Here we consider an idealized model that focuses on the evolution of the thermodynamic state of the chamber (pressure, temperature, gas and crystal content) as new magma is injected into the chamber. The magma chamber cools in contact with the crust, which responds viscoelastically to the pressure accumulated during recharge and volatile exsolution. The magma is considered eruptible if the crystal volume fraction is smaller than 0.5. If a critical overpressure is reached, mass is released from the magma chamber until the lithostatic pressure is recovered. The setup of the model allows for rapid calculations that provide the opportunity to test the influence of competing processes on the evolution of the magma reservoir. We show how the frequency of eruptions depends on the timescale of injection, cooling, and viscous relaxation and develop a scaling law that relates these timescales to the eruption frequency. Based on these timescales we place different eruption triggering mechanisms (second boiling, mass injection, and buoyancy) in a coherent framework and evaluate the conditions needed to grow large magma reservoirs.

  1. Deletion of AcMNPV ac146 eliminates the production of budded virus.

    PubMed

    Dickison, Virginia L; Willis, Leslie G; Sokal, Nadia R; Theilmann, David A

    Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) ac146 is a highly conserved gene in the Alpha- and Betabaculovirus genera that has an unknown function. Northern blot analysis and transcript mapping showed that ac146 is transcribed at late times post infection as a 1.2 kb mRNA. To determine the role of ac146 in the baculovirus life cycle ac146 knock out viruses were constructed. Transfection and plaque assays showed that all the ac146 deletions produced a single cell phenotype indicating that no infectious budded virus (BV) was produced, however occlusion bodies were formed. The lack of BV production was confirmed by viral titration utilizing both qPCR and TCID₅₀. Analysis of BV and occlusion derived virus (ODV) revealed that AC146 is associated with both forms of the virus and is modified specifically in ODV. This study therefore demonstrates that AC146 is a late virion associated protein and is essential for the viral life cycle.

  2. Optical processing of bubble chamber photographs.

    PubMed

    Falconer, D G

    1966-09-01

    The processing of bubble chamber photographs has emerged as a major task in the experimental study of sub-atomic decays and interactions. Although electronic computer techniques have proved useful in reconstructing the geometry and ascertaining the kinematics of high-energy events, the scanning and measuring of bubble chamber photographs has remained for the most part unautomated. An alternate approach to the computerization of the scan-measure task is through the newly developed optical computer, a device which accepts input data on photographic film and thus obviates the need for digitizing photographs before processing. The optical computer can aid the scan-measure task by suppressing beam tracks, measuring track widths, and determining scattering angles.

  3. Method of electroforming a rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortini, A. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    A transpiration cooled rocket chamber is made by forming a porous metal wall on a suitably shaped mandrel. The porous wall may be made of sintered powdered metal, metal fibers sintered on the mandrel or wires woven onto the mandrel and then sintered to bond the interfaces of the wires. Intersecting annular and longitudinal ribs are then electroformed on the porous wall. An interchamber wall having orifices therein is then electroformed over the annular and longitudinal ribs. Parallel longitudinal ribs are then formed on the outside surface of the interchamber wall after which an annular jacket is electroformed over the parallel ribs to form distribution passages therewith. A feed manifold communicating with the distribution passages may be fabricated and welded to the rocket chamber or the feed manifold may be electroformed in place.

  4. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, X.; McCreary, E.I.; Atencio, J.H.; McCown, A.W.; Sander, R.K.

    1998-08-01

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquid has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10{sup 12} level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed. {copyright} 1998 Optical Society of America

  5. Bubble chamber as a trace chemical detector.

    PubMed

    Luo, X; McCreary, E I; Atencio, J H; McCown, A W; Sander, R K

    1998-08-20

    A novel concept for trace chemical analysis in liquids has been demonstrated. The technique utilizes light absorption in a superheated liquid. Although a superheated liquid is thermodynamically unstable, a high degree of superheating can be dynamically achieved for a short period of time. During this time the superheated liquid is extremely sensitive to boiling at nucleation sites produced by energy deposition. Observation of bubbles in the superheated liquid in some sense provides amplification of the initial energy deposition. Bubble chambers containing superheated liquids have been used to detect energetic particles; now a bubble chamber is used to detect a trace chemical in superheated liquid propane by observing bubble formation initiated by optical absorption. Crystal violet is used as a test case and can be detected at the subpart-per-10(12) level by using a Nd:YAG laser. The mechanism for bubble formation and ideas for further improvement are discussed.

  6. Space station auxiliary thrust chamber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Senneff, J. M.

    1987-01-01

    A program to design, fabricate, and test a 50 lb sub f (222 N) thruster was undertaken to demonstrate the applicability of the reverse flow concept as an item of auxillary propulsion for the Space Station. The thruster was to operate at a mixture ratio (O/F) of 4, be capable of operating for 2 million lb sub f-seconds (8.896 million N-seconds) impulse with a chamber pressure of 75 psia (52N/sq cm) and a nozzle area ratio of 40. A successful demonstration of an (0/F) of 4 thruster, was followed by the design objective of operating at (O/F) of 8. The demonstration of this thruster resulted in the order of and additional (O/F) of 8 thruster chamber under the present NAS 3-24883 contract. The effort to fabricate and test the second (0/F) of 8 thruster is documented.

  7. Combustion interaction with radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberg, S. D.; Jassowski, D. M.; Barlow, R.; Lucht, R.; Mccarty, K.

    1990-01-01

    Over 15 hours of thruster operation at temperatures between 1916 and 2246 C without failure or erosion has been demonstrated using iridium-coated rhenium chamber materials with nitrogen tetroxide/monomethylhydrazine propellants operating over a mixture ratio range of 1.60-2.05. Research is now under way to provide a basic understanding of the mechanisms which make high-temperature operation possible and to extend the capability to a wider range of conditions, including other propellant combinations and chamber materials. Techniques have been demonstrated for studying surface fracture phenomena. These include surface Raman and Auger for study of oxide formation, surface Raman and X-ray diffraction to determine the oxide phase, Auger to study oxide stoichiometry, and sputter Auger to study interdiffusion of alloy species.

  8. High pressure hydrogen time projection chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Goulianos, K.

    1983-01-01

    We describe a high pressure hydrogen gas time projection chamber which consists of two cylindrical drift regions each 45 cm in diameter and 75 cm long. Typically, at 15 atm of H/sub 2/ with 2 kV/cm drift field and 7 kV on the 35..mu.. sense wires, the drift velocity is about 0.5 cm/..mu..sec and the spatial resolution +-200..mu...

  9. Compact Vapor Chamber Cools Critical Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2015-01-01

    Advancements in the production of proton exchange membrane fuel cells have NASA considering their use as a power source for spacecraft and robots in future space missions. With SBIR funding from Glenn Research Center, Lancaster, Pennsylvania-based Thermacore Inc. developed strong, lightweight titanium vapor chambers to keep the fuel cells operating at optimum temperatures. The company is now selling the technology for cooling electronic components.

  10. Comment on 'Proton beam monitor chamber calibration'.

    PubMed

    Palmans, Hugo; Vatnitsky, Stanislav M

    2016-09-01

    We comment on a recent article (Gomà et al 2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) which compares different routes of reference dosimetry for the energy dependent beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams. In this article, a 3% discrepancy is reported between a Faraday cup and a plane-parallel ionization chamber in the experimental determination of the number of protons per monitor unit. It is further claimed that similar discrepancies between calorimetry and ionization chamber based dosimetry indicate that [Formula: see text]-values tabulated for proton beams in IAEA TRS-398 might be overestimated. In this commentary we show, however, that this supporting argument misrepresents the evidence in the literature and that the results presented, together with published data, rather confirm that there exist unresolved problems with Faraday cup dosimetry. We also show that the comparison in terms of the number of protons gives a biased view on the uncertainty estimates for both detectors while the quantity of interest is absorbed dose to water or dose-area-product to water, even if a beam monitor is calibrated in terms of the number of protons. Gomà et al (2014 Phys. Med. Biol. 59 4961-71) also report on the discrepancy between cylindrical and plane-parallel ionization chambers and confirm experimentally that in the presence of a depth dose gradient, theoretical values of the effective point of measurement, or alternatively a gradient correction factor, account for the discrepancy. We believe this does not point to an error or shortcoming of IAEA TRS-398, which prescribes taking the centre of cylindrical ionization chambers as reference point, since it recommends reference dosimetry to be performed in the absence of a depth dose gradient. But these observations reveal that important aspects of beam monitor calibration in scanned proton beams are not addressed in IAEA TRS-398 given that those types of beams were not widely implemented at the time of its publication

  11. CFD Code Survey for Thrust Chamber Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Klaus W.

    1990-01-01

    In the quest fo find analytical reference codes, responses from a questionnaire are presented which portray the current computational fluid dynamics (CFD) program status and capability at various organizations, characterizing liquid rocket thrust chamber flow fields. Sample cases are identified to examine the ability, operational condition, and accuracy of the codes. To select the best suited programs for accelerated improvements, evaluation criteria are being proposed.

  12. Magma chamber dynamics and Vesuvius eruption forecasting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobran, F.

    2003-04-01

    Magma is continuously or periodically refilling an active volcano and its eruption depends on the mechanical, fluid, thermal, and chemical aspects of the magma storage region and its surroundings. A cyclically loaded and unloaded system can fail from a weakness in the system or its surroundings, and the fluctuating stresses can produce system failures at stress levels that are considerably below the yield strength of the material. Magma in a fractured rock system within a volcano is unstable and propagates toward the surface with the rate depending on the state of the system defined by the inertia, gravity, friction, and permeability parameters of magma and its source region. Cyclic loading and unloading of magma from a reservoir caused by small- or medium-scale eruptions of Vesuvius can produce catastrophic plinian eruptions because of the structural failure of the system and the quiescent periods between these eruptions increase with time until the next eruption cycle which will be plinian or subplinian and will occur with a very high probability this century. Such a system behavior is predicted by a Global Volcanic Simulator of Vesuvius developed for simulating different eruption scenarios for the purpose of urban planning the territory, reducing the number of people residing too close to the cone of the volcano, and providing safety to those beyond about 5 km radius of the crater. The magma chamber model of the simulator employs a thermomechanical model that includes magma inflow and outflow from the chamber, heat and mass transfer between the chamber and its surroundings, and thermoelastoplastic deformation of the shell surrounding the magma source region. These magma chamber, magma ascent, and pyroclastic dispersion models and Vesuvius eruption forecasting are described in Dobran, F., VOLCANIC PROCESSES, Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers, 2001, 590 pp.

  13. Cyclotron and linac production of Ac-225.

    PubMed

    Melville, Graeme; Allen, Barry J

    2009-04-01

    Radium needles that were once implanted into tumours as a cancer treatment are now obsolete and constitute a radioactive waste problem, as their half-life is 1600 years. The reduction of radium by photonuclear transmutation by bombarding Ra-226 with high-energy photons from a medical linear accelerator (linac) has been investigated. A linac dose of 2800 Gy produced about 2.4 MBq (64 microCi) of Ra-225, which decays to Ac-225 and can then be used for 'Targeted Alpha Therapy' (TAT) of cancer. This result, while consistent with theoretical calculations, is far too low to be of practical use unless much larger quantities of radium are irradiated. The increasing application of Ac-225 for cancer therapy indicates the potential need for its increased production and availability. This paper investigates the possibility of producing of Ac-225 in commercial quantities, which could potentially reduce obsolete radioactive material and displace the need for expensive importation of Ac-225 from the USA and Russia in the years ahead. Scaled up production of Ac-225 could theoretically be achieved by the use of a high current cyclotron or linac. Production specifications are determined for a linac in terms of current, pulse length and frequency, as well as an examination of other factors such as radiation issues and radionuclei separation. Yields are compared with those calculated for the Australian National Cyclotron in Sydney.

  14. Design and synthesis of 225Ac radioimmunopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    McDevitt, Michael R; Ma, Dangshe; Simon, Jim; Frank, R Keith; Scheinberg, David A

    2002-12-01

    The alpha-particle-emitting radionuclides 213Bi, 211At, 224Ra are under investigation for the treatment of leukemias, gliomas, and ankylosing spondylitis, respectively. 213Bi and 211At were attached to monoclonal antibodies and used as targeted immunotherapeutic agents while unconjugated 224Ra chloride selectively seeks bone. 225Ac possesses favorable physical properties for radioimmunotherapy (10d half-life and 4 net alpha particles), but has a history of unfavorable radiolabeling chemistry and poor metal-chelate stability. We selected functionalized derivatives of DOTA as the most promising to pursue from out of a group of potential 225Ac chelate compounds. A two-step synthetic process employing either MeO-DOTA-NCS or 2B-DOTA-NCS as the chelating moiety was developed to attach 225Ac to monoclonal antibodies. This method was tested using several different IgG systems. The chelation reaction yield in the first step was 93+/-8% radiochemically pure (n=26). The second step yielded 225Ac-DOTA-IgG constructs that were 95+/-5% radiochemically pure (n=27) and the mean percent immunoreactivity ranged from 25% to 81%, depending on the antibody used. This process has yielded several potential novel targeted 225Ac-labeled immunotherapeutic agents that may now be evaluated in appropriate model systems and ultimately in humans.

  15. Cosmic Shear - with ACS Pure Parallel Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ratnatunga, Kavan

    2002-07-01

    The ACS, with greater sensitivity and sky coverage, will extend our ability to measure the weak gravitational lensing of galaxy images caused by the large scale distribution of dark matter. We propose to use the ACS in pure parallel {non- proprietary} mode, following the guidelines of the ACS Default Pure Parallel Program. Using the HST Medium Deep Survey WFPC2 database we have measured cosmic shear at arc-min angular scales. The MDS image parameters, in particular the galaxy orientations and axis ratios, are such that any residual corrections due to errors in the PSF or jitter are much smaller than the measured signal. This situation is in stark contrast with ground-based observations. We have also developed a statistical analysis procedure to derive unbiased estimates of cosmic shear from a large number of fields, each of which has a very small number of galaxies. We have therefore set the stage for measurements with the ACS at fainter apparent magnitudes and smaller, 10 arc-second scales corresponding to larger cosmological distances. We will adapt existing MDS WFPC2 maximum likelihood galaxy image analysis algorithms to work with the ACS. The analysis would also yield an online database similar to that in archive.stsci.edu/mds/

  16. SONTRAC: A solar neutron track chamber detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frye, G. M., Jr.; Jenkins, T. L.; Owens, A.

    1985-01-01

    The recent detection on the solar maximum mission (SMM) satellite of high energy neutrons emitted during large solar flares has provided renewed incentive to design a neutron detector which has the sensitivity, energy resolution, and time resolution to measure the neutron time and energy spectra with sufficient precision to improve our understanding of the basic flare processes. Over the past two decades a variety of neutron detectors has been flown to measure the atmospheric neutron intensity above 10 MeV and to search for solar neutrons. The SONTRAC (Solar Neutron Track Chamber) detector, a new type of neutron detector which utilizes n-p scattering and has a sensitivity 1-3 orders of magnitude greater than previous instruments in the 20-200 MeV range is described. The energy resolution is 1% for neutron kinetic energy, T sub n 50 MeV. When used with a coded aperture mask at 50 m (as would be possible on the space station) an angular resolution of approx. 4 arc sec could be achieved, thereby locating the sites of high energy nuclear interactions with an angular precision comparable to the existing x-ray experiments on SMM. The scintillation chamber is investigated as a track chamber for high energy physics, either by using arrays of scintillating optical fibers or by optical imaging of particle trajectories in a block of scintillator.

  17. 23. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. View west of Tropic Chamber refrigeration ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. View west of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, ca. 1955. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  18. 1. View southeast of Climatic Chambers Building from roof of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. View southeast of Climatic Chambers Building from roof of Research Building. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  19. 7. Detail view west of Arctic Chamber wind tunnel shell ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Detail view west of Arctic Chamber wind tunnel shell (typical) in east elevation. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  20. 21. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. view north of Tropic Chamber, ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. view north of Tropic Chamber, ca. 1955. (Source: NRDEC). - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  2. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  3. VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PUMP ROOM FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  4. INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF AIRLOCK FROM INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  5. DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE INTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  6. DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF PLATFORM SUPPORT BRACKET, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. DETAIL OF WALLMOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF WALL-MOUNTED STAIRS ON INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  8. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  9. EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBERS R (TO LEFT) AND L (TO RIGHT), FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  10. EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR AND INTERIOR VIEW OF AIRLOCK FOR ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTH - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  11. BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST Cape ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BOTTOM LEVEL OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  12. UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    UPPER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING DOWN FROM AIRLOCK, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  14. VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE CONTROL ROOM FOR THE ALTITUDE CHAMBERS, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  15. DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF THE EXTERIOR OF THE DOMED LID, ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  16. DETAIL OF REPRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF RE-PRESSURIZATION AIR PIPE, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING SOUTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  17. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L FROM TOP LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING WEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  18. DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF DOMED BOTTOM, ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  19. LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    LOWER HALF OF THE INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL, FACING NORTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  20. INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER L, LOOKING UP FROM BOTTOM LEVEL OF INTERNAL PLATFORMS, FACING EAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  1. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall...

  2. 30 CFR 57.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... and Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing-Surface Only § 57.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall...

  3. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall be flushed with...

  4. 30 CFR 56.7807 - Flushing the combustion chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Rotary Jet Piercing Rotary Jet Piercing § 56.7807 Flushing the combustion chamber. The combustion chamber of a jet drill stem which has been sitting unoperated in a drill hole shall be flushed with...

  5. Space Station Live: Historic Vacuum Chamber to Test Webb Telescope

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affairs Officer Dan Huot recently visited Johnson Space Center’s 400,000 cubic foot vacuum chamber, Chamber A, and spoke with Mary Cerimele, the lab manager for this historic facility.

  6. DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF VACUUM PIPE OPENING WITHIN ALTITUDE CHAMBER R, FACING SOUTHEAST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  7. Andy Chambers Homestead, Chicken Coop, Saddle Shop, and Granary, looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Andy Chambers Homestead, Chicken Coop, Saddle Shop, and Granary, looking northeast - Andy Chambers Homestead, 0.4 mile south of Antelope Flats Road on the east side of Mormon Row Road, Kelly, Teton County, WY

  8. Chamber Design For Slow Nucleation Protein Crystal Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusey, Marc Lee

    1995-01-01

    Multiple-chamber dialysis apparatus grows protein crystals on Earth or in microgravity with minimum of intervention by technician. Use of multiple chambers provides gradation of nucleation and growth rates.

  9. 11. Second floor, northwest chamber, south wall. Former passage to ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Second floor, northwest chamber, south wall. Former passage to southwest chamber (door blocked off on far side) on left; closet on right. - Conner Homestead, House, Epping Road (State Route 101), Exeter, Rockingham County, NH

  10. CONTAINMENT SYSTEM, SPRAY CHAMBER, LOOKING NORTH WITH MIST COOLING MOLTEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    CONTAINMENT SYSTEM, SPRAY CHAMBER, LOOKING NORTH WITH MIST COOLING MOLTEN STEEL SLABS AS THEY PROGRESS THROUGH THIS CHAMBER. - U.S. Steel, Fairfield Works, Continuous Caster, Fairfield, Jefferson County, AL

  11. DESIGN, CONSTRUCTION, AND EVALUATION OF A CHAMBER FOR AEROBIOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A chamber was designed and constructed for aeromicrobiology applications. An ultraviolet (UV) radiation source was incorporated to sterilize the chamber between trials. Twelve bacterial species originally isolated from air samples and obtained from the American Type Culture Colle...

  12. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  13. 58. Interior view, porch chamber, south elevation. The room door ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    58. Interior view, porch chamber, south elevation. The room door is open allowing a view into the study chamber. - John Bartram House & Garden, House, 54th Street & Lindbergh Boulevard, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  14. 19. View northwest of Tropic Chamber reciprocal compressors (typical), in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. View northwest of Tropic Chamber reciprocal compressors (typical), in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  15. 16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. View northwest of Arctic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  16. 18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. View north of Tropic Chamber Worthington centrifugal compressor and control panel, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  17. 17. View northwest of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, in machine ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. View northwest of Tropic Chamber refrigeration equipment, in machine area. - Natick Research & Development Laboratories, Climatic Chambers Building, U.S. Army Natick Research, Development & Engineering Center (NRDEC), Natick, Middlesex County, MA

  18. 51. UPPER CHAMBER OF BISCUIT KILN No. 4, FROM THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. UPPER CHAMBER OF BISCUIT KILN No. 4, FROM THE SECOND FLOOR. ALL BRICK KILNS AT THE MORAVIAN POTTERY AND TILE WORKS HAD TWO CHAMBERS. WARE WAS STACKED IN THE LOWER CHAMBERS FOR FIRING AND THE UPPER CHAMBERS PROVIDED ACCESS TO FLUES AND DAMPERS FROM THE SECOND FLOOR. - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  19. Herds of methane chambers grazing bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinham, Alistair; Dunbabin, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Water to air methane emissions from freshwater reservoirs can be dominated by sediment bubbling (ebullitive) events. Previous work to quantify methane bubbling from a number of Australian sub-tropical reservoirs has shown that this can contribute as much as 95% of total emissions. These bubbling events are controlled by a variety of different factors including water depth, surface and internal waves, wind seiching, atmospheric pressure changes and water levels changes. Key to quantifying the magnitude of this emission pathway is estimating both the bubbling rate as well as the areal extent of bubbling. Both bubbling rate and areal extent are seldom constant and require persistent monitoring over extended time periods before true estimates can be generated. In this paper we present a novel system for persistent monitoring of both bubbling rate and areal extent using multiple robotic surface chambers and adaptive sampling (grazing) algorithms to automate the quantification process. Individual chambers are self-propelled and guided and communicate between each other without the need for supervised control. They can maintain station at a sampling site for a desired incubation period and continuously monitor, record and report fluxes during the incubation. To exploit the methane sensor detection capabilities, the chamber can be automatically lowered to decrease the head-space and increase concentration. The grazing algorithms assign a hierarchical order to chambers within a preselected zone. Chambers then converge on the individual recording the highest 15 minute bubbling rate. Individuals maintain a specified distance apart from each other during each sampling period before all individuals are then required to move to different locations based on a sampling algorithm (systematic or adaptive) exploiting prior measurements. This system has been field tested on a large-scale subtropical reservoir, Little Nerang Dam, and over monthly timescales. Using this technique

  20. Layer Formation in Convective Magma Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höink, T.; Schmalzl, J.; Hansen, U.

    2004-12-01

    The dynamics of a convective magma chamber is crucially influenced by the competetion between sedimentation and convective suspension of crystals. Crystal settling combined with the crystal's density contribution is a possible mechanism leading to differentiation and layer formation. Here we address the question whether crystals can remain suspended or whether they are able to dynamically form a layered structure within the convective lifetime of a magma chamber. We employ an existing numerical method that, by means of a finite volume scheme, discretizes the equations for thermally driven convection in an infinite Prandtl-number Boussinesq fluid in Cartesian geometry. We implement a newly developed settling algorithm for the numerical study of finite-sized-particle settling in a non-dilute convective suspension. Our approach considers a consistent settling velocity and the density contribution due to particle mass. The buoyancy ratio B, which is the ratio of the density variation due to crystal mass to the thermal density variation, is varied for five different Rayleigh numbers, covering a range of four orders of magnitude. We find B to be a critical parameter and its critical value to depend on the Rayleigh number. For subcritical values we observe that the presence of a crystal phase reduces convective vigor and most crystals stay suspended. When a critical buoyancy ratio is exceeded, the presence of crystals can significantly alter convective motion. For all investigated Rayleigh numbers we find a critical buoyancy ratio, above which layering can be achieved from an initially unstratified fluid. Most of the crystal mass collects in the dynamically created bottom layer, even for cases where the average settling velocity is three orders of magnitude smaller than the root mean square convective velocity. The time it takes a crystal to travel across the height of the cell with the full settling velocity in the absence of a thermal gradient defines the settling

  1. ac propulsion system for an electric vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geppert, S.

    1980-01-01

    It is pointed out that dc drives will be the logical choice for current production electric vehicles (EV). However, by the mid-80's, there is a good chance that the price and reliability of suitable high-power semiconductors will allow for a competitive ac system. The driving force behind the ac approach is the induction motor, which has specific advantages relative to a dc shunt or series traction motor. These advantages would be an important factor in the case of a vehicle for which low maintenance characteristics are of primary importance. A description of an EV ac propulsion system is provided, taking into account the logic controller, the inverter, the motor, and a two-speed transmission-differential-axle assembly. The main barrier to the employment of the considered propulsion system in EV is not any technical problem, but inverter transistor cost.

  2. Atrial-caval shunting (ACS) after trauma.

    PubMed

    Kudsk, K A; Sheldon, G F; Lim, R C

    1982-02-01

    Since 1968 the atrial-caval shunt (ACS), along with inflow occlusion at the porta hepatis, has been used at San Francisco General Hospital in 18 trauma patients to control massive hemorrhage from the inferior vena cava, hepatic veins, or liver. Thirteen patients died from irreversible shock. Five patients survived their initial injuries; one of them died 45 days later from the complications of shock and sepsis. No patients survived who sustained blunt trauma and were admitted in cardiac arrest. Only one of ten patients with BP less than 70 mm Hg after resuscitation survived, whereas four of eight with BP greater than 70 mm Hg survived. ACS was used to control caval injuries in seven patients (one survivor), severe hepatic parenchymal fractures in four patients (two survivors), and combined hepatic and caval injuries in seven patients (two survivors). Survivors had an average of 5.75 associated injuries; nonsurvivors had 3.8. No complications of ACS occurred in the surviving patients.

  3. HYDROGEN OUTGASSING AND SURFACE PROPERTIES OF TIN COATED STAINLESS STEEL CHAMBERS.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.; HSEUH,H.C.; MAPES,M.; TODD,R.; WEISS,D.; WILSON,D.

    2002-11-11

    The stainless steel vacuum chambers of the 248m accumulator ring of Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) are coated with {approx} 100 nm of titanium nitride (TiN) to reduce the secondary electron yield. The coating is produced by DC magnetron sputtering using a long cathode imbedded with permanent magnets. The outgassing rates of several SNS half-cell chambers were measured with and without TiN coating, and before and after in-situ bake. One potential benefit of a TiN coating is to serve as hydrogen permeation barrier that reduces the ultimate outgassing rate. By varying the coating parameters, films of different surface roughness were produced and analyzed by Auger electron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy to illustrate the dependence of the outgassing on the film structure.

  4. Measurement of the accumulation of water ice on optical components in cryogenic vacuum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Trevor M.; Montgomery Smith, L.; Collins, Frank G.; Labello, Jesse M.; Rogers, James P.; Lowry, Heard S.; Crider, Dustin H.

    2012-11-01

    Standard vacuum practices mitigate the presence of water vapor and contamination inside cryogenic vacuum chambers. However, anomalies can occur in the facility that can cause the accumulation of amorphous water ice on optics and test articles. Under certain conditions, the amorphous ice on optical components shatters, which leads to a reduction in signal or failure of the component. An experiment was performed to study and measure the deposition of water (H2O) ice on optical surfaces under high-vacuum cryogenic conditions. Water was introduced into a cryogenic vacuum chamber, via a hydrated molecular sieve zeolite, through an effusion cell and impinged upon a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and first-surface gold-plated mirror. A laser and photodiode setup, external to the vacuum chamber, monitored the multiple-beam interference reflectance of the ice-mirror configuration while the QCM measured the mass deposition. Data indicates that water ice, under these conditions, accumulates as a thin film on optical surfaces to thicknesses over 45 microns and can be detected and measured by nonintrusive optical methods which are based upon multiple-beam interference phenomena. The QCM validated the interference measurements. This experiment established proof-of-concept for a miniature system for monitoring ice accumulation within the chamber.

  5. Beneficial Effects of Adenylyl Cyclase Type 6 (AC6) Expression Persist Using a Catalytically Inactive AC6 Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Tong; Lai, Ngai Chin; Miyanohara, Atsushi; Guo, Tracy; Tang, Rouying; Firth, Amy L.; Yuan, Jason X.; Hammond, H. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac-directed expression of AC6 has pronounced favorable effects on cardiac function possibly not linked with cAMP production. To determine rigorously whether cAMP generation is required for the beneficial effects of increased AC6 expression, we generated a catalytically inactive AC6 mutant (AC6mut) that has markedly diminished cAMP generating capacity by replacing aspartic acid with alanine at position 426 in the C1 domain (catalytic region) of AC6. Gene transfer of AC6 or AC6mut (adenovirus-mediated) in adult rat cardiac myocytes resulted in similar expression levels and intracellular distribution, but AC6mut expression was associated with marked reduction in cAMP production. Despite marked reduction in cAMP generation, AC6mut influenced intracellular signaling events similarly to that observed after expression of catalytically intact AC6. For example, both AC6 and AC6mut reduced phenylephrine-induced cardiac myocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis (p < 0.001), expression of cardiac ankyrin repeat protein (p < 0.01), and phospholamban (p < 0.05). AC6mut expression, similar to its catalytically intact cohort, was associated with increased Ca2+ transients in cardiac myocytes after isoproterenol stimulation. Many of the biological effects of AC6 expression are replicated by a catalytically inactive AC6 mutant, indicating that the mechanisms for these effects do not require increased cAMP generation. PMID:21127130

  6. Characterization of a homemade ionization chamber for radiotherapy beams.

    PubMed

    Neves, Lucio P; Perini, Ana P; dos Santos, Gelson P; Xavier, Marcos; Khoury, Helen J; Caldas, Linda V E

    2012-07-01

    A homemade cylindrical ionization chamber was studied for routine use in therapy beams of (60)Co and X-rays. Several characterization tests were performed: leakage current, saturation, ion collection efficiency, polarity effect, stability, stabilization time, chamber orientation and energy dependence. All results obtained were within international recommendations. Therefore the homemade ionization chamber presents usefulness for routine dosimetric procedures in radiotherapy beams.

  7. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and...

  8. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and...

  9. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and...

  10. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and...

  11. 7 CFR 58.423 - Cheese vacuumizing chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cheese vacuumizing chamber. 58.423 Section 58.423 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards....423 Cheese vacuumizing chamber. The vacuum chamber shall be satisfactorily constructed and...

  12. VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE TOPS OF ALTITUDE CHAMBER R (TO LEFT) AND ALTITUDE CHAMBER L (TO RIGHT) FROM THE 42’-0” LEVEL OF ACCESS PLATFORMS, FACING NORTHWEST - Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Launch Complex 39, Altitude Chambers, First Street, between Avenue D and Avenue E, Cape Canaveral, Brevard County, FL

  13. Engineering analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers for GEM

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, J.A.; Belser, F.C.; Pratuch, S.M.; Wuest, C.R.; Mitselmakher, G.; Gordeev, A.; Johnson, C.V. |; Polychronakos, V.A.; Golutvin, I.A.

    1993-10-21

    Structural analyses of large precision cathode strip chambers performed up to the date of this publication are documented. Mechanical property data for typical chamber materials are included. This information, originally intended to be an appendix to the {open_quotes}CSC Structural Design Bible,{close_quotes} is presented as a guide for future designers of large chambers.

  14. Cloud Chamber Activities for the High School Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, John Timothy; Sankey, Mary Ann

    1995-01-01

    Presents the idea that cloud chambers can be used by students as an experimental tool enabling them to conduct their own investigations on radiation. Provides detail regarding the construction of a cloud chamber and suggestions for student assignments that involve the cloud chamber. (DDR)

  15. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  16. 21 CFR 884.5225 - Abdominal decompression chamber.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Abdominal decompression chamber. 884.5225 Section... Devices § 884.5225 Abdominal decompression chamber. (a) Identification. An abdominal decompression chamber is a hoodlike device used to reduce pressure on the pregnant patient's abdomen for the relief...

  17. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false PVHO-Decompression chambers. 197.332 Section 197.332... STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Equipment § 197.332 PVHO—Decompression chambers. Each decompression chamber must— (a) Meet the requirements of § 197.328; (b) Have internal...

  18. Detail of interior of compressed air chamber showing top of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of interior of compressed air chamber showing top of working chamber and tie rods that strengthen the outer shell plates of the compression chamber. - Sub Marine Explorer, Located along the beach of Isla San Telmo, Pearl Islands, Isla San Telmo, Former Panama Canal Zone, CZ

  19. Evaluation of Carbon Dioxide Dissipation within a Euthanasia Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Djoufack-Momo, Shelly M; Amparan, Ashlee A; Grunden, Beverly; Boivin, Gregory P

    2014-01-01

    CO2 euthanasia is used widely for small laboratory animals, such as rodents. A common necessity in many animal research facilities is to euthanize mice in sequential batches. We assessed the effects of several variables on the time it took for CO2 to dissipate within a chamber. Using standard euthanasia time, changes in flow rate were compared between a slow 15% fill rate for 7 min, and a slow 15% followed by a rapid 50% filling for a total of 5 min. Additional variables assessed included the effects of opening the lid after the completion of chamber filling, turning the chamber over after completion of filling, and the use and removal of a cage from within the chamber. For all trials, CO2 levels in the chambers peaked between 50% and 80%. After the gas was turned off, the concentration of CO2 dropped to below 10% CO2 within 2 min, except when the lid was left on the chamber, where concentration levels remained above 10% after 20 min. CO2 dissipation was significantly faster when the chamber was turned upside down after filling. Significant interaction effects occurred among the factors of cage presence within the chamber, flow rate, and chamber position. Only leaving the lid on the chamber had any practical implication for delaying CO2 dissipation. We recommend that users allow 2 min for CO2 to clear from the chamber before subsequent euthanasia procedures, unless the chamber is manipulated to increase the dissipation rate. PMID:25199098

  20. Coking oven with horizontal chambers for producing coke

    SciTech Connect

    Jakobi, W.

    1984-06-26

    In a coking oven with a horizontal chamber the chamber is provided with a filling hole having a cylindrical portion with the diameter D and a reduced portion downwardly extending therefrom into the chamber over the height H. The ratio between D and H 1.5.

  1. Semiclosed-circuit atmosphere control in a portable recompression chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riegel, P. S.; Caudy, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    A small portable recompression chamber is described that can be used both to treat a diver for decompression sickness or to transport him to a larger chamber complex. The device can be operated in either open circuit or semiclosed circuit atmospheres, permits two way conversation between patient and attendant, and uses an air injector for circulation of the chamber atmosphere.

  2. Modeling magmatic accumulations in the upper crust: Metamorphic implications for the country rock

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Madison M.; Geyer, Adelina; Álvarez-Valero, Antonio M.; Martí, Joan

    2016-06-01

    Field exposures of magma chambers tend to reveal contact metamorphic aureoles in the surrounding crust, which width varies from few centimeters to kilometers. The igneous accumulation not only increases the temperature around it, but also weakens its surrounding country rock beyond the brittle-ductile transition temperature. The formation of a ductile halo around the magmatic reservoir may significantly impact into the stability and growth of the magma chamber, as well as into potential dyke injections and processes of ground deformation. In this paper, we examine how a magmatic accumulation affects the country rock through the combination of petrologic and thermal perspectives. For this, we numerically modeled (i) the conductive cooling of an instantaneously emplaced magma chamber within compositionally representative pelitic and carbonate upper crusts, and (ii) the corresponding changes in the viscosity of the host rock potentially leading to ductile regimes. We consider basaltic to rhyolitic magma chambers at different depths with oblate, prolate and spherical geometries. The resulting temperature field distribution at different time steps is integrated with crustal metamorphic effects through phase diagram modeling. Our results indicate that the geometry of the magma accumulations plays a dominant role in controlling the local metamorphic and thermal effects on the country rocks. They conclude that (i) the combination of relatively simple geothermal models with petrologic datasets can generate first order predictions for the maximum metamorphic grade and geometry of magma chamber aureoles; (ii) the possible changes in the mechanical properties of the country rock are not necessarily linked to the petrological changes in contact aureoles; and (iii) the present rheologic outcomes may be used in further studies of magma chamber stability and integrity, which may favor the understanding of the melt transfer throughout the crust.

  3. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  4. A combination drift chamber/pad chamber for very high readout rates

    SciTech Connect

    Spiegel, L.; Cataldi, G.; Elia, V.; Mazur, P.; Murphy, C.T.; Smith, R.P.; Yang, W. ); Alexopoulos, T.; Durandet, C.; Erwin, A.; Jennings, J. ); Antoniazzi, L.; Introzzi, G.; Lanza, A.; Liguori, G.; Torre, P. Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Rome ); Arenton, M.; Conetti, S.

    1991-11-01

    Six medium-sized ({approx}1 {times} 2 m{sup 2}) drift chambers with pad and stripe readout have been constructed for and are presently operating in Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory experiment E-771. Each chamber module actually represents a pair of identical planes: two sets of anode wires, two sets of stripes, and two sets of pads. The wire planes are read out separately and represent X measurements in the coordinate system of the experiment. The twin stripe and pad planes are internally paired within the chamber modules; stripe signals represent Y measurements and pad signals combination X and Y measurements. Signals which develop on the stripes and pads are mirror (but inverted) images of what is seen on the wires. In addition to being used in the off-line pattern recognition, pad signals are also used as inputs to an on-line high transverse momentum (pt) trigger processor. While the techniques involved in the design and construction of the chambers are not novel, they may be of interest to experiments contemplating very large area, high rate chambers for future spectrometers.

  5. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  6. Study of DC and AC electric field effect on Pisum sativum seeds growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmood, Bahar; Jaleh, Sojoodi; Yasaman, Yasaie

    2014-07-01

    In this research the effect of electric field on two groups of wet and dry Pisum sativum seeds growth was studied. To generate the required electric field a parallel-plate capacitor with round copper plates of 30 cm diameter was used. The experiments were performed once in fixed exposure duration of 8 min in variable DC electric field of 0.25-1.5 kV/m. The other experiments were performed in variable fields of 50-125 kV/m in fixed exposure duration of 8 min, in two groups of AC and DC electric fields. The experiments were repeated three times. In each experiment 10 seeds were used and there was a sham exposed group for comparison, too. After application of electric field, the seeds were kept for six days in the same growth chamber with the temperature of 25 ± 1 °C and 12 h light/12 h darkness. On the 6th day length of stems and height of roots were measured. After doing statistical analysis, in low intensities of DC electric field, the highest significant increase of mean growth (The average of stem length and the height of roots) was seen in 1.5 kV/m in wet seeds. In high intensities of DC and AC electric fields, the highest significant increase of mean growth was seen in AC electric field of 100 kV/m in wet seeds.

  7. Correlated accumulation of anthocyanins and rosmarinic acid in mechanically stressed red cell suspensions of basil (Ocimum basilicum).

    PubMed

    Strazzer, Pamela; Guzzo, Flavia; Levi, Marisa

    2011-02-15

    A red basil cell line (T2b) rich in rosmarinic acid (RA) was selected for the stable production of anthocyanins (ACs) in the dark. Cell suspension cultures were subjected to mechanical stress through increased agitation (switch from 90 to 150 rpm) to determine the relationship between AC and RA accumulation. Cell extracts were analyzed by HPLC and LC-MS, and the resulting data were processed with multivariate statistical analysis. MS and MS/MS spectra facilitated the putative annotation of several complex cyanidin-based ACs, which were esterified with coumaric acid and, in some cases, also with malonic acid. It was also possible to identify various RA-related molecules, some caffeic and coumaric acid derivatives and some flavanones. Mechanical stress increased the total AC and RA contents, but reduced biomass accumulation. Many metabolites were induced by mechanical stress, including RA and some of its derivatives, most ACs, hydroxycinnamic acids and flavonoids, whereas the abundance of some RA dimers was reduced. Although AC and RA share a common early biosynthetic pathway (from phenylalanine to 4-coumaroyl-CoA) and could have similar or overlapping functions providing antioxidant activity against stress-generated reactive oxygen species, there appeared to be no competition between their individual pathways.

  8. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  9. Plant growth chamber based on space proven controlled environment technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ignatius, Ronald W.; Ignatius, Matt H.; Imberti, Henry J.

    1997-01-01

    Quantum Devices, Inc., in conjunction with Percival Scientific, Inc., and the Wisconsin Center for Space Automation and Robotics (WCSAR) have developed a controlled environment plant growth chamber for terrestrial agricultural and scientific applications. This chamber incorporates controlled environment technology used in the WCSAR ASTROCULTURE™ flight unit for conducting plant research on the Space Shuttle. The new chamber, termed CERES 2010, features air humidity, temperature, and carbon dioxide control, an atmospheric contaminant removal unit, an LED lighting system, and a water and nutrient delivery system. The advanced environment control technology used in this chamber will increase the reliability and repeatability of environmental physiology data derived from plant experiments conducted in this chamber.

  10. Advanced photon source experience with vacuum chambers for insertion devices

    SciTech Connect

    Hartog, P.D.; Grimmer, J.; Xu, S.; Trakhtenberg, E.; Wiemerslage, G.

    1997-08-01

    During the last five years, a new approach to the design and fabrication of extruded aluminum vacuum chambers for insertion devices was developed at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). With this approach, three different versions of the vacuum chamber, with vertical apertures of 12 mm, 8 mm, and 5 mm, were manufactured and tested. Twenty chambers were installed into the APS vacuum system. All have operated with beam, and 16 have been coupled with insertion devices. Two different vacuum chambers with vertical apertures of 16 mm and 11 mm were developed for the BESSY-II storage ring and 3 of 16 mm chambers were manufactured.

  11. New drift chamber for the Mark II at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1984-04-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is being constructed for the Mark II detector for use at the new SLAC Linear Collider. The design of the new chamber is based on a multi-sense-wire cell of the jet-chamber type. In addition to drift-time measurements, pulse height measurements from the sense wires will provide electron-hadron separation by dE/dx. The design and construction of the chamber, tests of prototypes, and chamber electronics are discussed. 7 references, 12 figures.

  12. Advanced Modified High Performance Synthetic Jet Actuator with Curved Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Xu, Tian-Bing (Inventor); Su, Ji (Inventor); Jiang, Xiaoning (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The advanced modified high performance synthetic jet actuator with optimized curvature shape chamber (ASJA-M) is a synthetic jet actuator (SJA) with a lower volume reservoir or chamber. A curved chamber is used, instead of the conventional cylinder chamber, to reduce the dead volume of the jet chamber and increase the efficiency of the synthetic jet actuator. The shape of the curvature corresponds to the maximum displacement (deformation) profile of the electroactive diaphragm. The jet velocity and mass flow rate for the ASJA-M will be several times higher than conventional piezoelectric actuators.

  13. Outgassing measurement of the aluminum alloy UHV chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Itoh, T.; Komaki, S.; Narushima, K.; Ishimaru, H.

    1986-01-01

    A large vacuum chamber (580 mm diameter) was fabricated from an aluminum alloy surface treated by a special process normally used on small chambers. The chamber was tested unbaked and baked at various temperatures, pressures, and holding periods. The chamber was filled with N2 gas, and the outgassing rate was measured after one hour. Then the ultimate pressure was measured. Outgassing rates for baked and unbaked groups were compared. It is concluded that the same surface treatment technique can be used on both large and small chambers produced by the same special extrusion process.

  14. Vapor chamber fin radiator study for the potassium Rankine cycle.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerrels, E. E.; Killen, R. E.; Couch, J. P.

    1972-01-01

    A structurally integrated vapor chamber fin (heat pipe) radiator is defined and evaluated as a potential candidate for rejecting waste heat from the potassium Rankine cycle powerplant. Several vapor chamber fin geometries, using stainless steel construction, are evaluated and an optimum is selected. A comparison is made with an operationally equivalent conduction fin radiator. Both radiators employ NaK-78 in the primary coolant loop. In addition, the Vapor Chamber Fin (VCF) radiator utilizes sodium in the vapor chambers. Preliminary designs are developed for the conduction fin and VCF concepts. Performance tests on a single vapor chamber were conducted to verify the VCF design.

  15. Theoretical Performance of Hydrogen-Oxygen Rocket Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, Gilbert K.; Tomazic, William A.; Kinney, George R.

    1961-01-01

    Data are presented for liquid-hydrogen-liquid-oxygen thrust chambers at chamber pressures from 15 to 1200 pounds per square inch absolute, area ratios to approximately 300, and percent fuel from about 8 to 34 for both equilibrium and frozen composition during expansion. Specific impulse in vacuum, specific impulse, combustion-chamber temperature, nozzle-exit temperature, characteristic velocity, and the ratio of chamber-to-nozzle-exit pressure are included. The data are presented in convenient graphical forms to allow quick calculation of theoretical nozzle performance with over- or underexpansion, flow separation, and introduction of the propellants at various initial conditions or heat loss from the combustion chamber.

  16. Microstrip gas chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and micro gap chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, W.G.; Harris, J.W.; Wieman, H.

    1994-07-01

    The authors report developments of the Microstrip Gas Chamber on thin-film Pestov glass and the Micro Gap Chamber. By coating a thin-layer of low-resistive, electronically-conductive glass on various substrates (including quartz and ceramics), they built MSGCs of high gain stability and low leakage current. They were tested in Ar-CH{sub 4} (10%) and He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of 17-20% were measured for 6keV x-rays. This design can make the choice of substrate less important, save the cost of ion-implantation, and use less glass material. Micro Gap Chamber was successfully tested in He-C{sub 2}H{sub 6} (50%) and Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 6}(50%) gas mixtures. Energy resolutions of about 20% were obtained. Both detectors are expected to have high rate capability.

  17. Transient AC voltage related phenomena for HVDC schemes connected to weak AC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pilotto, L.A.S.; Szechtman, M. ); Hammad, A.E. )

    1992-07-01

    In this paper a didactic explanation of voltage stability associated phenomena at HVDC terminals is presented. Conditions leading to ac voltage collapse problems are identified. A mechanism that excites control-induced voltage oscillations is shown. The voltage stability factor is used for obtaining the maximum power limits of ac/dc systems operating with different control strategies. Correlation to Pd {times} Id curves is given. Solutions for eliminating the risks of voltage collapse and for avoiding control-induced oscillations are discussed. The results are supported by detailed digital simulations of a weak ac/dc system using EMTP.

  18. AcsA-AcsB: The core of the cellulose synthase complex from Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769.

    PubMed

    McManus, John B; Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Kao, Teh-hui; Tien, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, produces cellulose of exceptionally high crystallinity in comparison to the cellulose of higher plants. This bacterial cellulose is synthesized and extruded into the extracellular medium by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). The catalytic component of this complex is encoded by the gene AcsAB. However, several other genes are known to encode proteins critical to cellulose synthesis and are likely components of the bacterial CSC. We have purified an active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB from G. hansenii ATCC23769 to homogeneity by two different methods. With the purified protein, we have determined how it is post-translationally processed, forming the active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB. Additionally, we have performed steady-state kinetic studies on the AcsA-AcsB complex. Finally through mutagenesis studies, we have explored the roles of the postulated CSC proteins AcsC, AcsD, and CcpAx. PMID:26672449

  19. AcsA-AcsB: The core of the cellulose synthase complex from Gluconacetobacter hansenii ATCC23769.

    PubMed

    McManus, John B; Deng, Ying; Nagachar, Nivedita; Kao, Teh-hui; Tien, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The gram-negative bacterium, Gluconacetobacter hansenii, produces cellulose of exceptionally high crystallinity in comparison to the cellulose of higher plants. This bacterial cellulose is synthesized and extruded into the extracellular medium by the cellulose synthase complex (CSC). The catalytic component of this complex is encoded by the gene AcsAB. However, several other genes are known to encode proteins critical to cellulose synthesis and are likely components of the bacterial CSC. We have purified an active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB from G. hansenii ATCC23769 to homogeneity by two different methods. With the purified protein, we have determined how it is post-translationally processed, forming the active heterodimer AcsA-AcsB. Additionally, we have performed steady-state kinetic studies on the AcsA-AcsB complex. Finally through mutagenesis studies, we have explored the roles of the postulated CSC proteins AcsC, AcsD, and CcpAx.

  20. A simplified model to tie magma chamber evolution to eruption frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degruyter, W.; Huber, C.

    2013-12-01

    Whether a magma body is able to produce eruptions and at what frequency remains a challenging problem in volcanology as it involves the non-linear interplay of different processes acting over different time scales. Due to their complexity they are often considered independently in spite of their coupled nature. Here we consider a simplified model that focuses on the evolution of the thermodynamical state of the chamber (pressure, temperature, gas and crystal content) as new magma is injected into the chamber. The crust heats up in contact with the magma chamber and is allowed to respond visco-elastically to the stress accumulated during recharge and volatile exsolution. The magma is considered eruptible if the crystal volume fraction is smaller than 0.5. If a critical overpressure is reached mass is released from the magma chamber in the form of dikes until the lithostatic pressure is recovered. Using scaling of dike propagation and thermal viability arguments, we assess whether the released mass can reach the surface or remains intruded in the crust. Our model also includes passive degassing, which is parameterized as a multiphase porous flow model that becomes active when the crystal fraction exceeds 0.5 and the fluid volume fraction of exsolved volatiles exceeds 0.2 (percolation threshold). Using this model, we study the effect of various scenarios for the magma recharge on the periodicity of eruptions, the volume of magma erupted (and its gas and crystal content), and whether the magma in the reservoir is headed to form eruptions or plutons. These recharge scenarios include (i) constant injection, (ii) periodic injection, and (iii) magmatic lensing through which magma chamber overpressure increases injection rate due to dike focusing. The modularity and the simplicity of the model allow for rapid calculations and offer the flexibility to add different and sometimes competing processes and test their influence on the evolution of the magma reservoir.

  1. Finite Element Analysis of Reverberation Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bunting, Charles F.; Nguyen, Duc T.

    2000-01-01

    The primary motivating factor behind the initiation of this work was to provide a deterministic means of establishing the validity of the statistical methods that are recommended for the determination of fields that interact in -an avionics system. The application of finite element analysis to reverberation chambers is the initial step required to establish a reasonable course of inquiry in this particularly data-intensive study. The use of computational electromagnetics provides a high degree of control of the "experimental" parameters that can be utilized in a simulation of reverberating structures. As the work evolved there were four primary focus areas they are: 1. The eigenvalue problem for the source free problem. 2. The development of a complex efficient eigensolver. 3. The application of a source for the TE and TM fields for statistical characterization. 4. The examination of shielding effectiveness in a reverberating environment. One early purpose of this work was to establish the utility of finite element techniques in the development of an extended low frequency statistical model for reverberation phenomena. By employing finite element techniques, structures of arbitrary complexity can be analyzed due to the use of triangular shape functions in the spatial discretization. The effects of both frequency stirring and mechanical stirring are presented. It is suggested that for the low frequency operation the typical tuner size is inadequate to provide a sufficiently random field and that frequency stirring should be used. The results of the finite element analysis of the reverberation chamber illustrate io-W the potential utility of a 2D representation for enhancing the basic statistical characteristics of the chamber when operating in a low frequency regime. The basic field statistics are verified for frequency stirring over a wide range of frequencies. Mechanical stirring is shown to provide an effective frequency deviation.

  2. A novel on-chip three-dimensional micromachined calorimeter with fully enclosed and suspended thin-film chamber for thermal characterization of liquid samples

    PubMed Central

    Davaji, Benyamin; Jeong Bak, Hye; Chang, Woo-Jin; Hoon Lee, Chung

    2014-01-01

    A microfabricated calorimeter (μ-calorimeter) with an enclosed reaction chamber is presented. The 3D micromachined reaction chamber is capable of analyzing liquid samples with volume of 200 nl. The thin film low-stress silicon nitride membrane is used to reduce thermal mass of the calorimeter and increase the sensitivity of system. The μ-calorimeter has been designed to perform DC and AC calorimetry, thermal wave analysis, and differential scanning calorimetry. The μ-calorimeter fabricated with an integrated heater and a temperature sensor on opposite sides of the reaction chamber allows to perform thermal diffusivity and specific heat measurements on liquid samples with same device. Measurement results for diffusivity and heat capacitance using time delay method and thermal wave analysis are presented. PMID:24926386

  3. Liquid Engine Design: Effect of Chamber Dimensions on Specific Impulse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoggard, Lindsay; Leahy, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Which assumption of combustion chemistry - frozen or equilibrium - should be used in the prediction of liquid rocket engine performance calculations? Can a correlation be developed for this? A literature search using the LaSSe tool, an online repository of old rocket data and reports, was completed. Test results of NTO/Aerozine-50 and Lox/LH2 subscale and full-scale injector and combustion chamber test results were found and studied for this task. NASA code, Chemical Equilibrium with Applications (CEA) was used to predict engine performance using both chemistry assumptions, defined here. Frozen- composition remains frozen during expansion through the nozzle. Equilibrium- instantaneous chemical equilibrium during nozzle expansion. Chamber parameters were varied to understand what dimensions drive chamber C* and Isp. Contraction Ratio is the ratio of the nozzle throat area to the area of the chamber. L is the length of the chamber. Characteristic chamber length, L*, is the length that the chamber would be if it were a straight tube and had no converging nozzle. Goal: Develop a qualitative and quantitative correlation for performance parameters - Specific Impulse (Isp) and Characteristic Velocity (C*) - as a function of one or more chamber dimensions - Contraction Ratio (CR), Chamber Length (L ) and/or Characteristic Chamber Length (L*). Determine if chamber dimensions can be correlated to frozen or equilibrium chemistry.

  4. Liquid rocket engine self-cooled combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Self-cooled combustion chambers are chambers in which the chamber wall temperature is controlled by methods other than fluid flow within the chamber wall supplied from an external source. In such chambers, adiabatic wall temperature may be controlled by use of upstream fluid components such as the injector or a film-coolant ring, or by internal flow of self-contained materials; e.g. pyrolysis gas flow in charring ablators, and the flow of infiltrated liquid metals in porous matrices. Five types of self-cooled chambers are considered in this monograph. The name identifying the chamber is indicative of the method (mechanism) by which the chamber is cooled, as follows: ablative; radiation cooled; internally regenerative (Interegen); heat sink; adiabatic wall. Except for the Interegen and heat sink concepts, each chamber type is discussed separately. A separate and final section of the monograph deals with heat transfer to the chamber wall and treats Stanton number evaluation, film cooling, and film-coolant injection techniques, since these subjects are common to all chamber types. Techniques for analysis of gas film cooling and liquid film cooling are presented.

  5. The Evolution and Development of Cephalopod Chambers and Their Shape.

    PubMed

    Lemanis, Robert; Korn, Dieter; Zachow, Stefan; Rybacki, Erik; Hoffmann, René

    2016-01-01

    The Ammonoidea is a group of extinct cephalopods ideal to study evolution through deep time. The evolution of the planispiral shell and complexly folded septa in ammonoids has been thought to have increased the functional surface area of the chambers permitting enhanced metabolic functions such as: chamber emptying, rate of mineralization and increased growth rates throughout ontogeny. Using nano-computed tomography and synchrotron radiation based micro-computed tomography, we present the first study of ontogenetic changes in surface area to volume ratios in the phragmocone chambers of several phylogenetically distant ammonoids and extant cephalopods. Contrary to the initial hypothesis, ammonoids do not possess a persistently high relative chamber surface area. Instead, the functional surface area of the chambers is higher in earliest ontogeny when compared to Spirula spirula. The higher the functional surface area the quicker the potential emptying rate of the chamber; quicker chamber emptying rates would theoretically permit faster growth. This is supported by the persistently higher siphuncular surface area to chamber volume ratio we collected for the ammonite Amauroceras sp. compared to either S. spirula or nautilids. We demonstrate that the curvature of the surface of the chamber increases with greater septal complexity increasing the potential refilling rates. We further show a unique relationship between ammonoid chamber shape and size that does not exist in S. spirula or nautilids. This view of chamber function also has implications for the evolution of the internal shell of coleoids, relating this event to the decoupling of soft-body growth and shell growth.

  6. A dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, M.; Starkloff, M.; Peiselt, K.; Anders, S.; Knipper, R.; Lee, J.; Behr, R.; Palafox, L.; Böck, A. C.; Schaidhammer, L.; Fleischmann, P. M.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2016-10-01

    The paper describes a dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter system operated up to kilohertz frequencies and 7 V rms. A 10 V programmable Josephson voltage standard (PJVS) array was installed on a pulse tube cooler (PTC) driven with a 4 kW air-cooled compressor. The operating margins at 70 GHz frequencies were investigated in detail and found to exceed 1 mA Shapiro step width. A key factor for the successful chip operation was the low on-chip power consumption of 65 mW in total. A thermal interface between PJVS chip and PTC cold stage was used to avoid a significant chip overheating. By installing the cryocooled PJVS array into an AC quantum voltmeter setup, several calibration measurements of dc standards and calibrator ac voltages up to 2 kHz frequencies were carried out to demonstrate the full functionality. The results are discussed and compared to systems with standard liquid helium cooling. For dc voltages, a direct comparison measurement between the dry-cooled AC quantum voltmeter and a liquid-helium based 10 V PJVS shows an agreement better than 1 part in 1010.

  7. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  8. Manipulating Flames with AC Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Kyle

    2013-11-01

    Time-oscillating electric fields applied to plasmas present in flames create steady flows of gas capable of shaping, directing, enhancing, or even extinguishing flames. Interestingly, electric winds induced by AC electric fields can be stronger that those due to static fields of comparable magnitude. Furthermore, unlike static fields, the electric force due to AC fields is localized near the surface of the flame. Consequently, the AC response depends only on the local field at the surface of the flame - not on the position of the electrodes used to generate the field. These results suggest that oscillating electric fields can be used to manipulate and control combustion processes at a distance. To characterize and explain these effects, we investigate a simple experimental system comprising a laminar methane-air flame positioned between two parallel-plate electrodes. We quantify both the electric and hydrodynamic response of the flame as a function of frequency and magnitude of the applied field. A theoretical model shows how steady gas flows emerge from the time-averaged electrical force due to the field-induced motion of ions generated within the flame and by their disappearance by recombination. These results provide useful insights into the application of AC fields to direct combustion processes.

  9. Ac-dc converter firing error detection

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, O.L.

    1996-07-15

    Each of the twelve Booster Main Magnet Power Supply modules consist of two three-phase, full-wave rectifier bridges in series to provide a 560 VDC maximum output. The harmonic contents of the twelve-pulse ac-dc converter output are multiples of the 60 Hz ac power input, with a predominant 720 Hz signal greater than 14 dB in magnitude above the closest harmonic components at maximum output. The 720 Hz harmonic is typically greater than 20 dB below the 500 VDC output signal under normal operation. Extracting specific harmonics from the rectifier output signal of a 6, 12, or 24 pulse ac-dc converter allows the detection of SCR firing angle errors or complete misfires. A bandpass filter provides the input signal to a frequency-to-voltage converter. Comparing the output of the frequency-to-voltage converter to a reference voltage level provides an indication of the magnitude of the harmonics in the ac-dc converter output signal.

  10. Microfluidic system for facilitated quantification of nanoparticle accumulation to cells under laminar flow.

    PubMed

    Kusunose, Jiro; Zhang, Hua; Gagnon, M Karen J; Pan, Tingrui; Simon, Scott I; Ferrara, Katherine W

    2013-01-01

    The identification of novel, synthetic targeting ligands to endothelial receptors has led to the rapid development of targeted nanoparticles for drug, gene and imaging probe delivery. Central to development and optimization are effective models for assessing particle binding in vitro. Here, we developed a simple and cost effective method to quantitatively assess nanoparticle accumulation under physiologically-relevant laminar flow. We designed reversibly vacuum-sealed PDMS microfluidic chambers compatible with 35 mm petri dishes, which deliver uniform or gradient shear stress. These chambers have sufficient surface area for facile cell collection for particle accumulation quantitation through FACS. We tested this model by synthesizing and flowing liposomes coated with APN (K (D) ~ 300 μM) and VCAM-1-targeting (K (D) ~ 30 μM) peptides over HUVEC. Particle binding significantly increased with ligand concentration (up to 6 mol%) and decreased with excess PEG. While the accumulation of particles with the lower affinity ligand decreased with shear, accumulation of those with the higher affinity ligand was highest in a low shear environment (2.4 dyne/cm(2)), as compared with greater shear or the absence of shear. We describe here a robust flow chamber model that is applied to optimize the properties of 100 nm liposomes targeted to inflamed endothelium. PMID:22855121

  11. Right/left assignment in drift chambers and proportional multiwire chambers (PWC's) using induced signals

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1979-01-01

    Improved multiwire chamber having means for resolving the left/right ambiguity in the location of an ionizing event. The chamber includes a plurality of spaced parallel anode wires positioned between spaced planar cathodes. Associated with each of the anode wires are a pair of localizing wires, one positioned on either side of the anode wire. The localizing wires are connected to a differential amplifier whose output polarity is determined by whether the ionizing event occurs to the right or left of the anode wire.

  12. Review of isothermal haze chamber performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, J. W.; Rogers, C. F.; Hudson, J. G.

    1981-01-01

    The theory of this method of characterizing cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) over the critical supersaturation range of about 0.01% to 0.2% was reviewed, and guidelines for the design and operation of IHC's are given. IHC data are presented and critically analyzed. Two of the four IHC's agree to about 40% over the entire range of critical. a third chamber shows similar agreement with the first two over the lower part of the critical supersaturation range but only a factor of two agreement at higher supersaturation. Some reasons for the discrepancies are given.

  13. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Hays, Christopher P.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  14. Indian LSSC (Large Space Simulation Chamber) facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brar, A. S.; Prasadarao, V. S.; Gambhir, R. D.; Chandramouli, M.

    1988-01-01

    The Indian Space Agency has undertaken a major project to acquire in-house capability for thermal and vacuum testing of large satellites. This Large Space Simulation Chamber (LSSC) facility will be located in Bangalore and is to be operational in 1989. The facility is capable of providing 4 meter diameter solar simulation with provision to expand to 4.5 meter diameter at a later date. With such provisions as controlled variations of shroud temperatures and availability of infrared equipment as alternative sources of thermal radiation, this facility will be amongst the finest anywhere. The major design concept and major aspects of the LSSC facility are presented here.

  15. Condensate Recycling in Closed Plant Growth Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bledsoe, J. O.; Sager, J. C.; Fortson, R. E.

    1994-01-01

    Water used in the the Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) Breadboard Project at the Kennedy Space Center is being recycled. Condensation is collected in the air ducts, filtered and deionized, and resupplied to the system for nutrient solutions, supplemental humidification, solvents and diluents. While the system functions well from a process control standpoint, precise and accurate tracking of water movement through the system to answer plant physiological questions is not consistent. Possible causes include hardware errors, undetected vapor loss from chamber leakage, and unmeasured changes in water volume in the plant growth trays.

  16. Carbon copy deaths: carbon monoxide gas chamber.

    PubMed

    Patel, F

    2008-08-01

    The news media can exert a powerful influence over suicidal behaviour. It has been observed that like-minded individuals are able to preplan a group suicide method using modern communication technology in the form of websites and online chatrooms and mobile phone texting. A case of carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning is presented to illustrate the recent phenomenon of cyber suicides by suffocation from a burning barbecue (charcoal burner) in 'gas chamber' conversions. Although barbecues (BBQ) are very popular in Britain and widely available, there have been relatively few reported cases of copycat deaths from CO gas suffocation. PMID:18586213

  17. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, A.

    1985-11-26

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  18. Vacuum chamber for containing particle beams

    DOEpatents

    Harvey, Alexander

    1987-01-01

    A vacuum chamber for containing a charged particle beam in a rapidly changing magnetic environment comprises a ceramic pipe with conducting strips oriented along the longitudinal axis of the pipe and with circumferential conducting bands oriented perpendicular to the longitudinal axis but joined with a single longitudinal electrical connection. When both strips and bands are on the outside of the ceramic pipe, insulated from each other, a high-resistance conductive layer, such as nickel can be coated on the inside of the pipe.

  19. Investigation on temperature separation and flow behaviour in vortex chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuno, Yuhi; Fukushima, Yusuke; Matsuo, Shigeru; Hashimoto, Tokitada; Setoguchi, Toshiaki; Kim, Heuy Dong

    2015-04-01

    In the previous researches, it is known that the swirl flow in circular pipe causes the temperature separation. Recently, it is shown that the temperature separation occurs in a vortex chamber when compressed air are pumped into this device from the periphery. Especially, in a cavity installed in the periphery of the chamber, the highest temperature was observed. Therefore, it is expected that this device can be used as a heat source in the engineering field. In recent researches, the mechanism of temperature separation in vortex chamber has been investigated by some researchers. However, there are few researches for the effect of diameter and volume of vortex chamber, height of central rod and position of cavity on the temperature separation. Further, no detailed physical explanation has been made for the temperature separation phenomena in the vortex chamber. In the present study, the effects of chamber configuration and position of the cavity on temperature separation in the vortex chamber were investigated experimentally.

  20. Vacuum chamber with a supersonic-flow aerodynamic window

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, C.L.

    1980-10-14

    A supersonic flow aerodynamic window is disclosed whereby a steam ejector situated in a primary chamber at vacuum exhausts superheated steam toward an orifice to a region of higher pressure, creating a barrier to the gas in the region of higher pressure which attempts to enter through the orifice. In a mixing chamber outside and in fluid communication with the primary chamber, superheated steam and gas are combined into a mixture which then enters the primary chamber through the orifice. At the point of impact of the ejector/superheated steam and the incoming gas/superheated steam mixture, a barrier is created to the gas attempting to enter the ejector chamber. This barrier, coupled with suitable vacuum pumping means and cooling means, serves to keep the steam ejector and primary chamber at a negative pressure, even though the primary chamber has an orifice to a region of higher pressure.