Science.gov

Sample records for accumulation chamber measurements

  1. SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FOR TIN COATING ON THE STAINLESS STEEL OF SNS ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.HSEUH,H.C.TODD,R.J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    BNL is responsible for the design and construction of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating on the stainless steel vacuum chamber of the SNS accumulator ring is needed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the undesirable resonant multiplication of electrons. The total SEY of TiN coated stainless steel material has been measured after coating samples were exposed to air and after electron and ion bombardment. We report here about TiN coating system setup at BNL and SEY measurements results at CERN, SLAC and KEK. We also present some simulation results of SNS accumulator ring electron-cloud effects using different SEY values.

  2. Chambers versus Relaxed Eddy Accumulation: an intercomparison study of two methods for short-term measurements of biogenic CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jasek, Alina; Zimnoch, Miroslaw; Gorczyca, Zbigniew; Chmura, Lukasz; Necki, Jaroslaw

    2014-05-01

    The presented work is a part of comprehensive study aimed at thorough characterization of carbon cycle in the urban environment of Krakow, southern Poland. In the framework of this study two independent methods were employed to quantify biogenic CO2 flux in the city: (i) closed chambers, and (ii) Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA). The results of a three-day intensive intercomparison campaign performed in July 2013 and utilizing both measurement methods are reported here. The chamber method is a widely used approach for measurements of gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. The system implemented in this study consisted of a single chamber operating in a closed-dynamic mode, combined with Vaisala CarboCAP infrared CO2 sensor in a mobile setup. An alternative flux measurement method, covering larger area is represented by REA, which is a modification of the eddy covariance method. It consists of a 3D anemometer (Gill Windmaster Pro) and the system collecting updraft and downdraft samples to 5-litre Tedlar bags. The CO2 mixing ratios in the collected samples are measured by Picarro G2101i analyzer. The setup consists of two sets of bags so that the sampling can be performed continuously with 15-min temporal resolution. A 48-hectares open meadow located close the city center was chosen as a test site for comparison of the two methods of CO2 flux measurements outlined above. In the middle of the meadow a 3-metre high tripod was installed with the anemometer and REA inlet system. For a period of 46 hours the system was measuring net CO2 flux from the surrounding area. A meteorological conditions and intensity of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) were also recorded. In the same time, CO2 flux from several points around the REA inlet was measured with the chamber system, resulting in 93 values for both respiration and net CO2 flux. Chamber results show rather homogenous distribution of the soil CO2 flux (the mean value equal to 40.9 ± 2.2 mmol/m2h), with

  3. ORGANIC EMISSION MEASUREMENTS VIA SMALL CHAMBER TESTING

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the measurement of organic emissions from a variety of indoor materials, using small (166 liter) environmental test chambers. The following materials were tested: adhesives, caulks, pressed wood products, floor waxes, paints, solid insecticides. For each mater...

  4. Short-term macroinvertebrate recruitment and sediment accumulation: a novel field chamber approach.

    PubMed

    Kochersberger, Jon P; Burton, G Allen; Custer, Kevin W

    2012-05-01

    Stream-deposited sediment is one of the major stressors affecting stream biota. Several methods exist to quantify stream sediment embeddedness, but they are relatively qualitative and operationally defined. The authors developed a short-term in situ embeddedness chamber method to measure aquatic insect recruitment and associated sediment accumulation in a more quantitative, better replicated manner. With sediment accumulation and aquatic insect recruitment as endpoints, three exposure periods were evaluated (4, 7, and 14 d) on a low-order stream (Honey Creek, New Carlisle, Ohio, USA) and a medium-order stream (Stillwater River, Covington, Ohio, USA). Chamber results show significant positive correlations between newly deposited fine sediment and insect recruitment. Embeddedness was also measured using the more conventional techniques of the Burns method and the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Quality Assessment Program method. This in situ chamber method allows for increased experimental options for assessing the stress of embeddedness and siltation on benthic communities and may prove useful for investigating the resilience of benthic communities after disturbances. PMID:22447442

  5. Chamber LIDAR measurements of aerosolized biological simulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David M.; Thrush, Evan P.; Thomas, Michael E.; Siegrist, Karen M.; Baldwin, Kevin; Quizon, Jason; Carter, Christopher C.

    2009-05-01

    A chamber aerosol LIDAR is being developed to perform well-controlled tests of optical scattering characteristics of biological aerosols, including Bacillus atrophaeus (BG) and Bacillus thuringiensis (BT), for validation of optical scattering models. The 1.064 μm, sub-nanosecond pulse LIDAR allows sub-meter measurement resolution of particle depolarization ratio or backscattering cross-section at a 1 kHz repetition rate. Automated data acquisition provides the capability for real-time analysis or recording. Tests administered within the refereed 1 cubic meter chamber can provide high quality near-field backscatter measurements devoid of interference from entrance and exit window reflections. Initial chamber measurements of BG depolarization ratio are presented.

  6. A Comparison of Outgassing Measurements for Three Vacuum Chamber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    M. L. Stutzman; P. Adderley; B. M. Poelker; M. Baylac; J. Clark; A. Day; J. Grames; J. Hansknecht; G. R. Myneni; P. M. Rutt; C. K. Sinclair

    2002-11-01

    Outgassing measurements of three UHV materials (304 Stainless Steel (SS), 316L SS and 6061T-6 aluminum) were made using the conductance and accumulation techniques as given in the AVS Recommended Practice for Outgassing Measurements [ ]. Measurement results indicate good agreement between the two techniques. This study was undertaken to help determine the vacuum limitations of the photoelectron guns used at Jefferson Lab and to aid in the choice of vacuum chamber materials that will be used in the construction of future photoelectron guns. The outgassing rate measured for all of the chamber materials, regardless of technique, was about 1 X 10{sup -12} Torr{sup -}l/s{sup -}cm{sup 2}.

  7. Metallic spherical anechoic chamber for antenna pattern measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farahbakhsh, Ali; Khalaj-Amirhosseini, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    Anechoic chambers are used for indoor antenna measurements. The common method of constructing an anechoic chamber is to cover all inside walls by the electromagnetic absorbers. In this paper, a fully metallic spherical chamber structure is presented in which the propagation of the electromagnetic waves inside the chamber is controlled and they are guided to an absorber. In the proposed method, an appropriate quiet zone is obtained, and unlike ordinary anechoic chambers, the absorber usage amount is reduced greatly. The performance of the chamber is evaluated by simulation. The results show that the proposed method could provide a useful technique for the indoor antenna measurements.

  8. MEASUREMENT OF SOIL RESPIRATION IN SITU: CHAMBER TECHNIQUES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chambers temporarily sealed to the soil surface are important and often the only means of measuring trace gas emissions to the atmosphere. However, such chamber measurements are not exempt from methodological problems. This review article identifies known sources of chamber-induced errors encounte...

  9. Outgassing measurement of the aluminum alloy UHV chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyamoto, M.; Itoh, T.; Komaki, S.; Narushima, K.; Ishimaru, H.

    1986-01-01

    A large vacuum chamber (580 mm diameter) was fabricated from an aluminum alloy surface treated by a special process normally used on small chambers. The chamber was tested unbaked and baked at various temperatures, pressures, and holding periods. The chamber was filled with N2 gas, and the outgassing rate was measured after one hour. Then the ultimate pressure was measured. Outgassing rates for baked and unbaked groups were compared. It is concluded that the same surface treatment technique can be used on both large and small chambers produced by the same special extrusion process.

  10. Modelling new particle formation from Jülich plant atmosphere chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Li; Boy, Michael; Mogensen, Ditte; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Franchin, Alessandro; Mentel, Thomas F.; Kleist, Einhard; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kulmala, Markku; dal Maso, Miikka

    2013-05-01

    An MALTE-BOX model is used to study the effects of oxidation of SO2 and BVOCs to new particle formation from Jülich Plant Atmosphere Chamber and CERN CLOUD chamber measurements. Several days of continuously measurements were chosen for the simulation. Our preliminary results show that H2SO4 is one of the critical compounds in nucleation process. Nucleation involving the oxidation of BVOCs shows better agreements with measurements.

  11. Ion chambers simplify absolute intensity measurements in the vacuum ultraviolet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sampson, J. A. R.

    1966-01-01

    Single or double ion chamber technique measures absolute radiation intensities in the extreme vacuum ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The ion chambers use rare gases as the ion carrier. Photon absorbed by the gas creates one ion pair so a measure of these is a measure of the number of incident photons.

  12. Soil Flux Chamber Measurements with Five Species CRDS and New Realtime Chamber Flux Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, N.; Alstad, K. P.; Arata, C.; Franz, P.

    2014-12-01

    Continuous soil flux chamber measurements remains a key tool for determining production and sequestration of direct and indirect greenhouse gases. The Picarro G2508 Cavity Ring-down Spectrometer has radically simplified soil flux studies by providing simultaneous measurements of five gases: CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O, and by lending itself to field deployment. Successful use of the Picarro G2508 for continuous soil flux measurements in a variety of ecosystem types has already been demonstrated. Most recently, Picarro is developing a real-time processing software to simplify chamber measurements of soil flux with the G2508 CRDS. The new Realtime Chamber Flux Processor is designed to work with all chamber types and sizes, and provides real-time flux values of N2O, CO2 & CH4. The software features include chamber sequence table, flexible data tagging feature, ceiling concentration measurement shut-off parameter, user-defined run-time interval, temperature/pressure input for field monitoring and volumetric conversion, and manual flux measurement start/stop override. Realtime Chamber Flux Processor GUI interface is presented, and results from a variety of sampling designs are demonstrated to emphasize program flexibility and field capability.

  13. Comsol Simulations as a Tool in Validating a Measurement Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakka, Antti; Sairanen, Hannu; Heinonen, Martti; Högström, Richard

    2015-12-01

    The Centre for Metrology and Accreditation (MIKES) is developing a temperature-humidity calibration system for radiosondes. The target minimum air temperature and dew-point temperature are -80° C and -90° C, respectively. When operating in this range, a major limiting factor is the time of stabilization which is mainly affected by the design of the measurement chamber. To find an optimal geometry for the chamber, we developed a numerical simulation method taking into account heat and mass transfer in the chamber. This paper describes the method and its experimental validation using two stainless steel chambers with different geometries. The numerical simulation was carried out using Comsol Multiphysics simulation software. Equilibrium states of dry air flow at -70° C with different inlet air flow rates were used to determine the geometry of the chamber. It was revealed that the flow is very unstable despite having relatively small Reynolds number values. Humidity saturation abilities of the new chamber were studied by simulating water vapor diffusion in the chamber in time-dependent mode. The differences in time of humidity stabilization after a step change were determined for both the new chamber model and the MIKES Relative Humidity Generator III (MRHG) model. These simulations were used as a validation of the simulation method along with experimental measurements using a spectroscopic hygrometer. Humidity saturation stabilization simulations proved the new chamber to be the faster of the two, which was confirmed by experimental measurements.

  14. Method for measuring anterior chamber volume by image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Gaoshou; Zhang, Junhong; Wang, Ruichang; Wang, Bingsong; Wang, Ningli

    2007-12-01

    Anterior chamber volume (ACV) is very important for an oculist to make rational pathological diagnosis as to patients who have some optic diseases such as glaucoma and etc., yet it is always difficult to be measured accurately. In this paper, a method is devised to measure anterior chamber volumes based on JPEG-formatted image files that have been transformed from medical images using the anterior-chamber optical coherence tomographer (AC-OCT) and corresponding image-processing software. The corresponding algorithms for image analysis and ACV calculation are implemented in VC++ and a series of anterior chamber images of typical patients are analyzed, while anterior chamber volumes are calculated and are verified that they are in accord with clinical observation. It shows that the measurement method is effective and feasible and it has potential to improve accuracy of ACV calculation. Meanwhile, some measures should be taken to simplify the handcraft preprocess working as to images.

  15. Vacuum Chamber for the Measurement System of the Beam Energy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumova, E.; Achasov, M.; Dong, HaiYi; Qu, HuaMin; Krasnov, A.; Kosarev, A.; Muchnoi, N.; Pyata, E.; Xiao, Qiong; Mo, XiaoHu; Wang, YiFang; Zhukov, A.

    Vacuum chamber for the beam energy measurement system based on the Compton backscattering method is presented. The main elements of the chamber are GaAs entrance viewport and a copper mirror. The viewport design provides baking out of the vacuum chamber up to 250 °C. To produce the viewport, an original technology based on brazing GaAs plate by lead has been developed. The vacuum chambers were installed at the BEPC-II and VEPP-4 M colliders. After installation the residual gas pressure is about 10-10 Torr.

  16. MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS USING SMALL TEST CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Organic compounds emitted from a variety of indoor materials have been measured using small (166 L) environmental test chambers. The paper discusses: a) factors to be considered in small chamber testing; b) parameters to be controlled; c) the types of results obtained. The follow...

  17. Quantifying the "chamber effect" in CO2 flux measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vihermaa, Leena; Childs, Amy; Long, Hazel; Waldron, Susan

    2014-05-01

    The significance of aquatic CO2 emissions has received attention in recent years. For example annual aquatic emissions in the Amazon basin have been estimated as 500 Mt of carbon1. Methods for determining the flux rates include eddy covariance flux tower measurements, flux estimates calculated from partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) in water and the use floating flux chambers connected to an infra-red gas analyser. The flux chamber method is often used because it is portable, cheaper and allows smaller scale measurements. It is also a direct method and hence avoids problems related to the estimation of the gas transfer coefficient that is required when fluxes are calculated from pCO2. However, the use of a floating chamber may influence the flux measurements obtained. The chamber shields the water underneath from effects of wind which could lead to lower flux estimates. Wind increases the flux rate by i) causing waves which increase the surface area for efflux, and ii) removing CO2 build up above the water surface, hence maintaining a higher concentration gradient. Many floating chambers have an underwater extension of the chamber below the float to ensure better seal to water surface and to prevent any ingress of atmospheric air when waves rock the chamber. This extension may cause additional turbulence in flowing water and hence lead to overestimation of flux rates. Some groups have also used a small fan in the chamber headspace to ensure thorough mixing of air in the chamber. This may create turbulence inside the chamber which could increase the flux rate. Here we present results on the effects of different chamber designs on the detected flux rates. 1Richey et al. 2002. Outgassing from Amazonian rivers and wetlands as a large tropical source of atmospheric CO2. Nature 416: 617-620.

  18. MEASUREMENT OF ORGANIC COMPOUND EMISSIONS USING SMALL TEST CHAMBERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the measurement of organic emissions from a variety of indoor materials, using small (166 liter) environmental test chambers. he following materials were tested: adhesives, caulks, pressed wood products, floor waxes, paints, and solid insecticides. or each mat...

  19. Detailed scour measurements around a debris accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Parola, Arthur C.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed scour measurements were made at Farm-Market 2004 over the Brazos River near Lake Jackson, Tex. during flooding in October 1994. Woody debris accumulations on bents 6, 7, and 8 obstructed flow through the bridge, causing scour of the streambed. Measurements at the site included three-dimensional velocities, channel bathymetry, water-surface elevations, water-surface slope, and discharge. Channel geometry upstream from the bridge caused approach conditions to be nonuniform.

  20. Measurement of organic compound emissions using small test chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tichenor, B.A.

    1989-01-01

    The paper discusses the measurement of organic emissions from a variety of indoor materials, using small (166 liter) environmental test chambers. The following materials were tested: adhesives, caulks, pressed wood products, floor waxes, paints, and solid insecticides. For each material, chamber concentration of organics has been determined for a range of environmental conditions (e.g., air exchange rate, temperature, and relative humidity). Various product loading ratios (area of sample/volume of chamber) have also been investigated. Emission rates for individual organic compounds, as well as total measured organics, were calculated. The effects of environmental variables on emission rates have been evaluated. Models are used to evaluate the effect of chamber walls and concentration on emission rates.

  1. Ionization chamber for measurements of high-level tritium gas

    SciTech Connect

    Carstens, D.H.W.; David, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    The construction and calibration of a simple ionization-chamber apparatus for measurement of high level tritium gas is described. The apparatus uses an easily constructed but rugged chamber containing the unknown gas and an inexpensive digital multimeter for measuring the ion current. The equipment after calibration is suitable for measuring 0.01 to 100% tritium gas in hydrogen-helium mixes with an accuracy of a few percent. At both the high and low limits of measurements deviations from the predicted theoretical current are observed. These are briefly discussed.

  2. Dynamic flux chamber measurements of hydrogen sulfide emission rate from a quiescent surface--A computational evaluation.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ademir A; Santos, Jane M; Beghi, Sandra P; Fernandes, Isabella F; Vom Marttens, Lya L C; Pereira Neto, Leovegildo I; Martins, Ramon S; Reis, Neyval C; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Enclosure devices have been studied and used for research purposes and practical applications in order to measure the emission rate of odorous pollutants from quiescent liquid surfaces to atmosphere. However, important questions remain about the interference of these measuring devices on the actual emission rate. The main concern regarding the use of a flux chamber is the fact that odorous compounds can accumulate into the chamber and yield gas-phase concentration increase inside the equipment, which causes a reduction of the emission rate during the measurement and thus gives an inaccurate local emission rate. Furthermore, the fluid flow inside the chamber does not reproduce the atmospheric boundary layer flow. This study applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique in order to investigate the influence of the fluid flow features inside a flux chamber on the measured hydrogen sulfide emission rate at quiescent liquid surfaces. The flux chamber design and operational conditions are those supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The results show that the US EPA flux chamber presents a fairly well mixed air phase. However, a trend to stagnation and hydrogen sulfide accumulation near chamber walls was detected in the computational simulation, which also indicated that the positioning of the sampling tube in relation to the inlet orifices may lead to deviations in the measurement results. CFD results showed that the wall shear and concentration gradients spatially vary at the gas-liquid interface, and friction velocity inside the chamber does not match typical values of atmospheric flow. PMID:26741548

  3. Anterior chamber volume. Its measurement and clinical application.

    PubMed

    Coakes, R L; Lloyd-Jones, D; Hitchings, R A

    1979-04-01

    Measurement of anterior chamber volume is discussed and attention drawn to a new, convenient slit-image method, which was used to study anterior chamber depth and volume before and after prophylactic peripheral iridectomy in the fellow eyes of patients presenting with unilateral acute angle-closure glaucoma. There was no significant change in depth after iridectomy but the mean anterior chamber volume increased significantly (P less than 0.01), by nearly 3 per cent. This increase was due to elimination of peripheral iris bombé which was not present in two control groups of normal eyes, one matched for anterior chamber depth and the other for age and refraction. Peripheral iris bombé may be a quantifiable factor predisposing to the development of acute angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:297385

  4. Optimization of a vacuum chamber for vibration measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danyluk, Mike; Dhingra, Anoop

    2011-10-01

    A 200 °C high vacuum chamber has been built to improve vibration measurement sensitivity. The optimized design addresses two significant issues: (i) vibration measurements under high vacuum conditions and (ii) use of design optimization tools to reduce operating costs. A test rig consisting of a cylindrical vessel with one access port has been constructed with a welded-bellows assembly used to seal the vessel and enable vibration measurements in high vacuum that are comparable with measurements in air. The welded-bellows assembly provides a force transmissibility of 0.1 or better at 15 Hz excitation under high vacuum conditions. Numerical results based on design optimization of a larger diameter chamber are presented. The general constraints on the new design include material yield stress, chamber first natural frequency, vibration isolation performance, and forced convection heat transfer capabilities over the exterior of the vessel access ports. Operating costs of the new chamber are reduced by 50% compared to a preexisting chamber of similar size and function.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF SOIL RESPIRATION IN SITU: CHAMBER TECHNIQUES.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber methods depend exclusively on headspace gas concentration measurements or determining the unused capacity of a known chemical trap, they provide only an indirect measure of the CO2 flux across the soil surface, which is in turn equal to the soil respiration rate only under steady-state condi...

  6. Automatic semi-continuous accumulation chamber for diffuse gas emissions monitoring in volcanic and non-volcanic areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelli, Matteo; Raco, Brunella; Norelli, Francesco; Virgili, Giorgio; Continanza, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Since various decades the accumulation chamber method is intensively used in monitoring activities of diffuse gas emissions in volcanic areas. Although some improvements have been performed in terms of sensitivity and reproducibility of the detectors, the equipment used for measurement of gas emissions temporal variation usually requires expensive and bulky equipment. The unit described in this work is a low cost, easy to install-and-manage instrument that will make possible the creation of low-cost monitoring networks. The Non-Dispersive Infrared detector used has a concentration range of 0-5% CO2, but the substitution with other detector (range 0-5000 ppm) is possible and very easy. Power supply unit has a 12V, 7Ah battery, which is recharged by a 35W solar panel (equipped with charge regulator). The control unit contains a custom programmed CPU and the remote transmission is assured by a GPRS modem. The chamber is activated by DataLogger unit, using a linear actuator between the closed position (sampling) and closed position (idle). A probe for the measure of soil temperature, soil electrical conductivity, soil volumetric water content, air pressure and air temperature is assembled on the device, which is already arranged for the connection of others external sensors, including an automatic weather station. The automatic station has been tested on the field at Lipari island (Sicily, Italy) during a period of three months, performing CO2 flux measurement (and also weather parameters), each 1 hour. The possibility to measure in semi-continuous mode, and at the same time, the gas fluxes from soil and many external parameters, helps the time series analysis aimed to the identification of gas flux anomalies due to variations in deep system (e.g. onset of volcanic crises) from those triggered by external conditions.

  7. Determining aerodynamic conductance of spar chambers from energy balance measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aerodynamic conductance (gA) of SPAR chambers was determined from measurements of energy balance and canopy temperature over a peanut canopy. gA was calculated from the slope of sensible heat flux (H) versus canopy-to-air temperature difference. H and the canopy-to-air temperature were varied by...

  8. Measurement of replacement factors for a parallel-plate chamber.

    PubMed

    Goswami, G C; Kase, K R

    1989-01-01

    We have measured the replacement correction factors (Prepl) for a PTW/Markus parallel plate chamber at mean incident electron energies of 3.1, 4.4, 8.9, 13.0, 16.3, and 18.8 MeV. The factors are significantly different from unity at low energies. PMID:2509869

  9. In situ measurement of ceramic vacuum chamber conductive coating quality

    SciTech Connect

    Doose, C.; Harkay, K.; Kim, S.; Milton, S.

    1997-08-01

    A method for measuring the relative surface resistivity and quality of conductive coatings on ceramic vacuum chambers was developed. This method is unique in that it allows one to test the coating even after the ceramic chamber is installed in the accelerator and under vacuum; furthermore, the measurement provides a localized surface reading of the coating conductance. The method uses a magnetic probe is calibrated using the measured DC end-to-end resistance of the tube under test and by comparison to a high quality test surface. The measurement method has also been verified by comparison to high frequency impedance measurements. A detailed description, results, and sensitivity of the technique are given here.

  10. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1995-12-31

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commisioned, will produce X-ray s of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 meters in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 ma of beam and a greater than 10 hour lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34 m long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamlline X28A and Photon Stimulated Desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of M, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per meter. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and H{sub 2}0 are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamlline U1OB and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum.

  11. Photon stimulated desorption measurement of an extruded aluminum beam chamber for the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Noonan, J.R.; Rosenberg, R.A.

    1996-05-01

    The Advanced Photon Source (APS), presently being commissioned, will produce x rays of unprecedented brightness. The high energy ring of the APS is a 7 GeV positron storage ring, 1104 m in circumference designed to operate at less than 10{sup {minus}9} Torr with 300 mA of beam and a greater than 10 h lifetime. The storage ring vacuum chamber is constructed from an extruded 6063 aluminum alloy. During the construction phase, a 2.34-m-long section of the APS extruded aluminum chamber was set up on National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) X-ray Beamline X28A and photon stimulated desorption (PSD) was measured. Cleaning and preparation of the chamber was identical to that of the APS construction. In addition to the chamber, small samples of Al, Be, and Cu were also exposed to white light having a critical energy of 5 keV. In addition to PSD, measurements were made of the specular and diffuse scattering of photons. The chamber and samples were each exposed to a dose greater than 10{sup 23} photons per m. Desorption yields for H{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O are reported as a function of accumulated flux, critical energy, incidence angle, and preparation. These results are compared with previous results for aluminum on NSLS Beamline U10B and PSD results of other laboratories published for aluminum. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  12. Ussing Chamber Technique to Measure Intestinal Epithelial Permeability.

    PubMed

    Vidyasagar, Sadasivan; MacGregor, Gordon

    2016-01-01

    Epithelial cells are polarized and have tight junctions that contribute to barrier function. Assessment of barrier function typically involves measurement of electrophysiological parameters or movement of nonionic particles across an epithelium. Here, we describe measurement of transepithelial electrical conductance or resistance, determination of dilution potential, and assessment of flux of nonionic particles such as dextran or mannitol, with particular emphasis on Ussing chamber techniques. PMID:27246022

  13. MEASUREMENT OF SURFACE ALPHA CONTAMINATION USING ELECTRET ION CHAMBERS

    SciTech Connect

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01

    Electret ion chambers (EICs) are known to be inexpensive, reliable, passive, integrating devices used for measurement of ionizing radiation. Their application for measurement of alpha contamination on surfaces was recently realized. This two-year project deals with the evaluation of electret ion chambers with different types of electrets and chambers for measurement of surface alpha contamination, their demonstration at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites, a cost-benefit comparison with the existing methods, and the potential deployment at DOE sites. During the first year (FY98) of the project, evaluation of the EICS was completed. It was observed that EICS could be used for measurement of free release level of alpha contamination for transuranics (100 dpm/100 cm{sup 2} fixed). DOE sites, where demonstration of EIC technology for surface alpha contamination measurements could be performed, were also identified. During FY99, demonstration and deployment of EICS at DOE sites are planned. A cost-benefit analysis of the EIC for surface alpha contamination measurement will also be performed.

  14. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2016-03-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, few studies addressed the challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems - the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the greenhouse gas monitoring system AGPS. From April until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar (Populus) plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered data sets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2 respectively. For the closed canopy phase (1 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; and (iv) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. Additionally, increased root growth was observed within the LI-8100A collars but not within the AGPS collars, which might have also contributed to the observed differences. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first

  15. Automation of soil flux chamber measurements: potentials and pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, C.-M.; Kammann, C.; Ceulemans, R.

    2015-09-01

    Recent technological advances have enabled the wider application of automated chambers for soil greenhouse gas (GHG) flux measurements, several of them commercially available. However, only few studies addressed the difficulties and challenges associated with operating these systems. In this contribution we compared two commercial soil GHG chamber systems-the LI-8100A Automated Soil CO2 Flux System and the Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. From April 2014 until August 2014, the two systems monitored in parallel soil respiration (SR) fluxes at a recently harvested poplar plantation, which provided a bare field situation directly after the harvest as well as a closed canopy later on. For the bare field situation (15 April-30 June 2014), the cumulated average SR obtained from the unfiltered datasets of the LI-8100A and the AGPS were 520 and 433 g CO2 m-2, respectively. For the closed canopy phase (01 July-31 August 2014), which was characterized by a higher soil moisture content, the cumulated average SR estimates were not significantly different with 507 and 501 g CO2 m-2 for the AGPS and the LI-8100A, respectively. Flux quality control and filtering did not significantly alter the results obtained by the LI-8100A, whereas the AGPS SR estimates were reduced by at least 20 %. The main reasons for the observed differences in the performance of the two systems were (i) a lower data coverage provided by the AGPS due to technical problems; (ii) incomplete headspace mixing in the AGPS chambers; (iii) lateral soil CO2 diffusion below the collars during AGPS chamber measurements; (iv) increased root growth within the LI-8100A collars; and (v) a possible overestimation of nighttime SR fluxes by the LI-8100A. In contrast to the LI-8100A, the AGPS had the gas sample inlets installed inside the collars and not the chambers. This unique design feature enabled for the first time the detection of disturbed chamber measurements during nights with a stratified atmosphere

  16. Modeling smog chamber measurements of vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.Y.; Nance, B.I.; Kelly, N.A.

    1997-12-31

    Vehicle exhaust VOC reactivities, measured at GM`s smog chamber facility, have been modeled using the SAPRC93 photochemical mechanism. The vehicle exhaust mixtures were generated by a single vehicle run over a portion of the Federal Test Procedure using three Auto/Oil reformulated test gasolines. For each run, up to 156 individual VOC species were identified. Initial HONO concentrations are needed to simulate reactivity measurement runs. (HONO is expected to be generated in a Tedlar bag holding the exhaust sample prior to its transfer to the smog chambers.) Measured and simulated relative incremental reactivities for the three exhaust mixtures are highly consistent. However, measured relative incremental reactivities are more sensitive to fuel effects than simulated ones. The maximum incremental reactivity (MIR)-based relative incremental reactivities, derived from individual species concentrations and MIR factors, are very close to simulated ones. A number of sensitivity simulation runs have been carried out to investigate the impact of HONO and other variables. Results show that relative reactivities of actual vehicle exhaust emissions can be measured by chamber runs in spite of the HONO effect.

  17. Innovative Fission Measurements with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M D; Barnes, P D; Klay, J L

    2005-11-16

    This study explores a pioneering idea to utilize a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure fission cross sections and other fission quantities. The TPC is inherently capable of measuring fragments from fission events, decay alphas, and beam-material scatters. This document explores whether the TPC can improve the precision of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section and measure other new and significant fission quantities simultaneously. This work shows that the TPC can in fact deliver sub-1% cross section measurements and should provide breakthroughs in both the quality and quantity of information available from neutron-induced fission experiments.

  18. New Fission Cross Section Measurements using a Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadler, Michael

    2008-03-01

    A group of six universities (ACU, California Polytechnic, Colorado School of Mines, Georgia Institute of Technology, Ohio, and Oregon State) and three national laboratories (Los Alamos, Lawrence Livermore, and Idaho) have undertaken the task of building a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure the fission cross sections needed for the next generation of nuclear reactors. The fission TPC concept will be presented, and why we think we can improve on 50 years of fission study.

  19. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  20. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  1. Measuring coral reef community metabolism using new benthic chamber technology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate measurement of coral reef community metabolism is a necessity for process monitoring and in situ experimentation on coral reef health. Traditional methodologies used for these measurements are effective but limited by location and scale constraints. We present field trial results for a new benthic chamber system called the Submersible Habitat for Analyzing Reef Quality (SHARQ). This large, portable incubation system enables in situ measurement and experimentation on community- scale metabolism. Rates of photosynthesis, respiration, and calcification were measured using the SHARQ for a variety of coral reef substrate types on the reef flat of South Molokai, Hawaii, and in Biscayne National Park, Florida. Values for daily gross production, 24-h respiration, and net calcification ranged from 0.26 to 6.45 g O2 m-2 day-1, 1.96 to 8.10 g O2 m-2 24 h-1, and 0.02 to 2.0 g CaCO3 m -2 day-1, respectively, for all substrate types. Field trials indicate that the SHARQ incubation chamber is an effective tool for in situ isolation of a water mass over a variety of benthic substrate types for process monitoring, experimentation, and other applications.

  2. Measuring evapotranspiration: comparison of eddy covariance, scintillometers and enclosed chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Mei Sun; Beringer, Jason; Pauwels, Valentijn R. N.; Daly, Edoardo; Walker, Jeffrey P.; Rüdiger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is the combination of evaporation from the soil surface and transpiration from plants. It is an important component of the hydrological cycle, particularly in arid and semi-arid areas where most of the precipitation is returned to the atmosphere via ET. It also drives the land-surface energy balance, largely affecting soil temperature and the heat exchange between the land and atmosphere. Therefore, the ability to quantify ET is important for accurate climate and weather predictions, as well as improving the management of water resources. Various methods for measuring ET are available, including gas chambers, lysimeters, Bowen-ratio energy balance stations, eddy-covariance systems, scintillometers, and space-borne sensors. These methods differ in spatial scales (from leaf to basin scale), time scales (seconds to days), principles (water-balance, mass-transfer, eddy-correlation, energy balance) and have their own strengths and limitations. For instance, point scale measurements, such as those obtained using lysimeters, assume that the sample is representative of a larger area, whereas measurements at a basin scale assume that the spatial average of all the other components in the water or energy balance equations can be measured accurately. The purpose of this study is to compare different techniques to measure ET across their respective scales and to identify causes of discrepancies between measurements. The final aim is to identify a technique or a combination of techniques to be used for verification of remote sensing evapotranspiration products. The study area is located in the Yanco Study Area (34.561°S, 35.170°S, 145.826°E, 146.439°E), situated within the western plains of the Murrumbidgee River catchment, in New South Wales, Australia. This area has been extensively monitored and a series of field experiments have been performed in the past to contribute to the pre- and post-launch algorithm development of earth observing

  3. Reporting central tendencies of chamber measured surface emission and oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Abichou, Tarek; Clark, Jeremy; Chanton, Jeffery

    2011-05-15

    Methane emissions, concentrations, and oxidation were measured on eleven MSW landfills in eleven states spanning from California to Pennsylvania during the three year study. The flux measurements were performed using a static chamber technique. Initial concentration samples were collected immediately after placement of the flux chamber. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. When reporting overall surface emissions and percent oxidation for a landfill cover, central tendencies are typically used to report 'averages' of the collected data. The objective of this study was to determine the best way to determine and report central tendencies. Results showed that 89% of the data sets of collected surface flux have lognormal distributions, 83% of the surface concentration data sets are also lognormal. Sixty seven percent (67%) of the isotope measured percent oxidation data sets are normally distributed. The distribution of data for all eleven landfills provides insight of the central tendencies of emissions, concentrations, and percent oxidation. When reporting the 'average' measurement for both flux and concentration data collected at the surface of a landfill, statistical analyses provided insight supporting the use of the geometric mean. But the arithmetic mean can accurately represent the percent oxidation, as measured with the stable isotope technique. We examined correlations between surface CH{sub 4} emissions and surface air CH{sub 4} concentrations. Correlation of the concentration and flux values using the geometric mean proved to be a good fit (R{sup 2} = 0.86), indicating that surface scans are a good way of identifying locations of high emissions.

  4. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, D. J.; Stevenson, A. W.; Wright, T. E.; Harty, P. D.; Lehmann, J.; Livingstone, J.; Crosbie, J. C.

    2015-11-01

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response.

  5. High spatial resolution dosimetric response maps for radiotherapy ionization chambers measured using kilovoltage synchrotron radiation.

    PubMed

    Butler, D J; Stevenson, A W; Wright, T E; Harty, P D; Lehmann, J; Livingstone, J; Crosbie, J C

    2015-11-21

    Small circular beams of synchrotron radiation (0.1 mm and 0.4 mm in diameter) were used to irradiate ionization chambers of the types commonly used in radiotherapy. By scanning the chamber through the beam and measuring the ionization current, a spatial map of the dosimetric response of the chamber was recorded. The technique is able to distinguish contributions to the large-field ionization current from the chamber walls, central electrode and chamber stem. Scans were recorded for the NE 2571 Farmer chamber, the PTW 30013, IBA FC65-G Farmer-type chambers, the NE 2611A and IBA CC13 thimble chambers, the PTW 31006 and 31014 pinpoint chambers, the PTW Roos and Advanced Markus plane-parallel chambers, and the PTW 23342 thin-window soft x-ray chamber. In all cases, large contributions to the response arise from areas where the incident beam grazes the cavity surfaces. Quantitative as well as qualitative information about the relative chamber response was extracted from the maps, including the relative contribution of the central electrode. Line scans using monochromatic beams show the effect of the photon energy on the chamber response. For Farmer-type chambers, a simple Monte Carlo model was in good agreement with the measured response. PMID:26510214

  6. Year-round measurements of CH4 exchange in a forested drained peatland using automated chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korkiakoski, Mika; Koskinen, Markku; Penttilä, Timo; Arffman, Pentti; Ojanen, Paavo; Minkkinen, Kari; Laurila, Tuomas; Lohila, Annalea

    2016-04-01

    Pristine peatlands are usually carbon accumulating ecosystems and sources of methane (CH4). Draining peatlands for forestry increases the thickness of the oxic layer, thus enhancing CH4 oxidation which leads to decreased CH4 emissions. Closed chambers are commonly used in estimating the greenhouse gas exchange between the soil and the atmosphere. However, the closed chamber technique alters the gas concentration gradient making the concentration development against time non-linear. Selecting the correct fitting method is important as it can be the largest source of uncertainty in flux calculation. We measured CH4 exchange rates and their diurnal and seasonal variations in a nutrient-rich drained peatland located in southern Finland. The original fen was drained for forestry in 1970s and now the tree stand is a mixture of Scots pine, Norway spruce and Downy birch. Our system consisted of six transparent polycarbonate chambers and stainless steel frames, positioned on different types of field and moss layer. During winter, the frame was raised above the snowpack with extension collars and the height of the snowpack inside the chamber was measured regularly. The chambers were closed hourly and the sample gas was sucked into a cavity ring-down spectrometer and analysed for CH4, CO2 and H2O concentration with 5 second time resolution. The concentration change in time in the beginning of a closure was determined with linear and exponential fits. The results show that linear regression systematically underestimated the CH4 flux when compared to exponential regression by 20-50 %. On the other hand, the exponential regression seemed not to work reliably with small fluxes (< 3.5 μg CH4 m-2 h-1): using exponential regression in such cases typically resulted in anomalously large fluxes and high deviation. Due to these facts, we recommend first calculating the flux with the linear regression and, if the flux is high enough, calculate the flux again using the exponential

  7. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based soil greenhouse gas flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Renewed interest in quantifying greenhouse gas emissions from soil has lead to an increase in the application of chamber-based flux measurement techniques. Despite the apparent conceptual simplicity of chamber-based methods, nuances in chamber design, deployment, and data analyses can have marked ef...

  8. THE CARBON DIOXIDE LEAKAGE FROM CHAMBERS MEASURED USING SULFUR HEXAFLUORIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    In plant chamber studies, if Co2 leaking from a chamber is not quantified, it can lead to an overestimate of assimilation rates and an underestimate of respiration rates: consequently, it is critical that Co2 leakage be determined. Sulfur Hexafluoride (SF6) was introduced into t...

  9. Measuring Social Capital Accumulation in Rural Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teilmann, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    Using a theoretical framework, the study proposes an index that can measure the social capital of local action group (LAG) projects. The index is founded on four indicators: number of ties, bridging social capital, recognition, and diversity, which are aggregated into one social capital index. The index has been tested in LAG-Djursland, Denmark,…

  10. Bakeout Chamber Within Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Daniel M.; Soules, David M.; Barengoltz, Jack B.

    1995-01-01

    Vacuum-bakeout apparatus for decontaminating and measuring outgassing from pieces of equipment constructed by mounting bakeout chamber within conventional vacuum chamber. Upgrade cost effective: fabrication and installation of bakeout chamber simple, installation performed quickly and without major changes in older vacuum chamber, and provides quantitative data on outgassing from pieces of equipment placed in bakeout chamber.

  11. Continuous measurements of methane flux in two Japanese temperate forests based on the micrometeorological and chamber methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshikawa, K.; Ueyama, M.; Takagi, K.; Kominami, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) budget in forest ecosystems have not been accurately quantified due to limited measurements and considerable spatiotemporal heterogeneity. In order to quantify CH4 fluxes at temperate forest at various spatiotemporal scales, we have continuously measured CH4 fluxes at two upland forests based on the micrometeorological hyperbolic relaxed eddy accumulation (HREA) and automated dynamic closed chamber methods.The measurements have been conducted at Teshio experimental forest (TSE) since September 2013 and Yamashiro forest meteorology research site (YMS) since November 2014. Three automated chambers were installed on each site. Our system can measure CH4 flux by the micrometeorological HREA, vertical concentration profile at four heights, and chamber measurements by a laser-based gas analyzer (FGGA-24r-EP, Los Gatos Research Inc., USA).Seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes were different in each site. CH4 was consumed during the summer, but was emitted during the fall and winter in TSE; consequently, the site acted as a net annual CH4 source. CH4 was steadily consumed during the winter, but CH4 fluxes fluctuated between absorption and emission during the spring and summer in YMS. YMS acted as a net annual CH4 sink. CH4 uptake at the canopy scale generally decreased with rising soil temperature and increased with drying condition for both sites. CH4 flux measured by most of chambers showed the consistent sensitivity examined for the canopy scale to the environmental variables. CH4 fluxes from a few chambers located at a wet condition were independent of variations in soil temperature and moisture at both sites. Magnitude of soil CH4 uptake was higher than the canopy-scale CH4 uptake. Our results showed that the canopy-scale CH4 fluxes were totally different with the plot-scale CH4 fluxes by chambers, suggesting the considerable spatial heterogeneity in CH4 flux at the temperate forests.

  12. Possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose measurements in clinical electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Takeshi; Araki, Fujio; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki

    2011-08-15

    Purpose: This study investigated the possibility of using cylindrical ionization chambers for percent depth-dose (PDD) measurements in high-energy clinical electron beams. Methods: The cavity correction factor, P{sub cav}, for cylindrical chambers with various diameters was calculated as a function of depth from the surface to R{sub 50}, in the energy range of 6-18 MeV electrons with the EGSnrc C ++ -based user-code CAVITY. The results were compared with those for IBA NACP-02 and PTW Roos parallel-plate ionization chambers. The effective point of measurement (EPOM) for the cylindrical chamber and the parallel-plate chamber was positioned according to the IAEA TRS-398 code of practice. The overall correction factor, P{sub Q}, and the percent depth-ionization (PDI) curve for a PTW30013 Farmer-type chamber were also compared with those of NACP-02 and Roos chambers. Results: The P{sub cav} values at depths between the surface and R{sub 50} for cylindrical chambers were all lower than those with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth for cylindrical chambers equal to or less than 4 mm in diameter was equivalent to or smaller than that for parallel-plate chambers. The P{sub Q} values for the PTW30013 chamber mainly depended on P{sub cav}, and for parallel-plate chambers depended on the wall correction factor, P{sub wall}, rather than P{sub cav}. P{sub Q} at depths from the surface to R{sub 50} for the PTW30013 chamber was consequently a lower value than that with parallel-plate chambers. However, the variation in depth was equivalent to that of parallel-plate chambers at electron energies equal to or greater than 9 MeV. The shift to match calculated PDI curves for the PTW30013 chamber and water (perturbation free) varied from 0.65 to 0 mm between 6 and 18 MeV beams. Similarly, the shifts for NACP-02 and Roos chambers were 0.5-0.6 mm and 0.2-0.3 mm, respectively, and were nearly independent of electron energy. Conclusions: Calculated PDI curves for PTW

  13. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  14. Theoretical study of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Meng, Dan; He, Yuehong; Wang, Heyi

    2013-10-15

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers has been theoretically studied for tritium measurements in gaseous form. A one-dimension model is introduced to establish the quantitative relationship between energy deposition rate and many factors, including carrier gas, gas pressure, wall material, chamber size, and gas temperature. Energy deposition rate has been calculated at pressure varying from 5 kPa to 500 kPa based on some approximations. It is found that energy deposition rate varies greatly for different parameters, especially at low gas pressure. For the same chamber, energy deposition rate in argon is much higher than in deuterium, as much as 70.7% higher at 5 kPa. Gold plated chamber gives highest energy deposition rate in the calculations while aluminum chamber results in the lowest. As chamber size gets smaller, β ray emitted by tritium will deposit less energy in the sensitive region of the chamber. For chambers flowing through with the same gas, energy deposition rate in a 10 L chamber is 23.9% higher than in a 0.05 L chamber at 5 kPa. Gas temperature also places slight influence on energy deposition rate, and 373 K will lead to 6.7% lower deposition rate than 233 K at 5 kPa. In addition, experiments have been performed to obtain energy deposition rate in a gold plated chamber, which show good accordance with theoretical calculations.

  15. Calculating the detection limits of chamber-based greenhouse gas flux measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chamber-based measurement of greenhouse gas emissions from soil is a common technique. However, when changes in chamber headspace gas concentrations are small over time, determination of the flux can be problematic. Several factors contribute to the reliability of measured fluxes, including: samplin...

  16. DYNAMIC FLUX CHAMBER SYSTEMS FOR FUMIGANT EMISSION MEASUREMENTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of effective field practices on emission reductions from soil fumigation relies on continuous and reliable emission data. Dynamic (flow through) flux chambers can provide continuous sampling for fumigants volatilized from the soil surface. The objective of this project was to design and c...

  17. Development of ion chambers for the measurement of low energy synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahant, A. K.; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Panyam, Vinatha S.

    2009-04-01

    Measurement of radiation fields due to low energy synchrotron radiation (SR) needs special considerations. The photoelectric interactions, which are mainly responsible for signal generation in this case, result in electron emission in a direction nearly perpendicular to the direction of incident photon. A free air ionisation chamber was designed and used for measurement of intensity of SR in the beam line and a methodology has been developed to measure SR fields away from the beam line using large volume ion chambers. Studies with spherical and cylindrical ion chambers in X-ray beams obtained at a tube potential of 15 kV (3 mm Be inherent filtration) showed that the chamber sensitivity at low energy strongly depended on curvature of the chamber wall especially in thick walled chambers. Our studies further showed that large volume thin and plane walled (0.01 mm thick aluminium wall) chambers could be used for measurement of SR fields away from the beam lines, with reasonably good accuracy (±10%) by calibrating them against the free air ion chamber through a similar chamber of smaller dimensions.

  18. A new chamber design for measuring community metabolism in a Michigan stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Uzarski, D.G.; Burton, T.M.; Stricker, Craig A.

    2001-01-01

    We designed an open-ended community metabolism chamber to simultaneously measure surface and hyporheic metabolism. Our chamber design eliminated reaeration, compartmentalized metabolism, maintained ambient conditions and included hyporheic respiration. We compared results from our hyporheic chamber to results obtained from: (1) closed benthic community metabolism chambers constructed as recommended by Bott et al. (1978), and (2) whole-stream metabolism techniques as modified by Marzolf et al. (1994). Simultaneous comparisons of all three procedures were made for a 35 m riffle section of Augusta Creek, a 3rd-order Michigan stream, in July 1997 and repeated in July 1998. Simultaneous comparisons of all three procedures were also made for a 30 m sandy run section of Augusta Creek in September 1997, and repeated in September 1998. Our hyporheic chamber estimates for community respiration (CR24) were similar to those obtained using the whole-stream metabolism procedure but were considerably higher than estimates obtained using the closed benthic chambers in three of the four experiments. These data suggest that our chamber design provided estimates of community metabolism which included both benthic and hyporheic respiration. The chamber incorporates several positive aspects of both closed chambers and the whole-stream method. This new method can be replicated, eliminates the need for a reaeration coefficient, ambient conditions are better approximated since it remains an open system, and it appears to provide more realistic estimates of whole-stream metabolism compared to the traditional chamber approach.

  19. Method and results of interpreting graduated measurements of wide gap spark chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akimov, V. V.; Veselova, G. V.; Kozlov, V. D.

    1980-01-01

    Measurement of gamma ray telescope plates is discussed. The graduated measurements of the angular resolution of wide gap spark chambers using photographic, video and vidicon information gathering schemes are presented.

  20. Comparative evaluation of predicted and measured performance of a 68-cubic meter truncated reverberant noise chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cyphers, H. D.; Munson, A. N.; On, F. J.

    1975-01-01

    The performance of a medium size, truncated reverberation chamber is evaluated in detail. Chamber performance parameters are predicted, using classical acoustic theory, and are compared to results from actual chamber measurements. Discrepancies are discussed in relation to several available empirical corrections developed by other researchers. Of more practical interest is the confirmation of a recent theory stating that the present guide for the ratio of specimen volume to test chamber volume, approximately 10 percent, is overly conservative, and can be increased by a factor of at least 2 and possibly 3. Results and theoretical justification of these findings are presented.

  1. Monte Carlo calculation of energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhilin, Chen; Shuming, Peng; Dan, Meng; Yuehong, He; Heyi, Wang

    2014-10-01

    Energy deposition in ionization chambers for tritium measurements has been theoretically studied using Monte Carlo code MCNP 5. The influence of many factors, including carrier gas, chamber size, wall materials and gas pressure, has been evaluated in the simulations. It is found that β rays emitted by tritium deposit much more energy into chambers flowing through with argon than with deuterium in them, as much as 2.7 times higher at pressure 100 Pa. As chamber size gets smaller, energy deposition decreases sharply. For an ionization chamber of 1 mL, β rays deposit less than 1% of their energy at pressure 100 Pa and only 84% even if gas pressure is as high as 100 kPa. It also indicates that gold plated ionization chamber results in the highest deposition ratio while aluminum one leads to the lowest. In addition, simulations were validated by comparison with experimental data. Results show that simulations agree well with experimental data.

  2. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface.

    PubMed

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3-5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. PMID:27132250

  3. Comparison of soil carbon dioxide flux measurements by static and portable chambers in various management practices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Portable chamber using infrared analyzer provides simple, rapid, and inexpensive measurement of emissions of soil carbon dioxide (CO2), a greenhouse gas responsible for global warming, but its effectiveness and precision compared with the static chamber using gas chromatograph is not well known. The...

  4. Morphological measurements of anatomic landmarks in human maxillary and mandibular molar pulp chambers.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Allan S; Musikant, Barry Lee

    2004-06-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to measure critical morphology of molar pulp chambers. One hundred random human maxillary and mandibular molars (200 teeth in total) were used. Each molar was radiographed mesiodistally on a millimeter grid. Using a stereomicroscope, the measurements were read to the nearest 0.5 mm. Results were as follows (mean, mm): pulp chamber floor to furcation, maxillary = 3.05 +/- 0.79, mandibular = 2.96 +/- 0.78; pulp chamber ceiling to furcation, maxillary = 4.91 +/- 1.06, mandibular = 4.55 +/- 0.91; buccal cusp to furcation, maxillary = 11.15 +/- 1.21, mandibular = 10.90 +/- 1.21; buccal cusp to pulp chamber floor, maxillary = 8.08 +/- 0.88, mandibular = 7.95 +/- 0.79; buccal cusp to pulp chamber ceiling, maxillary = 6.24 +/- 0.88, mandibular = 6.36 +/- 0.93; and pulp chamber height, maxillary = 1.88 +/- 0.69, mandibular = 1.57 +/- 0.68. The pulp chamber ceiling was at the level of the cementoenamel junction in maxillary, 98%, and mandibular, 97% of the specimens. The measurements showing the lowest percentage variance were buccal cusp to furcation (approximately 11%) and buccal cusp to pulp chamber ceiling (approximately 14%). The measurements were similar for both maxillary and mandibular molars. PMID:15167463

  5. DIFFUSION THEORY IMPROVES CHAMBER-BASED MEASUREMENTS OF TRACE GAS EMISSIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Chambers temporarily sealed to the soil surface are an important and for many purposes the only means of measuring trace gas emissions to the atmosphere. However, past interpretations of chamber data systematically underestimated actual emission rates in most applications because they ignored or poo...

  6. USDA-ARS GRACEnet Project Protocols, Chapter 3. Chamber-based trace gas flux measurements4

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This protocol addresses N2O, CO2 and CH4 flux measurement by soil chamber methodology. The reactivities of other gasses of interest such as NOx O3, CO, and NH3 will require different chambers and associated instrumentation. Carbon dioxide is included as an analyte with this protocol; however, when p...

  7. DESIGN AND OPERATIONS OF A DYNAMIC TEST CHAMBER FOR MEASUREMENT OF BIOCONTAMINANT POLLUTANT EMISSION AND CONTROL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses the design and operation of a room-size dynamic chamber used to measure biocontaminant pollutant emission and control. he chamber, a cube with inside dimensions of 2.55 m, was constructed with stainless steel walls and floor and an acrylic drop-in ceiling. emp...

  8. Surface Measurements of Oxygen, Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapor Fluxes Using AN Automated Chamber System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fentabil, M. M.; Fazackerley, S.; Nichol, C. F.

    2011-12-01

    The various soil respiration measurements that are available depend on measuring the emitted CO2 flux as organic carbon is respired aerobically. Comparative studies among the four well known methods (the open-flow infra-red gas analyzer method; the closed chamber method; the dynamic closed chamber method; and the alkali absorption method) under field conditions and laboratory experiments show differences. The discrepancies observed in these methods under field conditions could be evaluated by incorporating O2 flux measurement in addition to CO2 flux measurement. However, this is hampered by the absence of suitable equipment for measuring oxygen influx at the soil surface. A system to measure O2 fluxes at the soil surface using chamber methods has been developed. A gas handling subsystem and O2 analyser has been incorporated into an existing non-steady state automated chamber system originally designed for CO2 and H2O flux monitoring. The system consists of four 60 L soil chambers connected to temperature-controlled datalogger housing. During a measurement cycle, the chamber lid closes and the system measures changes of CO2/H2O and depletion of O2in the chamber headspace. Samples for CO2 /H2O circulate in a closed path between the chamber and an IR gas analyser. An air sample for O2 analysis is sub-sampled from this circulating air stream. Air samples for O2 are first dried using a two-stage Nafion drier. Mass flows and pressures are balanced at the pascal level prior to the gas passing into a ppm level fuel-cell oxygen analyser (Sable Systems Oxzilla). The chamber sample airstream is measured against a reference gas identically handled in a parallel air stream. A makeup gas of dry N2 is injected back to the chamber to return equimolar amounts of gas to replace the wet air removed, and hence prevent pressure fluctuation in the headspace of the chamber. The implementation of automated control of gas drying and sampling, pressure balancing, flow regulation and self

  9. Application of the Ultrasonic Oil Film Thickness Measurement System in Bearing Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Chong; Hu, Jian-ping; Liu, Zhen-xia; Lu, Ya-guo; Hao, Yu-ya

    2014-06-01

    The oil film thickness in aero-engine bearing chamber influences the heat transfer capacity of the bearing chamber wall, so measuring oil film thickness accuspeedly is essential to the design and thermal analysis of lubricating oil system. In this paper, software and hardware of an ultrasonic measurement system based on pulse echo technique, which measures the oil film thickness in bearing chamber, are established. The hardware system mainly consists of signal acquisition card, probe, delay block and the corresponding cables. Functions as measurement parameter setup, real-time display of measured waveforms, post-processing and so on are included in the measurement software. Finally, the oil film thickness of the wall is measured with the measurement system developed. Signal quality of the dynamic measurement is analyzed. Comparison and analysis of different oil film thickness under different rotation rates are conducted.

  10. Construction of an ionization chamber for the measurement of dose of low energy x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, Y. B. Alcantara; Jimenez, F. J. Ramirez

    2008-08-11

    We designed and constructed the prototype of an ionization chamber to measure the dose of an X-ray tube with Molybdenum anode. This X-ray tube is located in the Physics department at CINVESTAV and is used for medical physics purposes in the imaging area. The ionization chamber is designed to measure doses on biological samples exposed to X-rays and will be applied in radiation protection studies.

  11. Challenging the spin accumulation interpretation of local ``3T'' measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tinkey, Holly; Appelbaum, Ian; Li, Pengke

    2015-03-01

    The recent observation of magnetoresistance in local ``three-terminal'' (3T) measurements on ferromagnet/ insulator/ semiconductor junctions have spawned many claims of direct bulk spin injection or ``accumulation''. We present a self-consistent model to rigorously calculate expected voltage changes due to electrochemical potential splitting from spin accumulation driven by pure elastic tunnel injection in such junctions, and find that the experimentally observed magnetoresistance vastly exceeds theoretical predictions in all doping, temperature, and bias voltage regimes. Our own experimental measurements using inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy reveal that extrinsic impurities and defects within the junctions are responsible for the observed magnetoresistance signals, which cannot possibly be attributed to spin dephasing of polarized bulk electrons from elastic injection as claimed by proponents of the method. Supported by the Maryland Nanocenter, the Office of Naval Research Contract N000141110637, the National Science Foundation contracts ECCS-0901941 and ECCS-1231855 and Graduate Fellowship DGE13221, and the Defense Threat Reduction Agency contract HDTRA1.

  12. Large-chamber methane and nitrous oxide measurements are comparable to the backward lagrangian stochastic method.

    PubMed

    Redding, M R; Lewis, R; Waller, J; Phillips, F; Griffith, D

    2013-11-01

    Measurement of individual emission sources (e.g., animals or pen manure) within intensive livestock enterprises is necessary to test emission calculation protocols and to identify targets for decreased emissions. In this study, a vented, fabric-covered large chamber (4.5 × 4.5 m, 1.5 m high; encompassing greater spatial variability than a smaller chamber) in combination with on-line analysis (nitrous oxide [NO] and methane [CH] via Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy; 1 analysis min) was tested as a means to isolate and measure emissions from beef feedlot pen manure sources. An exponential model relating chamber concentrations to ambient gas concentrations, air exchange (e.g., due to poor sealing with the surface; model linear when ≈ 0 m s), and chamber dimensions allowed data to be fitted with high confidence. Alternating manure source emission measurements using the large-chamber and the backward Lagrangian stochastic (bLS) technique (5-mo period; bLS validated via tracer gas release, recovery 94-104%) produced comparable NO and CH emission values (no significant difference at < 0.05). Greater precision of individual measurements was achieved via the large chamber than for the bLS (mean ± standard error of variance components: bLS half-hour measurements, 99.5 ± 325 μg CH s and 9.26 ± 20.6 μg NO s; large-chamber measurements, 99.6 ± 64.2 μg CH s and 8.18 ± 0.3 μg NO s). The large-chamber design is suitable for measurement of emissions from manure on pen surfaces, isolating these emissions from surrounding emission sources, including enteric emissions. PMID:25602405

  13. Technical Note: Influence of Compton currents on profile measurements in small-volume ion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, Sean; Sperling, Nicholas; Parsai, E. Ishmael; Holmes, Shannon

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: This work is to evaluate the effects of Compton current generation in three small-volume ionization chambers on measured beam characteristics for electron fields. Methods: Beam scans were performed using Exradin A16, A26, and PTW 31014 microchambers. Scans with varying chamber components shielded were performed. Static point measurements, output factors, and cable only irradiations were performed to determine the contribution of Compton currents to various components of the chamber. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to evaluate why one microchamber showed a significant reduction in Compton current generation. Results: Beam profiles demonstrated significant distortion for two of the three chambers when scanned parallel to the chamber axis, produced by electron deposition within the wire. Measurements of ionization produced within the cable identified Compton current generation as the cause of these distortions. The size of the central collecting wire was found to have the greatest influence on the magnitude of Compton current generation. Conclusions: Microchambers can demonstrate significant (>5%) deviations from properties as measured with larger volume chambers (0.125 cm{sup 3} and above). These deviations can be substantially reduced by averaging measurements conducted at opposite polarities.

  14. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S., III; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Harmon, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual framework used by ecologists and biogeochemists must allow for accurate and clearly defined comparisons of carbon fluxes made with disparate techniques across a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales. Consistent with usage over the past four decades, we define "net ecosystem production" (NEP) as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems. Past use of this term has been ambiguous, because it has been used conceptually as a measure of carbon accumulation by ecosystems, but it has often been calculated considering only the balance between gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration. This calculation ignores other carbon fluxes from ecosystems (e.g., leaching of dissolved carbon and losses associated with disturbance). To avoid conceptual ambiguities, we argue that NEP be defined, as in the past, as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems and that it explicitly incorporate all the carbon fluxes from an ecosystem, including autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration, losses associated with disturbance, dissolved and particulate carbon losses, volatile organic compound emissions, and lateral transfers among ecosystems. Net biome productivity (NBP), which has been proposed to account for carbon loss during episodic disturbance, is equivalent to NEP at regional or global scales. The multi-scale conceptual framework we describe provides continuity between flux measurements made at the scale of soil profiles and chambers, forest inventories, eddy covariance towers, aircraft, and inversions of remote atmospheric flask samples, allowing a direct comparison of NEP estimates made at all temporal and spatial scales.

  15. Asymmetric electroosmotic flow and mobility measurements at nonstationary positions in the rectangular chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The electrophoretic mobility of a cell in solution is defined by its velocity divided by the electric field strength it experiences. An obvious way to measure the mobility of cells is to apply a constant electric field to a suspension of cells in a glass chamber and clock the velocities of individual cells through a microscope. This microscope method is the classic technique in cell electrophoresis and it has been used for the bulk of research in this field. Two aspects of the microscope method can critically affect the accuracy and consistency of its cell mobility measurements: (1) the electroosmotic fluctuations in the chamber from measurement to measurement; and (2) the number of cells which can be practically measured for statistically meaningful results. A new method of analyzing microelectrophoretic data using a computer program has been developed which addresses both of these aspects. It makes possible the mobility measurements of individual cells as positions throughout the rectangular chamber depth during asymmetric electroosmotic flow.

  16. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements of 1-butanol in helium: a comparative study of a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and a laminar flow diffusion chamber.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Hyvärinen, Antti-Pekka; Zdímal, Vladimír; Lihavainen, Heikki

    2005-06-01

    Isothermal homogeneous nucleation rates of 1-butanol were measured both in a thermal diffusion cloud chamber and in a laminar flow diffusion chamber built recently at the Institute of Chemical Process Fundamentals, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Prague, Czech Republic. The chosen system 1-butanol-helium can be studied reasonably well in both devices, in the overlapping range of temperatures. The results were compared with those found in the literature and those measured by Lihavainen in a laminar flow diffusion chamber of a similar design. The same isotherms measured with the thermal diffusion cloud chamber occur at highest saturation ratios of the three devices. Isotherms measured with the two laminar flow diffusion chambers are reasonably close together; the measurements by Lihavainen occur at lowest saturation ratios. The temperature dependences observed were similar in all three devices. The molecular content of critical clusters was calculated using the nucleation theorem and compared with the Kelvin equation. Both laminar flow diffusion chambers provided very similar sizes slightly above the Kelvin equation, whereas the thermal diffusion cloud chamber suggests critical cluster sizes significantly smaller. The results found elsewhere in the literature were in reasonable agreement with our results. PMID:15974753

  17. Utilising Geological Field Measurements and Historic Eruption Volumes to Estimate the Volume of Santorini's Magma Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browning, J.; Drymoni, K.; Gudmundsson, A.

    2015-12-01

    An understanding of the amount of magma available to supply any given eruption is useful for determining the potential eruption magnitude and duration. Geodetic measurements and inversion techniques are often used to constrain volume changes within magma chambers, as well as constrain location and depth, but such models are incapable of calculating total magma storage. For example, during the 2012 unrest period at Santorini volcano, approximately 0.021 km3 of new magma entered a shallow chamber residing at around 4 km below the surface. This type of event is not unusual, and is in fact a necessary condition for the formation of a long-lived shallow chamber, of which Santorini must possess. The period of unrest ended without culminating in eruption, i.e the amount of magma which entered the chamber was insufficient to break the chamber and force magma further towards the surface. We combine previously published data on the volume of recent eruptions at Santorini together with geodetic measurements. Measurements of dykes within the caldera wall provide an estimate of the volume of magma transported during eruptions, assuming the dyke does not become arrested. When the combined volume of a dyke and eruption are known (Ve) they can be used to estimate using fracture mechanics principles and poro-elastic constraints the size of an underlying shallow magma chamber. We present field measurements of dykes within Santorini caldera and provide an analytical method to estimate the volume of magma contained underneath Santorini caldera. In addition we postulate the potential volume of magma required as input from deeper sources to switch the shallow magma chamber from an equilibrium setting to one where the pressure inside the chamber exceeds the surrounding host rocks tensile strength, a condition necessary to form a dyke and a possible eruption.

  18. Technical Note: Semi-rigid chambers for methane gas flux measurements on tree stems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegenthaler, Andy; Welch, Bertie; Pangala, Sunitha R.; Peacock, Michael; Gauci, Vincent

    2016-02-01

    There is increasing interest in the measurement of methane (CH4) emissions from tree stems in a wide range of ecosystems so as to determine how they contribute to the total ecosystem flux. To date, tree CH4 fluxes are commonly measured using rigid closed chambers (static or dynamic), which often pose challenges as these are bulky and limit measurement of CH4 fluxes to only a very narrow range of tree stem sizes and shapes. To overcome these challenges we aimed to design and test new semi-rigid stem-flux chambers (or sleeves). We compared the CH4 permeability of the new semi-rigid chambers with that of the traditional rigid chamber approach, in the laboratory and in the field, with continuous flow or syringe injections. We found that the semi-rigid chambers had reduced gas permeability and optimal stem gas exchange surface to total chamber volume ratio (Sc / Vtot) better headspace mixing, especially when connected in a dynamic mode to a continuous flow gas analyser. Semi-rigid sleeves can easily be constructed and transported in multiple sizes, are extremely light, cheap to build and fast to deploy. This makes them ideal for use in remote ecosystems where access logistics is complicated.

  19. Measuring water use efficiency of Eucalypt tress with chambers and micrometeorological techniques — comment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindroth, A.; Cienciala, E.

    1995-07-01

    In a recent paper on water use efficiency (WUE) of Eucalypt trees, a large difference was found between WUE measured in a whole tree chamber and by micrometeorological methods, respectively. The former method gave up to 50% higher WUE on clear days. The authors attributed this to a changed radiation regime inside the chamber and concluded that chambers were unsuitable for such studies. In this paper we point out the importance of considering also the dependence of vapour pressure deficit on WUE. Because of WUE's sensitivity to vapour pressure deficit, as illustrated by examples from several species, it is practically meaningless to make comparisons without compensating for differences in vapour pressure deficit. In our opinion, chamber can still play an important role in water relation and productivity studies.

  20. Vacuum measurements of the K500 cyclotron accelerator chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Mallory, M.L.; Miller, P.S.; Kuchar, J.; Hudson, E.D.

    1986-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the unique internal cryopumping system, the pressure in the K500 superconducting cyclotron was measured as a function of radius for various gas flow rates emanating from the internal PIG source. For the test, a nude ion gauge with vertical dimension less than 2.3 cm was built and mounted on the internal beam probe. The effect of magnetic field on the ion gauge reading was determined and a method of degaussing the cyclotron was devised. Data from the normal shielded ion gauge located approximately 6 m away from the median plane was correlated with the internal vacuum measurements.

  1. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-05-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determinetemperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle,that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gasvolume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple,rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process controlapplications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outsidetemperature profile is tranferred to a chosen gas contained inside theguide.

  2. Acoustic temperature profile measurement technique for large combustion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkateshan, S. P.; Shakkottai, P.; Kwack, E. Y.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    Measurement of times of flight of sound waves can be used to determine temperatures in a gas. This paper describes a system, based on this principle, that is capable of giving the temperature profile in a nonisothermal gas volume, for example, prevalent in a large furnace. The apparatus is simple, rugged, accurate, and capable of being automated for process control applications. It is basically an acoustic waveguide where the outside temperature profile is transferred to a chosen gas contained inside the guide.

  3. Fission Fragment Angular Distributions measured with a Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinrath, Verena

    2015-04-28

    The subject is presented in a series of slides with the following organization: Introduction (What is anisotropy? Relevance (Theory and ratio cross section), Previous measurements); Experiment (Particle tracking in the fissionTPC, Neutron time of flight, Data analysis & uncertainty calculation, Preliminary result for 235U); and Future Work (Refine 235U result, Process 239Pu data).

  4. A diffusion chamber for passive separated measurements of radon/thoron concentration in dwellings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torabi Nabil, F.; Hosseini Pooya, S. M.; Shamsaie Zafarghandi, M.; Taheri, M.

    2012-12-01

    In this research, a passive diffusion chamber has been developed for separated measurement of radon and thoron. The chamber consists of two volumes which are separated by a fiber glass filter. Two lexan polycarbonate nuclear track detectors (film) are placed inside of the volumes to detect the alpha particles of radon/thorn and/or their progenies. Another lexan polycarbonate detector covered with an optimized thickness of an attenuator is placed outside of the chamber to measure only 212Po which its concentration can be related to that of long-life thoron progeny, 212Pb. The sensitivities have been measured by 2.06 and 0.053 [tracks cm-2(kBq m-3 day)-1] values for radon and thoron respectively inside of the chamber, and 7960 [tracks cm-2(kBq m-3 day)-1] value for thoron outside of the chamber. So the system can be successfully used for separated measurement of an extended range of radon/thoron concentrations in dwellings.

  5. Field inter-comparison of chamber and eddy covariance N2O measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brummer, C.; Lyshede, B.; Fuss, R.; Lempio, D.; Delorme, J.; Smith, J. J.; Hurkuck, M.; Kutsch, W. L.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate determination of ambient nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and the associated exchange between soil and atmosphere has been in the focus of ecosystem research for several years. In the last decade, substantial progress has been made in the development of fast-response technologies such as quantum cascade lasers (QCL). Reliable, robust, interference-free, fast and precise detectors are essential for long-term monitoring of N2O fluxes within chamber approaches and particularly in an eddy-covariance (EC) setup. Our study comprises chamber and EC N2O flux measurements from three short-term campaigns conducted over different land use types with the aim to (1) present a novel chamber design used in both a vial air-sampling setup and in connection with a QCL system, (2) compare the N2O flux data from the two chamber methods, i.e. vial/GC and QCL, with data from an EC approach, where the N2O mixing ratio was measured by an identical QCL system, and (3) identify measurement errors and uncertainties related to the respective measurement technique to elaborate an ideal approach for each expected flux regime in the field. Our results suggest a short closure time of only a few minutes when using a QCL in a chamber setup due to non-linearity in the concentration increase even under low flux conditions. We demonstrate that measurement errors of single vial/GC flux values were significantly higher than those of single QCL fluxes, the cumulative fluxes at the end of the campaigns, however, were almost identical. We observed good agreement - even of single flux rates - between vial/GC and QCL chamber measurements under high flux conditions (i.e. fluxes between 50 and 400 μg N2O-N m-2 h-1) but very poor agreement under low flux conditions. Implications for long-term measurements within the framework of research infrastructures are discussed.

  6. Automated, low-power chamber system for measuring nitrous oxide emissions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Continuous measurement of soil emissions is needed to constrain estimates of N2O loss to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the performance of a low-power, automated chamber system that can continuously measure N2O soil emissions, powered by wind and solar power. Laboratory testing of the Teledyne N2...

  7. Standardization of flux chambers and wind tunnels for area source emission measurements at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Researchers and practitioners have used many varied designs of wind tunnels and flux chambers to measure the flux of volatile organic compounds, odor, and ammonia from area sources at animal feeding operations. The measured fluxes are used to estimate emission factors or compare treatments. We sho...

  8. Single-hit resolution measurement with MEG II drift chamber prototypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, A. M.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Cascella, M.; Cei, F.; Chiappini, M.; Chiarello, G.; Chiri, C.; Dussoni, S.; Galli, L.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grassi, M.; Martinelli, V.; Nicolò, D.; Panareo, M.; Pepino, A.; Piredda, G.; Renga, F.; Ripiccini, E.; Signorelli, G.; Tassielli, G. F.; Tenchini, F.; Venturini, M.; Voena, C.

    2016-07-01

    Drift chambers operated with helium-based gas mixtures represent a common solution for tracking charged particles keeping the material budget in the sensitive volume to a minimum. The drawback of this solution is the worsening of the spatial resolution due to primary ionisation fluctuations, which is a limiting factor for high granularity drift chambers like the MEG II tracker. We report on the measurements performed on three different prototypes of the MEG II drift chamber aimed at determining the achievable single-hit resolution. The prototypes were operated with helium/isobutane gas mixtures and exposed to cosmic rays, electron beams and radioactive sources. Direct measurements of the single hit resolution performed with an external tracker returned a value of 110 μm, consistent with the values obtained with indirect measurements performed with the other prototypes.

  9. Proton Linear Energy Transfer measurement using Emulsion Cloud Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jae-ik; Park, Seyjoon; Kim, Haksoo; Kim, Meyoung; Jeong, Chiyoung; Cho, Sungkoo; Lim, Young Kyung; Shin, Dongho; Lee, Se Byeong; Morishima, Kunihiro; Naganawa, Naotaka; Sato, Osamu; Kwak, Jungwon; Kim, Sung Hyun; Cho, Jung Sook; Ahn, Jung Keun; Kim, Ji Hyun; Yoon, Chun Sil; Incerti, Sebastien

    2015-04-01

    This study proposes to determine the correlation between the Volume Pulse Height (VPH) measured by nuclear emulsion and Linear Energy Transfer (LET) calculated by Monte Carlo simulation based on Geant4. The nuclear emulsion was irradiated at the National Cancer Center (NCC) with a therapeutic proton beam and was installed at 5.2 m distance from the beam nozzle structure with various thicknesses of water-equivalent material (PMMA) blocks to position with specific positions along the Bragg curve. After the beam exposure and development of the emulsion films, the films were scanned by S-UTS developed in Nagoya University. The proton tracks in the scanned films were reconstructed using the 'NETSCAN' method. Through this procedure, the VPH can be derived from each reconstructed proton track at each position along the Bragg curve. The VPH value indicates the magnitude of energy loss in proton track. By comparison with the simulation results obtained using Geant4, we found the correlation between the LET calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and the VPH measured by the nuclear emulsion.

  10. Using In-situ Cryogenic Radiometers to Measure the Performance of a Large Thermal Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiPirro, Michael; Canavan, Edgar; Tuttle, James; Havey, Keith; Huguet, Jesse; Ousley, Wes; Shirron, Peter; Hait, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope will operate in space at temperatures lower than 50 K. To test the major parts of the telescope and instruments on the ground requires a very large thermal vacuum chamber with a helium-cooled shroud operating below 20 K. This chamber and shroud are being subjected to a series of 4 preliminary tests to characterize the chamber and the ground support equipment before the telescope and instruments are tested. We have made measurements in the first of these preliminary tests using simple radiometers, which are located in the chamber and are pointed at various locations and items of interest within the chamber. The radiometers, which have been previously described[1], consist of a Cernox thermometer attached to an absorber suspended behind a Winston cone with an acceptance half-angle of 11 degrees. 9 of these radiometers were anchored to the chamber at temperatures between 17 and 25 K and were able to resolve 2 mW over an area of one m2. This level of sensitivity corresponds to a 60 K blackbody, which spans the radiometer field of view, changing in temperature by 0.04 K. The results of this test and plans for future tests will be described.

  11. Design and Fabrication of A Modern Radon-Tight Chamber for Radon Concentration Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alhalemi, Ahmed; Jaafar, M. S.

    2010-07-01

    A modern radon-tight chamber (RTC) has been designed and fabricated to meet the request and requirements for both the Professional Continuous Radon Monitor (PCRM), and the RAD7 radon detector. The chamber is cubic shaped, made of Perspex with a volume of about 0.125 m3. The RTC was also equipped with a thermometer and a humidity sensor. A pair of gloves was attached on one side of the chamber's lateral opening for operating the PCRM. In addition, a fan was installed to circulate the air, and to distribute the radon gas to ensure homogeneity after the air inside the chamber is evacuated with nitrogen gas. At the end of the monitoring period, the results of the concentration of the radon emanated from a sample placed inside the chamber will then be available in any of three forms: numerical display on the control panel of the radon detector, printed report on the accessory printer, or transferred into a file on a personal computer via the RS-232 Serial port without disturbing the radon concentration inside the chamber. Computer software is provided by the manufacturer for this purpose. The result of analysis was presented in a one-way ANOVA that indicated that the radon concentration means are not difference for the three different positions of the PCRM (P > 0.05). Thus, this RTC can be used to measure the radon concentration and its progeny; in addition, it can be used for research and useful studies on radon exhalation from building materials.

  12. Measurement of carbon and water balances of semiarid scrubs using transient-state closed chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Ballesteros, Ana; Pérez-Priego, Óscar; Sánchez-Cañete, Enrique P.; Serrano-Ortiz, Penélope; Domingo, Francisco; Kowalski, Andrew S.

    2013-04-01

    The measurement of canopy photosynthesis and transpiration is crucial to understand the carbon and water cycles, specially, in water-limited ecosystems. When the objective is to quantify fluxes of carbon at whole-plant level, scaling up from leaf to canopy by using multi-layer models is always a tricky approach, because of the complexity in obtaining model parameters within the canopy. Here we present a transient-state closed chamber, large enough to measure medium-size plant gas exchanges in a semiarid shrubland. Additionally, a series of tests were carried out to evaluate physical and physiological plant responses to potential environmental modifications caused by the chamber. As results, leakage had a minimal impact on flux calculations (0.9 % min-1), and chambeŕs walls adsorption of water was not detected. Furthermore, the artificial turbulence generated by fans into the chamber to facilitate air mixing did not alter the transpiration rate. The optimal duration of the calculation window was 60 s, which was the sufficient time interval to avoid the disturbance of the enclosed plant. Maximum increases in air and plant temperature were 0.6 °C min-1 and 0.9 °C min-1, respectively. Therefore, the minimal effects that the chamber generated over the physiological processes of the enclosed plant indicate that this chamber is suitable for accurate measurements of gas exchanges at whole-plant scale in typical species that conform semiarid shrubland ecosystems.

  13. A multiple sampling time projection ionization chamber for nuclear fragment tracking and charge measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, G.; Bieser, F.; Brady, F. P.; Chance, J. C.; Christie, W. F.; Gilkes, M.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lynen, U.; Müller, Walter F. J.; Romero, J. L.; Sann, H.; Tull, C. E.; Warren, P.

    1997-02-01

    A detector has been developed for the tracking and charge measurement of the projectile fragment nuclei produced in relativistic nuclear collisions. This device, MUSIC II, is a second generation Multiple Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC), and employs the principles of ionization and time projection chambers. It provides unique charge determination for charges Z≥6, and excellent track position measurement. MUSIC II has been used most recently with the EOS (Equation of State) TPC and other EOS Collaboration detectors. Earlier it was used with other systems in experiments at the Heavy Ion Superconducting Spectrometer (HISS) facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and the ALADIN spectrometer at GSI.

  14. Large-angle ionization chambers for brachytherapy air-kerma-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culberson, Wesley S.

    There has been a significant increase in the use of low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides in the past decade to treat cancer with a special form of radiation therapy called brachytherapy. For treating prostate cancer, brachytherapy sources are approximately the size of a grain of rice and are normally radioactive 125I or 103Pd sources encapsulated in titanium or plastic. Although these sources have proven effective in the treatment of cancer, the clinical dosimetry is difficult due to the unique varieties available and their typically. A large-angle free-air chamber at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) called the Wide-Angle Free-Air Chamber (WAFAC) is the current standard for measuring the strength of low-energy photon-emitting radionuclides for brachytherapy. This chamber has served the clinical medical physics community well and is a significant improvement over previous standards. However, it has some shortcomings. This thesis describes the development of a new large-angle ionization chamber at the University of Wisconsin called the Variable-Aperture Free-Air Chamber (VAFAC) to measure brachytherapy sources with extended capabilities. This chamber is constructed to explore characteristics in the calibration of brachytherapy seeds by quantifying potential variations caused by anisotropy and the change in response with integration angle. In addition, the characterization of yet another large-angle free-air chamber called the Grossvolumen Extrapolationskammer (GROVEX) in the German national standards institute Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) is also presented. The objective of this thesis is to present improved measurement techniques with free-air ionization chambers that will improve the accuracy of the dose delivered to patients. First, it will be shown that the UW VAFAC is capable of measuring conventional 125I or 103Pd seeds as well as longer sources, coiled sources, and miniature x-ray tubes. Additionally, the VAFAC

  15. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-05-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  16. Measuring tropospheric HNO3 - Problems and prospects for Nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talbot, R. W.; Vijgen, A. S.; Harriss, R. C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of laboratory and field measurements was performed to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO3 concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO3 vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia, the Nylon filter measured an average of 70 percent higher HNO3 concentration than the mist chamber technique. The results indicate that O3 causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO3 measurements performed with the filter technique. This O3-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO3 concentrations determined with the two techniques. It is hypothesized that unidentified (organic?) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO3(-) on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO3 vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO3 with the mist chamber method.

  17. Real-time dielectric-film thickness measurement system for plasma processing chamber wall monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jin-Yong; Chung, Chin-Wook

    2015-12-01

    An in-situ real-time processing chamber wall monitoring system was developed. In order to measure the thickness of the dielectric film, two frequencies of small sinusoidal voltage (˜1 V) signals were applied to an electrically floated planar type probe, which is positioned at chamber wall surface, and the amplitudes of the currents and the phase differences between the voltage and current were measured. By using an equivalent sheath circuit model including a sheath capacitance, the dielectric thickness can be obtained. Experiments were performed in various plasma condition, and reliable dielectric film thickness was obtained regardless of the plasma properties. In addition, availability in commercial chamber for plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition was verified. This study is expected to contribute to the control of etching and deposition processes and optimization of periodic maintenance in semiconductor manufacturing process.

  18. Measurement of Greenhouse Gas Flux from Agricultural Soils Using Static Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Collier, Sarah M.; Ruark, Matthew D.; Oates, Lawrence G.; Jokela, William E.; Dell, Curtis J.

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies. PMID:25146426

  19. Measurement of greenhouse gas flux from agricultural soils using static chambers.

    PubMed

    Collier, Sarah M; Ruark, Matthew D; Oates, Lawrence G; Jokela, William E; Dell, Curtis J

    2014-01-01

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape management practices. The static chamber-based method described here is based on trapping gases emitted from the soil surface within a chamber and collecting samples from the chamber headspace at regular intervals for analysis by gas chromatography. Change in gas concentration over time is used to calculate flux. This method can be utilized to measure landscape-based flux of carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane, and to estimate differences between treatments or explore system dynamics over seasons or years. Infrastructure requirements are modest, but a comprehensive experimental design is essential. This method is easily deployed in the field, conforms to established guidelines, and produces data suitable to large-scale GHG emissions studies. PMID:25146426

  20. Photon stimulated desorption (PSD) measurements of extruded copper and of welded copper beam chambers for the PEP II asymmetric B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Perkins, C.; Calderon, M.; Barletta, W.

    1994-12-31

    PEP II is being built as a higher luminosity electron-positron collider, with asymmetric beams of 9 GeV and 3.1 GeV, having maximum currents of 3.0 A. Based on the previous work on the NSLS VUV beamline U10B, a copper was selected for construction of UHV beam chambers and absorbers to minimize the pressure rise from synchrotron radiation during operation. An extruded beam chamber and a welded beam chamber were fabricated from the selected copper for PSD measurements on NSLS X-ray beamline X28A. The chambers were exposed to white light with a critical energy of 5 KeV, both direct and through a 0.010 inch thick Beryllium filter. Each chamber was exposed to a dose of approximately 10{sup 23} photons per meter at an incidence angle of 25 mrad, after argon glow conditioning and a 150 C vacuum bake. Desorption yields for H{sub 2} CO, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} are reported as a function of accumulated photon flux, critical energy, and chamber preparation. The results are compared with the previous work on beamline U10B and with those of other published work for copper.

  1. Photon stimulated desorption measurements of extruded copper and of welded copper beam chambers for the PEP-II asymmetric B factory

    SciTech Connect

    Foerster, C.L.; Lanni, C.; Perkins, C.; Calderon, M.; Barletta, W.

    1995-05-01

    PEP II is being built as a higher luminosity electron--positron collider with asymmetric beams of 9 and 3.1 GeV, having maximum currents of 3.0 A. Based on our previous work on the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) vacuum ultraviolet beamline U10B, a copper was selected for construction of ultrahigh vacuum beam chambers and absorbers to minimize the pressure rise from synchrotron radiation during operation. An extruded beam chamber and a welded beam chamber were fabricated from the selected copper for photon stimulated desorption measurements on the NSLS x-ray beamline X28A. The chambers were exposed to white light with a critical energy of 5 keV, both directly and through a 0.010-in.-thick beryllium filter. Each chamber was exposed to a dose of approximately 10{sup 23} photons per meter at an incidence angle of 25 mrad, after argon glow preconditioning and a 150 {degree}C vacuum bake. Desorption yields for H{sub 2} CO, CO{sub 2}, and CH{sub 4} are reported as a function of accumulated photon flux, critical energy, and chamber preparation. The results are compared with the previous work on the beamline U10B and with those of other published work on copper. {copyright} {ital 1995} {ital American} {ital Vacuum} {ital Society}

  2. Long-term stability of liquid ionization chambers with regard to their qualification as local reference dosimeters for low dose-rate absorbed dose measurements in water.

    PubMed

    Bahar-Gogani, J; Grindborg, J E; Johansson, B E; Wickman, G

    2001-03-01

    The long-term sensitivity and calibration stability of liquid ionization chambers (LICs) has been studied at a local and a secondary standards dosimetry laboratory over a period of 3 years. The chambers were transported several times by mail between the two laboratories for measurements. The LICs used in this work are designed for absorbed dose measurements in the dose rate region of 0.1-100 mGy min(-1) and have a liquid layer thickness of 1 mm and a sensitive volume of 16.2 mm3. The liquids used as sensitive media in the chambers are mixtures of isooctane (C8H18) and tetramethylsilane (Si(CH3)4) in different proportions (about 2 to 1). Operating at a polarizing voltage of 300 V the leakage current of the chambers was stable and never exceeded 3% of the observable current at a dose rate of about 1 mGy min(-1). The volume sensitivity of the chambers was measured to be of the order of 10(-9) C Gy(-1) mm3. No systematic changes in the absorbed dose to water calibration was observed for any of the chambers during the test period (sigma < 0.2%). Variations in chamber dose response with small changes in the polarizing voltage as well as sensitivity changes with accumulated absorbed dose were also investigated. Measurements showed that the LIC response varies by 0.15% per 1% change in applied voltage around 300 V. No significant change could be observed in the LIC sensitivity after a single absorbed dose of 15 kGy. The results indicate that the LIC can be made to serve as a calibration transfer instrument and a reference detector for absorbed dose to water determinations providing good precision and long-term reproducibility. PMID:11277221

  3. Measuring tropospheric HNO sub 3 : Problems and prospects for nylon filter and mist chamber techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Talbot, R.W.; Vijgen, A.S.; Harriss, R.C. )

    1990-05-20

    The authors performed a series of laboratory and field measurements to evaluate the mist chamber technique for determining tropospheric HNO{sub 3} concentrations. Both the mist chamber and standard Nylon filter techniques exhibit high collection efficiency and excellent agreement measuring HNO{sub 3} vapors from a permeation source. When simultaneously sampling ambient air in eastern Virginia the Nylon filter measured an average of 70% higher HNO{sub 3} concentration than the mist chamber technique. Results indicate that O{sub 3} causes a low-level positive artifact interference in HNO{sub 3} measurements performed with the filter technique. This O{sub 3}-induced error is small, however, compared to the large difference between atmospheric HNO{sub 3} concentrations determined with the two techniques. The authors hypothesize that unidentified (organic ) nitrogen species in the atmosphere react for form NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} on the filter and this phenomenon may interfere with Nylon filter measurements of HNO{sub 3} vapor. These potential interferences did not appear to affect measurements of HNO{sub 3} with the mist chamber method, but they are continuing studies to evaluate potential interference from various atmospheric species. Because the mist chamber technique employs an aerosol prefilter, it is probably best suited for measuring HNO{sub 3} concentrations when particle-NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} levels are low. In light of the preliminary results, the authors caution users of the Nylon filter method to continue to critically evaluate this technique for specificity in determining HNO{sub 3} vapor phase concentrations in the atmosphere, particularly at low concentrations typical of the remote troposphere.

  4. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of an explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility outside the firing chamber must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation while the chamber door is open. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured to provide information for the final design. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic.

  5. Potentials and challenges associated with automated closed dynamic chamber measurements of soil CO2 fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Görres, Carolyn-Monika; Kammann, Claudia; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2015-04-01

    Soil respiration fluxes are influenced by natural factors such as climate and soil type, but also by anthropogenic activities in managed ecosystems. As a result, soil CO2 fluxes show a large intra- and interannual as well as intra- and intersite variability. Most of the available soil CO2 flux data giving insights into this variability have been measured with manually closed static chambers, but technological advances in the past 15 years have also led to an increased use of automated closed chamber systems. The great advantage of automated chambers in comparison to manually operated chambers is the higher temporal resolution of the flux data. This is especially important if we want to better understand the effects of short-term events, e.g. fertilization or heavy rainfall, on soil CO2 flux variability. However, the chamber method is an invasive measurement method which can potentially alter soil CO2 fluxes and lead to biased measurement results. In the peer-reviewed literature, many papers compare the field performance and results of different closed static chamber designs, or compare manual chambers with automated chamber systems, to identify potential biases in CO2 flux measurements, and thus help to reduce uncertainties in the flux data. However, inter-comparisons of different automated closed dynamic chamber systems are still lacking. Here we are going to present a field comparison of the most-cited automated chamber system, the LI-8100A Automated Soil Flux System, with the also commercially available Greenhouse Gas Monitoring System AGPS. Both measurement systems were installed side by side at a recently harvested poplar bioenergy plantation (POPFULL, http://uahost.uantwerpen.be/popfull/) from April 2014 until August 2014. The plantation provided optimal comparison conditions with a bare field situation after the harvest and a regrowing canopy resulting in a broad variety of microclimates. Furthermore, the plantation was planted in a double-row system with

  6. Field Evaluation of Open System Chambers for Measuring Whole Canopy Gas Exchanges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ability to monitor whole canopy CO2 and H2O fluxes of crop plants in the field is needed for many research efforts ranging from plant breeding to the study of Climate Change effects on crops. Four portable, transparent, open system chambers for measuring canopy gas exchanges were field tested on...

  7. Design and performance of an ionisation chamber for the measurement of low alpha-activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, A.; Hutsch, J.; Krüger, F.; Sobiella, M.; Wilsenach, H.; Zuber, K.

    2016-04-01

    A new ionisation chamber for alpha-spectroscopy has been built from radio-pure materials for the purpose of investigating long lived alpha-decays. The measurement makes use of pulse shape analysis to discriminate between signal and background events. The design and performance of the chamber is described in this paper. A background rate of (10.9 ± 0.6) counts per day in the energy region of 1-9 MeV was achieved with a run period of 30.8 days. The background is dominantly produced by radon daughters.

  8. Open-system chamber for measurements of gas exchanges at plant level.

    PubMed

    Alterio, Giovanni; Giorio, Pasquale; Sorrentino, Giuseppe

    2006-03-15

    Gas exchanges of whole canopy can be studied by covering entire plants with a chamber and using portable infrared gas analyzers (IRGAs) to measure CO2 and H2O exchanged with the air blown through the chamber enclosure. The control of temperature rise inside the chamber, which should be kept low, and the accurate measurement of the air flow are two crucial aspects for realistic and precise estimation of photosynthesis and transpiration. An automated open-system plant chamber (clear flexible balloon enclosure) for small plants was developed to ameliorate such a technique. The temperature rise is here predicted by heat balance analysis inside the chamber. The analysis shows that when as much as 500 W m2 of solar radiation is converted to sensible heat, a flow rate of 0.98 mol s(-1) (approximately = 20 L s(-1)) of air blown into a cylinder-shaped enclosure (0.8 m high, 0.5 m wide) is adequate to limit temperature increase to 2 K. An improved calibration for the measurement of the chamber airflow was obtained by combining the use of a Pitot tube anemometer with the classical CO2 injection approach. The concentration increase due to the injection of CO2 at a known rate into the chamber was predicted by the air flow calculated from the "Pitot" air velocity. The turbulent regime of air assured that a single-point Pitot measurement was enough for a good estimation (slope = 0.99; R2 = 0.999) of the actual air flow. The open-system chamber was tested on potted sunflower (Helianthus annuus, L.) and maize (Zea mays, L.) plants under variable solar radiation, temperature, and air humidity during the daytime. As expected, similar rates of maximal leaf-area based photosynthesis (about 40 micromol m(-2) s(-1)) were observed in the two species confirming the reliability of our system. The consistency of data also resulted from the typical relationships observed between photosynthetic rate and light. PMID:16570620

  9. Quantifying evapotranspiration from urban green roofs: a comparison of chamber measurements with commonly used predictive methods.

    PubMed

    Marasco, Daniel E; Hunter, Betsy N; Culligan, Patricia J; Gaffin, Stuart R; McGillis, Wade R

    2014-09-01

    Quantifying green roof evapotranspiration (ET) in urban climates is important for assessing environmental benefits, including stormwater runoff attenuation and urban heat island mitigation. In this study, a dynamic chamber method was developed to quantify ET on two extensive green roofs located in New York City, NY. Hourly chamber measurements taken from July 2009 to December 2009 and April 2012 to October 2013 illustrate both diurnal and seasonal variations in ET. Observed monthly total ET depth ranged from 0.22 cm in winter to 15.36 cm in summer. Chamber results were compared to two predictive methods for estimating ET; namely the Penman-based ASCE Standardized Reference Evapotranspiration (ASCE RET) equation, and an energy balance model, both parametrized using on-site environmental conditions. Dynamic chamber ET results were similar to ASCE RET estimates; however, the ASCE RET equation overestimated bottommost ET values during the winter months, and underestimated peak ET values during the summer months. The energy balance method was shown to underestimate ET compared the ASCE RET equation. The work highlights the utility of the chamber method for quantifying green roof evapotranspiration and indicates green roof ET might be better estimated by Penman-based evapotranspiration equations than energy balance methods. PMID:25072298

  10. Spatial uniformity in chamber-cleaning plasmas measured using planar laser-induced fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Steffens, Kristen L.; Sobolewski, Mark A.

    1998-11-24

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) measurements were made to determine 2-D spatial maps of CF{sub 2} density as an indicator of chemical uniformity in 92%CF{sub 4}/O{sub 2} and 50%C{sub 2}F{sub 6}/O{sub 2} chamber-cleaning plasmas. Measurements were also made of broadband optical emission and of discharge current and voltage. All measurements were made in the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) reference cell, a capacitively-coupled, parallel-plate platform designed to facilitate comparison of results among laboratories. The PLIF and emission results were found to correlate with discharge current and voltage measurements. Together, these optical and electrical measurements provide insight into the optimization of chamber-cleaning processes and reactors and suggest new methods of monitoring plasma uniformity.

  11. Comparing laboratory- and field-measured biota-sediment accumulation factors.

    PubMed

    Burkhard, Lawrence P; Arnot, Jon A; Embry, Michelle R; Farley, Kevin J; Hoke, Robert A; Kitano, Masaru; Leslie, Heather A; Lotufo, Guilherme R; Parkerton, Thomas F; Sappington, Keith G; Tomy, Gregg T; Woodburn, Kent B

    2012-01-01

    Standardized laboratory protocols for measuring the accumulation of chemicals from sediments are used in assessing new and existing chemicals, evaluating navigational dredging materials, and establishing site-specific biota-sediment accumulation factors (BSAFs) for contaminated sediment sites. The BSAFs resulting from the testing protocols provide insight into the behavior and risks associated with individual chemicals. In addition to laboratory measurement, BSAFs can also be calculated from field data, including samples from studies using in situ exposure chambers and caging studies. The objective of this report is to compare and evaluate paired laboratory and field measurement of BSAFs and to evaluate the extent of their agreement. The peer-reviewed literature was searched for studies that conducted laboratory and field measurements of chemical bioaccumulation using the same or taxonomically related organisms. In addition, numerous Superfund and contaminated sediment site study reports were examined for relevant data. A limited number of studies were identified with paired laboratory and field measurements of BSAFs. BSAF comparisons were made between field-collected oligochaetes and the laboratory test organism Lumbriculus variegatus and field-collected bivalves and the laboratory test organisms Macoma nasuta and Corbicula fluminea. Our analysis suggests that laboratory BSAFs for the oligochaete L. variegatus are typically within a factor of 2 of the BSAFs for field-collected oligochaetes. Bivalve study results also suggest that laboratory BSAFs can provide reasonable estimates of field BSAF values if certain precautions are taken, such as ensuring that steady-state values are compared and that extrapolation among bivalve species is conducted with caution. PMID:21538837

  12. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  13. Application of a Fourier transform IR system for measurements of N2O fluxes using micrometeorological methods, an ultralarge chamber system, and conventional field chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galle, B.; Klemedtsson, L.; Griffith, D. W. T.

    1994-08-01

    Measurements of the sources and sinks of biogenic trace gases such as N2O and CH4 from terrestrial ecosystems are important in explaining and predicting the influence of these gases on global warming. Because of their biological origins the fluxes of these gases often show high spatial and temporal variation. Traditional methods of flux measurement use different types of field chambers or micrometeorologically based methods. These methods have several shortcomings and may not always be applicable to flux measurements of trace gases such as N2O or CH4. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, due to its path-integrating and multicomponent nature, shows unique potential for the measurement of fluxes of greenhouse gases from various ecosystems. To assess this potential, we have used a medium resolution (1 cm-1) FTIR spectrometer to test its suitability for area-integrated measurements, simultaneous multicomponent measurements, and continuous real-time measurements of trace gas fluxes. We have tested three different configurations: a conventional field chamber where the FTIR is used to continuously and simultaneously monitor the concentration changes of several gases, a megachamber method using a large tent as field chamber with the FTIR optical path within the chamber, and a micrometeorological flux gradient method. The three configurations are described and discussed and their performance is demonstrated in measurements of fluxes of N2O from a fertilized grassland and CH4 from a forest soil.

  14. A Time Projection Chamber for precision 239Pu(n,f) cross section measurement

    SciTech Connect

    Heffner, M

    2008-01-14

    High precision measurements of the {sup 239}Pu(n,f) cross section have been identified as important for the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) and other programs. Currently the uncertainty on this cross section is of the order 2-3% for neutron energies below 14 MeV and the goal is to reduce this to less than 1%. The Time Projection Chamber (TPC) has been identified as a possible tool to make this high precision measurement.

  15. Dynamic oxygenation measurements using a phosphorescent coating within a mammary window chamber mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorescent lifetime imaging was employed to measure the spatial and temporal distribution of oxygen partial pressure in tissue under the coverslip of a mammary window chamber breast cancer mouse model. A thin platinum-porphyrin coating, whose phosphorescent lifetime varies monotonically with oxygen partial pressure, was applied to the coverslip surface. Dynamic temporal responses to induced modulations in oxygenation levels were measured using this approach. PMID:25780753

  16. Measurement and prediction of the heat flow and temperature level in a precombustion chamber diesel

    SciTech Connect

    Fahmy, A.S.; Radwan, M.S.; Shams, A.M.; Raafat, N.M.

    1984-01-01

    Heat flux and temperature mapping were carried out in necessary detail in the combustion chamber of a pepper-pot type pre-combustion chamber diesel engine. A test set up was specifically prepared for this purpose in which heat fluxes were measured by specially designed traversing thermo couples, four of which were installed across the cylinder head and five were fitted along the cylinder liner. In combustion chamber locations not subjected to very high heat flows viz pre-combustion chamber tip, fuel-injection nozzle tip, exhaust valve etc. but their temperature level is the all-important factor in service, fixed microthermo couples were embedded in the metal as close as possible to the gas face of the component. The widest possible variation in load and speed was applied and it was found that the predominant factor affecting the heat flux and temperature level was the fueling rate unit piston area, effected by engine load and/or speed. Qualitative evidence suggests that piston heat fluxes follow the same pattern of that in the cylinder head. Heat flux and temperature level correlations were developed for the various combustion chamber components. Heat fluxes and metal temperatures seemed to follow the direction and intensity of air swirl. Thus they proved to be considerably higher in this engine in comparison with compression-swirl or induction swirl engines. As a result, pre-combustion chamber engines will be more difficult to uprate than comet or direct-injection engines. Contrary to most other types of engines, the centre region of the cylinder head which encompasses the valve bridge did not exhibit the highest thermal load. In fact the outer locations of bore are the critical zones in design.

  17. SU-E-T-382: Influence of Compton Currents On Profile Measurements in Small- Volume Ion Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tanny, S; Parsai, E; Holmes, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Ionization chambers in electron radiation fields are known to exhibit polarity effects due to Compton currents. Previously we have presented a unique manifestation of this effect observed with a microionization chamber. We have expanded that investigation to include three micro-ionization chambers commonly used in radiation therapy. The purpose of this project is to determine what factors influence this polarity effect for micro-chambers and how it might be mitigated. Methods: Three chambers were utilized: a PTW 31016, an Exradin A-16, and an Exradin A- 26. Beam profile scans were obtained on a Varian TrueBeam linear accelerator in combination with a Wellhofer water phantom for 6, 9, and 12 MeV electrons. Profiles were obtained parallel and perpendicular to the chamber's long axis, with both positive and negative collecting bias. Profiles were obtained with various chamber components shielded by 5 mm of Pb at 6 MeV to determine their relative contributions to this polarity effect. Results: The polarity effect was observed for all three chambers, and the ratio of the polarity effect for the Exradin chambers is proportional to the ratio of chamber volumes. Shielding the stem of both Exradin chambers diminished, but did not remove the polarity effect. However, they demonstrated no out-of-field effect when the cable was shielded with Pb. The PTW chamber demonstrated a significantly reduced polarity effect without any shielding despite its comparable volume with the A-26. Conclusions: The sensitive volume of these micro-chambers is relatively insensitive to collecting polarity. However, charge deposition within the cable can dramatically alter measured ionization profiles. This is demonstrated by the removal of the out-of-field ionization when the cable is shielded for the Exradin chambers. We strongly recommend analyzing any polarity dependence for small-volume chambers used in characterization of electron fields.

  18. Automated, low-power chamber system for measuring nitrous oxide emissions.

    PubMed

    Fassbinder, Joel J; Schultz, Natalie M; Baker, John M; Griffis, Timothy J

    2013-01-01

    Continuous measurement of soil NO emissions is needed to constrain NO budget and emission factors. Here, we describe the performance of a low-power Teledyne NO analyzer and automated chamber system, powered by wind and solar, that can continuously measure soil NO emissions. Laboratory testing of the analyzer revealed significant temperature sensitivity, causing zero drift of -10.6 nmol mol °C. However, temperature-induced span drift was negligible, so the associated error in flux measurement for a typical chamber sampling period was on the order of 0.016 nmol m s. The 1-Hz precision of the analyzer over a 10-min averaging interval, after wavelet decomposition, was 1.5 nmol mol, equal to that of a tunable diode laser NO analyzer. The solar/wind hybrid power system performed well during summer, but system failures increased in frequency in spring and fall, usually at night. Although increased battery storage capacity would decrease down time, supplemental power from additional sources may be needed to continuously run the system during spring and fall. The hourly flux data were numerically subsampled at weekly intervals to assess the accuracy of integrated estimates derived from manually sampling static chambers. Weekly sampling was simulated for each of the five weekdays and for various times during each day. For each weekday, the cumulative N emissions estimate using only morning measurements was similar (within 15%) to the estimate using only afternoon measurements. Often, weekly sampling partially or completely missed large episodic NO emissions that continuous automated chamber measurements captured, causing weekly measurements to underestimate cumulative N emissions for 9 of the 10 sampling scenarios. PMID:23673853

  19. Biases in greenhouse gases static chambers measurements in stabilization ponds: Comparison of flux estimation using linear and non-linear models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Juan P.; Lasso, Ana; Lubberding, Henk J.; Peña, Miguel R.; Gijzen, Hubert J.

    2015-05-01

    The closed static chamber technique is widely used to quantify greenhouse gases (GHG) i.e. CH4, CO2 and N2O from aquatic and wastewater treatment systems. However, chamber-measured fluxes over air-water interfaces appear to be subject to considerable uncertainty, depending on the chamber design, lack of air mixing in the chamber, concentration gradient changes during the deployment, and irregular eruptions of gas accumulated in the sediment. In this study, the closed static chamber technique was tested in an anaerobic pond operating under tropical conditions. The closed static chambers were found to be reliable to measure GHG, but an intrinsic limitation of using closed static chambers is that not all the data for gas concentrations measured within a chamber headspace can be used to estimate the flux due to gradient concentration curves with non-plausible and physical explanations. Based on the total data set, the percentage of curves accepted was 93.6, 87.2, and 73% for CH4, CO2 and N2O, respectively. The statistical analyses demonstrated that only considering linear regression was inappropriate (i.e. approximately 40% of the data for CH4, CO2 and N2O were best fitted to a non-linear regression) for the determination of GHG flux from stabilization ponds by the closed static chamber technique. In this work, it is clear that when R2adj-non-lin > R2adj-lin, the application of linear regression models is not recommended, as it leads to an underestimation of GHG fluxes by 10-50%. This suggests that adopting only or mostly linear regression models will affect the GHG inventories obtained by using closed static chambers. According to our results, the misuse of the usual R2 parameter and only the linear regression model to estimate the fluxes will lead to reporting erroneous information on the real contribution of GHG emissions from wastewater. Therefore, the R2adj and non-linear regression model analysis should be used to reduce the biases in flux estimation by the

  20. Measurements of Ice Nuclei properties at the Jungfraujoch using the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Cédric

    2010-05-01

    Ice clouds and mixed-phase clouds have different microphysical properties. Both affect the climate in various ways. Ice phase present in these clouds have the ability to scatter the incoming solar radiation and absorb terrestrial radiation differently from water droplets. Ice is also responsible for most of the precipitation in the mid-latitudes. Ice crystals can be formed via two main processes: homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation. Investigation of thermodynamic conditions at which ice nuclei (IN) trigger nucleation and their number concentrations is necessary in order to understand the formation of the ice phase in the atmosphere. In order to investigate the presence of IN in the free troposphere, the Institute for Atmospheric and Climate Sciences of the ETH Zurich has recently designed a new chamber: the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC), which is the field version of the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (Stetzer et al., 2008). Both chambers follow the principle of a "continuous flow diffusion chamber" (Rogers, 1988) and can measure the number concentration of IN at different temperatures and relative humidities. Aerosols are collected through an inlet where an impactor removes larger particles that could be counted as ice crystals. The aerosol load is layered between two dry sheath air flows as it enters the main chamber. Both walls of the chamber are covered with a thin layer of ice and maintained at two different temperatures in order to create supersaturation with respect to ice (and with respect to water in case of a larger temperature difference between the walls). At the exit of the main chamber, the sample goes throught the evaporation part that is kept saturated with respect to ice. There, water droplets evaporate and only ice crystals and smaller aerosol particles are counted by the Optical Particle Counter (OPC) at the bottom of the chamber. The high alpine research station Jungfraujoch is located at 3580 m a.s.l. It is mainly in

  1. Measuring Streamwood Accumulations In A Reservoir Using Landsat Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, R. L.; Senter, A. E.; Pasternack, G. B.; Ustin, S.

    2011-12-01

    Streamwood (woody materials greater than 10 cm in diameter and 1 m in length) is important to river networks, providing structure, hydraulic variability, and organic carbon to river ecosystems. In reservoirs where recreational activities take place, streamwood is moved into holding areas to minimize human health hazards. A common disposal method in California is to burn the wood soon after the first rains; streamwood is often insufficiently quantified by managers before disposal. As a result of active management and the loss of longitudinal connectivity caused by dams, streamwood's potential as a geomorphic agent and its biological constituents are lost to downstream ecosystems. To measure how much streamwood can accumulate in a mountain reservoir, Landsat 5 multispectral 30-m resolution imagery was used to aerially quantify streamwood floating on the surface of New Bullard's Bar Reservoir on the North Yuba River, Sierra Nevada, California, in a time-series from 1984 to present. The scientific questions answered by this study were: 1) how much streamwood was transported into the reservoir on a yearly basis? And, 2) what discharge-area relationships exist between gaged discharge and streamwood measures? Landsat images representative of the highest water surface elevation of each year were acquired from the publically available USGS online database, then atmospherically corrected, empirical-line calibrated, and georeferenced using ENVI software. ROIs and spectral library files were developed for four endmembers: forest, water, streamwood, and shoreline, and used in supervised maximum likelihood classifications. An unsupervised isodata classification was also performed, and results were linked to understand areas of confusion and to create a more robust streamwood identification model. A 1-m USGS DOQ image from 1998 and field surveys in 2006 and 2010 were used to ground-truth Landsat results.

  2. An automated dynamic chamber system for surface exchange measurement of non-reactive and reactive trace gases of grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, L.; Ammann, C.; Nyfeler-Brunner, A.; Spirig, C.; Hens, K.; Meixner, F. X.

    2009-03-01

    We present an automated dynamic chamber system which is optimised for continuous unattended flux measurements of multiple non-reactive and reactive trace gases on grassland ecosystems. Main design features of our system are (a) highly transparent chamber walls consisting of chemically inert material, (b) individual purging flow units for each chamber, and (c) a movable lid for automated opening and closing of the chamber. The purging flow rate was chosen high enough to keep the mean residence time of the chamber air below one minute. This guarantees a proven efficient mixing of the chamber volume and a fast equilibration after lid closing. The dynamic chamber system is able to measure emission as well as deposition fluxes of trace gases. For the latter case, the modification of the turbulent transport by the chamber (compared to undisturbed ambient conditions) is quantitatively described by a bulk resistance concept. Beside a detailed description of the design and functioning of the system, results of field applications at two grassland sites are presented. In the first experiment, fluxes of five trace gases (CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, O3) were measured simultaneously on small grassland plots. It showed that the dynamic chamber system is able to detect the characteristic diurnal cycles with a sufficient temporal resolution. The results also demonstrated the importance of considering the chemical source/sink in the chamber due to gas phase reactions for the reactive compounds of the NO-NO2-O3 triad. In a second field experiment, chamber flux measurements of CO2 and methanol were compared to simultaneous independent eddy covariance flux measurements on the field scale. The fluxes obtained with the two methods showed a very good agreement indicating a minimal disturbance of the chambers on the physiological activity of the enclosed vegetation.

  3. An automated dynamic chamber system for surface exchange measurement of non-reactive and reactive trace gases of grassland ecosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pape, L.; Ammann, C.; Nyfeler-Brunner, A.; Spirig, C.; Hens, K.; Meixner, F. X.

    2008-08-01

    We present an automated dynamic chamber system which is optimised for continuous unattended flux measurements of multiple non-reactive and reactive trace gases on grassland ecosystems. Main design features of our system are (a) highly transparent chamber walls consisting of chemically inert material, (b) individual purging flow units for each chamber, and (c) a movable lid for automated opening and closing of the chamber. The purging flow rate was chosen high enough to keep the mean residence time of the chamber air below one minute. This guarantees a proven efficient mixing of the chamber volume and a fast equilibration after lid closing. The dynamic chamber system is able to measure emission as well as deposition fluxes of trace gases. For the latter case, the modification of the turbulent transport by the chamber (compared to undisturbed ambient conditions) is quantitatively described by a bulk resistance concept. Beside a detailed description of the design and functioning of the system, results of field applications at two grassland sites are presented. In the first experiment, fluxes of five trace gases (CO2, H2O, NO, NO2, O3) were measured simultaneously on small grassland plots. It showed that the dynamic chamber system is able to detect the characteristic diurnal cycles with a sufficient temporal resolution. The results also demonstrated the importance of considering the chemical source/sink in the chamber due to gas phase reactions for the reactive compounds of the NO-NO2-O3 triad. In a second field experiment, chamber flux measurements of CO2 and methanol were compared to simultaneous independent eddy covariance flux measurements on the field scale. The fluxes obtained with the two methods showed a very good agreement indicating a minimal disturbance of the chambers on the physiological activity of the enclosed vegetation.

  4. Factors affecting the measurement of mercury emissions from soils with flux chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    WallschläGer, Dirk; Turner, Ralph R.; London, Jacqueline; Ebinghaus, Ralf; Kock, Hans H.; Sommar, Jonas; Xiao, Zifan

    1999-09-01

    Air-surface exchange of mercury (Hg) above an arid geothermal area was measured with three parallel flux chamber experiments. The different experimental designs were intercompared with each other, with regard to the magnitude of the measured Hg fluxes and their response to environmental changes. Qualitatively, the measured Hg fluxes agreed well throughout the diurnal cycle, and in their response to environmental events and experimental manipulations, but quantitatively, there were significant discrepancies between the individual flux results. On average, the three designs yielded Hg fluxes agreeing within a factor of 2, but even more pronounced differences were observed during midday high emission periods and during apparent nighttime deposition events. The chamber flushing rate appears to have a very significant impact on the measured fluxes and on the response behavior to environmental change. This study demonstrates that both experimental differences and small-scale regional variability introduce large uncertainty in the estimation of natural Hg air-surface exchange by different flux chamber techniques. Also, the impact of environmental parameters on Hg air-surface exchange was studied. Rain events led to a strong increase in the Hg emissions, even when the covered soil remained dry, suggesting that the apparent chamber footprint is larger than the actually covered area. Exclusion of sunlight led to decreases in Hg emissions. Statistical analysis revealed the strongest correlations between the measured Hg fluxes and radiation and wind speed. Weaker correlations were observed with air and soil temperature and wind direction (probably due to local Hg sources). Fluxes were also inversely correlated with relative humidity.

  5. Small-Chamber Measurements of Chemical-Specific Emission Factors for Drywall

    SciTech Connect

    Maddalena, Randy; Russell, Marion; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-06-01

    Imported drywall installed in U.S. homes is suspected of being a source of odorous and potentially corrosive indoor pollutants. To support an investigation of those building materials by the Consumer Products Safety Commission (CPSC), Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) measured chemical-specific emission factors for 30 samples of drywall materials. Emission factors are reported for 75 chemicals and 30 different drywall samples encompassing both domestic and imported stock and incorporating natural, synthetic, or mixed gypsum core material. CPSC supplied all drywall materials. First the drywall samples were isolated and conditioned in dedicated chambers, then they were transferred to small chambers where emission testing was performed. Four sampling and analysis methods were utilized to assess (1) volatile organic compounds, (2) low molecular weight carbonyls, (3) volatile sulfur compounds, and (4) reactive sulfur gases. LBNL developed a new method that combines the use of solid phase microextraction (SPME) with small emission chambers to measure the reactive sulfur gases, then extended that technique to measure the full suite of volatile sulfur compounds. The testing procedure and analysis methods are described in detail herein. Emission factors were measured under a single set of controlled environmental conditions. The results are compared graphically for each method and in detailed tables for use in estimating indoor exposure concentrations.

  6. Continuous measurement of the radon concentration in water using electret ion chamber method

    SciTech Connect

    Dua, S.K.; Hopke, P.K. . Dept. of Chemistry); Kotrappa, P. )

    1992-10-01

    A radon concentration of 300 pCi/L has been proposed by the US Environmental Protection Agency as a limit for radon dissolved in municipal drinking water supplies. There is therefore a need for a continuous monitor to insure that the daily average concentration does not exceed this limit. In order to calibrate the system, varying concentrations of radon in water have been generated by bubbling radon laden air through a dynamic flowthrough water system. The value of steady state concentration of radon in water from this system depends on the concentration of radon in air, the air bubbling rate, and the water flow rate. The measurement system has been designed and tested using a 1 L volume electret ion chamber to determine the radon in water. In this dynamic method, water flows directly through the electret ion chamber. Radon is released to the air and measured with the electret. A flow of air is maintained through the chamber to prevent the build-up of high radon concentrations and too rapid discharge of the electret. It was found that the system worked well when the air flow was induced by the application of suction. The concentration in the water was calculated from the measured concentration in air and water and air flow rates. Preliminary results suggest that the method has sufficient sensitivity to measure concentrations of radon in water with acceptable accuracy and precision.

  7. New reaction chamber for transient field g-factor measurements with radioactive ion beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Illana, A.; Perea, A.; Nácher, E.; Orlandi, R.; Jungclaus, A.

    2015-06-01

    A new reaction chamber has been designed and constructed to measure g-factors of short-lived excited states using the Transient Field technique in combination with Coulomb excitation in inverse kinematics. In this paper we will discuss several important aspects which have to be considered in order to successfully carry out this type of measurement with radioactive ion beams, instead of the stable beams used in a wide range of experiments in the past. The technical solutions to the problems arising from the use of such radioactive beams will be exposed in detail and the first successful experiment using the new chamber in combination with MINIBALL cluster detectors at REX-ISOLDE (CERN) will be reported on.

  8. A Time Projection Chamber for High Accuracy and Precision Fission Cross-Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hill; K. Jewell; M. Heffner; D. Carter; M. Cunningham; V. Riot; J. Ruz; S. Sangiorgio; B. Seilhan; L. Snyder; D. M. Asner; S. Stave; G. Tatishvili; L. Wood; R. G. Baker; J. L. Klay; R. Kudo; S. Barrett; J. King; M. Leonard; W. Loveland; L. Yao; C. Brune; S. Grimes; N. Kornilov; T. N. Massey; J. Bundgaard; D. L. Duke; U. Greife; U. Hager; E. Burgett; J. Deaven; V. Kleinrath; C. McGrath; B. Wendt; N. Hertel; D. Isenhower; N. Pickle; H. Qu; S. Sharma; R. T. Thornton; D. Tovwell; R. S. Towell; S.

    2014-09-01

    The fission Time Projection Chamber (fissionTPC) is a compact (15 cm diameter) two-chamber MICROMEGAS TPC designed to make precision cross-section measurements of neutron-induced fission. The actinide targets are placed on the central cathode and irradiated with a neutron beam that passes axially through the TPC inducing fission in the target. The 4p acceptance for fission fragments and complete charged particle track reconstruction are powerful features of the fissionTPC which will be used to measure fission cross-sections and examine the associated systematic errors. This paper provides a detailed description of the design requirements, the design solutions, and the initial performance of the fissionTPC.

  9. Towards a consistent approach of measuring and modelling CO2 exchange with manual chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huth, Vytas; Vaidya, Shrijana; Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Günther, Anke; Gundlach, Laura; Hagemann, Ulrike; Elsgaard, Lars; Augustin, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Determining ecosystem CO2 exchange with the manual closed chamber method has been applied in the past for e.g. plant, soil or treatment on a wide range of terrestrial ecosystems. Its major limitation is the discontinuous data acquisation challenging any gap-filling procedures. In addition, both data acquisition and gap-filling of closed chamber data have been carried out in different ways in the past. The reliability and comparability of the derived results from different closed chamber studies has therefore remained unclear. Hence, this study compares two different approaches of obtaining fluxes of gross primary production (GPP) either via sunrise to noon or via gradually-shaded mid-day measurements of transparent chamber fluxes (i.e. net ecosystem exchange, NEE) and opaque chamber fluxes (i.e., ecosystem respiration, RECO) on a field experiment plot in NE Germany cropped with a lucerne-clover-grass mix. Additionally, we compare three approaches of pooling RECO data for consecutive modelling of annual balances of NEE, i.e. campaign-wise (single measurement day RECO models), seasonal-wise (one RECO model for the entire study period), and cluster-wise (two RECO models representing low-/high-vegetation-stage data) modelling. The annual NEE balances of the sunrise to noon measurements are insensitive towards differing RECO modelling approaches (-101 to -131 g C m‑2), whereas the choice of modelling annual NEE balances with the shaded mid-day measurements must be taken carefully (-200 to 425 g C m‑2). In addition, the campaign-wise RECO modelling approach is very sensitive to daily data pooling (sunrise vs. mid-day) and only advisable when the diurnal variability of CO2 fluxes and environmental parameters (i.e. photosynthetically active radiation, temperature) is sufficiently covered. The seasonal- and cluster-wise approaches lead to robust NEE balances with only little variation in terms of daily data collection. We therefore recommend sunrise to noon measurements

  10. Measurements of a 1/4-scale model of a 60-kg explosives firing chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Pastrnak, J.W.; Baker, C.F.; Simmons, L.F.

    1995-01-27

    In anticipation of increasingly stringent environmental regulations, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) proposes to construct a 60-kg firing chamber to provide blast-effects containment for, most of its open-air, high-explosive, firing operations. Even though these operations are within current environmental limits, containment of the blast effects and hazardous debris will further drastically reduce emissions to the environment and minimize the generated hazardous waste. The major design consideration of such a chamber is its overall structural dynamic response in terms of long-term containment of all blast effects from repeated internal detonations of high explosives. Another concern is how much other portions of the facility must be hardened to ensure personnel protection in the event of an accidental detonation. To assess these concerns, a 1/4-scale replica model of the planned contained firing chamber was designed, constructed, and tested with scaled explosive charges ranging from 25 to 125% of the operational explosives limit of 60 kg. From 16 detonations of high explosives, 880 resulting strains, blast pressures, and temperatures within the model were measured. Factors of safety for dynamic yield of the firing chamber structure were calculated and compared to the design criterion of totally elastic response. The rectangular, reinforced-concrete chamber model exhibited a lightly damped vibrational response that placed the structure in alternating cycles of tension and compression. During compression, both the reinforcing steel and the concrete remained elastic. During tension, the reinforcing steel remained elastic, but the concrete elastic limit was exceeded in two areas, the center spans of the ceiling and the north wall, where elastic safety factors as low as 0.66 were obtained, thus indicating that the concrete would be expected to crack in those areas. Indeed, visual post-test inspection of those areas revealed tight cracks in the concrete.

  11. Total diesel exhaust particulate length measurements using a modified household smoke alarm ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Vojtisek-Lom, Michal

    2011-02-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of various means to combat the negative health effects of ultrafine particles emitted by internal combustion engines, a reliable, low-cost instrument for dynamic measurements of the exhaust emissions of ultrafine particulate matter (PM) is needed. In this study, an ordinary ionization-type building smoke detector was modified to serve as a measuring ionization chamber and utilized for dynamic measurements of PM emissions from diesel engines. When used with diluted exhaust, the readings show an excellent correlation with total particulate length. The instrument worked well with raw and diluted exhaust and with varying emission levels and is well suitable for on-board use. PMID:21387930

  12. Technique for measuring air flow and carbon dioxide flux in large, open-top chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Ham, J.M.; Owensby, C.E.; Coyne, P.I.

    1993-10-01

    Open-Top Chambers (OTCs) are commonly used to evaluate the effect of CO{sub 2},O{sub 3}, and other trace gases on vegetation. This study developed and tested a new technique for measuring forced air flow and net CO{sub 2} flux from OTCs. Experiments were performed with a 4.5-m diam. OTC with a sealed floor and a specialized air delivery system. Air flow through the chamber was computed with the Bernoulli equation using measurements of the pressure differential between the air delivery ducts and the chamber interior. An independent measurement of air flow was made simultaneously to calibrate and verify the accuracy of the Bernoulli relationship. The CO{sub 2} flux density was calculated as the product of chamber air flow and the difference in CO{sub 2} concentration between the air entering and exhausting from the OTC (C{sub in}-C{sub out}). Accuracy was evaluated by releasing CO{sub 2} within the OTC at known rates. Data were collected with OTCs at ambient and elevated CO{sub 2} ({approx}700 {mu}mol{sup -1}). Results showed the Bernoulli equation, with a flow coefficient of 0.7, accurately measured air flow in the OTC within {+-}5% regardless of flow rate and air duct geometry. Experiments in ambient OTCs showed CO{sub 2} flux density ({mu}mol m{sup -2} s{sup -1}), computed from 2-min averages of air flow and C{sub in} - C{sub out,} was typically within {+-} 10% of actual flux, provided that the exit air velocity at the top of the OTC was greater than 0.6 m s{sup -1}. Obtaining the same accuracy in CO{sub 2}-enriched OTCs required a critical exit velocity near 1.2 m s{sup -1} to minimize the incursion of ambient air and prevent contamination of exit gas sample. When flux data were integrated over time to estimate daily CO{sub 2} flux ({mu}mol m{sup -2} d{sup -1}), actual and measured values agreed to within {+-}2% for both ambient and CO{sub 2}-enriched chambers, suggesting that accurate measurements of daily net C exchange are possible with this technique.

  13. Skin dose measurements using radiochromic films, TLDS and ionisation chamber and comparison with Monte Carlo simulation.

    PubMed

    Alashrah, Saleh; Kandaiya, Sivamany; Maalej, Nabil; El-Taher, A

    2014-12-01

    Estimation of the surface dose is very important for patients undergoing radiation therapy. The purpose of this study is to investigate the dose at the surface of a water phantom at a depth of 0.007 cm as recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurement with radiochromic films (RFs), thermoluminescent dosemeters and an ionisation chamber in a 6-MV photon beam. The results were compared with the theoretical calculation using Monte Carlo (MC) simulation software (MCNP5, BEAMnrc and DOSXYZnrc). The RF was calibrated by placing the films at a depth of maximum dose (d(max)) in a solid water phantom and exposing it to doses from 0 to 500 cGy. The films were scanned using a transmission high-resolution HP scanner. The optical density of the film was obtained from the red component of the RGB images using ImageJ software. The per cent surface dose (PSD) and percentage depth dose (PDD) curve were obtained by placing film pieces at the surface and at different depths in the solid water phantom. TLDs were placed at a depth of 10 cm in a solid water phantom for calibration. Then the TLDs were placed at different depths in the water phantom and were exposed to obtain the PDD. The obtained PSD and PDD values were compared with those obtained using a cylindrical ionisation chamber. The PSD was also determined using Monte Carlo simulation of a LINAC 6-MV photon beam. The extrapolation method was used to determine the PSD for all measurements. The PSD was 15.0±3.6% for RF. The TLD measurement of the PSD was 16.0±5.0%. The (0.6 cm(3)) cylindrical ionisation chamber measurement of the PSD was 50.0±3.0%. The theoretical calculation using MCNP5 and DOSXYZnrc yielded a PSD of 15.0±2.0% and 15.7±2.2%. In this study, good agreement between PSD measurements was observed using RF and TLDs with the Monte Carlo calculation. However, the cylindrical chamber measurement yielded an overestimate of the PSD

  14. N2O fluxes measurements over a maize crop combining chamber and micrometeorological systems during the NitroCosmes Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brut, Aurore; Tallec, Tiphaine; Le Dantec, Valerie; Joly, Lilian; Legain, Dominique; Dumelie, Nicolas; Barrie, Joel; Ceschia, Eric; Cousin, Julien; Decarpenterie, Thomas; Ferroni, Nicole; Mordelet, Patrick; Serca, Dominique; Thomas, Xavier; Mary, Bruno; Noual, Raphael; Marciel, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    Agriculture is responsible for 13.5% of the greenhouse gases emissions at the global scale. It is a potent emitter of nitrous oxide (N2O) through nitrogen supplies into the soil by fertilizers, manure and other soil-enriching agents. However, the magnitude of these emissions is still highly uncertain due to their high spatial and temporal variability [1]. So, N2O flux monitoring is essential to detect seasonal peaks in production and to better quantify these emissions from local to global scale. From May to September 2012, the NitroCosmes campaign involving CESBIO, GSMA, CNRM-GAME and Laboratoire d'Aérologie was held in southwestern France, at Lamasquère, an ICOS-level1 experimental site [2]. A full set-up including manual and automatic soil chambers, an Eddy Correlation (EC) tower (named Ecoflux), and a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system was deployed to measure N2O fluxes above a maize field. The EC Ecoflux Station [3] and the REA system were both relying on an innovative and accurate Quantum Cascade Laser sensor (QCL), developed at GSMA. The results for EC measurements are encouraging since they show good agreement with the different chamber measurements. Moreover, peaks of emissions were observed after rain events or addition of fertilizer. References should be listed as below [1] R.L. Desjardins et al., 2010, Agr. and Forest Met., 150, 817-824. [2] Béziat et al., 2009, Agr. and Forest Met., Volume 149, Issue 10, 1628-1645. [3] Mappe et al., 2013, Review of scientific Instruments, 84, DOI:10.1063/1.4790376.

  15. Ion chamber absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at ADCLs: Distribution analysis and stability

    SciTech Connect

    Muir, B. R.

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: To analyze absorbed dose calibration coefficients, N{sub D,w}, measured at accredited dosimetry calibration laboratories (ADCLs) for client ionization chambers to study (i) variability among N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type calibrated at each ADCL to investigate ion chamber volume fluctuations and chamber manufacturing tolerances; (ii) equivalency of ion chamber calibration coefficients measured at different ADCLs by intercomparing N{sub D,w} coefficients for chambers of the same type; and (iii) the long-term stability of N{sub D,w} coefficients for different chamber types by investigating repeated chamber calibrations. Methods: Large samples of N{sub D,w} coefficients for several chamber types measured over the time period between 1998 and 2014 were obtained from the three ADCLs operating in the United States. These are analyzed using various graphical and numerical statistical tests for the four chamber types with the largest samples of calibration coefficients to investigate (i) and (ii) above. Ratios of calibration coefficients for the same chamber, typically obtained two years apart, are calculated to investigate (iii) above and chambers with standard deviations of old/new ratios less than 0.3% meet stability requirements for accurate reference dosimetry recommended in dosimetry protocols. Results: It is found that N{sub D,w} coefficients for a given chamber type compared among different ADCLs may arise from differing probability distributions potentially due to slight differences in calibration procedures and/or the transfer of the primary standard. However, average N{sub D,w} coefficients from different ADCLs for given chamber types are very close with percent differences generally less than 0.2% for Farmer-type chambers and are well within reported uncertainties. Conclusions: The close agreement among calibrations performed at different ADCLs reaffirms the Calibration Laboratory Accreditation Subcommittee process of ensuring

  16. Development of a new ionisation chamber, for HP(10) measurement, using Monte-Carlo simulation and experimental methods.

    PubMed

    Silva, H; Cardoso, J; Oliveira, C

    2011-03-01

    An ionisation chamber that directly measures the quantity personal dose equivalent, H(p)(10), is used as a secondary standard in some metrology laboratories. An ionisation chamber of this type was first developed by Ankerhold. Using the Monte-Carlo simulation, the dose in the sensitive volume as a function of the IC dimensions and the effects of the several components of the ionising chamber have been investigated. Based on these results, a new ionising chamber, lighter than the previous ones, is constructed and experimentally tested. PMID:21208934

  17. Measuring diurnal cycles of plant transpiration fluxes in the Arctic with an automated clear chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, L. R.; Raz Yaseef, N.; Curtis, J. B.; Rahn, T. A.; Young, J. M.; Newman, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    Evapotranspiration is an important greenhouse gas and a major component of the hydrological cycle, but methodological challenges still limit our knowledge of this flux. Measuring evapotranspiration is even more difficult when aiming to partition plant transpiration and soil evaporation. Information on this process for arctic systems is very limited. In order to decrease this gap, our objective was to directly measure plant transpiration in Barrow, Alaska (71.3°N 156.7°W). A commercial system allows measuring carbon soil respiration fluxes with an automated clear chamber connected to an infrared gas-analyzer (Licor 8100), and while it simultaneously measures water concentrations, it is not calibrated to measure vapor fluxes. We calibrated the clear chamber against a previously established method based on a Licor 6400 soil chamber, and we developed a code to calculate fluxes. We performed laboratory comparisons in New Mexico and field comparisons in the Arctic, suggesting that this is a valid tool for a large range of climates. In the field we found a strong correlation between the two instruments with R2 of 0.79. Even with 24 hours of daylight in the Arctic, the system captures a clear diurnal transpiration flux, peaking at 0.9 mmol m-2 s-1 and showing no flux at the lowest points. This new method should be a powerful approach for long term measurements of specific vegetation types or surface features. Such Data can also be used to help understand controls on larger scale eddy covariance tower measurements of evapotranspiration.

  18. Morphological measurements of anatomic landmarks in pulp chambers of human anterior teeth.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myong M; Rasimick, Brian J; Turner, Aura M; Shah, Rinal P; Musikant, Barry Lee; Deutsch, Allan S

    2007-02-01

    This in vitro study measured key morphological features of pulp chambers in anterior teeth and tested the hypothesis that the distance from the lingual surface (midpoint from the cusp tip to the lingual CEJ) to the pulp chamber (the midpoint from the buccal to the lingual CEJ) was similar for different tooth types. Extracted human teeth were sorted and 100 samples of each of the following tooth types were chosen: maxillary central incisor (UCI), lateral incisor (ULI), and canine (UC), as well as mandibular central incisor (LCI), lateral incisor (LLI), and canine (LC). All teeth were digitally radiographed on a 1-mm X-ray grid. The mean values of measurement C, the distance from the lingual surface to the pulp chamber, varied significantly between tooth types (p<0.001). The mean values and SNK rankings were as follows: LC (5.9+/-0.5 mm)>UC (5.5+/-0.5)=UCI (5.4+/-0.4)>ULI (5.0+/-0.4)>LLI (4.8+/-0.5)>LCI (4.4+/-0.4). PMID:17258629

  19. Cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics: Analysis of the measurements at the Diamond Light Source and impedance bench measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutta, R.; Gerstl, S.; Casalbuoni, S.; Grau, A. W.; Holubek, T.; Saez de Jauregui, D.; Bartolini, R.; Cox, M. P.; Longhi, E. C.; Rehm, G.; Schouten, J. C.; Walker, R. P.; Migliorati, M.; Spataro, B.

    2016-05-01

    The beam heat load is an important input parameter needed for the cryogenic design of superconducting insertion devices. Theoretical models taking into account the different heating mechanisms of an electron beam to a cold bore predict smaller values than the ones measured with several superconducting insertion devices installed in different electron storage rings. In order to measure and possibly understand the beam heat load to a cold bore, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics (COLDDIAG) has been built. COLDDIAG is equipped with temperature sensors, pressure gauges, mass spectrometers as well as retarding field analyzers which allow to measure the beam heat load, total pressure, and gas content as well as the flux of particles hitting the chamber walls. COLDDIAG was installed in a straight section of the Diamond Light Source (DLS). In a previous paper the experimental equipment as well as the installation of COLDDIAG in the DLS are described [S. Gerstl et al., Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 17, 103201 (2014)]. In this paper we present an overview of all the measurements performed with COLDDIAG at the DLS and their detailed analysis, as well as impedance bench measurements of the cold beam vacuum chamber performed at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology after removal from the DLS. Relevant conclusions for the cryogenic design of superconducting insertion devices are drawn from the obtained results.

  20. High-Accuracy Measurements of the Centre of Gravity of Avalanches in Proportional Chambers

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Charpak, G.; Jeavons, A.; Sauli, F.; Stubbs, R.

    1973-09-24

    In a multiwire proportional chamber the avalanches occur close to the anode wires. The motion of the positive ions in the large electric fields at the vicinity of the wires induces fast-rising positive pulses on the surrounding electrodes. Different methods have been developed in order to determine the position of the centre of the avalanches. In the method we describe, the centre of gravity of the pulse distribution is measured directly. It seems to lead to an accuracy which is limited only by the stability of the spatial distribution of the avalanches generated by the process being measured.

  1. Mode-stirred chamber measurements of the Shielding Effectiveness of select cables and connectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toth, R.P.; Bacon, L.D.

    1990-06-01

    We have determined experimentally the Shielding Effectiveness (SE) at microwave frequencies of various types of single- and double-braided cables and connectors typical of systems that have been hardened to electromagnetic fields. This report describes a laboratory-sized reverberation chamber and the techniques used to measure the SE of several interconnecting components. Graphical results are presented in the report, along with smoothed overlay plots for each category of measurements. The overlay plots indicate the general trends in the raw data and highlight the differences between tested components. 7 refs., 22 figs.

  2. Geyser's magma chamber, California: constraints from gravity data, density measurements, and well information

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakely, Richard J.; Stanley, W.D.

    1993-01-01

    A new crustal model based on isostatic residual gravity, geologic mapping, well information, and density measurements shows that the high-gradient parts of the residual gravity anomaly can be explained in terms of lithologic variations within the upper 7 km of the crust, consistent with the upper-crustal framework of the area. This conclusion does not rule out the presence of a magma chamber at lower crustal depths; the broad aspects of the gravity anomaly support the presence of low-density partial melting at 15 to 20 km depth, consistent with magnetotelluric soundings and other geophysical measurements.

  3. Direct measurement of the impulse in a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket

    SciTech Connect

    Maeno, Akihiro; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Johzaki, Tomoyuki; Mori, Yoshitaka; Sunahara, Atsushi

    2011-08-15

    An experiment is conducted to measure an impulse for demonstrating a magnetic thrust chamber system for laser fusion rocket. The impulse is produced by the interaction between plasma and magnetic field. In the experiment, the system consists of plasma and neodymium permanent magnets. The plasma is created by a single-beam laser aiming at a polystyrene spherical target. The impulse is 1.5 to 2.2 {mu}Ns by means of a pendulum thrust stand, when the laser energy is 0.7 J. Without magnetic field, the measured impulse is found to be zero. These results indicate that the system for generating impulse is working.

  4. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. II. Microdosimetric measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    A low-pressure cloud chamber has been adapted to operate with pure water vapor. Photographs were obtained of tracks arising from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Distributions of lineal energy, radial distances around an ion track, and interdroplet distances were measured and compared with the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. After allowing for diffusion and the limitations of the geometry of the system, the measured and calculated distributions were found to be in good agreement. PMID:8278576

  5. Design of a dual chamber heat conduction calorimeter for ultrasonic beam measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ong, Hang See

    1997-12-01

    The recent emergence of medical ultrasound dosimetry in terms of Thermal and Mechanical Indices gives rise to the need for a device that is capable of measuring ultrasonic output power quickly and accurately. In the research project described in this dissertation, a dual chamber heat conduction calorimeter (HCC) is designed, built, and tested for the purpose of measuring ultrasonic output power of clinical diagnostic ultrasound devices. The HCC is composed of two identical water filled Aluminum wells housed in two separated compartments of an insulated box. The two compartments form the measuring and reference chambers of the calorimeter. The wells are sealed with plastic membranes that constitute the entrance window for the ultrasound. The bottom of each well is stuffed with a 4cm layer of 0.5cm thick rubber pads. These pads serve as a sonic-to-heat energy exchanger. A small resistive heater is embedded in both rubber pads for calibration purposes. Heat is measured with a series of Seebeck effect thermoelectric devices (thermopiles) sandwiched between the well and the heat sink surrounding the wells. The output voltage signal from the thermopiles is amplified, digitized, then analyzed and displayed in term of Thermal Index with a PC-based system. An optimum measurement technique is derived from an electric circuit model that is representative of the HCC. The performance and sensitivity of the HCC is tested and measured, initially with the embedded resistive heaters, then with an experimental transducer, and lastly with transducers from clinical ultrasound scanners.

  6. Measurement of Ultra Low OutGassing Rates for NLC UHV Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Leif S.

    2002-08-12

    Ultra low outgassing rates would be highly advantageous in accelerators and storage rings, such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC), where an outgassing rate of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec/cm{sup 2} could eliminate the need for costly distributed pumping. Measuring such low outgassing rates at room temperature has many difficulties. However, by inspection of Fick's law, it can be seen that thermal desorption is proportional to outgassing rate. It is commonly observed that the outgas rate doubles approximately every 15 C for temperatures under 100 C. By measuring outgassing rate versus temperature and time and extrapolating back to room temperature we can measure outgassing rates that would otherwise be difficult to make. To produce a reliable measurement also requires the total surface area under study to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the area of the measurement chamber walls. To accomplish this, 27 plates of 5083 aluminum were placed in the measurement chamber. This technique will be the basis for future investigation of outgassing rates of other sample plates fabricated with different machining and cleaning techniques.

  7. Measurement of Ultra Low Outgassing Rates for NLC UHV Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K; Shen, S; Behne, D; Corlett, J N; Atkinson, D; Kennedy, K; Miller, T; Eriksson, L; Ross, M

    2001-06-12

    Ultra low outgassing rates would be highly advantageous in accelerators and storage rings, such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC), where an outgassing rate of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec/cm{sup 2} could eliminate the need for costly distributed pumping. Measuring such low outgassing rates at room temperature has many difficulties. However, by inspection of Fick's law, it can be seen that thermal desorption is proportional to outgassing rate. It is commonly observed that the outgas rate doubles approximately every 15 C for temperatures under 100 C. By measuring outgassing rate versus temperature and time and extrapolating back to room temperature we can measure outgassing rates that would otherwise be difficult to make. To produce a reliable measurement also requires the total surface area under study to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the area of the measurement chamber walls. To accomplish this, 27 plates of 5083 aluminum were placed in the measurement chamber. This technique will be the basis for future investigation of outgassing rates of other sample plates fabricated with different machining and cleaning techniques.

  8. Rapid and accurate broadband absorption cross-section measurement of human bodies in a reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flintoft, Ian D.; Melia, Gregory C. R.; Robinson, Martin P.; Dawson, John F.; Marvin, Andy C.

    2015-06-01

    A measurement methodology for polarization and angle of incidence averaged electromagnetic absorption cross-section using a reverberation chamber is presented. The method is optimized for simultaneous rapid and accurate determination of average absorption cross-section over the frequency range 1-15 GHz, making it suitable for use in human absorption and exposure studies. The typical measurement time of the subject is about 8 min with a corresponding statistical uncertainty of about 3% in the measured absorption cross-section. The method is validated by comparing measurements on a spherical phantom with Mie series calculations. The efficacy of the method is demonstrated with measurements of the posture dependence of the absorption cross-section of a human subject and an investigation of the effects of clothing on the measured absorption which are important considerations for the practical design of experiments for studies on human subjects.

  9. Absolute Position of Targets Measured Through a Chamber Window Using Lidar Metrology Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubalak, David; Hadjimichael, Theodore; Ohl, Raymond; Slotwinski, Anthony; Telfer, Randal; Hayden, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a useful tool for taking metrology measurements without the need for physical contact with the parts under test. Lidar instruments are aimed at a target using azimuth and elevation stages, then focus a beam of coherent, frequency modulated laser energy onto the target, such as the surface of a mechanical structure. Energy from the reflected beam is mixed with an optical reference signal that travels in a fiber path internal to the instrument, and the range to the target is calculated based on the difference in the frequency of the returned and reference signals. In cases when the parts are in extreme environments, additional steps need to be taken to separate the operator and lidar from that environment. A model has been developed that accurately reduces the lidar data to an absolute position and accounts for the three media in the testbed air, fused silica, and vacuum but the approach can be adapted for any environment or material. The accuracy of laser metrology measurements depends upon knowing the parameters of the media through which the measurement beam travels. Under normal conditions, this means knowledge of the temperature, pressure, and humidity of the air in the measurement volume. In the past, chamber windows have been used to separate the measuring device from the extreme environment within the chamber and still permit optical measurement, but, so far, only relative changes have been diagnosed. The ability to make accurate measurements through a window presents a challenge as there are a number of factors to consider. In the case of the lidar, the window will increase the time-of-flight of the laser beam causing a ranging error, and refract the direction of the beam causing angular positioning errors. In addition, differences in pressure, temperature, and humidity on each side of the window will cause slight atmospheric index changes and induce deformation and a refractive index gradient within the window. Also, since the window is a

  10. Use of relativistic rise in ionization chambers for measurement of high energy heavy nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barthelmy, S. D.; Israel, M. H.; Klarmann, J.; Vogel, J. S.

    1983-01-01

    A balloon-borne instrument has been constructed to measure the energy spectra of cosmic-ray heavy nuclei in the range of about 0.3 to about 100 GeV/amu. It makes use of the relativistic rise portion of the Bethe-Bloch curve in ionization chambers for energy determination in the 10- to 100-GeV/amu interval. The instrument consists of six layers of dual-gap ionization chambers for energy determination above 10 GeV/amu. Charge is determined with a NE114 scintillator and a Pilot 425 plastic Cerenkov counter. A CO2 gas Cerenkov detector (1 atm; threshold of 30 GeV/amu) calibrates the ion chambers in the relativistic rise region. The main emphasis of the instrument is the determination of the change of the ratio of Iron (26) to the Iron secondaries (21-25) in the energy range of 10 to 100 GeV/amu. Preliminary data from a balloon flight in the fall of 1982 from Palestine, TX is presented.

  11. Morphologic Measurements of Anatomic Landmarks in Pulp Chambers of Human First Molars: A Study of Bitewing Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Khojastepour, Leila; Rahimizadeh, Naser; Khayat, Akbar

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Knowledge of the anatomic location and dimension of the molar pulp chamber may preserve healthy pulp during operative procedure and reduce risk of perforation of chamber during access preparation. A review of literatures regarding the morphology of pulp chamber however revealed very little information; so the aim of this in vivo study was to measure the dimensions of first molar pulp chambers as seen on bitewing (BW) radiographs. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this cross-sectional study molar's BW radiographs of 130 subjects in two age groups were taken under standardized conditions (group of 18-25 years old subjects and group of 50-65 years old subjects). The films were digitized and nine anatomical landmarks were evaluated from the image of each first molar as follow: A; mesial to distal pulp horn distance, B; mesial to distal walls at the middle of pulp chamber, C; mesial to distal orifices, D; mesial cusp tip to its horn, E; distal cusp tip to its horn, F; pulp chamber height, G; pulp chamber floor to furcation, H; pulp chamber ceiling to furcation, I; cusp tips to furcation. The data were evaluated by using AUTOCAD (2007) software with 0.00 precision. Two way ANOVA test (Uni-variant analysis) were used to determine the interaction between restoration and age on pulp chamber dimensions. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in pulp chamber dimensions between the genders. Although there was significant reduction in the size of pulp chamber with advancing age, no significant differences were found in the restored and non restored teeth. CONCLUSION: The finding of this study showed size reduction and changes of pulp chamber with age so may enhance knowledge to minimize errors during endodontics treatments. PMID:24265638

  12. Liquid ionization chamber measurements of dose distributions in small 6 MV photon beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasu, Alexandru; Löfroth, Per-Olov; Wickman, Göran

    1998-01-01

    A new liquid ionization chamber (LIC) design optimized for high spatial resolution was used for measurements of dose distributions in radiation fields intended for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). This work was mainly focused on the properties of this detector in radiation fields from linear accelerators for clinical radiotherapy (pulsed radiation with dose rates from approximately 0.5 to and beam diameters down to 8 mm). The narrow beams used in stereotactic radiosurgery require detectors with small sizes in order to provide a good spatial resolution. The LIC is investigated to see whether it can be used as a detector for dose measurements in beams currently used for stereotactic radiosurgery. Its properties are compared with those of silicon diodes. The comparisons include output factor (OF), depth dose and profile measurements in 6 MV photon fields of different sizes. For OF measurements, an NACP air ionization chamber was also used in the comparison. The dependence of the response on the detector orientation in the photon beam is also investigated for the diodes and the LIC. The results suggest that LICs can provide better properties than diodes for measuring dose distributions in narrow photon beams.

  13. Comparison of CO2 fluxes from eddy covariance and soil chambers measurements in a vineyard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vendrame, Nadia; Tezza, Luca; Meggio, Franco; Pitacco, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    In order to study the processes involved in the carbon balance of a vineyard, we set up a long-term monitoring station of CO2, water vapour and energyfluxes. The experimental site is located in an extensive flat vineyard in the north-east of Italy. We measure the net ecosystem exchange with the eddy covariance (EC) technique using a Campbell Scientific closed-path IRGA and sonic anemometer, and the soil CO2 flux using a Li-Cor multiplexed system connected with six automatic dynamic chambers. Ancillary meteorological and soil variables are also measured. The vineyard is planted with north-south oriented rows spaced 2.2 m apart. Floor is grass covered, and a strip 0.6 m wide on the rows is chemically treated. To represent the different soil conditions existing in the EC footprint and to study the components of the CO2 soil flux, we placed dark soil chambers both on the vineyard rows and in the inter-row space. A well-known limit of the EC technique is the underestimation of fluxes during calm wind periods, mainly occurring at night. In the autumn/winter vine dormancy period, the EC and soil chambers CO2 fluxes should be similar. We compared the CO2 fluxes measured using the two methods to evaluate the reliability of EC measurements at different atmospheric turbulent mixing conditions and stability. The EC technique underestimates the ecosystem respiration during night time periods with friction velocity lower than 0.1 m/s. The present comparison could enable the assessment of a friction velocity threshold, representing the limit above which the EC fluxes can be considered representative of the vegetation-atmosphere exchanges at our specific site.

  14. Alignment Measurements of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Instrument in a Thermal/Vacuum Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael D.; Herrera, Acey A.; Crane, J. Allen; Packard, Edward A.; Aviado, Carlos; Sampler, Henry P.

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a fall 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (approximately 0.2 degree) map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back Gregorian telescopes to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers, via 20 feed horns. Proper alignment of the telescope reflectors and the feed horns at the operating temperature of 90 K is a critical element to ensure mission success. We describe the hardware and methods used to validate the displacement/deformation predictions of the reflectors and the microwave feed horns during thermal/vacuum testing of the reflectors and the microwave instrument. The smallest deformation predictions to be measured were on the order of +/- 0.030 inches (+/- 0.762 mm). Performance of these alignment measurements inside a thermal/vacuum chamber with conventional alignment equipment posed several limitations. The most troublesome limitation was the inability to send personnel into the chamber to perform the measurements during the test due to vacuum and the temperature extremes. The photogrammetry (PG) system was chosen to perform the measurements since it is a non- contact measurement system, the measurements can be made relatively quickly and accurately, and the photogrammetric camera can be operated remotely. The hardware and methods developed to perform the MAP alignment measurements using PG proved to be highly successful. The measurements met the desired requirements, for the metal structures enabling the desired distortions to be measured resolving deformations an order of magnitude smaller than the imposed requirements. Viable data were provided to the MAP Project for a full analysis of the on-orbit performance of the Instrument's microwave system.

  15. IONIZATION CHAMBER

    DOEpatents

    Redman, W.C.; Shonka, F.R.

    1958-02-18

    This patent describes a novel ionization chamber which is well suited to measuring the radioactivity of the various portions of a wire as the wire is moved at a uniform speed, in order to produce the neutron flux traverse pattern of a reactor in which the wire was previously exposed to neutron radiation. The ionization chamber of the present invention is characterized by the construction wherein the wire is passed through a tubular, straight electrode and radiation shielding material is disposed along the wire except at an intermediate, narrow area where the second electrode of the chamber is located.

  16. Demonstration of the two-chamber approach for high-voltage measurements using collinear laser spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Will, Elisa; Ullmann, Johannes; Frömmgen, Nadja; Geppert, Christopher; Gorges, Christian; Hammen, Michael; Kaufmann, Simon; Krieger, Andreas; Nörtershäuser, Wilfried

    2014-06-01

    An electronic measurement of high-voltages of several ten kV with accuracy as required for precision experiments is currently only feasible using highly sophisticated voltage dividers. Collinear laser spectroscopy can provide a direct and precise measurement of high-voltages using the Doppler shift of accelerated ions. Although proposed already in 1982, a measurement with relative accuracy better than 10-4 was not reported so far. To improve this accuracy, a dedicated new setup for high-voltage measurements will be installed at the Technische Universität Darmstadt. A two-chamber approach will be used to remove uncertainties due to the insufficiently known starting potential inside the ion source. Here we present a demonstration of the pump-and-probe technique performed in preparatory studies at the TRIGA-LASER experiment in Mainz.

  17. Measurements of natural ice nuclei with a continuous flow diffusion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    A description is given of a continuous flow diffusion chamber technique for measuring the atmospheric concentrations of natural C-F nuclei. It is noted that the same device can also measure deposition nuclei; these two modes can thus be separated and compared. The laminar flow characteristics allow the temperature and supersaturation to be calculated with a high degree of precision and confidence. The method avoids the problems of a supporting substrate and of concentrating the sample into a small volume (as for membrane filters). The present measurements of natural ice nucleus concentrations at +1 percent water supersaturation are found to be comparable to research aircraft measurements of ice crystal concentrations in winter cap clouds over Elk Mountain, Wyoming (Vali et al., 1982).

  18. A Lab Assembled Microcontroller-Based Sensor Module for Continuous Oxygen Measurement in Portable Hypoxia Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Mathupala, Saroj P.; Kiousis, Sam; Szerlip, Nicholas J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Hypoxia-based cell culture experiments are routine and essential components of in vitro cancer research. Most laboratories use low-cost portable modular chambers to achieve hypoxic conditions for cell cultures, where the sealed chambers are purged with a gas mixture of preset O2 concentration. Studies are conducted under the assumption that hypoxia remains unaltered throughout the 48 to 72 hour duration of such experiments. Since these chambers lack any sensor or detection system to monitor gas-phase O2, the cell-based data tend to be non-uniform due to the ad hoc nature of the experimental setup. Methodology With the availability of low-cost open-source microcontroller-based electronic project kits, it is now possible for researchers to program these with easy-to-use software, link them to sensors, and place them in basic scientific apparatus to monitor and record experimental parameters. We report here the design and construction of a small-footprint kit for continuous measurement and recording of O2 concentration in modular hypoxia chambers. The low-cost assembly (US$135) consists of an Arduino-based microcontroller, data-logging freeware, and a factory pre-calibrated miniature O2 sensor. A small, intuitive software program was written by the authors to control the data input and output. The basic nature of the kit will enable any student in biology with minimal experience in hobby-electronics to assemble the system and edit the program parameters to suit individual experimental conditions. Results/Conclusions We show the kit’s utility and stability of data output via a series of hypoxia experiments. The studies also demonstrated the critical need to monitor and adjust gas-phase O2 concentration during hypoxia-based experiments to prevent experimental errors or failure due to partial loss of hypoxia. Thus, incorporating the sensor-microcontroller module to a portable hypoxia chamber provides a researcher a capability that was previously available

  19. Direct Measurement of the Bubble Nucleation Energy Threshold in a CF3I Bubble Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Behnke, E.; Benjamin, T.; Brice, S. J.; Broemmelsiek, D.; Collar, J. I.; Cooper, P. S.; Crisler, M.; Dahl, C. E.; Fustin, D.; Hall, Jeter C.; Harnish, C.; Levine, I.; Lippincott, W. H.; Moan, T.; Nania, T.; Neilson, R.; Ramberg, E.; Robinson, A. E.; Ruschman, M.; Sonnenschein, Andrew; Vazquez-Jauregui, E.; RIvera, R. A.; Uplegger, L.

    2013-07-30

    Here, we measured the energy threshold and efficiency for bubble nucleation from iodine recoils in a CF3I bubble chamber in the energy range of interest for a dark matter search. These interactions cannot be probed by standard neutron calibration methods, so we develop a new technique by observing the elastic scattering of 12 GeV/c negative pions. The pions are tracked with a silicon pixel telescope and the reconstructed scattering angle provides a measure of the nuclear recoil kinetic energy. The bubble chamber was operated with a nominal threshold of (13.6±0.6) keV. Interpretation of the results depends on the response to fluorine and carbon recoils, but in general we find agreement with the predictions of the classical bubble-nucleation theory. Moreover, this measurement confirms the applicability of CF3I as a target for spin-independent dark matter interactions and represents a novel technique for calibration of superheated fluid detectors.

  20. OH reactivity measurements from Boreal tree species in a plant chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nölscher, Anke; Custer, Thomas; Sinha, Vinayak; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Kleist, Einhard; Tillmann, Ralf; Wildt, Jürgen; Williams, Jonathan

    2010-05-01

    Boreal forest covers a large area (ca. 15 million km2) comparable in size to the Tropical rain forest (ca. 17 million km2). The vegetation in Boreal regions is typically conifer forest which is known to emit significant amounts of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCS), such as monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes, methanol and acetone. Many of these organic chemicals react rapidly with hydroxyl (OH) radicals to produce aerosols or secondary pollutants such as ozone. The total effect of the emitted species on the OH radical can be determined by measuring the total OH reactivity directly. Therefore a new measurement method was recently devised (Sinha et al., 2008). The Jülich plant atmosphere chamber (JPAC) at the Forschungszentrum-Jülich was used to investigate the overall reactivity of emissions from several Boreal tree species under controlled conditions in October 2009. Vegetation, temperature and light intensities typical of the Hyytiälä measurement station in Finland were used in these experiments and the levels of CO2, humidity and NOx were controlled. In addition to the reactivity measurement, a gas chromatograph (GC), a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTRMS) and a time-of-flight PTRMS (TOF-PTRMS) were used to quantify individual organic chemicals emitted by the plants for comparison with the overall reactivity. Experiments were performed under three different conditions. 1) Lower temperatures (T=20° C) resulted in low plant emissions with no diurnal variation. The total measured OH reactivity ranged from below detection limit (3 sec-1) to 7 sec-1 during the day and overnight rose to 8-13 sec-1. 2) Higher temperatures (T=35° C) produced higher emissions of volatile organic compounds and a clear diurnal trend. Reactivity data matched well with these results rising to 30-50 sec-1 by day and during the night sinking again to 8-13 sec-1. 3) Finally a control experiment was performed without trees in the plant chamber. In this experiment

  1. The calibration of plane parallel ionisation chambers for the measurement of absorbed dose in electron beams of low to medium energies. Part 1: the NACP chamber.

    PubMed

    Cross, P; Freeman, N

    1996-09-01

    A study was made of calibrating the NACP plane parallel chamber in electron beams from linear accelerators of a different manufacture with energies, Ep,o' from 4.4 to 19.1 MeV, and also in 4 and 6 MV photon beams as well as a cobalt60 beam. The photon beam measurements were both IN-AIR and IN-PHANTOM. With the exception of the lowest energy electron beam (nominal 5 MeV), the ND values from measurements in the electron beams were within +/- 1% of the average value from the three different methods according to the AAPM TG 39 protocol. The preferred method of calibration of an electron chamber is of course in an electron beam at R100 in water. This can still be done in medium energy electron beams (nominal 7 to 14 MeV) for the NACP chamber with the same degree of accuracy and precision as with AAPM TG 39 methodology. Alternatively the traditional cobalt-60 calibration beam can be replaced by a low energy (4-6MV) photon beam for in-phantom calibrations at 50 mm depth, giving comparable results, and with no more uncertainties than those obtained in electron beams. PMID:8936730

  2. Continuous measurements of H2 and CO deposition onto soil: a laboratory soil chamber experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, P.; Eiler, J.; Smith, N. V.; Thrift-Viveros, D. L.

    2004-12-01

    Hydrogen uptake in soil is the largest single component of the global budget of atmospheric H2, and is the most important parameter for predicting changes in atmospheric concentration with future changing sources (anthropogenic and otherwise). The rate of hydrogen uptake rate by soil is highly uncertain [1]. As a component of the global budget, it is simply estimated as the difference among estimates for other recognized sources and sinks, assuming the atmosphere is presently in steady state. Previous field chamber experiments [2] show that H2 deposition velocity varies complexly with soil moisture level, and possibly with soil organic content and temperature. We present here results of controlled soil chamber experiments on 3 different soil blocks (each ~20 x ~20 x ~21 cm) with a controlled range of moisture contents. All three soils are arid to semi arid, fine grained, and have organic contents of 10-15%. A positive air pressure (slightly higher than atmospheric pressure) and constant temperature and relative humidity was maintained inside the 10.7 liter, leak-tight plexiglass chamber, and a stream of synthetic air with known H2 concentration was continuously bled into the chamber through a needle valve and mass flow meter. H2, CO and CO2 concentrations were continuously analyzed in the stream of gas exiting the chamber, using a TA 3000 automated Hg-HgO reduced gas analyzer and a LI-820 CO2 gas analyzer. Our experimental protocol involved waiting until concentrations of analyte gases in the exiting gas stream reached a steady state, and documenting how that steady state varied with various soil properties and the rate at which gases were delivered to the chamber. The rate constants for H2 and CO consumption in the chamber were measured at several soil moisture contents. The calculated deposition velocities of H2 and CO into the soil are positively correlated with steady-state concentrations, with slopes and curvatures that vary with soil type and moisture level

  3. Swept source OCT with air puff chamber for corneal dynamics measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Karol; Alonso-Caneiro, David; Kaluzny, Bartlomiej; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Wojtkowski, Maciej

    2012-03-01

    None of currently used tonometers produce estimated IOP values that are free of errors. Measurement incredibility arises from indirect measurement of corneal deformation and the fact that pressure calculations are based on population averaged parameters of anterior segment. Reliable IOP values are crucial for understanding and monitoring of number of eye pathologies e.g. glaucoma. We have combined high speed swept source OCT with air-puff chamber. System provides direct measurement of deformation of cornea and anterior surface of the lens. This paper describes in details the performance of air-puff ssOCT instrument. We present different approaches of data presentation and analysis. Changes in deformation amplitude appears to be good indicator of IOP changes. However, it seems that in order to provide accurate intraocular pressure values an additional information on corneal biomechanics is necessary. We believe that such information could be extracted from data provided by air-puff ssOCT.

  4. Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) for measurements of fusion reactions with radioactive beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carnelli, P. F. F.; Almaraz-Calderon, S.; Rehm, K. E.; Albers, M.; Alcorta, M.; Bertone, P. F.; Digiovine, B.; Esbensen, H.; Fernández Niello, J.; Henderson, D.; Jiang, C. L.; Lai, J.; Marley, S. T.; Nusair, O.; Palchan-Hazan, T.; Pardo, R. C.; Paul, M.; Ugalde, C.

    2015-11-01

    A detection technique for high-efficiency measurements of fusion reactions with low-intensity radioactive beams was developed. The technique is based on a Multi-Sampling Ionization Chamber (MUSIC) operating as an active target and detection system, where the ionization gas acts as both target and counting gas. In this way, we can sample an excitation function in an energy range determined by the gas pressure, without changing the beam energy. The detector provides internal normalization to the incident beam and drastically reduces the measuring time. In a first experiment we tested the performance of the technique by measuring the 10,13,15C+12C fusion reactions at energies around the Coulomb barrier.

  5. Quantifying biases in non-steady state chamber measurements of soil-atmosphere gas exchange

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limitations of non-steady state (NSS) chamber methods for determining soil-to-atmosphere trace gas exchange rates have been recognized for several decades. Of these limitations, the so-called “chamber effect” is one of the most challenging to overcome. The chamber effect can be defined as the inhere...

  6. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-a-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    SciTech Connect

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-05

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  7. Comparative study of ionization chamber detectors vis-à-vis a CCD detector for dispersive XAS measurement in transmission geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poswal, A. K.; Agrawal, A.; Bhattachryya, D.; Jha, S. N.; Sahoo, N. K.

    2013-02-01

    We have designed and fabricated parallel plate ionization chamber detectors and voltage vs. current characteristics (V-I curve) of the detectors were recorded with synchrotron radiation to qualify for use in X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) measurements. After qualifying the ionization chambers, the detectors were used in the dispersive EXAFS beamline (BL-08) at INDUS-2 SRS in Turbo-XAS geometry. Using the same setup and under the same setting, XAS spectra were also recorded with a CCD detector and the observation on relative performance of the ionization chamber vis-a-vis the CCD detector is presented in this paper.

  8. Particle emission angle determination in Frisch grid ionization chambers by electron drift-time measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Göök, A.; Chernykh, M.; Enders, J.; Oberstedt, A.; Oberstedt, S.

    2010-09-01

    The double kinetic energy measurement of fission fragments with a double-sided Frisch grid ionization chamber allows a careful determination of the emission angle, which is essential in order to apply appropriate energy-loss corrections. We present a drift-time method, which uses the time that free electrons need to drift from the location of their creation, e.g. by a fission fragment in the counting gas, to the grid, before inducing a signal on the anode. Such a measurement leaves energy and angular information fully decoupled. We demonstrate the applicability of the drift-time method for the example of the 234,238U (γ,f) reactions performed at the superconducting Darmstadt electron linear accelerator. The angular resolutions achieved with this method are comparable to those obtained with other methods.

  9. Device interchangeability on anterior chamber depth and white-to-white measurements: a thorough literature review

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez-Vicent, Alberto; Pérez-Vives, Cari; Ferrer-Blasco, Teresa; García-Lázaro, Santiago; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2016-01-01

    We have reviewed a set of recently published studies that compared the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and/or white-to-white (WTW) distance obtained by means of different measuring devices. Since some of those studies reached contradictory conclusions regarding device interchangeability, this review was carried out in attempting to clarify which clinical devices can or cannot be considered as interchangeable in clinical practice to measure ACD and/or WTW distance, among these devices: A-scan, ultrasound biomicroscopy, Orbscan and Orbscan II (Bausch&Lomb Surgical Inc., San Dimas, California, USA), Pentacam and Pentacam HR (Oculus, Wetzlar, Germany), Galilei (Ziemer, Switzerland), Visante optical coherence tomography (Visante OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec Inc., Dublin, California, USA), IOLMaster (Carl Zeiss Meditec, Jena, Germany), and Lenstar LS 900/Biograph (Haag-Streit AG, Koeniz, Switzerland/Alcon Laboratories Inc., Ft Worth, Texas, USA). PMID:27500117

  10. New technique of the local heat flux measurement in combustion chambers of steam boilers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taler, Jan; Taler, Dawid; Sobota, Tomasz; Dzierwa, Piotr

    2011-12-01

    A new method for measurement of local heat flux to water-walls of steam boilers was developed. A flux meter tube was made from an eccentric tube of short length to which two longitudinal fins were attached. These two fins prevent the boiler setting from heating by a thermal radiation from the combustion chamber. The fins are not welded to the adjacent water-wall tubes, so that the temperature distribution in the heat flux meter is not influenced by neighbouring water-wall tubes. The thickness of the heat flux tube wall is larger on the fireside to obtain a greater distance between the thermocouples located inside the wall which increases the accuracy of heat flux determination. Based on the temperature measurements at selected points inside the heat flux meter, the heat flux absorbed by the water-wall, heat transfer coefficient on the inner tube surface and temperature of the water-steam mixture was determined.

  11. Kurtosis of room impulse responses as a diffuseness measure for reverberation chambers.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Cheol-Ho

    2016-05-01

    This study presents a kurtosis analysis of room impulse responses as a potential room diffuseness measure. The early part of an impulse response contains a direct sound and strong reflections. As these reflections are sparse and strong, the sound field is unlikely to be diffuse. Such deterministic reflections are extreme events, which prevent the pressure samples from being distributed Gaussianly, leading to a high kurtosis. This indicates that the kurtosis can be used as a diffuseness measure. Two rooms are analyzed. A non-uniform surface absorption distribution tends to increase the kurtosis significantly in a small room. A full scale reverberation chamber is tested with different diffuser settings, which shows that the kurtosis calculated from broadband impulse responses from 125 Hz to 4 kHz has a good correlation with the Sabine absorption coefficient according to ISO 354 (International Organization for Standardization, Geneva, Switzerland, 2003). PMID:27250175

  12. Clinical use of diodes and micro-chambers to obtain accurate small field output factor measurements.

    PubMed

    Kairn, T; Charles, P H; Cranmer-Sargison, G; Crowe, S B; Langton, C M; Thwaites, D I; Trapp, J V

    2015-06-01

    There have been substantial advances in small field dosimetry techniques and technologies, over the last decade, which have dramatically improved the achievable accuracy of small field dose measurements. This educational note aims to help radiation oncology medical physicists to apply some of these advances in clinical practice. The evaluation of a set of small field output factors (total scatter factors) is used to exemplify a detailed measurement and simulation procedure and as a basis for discussing the possible effects of simplifying that procedure. Field output factors were measured with an unshielded diode and a micro-ionisation chamber, at the centre of a set of square fields defined by a micro-multileaf collimator. Nominal field sizes investigated ranged from 6 × 6 to 98 × 98 mm(2). Diode measurements in fields smaller than 30 mm across were corrected using response factors calculated using Monte Carlo simulations of the diode geometry and daisy-chained to match micro-chamber measurements at intermediate field sizes. Diode measurements in fields smaller than 15 mm across were repeated twelve times over three separate measurement sessions, to evaluate the reproducibility of the radiation field size and its correspondence with the nominal field size. The five readings that contributed to each measurement on each day varied by up to 0.26  %, for the "very small" fields smaller than 15 mm, and 0.18 % for the fields larger than 15 mm. The diode response factors calculated for the unshielded diode agreed with previously published results, within uncertainties. The measured dimensions of the very small fields differed by up to 0.3 mm, across the different measurement sessions, contributing an uncertainty of up to 1.2 % to the very small field output factors. The overall uncertainties in the field output factors were 1.8 % for the very small fields and 1.1 % for the fields larger than 15 mm across. Recommended steps for acquiring small field output

  13. Measuring and predicting the emission rate of phthalate plasticizer from vinyl flooring in a specially-designed chamber.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ying; Liu, Zhe; Park, Jinsoo; Clausen, Per A; Benning, Jennifer L; Little, John C

    2012-11-20

    The emission of di-2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP) from vinyl flooring (VF) was measured in specially designed stainless steel chambers. In duplicate chamber studies, the gas-phase concentration in the chamber increased slowly and reached a steady state level of 0.8-0.9 μg/m(3) after about 20 days. By increasing the area of vinyl flooring and decreasing that of the stainless steel surface within the chamber, the time to reach steady state was significantly reduced, compared to a previous study (1 month versus 5 months). The adsorption isotherm of DEHP on the stainless steel chamber surfaces was explicitly measured using solvent extraction and thermal desorption. The strong partitioning of DEHP onto the stainless steel surface was found to follow a simple linear relationship. Thermal desorption resulted in higher recovery than solvent extraction. Investigation of sorption kinetics showed that it takes several weeks for the sorption of DEHP onto the stainless steel surface to reach equilibrium. The content of DEHP in VF was measured at about 15% (w/w) using pressurized liquid extraction. The independently measured or calculated parameters were used to validate an SVOC emission model, with excellent agreement between model prediction and the observed gas-phase DEHP chamber concentrations. PMID:23095118

  14. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1996-07-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) and National Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will be discussed.

  15. Threshold bubble chamber for measurement of knock-on DT neutron tails from magnetic and inertial confinement experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, R.K.; Zaveryaev, V.S.; Trusillo, S.V.

    1997-01-01

    We propose a new {open_quotes}threshold{close_quotes} bubble chamber detector for measurement of knock-on neutron tails. These energetic neutrons result from fusion reactions involving energetic fuel ions created by alpha knock-on collisions in tokamak and other magnetic confinement experiments, and by both alpha and neutron knock-on collisions in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The energy spectrum of these neutrons will yield information on the alpha population and energy distribution in tokamaks, and on alpha target physics and {rho}R measurements in ICF experiments. The bubble chamber should only detect neutrons with energies above a selectable threshold energy controlled by the bubble chamber pressure. The bubble chamber threshold mechanism, detection efficiency, and proposed applications to the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and National Ignition Facility experiments will be discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Chamber and Diffusive Based Carbon Flux Measurements in an Alaskan Arctic Ecosystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkman, E.; Oechel, W. C.; Zona, D.

    2013-12-01

    consumption, whereas chamber and eddy covariance methodologies only document net production from the surface. Also, the capability to measure spring, summer and fall chamber fluxes, and to continuously determine year-round CO2 and CH4 fluxes under even the most extreme weather conditions, allows an unprecedented level of data continuity and local spatial coverage. Comparison to a nearby eddy covariance tower measuring CO2 and CH4 fluxes with an LGR Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer add additional power to this set of measurements. Thus, inter-comparison between diffusive, chamber, and tower-based carbon fluxes should lend much insight into the spatial and temporal controls on carbon cycling in this ecosystem.

  17. [Measurement of peak correction factor of Farmer chamber for calibration of flattening filter free (FFF) clinical photon beams].

    PubMed

    Kontra, Gábor; Major, Tibor; Polgár, Csaba

    2015-06-01

    Farmer-type ionization chambers are considered the most reliable detectors and for this reason they are most frequently used for the calibration of photon beams of medical linear accelerators. Flattening filter free (FFF) photon beams of linear accelerators have recently started to be used in radiotherapy. The dose profile of FFF beams is peaked in the center of the field and the dose distribution will be inhomogeneous along the axis of the 2.3 cm long measuring volume of the Farmer chamber. The peaked radiation field will result in volume averaging effects in the large Farmer chamber, therefore this chamber will underestimate the true central axis dose. Our objective was to determine the value of the peak correction factor (Kp) of Farmer-type chamber with measurements to avoid the underestimation of the central axis dose during the calibration of FFF radiation fields. Measurements were made with 6 MV and 10 MV flattened (6X and 10X) and FFF beams (6XFFF and 10XFFF) of a Varian TrueBeam medical linear accelerator in a solid water phantom at 10 cm depth. The source surface distance (SSD) was 100 cm, the field size was 10×10 cm and the dose rate was always 400 MU/min during the measurements. We delivered 100 MU in each measurement and the absorbed dose to water was calculated according to the IAEA TRS-398 dosimetry protocol. The measured signals of the ionization chambers were always corrected for the ion recombination loss. The ion recombination correction factors (Kr) were determined with the two-voltage method separately for the used ion chambers and for flattened and unflattened beams. First, we measured the dose to water with PTW TM30012 Farmer chamber in 6XFFF and 6X beams, then calculated the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams (R6,Farmer). Immediately after this we repeated the above measurements with PTW TM31010 Semiflex chamber and determined the ratio of doses of 6XFFF and 6X beams again (R6,Semiflex). The length of the sensitive volume of the Semiflex

  18. Track studies in water vapor using a low-pressure cloud chamber. I. Macroscopic measurements.

    PubMed

    Stonell, G P; Marshall, M; Simmons, J A

    1993-12-01

    Techniques have been developed to operate a low-pressure cloud chamber with pure water vapor. Photographs have been obtained of the tracks arising in this medium from the passage of ionizing radiation. The sources used were low-energy X rays, 242Cm alpha particles, and low-energy protons. Track lengths of the electrons were similar to those found previously in tissue-equivalent gas. W values of 35.6 +/- 0.4 and 32.6 +/- 0.6 eV per ion pair for carbon and aluminum X rays also compare closely with those in tissue-equivalent gas, but are somewhat higher than the predictions of Monte Carlo calculations. Differential w values were obtained: for alpha particles of energy 5.3 MeV the value was 33.0 +/- 3.0 eV per ion pair; for protons of energy 390, 230, and 85 keV the values were 30.6 +/- 1.9, 31.9 +/- 2.0, and 33.6 +/- 3.4 eV per ion pair. The energy losses of protons in water vapor were measured in a second (dummy) chamber used for energy calibration. Results support Janni's values of stopping power for protons in the energy range 40-480 keV. PMID:8278575

  19. Airborne measurement of tropospheric ice nuclei aerosols using the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, C.; Stetzer, O.; Sierau, B.; Lohmann, U.

    2009-04-01

    Ice clouds and mixed phase clouds have different microphysical and radiative properties that need to be assessed in order to understand their impact on the climate. Indeed, on one hand ice crystals found in the ice phase have the ability to scatter incoming solar radiation and absorb terrestrial radiation. On the other hand, about 70% of the tropical precipitation forms via the ice-phase, this means an impact on the hydrological cycle. Investigation of the ability of an aerosol to act as Ice Nuclei (IN) requires knowledge of the thermodynamics conditions, i.e. relative humidity and temperature at which this aerosol form ice crystal. The PerformPINC project was a research campaign within the Education & Training program of the EUropean Fleet for Airborne Research (EUFAR). The project objectives were to measure the number concentration of IN in free and upper troposphere using the Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC) recently developed by the Institute for Atmospheric Climate Sciences at the ETH Zürich, and thus as a primary objective, testing the technical performance of the instrument during in-situ airborne measurements at different conditions within the chamber. The PINC is the portable version of the Zurich Ice Nucleation Chamber (ZINC) (Stetzer et al., 2008) and is meant for in-situ measurements. Both ZINC and PINC follow the same principle as the Continuous Flow Diffusion Chamber of the Colorado University (Rogers, 1988) that has proven to be of good performance in previous airborne in-situ campaigns (DeMott et al., 2003a). Unlike the CFDC, the PINC has a flat design composed of a main chamber, and an evaporation part. The cooling system of the PINC is also different and consists for the warm side of two BD120 compressors mounted in parallel. For the cold side, it is four BD120 compressors in parallel mounted to another BD120 compressor in serial, thus allowing us to reach lower temperature than the warm side. Aerosols are collected through an inlet where

  20. A multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) for measuring the charge of relativistic heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, W. B.; Romero, J. L.; Brady, F. P.; Tull, C. E.; Castaneda, C. M.; Barasch, E. F.; Webb, M. L.; Drummond, J. R.; Crawford, H. J.; Flores, I.; Greiner, D. E.; Lindstrom, P. J.; Sann, H.; Young, J. C.

    1987-04-01

    A large area (1 m × 2 m) multiple sampling ionization chamber (MUSIC) has been constructed and tested. The MUSIC detector makes multiple measurements of energy "loss", d E/d x, for a relativistic heavy ion. Given the velocity, the charge of the ion can be extracted from the energy loss distributions. The widths of the distributions we observe are much narrower than predicted by Vavilov's theory for energy loss while agreeing well with the theory of Badhwar which deals with the energy deposited. The versatile design of MUSIC allows a variety of anode configurations which results in a large dynamic range of charge. In our tests to date we have observed charge resolutions of 0.25e fwhm for 727 MeV/nucleon40A and 0.30e fwhm for 1.08 GeV/nucleon139La and139La fragments. Vertical position and multiple track determination are obtained by using time projection chamber electronics. Preliminary tests indicate that the position resolution is also very good with α ≅ 100 μm.

  1. A Push-Pull Test to Measure Volatilization Fluxes of Organic Pollutants without Flux Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. C.; Jaffe, P. R.

    2011-12-01

    Volatilization of organic contaminants is a potentially significant removal mechanism from wetlands, but field measurements are scarce and the physiochemical controls on volatilization from wetland soils remain poorly understood. It has been established that volatilization rates of certain pollutants are enhanced by vegetation and are strongly correlated with evapotranspiration (ET). These observations rely on flux chambers measurements, which are characterized by significant uncertainty due the chamber's effects on the meteorological variables around the plant and consequent impact on the biophysical processes governing ET and plant uptake of soil contaminants. Here we present data from a mesocosm study using a modified single-well push-pull test to measure in-situ volatilization rates from inundated soils vegetated with the wetland macrophytes Scirpus acutus and Typha latifolia, as well as from unplanted soil. This new method uses a test solution containing the volatile tracers sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), helium (He), and dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) to estimate first-order volatilization rates and examine the relationship between physiochemical properties and volatilization rates. The test also yields an estimate for the volume of subsurface gas bubbles, which is used to derive a retardation factor for the effect of interphase partitioning on the estimation of kinetic parameters. We evaluate models to partition observed fluxes into different pathways for plant-mediated volatilization: transpirational uptake and consequent volatilization, and gas-phase diffusion through porous root aerenchyma. Those models are then used to scale tracer-derived volatilization fluxes to priority organic pollutants including benzene, trichloroethylene, and vinyl chloride. We also discuss the implementation of this method at field scales to estimate volatilization as a component of phytoremediation applications.

  2. Ionization chamber measurements of the half-lives of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au.

    PubMed

    Unterweger, M P; Lindstrom, R M

    2004-01-01

    Samples of 24Na, 42K, 76As and 198Au were produced by irradiation in the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) reactor, and examined for impurities before and after measurement. Half-life measurements were carried out in the NIST 4pigamma pressurized ionization chamber. The results are compared to presently accepted values and previous NIST measurements. PMID:14987662

  3. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-01

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  4. Reanalysis of bubble chamber measurements of muon-neutrino induced single pion production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilkinson, Callum; Rodrigues, Philip; Cartwright, Susan; Thompson, Lee; McFarland, Kevin

    2014-12-01

    There exists a long-standing disagreement between bubble chamber measurements of the single pion production channel νμp →μ-p π+ from the Argonne and Brookhaven National Laboratories. We digitize and reanalyze data from both experiments to produce cross-section ratios for various interaction channels, for which the flux uncertainties cancel, and find good agreement between the experiments. By multiplying the cross-section ratio by the well-understood charged-current quasielastic cross section on free nucleons, we extract single-pion production cross sections which do not depend on the flux normalization predictions. The νμp →μ-p π+ cross sections we extract show good agreement between the ANL and BNL data sets.

  5. Raman measurements of substrate temperature in a molecular beam epitaxy growth chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Hutchins, T.; Nazari, M.; Eridisoorya, M.; Myers, T. M.; Holtz, M.

    2015-01-15

    A method is described for directly measuring the temperature of a substrate in a molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE) growth system. The approach relies on the establishment of the temperature dependence of Raman-active phonons of the substrate material using independently known calibration points across the range of interest. An unknown temperature in this range is then determined based on the Raman peak position with the substrate in situ the MBE chamber. The apparatus relies on conventional optics and Raman components. Shifting and broadening of the Raman spectrum are described based on the effects of thermal expansion and anharmonic decay. The choice of reference temperature is discussed. The method is qualified by examining the substrate temperature dependence, relative to that of a standard thermocouple, during a commonly used ramp procedure. Both temperature difference and time lag are obtained.

  6. Theoretical study of Jesse effect in tritium measurements using ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhilin; Peng, Shuming; Lu, Hanghang; Tan, Zhaoyi; Wang, Heyi; Long, Xingui; Masao, Matsuyama

    2016-01-01

    Jesse effect caused by impurities in helium might enhance the output signal significantly in tritium measurements with ionization chamber, which will lead to overestimation of tritium concentration in experiments. A theoretical method was proposed to evaluate Jesse effect quantitatively. Results indicate that besides Penning ionization, sub-excitation electrons also place very important influence on ionization enhancement by Jesse effect. An experiential expression about the relationship between enhancement factor and impurity concentration was established, in which second order of it fits experimental results very well. Theoretical calculation method in this paper is also applicable to evaluate Jesse effect in other kinds of mixtures besides hydrogen as impurities in helium. In addition, Jesse effects about tritium molecules as impurities have also been investigated.

  7. Homogeneous condensation - Freezing nucleation rate measurements for small water droplets in an expansion cloud chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagen, D. E.; Anderson, R. J.; Kassner, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental data on ice nucleation, presented in an earlier paper, are analyzed to yield information about the homogeneous nucleation rate of ice from supercooled liquid and the heights of energy barriers to that nucleation. The experiment consisted of using an expansion cloud chamber to nucleate from the vapor a cloud of supercooled pure water drops and the observation of the fraction of drops which subsequently froze. The analysis employed standard classical homogeneous nucleation theory. The data are used to extract the first experimental measurement (albeit indirect) of the activation energy for the transfer of a water molecule across the liquid-ice interface at temperatures near -40 C. The results provide further evidence that the local liquid structure becomes more icelike as the temperature is lowered.

  8. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Pekney, N.J.; Martello, D.V.; Schroeder, K.T.; Granite, E.J.

    2009-05-01

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7-day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m2 h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m2 h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  9. Environmental chamber measurements of mercury flux from coal utilization by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Pekney, Natalie J.; Martello, Donald; Schroeder, Karl; Granite, Evan

    2009-05-01

    An environmental chamber was constructed to measure the mercury flux from coal utilization by-product (CUB) samples. Samples of fly ash, FGD gypsum, and wallboard made from FGD gypsum were tested under both dark and illuminated conditions with or without the addition of water to the sample. Mercury releases varied widely, with 7- day experiment averages ranging from -6.8 to 73 ng/m(2) h for the fly ash samples and -5.2 to 335 ng/m(2) h for the FGD/wallboard samples. Initial mercury content, fly ash type, and light exposure had no observable consistent effects on the mercury flux. For the fly ash samples, the effect of a mercury control technology was to decrease the emission. For three of the four pairs of FGD gypsum and wallboard samples, the wallboard sample released less (or absorbed more) mercury than the gypsum.

  10. Immersion mode ice nucleation measurements with the new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Lohmann, Ulrike; Welti, André; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-05-01

    The new Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chAmber (PIMCA) has been developed for online immersion freezing of single-immersed aerosol particles. PIMCA is a vertical extension of the established Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber (PINC). PIMCA immerses aerosol particles into cloud droplets before they enter PINC. Immersion freezing experiments on cloud droplets with a radius of 5-7 μm at a prescribed supercooled temperature (T) and water saturation can be conducted, while other ice nucleation mechanisms (deposition, condensation, and contact mode) are excluded. Validation experiments on reference aerosol (kaolinite, ammonium sulfate, and ammonium nitrate) showed good agreement with theory and literature. The PIMCA-PINC setup was tested in the field during the Zurich AMBient Immersion freezing Study (ZAMBIS) in spring 2014 in Zurich, Switzerland. Significant concentrations of submicron ambient aerosol triggering immersion freezing at T > 236 K were rare. The mean frozen cloud droplet number concentration was estimated to be 7.22·105 L-1 for T < 238 K and determined from the measured frozen fraction and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations predicted for the site at a typical supersaturation of SS = 0.3%. This value should be considered as an upper limit of cloud droplet freezing via immersion and homogeneous freezing processes. The predicted ice nucleating particle (INP) concentration based on measured total aerosol larger than 0.5 μm and the parameterization by DeMott et al. (2010) at T = 238 K is INPD10=54 ± 39 L-1. This is a lower limit as supermicron particles were not sampled with PIMCA-PINC during ZAMBIS.

  11. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, N.; Mastepanov, M.; Parmentier, F.-J. W.; Lund, M.; Crill, P.; Christensen, T. R.

    2015-09-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the robust linear regression model (first order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat forming wetlands to calculate fluxes with different models. The flux differences from independent linear estimates are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration and argue that high-resolution automatic chamber measurements could be used for purposes beyond the estimation of the net gas flux.

  12. Optoelectronical Measurements Of The Electric Field Distribution At Pseudo Spark Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehrler, Horst

    1989-06-01

    A fiberoptic sensor for electric fieldstrength measurements was developed. This sensor allows to measure even high electric fields in a contactless way, therefore nearly undisturbing the phenomenon to be measured. The basic idea is to rotate the polarization plane of linearly polarized light in an optically active medium (linear electrooptic effect). Further advantages of this method are: high bandwidth near the GHz-region, high local resolution because of small size, no electromagnetic pulse disturbance, useable in high field regions, where electrical methods fail, even in rigid environments. The fiberoptic sensor together with the detector system, which comprises a streakcamera with an image processing system, allows the analog data aquisition and -transmission of about 40 time synchronised signals at one shot using fiberoptics. The application and results of the new diagnostic in the case of the Pseudo Spark Chamber, where classical electric measurements fail, will be presented. The Pseudo Spark1 is a hollow cathode, low pressure gas discharge system, in a special rotational symmetric geometrie. It is situated on the left hand side of the Paschen curve by about 20 Pa hydrogen. During the dicharge there is observed a well pinched electron beam as well as an ion beam; also various kinds of X-ray emission can be detected. The applications of this systems are in Pulse Power technology, lithography, as well as high power switching and material processing.

  13. Anechoic Chamber test of the Electromagnetic Measurement System ground test unit

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, L.E.; Scott, L.D.; Oakes, E.T.

    1987-04-10

    The Electromagnetic Measurement System (EMMS) will acquire data on electromagnetic (EM) environments at key weapon locations on various aircraft certified for nuclear weapons. The high-frequency ground unit of the EMMS consists of an instrumented B61 bomb case that will measure (with current probes) the localized current density resulting from an applied EM field. For this portion of the EMMS, the first system test was performed in the Anechoic Chamber Facility at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The EMMS pod was subjected to EM radiation at microwave frequencies of 1, 3, and 10 GHz. At each frequency, the EMMS pod was rotated at many positions relative to the microwave source so that the individual current probes were exposed to a direct line-of-sight illumination. The variations between the measured and calculated electric fields for the current probes with direct illumination by the EM source are within a few db. The results obtained from the anechoic test were better than expected and verify that the high frequency ground portion of the EMMS will accurately measure the EM environments for which it was designed.

  14. Convenient, Rapid and Accurate Measurement of SVOC Emission Characteristics in Experimental Chambers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cong; Liu, Zhe; Little, John C.; Zhang, Yinping

    2013-01-01

    Chamber tests are usually used to determine the source characteristics of semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) which are critical to quantify indoor exposure to SVOCs. In contrast to volatile organic compounds (VOCs), the sorption effect of SVOCs to chamber surfaces usually needs to be considered due to the much higher surface/air partition coefficients, resulting in a long time to reach steady state, frequently on the order of months, and complicating the mathematical analysis of the resulting data. A chamber test is also complicated if the material-phase concentration is not constant. This study shows how to design a chamber to overcome these limitations. A dimensionless mass transfer analysis is used to specify conditions for (1) neglecting the SVOC sorption effect to chamber surfaces, (2) neglecting the convective mass transfer resistance at sorption surfaces if the sorption effect cannot be neglected, and (3) regarding the material-phase concentration in the source as constant. Several practical and quantifiable ways to improve chamber design are proposed. The approach is illustrated by analyzing available data from three different chambers in terms of the accuracy with which the model parameters can be determined and the time needed to conduct the chamber test. The results should greatly facilitate the design of chambers to characterize SVOC emissions and the resulting exposure. PMID:24015246

  15. Measurement of Transverse Beam Size in Accumulator as a Function of Momenta During Stacking

    SciTech Connect

    Halling, Mike

    1992-01-22

    The horizontal and vertical emittance as a function of momentum was measured in the accumulator while stacking with a small stack. The data suggests that the transverse emittance of the beam is blown up between the injection orbit and the stacking orbit. The technique shows promise, and should be repeated with a large stack to measure the emittance in the accumulator at a time when we have large losses.

  16. Technical Note: Experimental determination of the effective point of measurement of two cylindrical ionization chambers in a clinical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, Yuya; Nishio, Teiji; Onishi, Hiroshi

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: IAEA TRS-398 notes that cylindrical ionization chambers are preferred for reference proton dosimetry. If a cylindrical ionization chamber is used in a phantom to measure the dose as a function of depth, the effective point of measurement (EPOM) must be taken into account. IAEA TRS-398 recommends a displacement of 0.75 times the inner cavity radius (0.75R) for heavy ion beams. Theoretical models by Palmans and by Bhullar and Watchman confirmed this value. However, the experimental results vary from author to author. The purpose of this study is to accurately measure the displacement and explain the past experimental discrepancies. Methods: In this work, we measured the EPOM of cylindrical ionization chambers with high accuracy by comparing the Bragg-peak position obtained with cylindrical ionization chambers (PTW 30013, PTW 31016) to that obtained using a plane-parallel ionization chamber (PTW 34045). Results: The EPOMs of PTW 30013 and 31016 were shifted by 0.92 ± 0.07 R with R = 3.05 mm and 0.90 ± 0.14 R with R = 1.45 mm, respectively, from the reference point toward the source. Conclusions: The EPOMs obtained were greater than the value of 0.75R proposed by the IAEA TRS-398 and the analytical results.

  17. Automated modeling of ecosystem CO2 fluxes based on closed chamber measurements: A standardized conceptual and practical approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffmann, Mathias; Jurisch, Nicole; Albiac Borraz, Elisa; Hagemann, Ulrike; Sommer, Michael; Augustin, Jürgen

    2015-04-01

    Closed chamber measurements are widely used for determining the CO2 exchange of small-scale or heterogeneous ecosystems. Among the chamber design and operational handling, the data processing procedure is a considerable source of uncertainty of obtained results. We developed a standardized automatic data processing algorithm, based on the language and statistical computing environment R© to (i) calculate measured CO2 flux rates, (ii) parameterize ecosystem respiration (Reco) and gross primary production (GPP) models, (iii) optionally compute an adaptive temperature model, (iv) model Reco, GPP and net ecosystem exchange (NEE), and (v) evaluate model uncertainty (calibration, validation and uncertainty prediction). The algorithm was tested for different manual and automatic chamber measurement systems (such as e.g. automated NEE-chambers and the LI-8100A soil CO2 Flux system) and ecosystems. Our study shows that even minor changes within the modelling approach may result in considerable differences of calculated flux rates, derived photosynthetic active radiation and temperature dependencies and subsequently modeled Reco, GPP and NEE balance of up to 25%. Thus, certain modeling implications will be given, since automated and standardized data processing procedures, based on clearly defined criteria, such as statistical parameters and thresholds are a prerequisite and highly desirable to guarantee the reproducibility, traceability of modelling results and encourage a better comparability between closed chamber based CO2 measurements.

  18. Wind tunnels vs. flux chambers: Area source emission measurements and the necessity for VOC and odour correction factors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC), odour, and ammonia (NH3) with little regard to air velocity or sweep air flow rates. As a result, flux measurements have been highly variable and scientists have been in disagreement as to the better...

  19. Flow and heat transfer measurements in a swirl chamber with different outlet geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biegger, Christoph; Weigand, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    In technical applications, an efficient cooling is necessary for high thermal load components such as turbine blades. One potential and promising technique is a swirling tube flow in comparison with an axial flow. The additional circumferential velocity and enhanced turbulent mixing increase the heat transfer. But the complex flow field and heat transfer mechanisms are still under research. Furthermore, the reliability of a swirl chamber regarding different outlet conditions is of great interest for a robust cooling design. Therefore, we investigated the influence of a straight, a tangential and a bend outlet. To gain understanding of the flow phenomena, we measured the velocity field by means of stereo-PIV (particle image velocimetry). We experimentally studied the cooling capability measuring the heat transfer coefficients using thermochromic liquid crystals. For an accurate cooling design, we used the local adiabatic wall temperature as the correct reference temperature for calculating the heat transfer coefficients. We will show the velocity field, the pressure loss and the heat transfer results for realistic Reynolds numbers from 10,000 to 40,000 and for swirl numbers between and . The obtained heat transfer is more than four times higher compared to an axial tube flow. Our measurements indicate that the here investigated outlet redirection has no significant influence on the flow field and the heat transfer coefficients.

  20. Flow chamber

    DOEpatents

    Morozov, Victor

    2011-01-18

    A flow chamber having a vacuum chamber and a specimen chamber. The specimen chamber may have an opening through which a fluid may be introduced and an opening through which the fluid may exit. The vacuum chamber may have an opening through which contents of the vacuum chamber may be evacuated. A portion of the flow chamber may be flexible, and a vacuum may be used to hold the components of the flow chamber together.

  1. Evaluation of Gas-filled Ionization Chamber Method for Radon Measurement at Two Reference Facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Tokonami, Shinji; Kobayashi, Yosuke; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Yatabe, Yoshinori; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    For quality assurance, gas-filled ionization chamber method was tested at two reference facilities for radon calibration: EML (USA) and PTB (Germany). Consequently, the radon concentrations estimated by the ionization chamber method were in good agreement with the reference radon concentrations provided by EML as well as PTB.

  2. Collection and measurement of atmospheric contaminants during Skylab AM/MDA unmanned altitude chamber test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The analytical data obtained from both cryogenic and grab sampling of the atmosphere of the Skylab AM/MDA during an 84 hour unmanned chamber run are reported. The level of contaminants found at different points of the test chamber are tabulated. The results indicate that there was no clear trend of increasing or decreasing contaminant levels during the test run.

  3. Measurement of nitrogen oxide emissions from an agricultural soil with a dynamic chamber system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roelle, Paul; Aneja, Viney P.; O'Connor, J.; Robarge, W.; Kim, Deug-Soo; Levine, Joel S.

    1999-01-01

    Biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were measured from an intensively managed agricultural row crop (corn, Zea mays) during a 4 week period (May 15 through June 9, 1995). The site was located in Washington County, near the town of Plymouth, which is in the Lower Coastal Plain of North Carolina. Soil NO flux was determined using a dynamic flowthrough chamber technique. The measurement period was characterized by two distinguishing features: an application of nitrogen (N) fertilizer at the midpoint of the experiment and a nontypical rainfall pattern. Average NO flux prior to the application of N fertilizer was 31.5 ± 10.1 ng N m-2 s-1, and more than doubled (77.7 ± 63.7 ng N m-2 s-1) after the application of a side-dressing of N fertilizer. Average soil extractable nitrogen values did not change significantly following application of the side-dressing of N fertilizer. We attribute this failure to detect a significant difference in soil extractable nitrogen following N fertilization to the method in which the fertilizer was applied, the subsequent rainfall pattern, and the technique of soil sampling. NO flux followed the same diurnal trend as soil temperature, with maximum NO emissions coinciding with maximum soil temperature, and minimum NO emissions coinciding with minimum soil temperature. NO flux was found to increase exponentially with soil temperature, but only after fertilization. Due to subsurface irrigation practices employed by the farmer, changes in soil water content were minimal, and no relation could be drawn between soil water content and NO flux. Simultaneous measurements of NOy, NO2, and NO emissions revealed that NO and NO2 emissions represent 86 and 8.7%, respectively, of NOy emissions leaving the soil. Simultaneous NO flux measurements made by a closed box flux technique, at the same site, revealed no statistically significant differences between the two different methodologies for measuring NO flux.

  4. Internal flow-field measurements in a model can-type gas-turbine combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koutmos, P.; McQuirk, J. J.; Vafidis, C.

    LDA measurements of the three mean velocity components and the corresponding turbulence intensities have been made to provide qualitative and quantitative information on the flow-field in a water model of a can-type gas turbine combustion chamber. The combustor geometry comprised a swirl driven primary zone, annulus fed rows of primary and secondary jets and an exit contraction nozzle. Flow visualization revealed a stable and symmetric vortex established within the primary zone via the combined effects of the inlet swirl and primary jet impingement. High levels of turbulence kinetic energy were generated within the vortex as well as near the location where the jets impinged. Large streamline curvature, anisotropy of the turbulence structure and very rapid transfer of momentum from the radial to the axial direction were associated with this primary region. In the downstream dilution zone a shallower jet trajectory was observed and the larger turbulence kinetic energy levels could be identified in this region with the shear layers formed between the bulk flow emerging from the primary zone and the incoming secondary jets. Moderate levels of spatial non-uniformities were measured at the exit from the nozzle.

  5. Track Reconstruction in a Time Projection Chamber Designed to Make High Precision Fission Cross Section Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sarvagya

    2010-10-01

    The TPC (Time Projection Chamber), being constructed by the NIFFTE (Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment) collaboration will be used for high-precision fission cross-section measurements. These measurements will aid in the design of future generations of nuclear power plants. The NIFFTE track reconstruction effort has developed two approaches consisting of a variety of statistical estimators. The first, consists of traditional cluster and hit finding algorithms that are performed on 2D planes. A least squares is performed on the hits to produce a track in the TPC. The alternate approach uses the Hough Transform, a brute force attempt at finding tracks that isolates features in the TPC volume through data binning. To determine fit parameters, a Kalman Filter has been implemented that accounts for multiple scattering and kinks in the track. Comparing simulated and reconstructed tracks have shown the validity of these methods. The software uses open source packages to ensure re-usability for future TPC projects. In my talk, I will describe these methods in detail.

  6. Aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by O3 measured at the CERN CLOUD chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyle, Christopher; Fuchs, Claudia; Gysel, Martin; Troestl, Jasmin; El Haddad, Imad; Frege, Carla; Dommen, Josef; Dias, Antonio; Jaervinen, Emma; Moehler, Ottmar; Baltensperger, Urs

    2015-04-01

    Measurements of aerosol growth due to the oxidation of SO2 by O3 in cloud droplets at temperatures of 10° C and -10° C are presented. Although this reaction has been well studied in bulk solutions at temperatures above 0° C, this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first time the reaction rate has been studied in laboratory formed, super-cooled cloud droplets. These experiments were made possible by utilising the adiabatic expansion system in the 27 m3 CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber at CERN. Experiments were performed on both acidic (sulphuric acid) and neutral (ammonium sulphate) seed aerosol. During 6 minute cloud cycles, droplets of approximately 10μm diameter were formed, and the growth of the aerosol due to the uptake and oxidation of SO2 was measured with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). A microphysical model was developed to simulate the cloud droplet activation and growth as well as the aqueous phase chemistry. The ability of the model to accurately represent the observed aerosol growth is assessed, and the implications for the extrapolation of the SO2+O3oxidation rates to sub-zero temperatures are discussed.

  7. SU-E-T-228: Liquid Ionisation Chamber Array and MicroDiamond Measurements with the CyberKnife System

    SciTech Connect

    Poppinga, D; Looe, H; Stelljes, T; Poppe, B; Blanck, O; Harder, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to measure the dose profile and output factors with a CyberKnife accelerator using a TM60019 microDiamond detector and a 1000SRS liquid chamber array (both PTW Freiburg, Germany). Methods: An MP3 water phantom (PTW, Freiburg) was positioned along the robotic world coordinate system. The TM60019 detector was adjusted to the center of the according fields and the semiconductor axis was aligned with the beam direction. Profiles at 5cm water depth and SSD = 80 cm were measured along the robotic x axis and y axis for the cylindrical collimators of the CyberKnife (diameter 60, 50, 40, 30, 20, 15, 12.5, 10, 7.5 and 5mm). To determine the output factors the dose profile was measured at 0.1 mm steps around the field center to find the maximum dose value. The liquid chamber array (1000SRS) measurement was performed with the same setup, but with RW3 buildup. Results: The 1000SRS measurements closely conform with the TM60019 profile measurement in all profile regions and for all collimator sizes. The profile measurement is influenced by the almost equal spatial resolution of the TM60019 detector (radius of the sensitive area 1.1mm) and of the 1000SRS liquid chamber array (single chamber width 2.3mm). The measured dose profiles have not been corrected for this limited spatial resolution. Rather we purpose to consider that spatial dose averaging over 2 mm wide regions might be justified in view of patient positioning inaccuracies and of the spaces in tissue participating in the biological radiation responses. Conclusion: The 1000SRS data points conform with the TM60019 profile measurements at all profile regions showing the applicability of liquid ion chamber arrays with the CyberKnife system.

  8. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  9. Measurements of CO2 exchange with an automated chamber system throughout the year: challenges in measuring night-time respiration on porous peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, M.; Minkkinen, K.; Ojanen, P.; Kämäräinen, M.; Laurila, T.; Lohila, A.

    2014-01-01

    We built an automatic chamber system to measure greenhouse gas (GHG) exchange in forested peatland ecosystems. We aimed to build a system robust enough which would work throughout the year and could measure through a changing snowpack in addition to producing annual GHG fluxes by integrating the measurements without the need of using models. The system worked rather well throughout the year, but it was not service free. Gap filling of data was still necessary. We observed problems in carbon dioxide (CO2) respiration flux estimation during calm summer nights, when a CO2 concentration gradient from soil/moss system to atmosphere builds up. Chambers greatly overestimated the night-time respiration. This was due to the disturbance caused by the chamber to the soil-moss CO2 gradient and consequent initial pulse of CO2 to the chamber headspace. We tested different flux calculation and measurement methods to solve this problem. The estimated flux was strongly dependent on (1) the starting point of the fit after closing the chamber, (2) the length of the fit, (3) the type of the fit (linear and polynomial), (4) the speed of the fan mixing the air inside the chamber, and (5) atmospheric turbulence (friction velocity, u*). The best fitting method (the most robust, least random variation) for respiration measurements on our sites was linear fitting with the period of 120-240 s after chamber closure. Furthermore, the fan should be adjusted to spin at minimum speed to avoid the pulse-effect, but it should be kept on to ensure mixing. If night-time problems cannot be solved, emissions can be estimated using daytime data from opaque chambers.

  10. Calculations of automatic chamber flux measurements of methane and carbon dioxide using short time series of concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirk, Norbert; Mastepanov, Mikhail; Parmentier, Frans-Jan W.; Lund, Magnus; Crill, Patrick; Christensen, Torben R.

    2016-02-01

    The closed chamber technique is widely used to measure the exchange of methane (CH4) and carbon dioxide (CO2) from terrestrial ecosystems. There is, however, large uncertainty about which model should be used to calculate the gas flux from the measured gas concentrations. Due to experimental uncertainties the simple linear regression model (first-order polynomial) is often applied, even though theoretical considerations of the technique suggest the application of other, curvilinear models. High-resolution automatic chamber systems which sample gas concentrations several hundred times per flux measurement make it possible to resolve the curvilinear behavior and study the information imposed by the natural variability of the temporal concentration changes. We used more than 50 000 such flux measurements of CH4 and CO2 from five field sites located in peat-forming wetlands ranging from 56 to 78° N to quantify the typical differences between flux estimates of different models. In addition, we aimed to assess the curvilinearity of the concentration time series and test the general applicability of curvilinear models. Despite significant episodic differences between the calculated flux estimates, the overall differences are generally found to be smaller than the local flux variability on the plot scale. The curvilinear behavior of the gas concentrations within the chamber is strongly influenced by wind-driven chamber leakage, and less so by changing gas concentration gradients in the soil during chamber closure. Such physical processes affect both gas species equally, which makes it possible to isolate biochemical processes affecting the gases differently, such as photosynthesis limitation by chamber headspace CO2 concentrations under high levels of incoming solar radiation. We assess the possibility to exploit this effect for a partitioning of the net CO2 flux into photosynthesis and ecosystem respiration as an example of how high-resolution automatic chamber

  11. Intercomparison of OH Radical Measurements by Long-Path Absorption and Laser Induced Fluorescence in the Atmosphere Simulation Chamber SAPHIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, H.-P.; Brauers, T.; Greif, J.; Häseler, R.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Rupp, L.

    2003-04-01

    A striking advantage of the SAPHIR chamber is the availability of two spectroscopic detection instruments for OH radicals: Laser-Induced Fluorescence Spectroscopy (LIF) and Long-Path Differential Optical Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS). Both instruments have already been compared in 1994 during the field measurement campaign POPCORN. They agreed well with a correlation coefficient of r=0.90 and a weighted linear fit with a slope of 1.09 +- 0.12. However, OH measurements in the simulation chamber differ significantly from measurements in ambient air. While DOAS measures OH as an integral value along the central longitudinal axis of SAPHIR, LIF samples the air locally and close (2 cm) to the floor of the chamber. Thus, the LIF measurements might be possibly affected by local concentration gradients caused by insufficient mixing of the chamber air or by deposition to the wall. On the other hand, if turbulent mixing of the chamber air is weak and high concentrations of ozone are used in experiments, the DOAS instrument might be subject to artificial formation of OH radicals in the air volume which is illuminated by the detection laser. This interference results from laser induced photolysis of ozone and the subsequent reaction of water vapor with the excited oxygen atoms formed. Thus it is of decisive importance to compare OH measurements from both instruments in order to investigate potential disturbing effects due to the specific sampling properties of both instruments within SAPHIR. We report on OH measurements accomplished simultaneously with both instruments using different trace gas compositions and experimental conditions.

  12. Measurements of CO2 exchange with an automated chamber system throughout the year: challenges in measuring nighttime respiration on porous peat soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koskinen, M.; Minkkinen, K.; Ojanen, P.; Kämäräinen, M.; Laurila, T.; Lohila, A.

    2013-08-01

    We built an automatic chamber system to measure greehouse gas (GHG) exchange in forested peatland ecosystems. We aimed to build a system robust enough which would work throughout the year and could measure through a changing snowpackin addition to producing annual GHG fluxes by integrating the measurements without the need of using models. The system worked rather well throughout the year, but it was not service free. Gap filling of data was still necessary. We observed problems in carbon dioxide (CO2) flux estimation during calm summer nights, when a CO2 concentration gradient from soil/moss system to atmosphere builds up. Chambers greatly overestimated the nighttime respiration. This was due to the disturbance caused by the chamber to the soil-moss CO2 gradient and consequent initial pulse of CO2 to the chamber headspace. We tested different flux calculation and measurement methods to solve this problem. The estimated flux was strongly dependent on (1) the type of the fit (linear and polynomial), (2) the starting point of the fit after closing the chamber, (3) the length of the fit, (4) the speed of the fan mixing the air inside the chamber, and (5) atmospheric turbulence (friction velocity, u*). The best fitting method (the most robust, least random variation) was linear fitting with the period of 120-240 s after chamber closure. Furthermore, the fan should be adjusted to spin at minimum speed to avoid the pulse-effect, but it should be kept on to ensure mixing. If nighttime problems cannot be solved, emissions can be estimated using daytime data from opaque chambers.

  13. Measurements of VOC emissions from three building materials using small environmental chamber under defined standard test conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, J.; Zhang, J.; Lusztyk, E.; Magee, R.J.

    1998-12-31

    VOC emission profile is an important parameter to describe the building materials and consumer products for their impact on indoor air quality (IAQ). Emission profiles are dependent on the test conditions. It is therefore very important to standardize testing conditions in order to compare emission factors and decay constants reported by various testing laboratories. Standard chamber test conditions (Chamber temperature of 23 C, relative humidity of 50 %, air change rate of 1 ACH, and specimen loading ratio of 0.4 m{sup 2}/m{sup 3}) have been proposed for using small environment chamber (0.05 m{sup 3}) by an international consortium research program led by the Institute for Research in Construction, NRCC. VOC emissions (excluding formaldehyde) from three building materials, a particleboard, a carpet with rubber backing and a vinyl floor tile were measured under above defined test conditions. Samples of the chamber air were collected using multi-sorbent tubes during the chamber tests, and analyzed by thermal desorption (TD) GC/FID. GC peaks were identified using TD/GC/MS. Major VOCs emitted were solvents, aldehydes, C10-and C15-terpenes for the particleboard, alkanes, alkenes and 4-phenyl cyclohexene for the carpet. VOC emissions from vinyl floor tile were dominated by a mixture of two alkyl propanoates, which eluted late (at about 230 C) on GC column. Total VOCs in the chamber air reached at 1100, 210 and 2400 m g/m3 for the particleboard, carpet and vinyl floor tile respectively. The analytical variation was around 5 to 10 % judged by a number of duplicates analyzed during the tests. First order exponential decay model and power law decay model were used to describe the emission factor decay from 12 h after the start of dynamic chamber tests. The power law model was found to better fit the experimental data than the first order decay model.

  14. Validation of the flow-through chamber (FTC) and steady-state (SS) methods for clearance rate measurements in bivalves

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Poul S.; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    Summary To obtain precise and reliable laboratory clearance rate (filtration rate) measurements with the ‘flow-through chamber method’ (FTC) the design must ensure that only inflow water reaches the bivalve's inhalant aperture and that exit flow is fully mixed. As earlier recommended these prerequisites can be checked by a plot of clearance rate (CR) versus increasing through-flow (Fl) to reach a plateau, which is the true CR, but we also recommend to plot percent particles cleared versus reciprocal through-flow where the plateau becomes the straight line CR/Fl, and we emphasize that the percent of particles cleared is in itself neither a criterion for valid CR measurement, nor an indicator of appropriate ‘chamber geometry’ as hitherto adapted in many studies. For the ‘steady-state method’ (SS), the design must ensure that inflow water becomes fully mixed with the bivalve's excurrent flow to establish a uniform chamber concentration prevailing at its incurrent flow and at the chamber outlet. These prerequisites can be checked by a plot of CR versus increasing Fl, which should give the true CR at all through-flows. Theoretically, the experimental uncertainty of CR for a given accuracy of concentration measurements depends on the percent reduction in particle concentration (100×P) from inlet to outlet of the ideal ‘chamber geomety’. For FTC, it decreases with increasing values of P while for SS it first decreases but then increases again, suggesting the use of an intermediate value of P. In practice, the optimal value of P may depend on the given ‘chamber geometry’. The fundamental differences between the FTC and the SS methods and practical guidelines for their use are pointed out, and new data on CR for the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, illustrate a design and use of the SS method which may be employed in e.g. long-term growth experiments at constant algal concentrations. PMID:23213362

  15. Validation of the flow-through chamber (FTC) and steady-state (SS) methods for clearance rate measurements in bivalves.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Poul S; Riisgård, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-15

    To obtain precise and reliable laboratory clearance rate (filtration rate) measurements with the 'flow-through chamber method' (FTC) the design must ensure that only inflow water reaches the bivalve's inhalant aperture and that exit flow is fully mixed. As earlier recommended these prerequisites can be checked by a plot of clearance rate (CR) versus increasing through-flow (Fl) to reach a plateau, which is the true CR, but we also recommend to plot percent particles cleared versus reciprocal through-flow where the plateau becomes the straight line CR/Fl, and we emphasize that the percent of particles cleared is in itself neither a criterion for valid CR measurement, nor an indicator of appropriate 'chamber geometry' as hitherto adapted in many studies. For the 'steady-state method' (SS), the design must ensure that inflow water becomes fully mixed with the bivalve's excurrent flow to establish a uniform chamber concentration prevailing at its incurrent flow and at the chamber outlet. These prerequisites can be checked by a plot of CR versus increasing Fl, which should give the true CR at all through-flows. Theoretically, the experimental uncertainty of CR for a given accuracy of concentration measurements depends on the percent reduction in particle concentration (100×P) from inlet to outlet of the ideal 'chamber geomety'. For FTC, it decreases with increasing values of P while for SS it first decreases but then increases again, suggesting the use of an intermediate value of P. In practice, the optimal value of P may depend on the given 'chamber geometry'. The fundamental differences between the FTC and the SS methods and practical guidelines for their use are pointed out, and new data on CR for the blue mussel, Mytilus edulis, illustrate a design and use of the SS method which may be employed in e.g. long-term growth experiments at constant algal concentrations. PMID:23213362

  16. Bubble Chamber : A novel technique for measuring thermonuclear rates at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Talwar, R.; Benesh, J.; Digiovine, B.; Grames, J.; Holt, R. J.; Kharashvili, G.; Meekins, D.; Moser, D.; Poelkar, M.; Rehm, K. E.; Robinson, A.; Sonnenschein, A.; Stutzman, M.; Suleiman, R.; Tennant, C.; Ugalde, C.

    2016-03-01

    Adopting ideas from dark matter search experiments, we have found that a superheated liquid in a bubble detector is sensitive to recoils produced by γ-ray beams impinging on the nuclei in the liquid. Such a target-detector system has a density factor of four orders of magnitude higher than conventional gas targets and is practically insensitive to the γ-ray beam itself. Also, since photodisintegration reactions have approximately two orders of magnitude higher cross-sections than direct particle capture reactions, such a technique can pave the way towards measuring these reactions within the stellar Gamow window. In an effort to study the 16O(γ , α)12C system using the bubble chamber technique, the first test of the superheated N2O liquid with a low-energy bremsstrahlung beam at JLab has been completed. This test has been performed to understand the background contributions from 17O and 18O nuclei in N2O. The experimental technique, results and future plans will be presented. This work has been supported by US DOE (DE-AC02-06CH11357) and Jefferson Science Associations, LLC (DE-AC05-06OR23177).

  17. Assaying of targets for nuclear measurements with a gridded ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Knitter, H. H.; Bortels, G.

    1985-06-01

    An ionization chamber with a Frisch grid is used to determine both the energy ( E) of the charge particles emitted from the sample positioned coplanar with the cathode, and the cosine of the emission angle (ϑ) with respect to the normal of the cathode Using the combined information on cosϑ and E, problems in particle counting due to sample absoprtion and scattering effect can be circumvented and sample source strengths are readily determined to an accurary of 0.3%. However, it is emphasized that the source strength can be determined from the particles emitted in a large solid angle close to 2τ sr, which means a considerable higher efficiency than for the conventional low geometry counting techniques. Moreover the present method, within reasonable limits is insensitive to source shape and thickness homogeneity. The technique will be illustrated by measurements of alpha particles and fission fragments emitted from a set of four vacuum evaporated UF 4, three electrodeposited and one suspension-sprayed 235U 3O 8 layers. The energy and angular distributions of alpha particles and of the heavy alpha recoils emitted from a self transferred 224Ra source will be discussed. The low energetic alpha recoils might be useful as probes for the investigation of ultrathin ( < 400 Å) layers.

  18. Radon emanation chamber: High sensitivity measurements for the SuperNEMO experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Soulé, B.; Collaboration: SuperNEMO Collaboration; and others

    2013-08-08

    Radon is a well-known source of background in ββ0ν experiments due to the high Q{sub β} value of one of its daughter nucleus, {sup 214}Bi. The SuperNEMO collaboration requires a maximum radon contamination of 0.1 mBq/m{sup 3} inside its next-generation double beta decay detector. To reach such a low activity, a drastic screening process has been set for the selection of the detector's materials. In addition to a good radiopurity, a low emanation rate is required. To test this parameter, a Radon Emanation Setup is running at CENBG. It consists in a large emanation chamber connected to an electrostatic detector. By measuring large samples and having a low background level, this setup reaches a sensitivity of a few μ Bq. m{sup −2}. d{sup −1} and is able to qualify materials used in the construction of the SuperNEMO detector.

  19. Development studies for the ILC: Measurements and simulations for a time projection chamber with GEM technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ledermann, Bernhard; Kaminski, Jochen; Kappler, Steffen; Müller, Thomas

    2007-10-01

    A Time Projection Chamber (TPC) with Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology is well suited for usage as central tracker at the International Linear Collider (ILC). To study the high potential of this detector type a small prototype of 25 cm length was built in Karlsruhe and used in several experimental setups. In this publication the results of these measurements and of additional Monte Carlo simulations are presented. By introducing the so-called equivalent drift distance a combination of all results was possible leading to a recommended configuration of the multi-GEM tower for the ILC-TPC. It will be shown that for conditions considered in the TESLA-TDR the transverse spatial resolution will be able to reach 65 μm for 10 cm and 190 μm for 200 cm drift at the ILC. This as well as the expectations for longitudinal spatial resolution, for energy resolutions of the specific ionization, and for single pad row efficiency should be able to meet the requirements of a future ILC-TPC.

  20. Chamber leakage effects on measured gas concentrations during contained demilitarization tests at NTS X-Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher R. Shadix; Joel Lipkin

    1999-11-01

    A series of contained explosive detonation and propellant burn experiments was conducted during 1996 and 1997 using a specially constructed, large, underground chamber located in the X-tunnel complex at Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS).

  1. Measurements of Gas-Wall Partitioning of Oxidized Species in Environmental Smog Chambers and Teflon Sampling Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krechmer, J.; Pagonis, D.; Ziemann, P. J.; Jimenez, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Environmental "smog" chambers have played an integral role in atmospheric aerosol research for decades. Recently, many works have demonstrated that the loss of gas-phase material to fluorinated ethylene propylene (FEP) chamber walls can have significant effects on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) yield results. The effects of gas-wall partitioning on highly oxidized species is still controversial, however. In this work we performed a series of experiments examining the losses of oxidized gas-phase compounds that were generated in-situ­ in an environmental chamber. The loss of species to the walls was measured using three chemical ionization mass spectrometry techniques: proton-transfer-reaction (PTR), nitrate (NO3-) ion, and iodide (I-). Many oxidized species have wall loss timescales ranging between 15 to 45 minutes and scale according to the molecule's estimated saturation concentration c* and functional groups. By comparing results of the different techniques, and in particular by the use of the "wall-less" NO3- source, we find that measuring species with high chamber wall-loss rates is complicated by the use of a standard ion-molecule reaction (IMR) region, as well as long Teflon sampling lines, which can be important sinks for gas-phase species. This effect is observed even for semi-volatile species and could have significant effects on ambient sampling techniques that make highly time-resolved measurements using long sampling lines, such as eddy covariance measurements.

  2. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and inaccuracy caused by inappropriate air velocity or sweep air flow...

  3. Measurement and validation of GHz-band whole-body average SAR in a human volunteer using reverberation chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jianqing; Suzuki, Tokio; Fujiwara, Osamu; Harima, Katsushige

    2012-12-01

    The World Health Organization’s (WHO) recommendation on the need for further research for radio-frequency dosimetry has promoted studies on the whole-body average-specific absorption rate (WBA-SAR) in various kinds of anatomical-based numerical models. For experimental validation of GHz-band WBA-SARs in a real human, however, there have not so far been any published papers, despite the fact that, in 1982, Hill measured WBA-SARs at frequencies less than 40 MHz in human volunteers using a TEM-cell exposure system. In this study, we provide a measurement technique with a reverberation chamber for validating numerical dosimetry results on GHz-band WBA-SARs in living humans. We measured WBA-SARs at 1, 1.5 and 2 GHz for a 22 year old male volunteer, with a height of 173 cm and a weight of 73 kg, in the reverberation chamber, and compared the results with the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation. The reverberation chamber was excited by using a signal generator through an amplifier with an output power of 30-40 mW, which produced inside the chamber with the volunteer an average electric field strength of 5 V m-1 equivalent to an average power spectral density of 6.6 μW cm-2. The WBA-SARs were obtained from the measured S11 and S21 together with the power density. On the other hand, the WBA-SARs have been calculated using the FDTD method for an adult male model with almost the same physique as that of the volunteer exposed to the electromagnetic field in the reverberation chamber. From the comparison between the measured and the calculated WBA-SARs, we could confirm that the measured GHz-band WBA-SARs approximately agree with the FDTD calculated results.

  4. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  5. Computer controlled chamber measurements for clay adherence relevant for potential dioxin exposure through skin.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Alesia; Bursac, Zoran; Johnson, Wayne; Davis, Jasmine

    2012-01-01

    A computer-controlled mechanical chamber was used to control the contact between aluminum sheet samples laden with clay, and cotton sheet samples for the measurement of mass transfer. The contact parameters of pressure (20 to 60 kPa) and time (10 to 70 sec) were varied for 160 multiple experiments of mass soil transfer. Before log transformation the average transfer for 'First Transfer' of clay particles was 34.4 ± 6.3 mg/8.97 cm(2) while that for 'Total Transfer' was 36.1 ± 6.8 mg/8.97 cm(2). Second contact, therefore, resulted in an average transfer of 1.70 ± 0.76 mg/8.97 cm(2). These values are well above adherence values measured for potting soil and sand as reported for previous experiments using the same methodologies. Based on the univariate analysis and the multiple regression analysis we were able to see some effect of parameters on the clay adherence values. The effect of pressure increases was significant for the higher levels of 50 and 60 kPa. In addition, we observed that increases in temperature were significant for 'First Transfer,' and less so for 'Total Transfer'. Past experiments using potting soil and play sand show high adherence values to human cadaver skin over cotton sample; the same scenario would be expected for clay. This data set can be used to improve estimates of dermal exposure to dioxins found in ball clays often used by artisans in the making of pottery. PMID:22320690

  6. High temporal resolution ecosystem CH4, CO2 and H2O flux data measured with a novel chamber technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Riis Christiansen, Jesper

    2016-04-01

    Soil-atmosphere exchange of greenhouse gases (GHGs) is commonly measured with closed static chambers (Pihlatie et al., 2013) with off-site gas chromatographic (GC) analysis for CH4 and N2O. Static chambers are widely used to observe in detail the effect of experimental manipulations, like climate change experiments, on GHG exchange (e.g. Carter et al., 2012). However, the low sensitivity of GC systems necessitates long measurement times and manual sampling, which increases the disturbance of the exchange of GHGs and leads to potential underestimation of fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2011; Creelman et al., 2013). The recent emergence of field proof infrared lasers using cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) have increased frequency and precision of concentration measurements and enabled better estimates of GHG fluxes (Christiansen et al., 2015) due to shorter chamber enclosure times. This minimizes the negative impact of the chamber enclosure on the soil-atmosphere gas exchange rate. Secondly, an integral aspect of understanding GHG exchange in terrestrial ecosystem is to achieve high temporal coverage. This is needed to capture the often dynamic behavior where fluxes can change rapidly over the course of days or even a few hours in response to e.g. rain events. Consequently, low temporal coverage in measurements of GHG exchange have in many past investigations led to highly uncertain annual budgets which severely limits our understanding of the ecosystem processes interacting with the climate system through GHG exchange. Real-time field measurements at high temporal resolution are needed to obtain a much more detailed understanding of the processes governing ecosystem CH4 exchange as well as for better predicting the effects of climate and environmental changes. We combined a state-of-the-art field applicable CH4 sensor (Los Gatos UGGA) with a newly developed ecosystem-level automatic chamber controlled by a LI-COR 8100/8150 system. The chamber is capable of

  7. Reproducibility and Agreement Between 2 Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography Devices for Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Kenneth M.; Maram, Jyotsna; Pan, Xiaojing; Dastiridou, Anna; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Ho, Alex; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Srinivas R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare anterior chamber angle parameters based on the location of Schwalbe line (SL) from 2 spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) instruments and to measure their reproducibility. Methods: Forty-two eyes from 21 normal, healthy participants underwent imaging of the inferior irido-corneal angle with the Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCT under tightly controlled low-light conditions. SL-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular iris space area (SL-TISA) were measured by masked, certified graders at the Doheny Imaging Reading Center using customized grading software. Interinstrument and intrainstrument, as well as interobserver and intraobserver reproducibility of SL-AOD and SL-TISA measurements were evaluated by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots with limits of agreement (LoA). Results: The mean SL-AOD was 0.662±0.191 mm in Spectralis and 0.677±0.213 mm in Cirrus. The mean SL-TISA was 0.250±0.073 mm2 in Spectralis and 0.256±0.082 mm2 in Cirrus. The agreement for intrainstrument (ICCs>0.979), intragrader (ICCs>0.992), and intergrader (ICCs>0.929) was excellent. Excellent agreement between the 2 devices was also documented with a mean difference of −0.016 (LoA −0.125 to 0.092) mm for SL-AOD and −0.007 (LoA −0.056 to 0.043) mm2 in SL-TISA. Conclusions: Both SD-OCTs provided comparable measurements and permitted calculation of SL-based angle metrics. There was excellent interinstrument and intrainstrument and intraobserver and interobserver reproducibility for Spectralis and Cirrus SD-OCTs, suggesting true interchangeability between SD-OCT devices. This has the potential to lead to development of standardized grading assessments and quantification of angle parameters that would be valid across various SD-OCT devices. PMID:26200742

  8. Spatial Accumulation-Rate Pattern Inferred from Radar Internal Layers and Point Measurements of Velocity and Accumulation near Taylor Mouth, Victoria Land

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddington, E. D.; Neumann, T. A.; Morse, D. L.; Marshall, H.

    2002-12-01

    Internal layers in ice sheets, as measured by ice-penetrating radar, are most likely isochrones. The depth to a shallow internal layer is proportional to the local accumulation rate. However, low-frequency radars often do not record very shallow layers. High-frequency radars (GPR) record shallow layers, but cannot detect the deeper layers that reflect longer-term patterns of climate. Older, deeper layers are also influenced to an increasing degree by accumulated strain due to ice flow, and by the upstream accumulation rate. For this Geophysical Inverse Problem, our Forward Model is a steady-state ice-flow model with measured ice-sheet surface topography, ice thickness, and flowband width, which tracks particles to create modelled internal layers. Ice motion is driven by the input flux into the upper end of the flowband, and by the accumulation pattern along the flowband. To solve the Inverse Problem, our observations comprise depth of an internal layer, and point measurements of accumulation rate and surface velocity. Associated uncertainties are also required. We use Least-Squares or Singular-Value Decomposition to solve for model parameters (input ice flux, piece-wise linear accumulation-rate profile, and layer age) that minimize the mismatch between the data and the model estimates of the data. If the layer age and its uncertainty are known independently, they can also be used. Variable weights can be assigned to each type of data. The data-resolution matrix shows that, for shallow layers, we can resolve high-wavenumber variations in accumulation rate. For deeper layers, we resolve spatial averages of accumulation rates. We apply the model to a flowband at Taylor Mouth between Taylor Dome and Taylor Glacier. The model finds more variation in the inferred accumulation-rate profile than in the depth-profile of an internal layer. The new accumulation-rate profile produces an improved chronology for an ice core collected along the flowline.

  9. Direct measurements of the ozone formation potential from dairy cattle emissions using a transportable smog chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, Cody J.; Yang, Wenli; Green, Peter G.; Mitloehner, Frank; Malkina, Irina L.; Flocchini, Robert G.; Kleeman, Michael J.

    Tropospheric ozone continues to be an air pollution problem in the United States, particularly in California, Texas, and across the eastern seaboard. The obvious sources of ozone precursors have been largely controlled over the past several decades, leading to the critical examination of secondary sources. In particular, California has new air quality rules addressing agricultural sources of ozone precursors, including dairy farms. Some recent estimates predict that dairy cattle are second only to on-road vehicles as a leading source of ozone precursor emissions in California's San Joaquin Valley. The objective of this work was to directly measure the ozone formation potential from dairy housing. A transportable "smog" chamber was constructed and validated using organic gases known to be present in dairy emissions. The ozone formation potential of emissions from eight non-lactating dairy cows and their fresh waste was then directly evaluated in the field at a completely enclosed cow corral on the campus of the University of California, Davis. The results demonstrate that the majority of the ozone formation is explained by ethanol (EtOH) in the emissions from the dairy cows, not by acetone as previously thought. Ozone formation potential is generally small, with <20 ppb of ozone produced under typical conditions when EtOH concentrations were ˜200 ppb and NO x concentrations were ˜50 ppb. The results match our current understanding of atmospheric ozone formation potential, ruling out the possibility of unknown organic compounds in dairy emissions with significant ozone formation potential. Simulations carried out with a modified form of the Caltech Atmospheric Chemistry Mechanism verify that actual ozone formation from dairy emissions is much lower than what would be predicted using the current regulatory profiles. Based on these results, the ozone formation potential of emissions from dairy cattle in California seems to be lower than previously estimated.

  10. Using transplants to measure accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes in forests of western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosso, A.L.; Muir, Patricia S.; Rambo, T.

    2001-01-01

    We sought a simple and effective transplant method that could be used to measure biomass accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes. Trials were carried out in the Pseudotsuga menziesii-dominated forests of western Oregon. We tested multiple transplant methods over a 13-month period while comparing accumulation rates of Antitrichia curtipendula (Hedw.) Brid. and Isothecium myosuroides Brid. among an old-growth stand, a young stand, and a recent clearcut. In our study area, Antitrichia is considered to be an old-growth associate while Isothecium is a more ubiquitous species. Methods tested included containment in net bags, containment in hairnets, and directly tying mats to substrates. Three sizes of transplants were tested with both natural and inert artificial substrates. Transplants of approximately five g enclosed in plastic net bags and tied to either natural or artificial substrates worked well for our purposes. Only minor differences were found in mean accumulation rates between the old growth and young stand, though variation in accumulation rates was higher in the old growth. Neither species appeared capable of surviving in the clearcut. Antitrichia accumulated biomass 60% faster in the canopy than in the understory on average. Antitrichia also accumulated at a faster rate than Isothecium, with mean 13-month biomass increases of 11.8 and 3.7% respectively for 5 g transplants in the understory. Our results suggest that Antitrichia's association with old growth may be due more to dispersal or establishment limitations than to a decreased ability to grow in young stands.

  11. Forest Ecosystem respiration estimated from eddy covariance and chamber measurements under high turbulence and substantial tree mortality from bark beetles

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Speckman, Heather N.; Frank, John M.; Bradford, John B.; Miles, Brianna L.; Massman, William J.; Parton, William J.; Ryan, Michael G.

    2015-01-01

    Eddy covariance nighttime fluxes are uncertain due to potential measurement biases. Many studies report eddy covariance nighttime flux lower than flux from extrapolated chamber measurements, despite corrections for low turbulence. We compared eddy covariance and chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration at the GLEES Ameriflux site over seven growing seasons under high turbulence (summer night mean friction velocity (u*) = 0.7 m s−1), during which bark beetles killed or infested 85% of the aboveground respiring biomass. Chamber-based estimates of ecosystem respiration during the growth season, developed from foliage, wood and soil CO2 efflux measurements, declined 35% after 85% of the forest basal area had been killed or impaired by bark beetles (from 7.1 ±0.22 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2005 to 4.6 ±0.16 μmol m−2 s−1 in 2011). Soil efflux remained at ~3.3 μmol m−2 s−1 throughout the mortality, while the loss of live wood and foliage and their respiration drove the decline of the chamber estimate. Eddy covariance estimates of fluxes at night remained constant over the same period, ~3.0 μmol m−2 s−1 for both 2005 (intact forest) and 2011 (85% basal area killed or impaired). Eddy covariance fluxes were lower than chamber estimates of ecosystem respiration (60% lower in 2005, and 32% in 2011), but the mean night estimates from the two techniques were correlated within a year (r2 from 0.18-0.60). The difference between the two techniques was not the result of inadequate turbulence, because the results were robust to a u* filter of > 0.7 m s−1. The decline in the average seasonal difference between the two techniques was strongly correlated with overstory leaf area (r2=0.92). The discrepancy between methods of respiration estimation should be resolved to have confidence in ecosystem carbon flux estimates.

  12. Snow accumulation of a high alpine catchment derived from LiDAR measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Schöber, J.; Seiser, B.; Fischer, A.; Stötter, J.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-12-01

    The spatial distribution of snow accumulation substantially affects the seasonal course of water storage and runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Whereas the areal extent of snow cover can be recorded by satellite data, spatial distribution of snow depth and hence snow water equivalent (SWE) is difficult to measure on catchment scale. In this study we present the application of airborne LiDAR (Light Detecting And Ranging) data to extract snow depths and accumulation distribution in an alpine catchment. Airborne LiDAR measurements were performed in a glacierized catchment in the Ötztal Alps at the beginning and the end of three accumulation seasons. The resulting digital elevation models (DEMs) were used to calculate surface elevation changes throughout the winter season. These surface elevation changes were primarily referred to as snow depths and are discussed concerning measured precipitation and the spatial characteristics of the accumulation distribution in glacierized and unglacierized areas. To determine the redistribution of catchment precipitation, snow depths were converted into SWE using a simple regression model. Snow accumulation gradients and snow redistribution were evaluated for 100 m elevation bands. Mean surface elevation changes of the whole catchment ranges from 1.97 m to 2.65 m within the analyzed accumulation seasons. By analyzing the distribution of the snow depths, elevation dependent patterns were obtained as a function of the topography in terms of aspect and slope. The high resolution DEMs show clearly the higher variation of snow depths in rough unglacierized areas compared to snow depths on smooth glacier surfaces. Mean snow depths in glacierized areas are higher than in unglacierized areas. Maximum mean snow depths of 100 m elevation bands are found between 2900 m and 3000 m a.s.l. in unglacierized areas and between 2800 m and 2900 m a.s.l. in glacierized areas, respectively. Calculated accumulation gradients range from 8% to

  13. Measuring NIRCam's position and orientation in 6 DOF using one reference mirror surface inside an environmental chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweiger, Paul F.; Andersen, Torben B.

    2015-09-01

    The Near Infrared Camera (NIRCam) instrument used to align and obtain science data for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) was tested at the module level at flight-like cryogenic temperature. This paper explains the background that created the innovative techniques used to measure NIRCam's modules alignments in 6 degrees of freedom (DOF) inside a thermal vacuum chamber. All 6 DOF were measured remotely, through a single chamber window port, using only a flat reference mirror/reticle surface mounted on each module. This measured orientation was then used to determine the optical input axis and entrance pupil for each module. The accuracy achieved was on the order of 20 microns in position and 5 arc seconds in angular orientation.

  14. USE OF AN INERT RADIOACTIVE PARTICLE FOR MEASURING PARTICLE ACCUMULATION BY FILTER-FEEDING BIVALVE MOLLUSCS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of an inert, radioactively labeled microsphere as a measure of particle accumulation (filtration activity) by Mulinia lateralis (Say) and Mytilus edulis L. was evaluated. Bottom sediment plus temperature and salinity of the water were varied to induce changes in filtratio...

  15. TRANSFORMATION AND TRANSPORT OF SEMI-VOLATILE ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM SOIL: MEASURING DICARBOXIMIDES IN A CHAMBER

    EPA Science Inventory

    A laboratory chamber was used to determine transport of a suspected anti-androgenic dicarboximide fungicide, vinclozolin (3,5-dichlorophenyl)-5-methyl-5-vinyl-oxzoli-dine-2,4-dione) and three degradation products from a North Carolina Piedmont aquic hapludult soil following a s...

  16. A Reference Method for Measuring Emissions of SVOCs in Small Chambers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) are indoor air pollutants that may may have significant adverse effects on human health, and emission of SVOCs from building materials and consumer products is of growing concern. Few chamber studies have been conducted due to the challenge...

  17. SU-E-T-118: Dose Verification for Accuboost Applicators Using TLD, Ion Chamber and Gafchromic Film Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Chisela, W; Yao, R; Dorbu, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To verify dose delivered with HDR Accuboost applicators using TLD, ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurements and to examine applicator leakage. Methods: A microSelectron HDR unit was used to deliver a dose of 50cGy to the mid-plane of a 62mm thick solid water phantom using dwell times from Monte Carlo pre-calculated nomograms for a 60mm, 70mm Round and 60mm Skin-Dose Optimized (SDO) applicators respectively. GafChromic EBT3+ film was embedded in the phantom midplane horizontally to measure dose distribution. Absolute dose was also measured with TLDs and an ADCL calibrated parallel-plate ion chamber placed in the film plane at field center for each applicator. The film was calibrated using 6MV x-ray beam. TLDs were calibrated in a Cs-137 source at UW-Madison calibration laboratory. Radiation leakage through the tungsten alloy shell was measured with a film wrapped around outside surface of a 60mm Round applicator. Results: Measured maximum doses at field center are consistently lower than predicated by 5.8% for TLD, 8.8% for ion chamber, and 2.6% for EBT3+ film on average, with measurement uncertainties of 2.2%, 0.3%, and 2.9% for TLD, chamber, film respectively. The total standard uncertainties for ion chamber and Gafchromic film measurement are 4.9% and 4.6% respectively[1]. The area defined by the applicator aperture was covered by 80% of maximum dose for 62mm compression thickness. When 100cGy is delivered to mid-plane with a 60mm Round applicator, surface dose ranges from 60cGy to a maximum of 145cGy, which occurs at source entrance to the applicator. Conclusion: Measured doses by all three techniques are consistently lower than predicted in our measurements. For a compression thickness of 62 mm, the field size defined by the applicator is only covered by 80% of prescribed dose. Radiation leakage of up to 145cGy was found at the source entrance of applicators.

  18. Automated Soil Flux Chamber Measurements with Five Species Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy and New Realtime Soil Flux Processor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alstad, Karrin; Saad, Nabil; Tan, Sze

    2015-04-01

    Continuous soil flux chamber measurements remains a key tool for determining production and sequestration of direct and indirect greenhouse gases. Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy has radically simplified soil flux studies by providing simultaneous measurements of five gases: CO2, CH4, N2O, NH3, and H2O in one analyzer (Picarro G2508) and by lending itself to field deployment. Successful use of the Picarro G2508 for continuous soil flux measurements in a variety of ecosystem types has already been demonstrated. Most recently, we have developed a real-time processing software to simplify chamber measurements and calculations of soil flux with the G2508 CRDS analyzer. The new Realtime Soil Flux Processor is designed to work with all chamber types and sizes, and provides a multi-option for real-time flux curve mathematical fitting and generation of flux values of N2O, CO2 & CH4 in addition to NH3 and H2O. The software features include: Sequence table Flexible data tagging feature Ceiling concentration shut-off parameter Set run-time interval Temperature/pressure input for field monitoring and volumetric conversion Manual start/stop override The Realtime Soil Flux Processor GUI interface and functionalities are presented, and results from a variety of sampling designs are demonstrated to emphasize program flexibility and field capability.

  19. The effect of pseudo-accumulation in the measurement of fatigue laser-induced damage threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melninkaitis, A.; Mirauskas, J.; Jupé, M.; Ristau, D.; Arenberg, J. W.; Sirutkaitis, V.

    2008-10-01

    Laser-induced damage threshold determination as a function of the number of incident pulses on a specific optic is a classic problem in laser damage studies. There are several models of the fundamental mechanisms explaining the fatigue laser damage behavior including temperature accumulation and changes of electronic or chemical material structure. Herewith we discuss the effects of unstable laser radiation on S-on-1 laser-induced damage probability. Numerical simulations of S-on-1 measurements for specific cases of defect densities, spot sizes and beam jitters are performed. It is demonstrated that the statistical effects of "pseudo-accumulation" reasoned by unstable laser radiation in transparent dielectrics containing nanometer sized defects leads to accumulation-like behavior. The magnitudes of the random beam walking and the energy fluctuations are directly related to the damage probability. Experimental results are also introduced to illustrate the theoretical results.

  20. Measurements of Beam Momentum at the Stacking Energy of the Accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Werkema, Steve; /Fermilab

    2000-11-29

    The momentum and orbit length of beam on the central and extraction orbits of the Antiproton Source Accumulator are calculated from measurements of revolution frequency and transverse beam position. This report gives the results of measurements made at the stacking energy before and after the 1998-99 Accumulator lattice upgrade. Before the lattice upgrade, the Accumulator central orbit length and momentum are measured to be: L{sub c} = 474.0433 {+-} 0.0025 m, p{sub c} = 8819.5 {+-} 4.1 MeV/c. After the lattice upgrade the central orbit length and momentum are measured to be: L{sub c} = 474.0532 {+-} 0.0016 m, p{sub c} = 8803.4 {+-} 2.7 MeV/c. The extraction orbit length and momentum prior to the lattice upgrade are measured to be: L{sub e} = 474.1916 {+-} 0.0054 m, p{sub e} = 8900.8 {+-} 9.2 MeV/c. After the lattice upgrade the extraction orbit length and momentum are measured to be: L{sub e} = 474.1599 {+-} 0.0036 m, p{sub e} = 8886.3 {+-} 6.1 MeV/c.

  1. Measuring oxygen tension modulation, induced by a new pre-radiotherapy therapeutic, in a mammary window chamber mouse model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schafer, Rachel; Gmitro, Arthur F.

    2015-03-01

    Tumor regions under hypoxic or low oxygen conditions respond less effectively to many treatment strategies, including radiation therapy. A novel investigational therapeutic, NVX-108 (NuvOx Pharma), has been developed to increase delivery of oxygen through the use of a nano-emulsion of dodecofluoropentane. By raising pO2 levels prior to delivering radiation, treatment efficacy may be improved. To aid in evaluating the novel drug, oxygen tension was quantitatively measured, spatially and temporally, to record the effect of administrating NVX-108 in an orthotopic mammary window chamber mouse model of breast cancer. The oxygen tension was measured through the use of an oxygen-sensitive coating, comprised of phosphorescent platinum porphyrin dye embedded in a polystyrene matrix. The coating, applied to the surface of the coverslip of the window chamber through spin coating, is placed in contact with the mammary fat pad to record the oxygenation status of the surface tissue layer. Prior to implantation of the window chamber, a tumor is grown in the SCID mouse model by injection of MCF-7 cells into the mammary fat pad. Two-dimensional spatial distributions of the pO2 levels were obtained through conversion of measured maps of phosphorescent lifetime. The resulting information on the spatial and temporal variation of the induced oxygen modulation could provide valuable insight into the optimal timing between administration of NVX-108 and radiation treatment to provide the most effective treatment outcome.

  2. Geodimeter measurements of slip and strain accumulation along the san andreas fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Prescott, W.H.

    1974-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducts repeated geodimeter surveys of trilateration networks in central California in order to study the processes of slip and strain accumulation along the San Andreas fault. The precision of distance measurement is described by a standard deviation ?? = (a2 + b2L2) 1 2 where a = 3mm, b = 2 ?? 10-7, and L is the line length. Within the precision of measurement, no anomalous strain episodes preceding earthquakes or even strain discontinuities at the time of earthquakes were detected from repeated measurements of lines near the epicenters of small (magnitude 4.5-5.1) earthquakes. Annual measurements of small (5-km aperture) strain polygons near the San Andreas fault have not proved strain accumulation in a 3-year period. Repeated measurements of longer lines over periods of 8 to 14 years indicate changes that cannot be attributed to fault slip and must represent strain accumulation at the level of a few parts in 107 per year. ?? 1974.

  3. Measurement of accumulation of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots by pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Kenton L; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Buchanan, Roger A

    2012-01-01

    As the production and use of nanomaterials increases, it is important to understand their environmental and biological fate. Because their unmatched chemical, physical, and optical properties make them useful in a wide variety of applications including biomedical imaging, photo-voltaics, and light emitting diodes, the use of semiconductor nanocrystals such as quantum dots (QDs) is increasing rapidly. Although QDs hold great potential in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications, the environmental implications of these particles is largely unexplored. The nanocrystal core of many types of QDs contains the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), so possible release of Cd from the QD core is cause for concern. Because many types of QDs are miscible in water, QD interactions with aquatic organisms and their environment require more attention. In the present study we used fluorometry to measure time and dose dependent uptake, accumulation, and post-exposure clearance of accumulated QDs in the gut tract by the aquatic vertebrate Pimephales promelas. By using fluorometry, we were able to measure accumulated QD concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to quantify accumulated QDs in an organism and is an important step in understanding the interactions among QDs in aquatic organisms and environments. PMID:22942867

  4. Measurement of Accumulation of Semiconductor Nanocrystal Quantum Dots by Pimephales Promelas

    PubMed Central

    Leigh, Kenton L.; Bouldin, Jennifer L.; Buchanan, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    As the production and use of nanomaterials increases, it is important to understand their environmental and biological fate. Because their unmatched chemical, physical, and optical properties make them useful in a wide variety of applications including biomedical imaging, photo-voltaics, and light emitting diodes, the use of semiconductor nanocrystals such as quantum dots (QDs) is increasing rapidly. Although QDs hold great potential in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications, the environmental implications of these particles is largely unexplored. The nanocrystal core of many types of QDs contains the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), so possible release of Cd from the QD core is cause for concern. Because many types of QDs are miscible in water, QD interactions with aquatic organisms and their environment require more attention. In the present study we used fluorometry to measure time and dose dependent uptake, accumulation, and post-exposure clearance of accumulated QDs in the gut tract by the aquatic vertebrate Pimephales promelas. By using fluorometry, we were able to measure accumulated QD concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to quantify accumulated QDs in an organism and is an important step in understanding the interactions among QDs in aquatic organisms and environments. PMID:22942867

  5. Spatial Measurements of Perfusion, Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Liposomes Accumulation in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Shawn; Mirmilshteyn, Daniel; Zheng, Jinzi; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes is a critical determinant of their efficacy. Both the chaotic tumor microcirculation and elevated IFP are linked to the heterogeneous intra-tumoral distribution of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems such as liposomes. In the present study, the relationship between tumor microcirculation, elevated IFP, and accumulation of nanoparticles was investigated through in vivo experimentation. This was accomplished by evaluation of the tumor microcirculation using dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and measurement of tumor IFP using a novel image-guided robotic needle placement system connected to the micro-CT scanner. The intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes was determined by CT image-based assessment of a nanoparticle liposomal formulation that stably encapsulate the contrast agent iohexol (CT-liposomes). CT imaging allowed for co-localization of the spatial distribution of tumor hemodynamics, IFP and CT-liposome accumulation in an individual subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. Measurements led to the discovery that perfusion and plasma volume fraction are strong mediators of the intra-tumoral distribution of liposomes. Furthermore, the results suggest that IFP plays an indirect role in mediating liposome distribution through modulating blood flow. PMID:27583578

  6. Vocal Dose Measures: Quantifying Accumulated Vibration Exposure in Vocal Fold Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Titze, Ingo R.; Švec, Jan G.; Popolo, Peter S.

    2011-01-01

    To measure the exposure to self-induced tissue vibration in speech, three vocal doses were defined and described: distance dose, which accumulates the distance that tissue particles of the vocal folds travel in an oscillatory trajectory; energy dissipation dose, which accumulates the total amount of heat dissipated over a unit volume of vocal fold tissues; and time dose, which accumulates the total phonation time. These doses were compared to a previously used vocal dose measure, the vocal loading index, which accumulates the number of vibration cycles of the vocal folds. Empirical rules for viscosity and vocal fold deformation were used to calculate all the doses from the fundamental frequency (F0) and sound pressure level (SPL) values of speech. Six participants were asked to read in normal, monotone, and exaggerated speech and the doses associated with these vocalizations were calculated. The results showed that large F0 and SPL variations in speech affected the dose measures, suggesting that accumulation of phonation time alone is insufficient. The vibration exposure of the vocal folds in normal speech was related to the industrial limits for hand-transmitted vibration, in which the safe distance dose was derived to be about 500 m. This limit was found rather low for vocalization; it was related to a comparable time dose of about 17 min of continuous vocalization, or about 35 min of continuous reading with normal breathing and unvoiced segments. The voicing pauses in normal speech and dialogue effectively prolong the safe time dose. The derived safety limits for vocalization will likely require refinement based on a more detailed knowledge of the differences in hand and vocal fold tissue morphology and their response to vibrational stress, and on the effect of recovery of the vocal fold tissue during voicing pauses. PMID:12959470

  7. Continuous measurement of soil carbon efflux with Forced Diffusion (FD) chambers in a tundra ecosystem of Alaska.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yongwon; Park, Sang-Jong; Lee, Bang-Yong; Risk, David

    2016-10-01

    Soil is a significant source of CO2 emission to the atmosphere, and this process is accelerating at high latitudes due to rapidly changing climates. To investigate the sensitivity of soil CO2 emissions to high temporal frequency variations in climate, we performed continuous monitoring of soil CO2 efflux using Forced Diffusion (FD) chambers at half-hour intervals, across three representative Alaskan soil cover types with underlying permafrost. These sites were established during the growing season of 2015, on the Seward Peninsula of western Alaska. Our chamber system is conceptually similar to a dynamic chamber, though FD is more durable and water-resistant and consumes less power, lending itself to remote deployments. We first conducted methodological tests, testing different frequencies of measurement, and did not observe a significant difference between collecting data at 30-min and 10-min measurement intervals (averaged half-hourly) (p<0.001). Temperature and thaw depth, meanwhile, are important parameters in influencing soil carbon emission. At the study sites, we observed cumulative soil CO2 emissions of 62.0, 126.3, and 133.5gCm(-2) for the growing period, in sphagnum, lichen, and tussock, respectively, corresponding to 83.8, 63.7, and 79.6% of annual carbon emissions. Growing season soil carbon emissions extrapolated over the region equated to 0.17±0.06 MgC over the measurement period. This was 47% higher than previous estimates from coarse-resolution manual chamber sampling, presumably because it better captured high efflux events. This finding demonstrates how differences in measurement method and frequency can impact interpretations of seasonal and annual soil carbon budgets. We conclude that annual CO2 efflux-measurements using FD chamber networks would be an effective means for quantifying growing and non-growing season soil carbon budgets, with optimal pairing with time-lapse imagery for tracking local and regional changes in environment and climate

  8. Iris as a reflector for differential absorption low-coherence interferometry to measure glucose level in the anterior chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yong; Zeng, Nan; Ji, Yanhong; Li, Yao; Dai, Xiangsong; Li, Peng; Duan, Lian; Ma, Hui; He, Yonghong

    2011-01-01

    We present a method of glucose concentration detection in the anterior chamber with a differential absorption optical low-coherent interferometry (LCI) technique. Back-reflected light from the iris, passing through the anterior chamber twice, was selectively obtained with the LCI technique. Two light sources, one centered within (1625 nm) and the other centered outside (1310 nm) of a glucose absorption band were used for differential absorption measurement. In the eye model and pig eye experiments, we obtained a resolution glucose level of 26.8 mg/dL and 69.6 mg/dL, respectively. This method has a potential application for noninvasive detection of glucose concentration in aqueous humor, which is related to the glucose concentration in blood.

  9. [Laser flare measurement with 3 different nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs after phacoemulsification with posterior chamber lens implantation].

    PubMed

    Schmidl, B; Mester, U; Diestelhorst, M; Konen, W

    1997-01-01

    In a prospective, randomised, double-masked, parallel-group study we compared the antiinflammatory effect of diclofenac sodium 0.1%, flurbiprofen 0.03%, and indomethacin 1.0% ophthalmic suspension in 99 patients undergoing phacoemulsification and posterior chamber lens implantation. The reduction in anterior chamber flare from day 1, as measured with the laser flare-meter (FM-500, KOWA) on day 4-5 postoperatively was significantly greater in the diclofenac group than with flurbiprofen (p = 0.022). Patients treated with diclofenac had significantly less burning and stinging than patients on flurbiprofen and indomethacin on postoperative days 4-5 (p < 0.0001) and 12-14 (p = 0.001). Diclofenac sodium appears to be more potent than flurbiprofen in controlling intraocular inflammation after cataract surgery, while having better local tolerance than flurbiprofen or indomethacin. PMID:9132126

  10. Development of a Novel Contamination Resistant Ion Chamber for Process Tritium Measurement and Use in the JET First Trace Tritium Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Worth, L.B.C.; Pearce, R.J.H.; Bruce, J.; Banks, J.; Scales, S.

    2005-07-15

    The accuracy of process measurements of tritium with conventional ion chambers is often affected by surface tritium contamination. The measurement of tritium in the exhaust of the JET torus is particularly difficult due to surface contamination with highly tritiated hydrocarbons. JET's first unsuccessful attempt to overcome the contamination problem was to use an ion chamber, with a heating element as the chamber wall so that it could be periodically decontaminated by baking. The newly developed ion chamber works on the principle of minimising the surface area within the boundary of the anode and cathode.This paper details the design of the ion chamber, which utilises a grid of 50-micron tungsten wire to define the ion chamber wall and the collector electrode. The effective surface area which, by contamination, is able to effect the measurement of tritium within the process gas has been reduced by a factor of {approx}200 over a conventional ion chamber. It is concluded that the new process ion chamber enables sensitive accurate tritium measurements free from contamination issues. It will be a powerful new tool for future tritium experiments both to improve tritium tracking and to help in the understanding of tritium retention issues.

  11. Test and evaluation of the Argonne BPAC10 Series air chamber calorimeter designed for 20 minute measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Perry, R.B.; Fiarman, S.; Jung, E.A. ); Cremers, T. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper is the final report on DOE-OSS Task ANLE88002 Fast Air Chamber Calorimetry.'' The task objective was to design, construct, and test an isothermal air chamber calorimeter for plutonium assay of bulk samples that would meet the following requirements for sample power measurement: average sample measurement time less than 20 minutes. Measurement of samples with power output up to 10 W. Precision of better than 1% RSD for sample power greater than 1 W. Precision better than 0.010 watt SD, for sample power less than 1 W. This report gives a description of the calorimeter hardware and software and discusses the test results. The instrument operating procedure, included as an appendix, gives examples of typical input/output and explains the menu driven software. Sample measurement time of less than 20 minutes was attained by pre-equilibration of the samples in low cost precision preheaters and by prediction of equilibrium measurements. Tests at the TA55 Plutonium Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, on typical samples, indicates that the instrument meets all the measurement requirements.

  12. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao )

    1996-01-01

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  13. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao

    1996-12-31

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil & gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  14. A summary of EPA radon chamber tests and results for rounds 3 and 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.M.; Sensintaffar, E.L.

    1993-02-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency`s Office of Radiation and Indoor Air (ORIA) established the National Radon Measurement Proficiency (RMP) Program in 1986. Through this voluntary program, participants can demonstrate their ability to measure radon and/or radon decay products by submitting their detection devices to a blind test in a designated radon chamber. In this report, two EPA radon and radon decay products test chambers (chambers A and C) located at the National Air and Radiation Environmental Laboratory in Montgomery, Alabama are described. These chambers were used to expose detectors submitted for testing in Round 4 of the National Radon Measurement Proficiency Program and are used routinely for calibration purposes. Also described are the measurement and calibration procedures which were used to establish the official target values for radon and radon decay products concentrations during RMP Round 4 testing. The results for RMP Round 3 (conducted at the US DOE Environmental Measurements Laboratory radon chamber in New York) and RMP Round 4 (conducted in the two NAREL chambers) are discussed and compared. Following Round 4, the NAREL staff analyzed the collective performance for each measurement method tested in these rounds and found that all methods agreed with the target values within expected limits except for RPISU`s and charcoal adsorbers. After analyzing the RMP4 results, NAREL staff spent several months evaluating the difference in charcoal adsorber response between Round 3 and 4 by performing radon chamber tests using EPA 4-inch, open-faced charcoal adsorbers.

  15. A Comparison of Eddy Covariance and Static Vented Chamber Measurements of Greenhouse Gas Flux in Mid-South US Rice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reba, M. L.; Fong, B.; Adviento-Borbe, M. A.; Linquist, B.

    2015-12-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) production in the Lower Mississippi River Basin constitutes over 75% of US rice production, but little research has been done on water and greenhouse gas (GHG) flux in this region at the field scale. Measurements of these fluxes were made in 2014 from a 26.3 ha drill-seeded rice (CL XL 753) field. Eddy covariance measurements of water and carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes allow for an integrated field measurement of the interaction between the landscape and the atmosphere. A static vented chamber technique was also used to measure fluxes of CO2, N2O (nitrous oxide) and CH4 in the same field on 19 occasions during the rice growing season. Estimates of GHG flux using static vented chamber were compared with the GHG fluxes from the eddy covariance method. These findings begin to address the increased interest in understanding agricultural impact on net GHG emission and consumption in an understudied region of the US. Future research might include similar data collection from multiple fields where water management is varied to measure its impact on net GHG flux.

  16. Comparison of Water Potentials Measured by In Situ Psychrometry and Pressure Chamber in Morphologically Different Species 1

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Neil C.; Spurway, R. A.; Schulze, E.-D.

    1984-01-01

    Leaf water potentials measured by in situ psychrometry were compared with leaf water potentials measured by the pressure chamber technique at various values of water potential in Helianthus annuus, Helianthus nuttallii, Vigna unguiculata, Nerium oleander, Pistacia vera, and Corylus avellana. In V. unguiculata, the leaf water potentials measured by the in situ psychrometer oscillated at the same periodicity as, and proportional to, the leaf conductance. In all species, potentials measured by in situ psychrometers operating in the psychrometric mode were linearly correlated with potentials measured with the pressure chamber. However, the in situ psychrometers underestimated the leaf water potential in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials and overestimated the water potential in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana. The underestimation in the two Helianthus species at low water potentials resulted from differences in water potential across the leaf. The overestimation in P. vera, N. oleander, and C. avellana was considered to arise from low epidermal conductances in these species even after abrasion of the cuticle. Pressure-volume studies with Lycopersicon esculentum showed that less water was expressed from distal than proximal leaflets when the whole leaf was slowly pressurized. The implication of this for water relations characteristics obtained by pressure-volume techniques is discussed. We conclude that in situ psychrometers are suitable for following dynamic changes in leaf water potential, but should be used with caution on leaves with low epidermal conductances. PMID:16663415

  17. Bacterial Motility Measured by a Miniature Chamber for High-Pressure Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is one of the physical stimuli that characterize the environment of living matter. Many microorganisms thrive under high pressure and may even physically or geochemically require this extreme environmental condition. In contrast, application of pressure is detrimental to most life on Earth; especially to living organisms under ambient pressure conditions. To study the mechanism of how living things adapt to high-pressure conditions, it is necessary to monitor directly the organism of interest under various pressure conditions. Here, we report a miniature chamber for high-pressure microscopy. The chamber was equipped with a built-in separator, in which water pressure was properly transduced to that of the sample solution. The apparatus developed could apply pressure up to 150 MPa, and enabled us to acquire bright-field and epifluorescence images at various pressures and temperatures. We demonstrated that the application of pressure acted directly and reversibly on the swimming motility of Escherichia coli cells. The present technique should be applicable to a wide range of dynamic biological processes that depend on applied pressures. PMID:22942763

  18. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Grayson, J. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions). The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η) ranging between 10-3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s) in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter) are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  19. Technical Note: New methodology for measuring viscosities in small volumes characteristic of environmental chamber particle samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renbaum-Wolff, L.; Grayson, J. W.; Bertram, A. K.

    2012-10-01

    Herein, a method for the determination of viscosities of small sample volumes is introduced, with important implications for the viscosity determination of particle samples from environmental chambers (used to simulate atmospheric conditions). The amount of sample needed is < 1 μl, and the technique is capable of determining viscosities (η) ranging between 10-3 and 103 Pascal seconds (Pa s) in samples that cover a range of chemical properties and with real-time relative humidity and temperature control; hence, the technique should be well-suited for determining the viscosities, under atmospherically relevant conditions, of particles collected from environmental chambers. In this technique, supermicron particles are first deposited on an inert hydrophobic substrate. Then, insoluble beads (~1 μm in diameter) are embedded in the particles. Next, a flow of gas is introduced over the particles, which generates a shear stress on the particle surfaces. The sample responds to this shear stress by generating internal circulations, which are quantified with an optical microscope by monitoring the movement of the beads. The rate of internal circulation is shown to be a function of particle viscosity but independent of the particle material for a wide range of organic and organic-water samples. A calibration curve is constructed from the experimental data that relates the rate of internal circulation to particle viscosity, and this calibration curve is successfully used to predict viscosities in multicomponent organic mixtures.

  20. Bacterial motility measured by a miniature chamber for high-pressure microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nishiyama, Masayoshi; Kojima, Seiji

    2012-01-01

    Hydrostatic pressure is one of the physical stimuli that characterize the environment of living matter. Many microorganisms thrive under high pressure and may even physically or geochemically require this extreme environmental condition. In contrast, application of pressure is detrimental to most life on Earth; especially to living organisms under ambient pressure conditions. To study the mechanism of how living things adapt to high-pressure conditions, it is necessary to monitor directly the organism of interest under various pressure conditions. Here, we report a miniature chamber for high-pressure microscopy. The chamber was equipped with a built-in separator, in which water pressure was properly transduced to that of the sample solution. The apparatus developed could apply pressure up to 150 MPa, and enabled us to acquire bright-field and epifluorescence images at various pressures and temperatures. We demonstrated that the application of pressure acted directly and reversibly on the swimming motility of Escherichia coli cells. The present technique should be applicable to a wide range of dynamic biological processes that depend on applied pressures. PMID:22942763

  1. Density and mixture fraction measurements in a GO2/GH2 uni-element rocket chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moser, M. D.; Pal, S.; Santoro, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a renewed interest in gas/gas injectors for rocket combustion. Specifically, the proposed new concept of full-flow oxygen rich preburner systems calls for the injection of both oxygen and hydrogen into the main chamber as gaseous propellants. The technology base for gas/gas injection must mature before actual booster class systems can be designed and fabricated. Since the data base for gas/gas injection is limited to studies focusing on the global parameters of small reaction engines, there is a critical need for experiment programs that emphasize studying the mixing and combustion characteristics of GO2 and GH2 propellants from a uni-element injector point of view. The experimental study of the combusting GO2/GH2 propellant combination in a uni-element rocket chamber also provides a simplified environment, in terms of both geometry and chemistry, that can be used to verify and validate computational fluid dynamic (CFD) models.

  2. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.; Briant, James K.

    1983-01-01

    An exposure chamber includes an imperforate casing having a fluid inlet at the top and an outlet at the bottom. A single vertical series of imperforate trays is provided. Each tray is spaced on all sides from the chamber walls. Baffles adjacent some of the trays restrict and direct the flow to give partial flow back and forth across the chambers and downward flow past the lowermost pan adjacent a central plane of the chamber.

  3. Experimental measurement and modeling of snow accumulation and snowmelt in a mountain microcatchment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danko, Michal; Krajčí, Pavel; Hlavčo, Jozef; Kostka, Zdeněk; Holko, Ladislav

    2016-04-01

    Fieldwork is a very useful source of data in all geosciences. This naturally applies also to the snow hydrology. Snow accumulation and snowmelt are spatially very heterogeneous especially in non-forested, mountain environments. Direct field measurements provide the most accurate information about it. Quantification and understanding of processes, that cause these spatial differences are crucial in prediction and modelling of runoff volumes in spring snowmelt period. This study presents possibilities of detailed measurement and modeling of snow cover characteristics in a mountain experimental microcatchment located in northern part of Slovakia in Western Tatra mountains. Catchment area is 0.059 km2 and mean altitude is 1500 m a.s.l. Measurement network consists of 27 snow poles, 3 small snow lysimeters, discharge measurement device and standard automatic weather station. Snow depth and snow water equivalent (SWE) were measured twice a month near the snow poles. These measurements were used to estimate spatial differences in accumulation of SWE. Snowmelt outflow was measured by small snow lysimeters. Measurements were performed in winter 2014/2015. Snow water equivalent variability was very high in such a small area. Differences between particular measuring points reached 600 mm in time of maximum SWE. The results indicated good performance of a snow lysimeter in case of snowmelt timing identification. Increase of snowmelt measured by the snow lysimeter had the same timing as increase in discharge at catchment's outlet and the same timing as the increase in air temperature above the freezing point. Measured data were afterwards used in distributed rainfall-runoff model MIKE-SHE. Several methods were used for spatial distribution of precipitation and snow water equivalent. The model was able to simulate snow water equivalent and snowmelt timing in daily step reasonably well. Simulated discharges were slightly overestimated in later spring.

  4. Radiation damage to tetramethlysilane and tetramethlygermanium ionization chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Y.; Higuchi, M.; Oyama, K.; Akaishi, H.; Yuta, H.; Abe, K.; Hasegawa, K.; Suekane, F.; Nagamine, T.; Kawamura, N.

    1994-08-01

    Two detector media suitable for a warm liquid, ionization chamber filled with tetramethylsilane(TMS) and tetramethylgermanium(TMG) were exposed to y radiation from a (sup 60)Co source up to dose 579Gray and 902Gray, respectively. The electron lifetimes and the free ion yields were measured as a function of accumulated radiation dose. A similar behavior of the electron lifetimes and the free ion yields with increasing radiation dose was observed between the TMS and TMG ionization chambers.

  5. Flux Chamber Measurements of Methane Emissions and Stable Isotope Composition from an Arctic Wetland Using Field-Deployed Real-Time CRDS Vs Lab Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, H. A.; Stern, J. C.; Graham, H. V.; Pratt, L. M.; White, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The emission of CH4 from Arctic landscapes under warming climate is an important feedback in Earth's climate system. Studies of CH4 flux from Arctic wetlands have been growing in recent years, but few provide details on biogeochemical controls. Stable isotopic measurements help elucidate methane production and consumption pathways and offer important understanding about dynamics of CH4 cycling in Arctic systems. In order to demonstrate the possible instrumental approaches to measuring methane dynamics of wetlands in the Arctic, a fringing wetland of a small lake near the Russell Glacier in Southwestern Greenland was outfitted with static flux chambers and instrumented with a field-deployable Cavity Ring Down Spectrometer (CRDS) to measure real-time concentrations of CH4 and CO2 and their stable carbon isotopes. Several different wetland plant communities were included in the flux chamber experiments and field tests were conducted during several weeks in July 2014. Analytical measurements by CRDS were compared to batch samples analyzed in the laboratory using both Off-Axis Integrated Cavity Output Spectroscopy (ICOS) and Gas Chromatography-Combustion-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry (GC-C-IRMS) with cryogenic pre-concentration. Results from flux chamber deployments will be presented and comparisons between the real-time field measurements and laboratory instrumental techniques will be evaluated.

  6. Application of a methane carbon isotope analyzer for the investigation of δ13C of methane emission measured by the automatic chamber method in an Arctic Tundra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mastepanov, Mikhail; Christensen, Torben

    2014-05-01

    Methane emissions have been monitored by an automatic chamber method in Zackenberg valley, NE Greenland, since 2006 as a part of Greenland Ecosystem Monitoring (GEM) program. During most of the seasons the measurements were carried out from the time of snow melt (June-July) until freezing of the active layer (October-November). Several years of data, obtained by the same method, instrumentation and at exactly the same site, provided a unique opportunity for the analysis of interannual methane flux patterns and factors affecting their temporal variability. The start of the growing season emissions was found to be closely related to a date of snow melt at the site. Despite a large between year variability of this date (sometimes more than a month), methane emission started within a few days after, and was increasing for the next about 30 days. After this peak of emission, it slowly decreased and stayed more or less constant or slightly decreasing during the rest of the growing season (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013). During the soil freezing, a second peak of methane emission was found (Mastepanov et al., Nature, 2008); its amplitude varied a lot between the years, from almost undetectable to comparable with total growing season emissions. Analysis of the multiyear emission patterns (Mastepanov et al., Biogeosciences, 2013) led to hypotheses of different sources for the spring, summer and autumn methane emissions, and multiyear cycles of accumulation and release of these components to the atmosphere. For the further investigation of this it was decided to complement the monitoring system with a methane carbon isotope analyzer (Los Gatos Research, USA). The instrument was installed during 2013 field season and was successfully operating until the end of the measurement campaign (27 October). Detecting both 12C-CH4 and 13C-CH4 concentrations in real time (0.5 Hz) during automatic chamber closure (15 min), the instrument was providing data for determination of

  7. A smog chamber comparison of a microfluidic derivatization measurement of gas-phase glyoxal and methylglyoxal with other analytical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, X.; Lewis, A. C.; Richard, A.; Baeza-Romero, M. T.; Adams, T. J.; Ball, S. M.; Daniels, M. J. S.; Goodall, I. C. A.; Monks, P. S.; Peppe, S.; Ródenas García, M.; Sánchez, P.; Muñoz, A.

    2013-06-01

    A microfluidic lab-on-a-chip derivatization technique has been developed to measure part per billion volume (ppbV) mixing ratios of gaseous glyoxal (GLY) and methylglyoxal (MGLY), and the method compared with other techniques in a smog chamber experiment. The method uses o-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorobenzyl) hydroxylamine (PFBHA) as a derivatization reagent and a microfabricated planar glass micro-reactor comprising an inlet, gas and fluid splitting and combining channels, mixing junctions, and a heated capillary reaction microchannel. The enhanced phase contact area-to-volume ratio and the high heat transfer rate in the micro-reactor result in a fast and highly efficient derivatization reaction, generating an effluent stream ready for direct introduction to a gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). A linear response for GLY was observed over a calibration range 0.7 to 400 ppbV, and for MGLY of 1.2 to 300 ppbV, when derivatized under optimal reaction conditions. The method detection limits (MDLs) were 80 pptV and 200 pptV for GLY and MGLY respectively, calculated as 3 times the standard deviation of the S/N of the blank sample chromatograms. These MDLs are below or close to typical concentrations in clean ambient air. The feasibility of the technique was assessed by applying the methodology under controlled conditions to quantify of α-dicarbonyls formed during the photo-oxidation of isoprene in a large scale outdoor atmospheric simulation chamber (EUPHORE). Good general agreement was seen between microfluidic measurements and Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Broad Band Cavity Enhanced Absorption Spectroscopy (BBCEAS) and a detailed photochemical chamber box modelling calculation for both GLY and MGLY. Less good agreement was found with Proton-Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS) and Solid Phase Microextraction (SPME) derivatization methods for MGLY measurement.

  8. Measurement of regression rate in hybrid rocket using combustion chamber pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Rajiv; Ramakrishna, P. A.

    2014-10-01

    An attempt was made in this paper to determine the regression rate of a hybrid fuel by using combustion chamber pressure. In this method, the choked flow condition at the nozzle throat of the hybrid rocket was used to obtain the mass of fuel burnt and in turn the regression rate. The algorithm used here is better than those reported in the literature as the results obtained were compared with the results obtained using the weight loss method and was demonstrated to be in good agreement with the results obtained using the weight loss method using the same motor and the same fuel and oxidizer combination. In addition, the O/F ratio obtained was in good agreement with those obtained using the weight loss method. The combustion efficiencies obtained were in good agreement with the average values.

  9. Radiated Emissions from a Remote-Controlled Airplane-Measured in a Reverberation Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ely, Jay J.; Koppen, Sandra V.; Nguyen, Truong X.; Dudley, Kenneth L.; Szatkowski, George N.; Quach, Cuong C.; Vazquez, Sixto L.; Mielnik, John J.; Hogge, Edward F.; Hill, Boyd L.; Strom, Thomas H.

    2011-01-01

    A full-vehicle, subscale all-electric model airplane was tested for radiated emissions, using a reverberation chamber. The mission of the NASA model airplane is to test in-flight airframe damage diagnosis and battery prognosis algorithms, and provide experimental data for other aviation safety research. Subscale model airplanes are economical experimental tools, but assembling their systems from hobbyist and low-cost components may lead to unforseen electromagnetic compatibility problems. This report provides a guide for accommodating the on-board radio systems, so that all model airplane systems may be operated during radiated emission testing. Radiated emission data are provided for on-board systems being operated separately and together, so that potential interferors can be isolated and mitigated. The report concludes with recommendations for EMI/EMC best practices for subscale model airplanes and airships used for research.

  10. Direct measurement of oxygen consumption rates from attached and unattached cells in a reversibly sealed, diffusionally isolated sample chamber

    PubMed Central

    Strovas, Timothy J.; McQuaide, Sarah C.; Anderson, Judy B.; Nandakumar, Vivek; Kalyuzhnaya, Marina G.; Burgess, Lloyd W.; Holl, Mark R.; Meldrum, Deirdre R.; Lidstrom, Mary E.

    2011-01-01

    Oxygen consumption is a fundamental component of metabolic networks, mitochondrial function, and global carbon cycling. To date there is no method available that allows for replicate measurements on attached and unattached biological samples without compensation for extraneous oxygen leaking into the system. Here we present the Respiratory Detection System, which is compatible with virtually any biological sample. The RDS can be used to measure oxygen uptake in microliter-scale volumes with a reversibly sealed sample chamber, which contains a porphyrin-based oxygen sensor. With the RDS, one can maintain a diffusional seal for up to three hours, allowing for the direct measurement of respiratory function of samples with fast or slow metabolic rates. The ability to easily measure oxygen uptake in small volumes with small populations or dilute samples has implications in cell biology, environmental biology, and clinical diagnostics. PMID:21546993

  11. Measuring Total Flux of Organic Vapors From the Unsaturated Zone Under Natural Conditions: Design, Laboratory and Field Testing of a Flux Chamber Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, F. D.; Choi, J.; Smith, J. A.

    2002-05-01

    A simple, easy-to-use, and inexpensive device for measuring VOC flux under natural conditions was designed and tested both in a controlled laboratory environment and in a natural field setting. The chamber consists of a stainless-steel right circular cylinder open on one end with a flexible, impermeable membrane allowing for chamber expansion and contraction. Air is pumped from inside the chamber through activated carbon traps and returned to the chamber maintaining a net zero pressure gradient from the inside to the outside of the chamber. The traps are analyzed using thermal desorption/GC-FID and the mass of contaminant is divided by the product of the sampled area and sample time to give VOC flux measured by the chamber. Design parameters for the chamber were selected using continuously stirred tank reactor (CSTR)-equation based modeling under step, sinusoidal and transport-model simulation flux inputs. Laboratory testing of the flux chamber under both diffusion and advection dominated conditions was performed in a device constructed to simulate unsaturated zone transport. Aqueous trichloroethene (TCE) solution was pumped through the bottom of a steel drum inside which 50-cm of fine sand was suspended. For diffusion-dominated transport experiments, the chamber was installed in the sand at the top of the simulator and operated in the same manner as would occur in the field. The flux measurement of the chamber was then compared to flux prediction based on measured linear concentration data from the simulator and Fick's law. Advective transport is initiated in the vadose zone simulator by flowing humidified, pressurized air into an input port in the bottom of the simulator below the suspended porous media. Soil-gas velocity is calculated by dividing the airflow input by the surface area of the simulator. Flux was measured with the chamber and compared to flux predicted using airflow and concentration data from the simulator. Results from both the diffusion-only and

  12. Errors in Measuring Water Potentials of Small Samples Resulting from Water Adsorption by Thermocouple Psychrometer Chambers 1

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, Jerry M.; Cortes, Peter M.

    1985-01-01

    The adsorption of water by thermocouple psychrometer assemblies is known to cause errors in the determination of water potential. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the effect of sample size and psychrometer chamber volume on measured water potentials of leaf discs, leaf segments, and sodium chloride solutions. Reasonable agreement was found between soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) leaf water potentials measured on 5-millimeter radius leaf discs and large leaf segments. Results indicated that while errors due to adsorption may be significant when using small volumes of tissue, if sufficient tissue is used the errors are negligible. Because of the relationship between water potential and volume in plant tissue, the errors due to adsorption were larger with turgid tissue. Large psychrometers which were sealed into the sample chamber with latex tubing appeared to adsorb more water than those sealed with flexible plastic tubing. Estimates are provided of the amounts of water adsorbed by two different psychrometer assemblies and the amount of tissue sufficient for accurate measurements of leaf water potential with these assemblies. It is also demonstrated that water adsorption problems may have generated low water potential values which in prior studies have been attributed to large cut surface area to volume ratios. PMID:16664367

  13. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOEpatents

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  14. Flux of organic compounds from grass measured by relaxed eddy accumulation technique.

    PubMed

    Olofsson, Marcus; Ek-Olausson, Birgitta; Ljungström, Evert; Langer, Sarka

    2003-12-01

    Fluxes of some Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from grass were measured at a golf course in western Sweden, using the Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) technique. The sampling was done by collecting VOC onto adsorbent tubes and the analysis was performed by thermal desorption followed by GC/MS. High emissions were observed after cutting. Transient fluxes of (Z)-3-hexenyl acetate (0.51 microg m(-2) s(-1)), (Z)-3-hexen-1-ol (0.14 microg m(-2) s(-1)) and (Z)-3-hexenal (0.40 microg m(-2) s(-1)) were measured, even at low temperatures. The REA technique requires a relatively large fetch area that is sometimes not available. Therefore, a procedure for correcting measured fluxes from a limited fetch is suggested. PMID:14710940

  15. A pressurized ion chamber monitoring system for environmental radiation measurements utilizing a wide-range temperature-compensated electrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenick, W. Van . Environmental Measurements Lab.)

    1994-08-01

    The performance of a complete pressurized ion chamber (PIC) radiation monitoring system is described. The design incorporates an improved temperature-compensated electrometer which is stable to [+-]3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]16] A over the environmental range of temperature ([minus]40 to +40 C). Using a single 10[sup 11] [Omega] feed-back resistor, the electrometer accurately measures currents over a range from 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]15] A to 3 [center dot] 10[sup [minus]11] A. While retaining the sensitivity of the original PIC system (the instrument responds readily to small background fluctuations on the order of 0.1 [mu]R h[sup [minus]1]), the new system measures radiation levels up to the point where the collection efficiency of the ion chamber begins to drop off, typically [approximately]27 pA at 1 mR h[sup [minus]1]. A data recorder and system controller was designed using the Tattletale[trademark] Model 4A computer. Digital data is stored on removable solid-state, credit-card style memory cards.

  16. Measurement of transpiration in Pinus taeda L. and Liquidambar styraciflua L. in an environmental chamber using tritiated water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levy, G. F.; Sonenshine, D. E.; Czoch, J. K.

    1976-01-01

    Transpiration rates of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L.) and sweetgum (Liquidambar styraciflua L.) were measured at two different atmospheric water vapor pressure deficits (V.P.D.) in a controlled environment growth chamber using tritiated water as a tracer. The trees were maintained in a sealed plant bed containing a hydroponic nutrient solution into which labeled water (spike) was introduced. Samples of leaves, chamber air, spiked nutrient solution and control water were assayed for ratio-activity using liquid scintillation techniques to determine transpiration rates. The transpiration rate of sweetgum in ml./hr./gm. (4.95) was found to be 5 times greater than that of loblolly pine (1.03) at 1.84 V.P.D. and 8 times greater at 6.74 V.P.D. (15.99 for sweetgum vs. 2.19 for pine). Transpiration (based on measurements of leaf radioactivity) in both species rose with increasing deficit; however sweetgum increased its output by 3 times while pine only doubled its rate. Cyclical changes in transpiration rates were noted in both species; the sweetgum cycle required a 6 hour interval whereas the pine cycle required a 9 hour interval.

  17. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying volatile organic compound and ammonia emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, David; Ham, Jay; Woodbury, Bryan; Cai, Lingshuang; Spiehs, Mindy; Rhoades, Marty; Trabue, Steve; Casey, Ken; Todd, Rick; Cole, Andy

    2013-02-01

    A variety of portable wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and potential inaccuracies caused by air velocity or sweep air flow rates that are either too low or too high to simulate field conditions. There is a need for correction factors to standardize flux chamber and wind tunnel measurements. In this manuscript, we present results of water evaporative flux and VOC flux measurements with the EPA flux chamber and a small wind tunnel. In the EPA flux chamber, water evaporative flux was positively correlated with sweep air flow rate (SAFR) between 1 and 20 L min-1 (r2 = 0.981-0.999) and negatively correlated with sweep air relative humidity between 0 and 80% (r2 = 0.982-0.992). Emissions of gas-film controlled compounds like NH3 and VOC at AFOs were positively correlated with evaporation rates between 0.6 and 2.8 mm d-1. We demonstrate a simple methodology for standardizing and comparing different chamber types by measuring water evaporation within the chamber using a gravimetric mass balance approach under controlled laboratory conditions. A water evaporative flux ratio correction factor (EFRCF) was used to improve the accuracy of field-measured VOC and NH3 chamber flux measurements. In a field study, both the EPA flux chamber (SAFR = 5 L min-1) and small wind tunnel (SAFR = 1 L min-1) underestimated the true field emissions of VOC, with EFRCFs of 2.42 and 3.84, respectively. EFRCFs are recommended for all but the driest of soil and manure conditions.

  18. The “Flexi-Chamber”: A Novel Cost-Effective In Situ Respirometry Chamber for Coral Physiological Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Camp, Emma F.; Krause, Sophie-Louise; Santos, Lourianne M. F.; Naumann, Malik S.; Kikuchi, Ruy K. P.; Smith, David J.; Wild, Christian; Suggett, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coral reefs are threatened worldwide, with environmental stressors increasingly affecting the ability of reef-building corals to sustain growth from calcification (G), photosynthesis (P) and respiration (R). These processes support the foundation of coral reefs by directly influencing biogeochemical nutrient cycles and complex ecological interactions and therefore represent key knowledge required for effective reef management. However, metabolic rates are not trivial to quantify and typically rely on the use of cumbersome in situ respirometry chambers and/or the need to remove material and examine ex situ, thereby fundamentally limiting the scale, resolution and possibly the accuracy of the rate data. Here we describe a novel low-cost in situ respirometry bag that mitigates many constraints of traditional glass and plexi-glass incubation chambers. We subsequently demonstrate the effectiveness of our novel “Flexi-Chamber” approach via two case studies: 1) the Flexi-Chamber provides values of P, R and G for the reef-building coral Siderastrea cf. stellata collected from reefs close to Salvador, Brazil, which were statistically similar to values collected from a traditional glass respirometry vessel; and 2) wide-scale application of obtaining P, R and G rates for different species across different habitats to obtain inter- and intra-species differences. Our novel cost-effective design allows us to increase sampling scale of metabolic rate measurements in situ without the need for destructive sampling and thus significantly expands on existing research potential, not only for corals as we have demonstrated here, but also other important benthic groups. PMID:26448294

  19. Exposure chamber

    DOEpatents

    Moss, Owen R.

    1980-01-01

    A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

  20. Measurement of absorbed dose-to-water for an HDR {sup 192}Ir source with ionization chambers in a sandwich setup

    SciTech Connect

    Araki, Fujio; Kouno, Tomohiro; Ohno, Takeshi; Kakei, Kiyotaka; Yoshiyama, Fumiaki; Kawamura, Shinji

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: In this study, a dedicated device for ion chamber measurements of absorbed dose-to-water for a Nucletron microSelectron-v2 HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy source is presented. The device uses two ionization chambers in a so-called sandwich assembly. Using this setup and by taking the average reading of the two chambers, any dose error due to difficulties in absolute positioning (centering) of the source in between the chambers is cancelled to first order. The method's accuracy was examined by comparing measurements with absorbed dose-to-water determination based on the AAPM TG-43 protocol.Methods: The optimal source-to-chamber distance (SCD) for {sup 192}Ir dosimetry was determined from ion chamber measurements in a water phantom. The {sup 192}Ir source was sandwiched between two Exradin A1SL chambers (0.057 cm{sup 3}) at the optimal SCD separation. The measured ionization was converted to the absorbed dose-to-water using a {sup 60}Co calibration factor and a Monte Carlo-calculated beam quality conversion factor, k{sub Q}, for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir. An uncertainty estimate of the proposed method was determined based on reproducibility of measurements at different institutions for the same type of source.Results: The optimal distance for the A1SL chamber measurements was determined to be 5 cm from the {sup 192}Ir source center, considering the depth dependency of k{sub Q} for {sup 60}Co to {sup 192}Ir and the chamber positioning. The absorbed dose to water measured at (5 cm, 90°) on the transverse axis was 1.3% lower than TG-43 values and its reproducibility and overall uncertainty were 0.8% and 1.7%, respectively. The measurement doses at anisotropic points agreed within 1.5% with TG-43 values.Conclusions: The ion chamber measurement of absorbed dose-to-water with a sandwich method for the {sup 192}Ir source provides a more accurate, direct, and reference dose compared to the dose-to-water determination based on air-kerma strength in the TG-43 protocol

  1. Effect of electron divergence in air gaps on the measurement of the energy of cascades in emulsion chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Apanasenko, A. V.; Baradzey, L. T.; Kanevskaya, Y. A.; Smorodin, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of an increase in electron density in the vicinity of the cascade axis caused by an avalanche passing through the gap between lead filters of the emulsion chamber was investigated experimentally. Optical densities were measured in three X-ray films spaced at 400, 800 and 1200 micrometer from the filter surface having a thickness of 6 cascade units. The optical densities of blackening spots caused by electron photon cascades of 1 to 2, 2 to 7 and greater than 7 BeV energies were measured. The results prove the presence of a gap between the filter and the nuclear emulsion which results in the underestimation of energy by several tenths of a percent.

  2. Combining eddy-covariance and chamber measurements to determine the methane budget from a small, heterogeneous urban wetland park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, T. H.; Stefanik, K. C.; Bohrer, G.; Rey Sanchez, A. C.; Mitsch, W. J.

    2015-12-01

    Methane (CH4) emissions from wetlands have large uncertainties. They are often small in magnitude and originate from landscapes with highly heterogeneous land cover patterns posing challenges to determining their green-house gas (GHG) budget. We combined two CH4 flux measurement approaches to overcome these issues and find the overall GHG budget of a small, heterogeneous, urban wetland park. Intermittent point measurements of fluxes from chambers provided information about the heterogeneity of fluxes, while eddy-covariance flux measurements provided information about the temporal dynamics of the fluxes. Both were combined to a scaled 'fixed frame' time series, correcting for temporal variability in the spatial coverage of the tower footprint. The macrophyte-vegetated (VEG) and open-water (OW) areas followed similar cycles and emitted similar levels of CH4 throughout the year. VEG exhibited a stronger late-summer emission peak than did OW, possibly due to CH4 transport through mature vegetation. Normalizing the tower data to a fixed frame allowed us to determine the overall CH4 budget of each patch type. OW was the strongest in terms of emissions per unit area, but the larger VEG area contributed the greatest total CH4 emission. Using a scaling approach for carbon (CO2) uptake we calculated the net total GHG contribution of this urban wetland park. Because chambers are not feasible over large vegetation or over extended time periods, the net CO2 budget over the same fixed-frame was approximated over a range and cannot be accurately measured directly over all the components of the park landscape. Overall the newly constructed wetland park acted as a sink for GHG over the last 3 years.

  3. Simultaneous optical and mr imaging of tissue within implanted window chamber: System development and application in measuring vascular permeability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shayegan Salek, Mir Farrokh

    Simultaneous optical imaging and MRI of a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model is investigated as a novel methodology to study the tumor microenvironment. Simultaneous imaging with two modalities allows for cross-validation of results, integration of the capabilities of the two modalities in one study and mitigation of invasive factors, such as surgery and anesthesia, in an in-vivo experiment. To make this investigation possible, three optical imaging systems were developed that operated inside the MRI scanner. One of the developed systems was applied to estimate vascular kinetic parameters of tumors in a dorsal skin-fold window chamber mouse model with simultaneous optical and MRI imaging. The target of imaging was a molecular agent that was dual labeled with both optical and MRI contrast agents. The labeling of the molecular agent, characteristics of the developed optical systems, the methodologies of measuring vascular kinetic parameters using optical imaging and MRI data, and the obtained results are described and illustrated.

  4. Human breath measurements in a clean-air chamber to determine half-lives for volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Sydney M.; Wallace, Lance A.; Pelllzzari, Edo D.; O'Neill, Hugh J.

    The expired breath of four non-occupationally exposed subjects was monitored following exposure at near-normal environmental concentrations using a specially developed pulmonary clearance technique. The four were exposed to polluted air on a heavily trafficked freeway or at a local dry-cleaning establishment, then spent the next 10 h in a clean-air environmental chamber. Breath and chamber-air samples were collected at regular intervals throughout the 10-h period and analyzed for the presence of selected target compounds. The breath levels of two of the compounds were elevated and decreased slowly with time once the subjects began to breathe clean air. Nonlinear least-squares fitting of the decay-uptake curves permitted the calculation of biological half-lives. Several of the target compounds occurred, however, at very low levels, and the resultant experimental scatter limited the value of these measurements. Higher initial exposures to most of the target compounds would have improved the reliability of the estimates.

  5. Wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, Muzaffer

    1989-01-01

    A wire chamber or proportional counter device, such as Geiger-Mueller tube or drift chamber, improved with a gas mixture providing a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor.

  6. Ice nucleating particles measured during the laboratory and field intercomparisons FIN-2 and FIN-3 by the diffusion chamber FRIDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Daniel; Schrod, Jann; Curtius, Joachim; Haunold, Werner; Thomson, Erik; Bingemer, Heinz

    2016-04-01

    The measurement of atmospheric ice nucleating particles (INP) is still challenging. In the absence of easily applicable INP standards the intercomparison of different methods during collaborative laboratory and field workshops is a valuable tool that can shine light on the performance of individual methods for the measurement of INP [1]. FIN-2 was conducted in March 2015 at the AIDA facility in Karlsruhe as an intercomparison of mobile instruments for measuring INP [2]. FIN-3 was a field campaign at the Desert Research Institutes Storm Peak Laboratory in Colorado in September 2015 [3]. The FRankfurt Ice nucleation Deposition freezinG Experiment (FRIDGE) participated in both experiments. FRIDGE measures ice nucleating particles by electrostatic precipitation of aerosol particles onto Si-wafers in a collection unit, followed by activation, growth, and optical detection of ice crystals on the substrate in an isostatic diffusion chamber [4,5]. We will present and discuss results of our measurements of deposition/condensation INP and of immersion INP with FRIDGE during FIN-2 and FIN-3. Acknowledgements: The valuable contributions of the FIN organizers and their institutions, and of the FIN Workshop Science team are gratefully acknowledged. Our work was supported by Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG) under the Research Unit FOR 1525 (INUIT) and the EU FP7-ENV- 2013 BACCHUS project under Grant Agreement 603445.

  7. Laboratory chamber measurements of the longwave extinction spectra and complex refractive indices of African and Asian mineral dusts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Biagio, C.; Formenti, P.; Styler, S. A.; Pangui, E.; Doussin, J.-F.

    2014-09-01

    In this study we present the first results from laboratory chamber experiments newly designed to investigate the longwave optical properties of mineral dust. Extinction spectra in the 2-16 µm range have been measured in situ (T = 293 K, RH < 2%) for polydispersed pure dust aerosols generated from natural parent soils from Tunisia, Niger, and the Gobi desert. Data are used in combination with particle size distributions to estimate the complex refractive index of each dust sample. Our results show that the magnitude and spectral dependence of the dust extinction and refractive indices differ according to particle mineralogy, suggesting the necessity for regionally resolved optical properties for modeling dust radiative effects in the longwave. The magnitude of extinction is controlled by the particle size distribution and remains significant down to low coarse particle concentrations, indicating that the longwave effect of mineral dust persists throughout long-range transport and is thus relevant at the global scale.

  8. First In Vivo Measurements of Methane Emissions from Ruminant Livestock Enteric Fermentation in Mexico Using Respiration Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelan-Ortega, O. A.; Ku-Vera, J. C.; Molina, L. T.; Pedraza-Beltrán, P. E.; Canul-Solis, J. R.; Piñeiro-Vázquez, A.; Hernández-Pineda, G.; Benaouda, M.

    2015-12-01

    Until recently there were no facilities in Mexico to measure in vivo methane (CH4) emission by livestock. Inventories were calculated using emission factors from the IPCC, so the uncertainty in calculation is high. In 2014 the first laboratory equipped to measure CH4 started operations at the Universidad Autónoma de Yucatán. The second laboratory was built at the Universidad Autónoma del Estado de México and it began operations in June 2015. The first laboratory consists of two open-circuit respiration chambers, which are currently used to measure CH4 emissions by cattle in Mexico's tropical regions. Chamber dimensions are: 3.0 x 2.14 x 1.44 m (DxHxW). Air exiting the chambers is drawn by a mass flowmeter (Flowkit 500) at a rate of 500 L/min. The air sample is passed through a multiplexer and then through a chemical desiccant before entering the methane infrared analyzer (MA-10). All the instruments were fabricated by Sable Systems International, Las Vegas, USA. The average CH4 emission factor for Nelore bulls of 350 kg live weight fed with a tropical grass was 117.3 L/day and it increased to 198.6 L/day when 3 kg of concentrate feed were supplemented. For adult crossbred cows also fed with a tropical grass CH4 emission ranged from 92.7 to 137.3 L/day. The second laboratory consist of a respiration chamber of the head box type. It consists of a head box of 1.05 x 0.8 x 1.80 m (WxDxH) made of 3.5 x 3.5 cm stainless steel angle, and on the bottom, top, sides, back and front of the head box, 0.6 cm clear acrylic sheeting was used to provide comfortable vision to the animal, and a metabolic cage of 1.08 x 2.92 x 1.8 m (WxDxH) made of iron tubes with steel sheeting floor adapted for feces and urine collection. The methane analyzer and the mass flowmeter were of the same model as in the first laboratory. Once calibrated, in vivo measurements were performed using high yielding adult Holstein cows with an average live weight of 573 ±71 kg and milk yield of 30kg

  9. DESIGN, FABRICATION, ASSEMBLY AND BENCH TESTING OF A TEXACO INFRARED RATIO PYROMETER SYSTEM FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF REACTION CHAMBER TEMPERATURE

    SciTech Connect

    Tom Leininger

    2001-03-31

    Reliable measurement of gasifier reaction chamber temperature is important for the proper operation of slagging, entrained-flow gasification processes. Historically, thermocouples have been used as the main measurement technique, with the temperature inferred from syngas methane concentration being used as a backup measurement. While these have been sufficient for plant operation in many cases, both techniques suffer from limitations. The response time of methane measurements is too slow to detect rapid upset conditions, and thermocouples are subject to long-term drift, as well as slag attack, which eventually leads to failure of the thermocouple. Texaco's Montebello Technology Center (MTC) has developed an infrared ratio pyrometer system for measuring gasifier reaction chamber temperature. This system has a faster response time than both methane and thermocouples, and has been demonstrated to provide reliable temperature measurements for longer periods of time when compared to thermocouples installed in the same MTC gasifier. In addition, the system can be applied to commercial gasifiers without any significant scale-up issues. The major equipment items, the purge system, and the safety shutdown system in a commercial plant are essentially identical to the prototypes at MTC. The desired result of this DOE program is ''a bench-scale prototype, either assembled or with critical components (laboratory) tested in a convincing manner.'' The prototype of the pyrometer system (including gasifier optical access port) that was designed, assembled and tested for this program, has had previous prototypes that have been built and successfully tested under actual coal and coke gasification conditions in three pilot units at MTC. It was the intent of the work performed under the auspices of this program to review and update the existing design, and to fabricate and bench test an updated system that can be field tested in one or more commercial gasifiers during a follow on phase

  10. Contamination measurements during IUS thermal vacuum tests in a large space chamber. [IUS equipment support system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Shaw, C. G.

    1984-01-01

    The levels of contamination that originate from inside the IUS equipment support section (ESS) due to outgassing from electronics components and wiring operating at elevated temperatures (80-160 F) were investigated. Pressure was measured inside and outside the ESS. Mass deposition measurements were made with quartz crystal microbalances (QCM) facing into and away from ESS vents. The OCM's were operated at -50 C and -180 C using thermoelectrically and cryogenically cooled QCM's. Gaseous nitrogen flow inside the ESS was used to obtain the effective molecular flow vent area of the ESS, which was evaluated to be 359 sq cm (56 sq in) compared to the 978 sq cm (150 sq in) estimated by an earlier atmosphere pressure billowing test. The total outgassing rate of the ESS materials at a temperature of 60 C (140 F) decays with a time constant of 11.5 hours based on pressure measurements during the hot cycle. A time constant of 22 hours was estimated for the fraction of the outgassing which will condense on a -50 C surface. In contrast, the time constant is only 10.1 hours for the outgassing material which condenses on a surface at -180 C. A surface at -180 C collects approximately one half of the material vented from the ESS which impinges on it. Pressure measurements show very good correlation with the mass deposition measurements.

  11. Gas-phase measurements of combustion interaction with materials for radiation-cooled chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, R. S.; Lucht, R. P.; Jassowski, D. M.; Rosenberg, S. D.

    1991-01-01

    Foil samples of Ir and Pt are exposed to combustion products in a controlled premixed environment at atmospheric pressure. Electrical heating of the foil samples is used to control the surface temperature and to elevate it above the radiative equilibrium temperature within the test apparatus. Profiles of temperature and OH concentration in the boundary layer adjacent to the specimen surface are measured by laser-induced fluorescence. Measured OH concentrations are significantly higher than equilibrium concentrations calculated for the known mixture ratio and the measured temperature profiles. This result indicates that superequilibrium concentrations of H-atoms and O-atoms are also present in the boundary layer, due to partial equilibrium of the rapid binary reactions of the H2/O2 chemical kinetic system. These experiments are conducted as part of a research program to investigate fundamental aspects of the interaction of combustion gases with advanced high-temperature materials for radiation-cooled thrusters.

  12. Alignment Measurements of the Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Instrument in a Thermal/Vacuum Chamber Using Photogrammetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, Michael D.; Herrera, Acey A.; Crane, J. Allen; Packard, Edward A.; Aviado, Carlos; Sampler, Henry P.; Obenschain, Arthur (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Microwave Anisotropy Probe (MAP) Observatory, scheduled for a late 2000 launch, is designed to measure temperature fluctuations (anisotropy) and produce a high sensitivity and high spatial resolution (< 0.3 deg at 90 GHz.) map of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation over the entire sky between 22 and 90 GHz. MAP utilizes back-to-back Gregorian telescopes to focus the microwave signals into 10 differential microwave receivers, via 20 feed horns. Proper alignment of the telescope reflectors and the feed horns at the operating temperature of 90 K is a critical element to ensure mission success. We describe the hardware and methods used to validate the displacement/deformation predictions of the reflectors and the microwave feed horns during thermal/vacuum testing of the reflectors and the microwave instrument. The smallest deformations to be resolved by the measurement system were on the order of +/- 0.030 inches (0.762 mm). Performance of these alignment measurements inside a thermal/vacuum chamber with conventional alignment equipment posed several limitations. A photogrammetry (PG) system was chosen to perform the measurements since it is a non-contact measurement system, the measurements can be made relatively quickly and accurately, and the photogrammetric camera can be operated remotely. The hardware and methods developed to perform the MAP alignment measurements using PG proved to be highly successful. The PG measurements met the desired requirements, enabling the desired deformations to be measured and even resolved to an order of magnitude smaller than the imposed requirements. Viable data were provided to the MAP Project for a full analysis of the on-orbit performance of the Instrument's microwave system.

  13. Design and laboratory testing of a chamber device to measure total flux of volatile organic compounds from the unsaturated zone under natural conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillman, Fred D.; Smith, James A.

    2004-11-01

    To determine if an aquifer contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) has potential for natural remediation, all natural processes affecting the fate and transport of VOCs in the subsurface must be identified and quantified. This research addresses the quantification of air-phase volatile organic compounds (VOCs) leaving the unsaturated zone soil gas and entering the atmosphere—including the additional flux provided by advective soil-gas movement induced by barometric pumping. A simple and easy-to-use device for measuring VOC flux under natural conditions is presented. The vertical flux chamber (VFC) was designed using numerical simulations and evaluated in the laboratory. Mass-balance numerical simulations based on continuously stirred tank reactor equations (CSTR) provided information on flux measurement performance of several sampling configurations with the final chamber configuration measuring greater than 96% of model-simulated fluxes. A laboratory device was constructed to evaluate the flux chamber under both diffusion-only and advection-plus-diffusion transport conditions. The flux chamber measured an average of 82% of 15 diffusion-only fluxes and an average of 95% of 15 additional advection-plus-diffusion flux experiments. The vertical flux chamber has the capability of providing reliable measurement of VOC flux from the unsaturated zone under both diffusion and advection transport conditions.

  14. Measurement of greenhouse gas flux from agricultural soils using static chambers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes between the soil and the atmosphere, in both managed and unmanaged ecosystems, is critical to understanding the biogeochemical drivers of climate change and to the development and evaluation of GHG mitigation strategies based on modulation of landscape mana...

  15. Comparison of buried soil sensors, surface chambers and above ground measurements of carbon dioxide fluxes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil carbon dioxide (CO2) flux is an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle. Accurate measurements of soil CO2 flux aids determinations of carbon budgets. In this study, we investigated soil CO2 fluxes with time and depth and above ground CO2 fluxes in a bare field. CO2 concentrations w...

  16. MEASUREMENT OF NITROGEN OXIDE EMISSIONS FROM AN AGRICULTURAL SOIL WITH A DYNAMIC CHAMBER SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Biogenic soil emissions of nitric oxide (NO) were measured from an intensively managed agricultural row crop (corn, Zea mays) during a 4 week period May 15 through June 9, 1995). The site was located in Washington County, near the town of Plymouth, which is in the Lower Coastal P...

  17. Measuring Muon-Neutrino Charged-Current Differential Cross Sections with a Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Spitz, Joshua B.

    2011-01-01

    More than 80 years after its proposed existence, the neutrino remains largely mysterious and elusive. Precision measurements of the neutrino's properties are just now beginning to take place. Such measurements are required in order to determine the mass of the neutrino, how many neutrinos there are, if neutrinos are different than anti-neutrinos, and more. Muon-neutrino charged-current differential cross sections on an argon target in terms of the outgoing muon momentum and angle are presented. The measurements have been taken with the ArgoNeuT Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber (LArTPC) experiment. ArgoNeuT is the first LArTPC to ever take data in a low energy neutrino beam, having collected thousands of neutrino and anti-neutrino events in the NuMI beamline at Fermilab. The results are relevant for long baseline neutrino oscillation experiments searching for non-zero $\\theta_{13}$, CP-violation in the lepton sector, and the sign of the neutrino mass hierarchy, among other things. Furthermore, the differential cross sections are important for understanding the nature of the neutrino-nucleus interaction in general. These measurements represent a significant step forward for LArTPC technology as they are among the first neutrino physics results with such a device.

  18. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  19. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-06-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  20. Measurement of 224Ra uptake in a fern actively accumulating radium.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Lee, H P; Chiu, C Y

    2006-03-01

    A method is proposed for determining the level of 224Ra in plant samples by measuring its descendant nuclide 212Pb at 239 keV by gamma-ray spectrometry. Variations of 224Ra and 212Pb over time during sample preparation and counting were delineated prior to gamma-ray measurement. The 224Ra concentrations in plant samples were measured by their direct uptake from soil, which could be determined and distinguished from that resulting from decay of 228Th inside the plants. We propose that a field-growing Dicranopteris linearis, which actively accumulates radium, can be used as an indicator of the nutritional transportation and metabolic rate of radium and other alkaline earth elements. We investigated the influence of rainfall on 224Ra concentrations in fronds of D. linearis and the corresponding uptake rates. 224Ra could serve as a natural tracer of growth in plants over a several days. Its presence and content in plants implies a temporal mineral metabolic rate, which can provide useful information for plant physiological and environmental investigations. PMID:16087212

  1. GPS measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California: 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 +/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 +/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  2. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  3. Intelligent monitor functional model with ionization chamber for mixed nuclear radiation field measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Valcov, N.; Purghel, L.; Celarel, A.

    1998-12-31

    By using the statistical discrimination technique, the components of an ionization current, due to a mixed radiation field, may be simultaneously measured. A functional model, including a series manufactured gamma-ray ratemeter was done, as an intermediate step in the design of specialized nuclear instrumentation, in order to check the concept of statistical discrimination method. The obtained results are in good agreement with the estimations of the statistical discrimination method.

  4. Calculation of Mass Transfer Coefficients in a Crystal Growth Chamber through Heat Transfer Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J H; Hand, L A

    2005-04-21

    The growth rate of a crystal in a supersaturated solution is limited by both reaction kinetics and the local concentration of solute. If the local mass transfer coefficient is too low, concentration of solute at the crystal-solution interface will drop below saturation, leading to a defect in the growing crystal. Here, mass transfer coefficients are calculated for a rotating crystal growing in a supersaturated solution of potassium diphosphate (KDP) in water. Since mass transfer is difficult to measure directly, the heat transfer coefficient of a scale model crystal in water is measured using temperature-sensitive paint (TSP). To the authors' knowledge this is the first use of TSP to measure temperatures in water. The corresponding mass transfer coefficient is then calculated using the Chilton- Colburn analogy. Measurements were made for three crystal sizes at two running conditions each. Running conditions include periodic reversals of rotation direction. Heat transfer coefficients were found to vary significantly both across the crystal faces and over the course of a rotation cycle, but not from one face to another. Mean heat transfer coefficients increased with both crystal size and rotation rate. Computed mass transfer coefficients were broadly in line with expectations from the full-scale crystal growth experiments. Additional experiments show that continuous rotation of the crystal results in about a 30% lower heat transfer compared to rotation with periodic reversals. The continuous rotation case also shows a periodic variation in heat transfer coefficient of about 15%, with a period about 1/20th of the rotation rate.

  5. Measuring the velocities of particles in a shot-blasting chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bombek, G.; Hribernik, A.

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents a method for measuring the velocity of a flow of particles accelerated on a shot-blasting wheel and then expanding into space at a wide angle of approximately 45°. The method uses the pulsed nature of the flow characteristic for turbo machinery with a finite number of wheel blades and calculates the velocity from the time shift between the particles hitting two targets at a known distance. This method does not depend on the material properties of the particles; however, a large number of particles is required for a successful measurement. The impacts are detected with a microphone covered by a steel membrane, making the exposed parts cheap and easily replaceable. This makes the method suitable for industrial test-and-development purposes, including the efficiencies of acceleration measurements. A cross-correlation of the signals was used, but the characteristic cycle (one rotation of the wheel) had to be determined beforehand by overlapping and averaging several cycles in order to compensate for the fact that different particles would be hitting the targets.

  6. The Mobile Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scharfstein, Gregory; Cox, Russell

    2012-01-01

    A document discusses a simulation chamber that represents a shift from the thermal-vacuum chamber stereotype. This innovation, currently in development, combines the capabilities of space simulation chambers, the user-friendliness of modern-day electronics, and the modularity of plug-and-play computing. The Mobile Chamber is a customized test chamber that can be deployed with great ease, and is capable of bringing payloads at temperatures down to 20 K, in high vacuum, and with the desired metrology instruments integrated to the systems control. Flexure plans to lease Mobile Chambers, making them affordable for smaller budgets and available to a larger customer base. A key feature of this design will be an Apple iPad-like user interface that allows someone with minimal training to control the environment inside the chamber, and to simulate the required extreme environments. The feedback of thermal, pressure, and other measurements is delivered in a 3D CAD model of the chamber's payload and support hardware. This GUI will provide the user with a better understanding of the payload than any existing thermal-vacuum system.

  7. Thimble ionization chambers in medium-energy x-ray beams and the role of constructive details of the central electrode: Monte Carlo simulations and measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ubrich, F.; Wulff, J.; Kranzer, R.; Zink, K.

    2008-09-01

    This paper presents investigations of thimble ionization chamber response in medium-energy kilovoltage x-ray beams (70-280 kVp, 0.09-3.40 mm Cu HVL). Two thimble ionization chambers (PTW30015 and PTW30016) were investigated, regarding the influence of the central electrode dimensions made of aluminum. Measurements were carried out in photon fields of different beam quality. Corresponding Monte Carlo simulations employing the EGSnrc Monte Carlo code system were performed. The simulations included the modelling of the x-ray tube and measurement setup for generation of x-ray spectra. These spectra were subsequently used to calculate the absorbed energy in the air cavity of the two thimble ionization chamber models and the air kerma at the reference point of the chambers. Measurements and simulations revealed an optimal diameter of the central electrode, concerning an almost energy-independent response of the ionizaton chamber. The Monte Carlo simulations are in good agreement with the measured values, expressed in beam quality correction factors kQ. The agreement was generally within 0.6% but could only be achieved with an accurate model of the central electrode including its exact shape. Otherwise, deviations up to 8.5% resulted, decreasing with higher photon energies, which can be addressed to the high yield of the photoelectric effect in the electrode material aluminum at low photon energies.

  8. Inverse combustion force estimation based on response measurements outside the combustion chamber and signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini Fouladi, Mohammad; Mohd. Nor, Mohd. Jailani; Kamal Ariffin, Ahmad; Abdullah, Shahrir

    2009-11-01

    Exposure to vibration has various physiological effects on vehicle passengers. Engine is one of the main sources of vehicle vibration. The major causes of engine vibration are combustion forces transmitted through the pistons and connection rods. Evaluation of sources is the first step to attenuate this vibration. Assessment of these sources is not an easy task because internal parts of machinery are not accessible. Often, instrumentation for such systems is costly, time consuming and some modifications would be necessary. Aim of the first part of this paper was to validate an inverse technique and carry out mobility analysis on a vehicle crankshaft to achieve matrix of Frequency Response Functions (FRFs). Outcomes were implemented to reconstruct the applied force for single and multiple-input systems. In the second part, the validated inverse technique and FRFs were used to estimate piston forces of an operating engine. Bearings of crankshaft were chosen as nearest accessible parts to piston connecting rods. Accelerometers were connected to the bearings for response measurement during an ideal engine operation. These responses together with FRFs, which were estimated in the previous part, were utilised in the inverse technique. Tikhonov regularization was used to solve the ill-conditioned inverse system. Two methods, namely L-curve criterion and Generalized Cross Validation (GCV), were employed to find the regularization parameter for the Tikhonov method. The inverse problem was solved and piston forces applied to crankpins were estimated. Results were validated by pressure measurement inside a cylinder and estimating the corresponding combustion force. This validation showed that inverse technique and measurement outcomes were roughly in agreement. In presence of various noise, L-curve criterion conduces to more robust results compared to the GCV method. But in the absence of high correlation between sources ( f>600 HzHz), the GCV technique leads to more accurate

  9. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, Thomas B.; Hawley, Robert L.; Helm, Veit; Morris, Elizabeth M.; Chaudhary, Rohan N.

    2016-08-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and high resolution neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation rates are not statistically different (95 % confidence interval) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation increases by 20 % below 3000 m elevation, and increases by 13 % above 3000 m elevation for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Three Regional Climate Models (PolarMM5, RACMO2.3, MAR) underestimate snow accumulation below 3000 m by 16-20 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modeled density profiles in place of NP densities. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates in the dry snow region. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the Operation IceBridge campaign.

  10. Development of a nano-tesla magnetic field shielded chamber and highly precise AC-susceptibility measurement coil at μK temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Anil; Prakash, Om; Ramakrishanan, S.

    2014-04-01

    A special sample measurement chamber has been developed to perform experiments at ultralow temperatures and ultralow magnetic field. A high permeability material known as cryoperm 10 and Pb is used to shield the measurement space consisting of the signal detecting set-up and the sample. The detecting setup consists of a very sensitive susceptibility coil wound on OFHC Cu bobbin.

  11. Evapotranspiration and assimilation flux measurements in a corn-soybean rotation system and a reconstructed prairie using a portable canopy chamber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measurement of Evapotranspiration (ET) and carbon dioxide assimilation flux (AF) is valuable for agricultural management, where ET indicates plant water use, and AF relates to photosynthesis and plant production. Portable canopy chambers were developed for directly measuring of ET and AF fluxes in v...

  12. Chemical ionization mass spectrometric measurements of SO2 emissions from jet engines in flight and test chamber operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunton, D. E.; Ballenthin, J. O.; Borghetti, J. F.; Federico, G. S.; Miller, T. M.; Thorn, W. F.; Viggiano, A. A.; Anderson, B. E.; Cofer, W. R.; McDougal, D. S.; Wey, C. C.

    2000-11-01

    We report the results of two measurements of the concentrations and emission indices of gas-phase sulfur dioxide (EI(SO2)) in the exhaust of an F100-200E turbofan engine. The broad goals of both experiments were to obtain exhaust sulfur speciation and aerosol properties as a function of fuel sulfur content. In the first campaign, an instrumented NASA T-39 Sabreliner aircraft flew in close formation behind several F-16 fighter aircraft to obtain near-field plume composition and aerosol properties. In the second, an F-100 engine of the same type was installed in an altitude test chamber at NASA Glenn Research Center where gas composition and nonvolatile aerosol concentrations and size distributions were obtained at the exit plane of the engine. In both experiments, SO2 concentrations were measured with the Air Force Research Laboratory chemical ionization mass spectrometer as a function of altitude, engine power, and fuel sulfur content. A significant aspect of the program was the use of the same fuels, the same engine type, and many of the same diagnostics in both campaigns. Several different fuels were purchased specifically for these experiments, including high-sulfur Jet A (˜1150 ppmm S), low-sulfur Jet A (˜10 ppmm S), medium-sulfur mixtures of these two fuels, and military JP-8+100 (˜170 and ˜300 ppmm S). The agreement between the flight and test cell measurements of SO2 concentrations was excellent, showing an overall precision of better than ±10% and an estimated absolute accuracy of ±20%. The EI(SO2) varied from 2.49 g SO2/kg fuel for the high-sulfur fuel in the test chamber to less than 0.01 g/kg for the lowest-sulfur fuel. No dependence of emission index on engine power, altitude or simulated altitude, separation distance or plume age, or the presence of contrails was observed. In all experiments the measured EI(SO2) was consistent with essentially all of the fuel sulfur appearing as gas-phase SO2 in the exhaust. However, accurate determination of S

  13. Methane fluxes measured by eddy covariance and static chamber techniques at a temperate forest in central ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. M.; Murphy, J. G.; Geddes, J. A.; Winsborough, C. L.; Basiliko, N.; Thomas, S. C.

    2012-12-01

    Methane flux measurements were carried out at a temperate forest (Haliburton Forest and Wildlife Reserve) in central Ontario (45°17´11´´ N, 78°32´19´´ W) from June-October, 2011. Continuous measurements were made by an off-axis integrated cavity output spectrometer Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) from Los Gatos Research Inc. that measures methane (CH4) at 10 Hz sampling rates. Fluxes were calculated from the gas measurements in conjunction with wind data collected by a 3-D sonic anemometer using the eddy covariance (EC) method. Observed methane fluxes showed net uptake of CH4 over the measurement period with an average uptake flux (± standard deviation of the mean) of -2.7 ± 0.13 nmol m-2 s-1. Methane fluxes showed a seasonal progression with average rates of uptake increasing from June through September and remaining high in October. This pattern was consistent with a decreasing trend in soil moisture content at the monthly time scale. On the diurnal timescale, there was evidence of increased uptake during the day, when the mid-canopy wind speed was at a maximum. These patterns suggest that substrate supply of CH4 and oxygen to methanotrophs, and in certain cases hypoxic soil conditions supporting methanogenesis in low-slope areas, drive the observed variability in fluxes. A network of soil static chambers used at the tower site showed close agreement with the eddy covariance flux measurements. This suggests that soil-level microbial processes, and not abiological leaf-level CH4 production, drive overall CH4 dynamics in temperate forest ecosystems such as Haliburton Forest.

  14. SU-E-T-561: Development of Depth Dose Measurement Technique Using the Multilayer Ionization Chamber for Spot Scanning Method

    SciTech Connect

    Takayanagi, T; Fujitaka, S; Umezawa, M; Ito, Y; Nakashima, C; Matsuda, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a measurement technique which suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with a multilayer ionization chamber (MLIC) and with a water phantom. Methods: The developed technique multiplies the raw MLIC data by a correction factor that depends on the initial beam range and water equivalent depth. The correction factor is derived based on a Bragg curve calculation formula considering range straggling and fluence loss caused by nuclear reactions. Furthermore, the correction factor is adjusted based on several integrated depth doses measured with a water phantom and the MLIC. The measured depth dose profiles along the central axis of the proton field with a nominal field size of 10 by 10 cm were compared between the MLIC using the new technique and the water phantom. The spread out Bragg peak was 20 cm for fields with a range of 30.6 cm and 6.9 cm. Raw MLIC data were obtained with each energy layer, and integrated after multiplying by the correction factor. The measurements were performed by a spot scanning nozzle at Nagoya Proton Therapy Center, Japan. Results: The profile measured with the MLIC using the new technique is consistent with that of the water phantom. Moreover, 97% of the points passed the 1% dose /1mm distance agreement criterion of the gamma index. Conclusion: We have demonstrated that the new technique suppresses the difference between profiles obtained with the MLIC and with the water phantom. It was concluded that this technique is useful for depth dose measurement in proton spot scanning method.

  15. Calibration system for measuring the radon flux density.

    PubMed

    Onishchenko, A; Zhukovsky, M; Bastrikov, V

    2015-06-01

    The measurement of radon flux from soil surface is the useful tool for the assessment of radon-prone areas and monitoring of radon releases from uranium mining and milling residues. The accumulation chambers with hollow headspace and chambers with activated charcoal are the most used devices for these purposes. Systematic errors of the measurements strongly depend on the geometry of the chamber and diffusion coefficient of the radon in soil. The calibration system for the attestation of devices for radon flux measurements was constructed. The calibration measurements of accumulation chambers and chambers with activated charcoal were conducted. The good agreement between the results of 2D modelling of radon flux and measurements results was observed. It was demonstrated that reliable measurements of radon flux can be obtained by chambers with activated charcoal (equivalent volume ~75 l) or by accumulation chambers with hollow headspace of ~7-10 l and volume/surface ratio (height) of >15 cm. PMID:25977351

  16. Aging effect in the BESIII drift chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ming-Yi, Dong; Qing-Lei, Xiu; Ling-Hui, Wu; Zhi, Wu; Zhong-Hua, Qin; Pin, Shen; Fen-Fen, An; Xu-Dong, Ju; Yi, Liu; Kai, Zhu; Qun, Ou-Yang; Yuan-Bo, Chen

    2016-01-01

    As the main tracking detector of BESIII, the drift chamber provides accurate measurements of the position and the momentum of the charged particles produced in e+e- collisions at BEPCII. After six years of operation, the drift chamber is suffering from aging problems due to huge beam-related background. The gains of the cells in the first ten layers show an obvious decrease, reaching a maximum decrease of about 29% for the first layer cells. Two calculation methods for the gain change (Bhabha events and accumulated charges with 0.3% aging ratio for inner chamber cells) give almost the same results. For the Malter effect encountered by the inner drift chamber in January 2012, about 0.2% water vapor was added to the MDC gas mixture to solve this cathode aging problem. These results provide an important reference for MDC operating high voltage settings and the upgrade of the inner drift chamber. Supported by the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP)

  17. Nondestructive Inspection Using Neutron for Regenerative Cooling Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Sato, Masaki; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Iikura, Hiroshi; Matsubayashi, Masatoshi

    The regenerative cooling combustion chamber of a liquid rocket engine is exposed to large temperature difference between the combustion gas and the coolant such as liquid hydrogen. It induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated over cyclic firing tests in the chamber wall. To evaluate the strain and the deformation of chamber walls is important since the chamber life usually relates to such strain and deformation. The primary objective of the present study is to establish a method to obtain experimental data on strains and deformations for correlation with the numerical data. In this study, residual strains and radiographs of a combustion chamber were obtained by applying a neutron diffraction method and a neutron radiography. Furthermore, two-dimensional nonlinear finite element method (FEM) analyses were conducted to calculate the residual strain in the chamber wall. From data of strain measurements, the feasibility of a neutron diffraction method for a combustion chamber was shown because the data from a X-ray diffraction method and FEM analyses qualitatively corresponded with those from a neutron diffraction method. Concerning neutron radiography, a higher resolution was necessary to observe chamber wall deformation.

  18. Theoretical model for diffusive greenhouse gas fluxes estimation across water-air interfaces measured with the static floating chamber method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Shangbin; Wang, Chenghao; Wilkinson, Richard Jeremy; Liu, Defu; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Wennian; Yang, Zhengjian; Wang, Yuchun; Lei, Dan

    2016-07-01

    Aquatic systems are sources of greenhouse gases on different scales, however the uncertainty of gas fluxes estimated using popular methods are not well defined. Here we show that greenhouse gas fluxes across the air-water interface of seas and inland waters are significantly underestimated by the currently used static floating chamber (SFC) method. We found that the SFC CH4 flux calculated with the popular linear regression (LR) on changes of gas concentration over time only accounts for 54.75% and 35.77% of the corresponding real gas flux when the monitoring periods are 30 and 60 min respectively based on the theoretical model and experimental measurements. Our results do manifest that nonlinear regression models can improve gas flux estimations, while the exponential regression (ER) model can give the best estimations which are close to true values when compared to LR. However, the quadratic regression model is proved to be inappropriate for long time measurements and those aquatic systems with high gas emission rate. The greenhouse gases effluxes emitted from aquatic systems may be much more than those reported previously, and models on future scenarios of global climate changes should be adjusted accordingly.

  19. A conducting salt-based amperometric biosensor for measurement of extracellular lactate accumulation in ischemic myocardium.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, S A; Cosofret, V V; Buck, R P; Yang, H; Cascio, W E; Hassen, S S

    1997-07-15

    In this paper, fabrication, characterization, and physiological application of a miniaturized amperometric lactate biosensor are described. The sensor is based on cross-linked lactate oxidase and tetrathiafulvalene-tetracyano-quinodimethane (TTF-TCNQ) charge transfer complex. The sensor was developed for continuous quantitative measurement of the lactate accumulation in ischemic myocardium under severe depletion of oxygen. The sensor was evaluated in vitro at an applied potential of 0.15 V vs Ag/AgCl; it proved to combine all the performance characteristics desired for the present application, such as proper response in absence of oxygen, good operational stability, good accuracy and precision (103.5 +/- 1.2%), adequate response time (t95% = 80 s), and wide linear dynamic range up to 27 mM (r = 0.9998) in N2-saturated solutions and at 37 degrees C. The prepared sensors (n = 12) showed sensitivity of 380 +/- 90 nA/mM, and a background current of 240 +/- 50 nA. The lower limit of detection is 0.4 +/- 0.15 mM with a S/N ratio equal to 3. Results obtained for direct lactate monitoring in ischemic rabbit papillary muscle under no-flow conditions and PO2 < 6 mm Hg are presented. PMID:9230678

  20. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, Albert H.

    1981-01-01

    An ionization chamber has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionize the gas.

  1. Ionization chamber

    DOEpatents

    Walenta, A.H.

    An ionization chamber is described which has separate drift and detection regions electrically isolated from each other by a fine wire grid. A relatively weak electric field can be maintained in the drift region when the grid and another electrode in the chamber are connected to a high voltage source. A much stronger electric field can be provided in the detection region by connecting wire electrodes therein to another high voltage source. The detection region can thus be operated in a proportional mode when a suitable gas is contained in the chamber. High resolution output pulse waveforms are provided across a resistor connected to the detection region anode, after ionizing radiation enters the drift region and ionizes the gas.

  2. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements.

    PubMed

    Nikezic, D; Yu, K N; Stajic, J M

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment. PMID:24593338

  3. Ice crystal habits from cloud chamber studies obtained by in-line holographic microscopy related to depolarization measurements.

    PubMed

    Amsler, Peter; Stetzer, Olaf; Schnaiter, Martin; Hesse, Evelyn; Benz, Stefan; Moehler, Ottmar; Lohmann, Ulrike

    2009-10-20

    We investigate hydrometeor habits at the AIDA chamber with a newly developed in-line holographic microscope HOLographic Imager for Microscopic Objects (HOLIMO). Sizes and habits of ice crystals and droplets in a mixed-phase cloud experiment are related to relative humidity with respect to ice (RH(ice)), temperature (T), and experiment time. This experiment is initiated with supercooled water drops. As a result, ice crystals within a maximum particle diameter size range of 2 to 118 microm (average size of 19 microm) are detected and 63% of them reveal regular habits. The observed particle habits match those predicted for a given RH(ice) and T. Two different growth modes emerge from this cloud. The first one appears during water injection and reveals mainly optical particle sizes in the range of 5 to 250 microm. The second mode grows to sizes of 5 to 63 microm, just after the particles of the first one fall out. It is found that an increasing aspect ratio chi of maximum length over thickness from 2 to 20 as obtained by HOLIMO corresponds to a decreasing linear depolarization ratio from 0.1 to 0.04, as independently obtained by depolarization measurements. PMID:19844319

  4. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Nikezic, D. Stajic, J. M.; Yu, K. N.

    2014-02-15

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK-TEST.F90 and TRACK-VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  5. Computer program for the sensitivity calculation of a CR-39 detector in a diffusion chamber for radon measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikezic, D.; Yu, K. N.; Stajic, J. M.

    2014-02-01

    Computer software for calculation of the sensitivity of a CR-39 detector closed in a diffusion chamber to radon is described in this work. The software consists of two programs, both written in the standard Fortran 90 programming language. The physical background and a numerical example are given. Presented software is intended for numerous researches in radon measurement community. Previously published computer programs TRACK_TEST.F90 and TRACK_VISION.F90 [D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 174, 160 (2006); D. Nikezic and K. N. Yu, Comput. Phys. Commun. 178, 591 (2008)] are used here as subroutines to calculate the track parameters and to determine whether the track is visible or not, based on the incident angle, impact energy, etching conditions, gray level, and visibility criterion. The results obtained by the software, using five different V functions, were compared with the experimental data found in the literature. Application of two functions in this software reproduced experimental data very well, while other three gave lower sensitivity than experiment.

  6. Standardization of flux chamber and wind tunnel flux measurements for quantifying volatile organic compound and ammonia emissions from area sources at animal feeding operations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A variety of wind tunnels and flux chambers have been used to measure fluxes of volatile organic compounds (VOC) and ammonia (NH3) at animal feeding operations (AFO). However, there has been little regard to the extreme variation and potential inaccuracies caused by inappropriate air velocity or sw...

  7. Monte Carlo simulations and benchmark measurements on the response of TE(TE) and Mg(Ar) ionization chambers in photon, electron and neutron beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yi-Chun; Huang, Tseng-Te; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Chen, Wei-Lin; Chen, Yen-Fu; Wu, Shu-Wei; Nievaart, Sander; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2015-06-01

    The paired ionization chambers (ICs) technique is commonly employed to determine neutron and photon doses in radiology or radiotherapy neutron beams, where neutron dose shows very strong dependence on the accuracy of accompanying high energy photon dose. During the dose derivation, it is an important issue to evaluate the photon and electron response functions of two commercially available ionization chambers, denoted as TE(TE) and Mg(Ar), used in our reactor based epithermal neutron beam. Nowadays, most perturbation corrections for accurate dose determination and many treatment planning systems are based on the Monte Carlo technique. We used general purposed Monte Carlo codes, MCNP5, EGSnrc, FLUKA or GEANT4 for benchmark verifications among them and carefully measured values for a precise estimation of chamber current from absorbed dose rate of cavity gas. Also, energy dependent response functions of two chambers were calculated in a parallel beam with mono-energies from 20 keV to 20 MeV photons and electrons by using the optimal simple spherical and detailed IC models. The measurements were performed in the well-defined (a) four primary M-80, M-100, M120 and M150 X-ray calibration fields, (b) primary 60Co calibration beam, (c) 6 MV and 10 MV photon, (d) 6 MeV and 18 MeV electron LINACs in hospital and (e) BNCT clinical trials neutron beam. For the TE(TE) chamber, all codes were almost identical over the whole photon energy range. In the Mg(Ar) chamber, MCNP5 showed lower response than other codes for photon energy region below 0.1 MeV and presented similar response above 0.2 MeV (agreed within 5% in the simple spherical model). With the increase of electron energy, the response difference between MCNP5 and other codes became larger in both chambers. Compared with the measured currents, MCNP5 had the difference from the measurement data within 5% for the 60Co, 6 MV, 10 MV, 6 MeV and 18 MeV LINACs beams. But for the Mg(Ar) chamber, the derivations reached 7

  8. Monte Carlo correction factors for a Farmer 0.6 cm3 ion chamber dose measurement in the build-up region of the 6 MV clinical beam.

    PubMed

    Pena, J; Sánchez-Doblado, F; Capote, R; Terrón, J A; Gómez, F

    2006-03-21

    Reference dosimetry of photon fields is a well-established subject and currently available protocols (such as the IAEA TRS-398 and AAPM TG-51) provide methods for converting the ionization chamber (IC) reading into dose to water, provided reference conditions of charged particle equilibrium (CPE) are fulfilled. But these protocols cannot deal with the build-up region, where the lack of CPE limits the applicability of the cavity theorems and so the chamber correction factors become depth dependent. By explicitly including the IC geometry in the Monte Carlo simulations, depth-dependent dose correction factors are calculated for a PTW 30001 0.6 cm(3) ion chamber in the build-up region of the 6 MV photon beam. The corrected percentage depth dose (PDD) agrees within 2% with that measured using the NACP 02 plane-parallel ion chamber in the build-up region at depths greater than 0.4 cm, where the Farmer chamber wall reaches the phantom surface. PMID:16510960

  9. Resolution measurement of an Interpolating Pad Chamber in the 9 GeV/c {pi}{sup {minus}} beam at BNL

    SciTech Connect

    Fenker, H.; Morgan, K.; Sypit, R.

    1994-03-07

    Results axe presented from the first test of a full size barrel prototype Interpolating Pad Chamber for the GEM central tracker in the 9 GeV/c {pi}{sup {minus}} beam at the Brookhaven AGS. An average resolution of 45 {mu}m has been achieved using electronics functionally identical to the final GEM design. Two 50 mRad stereo pad layers combine to give 680 {mu}m resolution in the direction along the chamber. A calibration procedure which uses the data to measure the gains and pedestals for each pad has been developed and is presented together with resolution results from the silicon telescope used to project the tracks into the pad chambers.

  10. Measurement of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio with the NIFFTE Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meharchand, Rhiannon; Niffte Collaboration

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear data play a fundamental role in energy and defense related applications. In recent years, understanding of these systems has become dependent upon advanced simulation and modeling, where uncertainties in nuclear data propagate into calculated performance parameters. It is important therefore that nuclear data uncertainties are minimized and well-understood. To this end, the Neutron Induced Fission Fragment Tracking Experiment (NIFFTE) collaboration is developing a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) to measure energy-differential (n,f) cross sections with unprecedented precision. (n,f) cross-section measurements with the NIFFTE TPC take place at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) WNR facility, a spallation neutron source which provides a neutron spectrum ranging from hundreds of keV to hundreds of MeV. During the 2012 LANSCE run cycle, data were collected on several actinide samples, including U-238 and U-235. These data, along with those collected during the 2013 LANSCE run cycle, will be used to deduce a U-238/U-235 (n,f) cross-section ratio, to benchmark TPC performance, and to provide high-quality data to the community. A brief overview of the NIFFTE TPC and preliminary analysis of the U-238/U-235 (n,f) ratio data will be presented. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Los Alamos National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-06NA25396 and by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344. LA-UR-13-24779.

  11. Direct measurement of spin accumulation in the Cu layer due to spin currents from Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, Roopali

    Spin transport is the key for reading or writing bits in spintronic devices by utilizing the Giant Magnetoresistance effect or the spin transfer torque effect. Spin currents have also been shown to play important role in the ultrafast manipulation of magnetization via all optical switching. Hence, detailed understanding of spin currents from ferromagnet to non-magnets is a crucial step in development of spintronic devices. However, directly observing these spin currents is extremely challenging due to magnetic moment injected into non-magnet being very small, less than 1/10000 of a regular ferromagnet. In this talk, I will present our recent measurements on the spin currents from a thin film Co ferromagnet into non-magnetic Cu metal in a nanopillar device. We have developed an extremely sensitive spectro-microscopy detection method based on element specific x-ray magnetic circular dichroism where current pulses driving the spin currents into the Cu layer are synchronized with the synchrotron x-ray photons. The sensitivity of this `lock-in' technique has allowed us to detect the extremely small transient Cu magnetization. We observe two spin currents induced effects in the Cu layer. The first effect is the transiently induced magnetization which occurs in bulk of the Cu layer due to spin accumulation and has a magnitude of 0.00003 μB per atom. The second effect occurs at the Co/Cu interface where we observe a 10% increase or 0.004 μB per atom for the hybridized Cu atoms due to spin torque-alignment.

  12. Insights on carbon budgets for Ponderosa pine systems growing at three levels of CO[sub 2] and of nitrogen from leaf to whole open-top chamber flux measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, J.T.; Picone, J.B.; Ross, P.D.; Ross, G.N.; Johnson, D.W. )

    1994-06-01

    At any scale of integration carbon accumulation in the biosphere is a small difference between large input and output terms and is proportional to resource levels. This can result in the impression that growth and carbon accumulation have little to do with either the input or output rates. Our measurements show that rising concentration of CO[sub 2] in the atmosphere results in biospheric influx and efflux of carbon increasing and the proportionality between carbon left and nitrogen in the system changing. A gap exists between the carbon balance inferred from gas-exchange and measured changes in pool sizes. The rhizosphere is the likely harbor for much of this [open quotes]missing carbon[close quotes]. These measurements were made on ponderosa pine saplings growing near Placerville, California USA. The chambers are set at ambient, 525 ppm, 700 ppm CO[sub 2]. Soil nitrogen levels are at the background level, plus 10 g/m[sup [minus]2] or plus 20 g/m[sup [minus]2].

  13. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  14. Comparison of Physiologic versus Pharmacologic Mydriasis on Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Dastiridou, Anna I.; Pan, Xiaojing; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Marion, Kenneth M.; Francis, Brian A.; Sadda, Srinivas R.; Chopra, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the effects of physiologic versus pharmacologic pupil dilation on anterior chamber angle (ACA) measurements obtained with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty eyes from 20 healthy, phakic individuals with open angles underwent anterior segment OCT imaging under 3 pupillary states: (1) pupil constricted under standard room lighting, (2) physiologic mydriasis in a darkened room, and (3) postpharmacologic mydriasis. Inferior angle Schwalbe's line-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular-iris-space area (SL-TISA) were computed for each eye and pupillary condition by masked, certified Reading Center graders using customized grading software. Results. SL-AOD and SL-TISA under pupillary constriction to room light were 0.87 ± 0.31 mm and 0.33 ± 0.14 mm2, respectively; decreased to 0.75 ± 0.29 mm (P < 0.01) and 0.29 ± 0.13 mm2  (P < 0.01), respectively, under physiologic mydriasis; and increased to 0.90 ± 0.38 mm (P < 0.01) and 0.34 ± 0.17 mm2  (P = 0.06) under pharmacologic mydriasis compared to baseline. Conclusions. Using SD-OCT imaging, pharmacologic mydriasis yielded the widest angle opening, whereas physiologic mydriasis yielded the most angle narrowing in normal individuals with open iridocorneal angles. Accounting for the state of the pupil and standardizing the lighting condition would appear to be of importance for future studies of the angle. PMID:25878896

  15. Comparison of Physiologic versus Pharmacologic Mydriasis on Anterior Chamber Angle Measurements Using Spectral Domain Optical Coherence Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dastiridou, Anna I; Pan, Xiaojing; Zhang, ZhouYuan; Marion, Kenneth M; Francis, Brian A; Sadda, Srinivas R; Chopra, Vikas

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the effects of physiologic versus pharmacologic pupil dilation on anterior chamber angle (ACA) measurements obtained with spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). Methods. Forty eyes from 20 healthy, phakic individuals with open angles underwent anterior segment OCT imaging under 3 pupillary states: (1) pupil constricted under standard room lighting, (2) physiologic mydriasis in a darkened room, and (3) postpharmacologic mydriasis. Inferior angle Schwalbe's line-angle opening distance (SL-AOD) and SL-trabecular-iris-space area (SL-TISA) were computed for each eye and pupillary condition by masked, certified Reading Center graders using customized grading software. Results. SL-AOD and SL-TISA under pupillary constriction to room light were 0.87 ± 0.31 mm and 0.33 ± 0.14 mm(2), respectively; decreased to 0.75 ± 0.29 mm (P < 0.01) and 0.29 ± 0.13 mm(2)  (P < 0.01), respectively, under physiologic mydriasis; and increased to 0.90 ± 0.38 mm (P < 0.01) and 0.34 ± 0.17 mm(2)  (P = 0.06) under pharmacologic mydriasis compared to baseline. Conclusions. Using SD-OCT imaging, pharmacologic mydriasis yielded the widest angle opening, whereas physiologic mydriasis yielded the most angle narrowing in normal individuals with open iridocorneal angles. Accounting for the state of the pupil and standardizing the lighting condition would appear to be of importance for future studies of the angle. PMID:25878896

  16. Magma chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Bruce D.

    1989-01-01

    Recent observational and theoretical investigations of terrestrial magma chambers (MCs) are reviewed. Consideration is given to the evidence for MCs with active convection and crystal sorting, problems of direct MC detection, theoretical models of MC cooling, the rheology and dynamics of solidification fronts, crystal capture and differentiation, convection with solidification, MC wall flows, and MC roof melting. Diagrams, graphs, and a list of problems requiring further research are provided.

  17. 40 CFR 86.1726-99 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... performance that is stable and representative of design intent. Sufficient mileage should be accumulated to... engines that have step function changes designed into the control system must use the 5,000 mile test..., the full useful life of the auxiliary power unit shall be defined as 50,000 miles for a Type A...

  18. 40 CFR 86.1726-99 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... tested in accordance with the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET; 40 CFR part 600, subpart B). The... lowest state-of-charge at the beginning of the test cycle. At no time throughout mileage accumulation... to this subpart: (1) For Otto-cycle and diesel vehicles and battery assisted combustion...

  19. Examining the Validity of Audience Accumulation Measures: A Comparison of MRI and SMRB.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavlik, John V.; Gerhart, Annette M.

    Concerned with the validity of the audience data reported by two major syndicated magazine readership services--Mediamark Research Inc. (MRI) and Simmons Market Research Bureau (SMRB)--a study examined the differences in MRI and SMRB calculations of reader turnover rates, which form the basis for estimating audience accumulation. Results indicated…

  20. Dynamics of Free Amino Acid Accumulations in Cotton Leaves Measured on Different Timelines After Irrigation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Accumulations of 16 free amino acids (FAAs) in cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., leaves in potted greenhouse plants were recorded across three time scales following irrigation. The time scales, 15-minute, 12-hours, and daily sampling intervals, revealed the dynamic response of each FAA, and showed dif...

  1. Laboratory Determination of Molybdenum Accumulation Rates as a Measure of Hypoxic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox sensitive metals, such as molybdenum (Mo), are enriched in reducing sediments due to authigenic fixation in anoxic interstitial waters of sediments. This study tested whether the process of fixation and accumulation of Mo in sediments could provide a geochemical indicator o...

  2. Direct measurement of absorbed dose to water in HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy: Water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43

    SciTech Connect

    Sarfehnia, Arman; Kawrakow, Iwan; Seuntjens, Jan

    2010-04-15

    Purpose: Gafchromic film and ionometric calibration procedures for HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy sources in terms of dose rate to water are presented and the experimental results are compared to the TG-43 protocol as well as with the absolute dose measurement results from a water calorimetry-based primary standard. Methods: EBT-1 Gafchromic films, an A1SL Exradin miniature Shonka thimble type chamber, and an SI HDR 1000 Plus well-type chamber (Standard Imaging, Inc., Middleton, WI) with an ADCL traceable S{sub k} calibration coefficient (following the AAPM TG-43 protocol) were used. The Farmer chamber and Gafchromic film measurements were performed directly in water. All results were compared to direct and absolute absorbed dose to water measurements from a 4 deg. C stagnant water calorimeter. Results: Based on water calorimetry, the authors measured the dose rate to water to be 361{+-}7 {mu}Gy/(h U) at a 55 mm source-to-detector separation. The dose rate normalized to air-kerma strength for all the techniques agree with the water calorimetry results to within 0.83%. The overall 1-sigma uncertainty on water calorimetry, ionization chamber, Gafchromic film, and TG-43 dose rate measurement amounts to 1.90%, 1.44%, 1.78%, and 2.50%, respectively. Conclusions: This work allows us to build a more realistic uncertainty estimate for absorbed dose to water determination using the TG-43 protocol. Furthermore, it provides the framework necessary for a shift from indirect HDR {sup 192}Ir brachytherapy dosimetry to a more accurate, direct, and absolute measurement of absorbed dose to water.

  3. Higher-frequency extension of the gauging ranges of vector receivers in the nonuniform field of measuring chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordienko, V. A.; Goncharenko, B. I.; Zadorozhnyi, S. S.; Starkova, M. V.

    2012-09-01

    The paper discusses the frequency-dependent error of gauging acoustic receivers in the field of a standing wave and the fundamental possibility of extending the operating range of gauging of hydrophones toward high frequencies and finite-size vector receivers (acoustic pressure gradient receivers) in a vertical liquid column, oscillating in a small-volume cylindrical chamber.

  4. Challenges in using flux chambers to measure ammonia and VOC emissions from open feedlot pen surfaces and retention ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Few methodologies currently available to estimate ammonia and volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions from livestock operations have been adequately validated for accuracy. Flow-through flux chambers and wind tunnels are sometimes used; however, ammonia and VOC flux from pen or pond surfaces are a...

  5. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  6. Feasibility Study on Neutron Diffraction Method for Evaluation of Residual Strain Distribution of Regenerative Cooled Combustion Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuoka, Tadashi; Moriya, Shin-Ichi; Sato, Masaki; Yoshida, Makoto; Tsuchiya, Yoshinori; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    The regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine is exposed to a large temperature difference between the hot gas (about 3500K) and the liquid hydrogen (about 20K). This induces thermal stress, and strain is accumulated in the chamber wall throughout the cyclic firing tests. Evaluation of the stress and the strain distribution in a chamber wall is essential since chamber life is usually related to such stress and strain. In this study, the residual strain in a regenerative cooled combustion chamber wall was measured by applying the neutron diffraction method and the X-ray diffraction method. The measured data were compared with the numerical data by finite element analysis, and the feasibility of the neutron diffraction method for the regenerative cooled combustion chamber of a cryogenic liquid rocket engine was evaluated.

  7. Reference dosimetry at the Australian Synchrotron's imaging and medical beamline using free-air ionization chamber measurements and theoretical predictions of air kerma rate and half value layer

    SciTech Connect

    Crosbie, Jeffrey C.; Rogers, Peter A. W.; Stevenson, Andrew W.; Hall, Christopher J.; Lye, Jessica E.; Nordstroem, Terese; Midgley, Stewart M.; Lewis, Robert A.

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Novel, preclinical radiotherapy modalities are being developed at synchrotrons around the world, most notably stereotactic synchrotron radiation therapy and microbeam radiotherapy at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble, France. The imaging and medical beamline (IMBL) at the Australian Synchrotron has recently become available for preclinical radiotherapy and imaging research with clinical trials, a distinct possibility in the coming years. The aim of this present study was to accurately characterize the synchrotron-generated x-ray beam for the purposes of air kerma-based absolute dosimetry. Methods: The authors used a theoretical model of the energy spectrum from the wiggler source and validated this model by comparing the transmission through copper absorbers (0.1-3.0 mm) against real measurements conducted at the beamline. The authors used a low energy free air ionization chamber (LEFAC) from the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency and a commercially available free air chamber (ADC-105) for the measurements. The dimensions of these two chambers are different from one another requiring careful consideration of correction factors. Results: Measured and calculated half value layer (HVL) and air kerma rates differed by less than 3% for the LEFAC when the ion chamber readings were corrected for electron energy loss and ion recombination. The agreement between measured and predicted air kerma rates was less satisfactory for the ADC-105 chamber, however. The LEFAC and ADC measurements produced a first half value layer of 0.405 {+-} 0.015 and 0.412 {+-} 0.016 mm Cu, respectively, compared to the theoretical prediction of 0.427 {+-} 0.012 mm Cu. The theoretical model based upon a spectrum calculator derived a mean beam energy of 61.4 keV with a first half value layer of approximately 30 mm in water. Conclusions: The authors showed in this study their ability to verify the predicted air kerma rate and x-ray attenuation

  8. A mechanical interpretation of pressure chamber measurements--what does the strength of the squeeze tell us?

    PubMed

    Roderick, Michael L; Canny, Martin J

    2005-04-01

    Argument still continues about what properties of a plant organ the pressure chamber measures. A mechanical (as opposed to a thermodynamic) analysis is made of the system squeezed by the pressurized gas, the non-gaseous part of the leaf. The boundary of the system is defined so that it remains at constant mass, and constant density is assumed, during the squeeze. This is equivalent to assuming constant volume. On those assumptions, it is shown that the liquid is brought to the cut surface by a change of shape of the system. Generic mechanical principles are then used to deduce a priori, a quantitative interpretation of the balance pressure. The formal mechanical interpretation involves two variables, the interfacial tension and the change in surface area, which cannot currently be measured. Instead of these, we used two related variables which can be measured, the mass fraction of water in the leaf (Q) and the maximum mass fraction of water at full saturation (Qx) to deduce an approximate mechanical interpretation. When Q is close to Qx, we deduced that the balance pressure (Pb) required for the shape change should be approximately proportional to the reduction in mass in changing from Qx to Q, a variable called the relative water loss (RWL). The constant of proportionality (kappa) is a basic characteristic of the type of leaf used, and the final relation, Pb=kappa (RWL) is called Relation A. We then deduce that the constant kappa should be an approximately linear function of Qx. The linear function is defined by limiting values, so that when Qx is 1, kappa is predicted to be 0 bar, and at the other extreme, when Qx is 0, kappa is predicted to be in the range 500-1000 bar. This is called Relation B. Experiments with 32 leaves from 10 species are used to test the mechanical interpretation. The results showed that Relation A was a reasonable approximation for most of the tested leaves. The data for 10 species, were used to estimate Relation B, confirming that as Qx

  9. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored. PMID:26406502

  10. A Measurement of the holographic minimum observable beam branching ratio in the Fermilab 15-foot bubble chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Aderholz, M.; Aggarwal, M.M.; Akbari, H.; Allport, P.P.; Badyal, S.K.; Ballagh, H.C.; Barth, M.; Baton, J.P.; Bingham, H.H.; Bjelkhagen, H.; Brucker, E.B.; Burnstein, R.A.; Campbell, J.R.; Cence, R.J.; Chatterjee, T.K.; Clayton, E.F.; Corrigan, G.; Coutures, C.; DeProspo, D.; Devanand,; De Wolf, E.A.; /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Brussels U., IIHE /CERN /Punjab U. /Fermilab /Hawaii U. /Imperial Coll., London /IIT, Chicago /Jammu U. /Munich, Max Planck Inst. /Oxford U. /Rutgers U., Piscataway /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /Stevens Tech. /Tufts U.

    1997-01-01

    Holography has been used successfully in combination with conventional optics for the first time in a large cryogenic bubble chamber, the 15-Foot Bubble Chamber at Fermilab, during a physics run. The innovative system combined the reference beam with the object beam, illuminating a conical volume of {approx} 1.4 m{sup 3}. Bubble tracks from neutrino interactions with a width of {approx} 120 {micro}m have been recorded with good contrast. The ratio of intensities of the object light to the reference light striking the film is called the Beam Branching Ratio. We obtained in our experiment an exceedingly small minimum-observable ratio of (0.54 {+-} 0.21) x 10{sup -7}. The technology has the potential for a wide range of applications.

  11. Measurement of electron temperature and density in the DIII-D neutral beam ion source arc chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Kellman, D.H.; Busath, J.; Hong, R.

    1993-10-01

    A swept-bias Langmuir probe diagnostic was employed with the DIII-D neutral beam ion source in an effort to study the effects of filament temperature, arc power, and backstreaming energetic electrons on the electron temperature and density of the arc discharge inside the ion source arc chamber. The arc chamber contains six Langmuir probes biased with a negative dc voltage. These probes provide a feedback signal for regulation of the arc power supply, and give a relative indication of plasma uniformity within the arc chamber. For this study, one probe was reconnected to a voltage-sweeping power supply, and probe current versus voltage characteristics were generated. These characteristics provided the information necessary to calculate electron temperature and density. With arc discharge only, the results demonstrated that an filament temperature increases, so does electron density. Electron temperature decreases at a faster rate, however, as required to maintain constant ion maturation current (regulated by the arc power supply). The results also demonstrated that increasing arc power (through control of the arc power supply) results in higher electron temperature and density. Experiments were also performed with probe voltage sweeps during beam extraction, at various accelerator voltage levels and at different delay times after beam turn-on with a fixed acceleration voltage. These results indicated an increase in electron temperature and density as acceleration voltage is increased. However, nearly identical trends result when arc discharges are produced at the same parameter settings as during these beams, but without beam extraction. This indicates minimal influence of backstreaming energetic electrons on electron temperature and density in the arc chamber. Temperature and density also remain fairly constant over time during a long beam pulse.

  12. On the interpretation of diamagnetic loop measurements for a current-carrying plasma column in a conducting chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleynikov, A. N.; Breizman, B. N.; Cherkassky, V. S.; Knyazev, B. A.

    1994-05-01

    An expression is derived for the signal of a magnetic loop encircling a plasma column inside a conducting chamber with nonuniform current distribution over the plasma cross section. The plasma with radius much smaller than the length of the column is assumed to be in a quasistationary force-balanced state. The ratio of the paramagnetic component to the diamagnetic component of the signal is shown to be independent of the loop radius. Both components increase as the loop radius decreases from the chamber radius to the plasma radius. From the derived expressions, the paramagnetic component of the signal is calculated numerically for several current distributions including those of interest for the experiments. At a given total current, the paramagnetic component of the signal may vary considerably, which generally has to be taken into account in interpreting experimental data. The results of the calculations are used to process the data obtained in the experiments on the SPIN plasma device [Knyazev et al., ``Characteristics of plasma produced by a linear discharge in the metal chamber of the SPIN device,'' J. Tech. Phys. 63, 49 (1993) (in Russian)].

  13. Shallow Magma Accumulation at Halema'uma'u Crater, Kilauea Volcano, Revealed by Microgravity Measurements (1975-2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, M.; Eggers, A.; Bagnardi, M.; Poland, M. P.; Miklius, A.

    2009-12-01

    We examined microgravity data collected during surveys of a dense network around the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, following the 1975 M7.2 earthquake and in 1981, 1998, 2003, and 2008. All gravity measurements are relative to a benchmark located 4 km northwest of the caldera. Gravity changes were adjusted for the free air effect by assuming a correction of -308.6 μGal/m and using leveling data (completed at approximately the same time as the gravity surveys) to determine elevation changes between successive gravity surveys. A several-year time series of water level measurements from a well within Kilauea’s caldera indicates that gravity variations due to groundwater fluctuations are negligible. Residual gravity data are characterized by a prominent positive residual gravity anomaly (an increase of 521 μGal during 1975-2008) along the east margin of Halema'uma'u Crater. The anomaly, which occurs in an area of relatively minor surface deformation, suggests subsurface magma accumulation in void space (probably a network of interconnected cracks) at shallow depths beneath Kilauea's caldera. The region beneath the southeast rim of Halema'uma'u Crater is a known volume of shallow magma storage on the basis of both geodetic and seismic data, and is near the site of several historical summit eruptive vents, including that of the 2008 explosion and subsequent eruption. Assuming a spherical source, we modeled the residual gravity changes measured at stations close to the Halema'uma'u source to estimate the source location, depth and mass change. The weighted least square inversion over the four time periods spanned by the daya gives a depth of 500-950 m (average is 725 m) with a total mass accumulation over 33 years of 6 x 1010 kg. Mass accumulation was variable over 1975-2008, with lower average rates during 1981-1998 and 1998-2003 and higher average rates during 1975-1981 and 2003-2008. The variable accumulation rates are consistent with changes in Kilauea

  14. Measurements of miniature ionization chamber currents in the JSI TRIGA Mark II reactor demonstrate the importance of the delayed contribution to the photon field in nuclear reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radulović, Vladimir; Fourmentel, Damien; Barbot, Loïc; Villard, Jean-François; Kaiba, Tanja; Gašper, Žerovnik; Snoj, Luka

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of experimental locations of a research nuclear reactor implies the determination of neutron and photon flux levels within, with the best achievable accuracy. In nuclear reactors, photon fluxes are commonly calculated by Monte Carlo simulations but rarely measured on-line. In this context, experiments were conducted with a miniature gas ionization chamber (MIC) based on miniature fission chamber mechanical parts, recently developed by the CEA (French Atomic Energy and Alternative Energies Commission) irradiated in the core of the Jožef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, Slovenia. The aim of the study was to compare the measured MIC currents with calculated currents based on simulations with the MCNP6 code. A discrepancy of around 50% was observed between the measured and the calculated currents; in the latter taking into consideration only the prompt photon field. Further experimental measurements of MIC currents following reactor SCRAMs (reactor shutdown with rapid insertions of control rods) provide evidence that over 30% of the total measured signal is due to the delayed photon field, originating from fission and activation products, which are untreated in the calculations. In the comparison between the measured and calculated values, these findings imply an overall discrepancy of less than 20% of the total signal which is still unexplained.

  15. A Framework for Measuring Fidelity of Implementation: A Foundation for Shared Language and Accumulation of Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Century, Jeanne; Rudnick, Mollie; Freeman, Cassie

    2010-01-01

    There is a growing recognition of the value of measuring fidelity of implementation (FOI) as a necessary part of evaluating interventions. However, evaluators do not have a shared conceptual understanding of what FOI is and how to measure it. Thus, the creation of FOI measures is typically a secondary focus and based on specific contexts and…

  16. The use of the high flux heater in the smoke chamber to measure ignitability and smoke evolution of composite panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Barnes, G. J.; Kourtides, D. A.; Parker, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    Ten samples of composite panels were evaluated in the smoke chamber using a high flux heater to produce heat flux levels up to 9.5 watts per square cm. This study demonstrated the potential of the apparatus as a means of evaluating ignitability as well as smoke evolution. Depending on the material and the heat flux level, ignitability results ranged from ignition within 2 seconds to no ignition during the test period. Smoke density generally increased with increasing heat flux. A composite panel consisting of bismaleimide-fiberglass/bismaleimide honeycomb with carbon microballoons exhibited the lowest smoke density at high heat flux levels and the greatest resistance to autoignition.

  17. The double beta decay spectrum of sup 100 Mo as measured with a TPC (time projection chamber)

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, S.R. ); Moe, M.K.; Nelson, M.A.; Vient, M.A. )

    1990-01-01

    A time projection chamber with 8.3 grams of enriched {sup 100}MoO{sub 3} as the central electrode has been operating approximately five months in an underground laboratory. A preliminary analysis of the two-electron sum energy spectrum, the spectrum of those same electrons taken singly, and the opening angle distribution yields a half life of 1.16{sub -0.08}{sup +0.34} {times} 10{sup 19} y at the 68% confidence level for two-neutrino double beta decay of {sup 100}Mo. 9 refs., 8 figs.

  18. SU-E-T-96: Demonstration of a Consistent Method for Correcting Surface Dose Measurements Using Both Solid State and Ionization Chamber Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, T; Gerbi, B; Higgins, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare the surface dose (SD) measured using a PTW 30-360 extrapolation chamber with different commonly used dosimeters (Ds): parallel plate ion chambers (ICs): RMI-449 (Attix), Capintec PS-033, PTW 30-329 (Markus) and Memorial; TLD chips (cTLD), TLD powder (pTLD), optically stimulated (OSLs), radiochromic (EXR2) and radiographic (EDR2) films, and to provide an intercomparison correction to Ds for each of them. Methods: Investigations were performed for a 6 MV x-ray beam (Varian Clinac 2300, 10x10 cm{sup 2} open field, SSD = 100 cm). The Ds were placed at the surface of the solid water phantom and at the reference depth dref=1.7cm. The measurements for cTLD, OSLs, EDR2 and EXR2 were corrected to SD using an extrapolation method (EM) indexed to the baseline PTW 30-360 measurements. A consistent use of the EM involved: 1) irradiation of three Ds stacked on top of each other on the surface of the phantom; 2) measurement of the relative dose value for each layer; and, 3) extrapolation of these values to zero thickness. An additional measurement was performed with externally exposed OSLs (eOSLs), that were rotated out of their protective housing. Results: All single Ds measurements overestimated the SD compared with the extrapolation chamber, except for Attix IC. The closest match to the true SD was measured with the Attix IC (− 0.1%), followed by pTLD (0.5%), Capintec (4.5%), Memorial (7.3%), Markus (10%), cTLD (11.8%), eOSL (12.8%), EXR2 (14%), EDR2 (14.8%) and OSL (26%). The EM method of correction for SD worked well for all Ds, except the unexposed OSLs. Conclusion: This EM cross calibration of solid state detectors with an extrapolation or Attix chamber can provide thickness corrections for cTLD, eOSLs, EXR2, and EDR2. Standard packaged OSLs were not found to be simply corrected.

  19. Absolute dose measurements by means of a small cylindrical ionization chamber for very high dose per pulse high energy electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Karaj, E.; Righi, S.; Di Martino, F.

    2007-03-15

    Very high dose per pulse (3-13 cGy/pulse) high energy electron beams are currently produced by special linear accelerators (linac) dedicated to Intra Operative Radiation Therapy (IORT). The electron beams produced by such linacs are collimated by special Perspex applicators of various size and cylindrically shaped. The biggest problems from the dosimetric point of view are caused by the high dose-per-pulse values and the use of inclined applicators. In this work measurements of absolute dose for the inclined applicators were done by using a small cylindrical ionization chamber, type CC01 (Wellhofer), a parallel plane ionization chamber type Markus (PTW 23343) and radiochromic films type EBT. We show a method which allows calculating the quality correction factors for CC01 chamber with an uncertainty of 1% and the absolute dose value for the inclined applicators using CC01 with an uncertainty of 3.1% for electron beams of energy of 6 and 7 MeV produced by the linac dedicated to IORT Novac7.

  20. Exact and near backscattering measurements of the linear depolarisation ratio of various ice crystal habits generated in a laboratory cloud chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Helen R.; Connolly, Paul J.; Webb, Ann R.; Baran, Anthony J.

    2016-07-01

    Ice clouds were generated in the Manchester Ice Cloud Chamber (MICC), and the backscattering linear depolarisation ratio, δ, was measured for a variety of habits. To create an assortment of particle morphologies, the humidity in the chamber was varied throughout each experiment, resulting in a range of habits from the pristine to the complex. This technique was repeated at three temperatures: -7 °C, -15 °C and -30 °C, in order to produce both solid and hollow columns, plates, sectored plates and dendrites. A linearly polarised 532 nm continuous wave diode laser was directed through a section of the cloud using a non-polarising 50:50 beam splitter. Measurements of the scattered light were taken at 178°, 179° and 180°, using a Glan-Taylor prism to separate the co- and cross-polarised components. The intensities of these components were measured using two amplified photodetectors and the ratio of the cross- to co-polarised intensities was measured to find the linear depolarisation ratio. In general, it was found that Ray Tracing over-predicts the linear depolarisation ratio. However, by creating more accurate particle models which better represent the internal structure of ice particles, discrepancies between measured and modelled results (based on Ray Tracing) were reduced.

  1. Secondary Electron Yield Measurements and Groove Chambers Tests in the PEP-II Beam Line Straights Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Pivi, M.T.F.; King, F.; Kirby, R.E.; Markiewicz, T; Raubenheimer, T.O.; Seeman, J.; Wang, L.; /SLAC

    2008-07-03

    Beam instability caused by the electron cloud has been observed in positron and proton storage rings and it is expected to be a limiting factor in the performance of the positron Damping Ring (DR) of future Linear Colliders such as ILC and CLIC [1, 2]. In the Positron Low Energy Ring (LER) of the PEP-II accelerator, we have installed vacuum chambers with rectangular grooves in a straight magnetic-free section to test this promising possible electron cloud mitigation technique. We have also installed a special chamber to monitor the secondary electron yield of TiN and TiZrV (NEG) coating, Copper, Stainless Steel and Aluminum under the effect of electron and photon conditioning in situ in the beam line. In this paper, we describe the ongoing R&D effort to mitigate the electron cloud effect for the ILC damping ring, the latest results on in situ secondary electron yield conditioning and recent update on the groove tests in PEP-II.

  2. CHAMBERS FERRY ROADLESS AREA, TEXAS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houser, B.B.; Ryan, George S.

    1984-01-01

    A geologic and geochemical investigation of the Chambers Ferry Roadless Area, Texas was conducted. The area has probable mineral-resource potential for oil and gas and for lignite. No metallic or additional energy resources were identified in the investigation. Detailed analyses of well logs from the vicinity of the Chambers Ferry Roadless Area, in conjunction with seismic data, are necessary to determine if the subsurface stratigraphy and structure are favorable for the accumulation of oil and gas. A shallow drilling program involving coring on a close-space grid is necessary for determination of the rank and continuity of seams of lignitic sediments in the area.

  3. Perspectives on anechoic chamber qualification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cunefare, Kenneth A.; Biesel, Van B.

    2002-11-01

    The qualification of a new anechoic chamber requires demonstration that the chamber produces a free-field environment within some tolerance bounds and over some acceptable volume. At the most basic level, qualification requires measurement of sound levels at increasing distances from a test source, and then comparing the levels to a theoretical free-field decay. While simple in concept, the actual performance of a qualification test is problematic in implementation, with troublesome issues relevant to the nature of the sound source, test signal (broadband or pure tone), spatial resolution of measurements (e.g., measurements at discrete locations or spatially continuous), and comparison of the data to a theoretical decay. This presentation will provide a brief historical perspective on chamber qualification and review current practice. It will demonstrate the inadequacy of broadband noise and widely spaced discrete measurements for qualification purposes. It will demonstrate that pure tone signals and spatially continuous measurements provide a rigorous test of a chambers performance.

  4. Simultaneous measurements of ice sheet elevation change, accumulation, and firn compaction using Operation IceBridge data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medley, Brooke; Ligtenberg, Stefan; van den Broeke, Michiel; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Nowicki, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    Altimetric methods for determination of ice sheet mass balance are extremely valuable as they typically measure large regions of the ice sheet, from basin- to continental-scale. The measured volume change is converted to mass change if the density of the lost material is known. The complication lies in the fact that the observed elevation change consists of two components of differing densities: firn and ice. Annual fluctuations in snow accumulation and firn compaction cause the firn column to vary in thickness, which is often a large component of the total elevation change in the interior since the density of firn is less than that of ice. Further complication arises from the fact that fluctuations in the firn compaction rate do not result in mass change. Therefore, to properly determine mass change, the observed elevation change must be partitioned into accumulation, firn compaction, and ice components. Because altimetry studies are often large in scale, models are used to account for the firn processes, which are coarse in resolution (~10s kilometers) relative to the observed elevation changes (sub-kilometer). Here, we take advantage of a unique opportunity to simultaneously measure surface elevation change, snow accumulation, and firn compaction over the Thwaites catchment in West Antarctica using two Operation IceBridge (OIB) sensors. The firn processes are observed using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) snow radar, and elevation changes are measured using the Airborne Topographic Mapper. Coincident observations such as the aforementioned allow us to not only accurately evaluate mass change over short distances, but also determine the importance of accounting for small-scale variations in firn processes in large-scale (basin-wide to continental) assessments of mass balance. Our results indicate that accumulation rates vary by more than 10% and compaction rates vary by more than 10 cm/yr over distances as little as 5 km in this region. Thus

  5. Strain accumulation in the Shumagin Islands: Results of initial GPS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Lisowski, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Deformation in the Shumagin seismic gap has been monitored with repeated trilateration (EDM) in the 1980-1987 interval and with the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the 1987-1991 interval. The geodetic network extends for 100-km across the Shumagin Islands to the Alaska Peninsula. Results from the GPS surveys are consistent with those previously reported for the EDM surveys: we failed to detect significant strain accumulation in the N30 deg W direction of plate convergence. Using the method of simultaneous reduction for position and strain rates, we found the average rate of extension in the direction of plate convergence to be -25 +/- 25 nanostrain/yr (nstrain/yr) during the 1987-1991 interval of GPS surveys compared with -20 +/- 15 nstrain/yr during the 1981-1987 interval of complete EDM surveys. We found a marginally significant -26 +/- 12 nstrain/yr extension rate in the 1981-1991 interval covered by the combined EDM and GPS surveys. Strain rates are higher, but not significantly so, in the part of the network closest to the trench. Spatial variation in the deformation is observed in the 1980-1991 average station velocities, where three of the four stations closest to the trench have an arcward velocity of a few mm/yr. The observed strain rates are an order of magnitude lower than the -200 nstrain/yr rate predicted by dislocation models.

  6. Chamber for Aerosol Deposition of Bioparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kern, Roger; Kirschner, Larry

    2008-01-01

    accumulation of electric charge on them, they are spray-coated with an anti-static material. During use, the base plate and the sides and top of the chamber are grounded as a further measure to minimize the buildup of electric charge.

  7. Measured differences in snow accumulation and melt among clearcut, juvenile, and mature forests in southern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R. D.; Spittlehouse, D. L.; Golding, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of the relationships between snow and forest cover, including its removal through logging, insects or disease and its regrowth, is a prerequisite to assessing the effects of forestry practices on streamflow from montane and boreal forest watersheds. Over a 3 year period, a juvenile and a juvenile-thinned lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) stand, a mature mixed Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt) and lodgepole pine stand, and a clearcut were intensively surveyed to quantify differences in snow water equivalent (SWE). Daily snowmelt, weather conditions, and the energy balance were measured during the first year of this study. The 1 April SWE was 32% and 14% less under the mature and juvenile forests respectively than in the clearcut. No significant differences in peak SWE were measured between the juvenile and juvenile-thinned stands. Continuous snowmelt lysimeter measurements showed that snowmelt began earlier, accumulated more rapidly, and disappeared 2 to 4 days earlier in the juvenile-thinned stand than in either the unthinned juvenile stand or the clearcut. When the snowpack had disappeared from the clearcut and juvenile stands, 30% of the SWE on 1 April remained in the mature forest. The results not only show that snow accumulation and melt differ significantly between clearcut, juvenile, and mature stands, but also that snowmelt patterns vary among juvenile stands with distinct structural differences. This is due to the difference in the energy balances, dominated by radiant heat fluxes, of the four sites. Copyright

  8. Proton beam monitor chamber calibration.

    PubMed

    Gomà, C; Lorentini, S; Meer, D; Safai, S

    2014-09-01

    The first goal of this paper is to clarify the reference conditions for the reference dosimetry of clinical proton beams. A clear distinction is made between proton beam delivery systems which should be calibrated with a spread-out Bragg peak field and those that should be calibrated with a (pseudo-)monoenergetic proton beam. For the latter, this paper also compares two independent dosimetry techniques to calibrate the beam monitor chambers: absolute dosimetry (of the number of protons exiting the nozzle) with a Faraday cup and reference dosimetry (i.e. determination of the absorbed dose to water under IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions) with an ionization chamber. To compare the two techniques, Monte Carlo simulations were performed to convert dose-to-water to proton fluence. A good agreement was found between the Faraday cup technique and the reference dosimetry with a plane-parallel ionization chamber. The differences-of the order of 3%-were found to be within the uncertainty of the comparison. For cylindrical ionization chambers, however, the agreement was only possible when positioning the effective point of measurement of the chamber at the reference measurement depth-i.e. not complying with IAEA TRS-398 recommendations. In conclusion, for cylindrical ionization chambers, IAEA TRS-398 reference conditions for monoenergetic proton beams led to a systematic error in the determination of the absorbed dose to water, especially relevant for low-energy proton beams. To overcome this problem, the effective point of measurement of cylindrical ionization chambers should be taken into account when positioning the reference point of the chamber. Within the current IAEA TRS-398 recommendations, it seems advisable to use plane-parallel ionization chambers-rather than cylindrical chambers-for the reference dosimetry of pseudo-monoenergetic proton beams. PMID:25109620

  9. Flushing induction chambers used for rodent anesthesia to reduce waste anesthetic gas.

    PubMed

    Wolforth, Janet; Dyson, Melissa C

    2011-03-01

    Anesthetic induction chambers used for medical research are a substantial source of waste anesthetic gas (WAG). Ideally, any generated waste gas should be actively vented away from personnel operating the chamber by either a ventilated hood or snorkel. Unfortunately, the ideal environment for anesthetizing rodents is not always available. In an effort to create a safer environment, the authors designed a system to reduce WAG. This system is portable, can be adapted to different precision vaporizing anesthetic systems and fits in a variety of physical locations. The system flushes anesthetic gas out of an induction chamber before operators open the chamber. To ensure that the system was adequately flushing the anesthetic gas, the authors measured WAG concentration in the environment above the induction chamber and directly behind the vent of an activated charcoal filter. They also compared the efficiency of the filters in vertical and horizontal positions. Finally, they measured the recovery time for mice and rats after flushing the anesthetic gas from an induction chamber. The results show that flushing the induction chamber was an inexpensive and effective method for reducing WAG accumulation in the air surrounding the chamber. PMID:21326188

  10. Measurement of the spark probability of a GEM detector for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, S.; Abuhoza, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Garabatos, C.; Hehner, J.; Kleipa, V.; Morhardt, T.; Schmidt, C. J.; Schmidt, H. R.; Wiechula, J.

    2015-11-01

    The triple GEM detectors for the CBM muon chamber (MuCh) will be operated in a high rate environment of heavily ionizing particles due to the presence of thick iron absorber in the system. Therefore, the stability of the detectors needs to be tested. In a dedicated beam time double mask triple GEM detectors have been tested at CERN SPS/H4. In this study pion beam of ~ 150 GeV/c has been used. Different methods to determine the spark has been described in this paper. The stability of the triple GEM detector setup in an environment of high energetic showers is studied. To this end the spark probability in a shower environment is compared to the spark probability in a pion beam. The spark probability was found to be ~10-7 in a high momentum pion beam and in an induced particle shower.

  11. Instantaneous and continuous measurement of /sup 14/C-labeled substrate oxidation to /sup 14/CO2 by minute tissue specimens: an ionization chamber method

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, W.D.; Klein, K.L.; Kurokawa, K.; Soll, A.H.

    1981-06-01

    The vibrating reed electrometer and ionization chamber have been adapted for the instantaneous and continuous measurement of /sup 14/C-labeled substrate oxidation to /sup 14/CO2 by minute quantities of isolated tissues. This modified technique, utilizing a ''closed'' circulation incubation system, is 10-50 times as sensitive as the previously described ''open'' circulation techniques. Substrate oxidation curves are described for human erythrocytes and polymorphonuclear leucocytes, canine parietal cells and isolated segments of the rat nephron. This apparatus should prove to be a useful tool for metabolic studies of small quantities of isolated tissue.

  12. A comparison of methane emission measurements using Eddy Covariance and manual and automated chamber-based techniques in Tibetan Plateau alpine wetland.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lingfei; Wang, Hao; Wang, Guangshuai; Song, Weimin; Huang, Yao; Li, Sheng-Gong; Liang, Naishen; Tang, Yanhong; He, Jin-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Comparing of different CH4 flux measurement techniques allows for the independent evaluation of the performance and reliability of those techniques. We compared three approaches, the traditional discrete Manual Static Chamber (MSC), Continuous Automated Chamber (CAC) and Eddy Covariance (EC) methods of measuring the CH4 fluxes in an alpine wetland. We found a good agreement among the three methods in the seasonal CH4 flux patterns, but the diurnal patterns from both the CAC and EC methods differed. While the diurnal CH4 flux variation from the CAC method was positively correlated with the soil temperature, the diurnal variation from the EC method was closely correlated with the solar radiation and net CO2 fluxes during the daytime but was correlated with the soil temperature at nighttime. The MSC method showed 25.3% and 7.6% greater CH4 fluxes than the CAC and EC methods when measured between 09:00 h and 12:00 h, respectively. PMID:23838484

  13. Under-canopy snow accumulation and ablation measured with airborne scanning LiDAR altimetry and in-situ instrumental measurements, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Musselman, K. N.; Molotch, N. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of canopy on snow accumulation and melt in a mountain forest using paired snow on and snow off scanning LiDAR altimetry, synoptic measurement campaigns and in-situ time series data of snow depth, SWE, and radiation collected from the Kaweah River watershed, Sierra Nevada, California. Our analysis of forest cover classified by dominant species and 1 m2 grided mean under canopy snow accumulation calculated from airborne scanning LiDAR, demonstrate distinct relationships between forest class and under-canopy snow depth. The five forest types were selected from carefully prepared 1 m vegetation classifications and named for their dominant tree species, Giant Sequoia, Jeffrey Pine, White Fir, Red Fir, Sierra Lodgepole, Western White Pine, and Foxtail Pine. Sufficient LiDAR returns for calculating mean snow depth per m2 were available for 31 - 44% of the canopy covered area and demonstrate a reduction in snow depth of 12 - 24% from adjacent open areas. The coefficient of variation in snow depth under canopies ranged from 0.2 - 0.42 and generally decreased as elevation increased. Our analysis of snow density snows no statistical significance between snow under canopies and in the open at higher elevations with a weak significance for snow under canopies at lower elevations. Incident radiation measurements made at 15 minute intervals under forest canopies show an input of up to 150 w/m2 of thermal radiation from vegetation to the snow surface on forest plots. Snow accumulated on the mid to high elevation forested slopes of the Sierra Nevada represents the majority of winter snow storage. However snow estimates in forested environments demonstrate a high level of uncertainty due to the limited number of in-situ observations and the inability of most remote sensing platforms to retrieve reflectance under dense vegetation. Snow under forest canopies is strongly mediated by forest cover and decoupled from the processes that dictate accumulation

  14. Inferential consequences of modeling rather than measuring snow accumulation in studies of animal ecology.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Angela; Cross, Paul C; Higgs, Megan; Beckmann, Jon P; Klaver, Robert W; Scurlock, Brandon M; Creel, Scott

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly common for studies of animal ecology to use model-based predictions of environmental variables as explanatory or predictor variables, even though model prediction uncertainty is typically unknown. To demonstrate the potential for misleading inferences when model predictions with error are used in place of direct measurements, we compared snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth as predicted by the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) to field measurements of SWE and snow depth. We examined locations on elk (Cervus canadensis) winter ranges in western Wyoming, because modeled data such as SNODAS output are often used for inferences on elk ecology. Overall, SNODAS predictions tended to overestimate field measurements, prediction uncertainty was high, and the difference between SNODAS predictions and field measurements was greater in snow shadows for both snow variables compared to non-snow shadow areas. We used a simple simulation of snow effects on the probability of an elk being killed by a predator to show that, if SNODAS prediction uncertainty was ignored, we might have mistakenly concluded that SWE was not an important factor in where elk were killed in predatory attacks during the winter. In this simulation, we were interested in the effects of snow at finer scales (< 1 km2) than the resolution of SNODAS. If bias were to decrease when SNODAS predictions are averaged over coarser scales, SNODAS would be applicable to population-level ecology studies. In our study, however, averaging predictions over moderate to broad spatial scales (9-2200 km2) did not reduce the differences between SNODAS predictions and field measurements. This study highlights the need to carefully evaluate two issues when using model output as an explanatory variable in subsequent analysis: (1) the model's resolution relative to the scale of the ecological question of interest and (2) the implications of prediction uncertainty on inferences when using model predictions

  15. Inferential consequences of modeling rather than measuring snow accumulation in studies of animal ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Faul C.; Klaver, Robert W.; Brennan, Angela; Creel, Scott; Beckmann, Jon P.; Higgs, Megan D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. It is increasingly common for studies of animal ecology to use model-based predictions of environmental variables as explanatory or predictor variables, even though model prediction uncertainty is typically unknown. To demonstrate the potential for misleading inferences when model predictions with error are used in place of direct measurements, we compared snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth as predicted by the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) to field measurements of SWE and snow depth. We examined locations on elk (Cervus canadensis) winter ranges in western Wyoming, because modeled data such as SNODAS output are often used for inferences on elk ecology. Overall, SNODAS predictions tended to overestimate field measurements, prediction uncertainty was high, and the difference between SNODAS predictions and field measurements was greater in snow shadows for both snow variables compared to non-snow shadow areas. We used a simple simulation of snow effects on the probability of an elk being killed by a predator to show that, if SNODAS prediction uncertainty was ignored, we might have mistakenly concluded that SWE was not an important factor in where elk were killed in predatory attacks during the winter. In this simulation, we were interested in the effects of snow at finer scales (2) than the resolution of SNODAS. If bias were to decrease when SNODAS predictions are averaged over coarser scales, SNODAS would be applicable to population-level ecology studies. In our study, however, averaging predictions over moderate to broad spatial scales (9–2200 km2) did not reduce the differences between SNODAS predictions and field measurements. This study highlights the need to carefully evaluate two issues when using model output as an explanatory variable in subsequent analysis: (1) the model’s resolution relative to the scale of the ecological question of interest and (2) the implications of prediction uncertainty on inferences when using model

  16. Investigating the error budget of tropical rainfall accumulations derived from combined passive microwave and infrared satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roca, R.; Chambon, P.; jobard, I.; Viltard, N.

    2012-04-01

    Measuring rainfall requires a high density of observations, which, over the whole tropical elt, can only be provided from space. For several decades, the availability of satellite observations has greatly increased; thanks to newly implemented missions like the Megha-Tropiques mission and the forthcoming GPM constellation, measurements from space become available from a set of observing systems. In this work, we focus on rainfall error estimations at the 1 °/1-day accumulated scale, key scale of meteorological and hydrological studies. A novel methodology for quantitative precipitation estimation is introduced; its name is TAPEER (Tropical Amount of Precipitation with an Estimate of ERrors) and it aims to provide 1 °/1-day rain accumulations and associated errors over the whole Tropical belt. This approach is based on a combination of infrared imagery from a fleet of geostationary satellites and passive microwave derived rain rates from a constellation of low earth orbiting satellites. A three-stage disaggregation of error into sampling, algorithmic and calibration errors is performed; the magnitudes of the three terms are then estimated separately. A dedicated error model is used to evaluate sampling errors and a forward error propagation approach is used for an estimation of algorithmic and calibration errors. One of the main findings in this study is the large contribution of the sampling errors and the algorithmic errors of BRAIN on medium rain rates (2 mm h-1 to 10 mm h-1) in the total error budget.

  17. The FiR 1 photon beam model adjustment according to in-air spectrum measurements with the Mg(Ar) ionization chamber.

    PubMed

    Koivunoro, H; Schmitz, T; Hippeläinen, E; Liu, Y-H; Serén, T; Kotiluoto, P; Auterinen, I; Savolainen, S

    2014-06-01

    The mixed neutron-photon beam of FiR 1 reactor is used for boron-neutron capture therapy (BNCT) in Finland. A beam model has been defined for patient treatment planning and dosimetric calculations. The neutron beam model has been validated with an activation foil measurements. The photon beam model has not been thoroughly validated against measurements, due to the fact that the beam photon dose rate is low, at most only 2% of the total weighted patient dose at FiR 1. However, improvement of the photon dose detection accuracy is worthwhile, since the beam photon dose is of concern in the beam dosimetry. In this study, we have performed ionization chamber measurements with multiple build-up caps of different thickness to adjust the calculated photon spectrum of a FiR 1 beam model. PMID:24588987

  18. Insights into aerosol formation chemistry from comprehensive gas-phase precursor measurement in the TRAPOZ chamber experiments; an overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, Timo; Wyche, Kevin; Monks, Paul S.; Camredon, Marie; Alam, Mohammed S.; Bloss, William J.; Rickard, Andrew R.

    2010-05-01

    Aerosols have a profound affect on the environment on local, regional and even global levels, with impacts including adverse health effects, (Alfarra, Paulsen et al. 2006) visibility reduction, cloud formation, direct radiative forcing (Charlson, Schwartz et al. 1992) and an important role in influencing the climate due to their contribution to important atmospheric processes (Baltensperger, Kalberer et al. 2005; Alfarra, Paulsen et al. 2006). The Total Radical Production from the OZonolysis of alkenes (TRAPOZ) project was used to study the gas phase and radical chemistry along with secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation for a number of different alkenes and terpenes. In order to better the scientific knowledge regarding the oxidation mechanisms of terpene and alkene species along with radical and SOA formation, the experiments were conducted under varying conditions controlled and monitored by the EUropean PHOto REactor (EUPHORE) simulation chamber in Valencia, Spain. A vast number of instruments enabled a detailed examination of the chemistry within oxidation of each precursor. However the work here will focus on the results obtained from the University of Leicester Chemical Ionisation Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (CIR-TOF-MS). With regard to the gas phase chemistry an analysis of the degradation of the precursor Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) and evolution of certain gas phase species in each experiment has been presented and discussed.

  19. Multiwire proportional chamber development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doolittle, R. F.; Pollvogt, U.; Eskovitz, A. J.

    1973-01-01

    The development of large area multiwire proportional chambers, to be used as high resolution spatial detectors in cosmic ray experiments is described. A readout system was developed which uses a directly coupled, lumped element delay-line whose characteristics are independent of the MWPC design. A complete analysis of the delay-line and the readout electronic system shows that a spatial resolution of about 0.1 mm can be reached with the MWPC operating in the strictly proportional region. This was confirmed by measurements with a small MWPC and Fe-55 X-rays. A simplified analysis was carried out to estimate the theoretical limit of spatial resolution due to delta-rays, spread of the discharge along the anode wire, and inclined trajectories. To calculate the gas gain of MWPC's of different geometrical configurations a method was developed which is based on the knowledge of the first Townsend coefficient of the chamber gas.

  20. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  1. Interseismic strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault measured using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a major feature of Middle Eastern tectonics, facilitating the westwards 'escape' of the Anatolian block away from the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision. In order to understand the role that the NAF plays in regional tectonics it is important to accurately determine the slip rate across the fault. Many slip rate estimates for the NAF have been made over Quaternary and longer time-scales but few geodetic estimates currently exist, especially in eastern Turkey. Here we construct satellite radar interferograms using Envisat ASAR data to measure ground displacements around the NAF and hence estimate the slip rate across it. We make use of SAR data from two satellite tracks, one ascending and one descending, that overlap across the NAF, providing a check on the assumption of horizontal fault-parallel motion that has previously been used in interseismic modelling of the fault. We mitigate the effects of atmospheric errors by constructing multiple interferograms over the fault and summing them, effectively creating a longer timespan interferogram and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. We empirically correct for orbital errors by flattening the radar swaths on the Anatolian Plateau, an area with little expected deformation. Our measurements of rates of displacement are consistent with an interseismic model for the NAF where deformation occurs at depth on a narrow shear zone below a layer in which the fault is locked. We jointly invert data from both satellite tracks to solve for best fitting model parameters, estimating both the slip rate and the depth to which the fault is locked. Our best-fitting model gives a slip rate of 23 mm/yr and a locking depth of 19 km, which is in agreement with a previous estimate made from a single track of ERS SAR data (Wright et al., 2001, GRL 28, 2117-2120), and with existing GPS data. We also construct a velocity field using a combination of InSAR and GPS data for eastern Turkey.

  2. Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl accumulation in unstable landforms 2. Simulations and measurements on eroding moraines

    SciTech Connect

    Zreda, M.G.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.

    1994-11-01

    Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl ages of boulders from late Pleistocene moraines in Bishop Creek, Sierra Nevada, California, provided valuable details about {sup 36}Cl surface exposure dating and the nature of post depositional processes that modify glacial landforms. The natural variability of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages among morainal boulders is due to soil erosion and gradual exposure of boulders at the surface. Two mechanisms are responsible for the resulting distributions of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages. Variability of the initial burial depth among boulders and variability in the chemical composition of boulders from the same depth both result in different {sup 36}Cl ages due to the dependence of the depth production profile on the boulder chemistry. The authors measured cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in boulders from a late Pleistocene moraine. The distribution of the calculated apparent ages allowed them to calculate the true age of 85 kyr and the erosion rate of 570 g cm{sup -2}. These results are in excellent agreement with independently estimated values of 87 kyr and 600 g cm{sup -2} for the age and erosion depth, respectively. These results indicate that the model satisfactorily simulates effects of erosion processes and can thus aid in surface exposure dating of eroding landforms.

  3. Micro/meso scale fatigue damage accumulation monitoring using nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagrai, Andrei; Donskoy, Dimitri; Chudnovsky, Alexander; Golovin, Edward; Agarwala, Vinod S.

    2006-03-01

    Monitoring the incipient damage at the earliest possible stage is essential for predicting structural performance and remaining life of structural components. Existing prognostic methodologies incorporate conventional SHM and NDE techniques responsive to cracks and delaminations resulted from the irreversible material fracture and disintegration at the macro-scale. There is an increasing need for technologies that could allow for monitoring material degradation at the micro/meso scale before the onset of the macro-scale fracture. In this contribution, we report results of the real-time monitoring of the material micro/meso scale degradation using the nonlinear acoustic vibro-modulation technique. The technique explores nonlinear acoustic interaction of high frequency ultrasound and low frequency structural vibration at the site of the incipient damage. The indicator of the damage severity, nonlinear acoustic damage index (DI), was measured in real time during the strain-controlled three-point bending fatigue test of aluminum and steel specimens. Nondestructively, degradation of the specimen was revealed through the increase in the DI, which correlated well with the respective decrease in the specimen's stiffness. Destructive SEM examination confirmed sensitivity of the DI to the incipient micro/meso scale damage and advocated for utilizing the vibro-modulation approach for assessment of material degradation before fracture.

  4. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and detailed neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, T. B.; Hawley, R. L.; Helm, V.; Morris, E. M.; Chaudhary, R. N.

    2015-12-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and detailed neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP accumulation rates are not statistically different (C.I. 95 %) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. Below 3000 m elevation, ASIRAS-NP increases by 20 % for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Above 3000 m elevation, accumulation increases by 13 % for 1995-2004 compared to 1985-1994. Model snow accumulation results from the calibrated Fifth Generation Mesoscale Model modified for polar climates (Polar MM5) underestimate mean annual accumulation by 16 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modelled density profiles in place of detailed NP data. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the IceBridge campaign.

  5. Drift and proportional tracking chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaros, J. A.

    1980-11-01

    The many techniques exploited in constructing tracking chambers, particle detectors which measure the trajectories and momenta of charged particles, are discussed. In high energy interactions, the final states are dominated by closely collimated jets of high multiplicity, requiring good track-pair resolution in the tracking chamber. High energy particles deflect very little in limited magnetic field volumes, necessitating good spatial resolution for accurate momentum measurements. The colliding beam technique requires a device easily adapted to full solid angle coverage, and the high event rates expected in some of these machines put a premium on good time resolution. Finally, the production and subsequent decays of the tau, charmed and beautiful mesons provide multiple vertex topologies. To reconstruct these vertices reliably requires improvements in spatial resolution and track pair resolution. The proportional counter and its descendant, the drift chamber, are considered as tracking chambers. The physics of this device are discussed in order to understand its performance limitations and promises.

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  7. Improved methods for measuring radioactive tracer accumulation and excretion by microarthropods, with applications for a mite species, Tyrophagus longior (Acarina, Acaridae)

    SciTech Connect

    Abbott, D T; Crossley, Jr, D A

    1980-08-01

    Radioisotope retention measurements of /sup 85/Sr and /sup 51/Cr in Tyrophagus longior (Gervais) (Acari: Acaridae) were fit to 2 and 1 component models. Biological half-life for the rapid component of both radioisotopes was about 10 hours, with assimilation of /sup 85/Sr being 62%. The identification of /sup 51/Cr turnover as gut clearance must remain tentative. An inexpensive disposable culture chamber for measuring radioisotope retention in microarthropods is described along with details of methodology.

  8. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  9. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  10. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  11. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) < snowpack Hg (2.38 ?? 0.68 ??g/m2) < event throughfall flux (5.63 ?? 0.38 ??g/m2). Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0

  12. Measurement and simulation of two-phase CO2 cooling in Micromegas modules for a Large Prototype of Time Projection Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharya, D. S.; Attié, D.; Colas, P.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Majumdar, N.; Bhattacharya, S.; Sarkar, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Ganjour, S.

    2015-08-01

    The readout electronics of a Micromegas (MM) module consume nearly 26 W of electric power, which causes the temperature of electronic board to increase upto 70 oC. Increase in temperature results in damage of electronics. Development of temperature gradient in the Time Projection Chamber (TPC) may affect precise measurement as well. Two-phase CO2 cooling has been applied to remove heat from the MM modules during two test beam experiments at DESY, Hamburg. Following the experimental procedure, a comprehensive study of the cooling technique has been accomplished for a single MM module by means of numerical simulation. This paper is focused to discuss the application of two-phase CO2 cooling to keep the temperature below 30 oC and stabilized within 0.2 oC.

  13. The development of new devices for accurate radiation dose measurement: A guarded liquid ionization chamber and an electron sealed water calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Kristin J.

    In this work we developed two new devices that aim to improve the accuracy of relative and reference dosimetry for radiation therapy: a guarded liquid ionization chamber (GLIC) and an electron sealed water (ESW) calorimeter. With the GLIC we aimed to develop a perturbation-free energy-independent detector with high spatial resolution for relative dosimetry. We achieved sufficient stability for short-term measurements using the GLIC-03, which has a sensitive volume of approximately 2 mm3. We evaluated ion recombination in pulsed photon beams using a theoretical model and also determined a new empirical method to correct for relative differences in general recombination which could be used in cases where the theoretical model was not applicable. The energy dependence of the GLIC-03 was 1.1% between 6 and 18 MV photon beams. Measurements in the build-up region of an 18 MV beam indicated that this detector produces minimal perturbation to the radiation field and confirmed the validity of the empirical recombination correction. The ESW calorimeter was designed to directly measure absorbed dose to water in clinical electron beams. We obtained reproducible measurements for 6 to 20 MeV beams. We determined corrections for perturbations to the radiation field caused by the glass calorimeter vessel and for conductive heat transfer due to the dose gradient and non-water materials. The overall uncertainty on the ESW calorimeter dose was 0.5% for the 9 to 20 MeV beams and 1.0% for 6 MeV, showing for the first time that the development of a water-calorimeter-based standard for electron beams over a wide range of energies is feasible. Comparison between measurements with the ESW calorimeter and the NRC photon beam standard calorimeter in a 6 MeV beam revealed a discrepancy of 0.7+/-0.2% which is still under investigation. Absorbed-dose beam quality conversion factors in electron beams were measured using the ESW calorimeter for the Exradin A12 and PTW Roos ionization chambers

  14. A Comparison of GHG Flux Measurements by Relaxed Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance Methods Using FTIR and QCL Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Laborde, M.; Hensen, A.; van den Bulk, P.; Famulari, D.; Griffith, D. W.; Nemitz, E.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation results obtained with a novel system for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements using an Ecotech Spectronus FTIR analyzer (Griffth et al, 2012) will be compared to eddy covariance fluxes using an Aerodyne QCL and a Licor 6262 NDIR analyzer. The REA FTIR system can be easily combined with other standard (e.g. NDIR) analyzers suited for eddy covariance measurements to allow for scaling of the obtained up/down concentration differences with the directly measured fluxes. Furthermore the FTIR system allows for on-line simultaneous high precision concentration measurement of a large number of different gases and even isotope composition, next to the measurement of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios. The final design goal for the REA FTIR system is an attractive fully automated, low maintenance system for long-term monitoring of Greenhouse Gas fluxes at the hourly time scale and a spatial scale of about 1 km2. During a campaign of four weeks in June 2013 (in the framework of the InGOS EU project) at a grazed grassland site at Easter Bush, Scotland (UK), simultaneous surface flux measurements of N2O and additionally CO2 and CH4 have been performed using our systems and a number of setups from other groups.. Weather conditions during the campaign were excellent and after the application of fertilizer at the field and some rainfall the increased emission of N2O was detected clearly by all systems. Both the eddy covariance and REA methods performed well during the campaign and the measured fluxes compare satisfactorily. In general the resulting fluxes from the FTIR system are lower then the QCL based results. Reasons for these deviations will be discussed together with implications of the results for the design of future REA measurements using the FTIR system. Griffith, D.W.T., N.M. Deutscher, C.G.R. Caldow, G. Kettlewell, M. Riggenbach and S. Hammer, A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications. Atmospheric Measurement

  15. Aging in large CDF tracking chambers

    SciTech Connect

    M. Binkley et al.

    2001-03-19

    The experience of the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) with aging in the large axial drift chamber responsible for tracking in the central region is presented. Premature aging in the Run 1 chamber was observed after only 0.02 C/cm. After cleaning much of the gas system and making modifications to reduce aerosols from the alcohol bubbler, the observed aging rate fell dramatically in test chambers. Considerable effort has been made to better understand the factors that affect aging since the replacement chamber for Run 2 will accumulate about 1.0 C/cm. Current test chambers using the full CDF gas system show aging rates of less than 5%/C/cm.

  16. The Lima-Peru seismic gap: a study of inter-seismic strain accumulation from a decade of GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norabuena, E. O.; Pollitz, F. F.; Dixon, T. H.

    2013-05-01

    The Peruvian subduction zone between the Mendaña Fracture zone and Arica, northern Chile, has been source of large megathrust earthquakes since historical to present times, The two last major events affecting the southern segment corresponds to Arequipa 2001 (Mw 8.3) and Pisco 2007 (Mw 8.1). A noteworthy event is the Lima 1746 earthquake with an assigned magnitude of Mw 8.5 and which is assumed to have broken several km of the seismogenic zone off Lima. The great shock was followed by a devastating tsunami that destroyed the main port of Callao, killing about 99 percent of its population. This extreme event was followed by quiescence of a few hundred years until the XX century when the Lima subduction zone was broken again by the earthquakes of May 1940 (Mw 8.0), October 1966 (Mw 8.0) and Lima 1974 (Mw 8.0). The broken areas overlap partially with the estimated area of the 1746 earthquake and put the region in a state of seismic gap representing a major hazard for Lima city - Peru's capital and its about 9 million of inhabitants. Our study reports the interseismic strain accumulation derived from a decade of GPS measurement at 11 geodetic monuments including one measurement in an island 80 km offshore and models variations of coupling along the plate interface.

  17. The Leipzig Ice Nucleation chamber Comparison (LINC): An overview of ice nucleation measurements observed with four on-line ice nucleation devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohn, Monika; Wex, Heike; Grawe, Sarah; Hartmann, Susan; Hellner, Lisa; Herenz, Paul; Welti, André; Stratmann, Frank; Lohmann, Ulrike; Kanji, Zamin A.

    2016-04-01

    Mixed-phase clouds (MPCs) are found to be the most relevant cloud type leading to precipitation in mid-latitudes. The formation of ice crystals in MPCs is not completely understood. To estimate the effect of aerosol particles on the radiative properties of clouds and to describe ice nucleation in models, the specific properties of aerosol particles acting as ice nucleating particles (INPs) still need to be identified. A number of devices are able to measure INPs in the lab and in the field. However, methods can be very different and need to be tested under controlled conditions with respect to aerosol generation and properties in order to standardize measurement and data analysis approaches for subsequent ambient measurements. Here, we present an overview of the LINC campaign hosted at TROPOS in September 2015. We compare four ice nucleation devices: PINC (Portable Ice Nucleation Chamber, Chou et al., 2011) and SPIN (SPectrometer for Ice Nuclei) are operated in deposition nucleation and condensation freezing mode. LACIS (Leipzig Aerosol Cloud Interaction Simulator, Hartmann et al., 2011) and PIMCA (Portable Immersion Mode Cooling chamber) measure in the immersion freezing mode. PIMCA is used as a vertical extension to PINC and allows activation and droplet growth prior to exposure to the investigated ice nucleation temperature. Size-resolved measurements of multiple aerosol types were performed including pure mineral dust (K-feldspar, kaolinite) and biological particles (Birch pollen washing waters) as well as some of them after treatment with sulfuric or nitric acid prior to experiments. LACIS and PIMCA-PINC operated in the immersion freezing mode showed very good agreement in the measured frozen fraction (FF). For the comparison between PINC and SPIN, which were scanning relative humidity from below to above water vapor saturation, an agreement was found for the obtained INP concentration. However, some differences were observed, which may result from ice

  18. Accumulation of bone strontium measured by in vivo XRF in rats supplemented with strontium citrate and strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Chettle, David R; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Druchok, Cheryl; Webber, Colin E; Adachi, Jonathan D; Beattie, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Strontium ranelate is an approved pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in Europe and Australia, but not in Canada or the United States. Strontium citrate, an alternative strontium salt, however, is available for purchase over-the-counter as a nutritional supplement. The effects of strontium citrate on bone are largely unknown. The study's objectives were 1) to quantify bone strontium accumulation in female Sprague Dawley rats administered strontium citrate (N=7) and compare these levels to rats administered strontium ranelate (N=6) and vehicle (N=6) over 8 weeks, and 2) to verify an in vivo X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) system for measurement of bone strontium in the rat. Daily doses of strontium citrate and strontium ranelate were determined with the intention to achieve equivalent amounts of elemental strontium. However, post-hoc analyses of each strontium compound conducted using energy dispersive spectrometry microanalysis revealed a higher elemental strontium concentration in strontium citrate than strontium ranelate. Bone strontium levels were measured at baseline and 8 weeks follow-up using a unique in vivo XRF technique previously used in humans. XRF measurements were validated against ex vivo measurements of bone strontium using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Weight gain in rats in all three groups was equivalent over the study duration. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare bone strontium levels amongst the three groups. Bone strontium levels in rats administered strontium citrate were significantly greater (p<0.05) than rats administered strontium ranelate and vehicle. ANCOVA analyses were performed with Sr dose as a covariate to account for differences in strontium dosing. The ANCOVA revealed differences in bone strontium levels between the strontium groups were not significant, but that bone strontium levels were still very significantly greater than vehicle. PMID:22995463

  19. Measurements of the Propagation of EM Waves through the Vacuum Chamber of the PEP-II Low Energy Ring for Beam Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, John Michael; De Santis, S.; Pivi, MTF; /SLAC

    2008-01-23

    We present the results of our measurements of the electron cloud density in the PEP-II low energy ring (LER) by propagating a TE wave into the beam pipe. By connecting a signal generator to a beam position monitor button we can excite a signal above the vacuum chamber cut-off frequency and measure its propagation through the beam pipe with a spectrum analyzer connected to another button about 50 meters away. The measurement can be performed with different beam conditions and also at different settings of the solenoids used to reduce the build up of electrons. The presence of a modulation in the TE wave transmission, synchronous with the beam revolution frequency, which appear to increase in depth when the solenoids are switched off, seem to be directly correlated to the electron cloud density in the region between the two BPM's. In this paper we present and discuss the measurements taken in the Interaction Region 12 straight of the LER during 2006 and the first part of 2007.

  20. Water table depth regulates evapotranspiration and methane flux of a near-pristine temperate lowland fen measured by eddy covariance and static chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaduk, Jörg; Pan, Gong; Cumming, Alex; Evans, Jon; Kelvin, Jon; Peacock, Mike; Gauci, Vincent; Hughes, John; Page, Susan; Balzter, Heiko

    2015-04-01

    Methane is the second most important greenhouse gas after carbon dioxide, although the current atmospheric concentration is only about two parts per million. This results from a radiative forcing of 0.48 +/-0.05 Wm-2, about 26 times that of carbon dioxide. Atmospheric concentrations as well as emissions to the atmosphere have been increasing strongly over the last decades. Emissions are to a large extent biogenic where the largest biogenic source, wetlands, has the largest uncertainty. This precludes the construction of a reliable global methane budget, as well as meaningful predictions, as results from wetland models are uncertain and there are insufficient data for model improvement. We measured evapotranspiration and methane flux of a near-pristine temperate lowland fen in East Anglia in the United Kingdom from July 2013 to June 2014 by eddy covariance, which represents the first annual cycle of eddy covariance measurements of methane flux in this category of wetland. Methane fluxes from vegetation and ditches were additionally measured separately with static chambers. Annual evapotranspiration was 720.4 to 732.6 mm yr-1. Annual methane release was 3.77 to 4.03 g CH4 m-2 yr-1. Water table and methane fluxes were very different in the two half years: an average of -0.63 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 (a net uptake) for July-December 2013 and 16.2 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 (a net release) for January-June 2014 with a data range of -99 to 410 nmol CH4 m-2s-1 over the full year. Water table has the dominant role in determining methane flux and, under a very low water table, methane uptake was observed. Temperature has a clear impact on fluxes at high water tables. Eddy covariance and chamber measurements show the same annual pattern flux magnitude throughout the year. The fen can switch from being a source to a sink if the water table changes over a small critical depth range. Our measurements have implications for large scale wetland restoration plans in the eastern UK and potential

  1. Dynamic PET Measures of Tau Accumulation in Cognitively Normal Older Adults and Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Measured Using [18F] THK-5351

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Suzanne L.; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Ishiki, Aiko; Furumoto, Shozo; Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Harada, Ryuichi; Tomita, Naoki; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Watanuki, Shoichi; Jagust, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background [18F]THK5351, a recently-developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for measuring tau neurofibrillary tangle accumulation, may help researchers examine aging, disease, and tau pathology in living human brains. We examined THK5351 tracer pharmacokinetics to define an optimal acquisition time for static late images. Methods Primary measurements were calculation of regional values of distribution volume ratios (DVR) and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) in 6 healthy older control and 10 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) participants. We examined associations between DVR and SUVR, searching for a 20 min SUVR time window that was stable and comparable to DVR. We additionally examined diagnostic group differences in this 20 min SUVR. Results In healthy controls, [18F]THK5351 uptake was low, with increased temporal relative to frontal binding. In AD, regional uptake was substantially higher than in healthy controls, with temporal exceeding frontal binding. Retention in cerebellar gray matter, which was used as the reference region, was low compared to other regions. Both DVR and SUVR values showed minimal change over time after 40 min. SUVR 20–40, 30–50, and 40–60 min were most consistently correlated with DVR; SUVR 40–60 min, the most stable time window, was used in further analyses. Significant (AD > healthy control) group differences existed in temporoparietal regions, with marginal medial temporal differences. We found high basal ganglia SUVR 40–60 min signal, with no group differences. Conclusions We examined THK5351, a new PET tracer for measuring tau accumulation, and compared multiple analysis methods for quantifying regional tracer uptake. SUVR 40–60 min performed optimally when examining 20 min SUVR windows, and appears to be a practical method for quantifying relative regional tracer retention. The results of this study offer clinical potential, given the usefulness of THK5351-PET as a biomarker of tau pathology in aging and

  2. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  3. Novel chamber to measure equilibrium soil-air partitioning coefficients of low-volatility organic chemicals under conditions of varying temperature and soil moisture.

    PubMed

    Wolters, André; Linnemann, Volker; Smith, Kilian E C; Klingelmann, Eva; Park, Byung-Jun; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-07-01

    The need to determine soil-air partitioning coefficients (K(SA)) of low-volatility organic chemicals as a measure of their distribution in the soil surface after release into the environment resulted in the development of a novel chamber system, which has been filed for patent. A major advantage of this pseudo-static system is that sufficient time can be factored into the experiment to ensure that the system has achieved equilibrium. In a highly precise method, the air is collected in adsorption tubes and subsequently liberated in a thermodesorption system for the quantitation of the adsorbed compound. The precision of the method is great enough that even the effects of temperature and soil moisture on the soil-air partitioning of very low-volatility compounds can be quantified. Because of analytical detection limits, quantitation of these influences has not been possible to date. Functionality of the setup was illustrated by measurements on the fungicide fenpropimorph. K(SA) values of fenpropimorph displayed a negative relationship with temperature and soil moisture. The type of application (spraying or incorporation) and the use of formulated compounds was shown to have a major impact on the measured K(SA) values. Comparison with calculations using an estimation method revealed that the use of experimentally determined K(SA) values will facilitate a more adequate consideration of volatilization in recent model approaches. PMID:18678019

  4. Seasonal Dynamics of N2O and CO2 Emissions from a Corn Production System measured with the Eddy covariance and Chamber techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwuozo, S. A.; Hui, D.; Dennis, S.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural Practices play a major role in the global fluxes of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide, nitrous oxide, and methane. The use of fertilizer in Corn production has generated concerns about its contribution to global climate change. Thus, farmers and others concerned have become interested in more efficient fertilization management practice and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. To understand best management practices, in the 2012 and 2013 corn growing seasons, field experiments was conducted at Tennessee State University Agricultural Research and Demonstration Center in Nashville, TN. The study examines the seasonal variations of (N2O) and (CO2) emissions from soil as a function of six treatment that include inorganic nitrogen fertilizer, chicken litter and biochar application. The combinations were: regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) no till, regular URAN 32-0-0 liquid fertilizer (2 times) conventional till, multiple URAN applications (4 times) no till, Denitrification inhibitor with regular URAN application in no till, chicken litter with regular URAN application no till and URAN application with biochar in no tilled plots. Each treatment was replicated 6 times. N2O and CO2 emissions were measured using a closed chamber method after rainfall event(s), fertilizer applications or every two weeks whichever was shorter. Corresponding soil NH4+-N and NO3--N, soil temperature and moisture were also measured during gas sampling. Plant physiological and growth parameters were measured as appropriate and meteorological records were kept. N2O flux was also continuously measured in a commercial corn field using the eddy covariance (EC) technique fitted with a fast response N2O analyzer to check the N2O emissions at the large scale and compare it to the chamber method. Results obtained with the EC technique were comparable with the chamber methods. Preliminary data indicate that N2O and CO2 fluxes were significantly influenced by the agricultural

  5. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  6. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, R.D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace is described. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700 C and 800 C) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800 to 950 C to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product. 2 figs.

  7. Two chamber reaction furnace

    DOEpatents

    Blaugher, Richard D.

    1998-05-05

    A vertical two chamber reaction furnace. The furnace comprises a lower chamber having an independently operable first heating means for heating the lower chamber and a gas inlet means for admitting a gas to create an ambient atmosphere, and an upper chamber disposed above the lower chamber and having an independently operable second heating means for heating the upper chamber. Disposed between the lower chamber and the upper chamber is a vapor permeable diffusion partition. The upper chamber has a conveyor means for conveying a reactant there through. Of particular importance is the thallinating of long-length thallium-barium-calcium-copper oxide (TBCCO) or barium-calcium-copper oxide (BCCO) precursor tapes or wires conveyed through the upper chamber to thereby effectuate the deposition of vaporized thallium (being so vaporized as the first reactant in the lower chamber at a temperature between about 700.degree. and 800.degree. C.) on TBCCO or BCCO tape or wire (the second reactant) at its simultaneous annealing temperature in the upper chamber of about 800.degree. to 950.degree. C. to thereby replace thallium oxide lost from TBCCO tape or wire because of the high annealing temperature or to deposit thallium on BCCO tape or wire. Continuously moving the tape or wire provides a single-step process that effectuates production of long-length TBCCO superconducting product.

  8. High speed OH-PLIF measurement of self-excited circumferential instabilities in an annular combustion chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worth, Nicholas; Dawson, James

    2012-11-01

    Self-excited thermo-acoustic instabilities are a significant issue in the development of lean burn gas turbine combustors. Such instabilities arise through coupling of the unsteady heat release and acoustic waves, which can propagate both longitudinally and circumferentially in annular combustor geometries. Although a large number of studies have investigated longitudinal fluctuations in single axisymmetric flames, it is currently uncertain whether these results can be used to emulate circumferential oscillations in annular geometry. Therefore, the aim of the current project is to investigate the flame dynamics in an annular model gas turbine combustor during self-excited circumferential oscillations. Pressure measurements are used to characterise the circumferential oscillations, with high-speed OH chemiluminescence and OH-PLIF used to capture the flame dynamics. The flame structure and dynamics are significantly affected by both the proximity of neighbouring flames and the excitation mode; with different responses observed for small and large separation distances, and standing and spinning modes. These observations indicate that results from single flame investigations may only be representative of self-excited flames in annular geometry under in a limited set of conditions.

  9. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  10. Joint measurement of the atmospheric muon flux through the Puy de Dôme volcano with plastic scintillators and Resistive Plate Chambers detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambrosino, F.; Anastasio, A.; Bross, A.; Béné, S.; Boivin, P.; Bonechi, L.; Cârloganu, C.; Ciaranfi, R.; Cimmino, L.; Combaret, Ch.; D'Alessandro, R.; Durand, S.; Fehr, F.; Français, V.; Garufi, F.; Gailler, L.; Labazuy, Ph.; Laktineh, I.; Lénat, J.-F.; Masone, V.; Miallier, D.; Mirabito, L.; Morel, L.; Mori, N.; Niess, V.; Noli, P.; Pla-Dalmau, A.; Portal, A.; Rubinov, P.; Saracino, G.; Scarlini, E.; Strolin, P.; Vulpescu, B.

    2015-11-01

    The muographic imaging of volcanoes relies on the measured transmittance of the atmospheric muon flux through the target. An important bias affecting the result comes from background contamination mimicking a higher transmittance. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations measured independently in 2013 the atmospheric muon flux transmitted through the Puy de Dôme volcano using their early prototype detectors, based on plastic scintillators and on Glass Resistive Plate Chambers, respectively. These detectors had three (MU-RAY) or four (TOMUVOL) detection layers of 1 m2 each, tens (MU-RAY) or hundreds (TOMUVOL) of nanosecond time resolution, a few millimeter position resolution, an energy threshold of few hundreds MeV, and no particle identification capabilities. The prototypes were deployed about 1.3 km away from the summit, where they measured, behind rock depths larger than 1000 m, remnant fluxes of 1.83±0.50(syst)±0.07(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (MU-RAY) and 1.95±0.16(syst)±0.05(stat) m-2 d-1 deg-2 (TOMUVOL), that roughly correspond to the expected flux of high-energy atmospheric muons crossing 600 meters water equivalent (mwe) at 18° elevation. This implies that imaging depths larger than 500 mwe from 1 km away using such prototype detectors suffer from an overwhelming background. These measurements confirm that a new generation of detectors with higher momentum threshold, time-of-flight measurement, and/or particle identification is needed. The MU-RAY and TOMUVOL collaborations expect shortly to operate improved detectors, suitable for a robust muographic imaging of kilometer-scale volcanoes.

  11. Comparison between a New Optical Biometry Device and an Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomographer for Measuring Central Corneal Thickness and Anterior Chamber Depth.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jinhai; Lu, Weicong; Savini, Giacomo; Chen, Hao; Wang, Chengfang; Yu, Xinxin; Bao, Fangjun; Wang, Qinmei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare between a new optical biometer (AL-Scan, Nidek Co., Aichi, Japan) and an anterior segment optical coherence tomographer (Visante AS-OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, USA) for measuring central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and aqueous depth (AD). Methods. Sixty-three eyes of 63 normal subjects were examined with AL-Scan and Visante AS-OCT in this prospective study. One eye per subject was measured three times with both devices to record their CCT, ACD, and AD. All procedures were performed by the same operator. Agreement between the two devices was assessed using paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results. The mean CCT, ACD, and AD measured by AL-Scan were 538.59 ± 27.37 μm, 3.70 ± 0.30 mm, and 3.16 ± 0.30 mm, respectively. The mean values obtained by the Visante OCT were 536.14 ± 26.61 μm for CCT, 3.71 ± 0.29 mm for ACD, and 3.17 ± 0.29 mm for AD. The mean CCT by the AL-Scan was higher than that obtained by the Visante AS-OCT (difference = 2.45 ± 6.07 μm, P < 0.05). The differences in ACD and AD measurements were not statistically significant. The 95% LoA of CCT, ACD, and AD were between -9.44 and 14.35 μm, -0.15 and 0.12 mm, and -0.15 and 0.12 mm, respectively. Conclusions. Since these two devices were comparable for measuring CCT, ACD, and AD, their results can be interchangeably used in the clinic. PMID:27403339

  12. Comparison between a New Optical Biometry Device and an Anterior Segment Optical Coherence Tomographer for Measuring Central Corneal Thickness and Anterior Chamber Depth

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jinhai; Lu, Weicong; Savini, Giacomo; Chen, Hao; Wang, Chengfang; Yu, Xinxin; Bao, Fangjun; Wang, Qinmei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To compare between a new optical biometer (AL-Scan, Nidek Co., Aichi, Japan) and an anterior segment optical coherence tomographer (Visante AS-OCT, Carl Zeiss Meditec, Dublin, USA) for measuring central corneal thickness (CCT), anterior chamber depth (ACD), and aqueous depth (AD). Methods. Sixty-three eyes of 63 normal subjects were examined with AL-Scan and Visante AS-OCT in this prospective study. One eye per subject was measured three times with both devices to record their CCT, ACD, and AD. All procedures were performed by the same operator. Agreement between the two devices was assessed using paired t-tests, Bland-Altman plots, and 95% limits of agreement (LoA). Results. The mean CCT, ACD, and AD measured by AL-Scan were 538.59 ± 27.37 μm, 3.70 ± 0.30 mm, and 3.16 ± 0.30 mm, respectively. The mean values obtained by the Visante OCT were 536.14 ± 26.61 μm for CCT, 3.71 ± 0.29 mm for ACD, and 3.17 ± 0.29 mm for AD. The mean CCT by the AL-Scan was higher than that obtained by the Visante AS-OCT (difference = 2.45 ± 6.07 μm, P < 0.05). The differences in ACD and AD measurements were not statistically significant. The 95% LoA of CCT, ACD, and AD were between −9.44 and 14.35 μm, −0.15 and 0.12 mm, and −0.15 and 0.12 mm, respectively. Conclusions. Since these two devices were comparable for measuring CCT, ACD, and AD, their results can be interchangeably used in the clinic. PMID:27403339

  13. Influence of particle size and shape on the backscattering linear depolarisation ratio of small ice crystals - cloud chamber measurements in the context of contrail and cirrus microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, M.; Büttner, S.; Möhler, O.; Skrotzki, J.; Vragel, M.; Wagner, R.

    2012-06-01

    The article presents the laser scattering and depolarisation instrument SIMONE that is installed at the large aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. SIMONE uses a 488 nm cw laser to probe simulated atmospheric clouds by measuring the scattered light from the 1.8° and 178.2° directions. At 178.2°, the scattered light is analysed for the linear polarisation state to deduce the linear depolarisation ratio δl which is a common measurement parameter of atmospheric LIDAR applications. The optical setup and the mathematical formalism of the depolarisation detection concept are given. SIMONE depolarisation measurements in spheroidal hematite aerosol and supercooled liquid clouds are used to validate the instrument. SIMONE data from a series of AIDA ice nucleation experiments at temperatures between 195 and 225 K were analysed in terms of the impact of the ice particle microphysics on δl. We found strong depolarisation values of up to 0.4 in case of small growing and sublimating ice particles with volume equivalent diameters of only a few micrometers. Modelling runs with the T-matrix method showed that the measured depolarisation ratios can be accurately reproduced assuming spheroidal and cylindrical particles with a size distribution that has been constrained by IR extinction spectroscopy. Based on the T-matrix modelling runs, we demonstrate that in case of small ice crystals the SIMONE depolarisation results are representative for the LIDAR depolarisation ratio which is measured at exact backscattering direction of 180°. The relevance of our results for the interpretation of recent LIDAR observations in cirrus and contrails is discussed. In view of our results, the high depolarisation ratios observed by the spaceborne LIDAR CALIOP in the tropical upper troposphere might be a hint for the presence of small (sublimating) ice particles in the outflows of deep convective systems.

  14. Influence of particle size and shape on the backscattering linear depolarisation ratio of small ice crystals - cloud chamber measurements in the context of contrail and cirrus microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnaiter, M.; Büttner, S.; Möhler, O.; Skrotzki, J.; Vragel, M.; Wagner, R.

    2012-11-01

    The article presents the laser scattering and depolarisation instrument SIMONE that is installed at the large aerosol and cloud chamber facility AIDA of the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. SIMONE uses a 488 nm cw laser to probe simulated atmospheric clouds by measuring the scattered light from the 1.8° and 178.2° directions. At 178.2°, the scattered light is analysed for the linear polarisation state to deduce the particle linear depolarisation ratio δp which is a common measurement parameter of atmospheric lidar applications. The optical setup and the mathematical formalism of the depolarisation detection concept are given. SIMONE depolarisation measurements in spheroidal hematite aerosol and supercooled liquid clouds are used to validate the instrument. SIMONE data from a series of AIDA ice nucleation experiments at temperatures between 195 and 225 K were analysed in terms of the impact of the ice particle microphysics on δp. We found strong depolarisation values of up to 0.4 in case of small growing and sublimating ice particles with volume equivalent diameters of only a few micrometers. Modelling runs with the T-matrix method showed that the measured depolarisation ratios can be accurately reproduced assuming spheroidal and cylindrical particles with a size distribution that has been constrained by IR extinction spectroscopy. Based on the T-matrix modelling runs, we demonstrate that in case of small ice crystals the SIMONE depolarisation results are representative for the lidar depolarisation ratio which is measured at exact backscattering direction of 180°. The relevance of our results for the interpretation of recent lidar observations in cirrus and contrails is discussed. In view of our results, the high depolarisation ratios observed by the spaceborne lidar CALIOP in the tropical upper troposphere might be a hint for the presence of small (sublimating) ice particles in the outflows of deep convective systems.

  15. Rate and reaction probability of the surface reaction between ozone and dihydromyrcenol measured in a bench scale reactor and a room-sized chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Shi; Morrison, Glenn C.

    2012-02-01

    Low volatility terpenoids emitted from consumer products can react with ozone on surfaces and may significantly alter concentrations of ozone, terpenoids and reaction products in indoor air. We measured the reaction probability and a second-order surface-specific reaction rate for the ozonation of dihydromyrcenol, a representative indoor terpenoid, adsorbed onto polyvinylchloride (PVC), glass, and latex paint coated spheres. The reaction probability ranged from (0.06-8.97) × 10 -5 and was very sensitive to humidity, substrate and mass adsorbed. The average surface reaction probability is about 10 times greater than that for the gas-phase reaction. The second-order surface-specific rate coefficient ranged from (0.32-7.05) × 10 -15 cm 4 s -1 molecule -1and was much less sensitive to humidity, substrate, or mass adsorbed. We also measured the ozone deposition velocity due to adsorbed dihydromyrcenol on painted drywall in a room-sized chamber, Based on that, we calculated the rate coefficient ((0.42-1.6) × 10 -15 cm 4 molecule -1 s -1), which was consistent with that derived from bench-scale experiments for the latex paint under similar conditions. We predict that more than 95% of dihydromyrcenol oxidation takes place on indoor surfaces, rather than in building air.

  16. Wire chambers revisited.

    PubMed

    Ott, R J

    1993-04-01

    Detectors used for radioisotope imaging have, historically, been based on scintillating crystal/photomultiplier combinations in various forms. From the rectilinear scanner through to modern gamma cameras and positron cameras, the basic technology has remained much the same. Efforts to overcome the limitations of this form of technology have foundered on the inability to reproduce the required sensitivity, spatial resolution and sensitive area at acceptable cost. Multiwire proportional chambers (MWPCs) have long been used as position-sensitive charged particle detectors in nuclear and high-energy physics. MWPCs are large-area gas-filled ionisation chambers in which large arrays of fine wires are used to measure the position of ionisation produced in the gas by the passage of charged particles. The important properties of MWPCs are high-spatial-resolution, large-area, high-count-rate performance at low cost. For research applications, detectors several metres square have been built and small-area detectors have a charged particle resolution of 0.4 mm at a count rate of several million per second. Modification is required to MWPCs for nuclear medicine imaging. As gamma rays or X-rays cannot be detected directly, they must be converted into photo- or Compton scatter electrons. Photon-electron conversion requires the use of high atomic number materials in the body of the chamber. Pressurised xenon is the most useful form of "gas only" photon-electron convertor and has been used successfully in a gamma camera for the detection of gamma rays at energies below 100 keV. This camera has been developed specifically for high-count-rate first-pass cardiac imaging. This high-pressure xenon gas MWPC is the key to a highly competitive system which can outperform scintillator-based systems. The count rate performance is close to a million counts per second and the intrinsic spatial resolution is better than the best scintillator-based camera. The MWPC camera produces quantitative

  17. Accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine food chains: field measurements and model calculations.

    PubMed

    Veltman, Karin; Hendriks, Jan; Huijbregts, Mark; Leonards, Pim; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; Vethaak, Dick

    2005-10-01

    Food chain accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine environments is compared to model estimations and fresh water field data. The food chain consists of herbivores, detritivores and primary and secondary carnivores i.e. fish, fish-eating birds and marine mammals. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls is predicted well by OMEGA for herbi-detritivores and primary and secondary carnivorous fish. Ratios are similar to those found for fresh water species. Accumulation ratios for fish-eating birds and mammals are overestimated by the model, which is attributed partly to biotransformation of meta-para unsubstituted congeners. Additionally, birds may feed in other less polluted areas. For brominated diphenylethers (BDE) accumulation patterns are highly species and congener specific. Accumulation depends on both K(ow) and metabolization capacities. BDE47 is the predominant congener in lower trophic levels. For marine birds and mammals accumulation ratios of BDE99 and 100 are similar to or higher than ratios of persistent PCBs. PMID:15893330

  18. Expandable Purge Chambers Would Protect Cryogenic Fittings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, Ivan I., III

    2004-01-01

    Expandable ice-prevention and cleanliness-preservation (EIP-CP) chambers have been proposed to prevent the accumulation of ice or airborne particles on quick-disconnect (QD) fittings, or on ducts or tubes that contain cryogenic fluids. In the original application for which the EIP-CP chambers were conceived, there is a requirement to be able to disconnect and reconnect the QD fittings in rapid succession. If ice were to form on the fittings by condensation and freezing of airborne water vapor on the cold fitting surfaces, the ice could interfere with proper mating of the fittings, making it necessary to wait an unacceptably long time for the ice to thaw before attempting reconnection. By keeping water vapor away from the cold fitting surfaces, the EIP-CP chambers would prevent accumulation of ice, preserving the ability to reconnect as soon as required. Basically, the role of an EIP-CP chamber would be to serve as an enclosure for a flow of dry nitrogen gas that would keep ambient air away from QD cryogenic fittings. An EIP-CP chamber would be an inflatable device made of a fabriclike material. The chamber would be attached to an umbilical plate holding a cryogenic QD fitting.

  19. Chemistry of α-pinene and naphthalene oxidation products generated in a Potential Aerosol Mass (PAM) chamber as measured by acetate chemical ionization mass spectrometry

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Chhabra, P. S.; Lambe, A. T.; Canagaratna, M. R.; Stark, H.; Jayne, J. T.; Onasch, T. B.; Davidovits, P.; Kimmel, J. R.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2014-07-01

    Recent developments in high resolution, time-of-flight chemical ionization mass spectrometry (HR-ToF-CIMS) have made possible the direct detection of atmospheric organic compounds in real-time with high sensitivity and with little or no fragmentation, including low volatility, highly oxygenated organic vapors that are precursors to secondary organic aerosol formation. Here, for the first time, we examine gas-phase O3 and OH oxidation products of α-pinene and naphthalene formed in the PAM flow reactor with an HR-ToF-CIMS using acetate reagent ion chemistry. Integrated OH exposures ranged from 1.2 × 1011 to 9.7 × 1011 molec cm−3 s, corresponding to approximately 1.0 to 7.5 daysmore » of equivalent atmospheric oxidation. Measured gas-phase organic acids are similar to those previously observed in environmental chamber studies. For both precursors, we find that acetate-CIMS spectra capture both functionalization (oxygen addition) and fragmentation (carbon loss) as a function of OH exposure. The level of fragmentation is observed to increase with increased oxidation. We present a method that estimates vapor pressures of organic molecules using the measured O/C ratio, H/C ratio, and carbon number for each compound detected by the CIMS. The predicted condensed-phase SOA average acid yields and O/C and H/C ratios agree within uncertainties with previous AMS measurements and ambient CIMS results. While acetate reagent ion chemistry is used to selectively measure organic acids, in principle this method can be applied to additional reagent ion chemistries depending on the application.« less

  20. Vestibulo-ocular reflex gain as a measure of vestibular function in guinea pigs while in a recompression chamber: apparatus design and effects of nitrogen narcosis.

    PubMed

    Stevens, D M; Dutka, A J; Snyder, J E

    1995-05-01

    There are several mechanisms whereby alteration of barometric pressure can produce vertigo in divers or aviators. Development of a reliable measure of vestibular function in an animal model is the first requirement for further study of these mechanisms. This report presents the development of a rotatory table device capable of evoking the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) of a guinea pig while in a hyperbaric chamber. To assess the reproducibility of this response, eight animals were monitored by electronystagmography during rotations at three table velocities (62.4, 83.3, and 100 degrees/s). Two test sessions were performed on each animal with a 6-hour interval between sessions. The VOR gain was calculated by dividing the average peak velocity of the slow phase component of the nystagmus by the peak stimulus velocity. At least eight observations per test speed were averaged; calibration of eye movement was performed prior to each session by forced ocular abduction. Multifactorial analysis of variance revealed no significant differences (p > .05) between the differing rotation speeds nor between test sessions for individual animals. However, there was a significant difference in VOR gain between animals (p < .002). The VOR gain was then measured, using the same techniques, in another group of seven animals before, during, and after an air dive to the equivalent of 200 feet of seawater (7.06 atmospheres absolute) to assess the effects of nitrogen narcosis. Pre- and post-dive VOR gains were significantly greater than those measured at depth (p < .05). These results are consistent with the slow processing model of nitrogen narcosis and the controversial theory that central nervous system depressants decrease the VOR gain. The results also demonstrate the ability of this inexpensive apparatus to provide a sensitive measure of pressure-induced changes of vestibular function in guinea pigs. PMID:8588631

  1. TH-C-19A-01: Analytic Design Method to Make a 2D Planar, Segmented Ion Chamber Water-Equivalent for Proton Dose Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, W; Hollebeek, R; Teo, B; Maughan, R; Dolney, D

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Quality Assurance (QA) measurements of proton therapy fields must accurately measure steep longitudinal dose gradients as well as characterize the dose distribution laterally. Currently, available devices for two-dimensional field measurements perturb the dose distribution such that routine QA measurements performed at multiple depths require multiple field deliveries and are time consuming. Methods: A design procedure for a two-dimensional detector array is introduced whereby the proton energy loss and scatter are adjusted so that the downstream dose distribution is maintained to be equivalent to that which would occur in uniform water. Starting with the design for an existing, functional two-dimensional segmented ion chamber prototype, a compensating material is introduced downstream of the detector to simultaneously equate the energy loss and lateral scatter in the detector assembly to the values in water. An analytic formalism and procedure is demonstrated to calculate the properties of the compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. The resulting design is validated with Monte Carlo simulations. Results: With respect to the specific prototype design considered, the results indicate that a graphite compensating layer of the proper dimensions can yield proton beam range perturbation less than 0.1mm and beam sigma perturbation less than 2% across the energy range of therapeutic proton beams. Conclusion: We have shown that, for a 2D gas-filled detector array, a graphite-compensating layer can balance the energy loss and multiple Coulomb scattering relative to uniform water. We have demonstrated an analytic formalism and procedure to determine a compensating material in the general case of multiple layers of arbitrary material. This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-04-2-0022. Opinions, interpretations, conclusions and recommendations

  2. Acceleration performance of individual European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax measured with a sprint performance chamber: comparison with high-speed cinematography and correlates with ecological performance.

    PubMed

    Vandamm, Joshua P; Marras, Stefano; Claireaux, Guy; Handelsman, Corey A; Nelson, Jay A

    2012-01-01

    Locomotor performance can influence the ecological and evolutionary success of a species. For fish, favorable outcomes of predator-prey encounters are often presumably due to robust acceleration ability. Although escape-response or "fast-start" studies utilizing high-speed cinematography are prevalent, little is known about the contribution of relative acceleration performance to ecological or evolutionary success in a species. This dearth of knowledge may be due to the time-consuming nature of analyzing film, which imposes a practical limit on sample sizes. Herein, we present a high-throughput potential alternative for measuring fish acceleration performance using a sprint performance chamber (SPC). The acceleration performance of a large number of juvenile European sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax) from two populations was analyzed. Animals from both hatchery and natural ontogenies were assessed, and animals of known acceleration ability had their ecological performance measured in a mesocosm environment. Individuals from one population also had their acceleration performance assessed by both high-speed cinematography and an SPC. Acceleration performance measured in an SPC was lower than that measured by classical high-speed video techniques. However, short-term repeatability and interindividual variation of acceleration performance were similar between the two techniques, and the SPC recorded higher sprint swimming velocities. Wild fish were quicker to accelerate in an SPC and had significantly greater accelerations than all groups of hatchery-raised fish. Acceleration performance had no significant effect on ecological performance (as assessed through animal growth and survival in the mesocosms). However, it is worth noting that wild animals did survive predation in the mesocosm better than farmed ones. Moreover, the hatchery-originated fish that survived the mesocosm experiment, when no predators were present, displayed significantly increased acceleration

  3. Deriving Time Series of Ice-Sheet Accumulation Variations from Altimeter Measurements of Surface-Elevation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Information on ice-sheet surface accumulation, A(t), is needed for studies of mass balance, polar climate variability, ice-sheet evolution, and dynamics. This paper describes a new method for deriving time series of A(t) variations, δA(t), on a monthly basis from continuous altimeter measurements. Changes in ice-sheet thickness and surface elevation are driven by a combination of δA(t), changes in the rates of firn compaction, and the rates of dynamic ice thickening or thinning (dHd/dt). Relevant time scales range from monthly fluctuations in δA(t) and surface temperature, Ts(t), to decadal to millennial scales of dynamic changes in ice flow. Our concept is based on the widely differing time-scales of principal processes, e.g. T> 5 years for dynamic changes and t = year/12 for δA(t) so that T >> t. An important aspect is our use of a baseline of ICESat-1 and ERS-1/ERS-2 altimeter measurements to obtain the multi-year (e.g. 5 to 17 years) dHd/dt of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. We calculate changes in surface elevations caused by variations in the rate of firn compaction driven by both δA(t) and Ts(t) to adjust the altimeter-observed height changes, dH/dt, in order to derive dHd/dt over time periods of ≥ 5 years. Although monthly values of both δA(t) and Ts(t) are used, the derived dHd/dt is dependent only on the average change in δA(t) over the period and not on the higher-frequency monthly δA(t). On a monthly basis, the total accumulation-driven height change, dHaCA/dt, is a sum of the direct-height change, dHa/dt, and the change in firn compaction, dCA/dt, both caused by δA(t). dHa/dt is equal to δA(t)/ρs, where ρs is relative density of surface snow (typically 0.3) and δA(t) is w.e. Model simulations of dHaCA/dt driven by monthly δA(t) from ERA-interim re-analyses show that altimeter-observable dHaCA/dt and the desired dHa/dt = δA(t)/ρs are closely related. The relationship is better at colder locations such as the South Pole (Tm

  4. Conductive heat transfer from an isothermal magma chamber and its application to the measured heat flow distribution from mount hood, Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nathenson, Menuel; Tilling, Robert I.

    1993-01-01

    A steady-state solution for heat transfer from an isothermal, spherical magma chamber, with an imposed regional geothermal gradient far from the chamber, is developed. The extensive published heat-flow data set for Mount Hood, Oregon, is dominated by conductive heat transfer in the deeper parts of most drill holes and provides an ideal application of such a model. Magma-chamber volumes or depths needed to match the distribution of heat-flow data are larger or shallower than those inferred from geologic evidence.

  5. Fast carry accumulator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Simple iterative accumulator combined with gated-carry, carry-completion detection, and skip-carry circuits produces three accumulators with decreased carry propagation times. Devices are used in machine control, measurement equipment, and computer applications to increase speed of binary addition. NAND gates are used in combining network.

  6. Three-dimensional echocardiography in a dynamic heart phantom: comparison of five different methods to measure chamber volume using a commercially available software.

    PubMed

    Wood, Peter W; Gibson, Patrick H; Becher, Harald

    2014-12-01

    Several methods of analysis are available for quantification of left ventricular volumes and ejection fraction using three-dimensional (3D) echocardiography. This study compared the accuracy and reproducibility of five methods of analysis in a novel, irregularly shaped dynamic heart phantom with excellent image quality. Five 3D datasets were acquired on a Philips IE33 platform using an X5-1 3D transducer. Each dataset was analysed by five different methods using the Philips QLab v8.1 software: Methods A1, A2 and A3, semi-automated contour detection with varying degrees of user correction; Method B, Simpson's biplane method using optimally aligned four- and two-chamber views and Method C, method of discs, manually delineated in reconstructed short-axis views. Time-volume curves were generated for each method and compared with the true volumes measured throughout systole in the phantom heart. A second observer repeated measurements by each method in a single 3D dataset. Method A1 (uncorrected semi-automated contouring) produced the most consistent time-volume curves, although end-diastolic and end-systolic volumes varied between datasets. Any manual correction of contours (Methods A2, A3 and B) resulted in significant variation in the time-volume curves, with less consistent endocardial tracking. Method C was not only the most accurate and reproducible method, but also the most time-consuming one. Different methods of 3D volume quantification vary significantly in accuracy and reproducibility using an irregular phantom heart model. Although contouring may appear optimal in long-axis views, this may not be replicated circumferentially, and the resulting measures appeared to be less robust following the manual correction of semi-automated contours. PMID:26693301

  7. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hourdakis, C. J.; Boziari, A.; Koumbouli, E.

    2009-02-01

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and NK and kQ were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed.

  8. The effect of a compression paddle on energy response, calibration and measurement with mammographic dosimeters using ionization chambers and solid-state detectors.

    PubMed

    Hourdakis, C J; Boziari, A; Koumbouli, E

    2009-02-21

    A compression paddle is always used in mammography x-ray examinations, in order to improve image quality and reduce patient doses. Although clinical dose measurements should be performed with the paddle to interfere with the x-ray beam, calibration of mammography dosimeters is performed free in air without the presence of the paddle. The paddle hardens the x-ray beam, which has an impact on a dosimeter performance, particularly on high-energy-dependent detectors. Due to the paddle, clinical mammography x-ray systems may exhibit beams with HVL values exceeding those of the IEC 61267 RQR-M series qualities at which dosimeters are usually calibrated. In this study, the influence of the paddle in mammography dosimetry is examined, in Mo/Mo anode/filter x-ray qualities. PMMA slabs of 1, 2 and 3 mm thickness and Al foils of 0.05, 0.10 and 0.15 mm thicknesses were used to simulate the paddles, producing beams with HVL values from 0.28 up to 0.43 mmAl. In these qualities, four solid-state (ST) detectors and three ionizations chambers (IC) were calibrated in terms of Kair and N(K) and k(Q) were deduced. The results showed that all IC and two modern-type ST dosimeters have a flat energy response in the above HVL range (less than 3%), so their calibration factor at RQR-M2 quality could be safely used for clinical measurements. Two other ST dosimeters exhibit up to 20% energy response, so differences up to 15% in dose measurement may be observed if the effect of paddle on their performance is ignored. Finally, the need of additional mammographic calibration qualities to the existing IEC 61267 RQR-M series is examined and discussed. PMID:19168939

  9. Test chamber for alpha spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Larsen, Robert P.

    1977-01-01

    Alpha emitters for low-level radiochemical analysis by measurement of alpha spectra are positioned precisely with respect to the location of a surface-barrier detector by means of a chamber having a removable threaded planchet holder. A pedestal on the planchet holder holds a specimen in fixed engagement close to the detector. Insertion of the planchet holder establishes an O-ring seal that permits the chamber to be pumped to a desired vacuum. The detector is protected against accidental contact and resulting damage.

  10. Laboratory Course on Drift Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Ferreira, Ix-B.; García-Herrera, J.; Villaseñor, L.

    2006-09-01

    Drift chambers play an important role in particle physics experiments as tracking detectors. We started this laboratory course with a brief review of the theoretical background and then moved on to the the experimental setup which consisted of a single-sided, single-cell drift chamber. We also used a plastic scintillator paddle, standard P-10 gas mixture (90% Ar, 10% CH4) and a collimated 90Sr source. During the laboratory session the students performend measurements of the following quantities: a) drift velocities and their variations as function of the drift field; b) gas gains and c) diffusion of electrons as they drifted in the gas.

  11. LiDAR measurement of seasonal snow accumulation along an elevation gradient in the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Molotch, N. P.; Flanagan, J.; Guo, Q.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from snow-on and snow-off airborne-scanning LiDAR measurements over a 53 km2 area in the southern Sierra Nevada. We found that snow depth as a function of elevation increased approximately 15 cm per 100 m, until reaching an elevation of 3300 m, where depth sharply decreased at a rate of 48 cm per 100 m. Departures from the 15 cm per 100 m trend, based on 1 m elevation-band means of regression residuals, showed slightly less steep increases below 2050 m; steeper increases between 2050 and 3300 m; and less steep increases above 3300 m. Although the study area is partly forested, only measurements in open areas were used. Below approximately 2050 m elevation, ablation and rainfall are the primary causes of departure from the orographic trend. From 2050 to 3300 m, greater snow depths than predicted were found on the steeper terrain of the northwest and the less steep northeast-facing slopes, suggesting that ablation, aspect, slope and wind redistribution all play a role in local snow-depth variability. At elevations above 3300 m, orographic processes mask the effect of wind deposition when averaging over large areas. Also, terrain in this basin becomes less steep above 3300 m. This suggests a reduction in precipitation from upslope lifting and/or the exhaustion of precipitable water from ascending air masses. Our results suggest a cumulative precipitation lapse rate for the 2100-3300 m range of about 6 cm per 100 m elevation for the accumulation period of 3 December 2009 to 23 March 2010. This is a higher gradient than the widely used PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model) precipitation products, but similar to that from reconstruction of snowmelt amounts from satellite snow-cover data. Our findings provide a unique characterization of the consistent, steep average increase in precipitation with elevation in snow-dominated terrain, using high-resolution, highly accurate data and highlighs the importance of solar

  12. The CLAS drift chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Mestayer, M.D.; Carman, D.S.; Asavaphibhop, B.

    1999-04-01

    Experimental Hall B at Jefferson Laboratory houses the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer, the magnetic field of which is produced by a superconducting toroid. The six coils of this toroid divide the detector azimuthally into six sectors, each of which contains three large multi-layer drift chambers for tracking charged particles produced from a fixed target on a toroidal axis. Within the 18 drift chambers are a total of 35,148 individually instrumented hexagonal drift cells. The novel geometry of these chambers provides for good tracking resolution and efficiency, along with large acceptance. The design and construction challenges posed by these large-scale detectors are described, and detailed results are presented from in-beam measurements.

  13. Diogene pictorial drift chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Gosset, J.

    1984-01-01

    A pictorial drift chamber, called DIOGENE, has been installed at Saturne in order to study central collisions of high energy heavy ions. It has been adapted from the JADE internal detector, with two major differences to be taken into account. First, the center-of-mass of these collisions is not identical to the laboratory reference frame. Second, the energy loss and the momentum ranges of the particles to be detected are different from the ones in JADE. It was also tried to keep the cost as small as possible, hence the choice of minimum size and minimum number of sensitive wires. Moreover the wire planes are shifted from the beam axis: this trick helps very much to quickly reject the bad tracks caused by the ambiguity of measuring drift distances (positive or negative) through times (always positive).

  14. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-07-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) × 106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2 = 0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK (20 ppbv) and toluene (90 ppbv) had been added. However, this discrepancy has a

  15. Comparison of OH concentration measurements by DOAS and LIF during SAPHIR chamber experiments at high OH reactivity and low NO concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fuchs, H.; Dorn, H.-P.; Bachner, M.; Bohn, B.; Brauers, T.; Gomm, S.; Hofzumahaus, A.; Holland, F.; Nehr, S.; Rohrer, F.; Tillmann, R.; Wahner, A.

    2012-03-01

    During recent field campaigns, hydroxyl radical (OH) concentrations that were measured by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) were up to a factor of ten larger than predicted by current chemical models for conditions of high OH reactivity and low NO concentration. These discrepancies, which were observed in forests and urban-influenced rural environments, are so far not entirely understood. In summer 2011, a series of experiments was carried out in the atmosphere simulation chamber SAPHIR in Jülich, Germany, in order to investigate the photochemical degradation of isoprene, methyl-vinyl ketone (MVK), methacrolein (MACR) and aromatic compounds by OH. Conditions were similar to those experienced during the PRIDE-PRD2006 campaign in the Pearl River Delta (PRD), China, in 2006, where a large difference between OH measurements and model predictions was found. During experiments in SAPHIR, OH was simultaneously detected by two independent instruments: LIF and differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). Because DOAS is an inherently calibration-free technique, DOAS measurements are regarded as a reference standard. The comparison of the two techniques was used to investigate potential artifacts in the LIF measurements for PRD-like conditions of OH reactivities of 10 to 30 s-1 and NO mixing ratios of 0.1 to 0.3 ppbv. The analysis of twenty experiment days shows good agreement. The linear regression of the combined data set (averaged to the DOAS time resolution, 2495 data points) yields a slope of 1.02 ± 0.01 with an intercept of (0.10 ± 0.03) ×106 cm-3 and a linear correlation coefficient of R2=0.86. This indicates that the sensitivity of the LIF instrument is well-defined by its calibration procedure. No hints for artifacts are observed for isoprene, MACR, and different aromatic compounds. LIF measurements were approximately 30-40% (median) larger than those by DOAS after MVK and toluene had been added. However, this discrepancy has a large uncertainty and

  16. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Final report for the first year, January 1-December 31, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Japar, S.M.; Hurley, M.D.; Wallington, T.J.

    1994-06-30

    A set of multiple indoor smog chambers were used to measure the increase in smog formation (smog = NO oxidation + O3 formation) from a series of individual test volatile organic compounds (VOC`s), as well as carbon monoxide (CO), when they were added to a standard urban mixture and irradiated for 10-12 hours with a solar simulator. The chambers and the mixtures were designed to simulate the Carter incremental reactivity concept that is being used in California. The test compounds covered a wide range of mechanistic uncertainties and predicted reactivities (reactivity is the increase in smog divided by the amount of test compound added). Also, the chambers were used to test the recently developed Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) Model which predicts that the smog formation of a mixture is constant and independent of NOx in the so-called light-limited regime.

  17. Poster — Thur Eve — 24: Commissioning and preliminary measurements using an Attix-style free air ionization chamber for air kerma measurements on the BioMedical Imaging and Therapy beamlines at the Canadian Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, D; McEwen, M; Shen, H; Siegbahn, EA; Fallone, BG; Warkentin, B

    2014-08-15

    Synchrotron facilities, including the Canadian Light Source (CLS), provide opportunities for the development of novel imaging and therapy applications. A vital step progressing these applications toward clinical trials is the availability of accurate dosimetry. In this study, a refurbished Attix-style (cylindrical) free air chamber (FAC) is tested and used for preliminary air kerma measurements on the two BioMedical Imaging and Therapy (BMIT) beamlines at the CLS. The FAC consists of a telescoping chamber that relies on a difference measurement of collected charge in expanded and collapsed configurations. At the National Research Council's X-ray facility, a Victoreen Model 480 FAC was benchmarked against two primary standard FACs. The results indicated an absolute accuracy at the 0.5% level for energies between 60 and 150 kVp. A series of measurements were conducted on the small, non-uniform X-ray beams of the 05B1-1 (∼8 – 100 keV) and 05ID-2 (∼20 – 200 keV) beamlines for a variety of energies, filtrations and beam sizes. For the 05B1-1 beam with 1.1 mm of Cu filtration, recombination corrections of less than 5 % could only be achieved for field sizes no greater than 0.5 mm × 0.6 mm (corresponding to an air kerma rate of ∼ 57 Gy/min). Ionic recombination thus presents a significant challenge to obtaining accurate air kerma rate measurements using this FAC in these high intensity beams. Future work includes measurements using a smaller aperture to sample a smaller and thus more uniform beam area, as well as experimental and Monte Carlo-based investigation of correction factors.

  18. Ionization-chamber smoke detector system

    DOEpatents

    Roe, Robert F.

    1976-10-19

    This invention relates to an improved smoke-detection system of the ionization-chamber type. In the preferred embodiment, the system utilizes a conventional detector head comprising a measuring ionization chamber, a reference ionization chamber, and a normally non-conductive gas triode for discharging when a threshold concentration of airborne particulates is present in the measuring chamber. The improved system is designed to reduce false alarms caused by fluctuations in ambient temperature. Means are provided for periodically firing the gas discharge triode and each time recording the triggering voltage required. A computer compares each triggering voltage with its predecessor. The computer is programmed to energize an alarm if the difference between the two compared voltages is a relatively large value indicative of particulates in the measuring chamber and to disregard smaller differences typically resulting from changes in ambient temperature.

  19. Utilizing Chamber Data for Developing and Validating Climate Change Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2012-01-01

    Controlled environment chambers (e.g. growth chambers, SPAR chambers, or open-top chambers) are useful for measuring plant ecosystem responses to climatic variables and CO2 that affect plant water relations. However, data from chambers was found to overestimate responses of C fluxes to CO2 enrichment. Chamber data may be confounded by numerous artifacts (e.g. sidelighting, edge effects, increased temperature and VPD, etc) and this limits what can be measured accurately. Chambers can be used to measure canopy level energy balance under controlled conditions and plant transpiration responses to CO2 concentration can be elucidated. However, these measurements cannot be used directly in model development or validation. The response of stomatal conductance to CO2 will be the same as in the field, but the measured response must be recalculated in such a manner to account for differences in aerodynamic conductance, temperature and VPD between the chamber and the field.

  20. Average absorption cross-section of the human body measured at 1-12 GHz in a reverberant chamber: results of a human volunteer study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flintoft, I. D.; Robinson, M. P.; Melia, G. C. R.; Marvin, A. C.; Dawson, J. F.

    2014-07-01

    The electromagnetic absorption cross-section (ACS) averaged over polarization and angle-of-incidence of 60 ungrounded adult subjects was measured at microwave frequencies of 1-12 GHz in a reverberation chamber. Average ACS is important in non-ionizing dosimetry and exposure studies, and is closely related to the whole-body averaged specific absorption rate (WBSAR). The average ACS was measured with a statistical uncertainty of less than 3% and high frequency resolution for individuals with a range of body shapes and sizes allowing the statistical distribution of WBSAR over a real population with individual internal and external morphologies to be determined. The average ACS of all subjects was found to vary from 0.15 to 0.4 m2 for an individual subject it falls with frequency over 1-6 GHz, and then rises slowly over the 6-12 GHz range in which few other studies have been conducted. Average ACS and WBSAR are then used as a surrogate for worst-case ACS/WBSAR, in order to study their variability across a real population compared to literature results from simulations using numerical phantoms with a limited range of anatomies. Correlations with body morphological parameters such as height, mass and waist circumference have been investigated: the strongest correlation is with body surface area (BSA) at all frequencies above 1 GHz, however direct proportionality to BSA is not established until above 5 GHz. When the average ACS is normalized to the BSA, the resulting absorption efficiency shows a negative correlation with the estimated thickness of subcutaneous body fat. Surrogate models and statistical analysis of the measurement data are presented and compared to similar models from the literature. The overall dispersion of measured average WBSAR of the sample of the UK population studied is consistent with the dispersion of simulated worst-case WBSAR across multiple numerical phantom families. The statistical results obtained allow the calibration of human exposure

  1. [The change in efficiency of protective measures for reduction of 137Cs accumulation by agricultural plants in various periods after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Aleksakhin, R M; Muzalevskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of 137Cs transfer factors to plants and the effects of protective measures on this radionuclide accumulation in the agricultural production is estimated on the example of the south-western regions of Bryansk District. Three periods in decreasing the 137Cs content in plants during 20 years after the Chernobyl accident are identified. The contribution of radionuclide decay, natural biogeochemical processes and protective measures aimed at reduction of the 137Cs accumulation in agricultural plants during various periods after radioactive fallout is shown. Maximum permissible levels of 137Cs contamination of cultivated lands, where crop products meeting current standards may be obtained, at different scopes of protective measures on radioactive-contaminated territories are forecasted. Periods after radioactive fallout, when crop and forage products meeting radiological standards are obtained, are assessed. PMID:21520624

  2. Anechoic chamber in industrial plants. [construction materials and structural design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halpert, E.; Juncu, O.; Lorian, R.; Marfievici, D.; Mararu, I.

    1974-01-01

    A light anechoic chamber for routine acoustical measurements in the machine building industry is reported. The outer housing of the chamber consists of modules cast in glass fiber reinforced polyester resin; the inner housing consists of pyramidal modules cut out of sound absorbing slates. The parameters of this anechoic chamber facilitate acoustical measurements according to ISO and CAEM recommendations.

  3. Linking the Annual Variation of Snow Radar-derived Accumulation in West Antarctica to Long-term Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, B.; Braaten, D. A.; Gogineni, P.; Paden, J. D.; Leuschen, C.; Purdon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the snow accumulation rate on polar ice sheets is important in assessing mass balance and ice sheet contribution to sea level rise. Measuring annual accumulation on a regional scale and extending back in time several decades has been accomplished using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Snow Radar on the NASA DC-8 that is part of NASA's Ice-Bridge project. The Snow Radar detects and maps near-surface internal layers in polar firn, operating from 2- 6 GHz and providing a depth resolution of ~4 cm. During November 2011, Snow Radar data were obtained for large areas of West Antarctica, including a flight segment that passed within ~70 km of Byrd Station (80°S, 119°W). Byrd Station has a very long automatic weather station (AWS) record, extending from present to 1980, with 3 relatively brief gaps in the record. The AWS data for Byrd Station were obtained from the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC) at the University of Wisconsin. The L1B Snow Radar data products, available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), were analyzed using layer picking software to obtain the depth of reflectors in the firn that are detected by the radar. These reflectors correspond to annual markers in the firn, and allow annual accumulation to be determined. Using the distance between the reflectors and available density profiles from ice cores, water equivalent accumulation for each annual layer back to 1980 is obtained. We are analyzing spatial variations of accumulation along flight lines, as well as variations in the time series of annual accumulation. We are also analyzing links between annual accumulation and surface weather observations from the Byrd Station AWS. Our analyses of surface weather observations have focused on annual temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind extremes (e.g. 5th and 95th percentiles) and links to annual snow accumulation. We are also examining satellite-derived sea ice extent records for the

  4. Investigation and performance tests of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with double sensitive volume for measuring diagnostic X-rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifi, B.; Zamani Zeinali, H.; Soltani, J.; Negarestani, A.; Shahvar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Medical diagnostic equipment, like diagnostic radiology and mammography require a dosimeter with high accuracy for dosimetry of the diagnostic X-ray beam. Ionization chambers are suitable instruments for dosimetry of diagnostic-range X-ray beams because of their appropriate response and high reliability. This work introduces the design and fabrication of a new parallel plate ionization chamber with a PMMA body, graphite-coated PMMA windows (0.5 mm thick) and a graphite-foil central electrode (0.1 mm thick, 0.7 g/cm3 dense). This design improves upon the response characteristics of existing designs through the specific choice of materials as well as the appropriate size and arrangement of the ionization chamber components. The results of performance tests conducted at the Secondary Standard Dosimetry laboratory in Karaj-Iran demonstrated the short and long-term stability, the low leakage current, the low directional dependence, and the high ion collection efficiency of the design. Furthermore, the FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations confirmed the low effect of central electrode on this new ionization chamber response. The response characteristics of the parallel plate ionization chamber presented in this work makes the instrument suitable for use as a standard dosimeter in laboratories.

  5. Target chambers for gammashpere

    SciTech Connect

    Carpenter, M.P.; Falout, J.W.; Nardi, B.G.

    1995-08-01

    One of our responsibilities for Gammasphere, was designing and constructing two target chambers and associated beamlines to be used with the spectrometer. The first chamber was used with the early implementation phase of Gammasphere, and consisted of two spun-Al hemispheres welded together giving a wall thickness of 0.063 inches and a diameter of 12 inches.

  6. Static diffusion cloud chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayers, G.

    1981-01-01

    The chamber geometry and optical arrangement are described. The supersaturation range is given and consists of readings taken at five fixed points: 0.25%, 0.5%, 0.75%, 1.0%, and 1.25%. The detection system is described including light source, cameras, and photocell detectors. The temperature control and the calibration of the chamber are discussed.

  7. High resolution drift chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Va'vra, J.

    1985-07-01

    High precision drift chambers capable of achieving less than or equal to 50 ..mu..m resolutions are discussed. In particular, we compare so called cool and hot gases, various charge collection geometries, several timing techniques and we also discuss some systematic problems. We also present what we would consider an ''ultimate'' design of the vertex chamber. 50 refs., 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Accumulation and Physiological Function in the Launch and Entry and Advanced Crew Escape Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) are worn by astronauts for launch and entry. Previous work by Waligora, et al., 1992, Waligora and Gilbert, 1992, and Dalrymple 1996, have found that carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation in the LES/ACES helmet may be problematic. CO2 accumulation is important because high inspired levels of CO2 reduce physical function and pose a safety hazard (e.g. levels of CO2 accumulation of 3.6% in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit are sufficient to terminate Extra Vehicular Activities). My task was to design a suitable test protocol for determining the important physiological aspects of LES/ACES use. Three basic issues arose. First was the determination of the astronaut's CO2 inspiration during visor-down use at rest and during walking at 3.5 mph. A sub-issue was the impact of a pneumotach on CO2 since it has been previously observed that when the Aerosport pneumotach was used, performance seemed improved, which might be attributable to a lowered respiration rate when using the pneumotach. The second issue was the energy costs of waLking in the LES/ACES with various G-suit inflation levels, since G-suit inflation increases metabolic costs and metabolic costs influence the C02 production in the LES/ACES helmet. Since G-suit inflation improves orthostatic tolerance after space flight, but likely increases the energy costs of walking, the balance between G-suit inflation and C02 accumulation is an important safety consideration. The third issue which arose from pilot work was the substantial reduction in physical function after a 10 min visor-down period prior to walk.

  9. Active osmoregulatory ion uptake across the pleopods of the isopod Idotea baltica (Pallas): electrophysiological measurements on isolated split endo- and exopodites mounted in a micro-ussing chamber.

    PubMed

    Postel, U; Becker, W; Brandt, A; Luck-Kopp, S; Riestenpatt, S; Weihrauch, D; Siebers, D

    2000-04-01

    The mechanism of active, osmoregulatory ion uptake was investigated in the pleopods of the marine isopod Idotea baltica (Pallas). Using isolated split half-podites of isopods acclimated to brackish water (20 salinity) mounted in a micro-Ussing chamber and symmetrically superfused with identical haemolymph-like salines, a mean short-circuit current I(sc) of -445 microA cm(-)(2) was measured in endopodites 3-5, corresponding to an inwardly directed transcellular movement of negative charge. Application of ouabain (5 mmol l(-)(1)) to the basolateral superfusate resulted in the almost total abolition of the I(sc) (reduced from -531 to -47 microA cm(-)(2)), suggesting that the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase is the driving force for active, electrogenic uptake of NaCl. In contrast, mean I(sc) values close to zero were found in preparations of all exopodites and in endopodites 1 and 2. The specific activities of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase corresponded with these results. Specific activities were highest in posterior endopodites 3-5 and depended on ambient salinity. In all other rami, the activities were much lower and independent of ambient salinity. Activities in posterior endopodites 3-5 were lowest in isopods acclimated to 30 salinity (2-4 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)), increased in individuals kept in 20 salinity (8.4 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)) and were highest in isopods acclimated to 15 salinity (18.2 micromol P(i )mg(-)(1 )protein h(-)(1)). When specimens were transferred from 30 to 40 salinity, Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity increased in the posterior endopodites. The electrophysiological and Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity measurements show that active electrogenic ion transport in this species occurs almost exclusively in posterior endopodites 3-5. The endopodite of the fifth pleopod of I. baltica exhibited a microscopic structure remarkably similar to that described for the lamellae of the phyllobranchiae of brachyurans. It is composed of two opposed epithelial

  10. The Light Response of the XENON100 Time Projection Chamber and the Measurements of the Optical Parameters with the Xenon Scintillation Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Bin

    The XENON program is a phased project using liquid xenon as a sensitive detector medium in search for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs). These particles are the leading candidates to explain the non-baryonic, cold dark matter in our Universe. XENON100, the successor experiment of XENON10, has increased the target liquid xenon mass to 61 kg with a 100 times reduction in background rate enabling a large increase in sensitivity to WIMP-nucleon interaction cross-section. To-date, the most stringent limit on this cross-section over a wide range of WIMP masses have been obtained with XENON100. XENON100 is a detector responding to the scintillation of xenon and the work of this thesis will mainly focus on the light response of the detector. Chapter 1 describes the evidences for dark matter and some of the detection methods, roughly divided by the indirect and the direct detection. In the section 1.2.2 for direct detection, a treatment of interaction rate of WIMPs is introduced. Chapter 2 is a description of the XENON100 detector, some of the main characteristics of liquid xenon, followed by the detector design. In Chapter 3, the light response of the XENON100 time projection chamber (TPC) is explained, including the Monte Carlo simulation work that was carried out prior to the main data taking. The Monte Carlo provided the basic idea of understanding the detector in the early stage of design and calibration, but the actual corrections of the light signals were determined later with the real data. Several optical parameters are critical in explaining the light response, such as the quantum efficiency (QE) of the photomultipliers (PMTs) used in the detector and the reflectivity of the teflon (Polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) material that surrounds the liquid xenon target volume and defines the TPC. Since the few existing measurements of reflectivity of PTFE in liquid xenon were performed in different conditions and thus could not be applied, the XENON

  11. An ionization chamber shower detector for the LHC Luminosity Monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Speziali, V.; Beche, J.F.; Burks, M.T.; Datte, P.S.; Haguenauer, M.; manfredi, P.F.; Millaud, J.E.; Placidi, M.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Riot, V.J.; Schmickler, H.; Turner, W.C.

    2000-10-01

    The front IR quadrupole absorbers (TAS) and the IR neutral particle absorbers (TAN) in the high luminosity insertions of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) each absorb approximately 1.8 TeV of forward collision products on average per pp interaction (~;;235W at design luminosity 1034cm-2s-1). This secondary particle flux can be exploited to provide a useful storage ring operations tool for optimization of luminosity. A novel segmented, multi-gap, pressurized gas ionization chamber is being developed for sampling the energy deposited near the maxima of the hadronic/ electromagnetic showers in these absorbers. The system design choices have been strongly influenced by optimization of signal to noise ratio and by the very high radiation environment. The ionization chambers are instrumented with low noise, fast, pulse shaping electronics to be capable of resolving individual bunch crossings at 40 MHz. Data on each bunch are to be separately accumulated over multiple bunch crossings until the desired statistical accuracy is obtained. At design luminosity approximately 2x103 bunch crossings will suffice for a 1percent luminosity measurement. In this paper we report the first experimental results of the ionization chamber and analog electronics. Single 450GeV protons from the SPS at CERN are used to simulate the hadronic/electromagnetic showers produced by the forward collision products from the interaction regions of the LHC.

  12. Airborne laser scan measurements of winter snow accumulation in high alpine catchments - hydrological implications and verification by ground penetrating radar at glacier surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Keuschnig, M.; Heilig, A.; Mayer, C.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The snow cover as storage of winter precipitation is a substantial source for runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Redistribution of solid precipitation, caused by wind and gravity, leads to a characteristic spatial distribution of snow accumulation which differs from simple model assumption of a homogenous snowpack increasing with altitude. Both, the distinct distribution of snow accumulation and the total amount of SWE stored in the snow cover, affect the magnitude and seasonality of melt water runoff. Complex relations exist between the spatial pattern of snow accumulation and the presence of glaciers and vice versa. For proper hydrological modeling in high mountain catchments, knowledge about snow cover distribution is an important requirement. To date, to evaluate modeling results, spatially insufficient point data on snow depths and SWE are usually available. On catchment scale, optical space-borne remote sensing techniques deliver areal extent of snow cover, but no snow depths and hence no volume of snow cover. Multi-temporal airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing method to obtain elevation changes extensively even in inaccessible alpine terrain. Before the start and at the end of accumulation season of winter 2010/2011, two airborne laser scan acquisitions were performed in the Ötztal Alps (Tirol, Austria). Differences of the respective digital elevation models were interpreted as snow depths and converted into SWE using a simple regression method between snow depths and snow density. Preferred snow accumulation areas were determined, e.g. wind sheltered depressions, the base of steep mountain walls and flat glacier surfaces. At catchment scale, solid precipitation is obviously redistributed from wind exposed mountain ridges to lower elevations, inducing characteristic elevations of maximum snow accumulation. Overall, catchment precipitation derived from snow accumulation is a valuable reference for precipitation approaches in

  13. A statistical approach to determining the uncertainty in power-law model estimates of emissions based on time-dependent chamber concentration measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of models for estimating emissions from products beyond the timeframe of an emissions test is a means of managing the time and expenses associated with product emissions certification. This paper presents a discussion of (1) the impact of uncertainty in test chamber emiss...

  14. A dynamic soil chamber system coupled with a tunable diode laser for online measurements of delta-13C, delta-18O, and efflux rate of soil respired CO2

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, Heath H; Mcdowell, Nate; Hanson, David; Hunt, John

    2009-01-01

    High frequency observations of the stable isotopic composition of CO(2) effluxes from soil have been sparse due in part to measurement challenges. We have developed an open-system method that utilizes a flow-through chamber coupled to a tunable diode laser (TDL) to quantify the rate of soil CO(2) efflux and its delta(13)C and delta(18)O values (delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively). We tested the method first in the laboratory using an artificial soil test column and then in a semi-arid woodland. We found that the CO(2) efflux rates of 1.2 to 7.3 micromol m(-2) s(-1) measured by the chamber-TDL system were similar to measurements made using the chamber and an infrared gas analyzer (IRGA) (R(2) = 0.99) and compared well with efflux rates generated from the soil test column (R(2) = 0.94). Measured delta(13)C and delta(18)O values of CO(2) efflux using the chamber-TDL system at 2 min intervals were not significantly different from source air values across all efflux rates after accounting for diffusive enrichment. Field measurements during drought demonstrated a strong dependency of CO(2) efflux and isotopic composition on soil water content. Addition of water to the soil beneath the chamber resulted in average changes of +6.9 micromol m(-2) s(-1), -5.0 per thousand, and -55.0 per thousand for soil CO(2) efflux, delta(13)C(R) and delta(18)O(R), respectively. All three variables initiated responses within 2 min of water addition, with peak responses observed within 10 min for isotopes and 20 min for efflux. The observed delta(18)O(R) was more enriched than predicted from temperature-dependent H(2)O-CO(2) equilibration theory, similar to other recent observations of delta(18)O(R) from dry soils (Wingate L, Seibt U, Maseyk K, Ogee J, Almeida P, Yakir D, Pereira JS, Mencuccini M. Global Change Biol. 2008; 14: 2178). The soil chamber coupled with the TDL was found to be an effective method for capturing soil CO(2) efflux and its stable isotope composition at high

  15. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  16. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  17. 45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION DDD), VIEW LOOKING EAST. LEAD ENCLOSED PIPING IS DRAIN FROM BOILER CHAMBER No. 1 - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  18. Multisegmented ion chamber for CT scanner dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.M.; Cacak, R.K.; Hendee, W.R.

    1981-01-01

    A multisegmented, ionization chamber capable of determining dosimetric profiles from a CT scanner has been developed and tested. The chamber consists of a number of 2 mm wide electrically isolated segments from which ionization currents may be measured. Presented here are the performance characteristics of the chamber including energy response, dose linearity, and corrections for ''cross talk'' between segments. Sample dosimetric profiles are depicted for 3 and 6 mm nominal beam widths at two locations in a dosimetric phantom positioned in the x-ray beam of a fourth generation CT scanner. The results agree well with the conventional method of obtaining dosimetry measurements with TLD chips.

  19. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  20. New central drift chamber for the MARK II at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelt, J.E.

    1986-09-01

    A new central drift chamber has been constructed for the Mark II detector for use at the new SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The design of the chamber is based on a multi-sense-wire cell of the jet chamber type. In addition to drift-time measurements, pulse-height measurements from the sense wires provide electron-hadron separation by dE/dx. The chamber has been tested in operation at PEP before its move to the SLC. The design and construction are described, and measurements from the new chamber are presented.

  1. Prediction of enteric methane emissions from sheep offered fresh perennial ryegrass () using data measured in indirect open-circuit respiration chambers.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y G; O'Connell, N E; Yan, T

    2016-06-01

    Development of effective methane (CH) mitigation strategies for grazing sheep requires accurate prediction tools. The present study aimed to identify key parameters influencing enteric CH emissions and develop prediction equations for enteric CH emissions from sheep offered fresh grass. The data used were collected from 82 sheep offered fresh perennial ryegrass () as sole diets in 6 metabolism experiments (data from non-grass-only diets were not used). Sheep were from breeds of Highlander, Texel, Scottish Blackface, and Swaledale at the age of 5 to 18 mo and weighing from 24.5 to 62.7 kg. Grass was harvested daily from 6 swards on contrasting harvest dates (May to December). Before the commencement of each study, the experimental sward was harvested at a residual height of 4 cm and allowed to grow for 2 to 4 wk. The feeding trials commenced when the grass sward was suitable to zero grazing (average grass height = 15 cm), thus offering grass of a quality similar to what grazing animals would receive under routine grazing management. Sheep were housed in individual pens for 14 d and then moved to individual calorimeter chambers for 4 d. Feed intake, fecal and urine outputs, and CH emissions were measured during the final 4 d. Data were analyzed using the REML procedure to develop prediction equations for CH emissions. Linear and multiple prediction equations were developed using BW, DMI, GE intake (GEI), and grass chemical concentrations (DM, OM, water-soluble carbohydrates [WSC], NDF, ADF, nitrogen [N], GE, DE, and ME) as explanatory variables. The mean CH production was 21.1 g/kg DMI or 0.062 MJ/MJ GEI. Dry matter intake and GEI were much more accurate predictors for CH emissions than BW ( < 0.001, = 0.86 and = 0.87 vs. = 0.09, respectively). Adding grass DE and ME concentrations and grass nutrient concentrations (e.g., OM, N, GE, NDF, and WSC) to the relationships between DMI or GEI and CH emissions improved prediction accuracy with values increased to 0

  2. Multigas Leakage Correction in Static Environmental Chambers Using Sulfur Hexafluoride and Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Jochum, Tobias; von Fischer, Joseph C; Trumbore, Susan; Popp, Jürgen; Frosch, Torsten

    2015-11-01

    In static environmental chamber experiments, the precision of gas flux measurements can be significantly improved by a thorough gas leakage correction to avoid under- or overestimation of biological activity such as respiration or photosynthesis. Especially in the case of small biological net gas exchange rates or gas accumulation phases during long environmental monitoring experiments, gas leakage fluxes could distort the analysis of the biogenic gas kinetics. Here we propose and demonstrate a general protocol for online correction of diffusion-driven gas leakage in plant chambers by simultaneous quantification of the inert tracer sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) and the investigated biogenic gases using enhanced Raman spectroscopy. By quantifying the leakage rates of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and hydrogen (H2) simultaneously with SF6 in the test chamber, their effective diffusivity ratios of approximately 1.60, 1.96, and 5.65 were determined, each related to SF6. Because our experiments suggest that the effective diffusivity ratios are reproducible for an individual static environmental chamber, even under varying concentration gradients and slight changes of the chamber sealing, an experimental method to quantify gas leakage fluxes by using effective diffusivity ratios and SF6 leakage fluxes is proposed. The method is demonstrated by quantifying the CO2 net exchange rate of a plant-soil ecosystem (Mirabilis jalapa). By knowing the effective chamber diffusivity ratio CO2/SF6 and the measured SF6 leakage rate during the experiment, the leakage contribution to the total CO2 exchange rate could be calculated and the biological net CO2 concentration change within the chamber atmosphere determined. PMID:26492154

  3. The Mars Chamber

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Mars chamber is a box about the size of a refrigerator that re-creates the temperatures, pressures, and atmosphere of the Martian surface, essentially creating a Mars environment on Earth! Scie...

  4. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    SciTech Connect

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  5. Device malfunction caused by "auto-oversensing" of transthoracic impedance measurement test pulses in a modern minute ventilation dual-chamber pacemaker.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Claudius; Vollmann, Dirk; Neuzner, Jörg

    2016-07-01

    Oversensing of physiologic and non-physiologic electrical signals is a relevant cause of malfunctions in subjects with CIED. Physicians taking care of CIED patients must be aware of the potential causes of oversensing and their pattern in EGMs. The present case describes an uncommon source and unique underlying root cause for oversensing in a modern dual-chamber MV rate-adaptive pacemaker. PMID:26745956

  6. New drift chamber for the Mark II at SLC

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.G.

    1984-04-01

    A new cylindrical drift chamber is being constructed for the Mark II detector for use at the new SLAC Linear Collider. The design of the new chamber is based on a multi-sense-wire cell of the jet-chamber type. In addition to drift-time measurements, pulse height measurements from the sense wires will provide electron-hadron separation by dE/dx. The design and construction of the chamber, tests of prototypes, and chamber electronics are discussed. 7 references, 12 figures.

  7. The Japanese Radon and Thoron Reference Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo; Sorimachi, Atsuyuki; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Miyahara, Nobuyuki

    2008-08-07

    Passive detectors used for large-scale and long-term surveys are generally calibrated in a well-controlled environment such as a radon chamber. It has been also pointed out that some of them are sensitive to thoron. Thus it is necessary to check the thoron contribution to the detector response with the proposed or similar test before practical use. The NIRS accommodates radon/aerosol and thoron chambers for quality assurance and quality control of radon measurements. Thus both chambers work so well that they can supply us with the calibration technique and consequently, a good level of knowledge of the radon and thoron issue.

  8. Dense Accumulation of Lipiodol Emulsion in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Nodule during Selective Balloon-occluded Transarterial Chemoembolization: Measurement of Balloon-occluded Arterial Stump Pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Irie, Toshiyuki Kuramochi, Masashi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki

    2013-06-15

    Purpose. To reveal the mechanism of dense accumulation of lipiodol emulsion (LE) in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) during selective balloon-occluded transarterial chemoembolization (B-TACE). Methods. Balloon-occluded arterial stump pressure (BOASP) at the embolization portion was measured during selective B-TACE for 43 nodules in 42 patients. Fluoroscopy and digital subtraction angiography were prospectively observed during selective B-TACE to note whether dense LE accumulation in HCC occurred. The LE concentration ratio of HCC to embolized liver parenchyma (LECHL ratio) was also calculated for each treatment on the basis of the computed tomographic scan obtained immediately after selective B-TACE. The relationships between degree of LE accumulation and the BOASP, as well as the LECHL ratio, were analyzed. Results. Arterial flow beyond the catheter tip was maintained even after balloon inflation. In 39 of 43 treatments, LE inflow into the nontumorous liver parenchyma ceased immediately after LE droplets were filled in arteries of the nontumorous liver parenchyma while LE inflow into the HCC nodule continued (group 1). More dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was obtained in these 39 treatments. In four treatments, LE inflow both into the nontumorous liver parenchyma and into the HCC nodule continued, and no dense LE accumulation in HCC nodule was observed (group 2). In these four treatments, thick anastomotic vessels with collateral artery were noted. The BOASP in group 1 was (mean {+-} SD) 33.8 {+-} 12.8 mmHg (range 13-64 mmHg) and that in group 2 was 92.3 {+-} 7.4 mmHg (range 83-100 mmHg). There was a statistically significant difference in BOASP between groups (p = 0.00004, Welch's t test). The LECHL ratio in group 1 was 18.3 {+-} 13.9 (range 2.9-54.2) and that in group 2 was 2.6 {+-} 1.1 (range 1.7-4.2). There was a statistically significant difference in the LECHL ratio between the groups (p = 0.000034, Welch's t test). Conclusion. Selective B-TACE induced

  9. Improved Rhenium Thrust Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, John Scott

    2015-01-01

    Radiation-cooled bipropellant thrust chambers are being considered for ascent/ descent engines and reaction control systems on various NASA missions and spacecraft, such as the Mars Sample Return and Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, iridium (Ir)-lined rhenium (Re) combustion chambers are the state of the art for in-space engines. NASA's Advanced Materials Bipropellant Rocket (AMBR) engine, a 150-lbf Ir-Re chamber produced by Plasma Processes and Aerojet Rocketdyne, recently set a hydrazine specific impulse record of 333.5 seconds. To withstand the high loads during terrestrial launch, Re chambers with improved mechanical properties are needed. Recent electrochemical forming (EL-Form"TM") results have shown considerable promise for improving Re's mechanical properties by producing a multilayered deposit composed of a tailored microstructure (i.e., Engineered Re). The Engineered Re processing techniques were optimized, and detailed characterization and mechanical properties tests were performed. The most promising techniques were selected and used to produce an Engineered Re AMBR-sized combustion chamber for testing at Aerojet Rocketdyne.

  10. Measurements of neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 205Tl, 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi with a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryzhov, I. V.; Tutin, G. A.; Mitryukhin, A. G.; Oplavin, V. S.; Soloviev, S. M.; Blomgren, J.; Renberg, P.-U.; Meulders, J. P.; El Masri, Y.; Keutgen, Th.; Prieels, R.; Nolte, R.

    2006-06-01

    Neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 205Tl, 204,206,207,208Pb and 209Bi have been measured in the energy range from 30 to 180 MeV. The measurements were performed with quasi-monoenergetic neutron beams using a multi-section Frisch-gridded ionization chamber. The neutron-induced fission cross-sections of 238U were used as reference data. The experimental techniques are described in detail as well as the data processing. The results are compared with existing experimental data.

  11. Measurement of interseismic strain accumulation in the Southern Andes (25°-35°S) using Envisat SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducret, G.; Doin, M. P.; Grandin, R.; Socquet, A.; Vigny, C.; Métois, M.; Béjar-Pizzaro, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Chilean subduction zone is one of the most active in the world. The Nazca plate subducts under the South America plate with a velocity around 7 cm/year. Along-strike and along-dip variations of interseismic coupling suggest that the subduction interface is divided into segments. Rupture of one or several consecutive segments may produce earthquakes of magnitude greater than 8.0. However, the definition of the segmentation in the particular case of the Chilean subduction and its relation to earthquake nucleation in general is a debated topic. We focus on an area extending over 1000 km in latitude, located between Taltal (~25°S) and Constitution (~35°S), which has been accumulating tectonic strain since the mid-20th century. Three main earthquakes occurred in the last decade around the boundaries of this segment : the 1995 Antogagasta (M=8.1) and the 2007 Tocopilla (M=7.7) earthquakes to the North and the 2010 Maule (M=8.8) earthquake to the South. A few seismic swarms occurred in recent years : the episode of Valparaiso (~33°S) in 1985, the Puntaqui (~30°S) crisis in 1997, and the swarms in the Copiapo (~27°S) region in 1973 and 2006. The 25-35°S part of the subduction zone experiences since 38 years a background seismicity (given by USGS catalog), that is mainly located along the plate interface and less frequently within the overriding plate. The seismicity rate is varying from South to North with a maximum seismicity located around La Serena area (~30°S). There, the coupling distribution is constrained by an important GPS dataset that indicate a lower coupling (less than 60%) compared with areas further North and South. Similarly, GPS data suggest that the Copiapo area also corresponds to a local minimum of coupling. However the GPS network is too sparse further North to constrain coupling variations between 28° and 25°S. We use InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) to provide additional insights on interseismic strain accumulation and the

  12. Automated Electrostatics Environmental Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Carlos; Lewis, Dean C.; Buchanan, Randy K.; Buchanan, Aubri

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Electrostatics Chamber (MEC) is an environmental chamber designed primarily to create atmospheric conditions like those at the surface of Mars to support experiments on electrostatic effects in the Martian environment. The chamber is equipped with a vacuum system, a cryogenic cooling system, an atmospheric-gas replenishing and analysis system, and a computerized control system that can be programmed by the user and that provides both automation and options for manual control. The control system can be set to maintain steady Mars-like conditions or to impose temperature and pressure variations of a Mars diurnal cycle at any given season and latitude. In addition, the MEC can be used in other areas of research because it can create steady or varying atmospheric conditions anywhere within the wide temperature, pressure, and composition ranges between the extremes of Mars-like and Earth-like conditions.

  13. Filament wound rocket motor chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The design, analysis, fabrication and testing of a Kevlar-49/HBRF-55A filament wound chamber is reported. The chamber was fabricated and successfully tested to 80% of the design burst pressure. Results of the data reduction and analysis from the hydrotest indicate that the chamber design and fabrication techniques used for the chamber were adequate and the chamber should perform adequately in a static test.

  14. Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) Chamber Characteristics Test

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jaehoon; White, Andy; Park, Seongtae; Hahn, Changhie; Baldeloma, Edwin; Tran, Nam; McIntire, Austin; Soha, Aria; /Fermilab

    2011-01-11

    Gas Electron Multipliers (GEMs) have been used in many HEP experiments as tracking detectors. They are sensitive to X-rays which allows use beyond that of HEP. The UTA High Energy group has been working on using GEMs as the sensitive gap detector in a DHCAL for the ILC. The physics goals at the ILC put a stringent requirement on detector performance. Especially the precision required for jet mass and positions demands an unprecedented jet energy resolution to hadronic calorimeters. A solution to meet this requirement is using the Particle Flow Algorithm (PFA). In order for PFA to work well, high calorimeter granularity is necessary. Previous studies based on GEANT simulations using GEM DHCAL gave confidence on the performance of GEM in the sensitive gap in a sampling calorimeter and its use as a DHCAL in PFA. The UTA HEP team has built several GEM prototype chambers, including the current 30cm x 30cm chamber integrated with the SLAC-developed 64 channel kPiX analog readout chip. This chamber has been tested on the bench using radioactive sources and cosmic ray muons. In order to have fuller understanding of various chamber characteristics, the experiments plan to expose 1-3 GEM chambers of dimension 35cm x 35cm x 5cm with 1cm x 1cm pad granularity with 64 channel 2-D simultaneous readout using the kPiX chip. In this experiment the experiments pan to measure MiP signal height, chamber absolute efficiencies, chamber gain versus high voltage across the GEM gap, the uniformity of the chamber across the 8cm x 8cm area, cross talk and its distance dependence to the triggered pad, chamber rate capabilities, and the maximum pad occupancy rate.

  15. Photodegradation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons in passive air samplers: Field testing different deployment chambers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartkow, M.E.; Kennedy, K.E.; Huckins, J.N.; Holling, N.; Komarova, T.; Muller, J.F.

    2006-01-01

    Semi-permeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were loaded with deuterated anthracene and pyrene as performance reference compounds (PRCs) and deployed at a test site in four different chambers (open and closed box chamber, bowl chamber and cage chamber) for 29 days. The losses of PRCs and the uptake of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from the ambient air were quantified. UV-B levels measured in each deployment chamber indicated that SPMDs would be exposed to the most UV-B in the cage chamber and open box chamber. Significantly less PAHs were quantified in SPMDs deployed in the cage chamber and open box chamber compared to samplers from the other two chambers, suggesting that photodegradation of PAHs had occurred. The loss of PRCs confirmed these results but also showed that photodegradation was occurring in the closed box chamber. The bowl chamber appears to provide the best protection from the influence of direct photodegradation. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Measurement of the atmospheric reactivity of emissions from gasoline and alternative-fueled vehicles: Assessment of available methodologies. Part 1. Indoor smog chamber study of reactivity. Part 2. Assessment of airtrak as a reactivity analyzer. Final report for the second year, March 1, 1994-February 28, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, N.A.; Wang, P.; Hurley, M.D.; Japar, S.M.; Chang, T.

    1996-06-13

    During the second year of the GM smog chamber study of incremental reactivity the authors performed smog chamber experiments to measure three important properties of incremental reactivity. First, they challenged the linear relationship between the Carter factors and the chamber-measured reactivities found during the first-year smog chamber study. Second, they compared the predicted and measured smog formation in simple and complex mixtures. Third, they measured the incremental reactivities of three hydrocarbons (n-butane, propene, and p-xylene) as well as the urban-surrogate mixture at three different temperatures, 22 deg C, 32 deg C (the default), and 42 deg C, to determine how temperature affects both the absolute and the relative reactivity. Finally, they conducted experiments in which the incremental reactivity of NO2 was measured in order to test the Integrated Empirical Rate (IER) model.

  17. Ultrasonic Drying Processing Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acosta, V.; Bon, J.; Riera, E.; Pinto, A.

    The design of a high intensity ultrasonic chamber for drying process was investigated. The acoustic pressure distribution in the ultrasonic drying chamber was simulated solving linear elastic models with attenuation for the acoustic-structure interaction. Together with the government equations, the selection of appropriate boundary conditions, mesh refinement, and configuration parameters of the calculation methods, which is of great importance to simulate adequately the process, were considered. Numerical solution, applying the finite element method (FEM), of acoustic-structure interactions involves to couple structural and fluid elements (with different degrees of freedom), whose solution implies several problems of hardware requirements and software configuration, which were solved. To design the drying chamber, the influence of the directivity of the drying open camera and the staggered reflectors over the acoustic pressure distribution was analyzed. Furthermore, to optimize the influence of the acoustic energy on the drying process, the average value of the acoustic energy distribution in the drying chamber was studied. This would determine the adequate position of the food samples to be dried. For this purpose, the acoustic power absorbed by the samples will be analyzed in later studies.

  18. Improved wire chamber

    DOEpatents

    Atac, M.

    1987-05-12

    An improved gas mixture for use with proportional counter devices, such as Geiger-Mueller tubes and drift chambers. The improved gas mixture provides a stable drift velocity while eliminating wire aging caused by prior art gas mixtures. The new gas mixture is comprised of equal parts argon and ethane gas and having approximately 0.25% isopropyl alcohol vapor. 2 figs.

  19. Liquid Wall Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-02-24

    The key feature of liquid wall chambers is the use of a renewable liquid layer to protect chamber structures from target emissions. Two primary options have been proposed and studied: wetted wall chambers and thick liquid wall (TLW) chambers. With wetted wall designs, a thin layer of liquid shields the structural first wall from short ranged target emissions (x-rays, ions and debris) but not neutrons. Various schemes have been proposed to establish and renew the liquid layer between shots including flow-guiding porous fabrics (e.g., Osiris, HIBALL), porous rigid structures (Prometheus) and thin film flows (KOYO). The thin liquid layer can be the tritium breeding material (e.g., flibe, PbLi, or Li) or another liquid metal such as Pb. TLWs use liquid jets injected by stationary or oscillating nozzles to form a neutronically thick layer (typically with an effective thickness of {approx}50 cm) of liquid between the target and first structural wall. In addition to absorbing short ranged emissions, the thick liquid layer degrades the neutron flux and energy reaching the first wall, typically by {approx}10 x x, so that steel walls can survive for the life of the plant ({approx}30-60 yrs). The thick liquid serves as the primary coolant and tritium breeding material (most recent designs use flibe, but the earliest concepts used Li). In essence, the TLW places the fusion blanket inside the first wall instead of behind the first wall.

  20. Mass accumulation beneath the summit of Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i (2008-2012): new constraints from micro-gravity and deformation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagnardi, M.; Poland, M. P.; Battaglia, M.; Amelung, F.

    2012-12-01

    Kilauea Volcano, Hawai'i, is currently erupting at two locations: from vents on the volcano's east rift zone (ERZ) since 1983 and at the summit, within Halema'uma'u Crater, since March 2008. A previous study that combined micro-gravity and deformation measurements acquired between 1975 and January 2008 revealed shallow magma accumulation ~1 km beneath the southeastern rim of Halema'uma'u Crater, near where the new eruptive vent opened. This vent is now occupied by a > 100 m diameter lava lake whose surface fluctuates between 60 and 150 meters below the vent rim. New gravity surveys of about 50 stations in the summit area of Kilauea have been performed since the start of the summit eruption. The measurements span a sequence of important volcanic events: (i) long-term deflation across the summit until March 2010, (ii) re-inflation until March 5, 2011, when (iii) an eruptive fissure opened along the ERZ causing rapid deflation at the summit of the volcano and, (iv) re-inflation from the end of the fissure eruption on March 9, 2011, through 2012. Microgravity measurements were performed using two Scintrex CG-5 gravimeters and following a double-looping procedure. GPS data and InSAR measurements from both the German Space Agency (DLR) TerraSAR-X satellite and the Italian Space Agency (ASI) satellite-constellation Cosmo-SkyMed are used to adjust the gravity measurements for the free-air effect and to constrain magmatic sources. Preliminary results show that, while no significant residual gravity changes are recorded from 2008 to March 2011, following the March 2011 eruption a positive gravity anomaly (> 100 ± 25 μGal) is present in the same area that showed signs of mass accumulation during 1975-2008. The positive residual gravity change is also accompanied by inflation of the summit (maximum uplift was about 0.12 m). We investigate the nature of this mass accumulation through the combined analysis of deformation and micro-gravity data.

  1. Accumulated exposure to ozone and measurement of health effects in children and counselors at two summer camps

    SciTech Connect

    Berry, M.; Lioy, P.J.; Gelperin, K.; Buckler, G.; Klotz, J. )

    1991-04-01

    In the summer of 1988 a multiorganizational field health study was conducted at two summer day camps in suburban-central New Jersey. Thirty-four campers and counselors had daily pulmonary function tests performed each afternoon while attending camp during the month of July. The subjects ranged from 9 to 35 years of age. A mobile medical screening van was used to house the spirometric equipment and travel to each camp. Continuous ozone measurements were collected over the 19-test day study period. An intense ozone episode was recorded just prior to and during the first 2 weeks of the study. The campers had an increase in respiratory symptoms with increases in ozone concentrations above 120 ppb. Exposures below 120 ppb ozone were not significantly associated with symptoms. Peak expiratory flow rate in children was the only lung function measure associated with increasing ozone concentrations, with an average loss of 4.74 ml/sec/ppb (P-value = 0.05) for the 8-hr ozone exposure measure. Furthermore, it appears that the early intense exposure to ozone produced a persistent decrease in lung function and baseline shift for three days after the episode that obscured the daily dose-response relationship.

  2. Measurement of N2O and CH4 soil fluxes from garden, agricultural and natural soils using both closed and open chamber systems coupled with high-precision CRDS analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yonggang; Jacobson, Gloria; Alexander, Chris; Fleck, Derek; Hoffnagel, John; Del Campo, Bernardo; Rella, Chris

    2013-04-01

    Studying the emission and uptake of greenhouse gases from soil is essential for understanding, adapting to and ultimately mitigating the effects of climate change. To-date, majority of such studies have been focused on carbon dioxide (CO2 ) , however, in 2006 the EPA estimated that "Agricultural activities currently generate the largest share, 63 percent, of the world's anthropogenic non-carbon dioxide (non-CO2) emissions (84 percent of nitrous oxide [N2O] and 52 percent of methane[CH4]), and make up roughly 15 percent of all anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions" (Prentice et al., 2001). Therefore, enabling accurate N2O and CH4 flux measurements in the field are clearly critical to our ability to better constrain carbon and nitrogen budgets, characterize soil sensitivities, agricultural practices, and microbial processes like denitrification and nitrification. To aide in these studies, Picarro has developed a new analyzer based on its proven, NIR technology platform, which is capable of measuring both N2O and CH4 down to ppb levels in a single, field-deployable analyzer. This analyzer measures N2O with a 1-sigma, precision of 3.5 ppb and CH4 with a 1-sigma precision of 3ppb on a 5 minute average. The instrument also has extremely low drift to enable accurate measurements with infrequent calibrations. The data rate of the analyzer is on the order of 5 seconds in order to capture fast, episodic emission events. One of the keys to making accurate CRDS measurements is to thoroughly characterize and correct for spectral interfering species. This is especially important for closed system soil chambers used on agricultural soils where a variety of soil amendments may be applied and gases not usually present in ambient air could concentrate to high levels. In this work, we present the results of analyzer interference testing and corrections completed for the interference of carbon dioxide, methane, ammonia, ethane, ethylene, acetylene, and water on N2O. In addition, we

  3. Almond test body. [for microwave anechoic chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominek, Allen K. (Inventor); Wood, Richard M. (Inventor); Gilreath, Melvin C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    The invention is an almond shaped test body for use in measuring the performance characteristics of microwave anechoic chambers and for use as a support for components undergoing radar cross-section measurements. The novel aspect of this invention is its shape, which produces a large dynamic scattered field over large angular regions making the almond valuable for verifying the performance of microwave anechoic chambers. As a component mount, the almond exhibits a low return that does not perturb the measurement of the component and it simulates the backscatter characteristics of the component as if over an infinite ground plane.

  4. Measurements of VOC/SVOC emission factors from burning incenses in an environmental test chamber: influence of temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate.

    PubMed

    Manoukian, A; Buiron, D; Temime-Roussel, B; Wortham, H; Quivet, E

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the influence of three environmental indoor parameters (i.e., temperature, relative humidity, and air exchange rate) on the emission of 13 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) during incense burning. Experiments have been carried out using an environmental test chamber. Statistical results from a classical two-level full factorial design highlight the predominant effect of ventilation on emission factors. The higher the ventilation, the higher the emission factor. Moreover, thanks to these results, an estimation of the concentration range for the compounds under study can be calculated and allows a quick look of indoor pollution induced by incense combustion. Carcinogenic substances (i.e., benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, and formaldehyde) produced from the incense combustion would be predicted in typical living indoors conditions to reach instantaneous concentration levels close to or higher than air quality exposure threshold values. PMID:26614451

  5. The construction and operating characteristics of a cathode strip chamber system designed to measure the reaction vertices of a stopping kaon beam

    SciTech Connect

    M.W. Ahmed; D. Androic; I. Bertovic; J. Bjoraker; R. Chrien; X. Cui; D. Dehnhard; Anton Empl; M. Furic; J. Gerald; R. Gill; E.V. Hungerford; H. Jungst; K.J. Lan; Jinghua Liu; C.L. Morris; J.M. O'Donnell; J.C. Peng; T. Petkovic; P. Pile; M. Planinic; C.M. Riedel; A. Rusek; R. Sutter; Liguang Tang; H.A. Thiessen; M. Youn; V. Zeps

    2001-08-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a segmented-target, cathode-strip, tracking-detector is discussed. The chamber was made of low-Z materials in order to allow photons to leave the target region. It was used to determine the reaction vertex of stopping kaons, and was successfully operated in a high-intensity kaon beamline at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The vertical and horizontal resolutions of the stopping kaon reaction positions were sigma{sub X{approx}}0.454mm and sigma{sub Y{approx}}1.180mm, respectively. The uncertainty in the longitudinal (Z) direction is given by one-half the thickness of a target segment.

  6. Sperm Cell Dynamics in Shallow Chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Condat, Carlos; Marconi, Veronica; Guidobaldi, Alejandro; Giojalas, Laura; Silhanek, Alejandro; Jeyaram, Yogesh; Moshchalkov, Victor

    2015-03-01

    Self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamic behavior in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Here we analyze the motion of spermatozoids confined to shallow chambers, investigating the nature of the cell trajectories and their accumulation near the side boundaries. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and down surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion near the center of the gap. Use of microstructured petal-shaped edges limits accumulation near the borders and contributes to increase the concentration in the chamber interior. System stabilization occurs over times of the order of minutes, which agrees well with a theoretical estimate that assumes that the cell mean-square displacement is largely due to the quasi-linear segments. Pure quasi-circular trajectories would require several hours to stabilize. Our estimates also indicate that stabilization proceeds 2.5 times faster in the rosette geometries than in the smooth-edged chambers, which is another practical reason to prefer the former.

  7. BOREAS TGB-1 NSA SF6 Chamber Flux Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crill, Patrick; Varner, Ruth K.; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Conrad, Sara K. (Editor)

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TGB-1 team made several chamber and tower measurements of trace gases at sites in the BOREAS NSA. This data set contains sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) dark chamber flux measurements at the NSA-OJP and NSA-YJP sites from 16-May through 13-Sep-1994. Gas samples were extracted approximately every 7 days from dark chambers and analyzed at the NSA lab facility. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files.

  8. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-10-17

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  9. Multi-chamber deposition system

    DOEpatents

    Jacobson, Richard L.; Jeffrey, Frank R.; Westerberg, Roger K.

    1989-06-27

    A system for the simultaneous deposition of different coatings onto a thin web within a large volume vacuum chamber is disclosed which chamber is provided with a plurality of deposition chambers in which the different layers are deposited onto the film as its moves from a supply roll to a finished take-up roll of coated web. The deposition chambers provided within the large vacuum chamber are provided with separate seals which minimize back diffusion of any dopant gas from adjacent deposition chambers.

  10. Combustor with fuel preparation chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zelina, Joseph (Inventor); Myers, Geoffrey D. (Inventor); Srinivasan, Ram (Inventor); Reynolds, Robert S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An annular combustor having fuel preparation chambers mounted in the dome of the combustor. The fuel preparation chamber comprises an annular wall extending axially from an inlet to an exit that defines a mixing chamber. Mounted to the inlet are an air swirler and a fuel atomizer. The air swirler provides swirled air to the mixing chamber while the atomizer provides a fuel spray. On the downstream side of the exit, the fuel preparation chamber has an inwardly extending conical wall that compresses the swirling mixture of fuel and air exiting the mixing chamber.

  11. 50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    50. BOILER CHAMBER No. 1, LOOKING SOUTHEAST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ENCLOSURE (LOCATION III) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  12. 61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. BOILER CHAMBER No. 2, LOOKING SOUTHWEST BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION PPP) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  13. 44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. AUXILIARY CHAMBER BETWEEN CHAMBER AND CONCRETE ENCLOSURE (LOCATION CCC), LOOKING NORTHEAST SHOWING DRAIN PIPE FROM SUMP - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  14. 41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    41. AUXILIARY CHAMBER, CONCRETE ENCLOSURE CHAMBER AIR LOCK (EXTERIOR), LOOKING NORTHEAST FROM SOUTHWEST CORNER (LOCATION AAA) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  15. 72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    72. VISITOR'S CENTER, MODEL OF BOILER CHAMBER, AUXILIARY CHAMBER, REACTOR AND CANAL (LOCATION T) - Shippingport Atomic Power Station, On Ohio River, 25 miles Northwest of Pittsburgh, Shippingport, Beaver County, PA

  16. LiDAR measurement of seasonal snow accumulation along an elevation gradient in the southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Molotch, N. P.; Flanagan, J.; Guo, Q.

    2014-05-01

    We present results from snow-on and snow-off airborne-scanning LiDAR measurements over a 53-km2 area in the southern Sierra Nevada. We found that snow depth as a function of elevation increased approximately 15 cm 100 m-1, until reaching an elevation of 3300 m, where depth sharply decreased at a rate of 48 cm 100 m-1. Departures from the 15 cm 100 m-1 trend, based on 1-m elevation-band means of regression residuals, showed slightly less-steep increases below 2050 m; steeper increases between 2050-3300 m; and less-steep increases above 3300 m. Although the study area is partly forested, only measurements in open areas were used. Below approximately 2050 m elevation, ablation and rainfall are the primary causes of departure from the orographic trend. From 2050 to 3300 m, greater snow depths than predicted were found on the steeper terrain of the northwest and the less-steep northeast-facing slopes, suggesting that ablation, aspect, slope and wind redistribution all play a role in local snow-depth variability. At elevations above 3300 m orographic processes mask the effect of wind deposition when averaging over large areas. Also, terrain in this basin becomes less steep above 3300 m. This suggests a reduction in precipitation from upslope lifting, and/or the exhaustion of precipitable water from ascending air masses. Our results suggest a precipitation lapse rate for the 2100-3300 m range of about 6 cm 100 m-1 elevation. This is a higher gradient than the widely used PRISM (Parameter-elevation Relationships on Independent Slopes Model) precipitation products, but similar to that from reconstruction of snowmelt amounts from satellite snowcover data. Our findings provide a unique characterization of the consistent, steep average increase in precipitation with elevation in snow-dominated terrain, using high-resolution, highly-accurate data, as well as the importance of solar radiation, wind redistribution and mid-winter melt with regard to snow distribution.

  17. X ray attenuation measurements for high-temperature materials characterization and in-situ monitoring of damage accumulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., 1991

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baaklini, George Y.

    1992-01-01

    The scope of this dissertation is to develop and apply x ray attenuation measurement systems that are capable of: (1) characterizing density variations in high-temperature materials, e.g., monolithic ceramics, ceramic and intermetallic matrix composites, and (2) noninvasively monitoring damage accumulation and failure sequences in ceramic matrix composites under room temperature tensile testing. This dissertation results in the development of: (1) a point scan digital radiography system, and (2) an in-situ x ray material testing system. Radiographic evaluation before, during, and after loading shows the effect of preexisting volume flaws on the fracture behavior of composites. Results show that x ray film radiography can monitor damage accumulation during tensile loading. Matrix cracking, fiber matrix debonding, fiber bridging, and fiber pullout are imaged throughout the tensile loading of the specimens. Further in-situ radiography is found to be a practical technique for estimating interfacial shear strength between the silicon carbide fibers and the reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix. It is concluded that pretest, in-situ, and post test x ray imaging can provide for greater understanding of ceramic matrix composite mechanical behavior.

  18. Seasonality in contaminant accumulation in Arctic marine pelagic food webs using trophic magnification factor as a measure of bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hallanger, Ingeborg G; Warner, Nicholas A; Ruus, Anders; Evenset, Anita; Christensen, Guttorm; Herzke, Dorte; Gabrielsen, Geir W; Borgå, Katrine

    2011-05-01

    Seasonality in biomagnification of persistent organic pollutants (POPs; polychlorinated biphenyls, chlorinated pesticides, and brominated flame retardants) in Arctic marine pelagic food webs was investigated in Kongsfjorden, Svalbard, Norway. Trophic magnification factors (TMFs; average factor change in concentration between two trophic levels) were used to measure food web biomagnification in biota in May, July, and October 2007. Pelagic zooplankton (seven species), fish (five species), and seabirds (two species) were included in the study. For most POP compounds, highest TMFs were found in July and lowest were in May. Seasonally changing TMFs were a result of seasonally changing POP concentrations and the δ¹⁵N-derived trophic positions of the species included in the food web. These seasonal differences in TMFs were independent of inclusion/exclusion of organisms based on physiology (i.e., warm- versus cold-blooded organisms) in the food web. The higher TMFs in July, when the food web consisted of a higher degree of boreal species, suggest that future warming of the Arctic and increased invasion by boreal species can result in increased food web magnification. Knowledge of the seasonal variation in POP biomagnification is a prerequisite for understanding changes in POP biomagnification caused by climate change. PMID:21312250

  19. A new ring-shaped graphite monitor ionization chamber

    NASA Astrophysi