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Sample records for accumulation mode aerosols

  1. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  2. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-01-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  3. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  4. The organic fraction of bubble-generated, accumulation mode Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, R. L.; Harris, B.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent studies have detected a dominant accumulation mode (~100 nm) in the Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA) number distribution. There is evidence to suggest that particles in this mode are composed primarily of organics. To investigate this hypothesis we conducted experiments on NaCl, artificial SSA and natural SSA particles with a Volatility-Hygroscopicity-Tandem-Differential-Mobility-Analyser (VH-TDMA). NaCl particles were atomiser generated and a bubble generator was constructed to produce artificial and natural SSA particles. Natural seawater samples for use in the bubble generator were collected from biologically active, terrestrially-affected coastal water in Moreton Bay, Australia. Differences in the VH-TDMA-measured volatility curves of artificial and natural SSA particles were used to investigate and quantify the organic fraction of natural SSA particles. Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) data, also obtained by the VH-TDMA, were used to confirm the conclusions drawn from the volatility data. Both datasets indicated that the organic fraction of our natural SSA particles evaporated in the VH-TDMA over the temperature range 170-200 °C. The organic volume fraction for 71-77 nm natural SSA particles was 8±6%. Organic volume fraction did not vary significantly with varying water residence time (40 s to 24 h) in the bubble generator or SSA particle diameter in the range 38-173 nm. At room temperature we measured shape- and Kelvin-corrected HGF at 90% RH of 2.46±0.02 for NaCl, 2.35±0.02 for artifical SSA and 2.26±0.02 for natural SSA particles. Overall, these results suggest that the natural accumulation mode SSA particles produced in these experiments contained only a minor organic fraction, which had little effect on hygroscopic growth. Our measurement of 8±6% is an order of magnitude below two previous measurements of the organic fraction in SSA particles of comparable sizes. We stress that our results were obtained using coastal seawater and they can't necessarily

  5. The organic fraction of bubble-generated, accumulation mode Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modini, R. L.; Harris, B.; Ristovski, Z. D.

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies have detected a dominant accumulation mode (~100 nm) in the Sea Spray Aerosol (SSA) number distribution. There is evidence to suggest that particles in this mode are composed primarily of organics. To investigate this hypothesis we conducted experiments on NaCl, artificial SSA and natural SSA particles with a Volatility-Hygroscopicity-Tandem-Differential-Mobility-Analyser (VH-TDMA). NaCl particles were atomiser generated and a bubble generator was constructed to produce artificial and natural SSA particles. Natural seawater samples for use in the bubble generator were collected from biologically active, terrestrially-affected coastal water in Moreton Bay, Australia. Differences in the VH-TDMA-measured volatility curves of artificial and natural SSA particles were used to investigate and quantify the organic fraction of natural SSA particles. Hygroscopic Growth Factor (HGF) data, also obtained by the VH-TDMA, were used to confirm the conclusions drawn from the volatility data. Both datasets indicated that the organic fraction of our natural SSA particles evaporated in the VH-TDMA over the temperature range 170-200°C. The organic volume fraction for 71-77 nm natural SSA particles was 8±6%. Organic volume fraction did not vary significantly with varying water residence time (40 s0 to 24 h) in the bubble generator or SSA particle diameter in the range 38-173 nm. At room temperature we measured shape- and Kelvin-corrected HGF at 90% RH of 2.46±0.02 for NaCl, 2.35±0.02 for artifical SSA and 2.26±0.02 for natural SSA particles. Overall, these results suggest that the natural accumulation mode SSA particles produced in these experiments contained only a minor organic fraction, which had little effect on hygroscopic growth. Our measurement of 8±6% is an order of magnitude below two previous measurements of the organic fraction in SSA particles of comparable sizes. Further studies with a variety of different seawaters are required to better quantify how

  6. The Aerosol Coarse Mode Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnott, W. P.; Adhikari, N.; Air, D.; Kassianov, E.; Barnard, J.

    2014-12-01

    Many areas of the world show an aerosol volume distribution with a significant coarse mode and sometimes a dominant coarse mode. The large coarse mode is usually due to dust, but sea salt aerosol can also play an important role. However, in many field campaigns, the coarse mode tends to be ignored, because it is difficult to measure. This lack of measurements leads directly to a concomitant "lack of analysis" of this mode. Because, coarse mode aerosols can have significant effects on radiative forcing, both in the shortwave and longwave spectrum, the coarse mode -- and these forcings -- should be accounted for in atmospheric models. Forcings based only on fine mode aerosols have the potential to be misleading. In this paper we describe examples of large coarse modes that occur in areas of large aerosol loading (Mexico City, Barnard et al., 2010) as well as small loadings (Sacramento, CA; Kassianov et al., 2012; and Reno, NV). We then demonstrate that: (1) the coarse mode can contribute significantly to radiative forcing, relative to the fine mode, and (2) neglecting the coarse mode may result in poor comparisons between measurements and models. Next we describe -- in general terms -- the limitations of instrumentation to measure the coarse mode. Finally, we suggest a new initiative aimed at examining coarse mode aerosol generation mechanisms; transport and deposition; chemical composition; visible and thermal IR refractive indices; morphology; microphysical behavior when deposited on snow and ice; and specific instrumentation needs. Barnard, J. C., J. D. Fast, G. Paredes-Miranda, W. P. Arnott, and A. Laskin, 2010: Technical Note: Evaluation of the WRF-Chem "Aerosol Chemical to Aerosol Optical Properties" Module using data from the MILAGRO campaign, Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 10, 7325-7340. Kassianov, E. I., M. S. Pekour, and J. C. Barnard, 2012: Aerosols in Central California: Unexpectedly large contribution of coarse mode to aerosol radiative forcing

  7. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  8. Coarse mode aerosols in the High Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baibakov, K.; O'Neill, N. T.; Chaubey, J. P.; Saha, A.; Duck, T. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2014-12-01

    Fine mode (submicron) aerosols in the Arctic have received a fair amount of scientific attention in terms of smoke intrusions during the polar summer and Arctic haze pollution during the polar winter. Relatively little is known about coarse mode (supermicron) aerosols, notably dust, volcanic ash and sea salt. Asian dust is a regular springtime event whose optical and radiative forcing effects have been fairly well documented at the lower latitudes over North America but rarely reported for the Arctic. Volcanic ash, whose socio-economic importance has grown dramatically since the fear of its effects on aircraft engines resulted in the virtual shutdown of European civil aviation in the spring of 2010 has rarely been reported in the Arctic in spite of the likely probability that ash from Iceland and the Aleutian Islands makes its way into the Arctic and possibly the high Arctic. Little is known about Arctic sea salt aerosols and we are not aware of any literature on the optical measurement of these aerosols. In this work we present preliminary results of the combined sunphotometry-lidar analysis at two High Arctic stations in North America: PEARL (80°N, 86°W) for 2007-2011 and Barrow (71°N,156°W) for 2011-2014. The multi-years datasets were analyzed to single out potential coarse mode incursions and study their optical characteristics. In particular, CIMEL sunphotometers provided coarse mode optical depths as well as information on particle size and refractive index. Lidar measurements from High Spectral Resolution lidars (AHSRL at PEARL and NSHSRL at Barrow) yielded vertically resolved aerosol profiles and gave an indication of particle shape and size from the depolarization ratio and color ratio profiles. Additionally, we employed supplementary analyses of HYSPLIT backtrajectories, OMI aerosol index, and NAAPS (Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System) outputs to study the spatial context of given events.

  9. Nanoscale welding aerosol sensing based on whispering gallery modes in a cylindrical silica resonator

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Aram; Mills, Thomas; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    We report an experimental technique where one uses a standard silica fiber as a cylindrical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator to sense airborne nanoscale aerosols produced by electric arc welding. We find that the accumulation of aerosols on the resonator surface induces a measurable red-shift in resonance frequency, and establish an empirical relation that links the magnitude of resonance shift with the amount of aerosol deposition. The WGM quality factors, by contrast, do not decrease significantly, even for samples with a large percentage of surface area covered by aerosols. Our experimental results are discussed and compared with existing literature on WGM-based nanoparticle sensing. PMID:25837078

  10. Fine Mode Aerosol over the United Arab Emirates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ross, K. E.; Piketh, S. J.; Reid, J. S.; Reid, E. A.

    2005-12-01

    The aerosol loading of the atmosphere over the Arabian Gulf region is extremely diverse and is composed not only of dust, but also of pollution that is derived largely from oil-related activities. Fine mode pollution particles are most efficient at scattering incoming solar radiation and have the potential to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), and may therefore have implications for climate change. The smaller aerosols may also pose a health hazard if present in high concentrations. The United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2) was designed to investigate aerosol and meteorological characteristics over the region using ground-based, aircraft and satellite measurements, and was conducted in August and September 2004. Aerosol chemical composition has been obtained from filters that were collected at the site of the Mobile Atmospheric Aerosol and Radiation Characterization Observatory (MAARCO) on the coast of the UAE between Abu Dhabi and Dubai. Filter samples were also collected on an airborne platform in order to assess how aerosol chemical composition varies across the region and throughout the depth of the boundary layer. Results of the analysis of the PM2.5 coastal samples show that ammonium sulphate is the most prevalent constituent of the fine mode aerosol in the region (>50% of the mass), followed by organic matter, alumino-silicates, calcium carbonate and black carbon. Source apportionment indicates that most of the fine aerosol mass is derived from fossil fuel combustion, while mineral dust and local vehicle emissions also contribute to the fine aerosol loading. The organic carbon-to-total carbon ratio of the aerosol is 0.65, which is typical of fossil fuel combustion. The dominance of sulphates means that the fine mode aerosol in the region is probably responsible for a negative radiative forcing, and that the polluting emissions significantly elevate the concentration of CCN.

  11. Biology of the Coarse Aerosol Mode: Insights Into Urban Aerosol Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dueker, E.; O'Mullan, G. D.; Montero, A.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial aerosols have been understudied, despite implications for climate studies, public health, and biogeochemical cycling. Because viable bacterial aerosols are often associated with coarse aerosol particles, our limited understanding of the coarse aerosol mode further impedes our ability to develop models of viable bacterial aerosol production, transport, and fate in the outdoor environment, particularly in crowded urban centers. To address this knowledge gap, we studied aerosol particle biology and size distributions in a broad range of urban and rural settings. Our previously published findings suggest a link between microbial viability and local production of coarse aerosols from waterways, waste treatment facilities, and terrestrial systems in urban and rural environments. Both in coastal Maine and in New York Harbor, coarse aerosols and viable bacterial aerosols increased with increasing wind speeds above 4 m s-1, a dynamic that was observed over time scales ranging from minutes to hours. At a New York City superfund-designated waterway regularly contaminated with raw sewage, aeration remediation efforts resulted in significant increases of coarse aerosols and bacterial aerosols above that waterway. Our current research indicates that bacterial communities in aerosols at this superfund site have a greater similarity to bacterial communities in the contaminated waterway with wind speeds above 4 m s-1. Size-fractionated sampling of viable microbial aerosols along the urban waterfront has also revealed significant shifts in bacterial aerosols, and specifically bacteria associated with coarse aerosols, when wind direction changes from onshore to offshore. This research highlights the key connections between bacterial aerosol viability and the coarse aerosol fraction, which is important in assessments of production, transport, and fate of bacterial contamination in the urban environment.

  12. Fine mode aerosol chemistry over a rural atmosphere near the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Anandamay; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted on the chemical characterization of fine mode aerosol or PM2.5 over a rural atmosphere near the coast of Bay of Bengal in eastern India. Samples were collected and analyzed during March 2013 - February 2014. The concentration of PM2.5 was found span over a wide range from as low as 3 µg m-3 to as high as 180 µg m-3. The average concentration of PM2.5 was 62 µg m-3. Maximum accumulation of fine mode aerosol was observed during winter whereas minimum was observed during monsoon. Water soluble ionic species of fine mode aerosol were characterized over this rural atmosphere. In spite of being situated near the coast of Bay of Bengal, we observed significantly higher concentrations for anthropogenic species like ammonium and sulphate. The concentrations of these two species were much higher than the sea-salt aerosols. Ammonium and sulphate contributed around 30 % to the total fine mode aerosols. Even dust aerosol species like calcium also showed higher concentrations. Chloride to sodium ratio was found to be much less than that in standard sea-water indicating strong interaction between sea-salt and anthropogenic aerosols. Use of fertilizers in various crop fields and human and animal wastes significantly increased ammonium in fine mode aerosols. Dust aerosol species were accumulated in the atmosphere which could be due to transport of finer dust species from nearby metropolis or locally generated. Non-sea-sulphate and nitrate showed significant contributions in fine mode aerosols having both local and transported sources. Source apportionment shows prominent emission sources of anthropogenic aerosols from local anthropogenic activities and transported from nearby Kolkata metropolis as well.

  13. Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Siniuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R.; Tripathi, S. N.; Dubovik, O.; Giles, D. M.; Martins, J.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.

    2009-12-01

    Several regions of the earth exhibit seasonal mixtures of fine and coarse mode sized aerosol types, which are challenging to characterize from satellite remote sensing. Over land the coarse mode size aerosols (radius >1 micron) originate primarily from arid regions, which generate airborne soil dust, and the dominant fine mode sources are gases and particulates from urban/industrial emissions and from biomass burning. AERONET sun-sky radiometer almucantar retrievals from several years are analyzed for the urban sites of Beijing, China and Kanpur, India (in the Ganges floodplain) where seasonal coarse mode dust particles mix with fine mode pollution aerosol, predominately in the spring. As increasingly more absorbing fine mode pollutants are added to the dust aerosol at both sites, the single scattering albedo (SSA) of the mixtures at 675 nm through 1020 nm decrease as the fine mode fraction of AOD increases, while the 440 nm SSA is relatively constant. Additionally we compare multi-year data from Ilorin, Nigeria where desert dust from the Sahara and Sahel mix with fine mode biomass-burning aerosols. The volume size distribution retrievals from this site often shows tri-modality (third mode centered at 0.6 micron radius), which suggests a different particle source than found for most other arid region AERONET sites, which typically have bi-modal distributions. Comparison of mid-visible single scattering albedo obtained from in situ aircraft measurements during DABEX to multi-year means from the Ilorin site AERONET retrievals show close agreement (within 0.03 or less) over a wide range of Angstrom exponent (0.3 to 1.5). Observed differences in the spectral SSA as a function of fine mode fraction of the optical depth between all three sites are discussed and occur due to differences in absorption for both modes and also due to fine mode particle size dynamics.

  14. Germanium accumulation-mode charge-injection-device process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, T. G.

    1981-01-01

    Gallium doped germanium is suitable for applications in the detection of far infrared radiation. Measurements were made on experimental photoconductors (PCs), accumulation mode charge injection devices (AMCIDs), and the SSPC (a switched, sampled PC alternative to the AMCID). The results indicate that the SSPC, which had a responsivity near 1.5 amp/watt, is desirable for use in two dimensional detector arrays.

  15. Coarse mode aerosol measurement using a Low Turbulence Inlet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, J.; Bart, M.; Trembath, J.; McQuaid, J. B.; Brooks, B. J.; Osborne, S.

    2012-04-01

    The Sahara desert is a major natural source of global mineral dust emissions (Forster et al., 2007) through the mobilisation and lifting of dust particles into the atmosphere from dust storms. A significant fraction of this dust is in the aerosol coarse mode (Weinzierl et al., 2009). It is highlighted of the difficulty in making accurate and reliable measurements from an aircraft platform, particularly that of coarse mode aerosol (Wendisch et al., 2004). To achieve the measurement of a representative aerosol sample an aerosol inlet, on an aircraft, is required for the delivery of the sample to the instruments making the measurements. Inlet design can modify aerosol size distribution through either underestimating due to aerosol losses or overestimation due to enhancements. The Low Turbulence Inlet (LTI) was designed to improve inlet efficiency. This is achieved by reducing turbulence flow within the tip of the inlet, reducing impaction of particles to the walls of the inlet (Wilson et al., 2004). The LTI further maintains isokinetic sampling flow (free stream velocity, U0 and sampling velocity, U are equal to 1). Dust aerosol over the Sahara desert provides an excellent environment to test and quantify the capabilities of the LTI on the FAAM BAe 146, whilst enabling in-situ dust measurement. The LTI was operated during the Fennec field campaign in June 2011 with 11 flights during the campaign over Mauritania and Mali. We are using the LTI to provide critical information on the sampling characteristics of the inlet used by nearly all aerosol instruments inside the aircraft (AMS, Nephelometer, PSAP, and CCN). Inlet experiments were performed with identical Optical Particle Counters (OPC) connected to the rosemount and LTI with size distribution for each inlet measured and Rosemount enhancements determined. Rosemount inlet enhancements were determined to be 2 to 4 times for particles up to 2.5 µm. A key parameter in aerosol measurement is size distribution, in which

  16. Global fine-mode aerosol radiative effect, as constrained by comprehensive observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chul E.; Chu, Jung-Eun; Lee, Yunha; van Noije, Twan; Jeoung, Hwayoung; Ha, Kyung-Ja; Marks, Marguerite

    2016-07-01

    Aerosols directly affect the radiative balance of the Earth through the absorption and scattering of solar radiation. Although the contributions of absorption (heating) and scattering (cooling) of sunlight have proved difficult to quantify, the consensus is that anthropogenic aerosols cool the climate, partially offsetting the warming by rising greenhouse gas concentrations. Recent estimates of global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing (i.e., global radiative forcing due to aerosol-radiation interactions) are -0.35 ± 0.5 W m-2, and these estimates depend heavily on aerosol simulation. Here, we integrate a comprehensive suite of satellite and ground-based observations to constrain total aerosol optical depth (AOD), its fine-mode fraction, the vertical distribution of aerosols and clouds, and the collocation of clouds and overlying aerosols. We find that the direct fine-mode aerosol radiative effect is -0.46 W m-2 (-0.54 to -0.39 W m-2). Fine-mode aerosols include sea salt and dust aerosols, and we find that these natural aerosols result in a very large cooling (-0.44 to -0.26 W m-2) when constrained by observations. When the contribution of these natural aerosols is subtracted from the fine-mode radiative effect, the net becomes -0.11 (-0.28 to +0.05) W m-2. This net arises from total (natural + anthropogenic) carbonaceous, sulfate and nitrate aerosols, which suggests that global direct anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing is less negative than -0.35 W m-2.

  17. Aerosol accumulation intensity and composition variations under different weather conditions in urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinberga, Iveta; Bikshe, Janis; Eindorfa, Aiva

    2014-05-01

    During the last decade aerosol (PM10, PM2.5) mass and composition measurements were done in different urban environments - parallel street canyons, industrial sites and at the background level in Riga, Latvia. Effect of meteorological parameters on the accumulation and ventilation intensity was investigated in order to understand microclimatological parameters affecting aerosol pollution level and chemical composition changes. In comparison to industrial sites (shipping activities, bulk cargo, oil and naphtha processing), urban street canyon aerosol mass concentration was significantly higher, for PM10 number of daily limit exceedances are higher by factor 3.4 - 3.9 in street canyons. Exceedances of PM2.5 annual limits were identified only in street canyons as well. Precipitation intensity, wind speed, days with mist highly correlates with aerosol concentration; in average during the year about 1 - 2 % presence of calm wind days, 20 - 30 days with mist facilitate accumulation of aerosols and mitigating growing of secondary aerosols. It has been assessed that about 25 % of daily exceedances in street canyons are connected with sea salt/street sanding factor. Strong dependency of wind speed and direction were identified in winter time - low winds (0.4 - 1.7 m/s) blowing from south, south-east (cross section of the street) contributing to PM10 concentrations over 100 - 150 ug/m3. Seasonal differences in aerosol concentrations were identified as a result of recombination of direct source impact, specific meteorological and synoptical conditions during the period from January until April when usually dominates extremely high aerosol concentrations. While aerosol mass concentration levels in monitoring sites significantly differs, concentrations of heavy metals (Pb, Ni, Cd, and As) are almost at the same level, even more - concentration of Cd for some years was higher in industrial area where main pollution is caused by oil processing and storage, heavy traffic

  18. Climatological Aspects of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Li, Z.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S.N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Dubovik O.; O'Neill, N. T.; Smirnov, A.; Wang, P.; Xia, X.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosol mixtures composed of coarse mode desert dust combined with fine mode combustion generated aerosols (from fossil fuel and biomass burning sources) were investigated at three locations that are in and/or downwind of major global aerosol emission source regions. Multiyear monitoring data at Aerosol Robotic Network sites in Beijing (central eastern China), Kanpur (Indo-Gangetic Plain, northern India), and Ilorin (Nigeria, Sudanian zone of West Africa) were utilized to study the climatological characteristics of aerosol optical properties. Multiyear climatological averages of spectral single scattering albedo (SSA) versus fine mode fraction (FMF) of aerosol optical depth at 675 nm at all three sites exhibited relatively linear trends up to 50% FMF. This suggests the possibility that external linear mixing of both fine and coarse mode components (weighted by FMF) dominates the SSA variation, where the SSA of each component remains relatively constant for this range of FMF only. However, it is likely that a combination of other factors is also involved in determining the dynamics of SSA as a function of FMF, such as fine mode particles adhering to coarse mode dust. The spectral variation of the climatological averaged aerosol absorption optical depth (AAOD) was nearly linear in logarithmic coordinates over the wavelength range of 440-870 nm for both the Kanpur and Ilorin sites. However, at two sites in China (Beijing and Xianghe), a distinct nonlinearity in spectral AAOD in logarithmic space was observed, suggesting the possibility of anomalously strong absorption in coarse mode aerosols increasing the 870 nm AAOD.

  19. Dynamics of the Optical Properties of Fine/Coarse Mode Aerosol Mixtures in Diverse Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Sinyuk, A.; Pinker, R. T.; Goloub, P.; Chen, H.; Chatenet, B.; Singh, R. P.; Al Mandoos, A.; Reid, J. S.; Smirnov, A.

    2007-12-01

    Several regions of the earth exhibit seasonal mixtures of fine and coarse mode aerosol types, which are challenging to characterize from satellite remote sensing. Over land the coarse mode aerosols originate primarily from arid regions, which generate airborne soil dust, and the primary fine mode sources are urban/industrial emissions of gases and particulates and also biomass burning. The recently developed AERONET Version 2 retrieval algorithm produces more accurate retrievals of particle size distribution when non-spherical particles (such as dust) are present and also more accurate spectral single scattering albedo due to improved specification of the earth surface bidirectional reflectance. We show comparison of AERONET Version 1 and 2 retrievals that exhibit differences and suggest significantly improved single scattering albedo in Version 2. AERONET almucantar retrievals from several years are analyzed for the urban sites of Beijing, China and Kanpur, India (in the Ganges floodplain) where seasonal coarse mode dust particles mix with fine mode pollution aerosol, predominately in the spring. Additionally we compare multi-year data from Ilorin, Nigeria where desert dust from the Sahara and Sahel mix with fine mode biomass-burning aerosols. We also analyze data from two sites in the United Arab Emirates where dust mixes with urban/industrial pollution largely from petroleum industry emissions. The data are analyzed as a function of the aerosol optical depth fine mode fraction and also by Angstrom exponent, with comparisons made between sites.

  20. Response of North Pacific eastern subtropical mode water to greenhouse gas versus aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiang; Luo, Yiyong

    2016-04-01

    Mode water is a distinct water mass characterized by a near vertical homogeneous layer or low potential vorticity, and is considered essential for understanding ocean climate variability. Based on the output of GFDL CM3, this study investigates the response of eastern subtropical mode water (ESTMW) in the North Pacific to two different single forcings: greenhouse gases (GHGs) and aerosol. Under GHG forcing, ESTMW is produced on lighter isopycnal surfaces and is decreased in volume. Under aerosol forcing, in sharp contrast, it is produced on denser isopycnal surfaces and is increased in volume. The main reason for the opposite response is because surface ocean-to-atmosphere latent heat flux change over the ESTMW formation region shoals the mixed layer and thus weakens the lateral induction under GHG forcing, but deepens the mixed layer and thus strengthens the lateral induction under aerosol forcing. In addition, local wind changes are also favorable to the opposite response of ESTMW production to GHG versus aerosol.

  1. CMAQ AEROSOL MODULE DEVELOPMENT RECENT ENHANCEMENTS & FUTURE PLANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent enhancements to the CMAQ aerosol module will be reviewed briefly. These include revision of the secondary organic aerosol subroutine to improve numerical efficiency and control the growth of the accumulation mode standard deviation, revision of the nucleation subroutine t...

  2. Fine mode aerosol composition at three long-term atmospheric monitoring sites in the Amazon Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Artaxo, P.; Gerab, F.; Yamasoe, M.A.; Martins, J.V.

    1994-11-01

    The Amazon Basin tropical rain forest is a key region to study processes that are changing the composition of the global atmosphere, including the large amount of fine mode aerosol particles emitted during biomass burning that might influence the global atmosphere. Three background monitoring stations, Alta Floresta, Cuiaba, and Serra do Navio, are operating continuously measuring aerosol composition. Fine (particle diameter less than 2.0 microns) and coarse (particle diameter greater than 2.0 microns and less than 10 microns) mode aerosol particles were collected using stacked filter units. Particle-induced X-ray emission was used to measure concentrations of up to 20 elements in the fine mode: Al, Si, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr, Zr, and Pb. Soot carbon and gravimetric mass analysis were also performed. Absolute Principal Factor Analysis (APFA) has derived absolute elemental source profiles. APFA showed four aerosol particle components: soil dust (Al, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe), biomass burning (soot, fine mode mass concentration, K, Cl), natural primary biogenic particles with gas-to-particle component (K, S, Ca, Mn, Zn), and marine aerosol (Cl). Biogenic and biomass burning aerosol particles dominate the fine mode mass concentration, with the presence of K, P, S, Cl, Zn, Br, and fine mode mass concentration (FPM). At the Alta Floresta and Cuiaba sites, during the dry season, a strong component of biomass burning is observed. Inhalable particulate matter (particle diameter less than 10 microns) mass concentration up to 700 micrograms/cu m was measured. Fine particle mass concentration alone can go as high as 400 micrograms/cu m for large regions.

  3. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. PMID:27295441

  4. Combining VIS and MIR lidars to separate aerosol modes in the troposphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen Meei; Corrigan, Paul; Gross, Barry; Wu, YongHua; Moshary, Fred

    2010-04-01

    Indentifying and quantifying ambient aerosols are important for air-quality applications. Unlike trace gases where chemical spectral signatures are sharp and well defined, aerosol spectral signatures are broader and highly overlapping. Therefore separation of aerosols into different size classes requires very broad spectral coverage from the visible (VIS) to mid-infrared (MIR). In this paper, we investigate the feasibility in using a VIS (0.65μm) diode laser combined with a suitable pulsed high power Quantum Cascade Laser (4.6μm) to obtain backscatter measurements that can be used to isolate fine and coarse mode aerosol fractions. Based on realistic source characteristics, we study the information content in the spectral extinction using different combinations of extinction measurements using Least Squares Minimization applied to a wide range of aerosol multimode mixtures obtained using realistic models obtained from the Optical Properties of Aerosol and Clouds (OPAC) model. This model is especially convenient since the optical spectral extinction and backscatter spectra are evaluated over a wide wavelength range from 250nm to 40μm. In particular, we find that with the latest QCL systems, it is possible to achieve signal to noise ratio (SNR) values ~10 with suitable temporal and spatial averaging for aerosol layers ~1.5km making it suitable for PBL layer studies.

  5. Investigation of the relative fine and coarse mode aerosol loadings and properties in the Southern Arabian Gulf region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, Kathleen C.; Reid, Jeffrey S.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Ross-Langerman, Kristy; Piketh, Stuart; Cliff, Steven; Al Mandoos, Abdulla; Broccardo, Stephen; Zhao, Yongjing; Zhang, Jianglong; Perry, Kevin D.

    2016-03-01

    The aerosol chemistry environment of the Arabian Gulf region is extraordinarily complex, with high concentrations of dust aerosols from surrounding deserts mixed with anthropogenic aerosols originating from a large petrochemical industry and pockets of highly urbanized areas. Despite the high levels of aerosols experienced by this region, little research has been done to explore the chemical composition of both the anthropogenic and mineral dust portion of the aerosol burden. The intensive portion of the United Arab Emirates Unified Aerosol Experiment (UAE2), conducted during August and September 2004 was designed in part to resolve the aerosol chemistry through the use of multiple size-segregated aerosol samplers. The coarse mode mass (derived by subtracting the PM2.5 aerosol mass from the PM10 mass) is largely dust at 76% ± 7% of the total coarse mode mass, but is significantly impacted by anthropogenic pollution, primarily sulfate and nitrate. The PM2.5 aerosol mass also contains a large dust burden, at 38% ± 26%, but the anthropogenic component dominates. The total aerosol burden has significant impact not only on the atmosphere, but also the local population, as the air quality levels for both the PM10 and PM2.5 aerosol masses reached unhealthy levels for 24% of the days sampled.

  6. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  7. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  8. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-03-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  9. Evidence of a Weakly Absorbing Intermediate Mode of Aerosols in AERONET Data from Saharan and Sahelian Sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianelli, Scott M.; Lacis, Andrew A.; Carlson, Barbara E.; Hameed, Sultan

    2013-01-01

    Accurate retrievals of aerosol size distribution are necessary to estimate aerosols' impact on climate and human health. The inversions of the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) usually retrieve bimodal distributions. However, when the inversion is applied to Saharan and Sahelian dust, an additional mode of intermediate size between the coarse and fine modes is sometimes seen. This mode explains peculiarities in the behavior of the Angstrom exponent, along with the fine mode fraction retrieved using the spectral deconvolution algorithm, observed in a March 2006 dust storm. For this study, 15 AERONET sites in northern Africa and on the Atlantic are examined to determine the frequency and properties of the intermediate mode. The mode is observed most frequently at Ilorin in Nigeria. It is also observed at Capo Verde and multiple sites located within the Sahel but much less frequently at sites in the northern Sahara and the Canary Islands. The presence of the intermediate mode coincides with increases in Angstrom exponent, fine mode fraction, single-scattering albedo, and to a lesser extent percent sphericity. The Angstrom exponent decreases with increasing optical depth at most sites when the intermediate mode is present, but the fine mode fraction does not. Single-scattering albedo does not steadily decrease with fine mode fraction when the intermediate mode is present, as it does in typical mixtures of dust and biomass-burning aerosols. Continued investigation is needed to further define the intermediate mode's properties, determine why it differs from most Saharan dust, and identify its climate and health effects.

  10. Analysis of Fine-Mode Aerosol Retrieval Capabilities by Different Passive Remote Sensing Instrument Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knobelspiesse, Kirk; Cairns, Brian; Mishchenko, Michael; Chowdhary, Jacek; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Diedenhoven, Bastiaan; Martin, William; Ottaviani, Matteo; Alexandrov, Mikhail

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing of aerosol optical properties is difficult, but multi-angle, multi-spectral, polarimetric instruments have the potential to retrieve sufficient information about aerosols that they can be used to improve global climate models. However, the complexity of these instruments means that it is difficult to intuitively understand the relationship between instrument design and retrieval success. We apply a Bayesian statistical technique that relates instrument characteristics to the information contained in an observation. Using realistic simulations of fine size mode dominated spherical aerosols, we investigate three instrument designs. Two of these represent instruments currently in orbit: the Multiangle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) and the POLarization and Directionality of the Earths Reflectances (POLDER). The third is the Aerosol Polarimetry Sensor (APS), which failed to reach orbit during recent launch, but represents a viable design for future instruments. The results show fundamental differences between the three, and offer suggestions for future instrument design and the optimal retrieval strategy for current instruments. Generally, our results agree with previous validation efforts of POLDER and airborne prototypes of APS, but show that the MISR aerosol optical thickness uncertainty characterization is possibly underestimated.

  11. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  12. The Aerosol Coarse Mode: Its Importance for Light Scattering Enhancement and Columnar Optical Closure Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zieger, P.

    2015-12-01

    Ambient aerosol particles can take up water and thus change their optical properties depending on the hygroscopicity and the relative humidity (RH) of the surrounding air. Knowledge of the hygroscopicity effect is of importance for radiative forcing calculations but is also needed for the comparison or validation of remote sensing or model results with in situ measurements. Specifically, the particle light scattering depends on RH and can be described by the scattering enhancement factor f(RH), which is defined as the particle light scattering coefficient at defined RH divided by its dry value. Here, we will present insights from measurements of f(RH) across Europe (Zieger et al., 2013) and will demonstrate why the coarse mode is important when modeling or predicting f(RH) from auxiliary aerosol in-situ measurements. We will show the implications by presenting the results of a recently performed columnar optical closure study (Zieger et al., 2015). This study linked ground-based in-situ measurements (with the help of airborne aerosol size distribution measurements) to columnar aerosol optical properties derived by a co-located AERONET sun photometer. The in situ derived aerosol optical depths (AOD) were clearly correlated with the directly measured values of the AERONET sun photometer but were substantially lower compared to the directly measured values (factor of ˜ 2-3). Differences became greater for longer wavelengths. The disagreement between in situ derived and directly measured AOD was hypothesized to originate from losses of coarse and fine mode particles through dry deposition within the forest's canopy and losses in the in situ sampling lines. In addition, elevated aerosol layers from long-range transport were observed for parts of the campaign which could have explained some of the disagreement. Zieger, P., Fierz-Schmidhauser, R., Weingartner, E., and Baltensperger, U.: Effects of relative humidity on aerosol light scattering: results from different

  13. Characterization of accumulation-mode Si/SiGe triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, T. M.; Zajac, D. M.; Mi, X.; Zhang, S. S.; Petta, J. R.

    The transition from quantum dots fabricated from doped Si/SiGe quantum wells to undoped accumulation-mode structures has greatly improved the performance of few-electron quantum dots. Our accumulation-mode devices are reconfigurable and allow for operation as single, double, or triple quantum dots. In these devices, we measure typical charging energies Ec = 5 . 7 meV, orbital excited state energies as large as Eo = 2.9 meV, and valley splittings of up to Ev = 80 μeV. With the device configured as a triple quantum dot, we easily reach the (1,1,1) charge configuration. The gate architecture allows the interdot tunnel coupling to be tuned over a wide range, which is important for operation as an exchange-only spin qubit. Research sponsored by ARO Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0149.

  14. Representation of Nucleation Mode Microphysics in a Global Aerosol Model with Sectional Microphysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Y. H.; Pierce, J. R.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    In models, nucleation mode (1 nmaerosol microphysical processes or can be parameterized to obtain the growth and survival of nuclei to the model's lower size boundary. This study investigates how the representation of nucleation mode microphysics impacts aerosol number predictions in the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) aerosol microphysics model running with the GISS GCM II-prime by varying its lowest diameter boundary: 1 nm, 3 nm, and 10 nm. The model with the 1 nm boundary simulates the nucleation mode particles with fully resolved microphysical processes, while the model with the 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries uses a nucleation mode dynamics parameterization to account for the growth of nucleated particles to 10 nm and 3 nm, respectively.We also investigate the impact of the time step for aerosol microphysical processes (a 10 min versus a 1 h time step) to aerosol number predictions in the TOMAS models with explicit dynamics for the nucleation mode particles (i.e., 3 nm and 1 nm boundary). The model with the explicit microphysics (i.e., 1 nm boundary) with the 10 min time step is used as a numerical benchmark simulation to estimate biases caused by varying the lower size cutoff and the time step. Different representations of the nucleation mode have a significant effect on the formation rate of particles larger than 10 nm from nucleated particles (J10) and the burdens and lifetimes of ultrafinemode (10 nm=Dp =70 nm) particles but have less impact on the burdens and lifetimes of CCN-sized particles. The models using parameterized microphysics (i.e., 10 nm and 3 nm boundaries) result in higher J10 and shorter coagulation lifetimes of ultrafine-mode particles than the model with explicit dynamics (i.e., 1 nm boundary). The spatial distributions of CN10 (Dp =10 nm) and CCN(0.2 %) (i.e., CCN concentrations at 0.2%supersaturation) are moderately affected, especially CN10 predictions above 700 h

  15. Mesoscale and synoptic scale transport of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, G.T.

    1980-01-01

    An overview is presented of mesoscale and synoptic-scale (macroscale) aerosol transport as observed in recent air pollution field studies. Examples of mesoscale transport systems are discussed, including urban plumes, sea breezes, the mountain-valley wind cycle, and the urban-heat-island circulation. The synoptic-scale systems considered are migrating high- and low-pressure systems. Documented cases are reviewed of aerosol transport in the various mesoscale systems, aerosol accumulation and transport in high-pressure systems, and acid precipitation in low-pressure systems. The characteristics of the transported aerosols are identified, along with the chemical species that occur primarily in aerosols in the accumulation mode (particle diameters of 0.1-3 microns). It is shown that aerosol particles in the accumulation mode are the most important in terms of synoptic-scale and mesoscale transport and that such particles are primarily responsible for visible haze.

  16. Simplifying aerosol size distributions modes simultaneously detected at four monitoring sites during SAPUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brines, M.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Querol, X.

    2013-10-01

    The analysis of aerosol size distributions is a useful tool for understanding the sources and the processes influencing particle number concentrations (N) in urban areas. Hence, during the one month SAPUSS campaign (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies, EU Marie Curie Action) in autumn 2010 in Barcelona (Spain), four SMPS (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizers) were simultaneously deployed at four monitoring sites: a road side (RSsite), an urban background site located in the city (UBsite), an urban background located in the nearby hills of the city (Torre Collserola, TCsite) and a regional background site located about fifty km from the Barcelona urban areas (RBsite). The spatial distribution of sites allows study of the aerosol temporal variability as well as the spatial distribution, progressively moving away from urban aerosol sources. In order to interpret the datasets collected, a k-means cluster analysis was performed on the combined SMPS datasets. This resulted in nine clusters describing all aerosol size distributions from the four sites. In summary there were three main categories (with three clusters in each category): "Traffic" (Traffic 1 "Tclus1" - 8%, Traffic 2 "Tclus2" - 13%, Traffic 3, "Tclus3" - 9%), "Background Pollution" (Urban Background 1 "UBclus1" - 21%, Regional Background 1, "RBclus1" - 15%, Regional Background 2, "RBclus2" - 18%) and "Special cases" (Nucleation "NUclus" - 5%, Regional Nitrate, "NITclus" - 6%, and Mix "MIXclus" - 5%). As expected, the frequency of traffic clusters (Tclus1-3) followed the order RSsite, UBsite, TCsite, and RBsite. These showed typical traffic modes mainly distributed at 20-40 nm. The urban background sites (UBsite and TCsite) reflected also as expected urban background number concentrations (average values, N = 2.4×104 cm-3 relative to 1.2×105 cm-3 seen at RSsite). The cluster describing the urban background pollution (UBclus1) could be used to monitor the sea breeze circulation towards the

  17. Modes in the size distributions and neutralization extent of fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols observed at Canadian rural locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, X. H.; Zhang, L.

    2012-02-01

    Among the 192 samples of size-segregated water-soluble inorganic ions collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at eight rural locations in Canada, ten samples were identified to have gone through fog processing. The supermicron particle modes of ammonium salt aerosols were found to be the fingerprint of fog processed aerosols. However, the patterns and the sizes of the supermicron modes varied with ambient temperature (T) and particle acidity and also differed between inland and coastal locations. Under T > 0 °C condition, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were completely neutralized and had a dominant mode at 1-2 μm and a minor mode at 5-10 μm if particles were in neutral condition, and ammonium sulfate was incompletely neutralized and only had a 1-2 μm mode if particles were in acidic conditions. Under T < 0 °C at the coastal site, fog-processed aerosols exhibited a bi-modal size distribution with a dominant mode of incompletely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at about 3 μm and a minor mode of completely-neutralized ammonium sulfate at 8-9 μm. Under T < 0 °C condition at the inland sites, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols were sometimes completely neutralized and sometimes incompletely neutralized, and the size of the supermicron mode was in the range from 1 to 5 μm. Overall, fog-processed ammonium salt aerosols under T < 0 °C condition were generally distributed at larger size (e.g., 2-5 μm) than those under T > 0 °C condition (e.g., 1-2 μm).

  18. Diversity of Aerosol Optical Thickness in analysis and forecasting modes of the models from the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction Multi-Model Ensemble (ICAP-MME)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.

    2014-12-01

    With the emergence of global aerosol models intended for operational forecasting use at global numerical weather prediction (NWP) centers, the International Cooperative for Aerosol Prediction (ICAP) was founded in 2010. One of the objectives of ICAP is to develop a global multi-model aerosol forecasting ensemble (ICAP-MME) for operational and basic research use. To increase the accuracy of aerosol forecasts, several of the NWP centers have incorporated assimilation of satellite and/or ground-based observations of aerosol optical thickness (AOT), the most widely available and evaluated aerosol parameter. The ICAP models are independent in their underlying meteorology, as well as aerosol sources, sinks, microphysics and chemistry. The diversity of aerosol representations in the aerosol forecast models results in differences in AOT. In addition, for models that include AOT assimilations, the diversity in assimilation methodology, the observed AOT data to be assimilated, and the pre-assimilation treatments of input data also leads to differences in the AOT analyses. Drawing from members of the ICAP latest generation of quasi-operational aerosol models, five day AOT forecasts and AOT analyses are analyzed from four multi-species models which have AOT assimilations: ECMWF, JMA, NASA GSFC/GMAO, and NRL/FNMOC. For forecast mode only, we also include the dust products from NOAA NGAC, BSC, and UK Met office in our analysis leading to a total of 7 dust models. AOT at 550nm from all models are validated at regionally representative Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and a data assimilation grade multi-satellite aerosol analysis. These analyses are also compared with the recently developed AOT reanalysis at NRL. Here we will present the basic verification characteristics of the ICAP-MME, and identify regions of diversity between model analyses and forecasts. Notably, as in many other ensemble environments, the multi model ensemble consensus mean outperforms all of the

  19. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, O. V. Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  20. Rapid scene categorization: role of spatial frequency order, accumulation mode and luminance contrast.

    PubMed

    Kauffmann, Louise; Chauvin, Alan; Guyader, Nathalie; Peyrin, Carole

    2015-02-01

    Visual analysis follows a default, predominantly coarse-to-fine processing sequence. Low spatial frequencies (LSF) are processed more rapidly than high spatial frequencies (HSF), allowing an initial coarse parsing of visual input, prior to analysis of finer information. Our study investigated the influence of spatial frequency processing order, accumulation mode (i.e. how spatial frequency information is received as an input by the visual system, throughout processing), and differences in luminance contrast between spatial frequencies on rapid scene categorization. In Experiment 1, we used sequences composed of six filtered scenes, assembled from LSF to HSF (coarse-to-fine) or from HSF to LSF (fine-to-coarse) to test the effects of spatial frequency order. Spatial frequencies were either successive or additive within sequences to test the effects of spatial frequency accumulation mode. Results showed that participants categorized coarse-to-fine sequences more rapidly than fine-to-coarse sequences, irrespective of spatial frequency accumulation in the sequences. In Experiment 2, we investigated the extent to which differences in luminance contrast rather than in spatial frequency account for the advantage of coarse-to-fine over fine-to-coarse processing. Results showed that both spatial frequencies and luminance contrast account for a predominant coarse-to-fine processing, but that the coarse-to-fine advantage stems mainly from differences in spatial frequencies. Our study cautions against the use of contrast normalization in studies investigating spatial frequency processing. We argue that this type of experimental manipulation can impair the intrinsic properties of a visual stimulus. As the visual system relies on these to enable recognition, bias may be induced in strategies of visual analysis. PMID:25499838

  1. Variability of Marine Aerosol Fine-Mode Fraction and Estimates of Anthropogenic Aerosol Component Over Cloud-Free Oceans from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yu, Hongbin; Chin, Mian; Remer, Lorraine A.; Kleidman, Richard G.; Bellouin, Nicolas; Bian, Huisheng; Diehl, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    In this study, we examine seasonal and geographical variability of marine aerosol fine-mode fraction (f(sub m)) and its impacts on deriving the anthropogenic component of aerosol optical depth (tau(sub a)) and direct radiative forcing from multispectral satellite measurements. A proxy of f(sub m), empirically derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Collection 5 data, shows large seasonal and geographical variations that are consistent with the Goddard Chemistry Aerosol Radiation Transport (GOCART) and Global Modeling Initiative (GMI) model simulations. The so-derived seasonally and spatially varying f(sub m) is then implemented into a method of estimating tau(sub a) and direct radiative forcing from the MODIS measurements. It is found that the use of a constant value for fm as in previous studies would have overestimated Ta by about 20% over global ocean, with the overestimation up to 45% in some regions and seasons. The 7-year (2001-2007) global ocean average tau(sub a) is 0.035, with yearly average ranging from 0.031 to 0.039. Future improvement in measurements is needed to better separate anthropogenic aerosol from natural ones and to narrow down the wide range of aerosol direct radiative forcing.

  2. Laboratory Testing and Calibration of the Nuclei-Mode Aerosol Size Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.

    1999-01-01

    This grant was awarded to complete testing and calibration of a new instrument, the nuclei-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), following its use in the WB-57F Aerosol Measurement (WAM) campaign in early 1998. The N-MASS measures the size distribution of particles in the 4-60 nm diameter range with 1-Hz response at typical free tropospheric conditions. Specific tasks to have been completed under the auspices of this award were: 1) to experimentally determine the instrumental sampling efficiency; 2) to determine the effects of varying temperatures and flows on N-MASS performance; and 3) to calibrate the N-MASS at typical flight conditions as operated in WAM. The work outlined above has been completed, and a journal manuscript based on this work and that describes the performance of the N-MASS is in preparation. Following a brief description of the principles of operation of the instrument, the major findings of this study are described.

  3. AEROSOL DEPOSITION EFFICIENCIES AND UPSTREAM RELEASE POSITIONS FOR DIFFERENT INHALATION MODES IN AN UPPER BRONCHIAL AIRWAY MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aerosol Deposition Efficiencies and Upstream Release Positions for Different Inhalation Modes in an Upper Bronchial Airway Model

    Zhe Zhang, Clement Kleinstreuer, and Chong S. Kim

    Center for Environmental Medicine and Lung Biology, University of North Carolina at Ch...

  4. Simplifying aerosol size distributions modes simultaneously detected at four monitoring sites during SAPUSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brines, M.; Dall'Osto, M.; Beddows, D. C. S.; Harrison, R. M.; Querol, X.

    2014-03-01

    The analysis of aerosol size distributions is a useful tool for understanding the sources and the processes influencing particle number concentrations (N) in urban areas. Hence, during the one-month SAPUSS campaign (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies, EU Marie Curie Action) in autumn 2010 in Barcelona (Spain), four SMPSs (Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer) were simultaneously deployed at four monitoring sites: a road side (RSsite), an urban background site located in the city (UBsite), an urban background site located in the nearby hills of the city (Torre Collserola, TCsite) and a regional background site located about 50 km from the Barcelona urban areas (RBsite). The spatial distribution of sites allows study of the aerosol temporal variability as well as the spatial distribution, progressively moving away from urban aerosol sources. In order to interpret the data sets collected, a k-means cluster analysis was performed on the combined SMPS data sets. This resulted in nine clusters describing all aerosol size distributions from the four sites. In summary there were three main categories (with three clusters in each category): "Traffic" (Traffic 1, "Tclus_1" - 8%; Traffic 2, "Tclus_2" - 13%; and Traffic 3, "Tclus_3" - 9%) "Background Pollution" (Urban Background 1, "UBclus_1" - 21%; Regional Background 1, "RBclus_1" - 15%; and Regional Background 2, "RBclus_2" - 18%) and "Special Cases" (Nucleation, "NUclus" - 5%; Regional Nitrate, "NITclus" - 6%; and Mix, "MIXclus" - 5%). As expected, the frequency of traffic clusters (Tclus_1-3) followed the order RSsite, UBsite, TCsite, and RBsite. These showed typical traffic modes mainly distributed at 20-40 nm. The urban background sites (UBsite and TCsite) reflected also as expected urban background number concentrations (average values, N = 1.0 × 104 cm-3 and N = 5.5 × 103 cm-3, respectively, relative to 1.3 × 104 cm-3 seen at RSsite). The cluster describing the urban background pollution (UBclus_1

  5. Analysis of Fine and Coarse mode Aerosol Distributions from AERONET's mini-DRAGON Set-up at Singapore 2012

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S. V.; Chew, B. N.; Muller, A.; Liew, S.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol type and particle size regime. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from industrial and urban areas. However, depending on the time of the year (July-October), there can be a strong bio-mass component originated from uncontrolled forest/plantation fires from the neighboring land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. Unlike urban/fossil fuel aerosols, smoke or bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. Trans-boundary smoke episodes has become an annual phenomenon in this region. Severe episodes were recorded in 1997 and 2006 and other minor episodes happened during 2002, 2004, 2010 and more recently on 2013. On August-September 2012, as part of CRISP participation on the August-September ground campaign of the Southeast Asia Composition, Cloud Climate Coupling Regional Study (SEAC4RS), a Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) set of six CIMEL CE-318A automatic Sun-tracking photometers have been deployed at sites located at North (Yishun ITE), East (Temasek Poly), West (NUS and Pandan Reservoir), Central (NEA) and South (St. John's island) of Singapore. In order to fully discriminate bio-mass burning events over other local sources, we perform a spectral discrimination of fine/coarse mode particle regime to all DRAGON sites; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponent are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set. Spatio-temporal relationship between sites are also investigated.

  6. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  7. Hybrid architecture for shallow accumulation mode AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with epitaxial gates

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Hamilton, A. R.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ritzmann, J.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-01-05

    Accumulation mode devices with epitaxially grown gates have excellent electrical stability due to the absence of dopant impurities and surface states. We overcome typical fabrication issues associated with epitaxially gated structures (e.g., gate leakage and high contact resistance) by using separate gates to control the electron densities in the Ohmic and Hall bar regions. This hybrid gate architecture opens up a way to make ultrastable nanoscale devices where the separation between the surface gates and the 2D electron gas is small. In this work, we demonstrate that the hybrid devices made from the same wafer have reproducible electrical characteristics, with identical mobility and density traces over a large range of 2D densities. In addition, thermal cycling does not influence the measured electrical characteristics. As a demonstration of concept, we have fabricated a hybrid single-electron transistor on a shallow (50 nm) AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure that shows clear Coulomb blockade oscillations in the low temperature conductance.

  8. 238Pu: accumulation, tissue distribution, and excretion in Mayak workers after exposure to plutonium aerosols.

    PubMed

    Suslova, Klara G; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Khokhryakov, Viktor V; Miller, Scott C

    2012-03-01

    The alpha spectrometry measurements of specific activity of 238Pu and 239Pu in urine from bioassay examinations of 1,013 workers employed at the radiochemical and plutonium production facilities of the Mayak Production Association and in autopsy specimens of lung, liver, and skeleton from 85 former nuclear workers who died between 1974-2009, are summarized.The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in the body and excreta has not changed with time in workers involved in production of weapons-grade plutonium production (e.g., the plutonium production facility and the former radiochemical facility). The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in individuals exposed to plutonium isotopes at the newer Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant ranged from 0.13% up to 27.5% based on the autopsy data. No statistically significant differences between 238Pu and 239Pu in distribution by the main organs of plutonium deposition were found in the Mayak workers. Based on the bioassay data,the fraction of 238Pu activity in urine is on average 38-69% of the total activity of 238Pu and 239Pu, which correlates with the isotopic composition in workplace air sampled at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant. In view of the higher specific activity of 238Pu, the contribution of 238Pu to the total internal dose, particularly in the skeleton and liver, might be expected to continue to increase, and continued surveillance is recommended. PMID:22420016

  9. Silica uptake by Spartina—evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a critical role in plant functional ecology, protecting plants from multiple environmental stressors. While all terrestrial plants contain some Si, wetland grasses are frequently found to have the highest concentrations, although the mechanisms driving Si accumulation in wetland grasses remain in large part uncertain. For example, active Si accumulation is often assumed to be responsible for elevated Si concentrations found in wetland grasses. However, life stage and differences in Si availability in the surrounding environment also appear to be important variables controlling the Si concentrations of wetland grasses. Here we used original data from five North American salt marshes, as well as all known published literature values, to examine the primary drivers of Si accumulation in Spartina, a genus of prolific salt marsh grasses found worldwide. We found evidence of multiple modes of Si accumulation in Spartina, with passive accumulation observed in non-degraded marshes where Spartina was native, while rejective accumulation was found in regions where Spartina was invasive. Evidence of active accumulation was found in only one marsh where Spartina was native, but was also subjected to nutrient over-enrichment. We developed a conceptual model which hypothesizes that the mode of Si uptake by Spartina is dependent on local environmental factors and genetic origin, supporting the idea that plant species should be placed along a spectrum of Si accumulation. We hypothesize that Spartina exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic plasticity with regard to Si accumulation, allowing these plants to respond to changes in marsh condition. These results provide new insight regarding how salt marsh ecosystems regulate Si exchange at the land-sea interface. PMID:24904599

  10. Mode shift of an inhaled aerosol bolus is correlated with flow sequencing in the human lung

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mills, Christopher N.; Darquenne, Chantal; Prisk, G. Kim; West, J. B. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    We studied the effects on aerosol bolus inhalations of small changes in convective inhomogeneity induced by posture change from upright to supine in nine normal subjects. Vital capacity single-breath nitrogen washout tests were used to determine ventilatory inhomogeneity change between postures. Relative to upright, supine phase III slope was increased 33 +/- 11% (mean +/- SE, P < 0.05) and phase IV height increased 25 +/- 11% (P < 0.05), consistent with an increase in convective inhomogeneity likely due to increases in flow sequencing. Subjects also performed 0.5-microm-particle bolus inhalations to penetration volumes (V(p)) between 150 and 1,200 ml during a standardized inhalation from residual volume to 1 liter above upright functional residual capacity. Mode shift (MS) in supine posture was more mouthward than upright at all V(p), changing by 11.6 ml at V(p) = 150 ml (P < 0.05) and 38.4 ml at V(p) = 1,200 ml (P < 0.05). MS and phase III slope changes correlated positively at deeper V(p). Deposition did not change at any V(p), suggesting that deposition did not cause the MS change. We propose that the MS change results from increased sequencing in supine vs. upright posture.

  11. Exploration of Whispering Gallery Modes in an Optically Trapped Aerosol Droplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludvigsen, Angela; McCann, Lowell

    2015-03-01

    Optical traps use a laser beam to catch and hold small transparent objects. Past observations of optically trapped aqueous aerosol droplets have shown that the droplet moves between two or more stable positions depending upon the power of the trapping laser. It is hypothesized that this movement coincides with a resonance of the light with the droplet called a Whispering Gallery Mode. When the resonance occurs, additional forces act on the droplet. To investigate this behavior, Raman scattered light from the droplet is measured using a spectrometer while simultaneously recording the droplet's position. The Raman spectrum exhibits a series of peaks that appear due to the very spherical shape of the droplet called Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. The location and spacing of the peaks are related to the diameter and the optical properties of the droplet. In order to achieve an accurate determination of the radius from this spectrum, the magnitude of the electric and magnetic fields of the light scattered off the droplet are calculated. This allows for a precise measurement of the droplet's radius at the moment that the droplet moves between stable positions.

  12. Chemometric analysis of multi-sensor hyperspectral images of coarse mode aerosol particles for the image-based investigation on aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A.; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Held, Andreas; Lohninger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Multi-sensor hyperspectral imaging is a novel technique, which allows the determination of composition, chemical structure and pure components of laterally resolved samples by chemometric analysis of different hyperspectral datasets. These hyperspectral datasets are obtained by different imaging methods, analysing the same sample spot and superimposing the hyperspectral data to create a single multi-sensor dataset. Within this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images were obtained from size-segregated aerosol particles, sampled above Western Australian salt lakes. The particles were collected on aluminum foils inside a 2350 L Teflon chamber using a Sioutas impactor, sampling aerosol particles of sizes between 250 nm and 10 µm. The complex composition of the coarse-mode particles can be linked to primary emissions of inorganic species as well as to oxidized volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions. The oxidation products of VOC emissions are supposed to form an ultra-fine nucleation mode, which was observed during several field campaigns between 2006 and 2013. The aluminum foils were analysed using chemical imaging and electron microscopy. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the foils at a resolution of about 1 µm. The same area was analysed using a Quanta FEI 200 electron microscope (about 250 nm resolution). In addition to the high-resolution image, the elemental composition could be investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The obtained hyperspectral images were combined into a multi-sensor dataset using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs, www.imagelab.at). After pre-processing of the images, the multi-sensor hyperspectral dataset was analysed using several chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and other multivariate methods. Vertex

  13. Reconciliation of coarse mode sea-salt aerosol particle size measurements and parameterizations at a subtropical ocean receptor site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, Jeffrey S.; Brooks, Barbara; Crahan, Katie K.; Hegg, Dean A.; Eck, Thomas F.; O'Neill, Norm; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Anderson, Kenneth D.

    2006-01-01

    In August/September of 2001, the R/P FLIP and CIRPAS Twin Otter research aircraft were deployed to the eastern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, as part of the Rough Evaporation Duct (RED) experiment. Goals included the study of the air/sea exchange, turbulence, and sea-salt aerosol particle characteristics at the subtropical marine Pacific site. Here we examine coarse mode particle size distributions. Similar to what has been shown for airborne dust, optical particle counters such as the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe (FSSP), Classical Scattering Aerosol Spectrometer Probe (CSASP) and the Cloud Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) within the Cloud Aerosol and Precipitation Spectrometer (CAPS) instrument systematically overestimate particle size, and consequently volume, for sea salt particles. Ground-based aerodynamic particle sizers (APS) and AERONET inversions yield much more reasonable results. A wing pod mounted APS gave mixed results and may not be appropriate for marine boundary layer studies. Relating our findings to previous studies does much to explain the bulk of the differences in the literature and leads us to conclude that the largest uncertainty facing flux and airborne cloud/aerosol interaction studies is likely due to the instrumentation itself. To our knowledge, there does not exist an in situ aircraft system that adequately measures the ambient volume distribution of coarse mode sea salt particles. Most empirically based sea salt flux parameterizations can trace their heritage to a clearly biased measurement technique. The current "state of the art" in this field prevents any true form of clear sky radiative "closure" for clean marine environments.

  14. The Influence of Free Tropospheric Aerosol on the Boundary Layer Aerosol Budget in the Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igel, A. L.; Ekman, A.; Leck, C.; Savre, J.; Tjernstrom, M. K. H.; Sedlar, J.

    2015-12-01

    Large-eddy simulations of the summertime high Arctic boundary layer with mixed-phase stratus clouds have been performed based on observations taken during the ASCOS[1] campaign. The model includes a prognostic aerosol scheme where accumulation mode aerosol particles can be activated into cloud droplets, impaction scavenged, and regenerated upon cloud droplet evaporation or ice crystal sublimation. Two sets of simulations were performed, one with a constant aerosol concentration in the boundary layer and free troposphere, and one with enhanced free tropospheric concentrations based on observed aerosol concentration profiles. We find that the rate of aerosol depletion in the boundary layer is an order of magnitude larger than the median surface emission rates measured over the open water, indicating that for the present case the surface emissions are unlikely to compensate for aerosol loss due to interactions with clouds. In this case study, when the enhanced free troposphere aerosol concentrations are included, the entrainment of these particles into the boundary layer is able to offset the loss of particles from aerosol-cloud interactions. These results suggest that enhanced levels of accumulation mode particles, if located at the cloud top, may be an important source of accumulation mode particles in the Arctic boundary layer. [1] The Arctic Summer Cloud Ocean Study (ASCOS) was conducted in 2008 with the overall aim to improve our understanding of stratus cloud formation and possible climate feedback processes over the central Arctic Ocean. Tjernström et al., 2014 give more details.

  15. Fog and Cloud Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M. A.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, G. T.; Krotkov, N. A.; Carn, S. A.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A.; Schafer, J. S.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2011-01-01

    Large fine mode (sub-micron radius) dominated aerosols in size distributions retrieved from AERONET have been observed after fog or low-altitude cloud dissipation events. These column-integrated size distributions have been obtained at several sites in many regions of the world, typically after evaporation of low altitude cloud such as stratocumulus or fog. Retrievals with cloud processed aerosol are sometimes bimodal in the accumulation mode with the larger size mode often approx.0.4 - 0.5 microns radius (volume distribution); the smaller mode typically approx.0.12 to aprrox.0.20 microns may be interstitial aerosol that were not modified by incorporation in droplets and/or aerosol that are less hygroscopic in nature. Bimodal accumulation mode size distributions have often been observed from in situ measurements of aerosols that have interacted with clouds, and AERONET size distribution retrievals made after dissipation of cloud or fog are in good agreement with particle sizes measured by in situ techniques for cloud-processed aerosols. Aerosols of this type and large size range (in lower concentrations) may also be formed by cloud processing in partly cloudy conditions and may contribute to the shoulder of larger size particles in the accumulation mode retrievals, especially in regions where sulfate and other soluble aerosol are a significant component of the total aerosol composition. Observed trends of increasing aerosol optical depth (AOD) as fine mode radius increased suggests higher AOD in the near cloud environment and therefore greater aerosol direct radiative forcing than typically obtained from remote sensing, due to bias towards sampling at low cloud fraction.

  16. Suppression of 1/f Noise in Accumulation Mode FD-SOI MOSFETs on Si(100) and (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Gaubert, P.; Teramoto, A.; Tye, C.; Sugawa, S.; Ohmi, T.

    2009-04-23

    In this paper, a new approach to reduce the 1/f noise levels in the MOSFETs on varied silicon orientations, such as Si(100) and (110) surfaces, has been carried out. We focus on the Accumulation-mode (AM) FD-SOI device structure and demonstrate that the 1/f noise levels in this AM FD-SOI MOSFETs are obviously reduced on both the Si(100) and (110) surfaces.

  17. Airborne Coarse Mode Aerosol Measurements with the CAS-DPOL Instrument: Effects of Particle Shape and Refractive Index and Implications for Radiative Transfer Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Spanu, A.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.

    2015-12-01

    Each year huge amounts of mineral dust are mobilized in deserts and arid regions of the world and transported over large distances forming thick elevated aerosol layers with a substantial fraction of coarse mode particles. Optical properties of mineral dust, including the absorptive refractive index of some components, cause a significant effect on the atmospheric radiative energy balance from optical to infrared wavelengths. The aerosol characteristics, in particular its coarse mode size distribution, are modified during long-range transport by aging and deposition processes. This also affects the aerosol optical properties and therefore the effect on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties are essential to characterize those effects in order to be implemented in global climate models in parametrized form. However, in-situ measurements of airborne coarse mode aerosols such as mineral dust and volcanic ash are challenging and the measurements are usually affected by substantial uncertainties. In this work we use airborne measurements of mineral dust from our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL during SALTRACE 2013 to discuss the analysis of such data. We cover the effects of varying refractive index and particle shapes and develop recommendations for the configuration of the CAS-DPOL for aerosol studies. We also present an inversion method to derive coarse mode size distributions from light-scattering probes for mixtures of non-spherical, absorbing aerosols. The size distributions retrieved from the in-situ measurements are then validated using an independent analysis with a combination of sun-photometer and lidar data. We apply these methods to investigate the Saharan mineral dust particle size distributions measured on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and discuss the influence of aerosol aging on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. With this example we also assess how the uncertainties

  18. Inhalation Exposure and Lung Dose Analysis of Multi-mode Complex Ambient Aerosols

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Ambient aerosols are complex mixture of particles with different size, shape and chemical composition. Although they are known to cause health hazard, it is not fully understood about causal mechanisms and specific attributes of particles causing the effects. Internal ...

  19. [Characteristics of Number Concentration Size Distributions of Aerosols Under Processes in Beijing].

    PubMed

    Su, Jie; Zhao, Pu-sheng; Chen, Yi-na

    2016-04-15

    The aerosol number concentration size distributions were measured by a Wide-Range Particle Spectrometer (WPS-1000XP) at an urban site of Beijing from 2012 to 2014; and the characteristics of the size distributions in different seasons and weather conditions were discussed. The results showed that the daily average number concentration of Aitken mode aerosols was highest in the spring and lowest in the autumn; the daily average number concentration of accumulation mode aerosols was bigher in the spring and winter, while lowest in summer; and the average concentration of coarse mode was highest during the winter. The Aitken mode particles had the most significant diurnal variations resulted from the traffic sources and the summer photochemical reactions. In the spring, autumn and winter, the number concentrations of accumulation mode of the nighttime was higher than that of the daytime. The coarse mode particles did not have obvious diurnal variation. During the heavy pollution process, the accumulation mode aerosols played a decisive role in PM₂.₅ concentrations and was usually removed by the north wind. The precipitation could effectively eliminate the coarse mode particles, but it bad no obvious effect on the accumulation mode particles under small speed wind and zero speed wind. During the dust process, the concentrations of coarse mode particles increased significantly, while the accumulation mode aerosol concentration was obviously decreased. PMID:27548939

  20. Rapid and gradual modes of aerosol trace metal dissolution in seawater

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Katherine R. M.; Chien, Chia-Te; Post, Anton F.; Saito, Mak A.; Paytan, Adina

    2015-01-01

    Atmospheric deposition is a major source of trace metals in marine surface waters and supplies vital micronutrients to phytoplankton, yet measured aerosol trace metal solubility values are operationally defined, and there are relatively few multi-element studies on aerosol-metal solubility in seawater. Here we measure the solubility of aluminum (Al), cadmium (Cd), cobalt (Co), copper (Cu), iron (Fe), manganese (Mn), nickel (Ni), lead (Pb), and zinc (Zn) from natural aerosol samples in seawater over a 7 days period to (1) evaluate the role of extraction time in trace metal dissolution behavior and (2) explore how the individual dissolution patterns could influence biota. Dissolution behavior occurs over a continuum ranging from rapid dissolution, in which the majority of soluble metal dissolved immediately upon seawater exposure (Cd and Co in our samples), to gradual dissolution, where metals dissolved slowly over time (Zn, Mn, Cu, and Al in our samples). Additionally, dissolution affected by interactions with particles was observed in which a decline in soluble metal concentration over time occurred (Fe and Pb in our samples). Natural variability in aerosol chemistry between samples can cause metals to display different dissolution kinetics in different samples, and this was particularly evident for Ni, for which samples showed a broad range of dissolution rates. The elemental molar ratio of metals in the bulk aerosols was 23,189Fe: 22,651Al: 445Mn: 348Zn: 71Cu: 48Ni: 23Pb: 9Co: 1Cd, whereas the seawater soluble molar ratio after 7 days of leaching was 11Fe: 620Al: 205Mn: 240Zn: 20Cu: 14Ni: 9Pb: 2Co: 1Cd. The different kinetics and ratios of aerosol metal dissolution have implications for phytoplankton nutrition, and highlight the need for unified extraction protocols that simulate aerosol metal dissolution in the surface ocean. PMID:25653645

  1. Verification and application of the extended spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA+) methodology to estimate aerosol fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients in the marine boundary layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaku, K. C.; Reid, J. S.; O'Neill, N. T.; Quinn, P. K.; Coffman, D. J.; Eck, T. F.

    2014-10-01

    The spectral deconvolution algorithm (SDA) and SDA+ (extended SDA) methodologies can be employed to separate the fine and coarse mode extinction coefficients from measured total aerosol extinction coefficients, but their common use is currently limited to AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) aerosol optical depth (AOD). Here we provide the verification of the SDA+ methodology on a non-AERONET aerosol product, by applying it to fine and coarse mode nephelometer and particle soot absorption photometer (PSAP) data sets collected in the marine boundary layer. Using data sets collected on research vessels by NOAA-PMEL(National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration - Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory), we demonstrate that with accurate input, SDA+ is able to predict the fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficient partition in global data sets representing a range of aerosol regimes. However, in low-extinction regimes commonly found in the clean marine boundary layer, SDA+ output accuracy is sensitive to instrumental calibration errors. This work was extended to the calculation of coarse and fine mode scattering coefficients with similar success. This effort not only verifies the application of the SDA+ method to in situ data, but by inference verifies the method as a whole for a host of applications, including AERONET. Study results open the door to much more extensive use of nephelometers and PSAPs, with the ability to calculate fine and coarse mode scattering and extinction coefficients in field campaigns that do not have the resources to explicitly measure these values.

  2. The secondary formation of inorganic aerosols in the droplet mode through heterogeneous aqueous reactions under haze conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xinfeng; Wang, Wenxing; Yang, Lingxiao; Gao, Xiaomei; Nie, Wei; Yu, Yangchun; Xu, Pengju; Zhou, Yang; Wang, Zhe

    2012-12-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosols play important roles in visibility reduction and in regional haze pollution. To investigate the characteristics of size distributions of secondary sulfates and nitrates as well as their formation mechanisms under hazes, size-resolved aerosols were collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) at an urban site in Jinan, China, in all four seasons (December 2007-October 2008). In haze episodes, the secondary sulfates and nitrates primarily formed in fine particles, with elevated concentration peaks in the droplet mode (0.56-1.8 μm). The fine sulfates and nitrates were completely neutralized by ammonia and existed in the forms of (NH4)2SO4 and NH4NO3, respectively. The secondary formation of sulfates, nitrates and ammonium (SNA) was found to be related to heterogeneous aqueous reactions and was largely dependent on the ambient humidity. With rising relative humidity, the droplet-mode SNA concentration, the ratio of droplet-mode SNA to the total SNA, the fraction of SNA in droplet-mode particles and the mass median aerodynamic diameter of SNA presented an exponential, logarithmic or linear increase. Two heavily polluted multi-day haze episodes in winter and summer were analyzed in detail. The secondary sulfates were linked to heterogeneous uptake of SO2 followed by the subsequent catalytic oxidation by oxygen together with iron and manganese in winter. The fine nitrate formation was strongly associated with the thermodynamic equilibrium among NH4NO3, gaseous HNO3 and NH3, and showed different temperature-dependences in winter and summer.

  3. A pathway analysis of global aerosol processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schutgens, Nick; Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Although budgets for aerosol emission and deposition (macrophysical fluxes) have been studied before, much less is known about the budgets of processes e.g. nucleation, coagulation and condensation. A better understanding of their relative importance would improve our understanding of the aerosol system and help model development and evaluation. Aerosols are not only emitted from and deposited to the Earth's surface but are modified during their transport. The processes for these modifications include nucleation of H2SO4 gas into new aerosol, coagulation with other aerosol and condensation of H2SO4 unto existing aerosol. As a result of these processes, aerosol grow in size and change their chemical composition, often becoming hydrophilic where they were hydrophobic before. This affects their characteristics for various deposition processes (sedimentation, dry or wet deposition) as well as their radiative properties and hence climate forcing by aerosol. We present a complete budget of all aerosol processes in the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM including the M7 microphysics. This model treats aerosol as 7 distinct but interacting two-moment modes of mixed species (soot, organic carbons, sulfate, sea salt and dust). We will show both global budgets as well as regional variations in dominant processes. Some of our conclusions are: condensation of H2SO4 gas onto pre-existing particles is an important process, dominating the growth of small particles in the nucleation mode to the Aitken mode and the ageing of hydrophobic matter. Together with in-cloud production of H2SO4, it significantly contributes to (and often dominates) the mass burden (and hence composition) of the hydrophilic Aitken and accumulation mode particles. Particle growth itself is the leading source of number densities in the hydrophilic Aitken and accumulation modes, with their hydrophobic counterparts contributing (even locally) relatively little. However, the coarse mode is mostly decoupled from the

  4. Modes of reproduction and the accumulation of deleterious mutations with multiplicative fitness effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haccou, Patsy; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Mutational load depends not only on the number and nature of mutations but also on the reproductive mode. Traditionally, only a few specific reproductive modes are considered in the search of explanations for the maintenance of sex. There are, however, many alternatives. Including these may give radically different conclusions. The theory on deterministic deleterious mutations states that in large populations segregation and recombination may lead to a lower load of deleterious mutations, provided that there are synergistic interactions. Empirical research suggests that effects of deleterious mutations are often multiplicative. Such situations have largely been ignored in the literature, since recombination and segregation have no effect on mutation load in the absence of epistasis. However, this is true only when clonal reproduction and sexual reproduction with equal male and female ploidy are considered. We consider several alternative reproductive modes that are all known to occur in insects: arrhenotoky, paternal genome elimination, apomictic thelytoky, and automictic thelytoky with different cytological mechanisms to restore diploidy. We give a method that is based on probability-generating functions, which provides analytical and numerical results on the distributions of deleterious mutations. Using this, we show that segregation and recombination do make a difference. Furthermore, we prove that a modified form of Haldane's principle holds more generally for thelytokous reproduction. We discuss the implications of our results for evolutionary transitions between different reproductive modes in insects. Since the strength of Muller's ratchet is reduced considerably for several forms of automictic thelytoky, many of our results are expected to be also valid for initially small populations. PMID:15020489

  5. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, Kirsty; Carslaw, Kenneth; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne; Adams, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth's energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect (AIE) using analytic representations of cloud and aerosol distributions and processes. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of AIEs that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates by the simple model are sensitive to preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, preindustrial accumulation mode radius, width of the accumulation mode, size of primary particles, cloud thickness, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Estimates of present-day AIEs as low as 5 W/sq m and as high as 0.3 W/sq m are obtained for plausible sets of parameter values. Estimates are surprisingly linear in emissions. The estimates depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models, which adds to understanding of the dependence on AIE uncertainty on uncertainty in parameter values.

  6. Microbial community composition of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating organisms in full-scale wastewater treatment plants operated in fully aerobic mode.

    PubMed

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11-18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5-38.2 mg-C g-VSS(-1) h(-1)). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  7. Description and evaluation of a new four-mode version of the Modal Aerosol Module (MAM4) within version 5.3 of the Community Atmosphere Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Ma, P.-L.; Wang, H.; Tilmes, S.; Singh, B.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Rasch, P. J.

    2016-02-01

    Atmospheric carbonaceous aerosols play an important role in the climate system by influencing the Earth's radiation budgets and modifying the cloud properties. Despite the importance, their representations in large-scale atmospheric models are still crude, which can influence model simulated burden, lifetime, physical, chemical and optical properties, and the climate forcing of carbonaceous aerosols. In this study, we improve the current three-mode version of the Modal Aerosol Module (MAM3) in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) by introducing an additional primary carbon mode to explicitly account for the microphysical ageing of primary carbonaceous aerosols in the atmosphere. Compared to MAM3, the four-mode version of MAM (MAM4) significantly increases the column burdens of primary particulate organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) by up to 40 % in many remote regions, where in-cloud scavenging plays an important role in determining the aerosol concentrations. Differences in the column burdens for other types of aerosol (e.g., sulfate, secondary organic aerosols, mineral dust, sea salt) are less than 1 %. Evaluating the MAM4 simulation against in situ surface and aircraft observations, we find that MAM4 significantly improves the simulation of seasonal variation of near-surface BC concentrations in the polar regions, by increasing the BC concentrations in all seasons and particularly in cold seasons. However, it exacerbates the overestimation of modeled BC concentrations in the upper troposphere in the Pacific regions. The comparisons suggest that, to address the remaining model POM and BC biases, future improvements are required related to (1) in-cloud scavenging and vertical transport in convective clouds and (2) emissions of anthropogenic and biomass burning aerosols.

  8. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  9. Addressing the ice nucleating abilities of marine aerosol: A combination of deposition mode laboratory and field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladino, L. A.; Yakobi-Hancock, J. D.; Kilthau, W. P.; Mason, R. H.; Si, M.; Li, J.; Miller, L. A.; Schiller, C. L.; Huffman, J. A.; Aller, J. Y.; Knopf, D. A.; Bertram, A. K.; Abbatt, J. P. D.

    2016-05-01

    This study addresses, through two types of experiments, the potential for the oceans to act as a source of atmospheric ice-nucleating particles (INPs). The INP concentration via deposition mode nucleation was measured in situ at a coastal site in British Columbia in August 2013. The INP concentration at conditions relevant to cirrus clouds (i.e., -40 °C and relative humidity with respect to ice, RHice = 139%) ranged from 0.2 L-1 to 3.3 L-1. Correlations of the INP concentrations with levels of anthropogenic tracers (i.e., CO, SO2, NOx, and black carbon) and numbers of fluorescent particles do not indicate a significant influence from anthropogenic sources or submicron bioaerosols, respectively. Additionally, the INPs measured in the deposition mode showed a poor correlation with the concentration of particles with sizes larger than 500 nm, which is in contrast with observations made in the immersion freezing mode. To investigate the nature of particles that could have acted as deposition INP, laboratory experiments with potential marine aerosol particles were conducted under the ice-nucleating conditions used in the field. At -40 °C, no deposition activity was observed with salt aerosol particles (sodium chloride and two forms of commercial sea salt: Sigma-Aldrich and Instant Ocean), particles composed of a commercial source of natural organic matter (Suwannee River humic material), or particle mixtures of sea salt and humic material. In contrast, exudates from three phytoplankton (Thalassiosira pseudonana, Nanochloris atomus, and Emiliania huxleyi) and one marine bacterium (Vibrio harveyi) exhibited INP activity at low RHice values, down to below 110%. This suggests that the INPs measured at the field site were of marine biological origins, although we cannot rule out other sources, including mineral dust.

  10. Indoor/outdoor relationships of quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse mode particles in school environments in Barcelona: chemical composition and sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.

    2013-12-01

    The mass concentration, chemical composition and sources of quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UFP, PM0.25), accumulation (PM0.25-2.5) and coarse mode (PM2.5-10) particles were determined in indoor and outdoor air at 39 schools in Barcelona (Spain). Quasi-UFP mass concentrations measured (25.6 μg m-3 outdoors, 23.4 μg m-3 indoors) are significantly higher than those reported in other studies, and characterised by higher carbonaceous and mineral matter contents and a lower proportion of secondary inorganic ions. Results suggest that quasi-UFPs in Barcelona are affected by local sources in the schools, mainly human activity (e.g. organic material from textiles, etc.; contributing 23-46% to total quasi-UFP mass) and playgrounds (in the form of mineral matter, contributing about 9% to the quasi-UFP mass). The particle size distribution of toxicologically relevant metals and major aerosol components was characterised, displaying bimodal size distributions for most elements and components, and a unimodal distribution for inorganic salts (ammonium nitrate and sulphate) and elemental carbon (EC). Regarding metals, Ni and Cr were partitioned mainly in quasi-UFPs and could thus be of interest for epidemiological studies, given their high redox properties. Children exposure to quasi-UFP mass and chemical species was assessed by comparing the concentrations measured at urban background and traffic areas schools. Finally, three main indoor sources across all size fractions were identified by assessing indoor/outdoor ratios (I/O) of PM species used as their tracers: human activity (organic material), cleaning products, paints and plastics (Cl- source), and a metallic mixed source (comprising combinations of Cu, Zn, Co, Cd, Pb, As, V and Cr).

  11. Biogenic Contributions to Summertime Arctic Aerosol: Observations of Aerosol Composition from the Netcare 2014 Aircraft Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, M. D.; Burkart, J.; Koellner, F.; Schneider, J.; Bozem, H.; Hoor, P. M.; Brauner, R.; Herber, A. B.; Leaitch, W. R.; Abbatt, J.

    2014-12-01

    The Arctic is a complex and poorly studied aerosol environment, impacted by strong anthropogenic contributions during winter months and by regional sources in cleaner summer months. In order to gain a predictive understanding of the changing climate in this region, it is necessary to understand the balance between these two aerosol sources to clarify how aerosol might be altered by or contribute to climate change. We present results of vertically resolved, submicron aerosol composition from an Aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) during the NETCARE 2014 Polar6 aircraft campaign. The campaign was based in the high Arctic, at Resolute, NU (74°N), allowing measurements from 60 to 2900 meters over ice, open water and near the ice-edge. Concurrent measurements aboard the Polar6 included ultrafine and accumulation mode particle number and size, cloud condensation nuclei concentrations, trace gas concentrations and single particle composition. Aerosol vertical profiles measured by the AMS can be broadly characterized into two regimes corresponding to different meteorological conditions: the first with very low aerosol loading (<0.1 μg/m3) at low altitudes compared to that aloft and high numbers of nucleation mode particles, and the second with higher concentrations at lower levels. This second regime was associated with low concentrations of nucleation mode particles, and higher observable levels of methane sulphonic acid (MSA) from AMS measurements at low altitudes. MSA, produced during the oxidation of dimethyl sulphide, is a marker for the contribution of ocean-derived biogenic sulphur to particulate sulphur and could be identified and quantified using the high-resolution AMS. MSA to sulphate ratios were observed to increase towards lower altitudes, suggesting a contribution to aerosol loading from the ocean. In addition, we present measurements of aerosol neutralization and the characteristics of organic aerosol that relate to the growth of

  12. Eosinophil accumulation in pulmonary airways of guinea-pigs induced by exposure to an aerosol of platelet-activating factor: effect of anti-asthma drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, S.; Aoki, S.; Boubekeur, K.; Chapman, I. D.; Smith, D.; Kings, M. A.; Morley, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Exposure of guinea-pigs to aerosols of platelet activating factor (PAF) (0.01 to 100 micrograms ml-1) induced a dose-dependent increased incidence of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) at 48 h. Total leucocyte numbers and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils were unchanged in BAL fluid. 2. Increased numbers of eosinophils were detected in BAL 1 h after exposure to PAF but eosinophilia was not maximal until 48 h. One week after exposure to PAF, the percentage of eosinophils in BAL was within the normal range. 3. Depletion of circulating platelets or neutrophils by intravenous injection of specific antisera did not modify accumulation of eosinophils in the airway lumen following inhalation of PAF (10 micrograms ml-1). 4. PAF-induced pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation was inhibited by treatment with SDZ 64-412, a selective PAF-antagonist, whether the compound was administered before, or 30 min after, inhalation of PAF. 5. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was inhibited by prior treatment with aminophylline, cromoglycate, ketotifen, dexamethasone and AH 21-132. 6. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was not inhibited by prior treatment with indomethacin, salbutamol or mepyramine. PMID:2328394

  13. Exploring nutritional modes of cultivation for enhancing lipid accumulation in microalgae.

    PubMed

    Ratha, Sachitra Kumar; Babu, Santosh; Renuka, Nirmal; Prasanna, Radha; Prasad, Rachapudi Badari Narayana; Saxena, Anil Kumar

    2013-05-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the most promising nutritional mode of growth for enhanced biomass and lipid productivity in a set of twenty microalgal strains, grown under photoautotrophic and mixotrophic/heterotrophic conditions using 2% glucose as carbon source. These included four cyanobacterial strains (Cyanosarcina, Phormidium, Nostoc and Anabaena) and sixteen green algae belonging to six genera (five strains each of Chlorella and Chlorococcum, two of Scenedesmus and one each of Chlamydomonas, Kirchneria, Bracteacoccus and Ulothrix). Lipid productivity ranged from 2-13% under photoautotrophic conditions, 1.7-32% under mixotrophic conditions and 0.9-20% under heterotrophic conditions. MIC-G5 Chlorella sp. followed by MIC-G11 Chlorella sp. exhibited the highest cellular lipid content (355 and 271 μg/ml) and lipid productivity of 32% and 28% respectively in mixotrophic condition. In the glucose supplemented conditions (heterotrophic), a significant reduction in PUFA from 25.1 to 9.4, 29.2 to 12.4 and 44.7 to 10.2 was observed in MIC-G4, MIC-G5 and MIC-G11, respectively. A remarkable enhancement of 33-70% in SFA was recorded under mixotrophic conditions. As the quality of biodiesel is based on high SFA and low PUFA, our results illustrate the significance of glucose supplemented condition as a promising strategy for generating high value biodiesel from algae. PMID:22736510

  14. Aerosol Inflluence on Ice Nucleation via the Immersion Mode in Mixed-Phase Arctic Stratiform Clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Boer, G.; Hashino, T.; Tripoli, G. J.; Eloranta, E. W.

    2009-12-01

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds are commonly observed at high latitudes (e.g. Shupe et al., 2006; de Boer et al., 2009a). Herman and Goody (1976), as well as Curry et al. (1996) present summaries of Arctic cloud climatologies that show low altitude stratus frequencies of up to 70% during transitional seasons. In addition to their frequent occurrence, these clouds have significant impacts on the near-surface atmospheric radiative budget, with estimates of wintertime reductions in net surface cooling of 40-50 Wm-2 (Curry et al., 1996) due predominantly to liquid in the mixed-phase layer. Both observational and modeling studies (e.g. Harrington et al., 1999; Jiang et al., 2000; Shupe et al., 2008; Klein et al., 2008) show a strong connection between the amount of ice present and the lifetime of the liquid portion of the cloud layer. This is thought to occur via the Bergeron-Findeissen mechanism (Pruppacher and Klett, 1997) in which ice grows at the expense of liquid due to its lower saturation vapor pressure. Unfortunately, the mechanisms by which ice is nucleated within these mixed-phase layers are not yet fully understood, and therefore an accurate depiction of this process for mixed-phase stratiform clouds has not yet been characterized. The nucleation mechanisms that are active in a given environment are sensitive to aerosol properties. Insoluble particles are typically good nuclei for ice particle formation, while soluble particles are typically better at nucleating water droplets. Aerosol observations from the Arctic often show mixed aerosol particles that feature both soluble and insoluble mass (Leaitch et al., 1984). Soluble mass fractions for these particles have been shown to be high, with estimates of 60-80% and are often made up of sulfates (Zhou et al., 2001; Bigg and Leck, 2001). It is believed that a significant portion of this sulfate mass comes from dimethyl sulfide (DMS) production in the Arctic Ocean and subsequent atmospheric oxidation. Since these

  15. Microbial Community Composition of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Accumulating Organisms in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants Operated in Fully Aerobic Mode

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11–18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5–38.2 mg-C g-VSS−1 h−1). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  16. Synchronized growth and neutral lipid accumulation in Chlorella sorokiniana FC6 IITG under continuous mode of operation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Vikram; Muthuraj, Muthusivaramapandian; Palabhanvi, Basavaraj; Das, Debasish

    2016-01-01

    Synchronized growth and neutral lipid accumulation with high lipid productivity under mixotrophic growth of the strain Chlorella sorokiniana FC6 IITG was achieved via manipulation of substrates feeding mode and supplementation of lipid elicitors in the growth medium. Screening and optimization of lipid elicitors resulted in lipid productivity of 110.59mgL(-1)day(-1) under the combined effect of lipid inducers sodium acetate and sodium chloride. Fed-batch cultivation of the strain in bioreactor with intermittent feeding of limiting nutrients and lipid inducer resulted in maximum biomass and lipid productivity of 2.08 and 0.97gL(-1)day(-1) respectively. Further, continuous production of biomass with concomitant lipid accumulation was demonstrated via continuous feeding of BG11 media supplemented with lipid inducers sodium acetate and sodium chloride. The improved biomass and lipid productivity in chemostat was found to be 2.81 and 1.27gL(-1)day(-1) respectively operated at a dilution rate of 0.54day(-1). PMID:26575619

  17. A uniform doping ultra-thin SOI LDMOS with accumulation-mode extended gate and back-side etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Hui, Zhang; Jie, Wei; Chao, Yin; Qiao, Tan; Jian-Ping, Liu; Peng-Cheng, Li; Xiao-Rong, Luo

    2016-02-01

    A uniform doping ultra-thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) lateral-double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) with low specific on-resistance (Ron,sp) and high breakdown voltage (BV) is proposed and its mechanism is investigated. The proposed LDMOS features an accumulation-mode extended gate (AG) and back-side etching (BE). The extended gate consists of a P- region and two diodes in series. In the on-state with VGD > 0, an electron accumulation layer is formed along the drift region surface under the AG. It provides an ultra-low resistance current path along the whole drift region surface and thus the novel device obtains a low temperature distribution. The Ron,sp is nearly independent of the doping concentration of the drift region. In the off-state, the AG not only modulates the surface electric field distribution and improves the BV, but also brings in a charge compensation effect to further reduce the Ron,sp. Moreover, the BE avoids vertical premature breakdown to obtain high BV and allows a uniform doping in the drift region, which avoids the variable lateral doping (VLD) and the “hot-spot” caused by the VLD. Compared with the VLD SOI LDMOS, the proposed device simultaneously reduces the Ron,sp by 70.2% and increases the BV from 776 V to 818 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176069 and 61376079).

  18. A Simple Model of Global Aerosol Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Smith, Steven J.; Wang, Minghuai; Zhang, Kai; Pringle, K. J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pierce, Jeffrey; Bauer, Susanne E.; Adams, P. J.

    2013-06-28

    Most estimates of the global mean indirect effect of anthropogenic aerosol on the Earth’s energy balance are from simulations by global models of the aerosol lifecycle coupled with global models of clouds and the hydrologic cycle. Extremely simple models have been developed for integrated assessment models, but lack the flexibility to distinguish between primary and secondary sources of aerosol. Here a simple but more physically-based model expresses the aerosol indirect effect using analytic representations of droplet nucleation, cloud and aerosol vertical structure, and horizontal variability in cloud water and aerosol concentration. Although the simple model is able to produce estimates of aerosol indirect effects that are comparable to those from some global aerosol models using the same global mean aerosol properties, the estimates are found to be sensitive to several uncertain parameters, including the preindustrial cloud condensation nuclei concentration, primary and secondary anthropogenic emissions, the size of the primary particles, the fraction of the secondary anthropogenic emissions that accumulates on the coarse mode, the fraction of the secondary mass that forms new particles, and the sensitivity of liquid water path to droplet number concentration. Aerosol indirect effects are surprisingly linear in emissions. This simple model provides a much stronger physical basis for representing aerosol indirect effects than previous representations in integrated assessment models designed to quickly explore the parameter space of emissions-climate interactions. The model also produces estimates that depend on parameter values in ways that are consistent with results from detailed global aerosol-climate simulation models.

  19. Role of sea ice and hemispheric circulation mode on sulphur oxidised compounds (Methanesulfonate and Sulfate) in the Artic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becagli, Silvia; Calzolai, Giulia; Dayan, Uri; Di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Frosini, Daniele; Mazzola, Mauro; Rugi, Francesco; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Vitale, Vito; Udisti, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    result from the retreat of the ice cover and would be accompanied by an increase in primary production. In order to better understand the links among MS- concentrations in the aerosol, biogenic activity, and sea ice extent, and to evaluate the effect of transport processes from the surrounding oceanic areas, the atmospheric MS- measured at Thule and Ny-Ålesund were compared with sea ice extent north of 70°N, general circulation mode patterns (East Atlantic-Western Russia Oscillation), and meteo-synoptic conditions during days with the highest MS- concentrations. Arrigo, K. R., G. van Dijken, and S. Pabi, 2008. Impact of a shrinking Arctic ice cover on marine primary production, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L19603, doi:10.1029/2008GL035028. Gabric, A. J., B. Qu, P. Matrai, and A. C. Hirst, 2005. The simulated response of dimethylsulfide production in the Arctic Ocean to global warming, Tellus, 57B, 391-403, doi:10.1111/j.1600-0889.2005.00163.x.

  20. High variability of stress accumulation, seismic and aseismic release mode along the Peru-Ecuador subduction zone (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nocquet, J.; Villegas, J. C.; Chlieh, M.; Mothes, P. A.; Rolandone, F.; Jarrín, P.; Cisneros, D.; Vallee, M.

    2013-12-01

    Most geodetic measurements of interseismic strain along subduction zones have led to the view of coupled asperities of variable size usually separated by narrower zones of low coupling. Along the western margin of South America, fast convergence of the oceanic Nazca plate has repeatedly produced M>8 earthquakes and three of the ten largest megathrust earthquakes since 1900. Contrasting with this behavior, the segment comprised between central Peru and central Ecuador has not experienced any great earthquake for at least five centuries. New GPS measurements in Peru and Ecuador first highlight that a along a ~1000km long segment, convergence is predominantly accommodated by aseismic creep along the plate interface, with possible coupling occurring at shallow depth, close to the trench. This area is bounded by highly locked segments, which produced M>8.5 earthquakes in central Peru and northern Ecuador. While the observed low interseismic coupling explains the lack of great earthquakes, this area has experienced two earthquakes that share the characteristics of tsunamigenic earthquakes, indicating a correlation between the mode of stress accumulation along the plate interface and its release. Finally, we have observed several episodes of slow slip, sometimes associated with intense, micro to moderate seismicity. These observations suggest a specific behavior for this segment, which contrasts with the behavior of the neighboring segments.

  1. Partitioning of trace elements and metals between quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse aerosols in indoor and outdoor air in schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.; Sunyer, J.

    2015-04-01

    Particle size distribution patterns of trace elements and metals across three size fractions (<0.25 μm, quasi-ultrafine particles, q-UF; 0.25-2.5 μm, accumulation particles; 2.5-10 μm, coarse particles) were analysed in indoor and outdoor air at 39 primary schools across Barcelona (Spain). Special attention was paid to emission sources in each particle size range. Results evidenced the presence in q-UF particles of high proportions of elements typically found in coarse PM (Ca, Al, Fe, Mn or Na), as well as several potentially health-hazardous metals (Mn, Cu, Sn, V, Pb). Modal shifts (e.g., from accumulation to coarse or q-UF particles) were detected when particles infiltrated indoors, mainly for secondary inorganic aerosols. Our results indicate that the location of schools in heavily trafficked areas increases the abundance of q-UF particles, which infiltrate indoors quite effectively, and thus may impact children exposure to these health-hazardous particles.

  2. Microphysical processing of aerosol particles in orographic clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pousse-Nottelmann, S.; Zubler, E. M.; Lohmann, U.

    2015-08-01

    An explicit and detailed treatment of cloud-borne particles allowing for the consideration of aerosol cycling in clouds has been implemented into COSMO-Model, the regional weather forecast and climate model of the Consortium for Small-scale Modeling (COSMO). The effects of aerosol scavenging, cloud microphysical processing and regeneration upon cloud evaporation on the aerosol population and on subsequent cloud formation are investigated. For this, two-dimensional idealized simulations of moist flow over two bell-shaped mountains were carried out varying the treatment of aerosol scavenging and regeneration processes for a warm-phase and a mixed-phase orographic cloud. The results allowed us to identify different aerosol cycling mechanisms. In the simulated non-precipitating warm-phase cloud, aerosol mass is incorporated into cloud droplets by activation scavenging and released back to the atmosphere upon cloud droplet evaporation. In the mixed-phase cloud, a first cycle comprises cloud droplet activation and evaporation via the Wegener-Bergeron-Findeisen (WBF) process. A second cycle includes below-cloud scavenging by precipitating snow particles and snow sublimation and is connected to the first cycle via the riming process which transfers aerosol mass from cloud droplets to snowflakes. In the simulated mixed-phase cloud, only a negligible part of the total aerosol mass is incorporated into ice crystals. Sedimenting snowflakes reaching the surface remove aerosol mass from the atmosphere. The results show that aerosol processing and regeneration lead to a vertical redistribution of aerosol mass and number. Thereby, the processes impact the total aerosol number and mass and additionally alter the shape of the aerosol size distributions by enhancing the internally mixed/soluble Aitken and accumulation mode and generating coarse-mode particles. Concerning subsequent cloud formation at the second mountain, accounting for aerosol processing and regeneration increases

  3. Whispering Gallery Modes Used to Determine the Changing Size of Levitated Aerosol Droplets in a Fluctuating Optical Trap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludvigsen, Angela; McCann, Lowell

    A laser can be used as an optical trap to catch and hold small, transparent objects. Observations of optically trapped aqueous aerosol droplets have demonstrated that the droplet moves between two or more stable positions dependent upon the power of the trapping laser. It is hypothesized that this movement coincides with a resonance between the trapping light and the droplet's surface, called a Whispering Gallery Mode. When this resonance occurs, forces acting on the droplet cause it to move. To investigate this behavior, Raman scattered light from the droplet as well as the droplet's position are measured. The Raman spectrum exhibits a series of peaks resulting from the droplet's spherical shape, referred to as Cavity Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy. The location and spacing of these peaks are known to be related to the diameter and the optical properties of the droplet. From this spectrum, the magnitude of the electric and magnetic fields of the scattered light are calculated. This allows for a precise measurement of the droplet's radius at the moment that the droplet moves between stable positions. After determining the droplet's radius from the spectrum, the effect of varying the intensity of the trapping laser beam on the droplet radius can be investigated.

  4. Spectral Discrimination of Fine and Coarse Mode Aerosol Optical Depth from AERONET Direct Sun Data of Singapore and South-East Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas Cortijo, S.; Chew, B.; Liew, S.

    2009-12-01

    Aerosol optical depth combined with the Angstrom exponent and its derivative, are often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with Angstrom exp. values greater than 2 indicating small (fine mode) particles associated with urban pollution and bio-mass burning. Around this region, forest fires are a regular occurrence during the dry season, specially near the large land masses of Sumatra and Borneo. The practice of clearing land by burning the primary and sometimes secondary forest, results in a smog-like haze covering large areas of regional cities such as cities Singapore, Kuala Lumpur and sometimes the south of Thailand, often reducing visibility and increasing health problems for the local population. In Singapore, the sources of aerosols are mostly from fossil fuel burning (energy stations, incinerators, urban transport etc.) and from the industrial and urban areas. The proximity to the sea adds a possible oceanic source. However, as stated above and depending on the time of the year, there can be a strong bio-mass component coming from forest fires from various regions of the neighboring countries. Bio-mass related aerosol particles are typically characterized by showing a large optical depth and small, sub-micron particle size distributions. In this work, we analyze three years of direct Sun measurements performed with a multi-channel Cimel Sun-Photometer (part of the AERONET network) located at our site. In order to identify bio-mass burning events in this region, we perform a spectral discrimination between coarse and fine mode optical depth; subsequently, the fine mode parameters such as optical depth, optical ratio and fine mode Angstrom exponents (and its derivative) are used to identify possible bio-mass related events within the data set.

  5. Interannual variation in the fine-mode MODIS aerosol optical depth and its relationship to the changes in sulfur dioxide emissions in China between 2000 and 2010

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itahashi, S.; Uno, I.; Yumimoto, K.; Irie, H.; Osada, K.; Ogata, K.; Fukushima, H.; Wang, Z.; Ohara, T.

    2012-03-01

    Anthropogenic SO2 emissions increased alongside economic development in China at a rate of 12.7% yr-1 from 2000 to 2005. However, under new Chinese government policy, SO2 emissions declined by 3.9% yr-1 between 2005 and 2009. Between 2000 and 2010, we found that the variability in the fine-mode (submicron) aerosol optical depth (AOD) over the oceans adjacent to East Asia increased by 3-8% yr-1 to a peak around 2005-2006 and subsequently decreased by 2-7% yr-1, based on observations by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on board NASA's Terra satellite and simulations by a chemical transport model. This trend is consistent with ground-based observations of aerosol particles at a mountainous background observation site in central Japan. These fluctuations in SO2 emission intensity and fine-mode AOD are thought to reflect the widespread installation of fuel-gas desulfurization (FGD) devices in power plants in China, because aerosol sulfate is a major determinant of the fine-mode AOD in East Asia. Using a chemical transport model, we confirmed that the contribution of particulate sulfate to the fine-mode AOD is more than 70% of the annual mean and that the abovementioned fluctuation in fine-mode AOD is caused mainly by changes in SO2 emission rather than by other factors such as varying meteorological conditions in East Asia. A strong correlation was also found between satellite-retrieved SO2 vertical column density and bottom-up SO2 emissions, both of which were also consistent with observed fine-mode AOD trends. We propose a simplified approach for evaluating changes in SO2 emissions in China, combining the use of modeled sensitivity coefficients that describe the variation of fine-mode AOD with changes in SO2 emissions and satellite retrieval. Satellite measurements of fine-mode AOD above the Sea of Japan marked a 4.1% yr-1 decline between 2007 and 2010, which corresponded to the 9% yr-1 decline in SO2 emissions from China during the same

  6. Aerosol optical depth during episodes of Asian dust storms and biomass burning at Kwangju, South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogunjobi, K. O.; He, Z.; Kim, K. W.; Kim, Y. J.

    Spectral daily aerosol optical depths (τ a λ) estimated from a multi-filter radiometer over Kwangju were analyzed from January 1999 to August 2001 (total of 277 days). Optical depths obtained showed a pronounced temporal trend, with maximum dust loading observed during spring time and biomass burning aerosol in early summer and autumn of each year. Result indicates that τ a501 nm increased from spring average of 0.45±0.02 to values >0.7 on 7 April 2000, and 13 April 2001. Daily mean spectral variations in the Ångström exponents α were also computed for various episode periods under consideration. A dramatic change in α value is noted especially at high aerosol optical depth when coarse mode aerosol dominates over the influence of accumulation-mode aerosol. High values of τ a λ associated with high values of α in early June and October are characteristics of smoke aerosol predominantly from biomass burning aerosol. Also, volume size distribution is investigated for different pollution episodes with result indicating that the peak in the distribution of the coarse mode volume radius and fine mode particles of dust and biomass-burning aerosol respectively increases as aerosol optical depth increases at Kwangju. Air-mass trajectory were developed on 7-8 April and 19-20 October, 2000 to explain the transport of Asian dust particle and biomass burning to Kwangju.

  7. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  8. Effects of particle shape, hematite content and semi-external mixing with carbonaceous components on the optical properties of accumulation mode mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Arola, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiative forcing estimation of the polluted mineral dust is limited due to lack of morphological analysis, mixing state with the carbonaceous components and the hematite content in the pure dust. The accumulation mode mineral dust has been found to mix with anthropogenically produced black carbon, organic carbon and brown carbon during long range transport. The above features of the polluted dust are not well accounted in the optical models and lead the uncertainty in the numerical estimation of their radiative impact. The Semi-external mixing being a prominent mixing of dust and carbonaceous components has not been studied in details so for compared to core-shell, internal and external mixing studies. In present study, we consider the pure mineral dust composed of non-metallic components (such as Quartz, Feldspar, Mica and Calcite) and metalic component like hematite (Fe2O3). The hematite percentage in the pure mineral dust governs its absorbance. Based on this hematite variation, the hematite fraction in pure mineral dust has been constrained between 0-8%. The morphological and mineralogical characterization of the polluted dust led to consider the three sphere, two sphere and two spheroid model shapes for polluted dust particle system. The pollution gives rise to various light absorbing aerosol components like black carbon, brown carbon and organic carbon (comprising of HUmic-Like Substances, HULIS) in the atmosphere. The entire above discussed model shapes have been considered for the mineral dust getting polluted with (1) organic carbon (especially HULIS component) (2) Brown carbon and (3) black carbon by making a semi-external mixture with pure mineral dust. The optical properties (like Single Scattering Albedo, SSA; Asymmetry parameter, g and Extinction efficiency, Qext) of above model shapes for the polluted dust have been computed using Discrete Dipole Approximation, DDA code. For above model shapes, the SSA was found to vary depending on hematite

  9. Aerosol First Indirect Effects on Non-Precipitating Low-Level Liquid Cloud Properties as Simulated by CAM5 at ARM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Chuanfeng; Klein, Stephen A.; Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Boyle, James; Zhang, Yuying

    2012-04-28

    We quantitatively examine the aerosol first indirect effects (FIE) for non-precipitating low-level single-layer liquid phase clouds simulated by the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) running in the weather forecast mode at three DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) sites. The FIE is quantified in terms of a relative change in cloud droplet effective radius for a relative change in aerosol accumulation mode number concentration under conditions of fixed liquid water content (LWC). CAM5 simulates aerosol-cloud interactions reasonably well for this specific cloud type, and the simulated FIE is consistent with the long-term observations at the examined locations. The FIE in CAM5 generally decreases with LWC at coastal ARM sites, and is larger by using cloud condensation nuclei rather than aerosol accumulation mode number concentration as the choice of aerosol amount. However, it has no significant variations with location and has no systematic strong seasonal variations at examined ARM sites.

  10. Burst mode with ps- and fs-pulses: Influence on the removal rate, surface quality, and heat accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuenschwander, B.; Kramer, Th.; Lauer, B.; Jaeggi, B.

    2015-03-01

    The burst mode for ps and fs pulses for steel and copper is investigated. It is found that the reduction of the energy in a single pulse (in the burst) represents the main factor for the often reported gain in the removal rate using the burst mode e.g. for steel no investigated burst sequence lead to a higher removal rate compared to single pulses at higher repetition rate. But for copper a situation was found where the burst mode leads to a real increase of the removal rate in the range of 20%. Further the burst mode offers the possibility to generate slightly melted flat surfaces with good optical properties in the case of steel. Temperature simulations indicate that the surface state during the burst mode could be responsible for the melting effect or the formation of cavities in clusters which reduces the surface quality.

  11. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2015-07-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from an Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi Russia are analyzed. Source region effects on particle modal features, and number and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June of 0.42 μg m-3 and in September-October of 0.36-0.57 μg m-3. These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated aerosol sources such as Arctic haze in early spring which increases accumulation and coarse mode numbers, and biogenic emissions in summer which affects the smaller, nucleation and Aitken mode particles. The impact of temperature dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant. Therefore, in addition to the precursor emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds, the frequent Siberian forest fires, although far are suggested to play a role in Arctic aerosol composition during the warmest months. During calm and cold months aerosol concentrations were occasionally increased by nearby aerosol sources in trapping inversions. These results provide valuable information on inter-annual cycles and sources of Arctic aerosols.

  12. Comparison of MADE3-simulated and observed aerosol distributions with a focus on aerosol vertical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser, Christopher; Hendricks, Johannes; Righi, Mattia; Jöckel, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    The reliability of aerosol radiative forcing estimates from climate models depends on the accuracy of simulated global aerosol distribution and composition, as well as on the models' representation of the aerosol-cloud and aerosol-radiation interactions. To help improve on previous modeling studies, we recently developed the new aerosol microphysics submodel MADE3 that explicitly tracks particle mixing state in the Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges. We implemented MADE3 into the global atmospheric chemistry general circulation model EMAC and evaluated it by comparison of simulated aerosol properties to observations. Compared properties include continental near-surface aerosol component concentrations and size distributions, continental and marine aerosol vertical profiles, and nearly global aerosol optical depth. Recent studies have shown the specific importance of aerosol vertical profiles for determination of the aerosol radiative forcing. Therefore, our focus here is on the evaluation of simulated vertical profiles. The observational data is taken from campaigns between 1990 and 2011 over the Pacific Ocean, over North and South America, and over Europe. The datasets include black carbon and total aerosol mass mixing ratios, as well as aerosol particle number concentrations. Compared to other models, EMAC with MADE3 yields good agreement with the observations - despite a general high bias of the simulated mass mixing ratio profiles. However, BC concentrations are generally overestimated by many models in the upper troposphere. With MADE3 in EMAC, we find better agreement of the simulated BC profiles with HIPPO data than the multi-model average of the models that took part in the AeroCom project. There is an interesting difference between the profiles from individual campaigns and more "climatological" datasets. For instance, compared to spatially and temporally localized campaigns, the model simulates a more continuous decline in both total

  13. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Hoose, C.; Heikkilä, U.; van Donkelaar, A.; Ferrachat, S.

    2009-10-01

    A diagnostic nucleation scavenging scheme, which determines stratiform cloud scavenging ratios for both aerosol mass and number distributions, based on cloud droplet, and ice crystal number concentrations, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM global climate model. This is coupled with a size-dependent in-cloud impaction scavenging parameterization for both cloud droplet-aerosol, and ice crystal-aerosol collisions. Sensitivity studies are presented, which compare aerosol concentrations, and deposition between a variety of in-cloud scavenging approaches, including prescribed fractions, several diagnostic schemes, and a prognostic aerosol cloud processing treatment that passes aerosol in-droplet and in-ice crystal concentrations between model time steps. For one sensitivity study, assuming 100% of the in-cloud aerosol is scavenged into the cloud droplets and ice crystals, the annual global mean accumulation mode number burden is decreased by 65%, relative to a simulation with prognostic aerosol cloud processing. Diagnosing separate nucleation scavenging ratios for aerosol number and mass distributions, as opposed to equating the aerosol mass scavenging to the number scavenging ratios, reduces the annual global mean sulfate burden by near to 10%. The annual global mean sea salt burden is 30% lower for the diagnostic approach, which does not carry aerosol in-droplet and in-crystal concentrations between model time-steps as compared to the prognostic scheme. Implementation of in-cloud impaction scavenging reduced the annual, global mean black carbon burden by 30% for the prognostic aerosol cloud processing scheme. Better agreement with observations of black carbon profiles from aircraft (changes near to one order of magnitude for mixed phase clouds), 210Pb surface layer concentrations and wet deposition, and the geographic distribution of aerosol optical depth are found for the new diagnostic scavenging as compared to prescribed ratio scavenging scheme of the standard ECHAM

  14. Nitrogenated and aliphatic organic vapors as possible drivers for marine secondary organic aerosol growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Osto, Manuel; Ceburnis, Darius; Monahan, Ciaran; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Bialek, Jakub; Kulmala, Markku; KurtéN, Theo; Ehn, Mikael; Wenger, John; Sodeau, John; Healy, Robert; O'Dowd, Colin

    2012-06-01

    Measurements of marine aerosol chemistry, using state-of-the-art mass spectrometry, as well as aerosol microphysics, hygroscopicity and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity were undertaken during new particle growth events. The events were detected in air advecting over North East (NE) Atlantic waters during the EUCAARI Intensive Observation Period in June 2008 at Mace Head, Ireland. During these growth events, the aerosol mass spectrometers illustrated increases in accumulation mode aerosol phase nitrogenated and aliphatic compounds thought to condense from the gas phase. Since the composition changes observed in the accumulation mode occurred simultaneously to the growth of the accumulation, Aitken and nucleation modes, the growth of both the nucleation mode and the Aitken mode is attributed to the condensation of these species. Nitrogenated compounds like amines are also plausible candidates in the nucleation process, as suggested by quantum mechanic calculations. It is also plausible that amides and organic nitrites, also identified by the mass spectrometers, are possible candidate chemical compounds, suggesting that multiple types of chemical species may be contributing. Given that these open ocean aerosol formation and growth events occur in very clean polar marine air masses, we suggest that the organic compounds responsible for particle formation and growth are mainly of biogenic origin. Despite increasing the particle number concentration, the initial effect is to suppress hygroscopicity and CCN activity.

  15. Efficient polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) accumulation by a new continuous feeding mode in three-stage mixed microbial culture (MMC) PHA production process.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Long; Wen, Qinxue; Guo, Zirui

    2015-09-10

    A new continuous feeding mode was developed to optimize the polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) accumulation step in the three-stage PHAs production process by mixed microbial cultures (MMCs) using mixed volatile fatty acids (VFAs) as substrate. The continuous feeding assays under low biomass loading rate (BLR) (in the range of 3.5-5.5Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d) can be directly fed with feedstock with pH from 5.0 to 10.0 without any pH regulation. The maximum intracellular PHA content of 70.4% and system PHA yield (YPHA/S(sys)) of 0.81Cmol PHA/Cmol VFA were achieved under the continuous feeding mode at BLR of 3.86Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d when directly fed with substrate at pH 5. These values were higher than those under the pulse wise feeding mode with the same substrate and active biomass concentration. The results indicated that a self-balanced pH state was formed in the continuous feeding system. Further studies on the reaction pH and kinetics of the MMCs in the continuous feeding reactor were conducted to understand the pH variation mechanism and accumulation process. The optimal BLR to get high PHA content and YPHA/S(sys) was 3.5-5.5Cmol VFA/Cmol X/d. PMID:26073996

  16. Aerosol optical properties in the ABL over arctic sea ice from airborne aerosol lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Lukas; Neuber, Roland; Ritter, Christoph; Maturilli, Marion; Dethloff, Klaus; Herber, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Between 2009 and 2013 aerosols, sea ice properties and meteorological variables were measured during several airborne campaigns covering a wide range of the western Arctic Ocean. The campaigns were carried out with the aircraft Polar 5 of the German Alfred-Wegener-Institute (AWI) during spring and summer periods. Optical properties of accumulation mode aerosol and clouds were measured with the nadir looking AMALi aerosol lidar covering the atmospheric boundary layer and the free troposphere up to 3000m, while dropsondes provided coincident vertical profiles of meteorological quantities. Based on these data we discuss the vertical distribution of aerosol backscatter in and above the atmospheric boundary layer and its dependence on relative humidity, dynamics and underlying sea ice properties. We analyze vertical profiles of lidar and coincident dropsonde measurements from various locations in the European and Canadian Arctic from spring and summer campaigns. Sea ice cover is derived from modis satellite and aircraft onboard camera images. The aerosol load in the arctic atmospheric boundary layer shows a high variability. Various meteorological parameters and in particular boundary layer properties are discussed with their respective influence on aerosol features. To investigate the effect of the frequency and size of open water patches on aerosol properties, we relate the profiles to the sea ice properties influencing the atmosphere in the upwind region.

  17. Physical Investigations of Small Particles: (I) Aerosol Particle Charging and Flux Enhancement and (II) Whispering Gallery Mode Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Yglesias, Xerxes

    Part I: Particles are a key feature of planetary atmospheres. On Earth they represent the greatest source of uncertainty in the global energy budget. This uncertainty can be addressed by making more measurement, by improving the theoretical analysis of measurements, and by better modeling basic particle nucleation and initial particle growth within an atmosphere. This work will focus on the latter two methods of improvement. Uncertainty in measurements is largely due to particle charging. Accurate descriptions of particle charging are challenging because one deals with particles in a gas as opposed to a vacuum, so different length scales come into play. Previous studies have considered the effects of transition between the continuum and kinetic regime and the effects of two and three body interactions within the kinetic regime. These studies, however, use questionable assumptions about the charging process which resulted in skewed observations, and bias in the proposed dynamics of aerosol particles. These assumptions affect both the ions and particles in the system. Ions are assumed to be point monopoles that have a single characteristic speed rather than follow a distribution. Particles are assumed to be perfect conductors that have up to five elementary charges on them. The effects of three body interaction, ion-molecule-particle, are also overestimated. By revising this theory so that the basic physical attributes of both ions and particles and their interactions are better represented, we are able to make more accurate predictions of particle charging in both the kinetic and continuum regimes. The same revised theory that was used above to model ion charging can also be applied to the flux of neutral vapor phase molecules to a particle or initial cluster. Using these results we can model the vapor flux to a neutral or charged particle due to diffusion and electromagnetic interactions. In many classical theories currently applied to these models, the finite size

  18. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Comparative Decomposition of Aerosol Direct, Semidirect, and Indirect Radiative Forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Eaton, Brian

    2012-10-01

    The authors have decomposed the anthropogenic aerosol radiative forcing into direct contributions from each aerosol species to the planetary energy balance through absorption and scattering of solar radiation, indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosol on solar and infrared radiation through droplet and crystal nucleation on aerosol, and semidirect effects through the influence of solar absorption on the distribution of clouds. A three-mode representation of the aerosol in version 5.1 of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5.1) yields global annual mean radiative forcing estimates for each of these forcing mechanisms that are within 0.1 W m–2 of estimates using a more complex seven-mode representation that distinguishes between fresh and aged black carbon and primary organic matter. Simulating fresh black carbon particles separately from internally mixed accumulation mode particles is found to be important only near fossil fuel sources. In addition to the usual large indirect effect on solar radiation, this study finds an unexpectedly large positive longwave indirect effect (because of enhanced cirrus produced by homogenous nucleation of ice crystals on anthropogenic sulfate), small shortwave and longwave semidirect effects, and a small direct effect (because of cancelation and interactions of direct effects of black carbon and sulfate). Differences between the threemode and seven-mode versions are significantly larger (up to 0.2 W m–2) when the hygroscopicity of primary organic matter is decreased from 0.1 to 0 and transfer of the primary carbonaceous aerosol to the accumulation mode in the seven-mode version requires more hygroscopic material coating the primary particles. Radiative forcing by cloudborne anthropogenic black carbon is only 20.07 W m–2.

  19. Below-cloud rain scavenging of atmospheric aerosols for aerosol deposition models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chate, D. M.; Murugavel, P.; Ali, K.; Tiwari, S.; Beig, G.

    2011-03-01

    Below-cloud aerosol scavenging is generally estimated from field measurements using advanced instruments that measure changes in aerosol distributions with respect to rainfall. In this study, we discuss various scavenging mechanisms and scavenging coefficients from past laboratory and field measurements. Scavenging coefficients derived from field measurements (representing natural aerosols scavenging) are two orders higher than that of theoretical ones for smaller particles (Dp < 2 μm). Measured size-resolved scavenging coefficients can be served as a better option to the default scavenging coefficient (e.g. a constant of 10-4 s-1 for all size of aerosols, as used in the CALPUFF model) for representing below-cloud aerosol scavenging. We propose scavenging correction parameter (CR) as an exponential function of size-resolved scavenging coefficients, winds and width in the downwind of the source-receptor system. For a wind speed of 3 m s-1, CR decrease with the width in the downwind for particles of diameters Dp < 0.1 μm but CR does not vary much for particles in the accumulation mode (0.1 < Dp < 2 μm). For a typical urban aerosol distribution, assuming 3 m s-1 air-flow in the source-receptor system, 10 km downwind width, 2.84 mm h-1 of rainfall and using aerosol size dependent scavenging coefficients in the CR, scavenging of aerosols is found to be 16% in number and 24% in volume of total aerosols. Using the default scavenging coefficient (10-4 s-1) in the CALPUFF model, it is found to be 64% in both number and volume of total aerosols.

  20. Characterization of aerosols from biomass burning--a case study from Mizoram (Northeast), India.

    PubMed

    Badarinath, K V S; Madhavi Latha, K; Kiran Chand, T R; Gupta, Prabhat K; Ghosh, A B; Jain, S L; Gera, B S; Singh, Risal; Sarkar, A K; Singh, Nahar; Parmar, R S; Koul, S; Kohli, R; Nath, Shambhu; Ojha, V K; Singh, Gurvir

    2004-01-01

    Physical and optical properties of biomass burning aerosols in Northeastern region, India analyzed based on measurements made during February 2002. Large spatial extent of Northeastern Region moist tropical to moist sub-tropical forests in India have high frequency of burning in annual dry seasons. Characterization of resultant trace gases and aerosols from biomass burning is important for the atmospheric radiative process. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) observed to be high during burning period compared to pre- and post-burning days. Peak period of biomass burning is highly correlated with measured AOD and total columnar water vapor. Size distribution of aerosols showed bimodal size distribution during burning day and unimodal size distribution during pre- and post-burning days. Size distribution retrievals from biomass burning aerosols show dominance of accumulation mode particles. Weighted mean radius is high (0.22 microm) during burning period. Columnar content of aerosols observed to be high during burning period in addition to the drastic reduction of visibility. During the burning day Anderson sampler measurements showed dominance of accumulation mode particles. The diurnal averaged values of surface shortwave aerosol radiative forcing af biomass burning aerosols varies from -59 to -87 Wm(-2) on different days. Measured and modeled solar irradiances are also discussed in the paper. PMID:14559268

  1. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODE-CHOICE SIMULATOR WITH THE LOG DATA ACCUMULATED IN ON-DEMAND BUS SERVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Kota; Yamato, Hiroyuki; Hiekata, Kazuo

    The new simulator which can estimate the mode-choi ce in the area was developed and evaluated in the field test. The characteristic of the developed simulato r is to be able to estimate the number of demand and demand pattern in high-accuracy with the real operation log data of the On-demand Bus. The simulator is devided into micro-simulator whose passenger agents choose their transpor t mode by the sacrifice model. The developed simulator is evaluated in the real fi eld test in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture. The new transportation like LRT (Light Rail Transit) and On-demand Bus is eval uated by the simulator and the result of simulation is confirmed to be reliable by the local government officers.

  2. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2014-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  3. Fog Induced Aerosol Modification Observed by AERONET, Including Occurrences During Major Air Pollution Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, T. F.; Holben, B. N.; Reid, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Rivas, M.; Singh, R. P.; Tripathi, S. N.; Bruegge, C. J.; Li, Z.; Platnick, S. E.; Arnold, T.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Burton, S. P.; Kim, J.; Kim, Y. J.; Sinyuk, A.; Dubovik, O.; Arola, A. T.; Schafer, J.; Artaxo, P.; Smirnov, A.; Chen, H.; Goloub, P.

    2015-12-01

    The modification of aerosol optical properties due to interaction with fog is examined from measurements made by sun/sky radiometers at several AERONET sites. Retrieved total column volume size distributions for cases identified as aerosol modified by fog often show very a large 'middle mode' submicron radius (~0.4 to 0.5 microns), which is typically seen as a component of a bimodal sub-micron distribution. These middle mode sized particles are often called cloud-processed or residual aerosol. This bimodal accumulation mode distribution may be due to one mode (the larger one) from fog-processed aerosol and the other from interstitial aerosol, or possibly from two different aerosol species (differing chemical composition) with differing hygroscopic growth factors. The size of the fine mode particles from AERONET retrieved for these cases exceeds the size of sub-micron sized particles retrieved for nearly all other aerosol types, suggesting significant modification of aerosols within the fog or cloud environment. In-situ measured aerosol size distributions made during other fog events are compared to the AERONET retrievals, and show close agreement in the residual mode particle size. Almucantar retrievals are analyzed from the Kanpur site in the Indo-Gangetic Plain in India (fog in January), Beijing (fog in winter), Fresno, CA in the San Joaquin Valley (fog in winter), South Korea (Yellow Sea fog in spring), Arica on the northern coast of Chile (stratocumulus), and several other sites with aerosol observations made after fog dissipated. Additionally, several major air pollution events are discussed where extremely high aerosol concentrations were measured at the surface and during which fog also occurred, resulting in the detection very large fine mode aerosols (residual mode) from AERONET retrievals in some of these events. Low wind speeds that occurred during these events were conducive to both pollutant accumulation and also fog formation. The presence of fog then

  4. Water-soluble inorganic ions in airborne particulates from the nano to coarse mode: a case study of aerosol episodes in southern region of Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Peng; Tsai, Jiun-Horng; Chang, Kai-Lun; Lin, Jim Juimin

    2008-06-01

    In 2004, airborne particulate matter (PM) was collected for several aerosol episodes occurring in the southern region of Taiwan. The particulate samples were taken using both a MOUDI (Micro-orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor) and a nano-MOUDI sampler. These particulate samples were analyzed for major water-soluble ionic species with an emphasis to characterize the mass concentrations and distributions of these ions in the ambient ultrafine (PM0.1, diameter <0.1 microm) and nano mode (PMnano, diameter <0.056 microm) particles. Particles collected at the sampling site (the Da-Liao station) on the whole exhibited a typical tri-modal size distribution on mass concentration. The mass concentration ratios of PMnano/PM2.5, PM0.1/PM2.5, and PM1/PM2.5 on average were 1.8, 2.9, and 71.0%, respectively. The peak mass concentration appeared in the submicron particle mode (0.1 microm < diameter <1.0 microm). Mass fractions (percentages) of the three major water-soluble ions (nitrate, sulfate, and ammonium) as a group in PMnano, PM0.1, PM1, and PM2.5 were 18.4, 21.7, 50.0, and 50.7%, respectively. Overall, results from this study supported the notion that secondary aerosols played a significant role in the formation of ambient submicron particulates (PM0.1-1). Particles smaller than 0.1 microm were essentially basic, whereas those greater than 2.5 microm were neutral or slightly acidic. The neutralization ratio (NR) was close to unity for airborne particles with diameters ranging from 0.18 to 1 microm. The NRs of these airborne particles were found strongly correlated with their sizes, at least for samples taken during the aerosol episodes under study. Insofar as this study is exploratory in nature, as only a small number of particulate samples were used, there appears to be a need for further research into the chemical composition, source contribution, and formation of the nano and ultrafine mode airborne particulates. PMID:17874279

  5. Investigation of aerosol components influencing atmospheric transfer of UV radiation in Baltic Sea region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reinart, A.; Kikas, Ü.; Tamm, E.

    2006-01-01

    Linking of atmospheric aerosol size distributions and optical properties via predefined aerosol components was investigated. The measured aerosol volume distributions were decomposed to Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) components, and aerosol optical properties were calculated for a mixture of those components. The obtained aerosol optical properties were then used for modeling the surface UV irradiances with the libRadtran radiative transfer code. The results were verified with the columnar aerosol characteristics obtained from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) station Tõravere (58.26°N, 26.46°E) and clear-sky surface UV measurements in Pärnu, Estonia (58.38°N, 24.51°E). The best decomposition results were obtained with four OPAC components, when their lookup characteristics varied within ±10%. Variation of aerosol optical properties in 17 days was influenced by the following aerosol components: soot, 1.2 ± 1.4%; insoluble, 23.1 ± 8.3%; water-soluble, 44.0 ± 10.8%; accumulation mode sea salt, 31.6 ± 6.2% of total aerosol volume. The average refractive index (for λ = 440 nm) of the component mixture was of 1.42 - 0.013i. Interpretation of the soot component was disputable, since similarly high soot concentrations corresponded to the secondary particles in polluted atmosphere and the nucleation bursts in clean atmosphere. The sea-salt component showed a correlation with the aerosol residence time over sea. The water-soluble component and the additional "biomass haze" component represented partly the same aerosol volume in the diameter range of 0.18-1.8 μm. The surface UV irradiances modeled with the AERONET data and the fitted aerosol components were highly correlated with each other, but both model results underestimated the UV extinction by aerosol.

  6. Sun photometer and lidar measurements of the plume from the Hawaii Kilauea Volcano Pu'u O'o vent: Aerosol flux and SO2 lifetime

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porter, J.N.; Horton, K.A.; Mouginis-Mark, P. J.; Lienert, B.; Sharma, S.K.; Lau, E.; Sutton, A.J.; Elias, T.; Oppenheimer, C.

    2002-01-01

    Aerosol optical depths and lidar measurements were obtained under the plume of Hawaii Kilauea Volcano on August 17, 2001, ???9 km downwind from the erupting Pu'u O'o vent. Measured aerosol optical depths (at 500 nm) were between 0.2-0.4. Aerosol size distributions inverted from the spectral sun photometer measurements suggest the volcanic aerosol is present in the accumulation mode (0.1-0.5 micron diameter), which is consistent with past in situ optical counter measurements. The aerosol dry mass flux rate was calculated to be 53 Mg d-1. The estimated SO2 emission rate during the aerosol measurements was ???1450 Mg d-1. Assuming the sulfur emissions at Pu'u O'o vent are mainly SO2 (not aerosol), this corresponds to a SO2 half-life of 6.0 hours in the atmosphere.

  7. Recrystallization of bulk and plasma-coated tungsten with accumulated thermal energy relevant to Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Lim, Sun-Taek; Jin, Younggil; Lee, Jin Young; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The recrystallization of bulk tungsten is investigated under various thermal loads that are relevant to the accumulation energy during Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation. A thermal plasma torch is used to examine only the thermal load effect on the material; therefore, the charge and atomic effects are ignored. In this condition, recrystallization is observed in bulk W with a surface temperature above 1700 °C. The effect becomes severe with a finite recrystallization thickness near the surface, which introduces vertical cracking along grain boundaries with increasing thermal load. However, plasma-sprayed tungsten (PS-W) is not crystallized because neighboring lamellas merge, destroying their interlayer and producing no vertical cracks. This is attributed to an annealing effect in PS-W. Therefore, these results suggest that a multilayer W structure is advantageous in the fabrication of W, especially for long pulse operation in a future fusion reactor.

  8. Tropopsheric Aerosol Chemistry via Aerosol Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worsnop, Douglas

    2008-03-01

    A broad overview of size resolved aerosol chemistry in urban, rural and remote regions is evolving from deployment of aerosol mass spectrometers (AMS) throughout the northern hemisphere. Using thermal vaporization and electron impact ionization as universal detector of non-refractory inorganic and organic composition, the accumulation of AMS results represent a library of mass spectral signatures of aerosol chemistry. For organics in particular, mass spectral factor analysis provides a procedure for classifying (and simplifying) complex mixtures composed of the hundreds or thousands of individual compounds. Correlations with parallel gas and aerosol measurements (e.g. GC/MS, HNMR, FTIR) supply additional chemical information needed to interpret mass spectra. The challenge is to separate primary and secondary; anthropogenic, biogenic and biomass burning sources - and subsequent - transformations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics.

  9. Biogenic amines in submicron marine aerosol (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.

    2010-12-01

    Ammonium salts of dimethyl and diethyl amine (DMA+ and DEA+) have been detected in size segregated marine samples collected in the North Atlantic over open ocean and at a coastal site. DMA+ and DEA+ peak in the accumulation mode range while very low concentration, close to detection limit, are observed in the coarse size fractions, as well as in sea spray aerosol artificially generated in the laboratory using sea water. These results indicate a secondary formation pathway. DMA+ and DEA+ represent up to 20% of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) in our samples , and to our knowledge they are the most abundant organic species besides MSA ever detected in clean marine aerosol . Maximum concentrations have been observed during spring and summer when the biological activity is high and in clean marine air masses, thus indicating biogenic sources. Total organic nitrogen (ON) concentration also peaks in the accumulation mode range and represents in our samples a fraction from 32 to 54 % of the total SOA. Ammonium salt formation from biogenic amines might be an important source of marine SOA and atmospheric nitrogen at the global scale with a seasonal variation connected to the oceanic biological productivity and an atmospheric cycle parallel to that of the organosulfur species.

  10. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Kai; Wan, Hui; Wang, Bin; Zhang, Meigen; Feichter, J.; Liu, Xiaohong

    2010-07-14

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  11. Tropospheric aerosol size distributions simulated by three online global aerosol models using the M7 microphysics module

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; Wan, H.; Wang, B.; Zhang, M.; Feichter, J.; Liu, X.

    2010-03-01

    Tropospheric aerosol size distributions are simulated by three online global models that employ exactly the same modal approach but differ in many aspects such as model meteorology, natural aerosol emissions, sulfur chemistry, and the parameterization of deposition processes. The main purpose of this study is to identify where the largest inter-model discrepancies occur and what the main reasons are. The number concentrations of different aerosol size ranges are compared among the three models and against observations. Overall all the three models can capture the basic features of the observed aerosol number spatial distributions. The magnitude of the number concentration of each mode is consistent among the three models. Quantitative differences are also clearly detectable. For the soluble and insoluble coarse mode and accumulation mode, inter-model discrepancies mainly result from differences in the sea salt and dust emissions, as well as the different strengths of the convective transport in the meteorological models. For the nucleation mode and the soluble Aitken mode, the spread of the model results is largest in the tropics and in the middle and upper troposphere. Diagnostics and sensitivity experiments suggest that this large spread is closely related to the sulfur cycle in the models, which is strongly affected by the choice of sulfur chemistry scheme, its coupling with the convective transport and wet deposition calculation, and the related meteorological fields such as cloud cover, cloud water content, and precipitation. The aerosol size distributions simulated by the three models are compared to observations in the boundary layer. The characteristic shape and magnitude of the distribution functions are reasonably reproduced in typical conditions (i.e., clean, polluted and transition areas). Biases in the mode parameters over the remote oceans and the China adjacent seas are probably caused by the fixed mode variance in the mathematical formulations used

  12. Aerosol characterization over Sundarban mangrove forest at the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Das, Sanat Kumar; Sarkar, Chirantan; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Singh, Soumendra; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A comprehensive study was conducted on chemical characterization of size segregated and cumulative aerosols during winter, 2015 and summer 2016 over a remote mangrove forest at Sundarban at the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal. Aerosols originated from the surf zone at the land-ocean boundary of Sundarban mangrove forest and aerosols advected from Kolkata and other metropolitan and urban cities at Indo-Gangetic Plain were characterized in terms of major water soluble inorganic species. Attempt was made to investigate the combined effect of locally generated sea-salt and advected anthropogenic aerosols could change the pristine marine character at this region during the above mentioned periods. Significant chloride depletion from sea-salt aerosols was observed in coarse and ultrafine mode compared to fine mode in winter whereas reverse trend was observed during summer. On an average the chloride to sodium ratio in PM10 aerosol was found to be around 0.6 which was much lower than that in sea-water. It was observed that non-sea-sulphate and nitrate aerosols were the major species depleting chloride from sea-salt aerosols. This supported the interaction between fresh marine and polluted anthropogenic aerosols. The average concentration of PM10 aerosols was 64 μg m-3 in winter and 89 μg m-3 in summer. Major water soluble ionic species were used for the source apportionment of aerosol during the two seasons. On an average it was observed that 60-70 % of total PM10 aerosols were constituted by the major water soluble ionic species. Emission flux and deposition flux of aerosols were also studied over this remote forest region. It was also observed that anthropogenic ionic species were mostly accumulated in the ultrafine and fine mode region both during winter and summer. On the other hand sea-salt species were mostly accumulated in the coarse mode region. Sulphate aerosol showed bimodal distribution with prominent peaks both at ultrafine/fine and coarse mode region

  13. Toward a minimal representation of aerosol direct and indirect effects: model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Easter, R. C.; Ghan, S. J.; Zaveri, R.; Rasch, P.; Shi, X.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Vitt, F.; Conley, A.; Park, S.; Neale, R.; Hannay, C.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Hess, P.; Mahowald, N.; Collins, W.; Iacono, M. J.; Bretherton, C. S.; Flanner, M. G.; Mitchell, D.

    2011-12-01

    A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), and a version with three lognormal modes (MAM3) for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries) simulations. Major approximations in MAM3 include assuming immediate mixing of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) with other aerosol components, merging of the MAM7 fine dust and fine sea salt modes into the accumulation mode, merging of the MAM7 coarse dust and coarse sea salt modes into the single coarse mode, and neglecting the explicit treatment of ammonia and ammonium cycles. Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7 as most (~90%) of these aerosol species are in the accumulation mode. Differences of POM and BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%) because of the assumed hygroscopic nature of POM, so that much of the freshly emitted POM and BC is wet-removed before mixing internally with soluble aerosol species. Sensitivity tests with the POM assumed to be hydrophobic and with slower aging increase the POM and BC concentrations, especially at high latitudes (by several times). The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of the log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical

  14. Global microphysical simulation of stratospheric sulfate aerosol after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sekiya, T.; Sudo, K.

    2014-12-01

    An explosive volcanic eruption can inject a large amount of SO2 into the stratosphere, which is oxidized to form sulfate aerosol. Such aerosol has an impact on the Earth's radiative budget by enhancing back-scattering of the solar radiation. Changes in the size distribution of the aerosol were observed after large volcanic eruptions. Representing the changes in size distribution is important for climate simulation, because the changes affect climate responses to large volcanic eruptions. This study newly developed an aerosol microphysics module and investigated changes in stratospheric sulfate aerosol after the Mt. Pinatubo eruption in the framework of a chemistry-aerosol coupled climate model MIROC-CHASER/SPRINTARS. The module represents aerosol size distribution with three lognormal modes (nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation modes) and includes nucleation, condensation growth/evaporation, and coagulation processes. As a model evaluation, we tested reproducibility of the impacts of the Mt. Pinatubo eruption. We carried out a simulation, in which 20 Mt of SO2 and 100 Mt of volcanic ash were injected respectively into 25 km and 16—22 km altitudes over Mt. Pinatubo (120.4°E, 15.1°N) on June 15th 1991. We compared the model results with space-borne and balloon-borne observations. Although our model overestimated a near-global mean (60°N—60°S) of stratospheric aerosol optical depth (SAOD) observed by SAGE II instrument until one year after the eruption, it reproduced the observed SAOD in the subsequent period. The model well captured the observed increase of effective radius at 20 km altitude in the northern midlatitudes. In addition, we analyzed the pathway of volcanic sulfur from SO2 to sulfate aerosol. The most amount of the volcanic sulfur was converted from SO2 to accumulation mode aerosol by 100 days after the eruption. The conversion into the accumulation mode aerosol is attributable to coagulation until the first 14 days and to condensation growth

  15. Enhanced extinction of visible radiation due to hydrated aerosols in mist and fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Dupont, J.-C.; Hammer, E.; Hoyle, C. R.; Haeffelin, M.; Burnet, F.; Jolivet, D.

    2015-06-01

    The study assesses the contribution of aerosols to the extinction of visible radiation in the mist-fog-mist cycle. Relative humidity is large in the mist-fog-mist cycle, and aerosols most efficient in interacting with visible radiation are hydrated and compose the accumulation mode. Measurements of the microphysical and optical properties of these hydrated aerosols with diameters larger than 0.4 μm were carried out near Paris, during November 2011, under ambient conditions. Eleven mist-fog-mist cycles were observed, with a cumulated fog duration of 96 h, and a cumulated mist-fog-mist cycle duration of 240 h. In mist, aerosols grew by taking up water at relative humidities larger than 93%, causing a visibility decrease below 5 km. While visibility decreased down from 5 to a few kilometres, the mean size of the hydrated aerosols increased, and their number concentration (Nha) increased from approximately 160 to approximately 600 cm-3. When fog formed, droplets became the strongest contributors to visible radiation extinction, and liquid water content (LWC) increased beyond 7 mg m-3. Hydrated aerosols of the accumulation mode co-existed with droplets, as interstitial non-activated aerosols. Their size continued to increase, and some aerosols achieved diameters larger than 2.5 μm. The mean transition diameter between the aerosol accumulation mode and the small droplet mode was 4.0 ± 1.1 μm. Nha also increased on average by 60 % after fog formation. Consequently, the mean contribution to extinction in fog was 20 ± 15% from hydrated aerosols smaller than 2.5 μm and 6 ± 7% from larger aerosols. The standard deviation was large because of the large variability of Nha in fog, which could be smaller than in mist or 3 times larger. The particle extinction coefficient in fog can be computed as the sum of a droplet component and an aerosol component, which can be approximated by 3.5 Nha (Nha in cm-3 and particle extinction coefficient in Mm-1. We observed an influence of

  16. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  17. Processes controlling the annual cycle of Arctic aerosol number and size distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, Betty; Martin, Randall V.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Tunved, Peter; Breider, Thomas J.; D'Andrea, Stephen D.; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-03-01

    Measurements at high-Arctic sites (Alert, Nunavut, and Mt. Zeppelin, Svalbard) during the years 2011 to 2013 show a strong and similar annual cycle in aerosol number and size distributions. Each year at both sites, the number of aerosols with diameters larger than 20 nm exhibits a minimum in October and two maxima, one in spring associated with a dominant accumulation mode (particles 100 to 500 nm in diameter) and a second in summer associated with a dominant Aitken mode (particles 20 to 100 nm in diameter). Seasonal-mean aerosol effective diameter from measurements ranges from about 180 in summer to 260 nm in winter. This study interprets these annual cycles with the GEOS-Chem-TOMAS global aerosol microphysics model. Important roles are documented for several processes (new-particle formation, coagulation scavenging in clouds, scavenging by precipitation, and transport) in controlling the annual cycle in Arctic aerosol number and size. Our simulations suggest that coagulation scavenging of interstitial aerosols in clouds by aerosols that have activated to form cloud droplets strongly limits the total number of particles with diameters less than 200 nm throughout the year. We find that the minimum in total particle number in October can be explained by diminishing new-particle formation within the Arctic, limited transport of pollution from lower latitudes, and efficient wet removal. Our simulations indicate that the summertime-dominant Aitken mode is associated with efficient wet removal of accumulation-mode aerosols, which limits the condensation sink for condensable vapours. This in turn promotes new-particle formation and growth. The dominant accumulation mode during spring is associated with build up of transported pollution from outside the Arctic coupled with less-efficient wet-removal processes at colder temperatures. We recommend further attention to the key processes of new-particle formation, interstitial coagulation, and wet removal and their delicate

  18. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  19. Regional Biases in Droplet Activation Parameterizations: Strong Influence on Aerosol Second Indirect Effect in the Community Atmosphere Model v5.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morales, R.; Nenes, A.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions constitute one of the most uncertain aspects of anthropogenic climate change estimates. The magnitude of these interactions as represented in climate models strongly depends on the process of aerosol activation. This process is the most direct physical link between aerosols and cloud microphysical properties. Calculation of droplet number in GCMs requires the computation of new droplet formation (i.e., droplet activation), through physically based activation parameterizations. Considerable effort has been placed in ensuring that droplet activation parameterizations have a physically consistent response to changes in aerosol number concentration. However, recent analyses using an adjoint sensitivity approach showed that parameterizations can exhibit considerable biases in their response to other aerosol properties, such as aerosol modal diameter or to the aerosol chemical composition. This is a potentially important factor in estimating aerosol indirect effects since changes in aerosol properties from pre-industrial times to present day exhibit a very strong regional signature. In this work we use the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM5) to show that the regional imprint of the changes in aerosol properties during the last century interacts with the droplet activation parameterization in a way that these biases are amplified over climatically relevant regions. Two commonly used activation routines, the CAM5 default, Abdul-Razzak and Ghan parameterization, as well as the Fountoukis and Nenes parameterization are used in this study. We further explored the impacts of Nd parameterization biases in the first and second aerosol indirect effects separately, by performing simulations were droplet number was not allowed to intervene in the precipitation initiation process. The simulations performed show that an unphysical response to changes in the diameter of accumulation mode aerosol translates into extremely high Nd concentrations over South

  20. Light extinction by aerosols during summer air pollution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Y. J.; Fraser, R. S.

    1983-01-01

    In order to utilize satellite measurements of optical thickness over land for estimating aerosol properties during air pollution episodes, the optical thickness was measured from the surface and investigated. Aerosol optical thicknesses have been derived from solar transmission measurements in eight spectral bands within the band lambda 440-870 nm during the summers of 1980 and 1981 near Washington, DC. The optical thicknesses for the eight bands are strongly correlated. It was found that first eigenvalue of the covariance matrix of all observations accounts for 99 percent of the trace of the matrix. Since the measured aerosol optical thickness was closely proportional to the wavelength raised to a power, the aerosol size distribution derived from it is proportional to the diameter (d) raised to a power for the range of diameters between 0.1 to 1.0 micron. This power is insensitive to the total optical thickness. Changes in the aerosol optical thickness depend on several aerosol parameters, but it is difficult to identify the dominant one. The effects of relative humidity and accumulation mode concentration on the optical thickness are analyzed theoretically, and compared with the measurements.

  1. Comparing the mechanism of water condensation and evaporation in glassy aerosol

    PubMed Central

    Bones, David L.; Reid, Jonathan P.; Lienhard, Daniel M.; Krieger, Ulrich K.

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric models generally assume that aerosol particles are in equilibrium with the surrounding gas phase. However, recent observations that secondary organic aerosols can exist in a glassy state have highlighted the need to more fully understand the kinetic limitations that may control water partitioning in ambient particles. Here, we explore the influence of slow water diffusion in the condensed aerosol phase on the rates of both condensation and evaporation, demonstrating that significant inhibition in mass transfer occurs for ultraviscous aerosol, not just for glassy aerosol. Using coarse mode (3–4 um radius) ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/aqueous droplets as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosol, we demonstrate that the timescale for particle equilibration correlates with bulk viscosity and can be ≫103 s. Extrapolation of these timescales to particle sizes in the accumulation mode (e.g., approximately 100 nm) by applying the Stokes-Einstein equation suggests that the kinetic limitations imposed on mass transfer of water by slow bulk phase diffusion must be more fully investigated for atmospheric aerosol. Measurements have been made on particles covering a range in dynamic viscosity from < 0.1 to > 1013 Pa s. We also retrieve the radial inhomogeneities apparent in particle composition during condensation and evaporation and contrast the dynamics of slow dissolution of a viscous core into a labile shell during condensation with the slow percolation of water during evaporation through a more homogeneous viscous particle bulk. PMID:22753520

  2. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Wagner, N. L.; Anderson, B. E.; Beyersdorf, A.; Campuzano-Jost, P.; Day, D. A.; Diskin, G. S.; Gordon, T. D.; Jimenez, J. L.; Lack, D. A.; Liao, J.; Markovic, M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Perring, A. E.; Richardson, M. S.; Schwarz, J. P.; Welti, A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Murphy, D. M.

    2015-11-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013. Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation of these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ~ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental airmasses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 μm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  3. Aerosol optical properties in the southeastern United States in summer - Part 2: Sensitivity of aerosol optical depth to relative humidity and aerosol parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Wagner, Nicholas L.; Anderson, Bruce E.; Beyersdorf, Andreas; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Day, Douglas A.; Diskin, Glenn S.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Jimenez, Jose L.; Lack, Daniel A.; Liao, Jin; Markovic, Milos Z.; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Perring, Anne E.; Richardson, Matthews S.; Schwarz, Joshua P.; Welti, Andre; Ziemba, Luke D.; Murphy, Daniel M.

    2016-04-01

    Aircraft observations of meteorological, trace gas, and aerosol properties were made between May and September 2013 in the southeastern United States (US). Regionally representative aggregate vertical profiles of median and interdecile ranges of the measured parameters were constructed from 37 individual aircraft profiles made in the afternoon when a well-mixed boundary layer with typical fair-weather cumulus was present (Wagner et al., 2015). We use these 0-4 km aggregate profiles and a simple model to calculate the sensitivity of aerosol optical depth (AOD) to changes in dry aerosol mass, relative humidity, mixed-layer height, the central diameter and width of the particle size distribution, hygroscopicity, and dry and wet refractive index, while holding the other parameters constant. The calculated sensitivity is a result of both the intrinsic sensitivity and the observed range of variation in these parameters. These observationally based sensitivity studies indicate that the relationship between AOD and dry aerosol mass in these conditions in the southeastern US can be highly variable and is especially sensitive to relative humidity (RH). For example, calculated AOD ranged from 0.137 to 0.305 as the RH was varied between the 10th and 90th percentile profiles with dry aerosol mass held constant. Calculated AOD was somewhat less sensitive to aerosol hygroscopicity, mean size, and geometric standard deviation, σg. However, some chemistry-climate models prescribe values of σg substantially larger than we or others observe, leading to potential high biases in model-calculated AOD of ˜ 25 %. Finally, AOD was least sensitive to observed variations in dry and wet aerosol refractive index and to changes in the height of the well-mixed surface layer. We expect these findings to be applicable to other moderately polluted and background continental air masses in which an accumulation mode between 0.1-0.5 µm diameter dominates aerosol extinction.

  4. Sensitivity of aerosol properties to new particle formation mechanism and to primary emissions in a continental-scale chemical transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang,L.S.; Schwartz, S.E.; McGraw, R.; Lewis, E.R.

    2009-04-02

    Four theoretical formulations of new particle formation (NPF) and one empirical formulation are used to examine the sensitivity of observable aerosol properties to NPF formulation and to properties of emitted particles in a continental-scale model for the United States over a 1-month simulation (July 2004). For each formulation the dominant source of Aitken mode particles is NPF with only a minor contribution from primary emissions, whereas for the accumulation mode both emissions and transfer of particles from the Aitken mode are important. The dominant sink of Aitken mode number is coagulation, whereas the dominant sink of accumulation mode number is wet deposition (including cloud processing), with a minor contribution from coagulation. The aerosol mass concentration, which is primarily in the accumulation mode, is relatively insensitive to NPF formulation despite order-of-magnitude differences in the Aitken mode number concentration among the different parameterizations. The dominant sensitivity of accumulation mode number concentration is to the number of emitted particles (for constant mass emission rate). Comparison of modeled aerosol properties with aircraft measurements shows, as expected, better agreement in aerosol mass concentration than in aerosol number concentration for all NPF formulations considered. These comparisons yield instances of rather accurate simulations in the planetary boundary layer, with poor model performance in the free troposphere attributed mainly to lack of representation of biomass burning and/or to long-range transport of particles from outside the model domain. Agreement between model results and measurements is improved by using smaller grid cells (12 km versus 60 km).

  5. Influences of in-cloud aerosol scavenging parameterizations on aerosol concentrations and wet deposition in ECHAM5-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croft, B.; Lohmann, U.; Martin, R. V.; Stier, P.; Wurzler, S.; Feichter, J.; Hoose, C.; Heikkilä, U.; van Donkelaar, A.; Ferrachat, S.

    2010-02-01

    A diagnostic cloud nucleation scavenging scheme, which determines stratiform cloud scavenging ratios for both aerosol mass and number distributions, based on cloud droplet, and ice crystal number concentrations, is introduced into the ECHAM5-HAM global climate model. This scheme is coupled with a size-dependent in-cloud impaction scavenging parameterization for both cloud droplet-aerosol, and ice crystal-aerosol collisions. The aerosol mass scavenged in stratiform clouds is found to be primarily (>90%) scavenged by cloud nucleation processes for all aerosol species, except for dust (50%). The aerosol number scavenged is primarily (>90%) attributed to impaction. 99% of this impaction scavenging occurs in clouds with temperatures less than 273 K. Sensitivity studies are presented, which compare aerosol concentrations, burdens, and deposition for a variety of in-cloud scavenging approaches: prescribed fractions, a more computationally expensive prognostic aerosol cloud processing treatment, and the new diagnostic scheme, also with modified assumptions about in-cloud impaction and nucleation scavenging. Our results show that while uncertainties in the representation of in-cloud scavenging processes can lead to differences in the range of 20-30% for the predicted annual, global mean aerosol mass burdens, and near to 50% for accumulation mode aerosol number burden, the differences in predicted aerosol mass concentrations can be up to one order of magnitude, particularly for regions of the middle troposphere with temperatures below 273 K where mixed and ice phase clouds exist. Different parameterizations for impaction scavenging changed the predicted global, annual mean number removal attributed to ice clouds by seven-fold, and the global, annual dust mass removal attributed to impaction by two orders of magnitude. Closer agreement with observations of black carbon profiles from aircraft (increases near to one order of magnitude for mixed phase clouds), mid

  6. Effects of diesel exhaust aftertreatment devices on concentrations and size distribution of aerosols in underground mine air.

    PubMed

    Bugarski, Aleksandar D; Schnakenberg, George H; Hummer, Ion A; Cauda, Emanuele; Janisko, Samuel I; Patts, Larry D

    2009-09-01

    Three types of uncatalyzed diesel particulate filter (DPF) systems, three types of high-temperature disposable filter elements (DFEs), and one diesel oxidation catalytic converter (DOC) were evaluated in underground mine conditions for their effects on the concentrations and size distributions of diesel aerosols. Those effects were compared with the effects of a standard muffler. The experimental work was conducted directly in an underground environment using a unique diesel laboratory developed in an underground experimental mine. The DPF systems reduced total mass of aerosols in the mine air approximately 10-fold for light-load and 20-fold or more for high-load test conditions. The DFEs offered similar reductions in aerosol mass concentrations. The efficiency of the new DFEs significantly increased with accumulation of operating time and buildup of diesel particulate matter in the porous structure of the filter elements. A single laundering process did not exhibit substantial effects on performance of the filter element The effectiveness of DPFs and DFEs in removing aerosols by number was strongly influenced by engine operating mode. The concentrations of nucleation mode aerosols in the mine air were found to be substantially higher for both DPFs and DFEs when the engine was operated at high-load modes than at low-load modes. The effects of the DOC on mass and number concentrations of aerosols in mine air were relatively minor when compared to those of the DPF and DFE systems. PMID:19764243

  7. Ion balances of size-resolved tropospheric aerosol samples: implications for the acidity and atmospheric processing of aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Hillamo, Risto; Teinilä, Kimmo; Pakkanen, Tuomo; Allegrini, Ivo; Sparapani, Roberto

    A large set of size-resolved aerosol samples was inspected with regard to their ion balance to shed light on how the aerosol acidity changes with particle size in the lower troposphere and what implications this might have for the atmospheric processing of aerosols. Quite different behaviour between the remote and more polluted environments could be observed. At the remote sites, practically the whole accumulation mode had cation-to-anion ratios clearly below unity, indicating that these particles were quite acidic. The supermicron size range was considerably less acidic and may in some cases have been close to neutral or even alkaline. An interesting feature common to the remote sites was a clear jump in the cation-to-anion ratio when going from the accumulation to the Aitken mode. The most likely reason for this was cloud processing which, via in-cloud sulphate production, makes the smallest accumulation-mode particles more acidic than the non-activated Aitken-mode particles. A direct consequence of the less acidic nature of the Aitken mode is that it can take up semi-volatile, water-soluble gases much easier than the accumulation mode. This feature may have significant implications for atmospheric cloud condensation nuclei production in remote environments. In rural and urban locations, the cation-to-anion ratio was close to unity over most of the accumulation mode, but increased significantly when going to either larger or smaller particle sizes. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the supermicron size range were ascribed to carbonate associated with mineral dust. The ubiquitous presence of carbonate in these particles indicates that they were neutral or alkaline, making them good sites for heterogeneous reactions involving acidic trace gases. The high cation-to-anion ratios in the Aitken mode suggest that these particles contained some water-soluble anions not detected by our chemical analysis. This is worth keeping in mind when investigating the hygroscopic

  8. Toward a Minimal Representation of Aerosols in Climate Models: Description and Evaluation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Xiaohong; Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Rasch, Philip J.; Shi, Xiangjun; Lamarque, J.-F.; Gettelman, A.; Morrison, H.; Vitt, Francis; Conley, Andrew; Park, S.; Neale, Richard; Hannay, Cecile; Ekman, A. M.; Hess, Peter; Mahowald, N.; Collins, William D.; Iacono, Michael J.; Bretherton, Christopher S.; Flanner, M. G.; Mitchell, David

    2012-05-21

    A modal aerosol module (MAM) has been developed for the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5), the atmospheric component of the Community Earth System Model version 1 (CESM1). MAM is capable of simulating the aerosol size distribution and both internal and external mixing between aerosol components, treating numerous complicated aerosol processes and aerosol physical, chemical and optical properties in a physically based manner. Two MAM versions were developed: a more complete version with seven-lognormal modes (MAM7), and a three-lognormal mode version (MAM3) for the purpose of long-term (decades to centuries) simulations. Major approximations in MAM3 include assuming immediate mixing of primary organic matter (POM) and black carbon (BC) with other aerosol components, merging of the MAM7 fine dust and fine sea salt modes into the accumulation mode, merging of the MAM7 coarse dust and coarse sea salt modes into the single coarse mode, and neglecting the explicit treatment of ammonia and ammonium cycles. Simulated sulfate and secondary organic aerosol (SOA) mass concentrations are remarkably similar between MAM3 and MAM7 as most ({approx}90%) of these aerosol species are in the accumulation mode. Differences of POM and BC concentrations between MAM3 and MAM7 are also small (mostly within 10%) because of the assumed hygroscopic nature of POM, so that freshly emitted POM and BC are wet-removed before mixing internally with soluble aerosol species. Sensitivity tests with the POM assumed to be hydrophobic and with slower aging process increase the POM and BC concentrations, especially at high latitudes (by several times). The mineral dust global burden differs by 10% and sea salt burden by 30-40% between MAM3 and MAM7 mainly due to the different size ranges for dust and sea salt modes and different standard deviations of log-normal size distribution for sea salt modes between MAM3 and MAM7. The model is able to qualitatively capture the observed geographical and

  9. The Messy Aerosol Submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): Description and a Box Model Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, Valentina

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl)chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealized marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HClCl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse particles. MADE3 and PartMC- MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes about 2 micrometers) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distribution, and also in terms of aerosol composition. Considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems suitable for application within a global model.

  10. Aerosol Remote Sensing in Polar Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    defined to represent the average features of nuclei, accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface-atmosphere system over polar regions.

  11. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Wehrli, Christoph; et al

    2015-01-01

    , accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.« less

  12. Aerosol remote sensing in polar regions

    SciTech Connect

    Tomasi, Claudio; Kokhanovsky, Alexander A.; Lupi, Angelo; Ritter, Christoph; Smirnov, Alexander; O'Neill, Norman T.; Stone, Robert S.; Holben, Brent N.; Nyeki, Stephan; Mazzola, Mauro; Lanconelli, Christian; Vitale, Vito; Stebel, Kerstin; Aaltonen, Veijo; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Rodriguez, Edith; Herber, Andreas B.; Radionov, Vladimir F.; Zielinski, Tymon; Petelski, Tomasz; Sakerin, Sergey M.; Kabanov, Dmitry M.; Xue, Yong; Mei, Linlu; Istomina, Larysa; Wagener, Richard; McArthur, Bruce; Sobolewski, Piotr S.; Kivi, Rigel; Courcoux, Yann; Larouche, Pierre; Broccardo, Stephen; Piketh, Stuart J.

    2015-01-01

    , accumulation and coarse mode particles for Arctic haze, summer background aerosol, Asian dust and boreal forest fire smoke, and for various background austral summer aerosol types at coastal and high-altitude Antarctic sites. The main columnar aerosol optical characteristics were determined for all 14 particle modes, based on in-situ measurements of the scattering and absorption coefficients. Diurnally averaged direct aerosol-induced radiative forcing and efficiency were calculated for a set of multimodal aerosol extinction models, using various Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function models over vegetation-covered, oceanic and snow-covered surfaces. These gave a reliable measure of the pronounced effects of aerosols on the radiation balance of the surface–atmosphere system over polar regions.

  13. Study of Aerosol Liquid Water Content based on Hygroscopicity Measurements at High Relative Humidity in the North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Y.; Zhao, C.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosol has significant effects on direct/indirect climate forcing, visibility, tropospheric chemistry and human health. Water can represent an extensive proportion of the mass of aerosol particles, and can also serve as a medium for aqueous-phase reactions in such particulate matter. In this study, a new method is proposed to estimate the aerosol liquid water content at high relative humidity, based on aerosol hygroscopic growth factors, particle number size distribution and relative humidity measured during the Haze in China (HaChi) campaign of July-August, 2009. The aerosol liquid water content estimated by this method is compared to the results calculated by a thermodynamic equilibrium model (ISORROPIA II). The calculation results from these two methods agree well at high relative humidity above 60% with the correlation coefficient of 0.9658. At relative humidity lower than 60%, the thermodynamic equilibrium model underestimates the aerosol liquid water content. The discrepancy is mainly caused by the ISORROPIA II model, which considers only limited chemical species. The mean and maximum value of aerosol liquid water content during July-August, 2009 in the North China Plain reached 1.69×10^{-4}g/m^3 and 9.71×10^{-4}g/m^3, respectively. Aerosol liquid water content is highly related to the relative humidity. There exists a distinct diurnal variation of the aerosol liquid water content, with lower values during daytime and higher ones during night time. The contribution to the aerosol liquid water content from the accumulation mode is dominating among all the aerosol particle modes.

  14. Enhanced extinction of visible radiation due to hydrated aerosols in mist and fog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elias, T.; Dupont, J.-C.; Hammer, E.; Hoyle, C. R.; Haeffelin, M.; Burnet, F.; Jolivet, D.

    2015-01-01

    The study assesses the contribution of aerosols to the extinction of visible radiation in the mist-fog-mist cycle. Measurements of the microphysical and optical properties of hydrated aerosols with diameters larger than 400 nm, composing the accumulation mode, which are the most efficient to interact with visible radiation, were carried out near Paris, during November 2011, in ambient conditions. Eleven mist-fog-mist cycles were observed, with cumulated fog duration of 95 h, and cumulated mist-fog-mist duration of 240 h. In mist, aerosols grew up by taking up water at relative humidities larger than 93%, causing a visibility decrease below 5 km. While visibility decreased down to few km, the mean size of the hydrated aerosols increased, and their number concentration (Nha) increased from approximately 160 to approximately 600 cm-3. When fog formed, droplets became the strongest contributors to visible radiation extinction, and liquid water content (LWC) increased beyond 7 mg m-3. Hydrated aerosols of the accumulation mode co-existed with droplets, as interstitial non-activated aerosols. Their size continued to increase, and a significant proportion of aerosols achieved diameters larger than 2.5 μm. The mean transition diameter between the accumulation mode and the small droplet mode was 4.0 ± 1.1 μm. Moreover Nha increased on average by 60% after fog formation. Consequently the mean aerosol contribution to extinction in fog was 20 ± 15% for diameter smaller than 2.5 μm and 6 ± 7% beyond. The standard deviation is large because of the large variability of Nha in fog, which could be smaller than in mist or three times larger. The particle extinction coefficient in fog can be computed as the sum of a droplet component and an aerosol component, which can be approximated by 3.5 Nha (Nha in cm-3 and particle extinction coefficient in Mm-1). We observed an influence of the main formation process on Nha, but not on the contribution to fog extinction by aerosols

  15. Aerosol optical properties and types over the tropical urban region of Hyderabad, India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharol, Shailesh Kumar; Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Rani Sharma, Anu; Kvs, Badarinath; Kambezidis, H. D.

    outbreaks), while the presence of mixed aerosols, without dominance of the coarse or accumulation mode is the usual situation. According to the analysis the three individual components of differing origin, composition and optical characteristics are, a) an urban/industrial aerosol type composed of aerosols produced locally and all year round by combustion activities in the city or long-range transported (mainly in spring) biomass burning, b) an aerosol type of mineral origin raised by the wind in the deserts (mainly in premonsoon) or constitutes coarse-mode aerosols under high relative humidity conditions mainly in the monsoon period, and c) an aerosol type with a marine influence under background conditions occurred in monsoon and postmonsoon periods. Nevertheless, the mixed or undetermined aerosol type dominates with percentages varying from 44.3% (premonsoon) to 72.9% (postmonsoon). Spec-tral AOD and α data are analyzed to obtain information about the adequacy of the simple use of the ˚ngstrüm exponent for characterizing the aerosols. This is achieved by taking advantage A of the spectral variation of lnAOD vs lnλ, the so-called curvature. The results show that the spectral curvature can be effectively used as a tool for aerosol types discrimination, since the fine-mode aerosols exhibit negative curvature, while the coarse-mode particles positive. The present study is among the first over Hyderabad focusing on the seasonal pattern of aerosol properties and types and aiming at associating them with local emissions, regional climatology and long-range transport. Keywords: AOD, aerosol types; sun photometer; back trajectories; Hyderabad; India

  16. "APEC Blue": Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R

    2016-01-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61-67% and 51-57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2-3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as "APEC Blue". We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution. PMID:26891104

  17. Aerosol observations and growth rates in the tropical tropopause layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddicor, D. A.; Vaughan, G.; Choularton, T. W.; Bower, K. N.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Williams, P. I.; Flynn, M.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Pätz, W.; Isaac, P.; Hacker, J.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-01-01

    We present a case study of Aitken and accumulation mode aerosol observed downwind of the anvils of deep tropical thunderstorms. The measurements were made by condensation nuclei counters flown on the Egrett high-altitude aircraft from Darwin during the ACTIVE campaign, in monsoon conditions producing widespread convection over land and ocean. Maximum measured concentrations of aerosol in the size range 10-100 nm were 25 000 cm-3 STP. By calculating back-trajectories from the observations, and projecting on to infrared satellite images, the time since the air exited cloud was estimated. In this way a time scale of ~ 3-4 h was derived for the 10-100 nm aerosol concentration to reach its peak. We examine the hypothesis that the growth in aerosol concentrations can be explained by production of sulphuric acid from SO2 followed by particle nucleation and coagulation. Estimates of the sulphuric acid production rate show that the observations are only consistent with this hypothesis if the particles coagulate to sizes > 10 nm much more quickly than is suggested by current theory. Alternatively, other condensible gases (possibly organic) drive the growth of aerosol particles in the TTL.

  18. Estimation of aerosol optical properties considering hygroscopicity and light absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chang Hoon; Lee, Ji Yi; Kim, Yong Pyo

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the influences of water solubility and light absorption on the optical properties of organic aerosols were investigated. A size-resolved model for calculating optical properties was developed by combining thermodynamic hygroscopic growth and aerosol dynamics models. The internal mixtures based on the homogeneous and core-shell mixing were compared. The results showed that the radiative forcing (RF) of Water Soluble Organic Carbon (WSOC) aerosol can be estimated to range from -0.07 to -0.49 W/m2 for core-shell mixing and from -0.09 to -0.47 W/m2 for homogeneous mixing under the simulation conditions (RH = 60%). The light absorption properties of WSOC showed the mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of WSOC can be estimated 0.43-0.5 m2/g, which accounts for 5-10% of the MAE of elemental carbon (EC). The effect on MAE of increasing the imaginary refractive index of WSOC was also calculated, and it was found that increasing the imaginary refractive index by 0.001i enhanced WSOC aerosol absorption by approximately 0.02 m2/g. Finally, the sensitivity test results revealed that changes in the fine mode fraction (FMF) and in the geometric mean diameter of the accumulation mode play important roles in estimating RF during hygroscopic growth.

  19. Diurnal cycling of urban aerosols under different weather regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gregorič, Asta; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Remškar, Maja; Vaupotič, Janja; Stanič, Samo

    2016-04-01

    A one month measurement campaign was performed in summer 2014 in Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia (population 280,000), aiming to study temporal and spatial distribution of urban aerosols and the mixing state of primary and secondary aerosols. Two background locations were chosen for this purpose, the first one in the city center (urban background - KIS) and the second one in the suburban background (Brezovica). Simultaneous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle number size distribution of submicron aerosols (PM1) were conducted at both locations. In the summer season emission from traffic related sources is expected to be the main local contribution to BC concentration. Concentrations of aerosol species and gaseous pollutants within the planetary boundary layer are controlled by the balance between emission sources of primary aerosols and gases, production of secondary aerosols, chemical reactions of precursor gases under solar radiation and the rate of dilution by mixing within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) as well as with tropospheric air. Only local emission sources contribute to BC concentration during the stable PBL with low mixing layer height, whereas during the time of fully mixed PBL, regionally transported BC and other aerosols can contribute to the surface measurements. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol at the urban and suburban background location under different weather regimes. Particles in three size modes - nucleation (< 25 nm, NUM), Aitken (25 - 90 nm, AIM) and accumulation mode (90 - 800 nm, ACM), as well as BC mass concentration were evaluated separately for sunny, cloudy and rainy days, taking into account modelled values of PBL height. Higher particle number and black carbon concentrations were observed at the urban background (KIS) than at the suburban background location (Brezovica). Significant diurnal pattern of total particle concentration and black carbon concentration was observed at both

  20. Multi-year investigations of aerosols from an island station, Port Blair, in the Bay of Bengal: climatology and source impacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naseema Beegum, S.; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Gogoi, Mukunda M.; Babu, S. Suresh; Pandey, S. K.

    2012-08-01

    Long-term measurements of spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) using multi-wavelength solar radiometer (MWR) for a period of seven years (from 2002 to 2008) from the island location, Port Blair (11.63° N, 92.7° E, PBR) in the Bay of Bengal (BoB), along with the concurrent measurements of the size distribution of near-surface aerosols, have been analyzed to delineate the climatological features of aerosols over eastern BoB. In order to identity the contribution of different aerosol types from distinct sources, concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis has been employed. Climatologically, AODs increase from January to reach peak value of ~0.4 (at 500 nm) in March, followed by a weak decrease towards May. Over this general pattern, significant modulations of intra-seasonal time scales, caused by the changes in the relative strength of distinctively different sources, are noticed. The derivative (α') of the Angstrom wavelength exponent α in the wavelength domain, along with CWT analysis, are used to delineate the different important aerosol types that influence this remote island. Corresponding changes in the aerosol size distributions are inferred from the numerical inversion of the spectral AODs as well from (surface) measurements. The analyses revealed that advection plays a major role in modifying the aerosol properties over the remote island location, the potential sources contributing to the accumulation mode (coarse mode) aerosols over eastern BoB being the East Asia and South China regions (Indian mainland and the oceanic regions).

  1. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  2. Radioactive Aerosols as an Index of Air Pollution in the City of Thessaloniki, Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ioannidou, A.; Papastefanou, C.

    2010-01-01

    This study summarizes results of an investigation done in order to find out how the radioactive aerosols of 7Be could serve as indicators of air pollution conditions. Beryllium-7 is a cosmic-ray produced radionuclide with an important fraction of its production to take place in the upper troposphere. Once it is formed is rapidly associated with submicron aerosol particles and participates in the formation and growth of the accumulation mode aerosols, which is a major reservoir of pollutants in the atmosphere. In order to define any influence of AMAD of 7Be aerosols by air pollution conditions, the aerodynamic size distribution of 7Be aerosols was determined by collecting samples at different locations in the suburban area of the city of Thessaloniki, including rural areas, industrial areas, high elevations, marine environment and the airport area. The aerodynamic size distribution of 7Be aerosols in different locations was obtained by using Andersen 1-ACFM cascade impactors and the Activity Median Aerodynamic Diameter (AMAD) was determined. Some dependency of the AMADs on height has been observed, while in near marine environment the 7Be activity size distribution was dominant in the upper size range of aerosol particles. Low AMADs as low as 0.62 to 0.74 μm of 7Be aerosols have been observed at locations characterized with relative low pollution, while it is concluded that in the activity size distribution of ambient aerosols, 7Be changes to larger particle sizes in the presence of pollutants, since low AMADs of 7Be aerosols have been observed at low polluted locations. Preliminary data of simultaneous measurements of 214Pb and 212Pb with gaseous air pollutants CO, NO, NOX, SO2 and total suspended particulate matter (TSP) show that radon decay products near the ground could be a useful index of air pollution potential conditions and transport processes in the boundary layer.

  3. Identification of aerosol types over an urban site based on air-mass trajectory classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pawar, G. V.; Devara, P. C. S.; Aher, G. R.

    2015-10-01

    Columnar aerosol properties retrieved from MICROTOPS II Sun Photometer measurements during 2010-2013 over Pune (18°32‧N; 73°49‧E, 559 m amsl), a tropical urban station in India, are analyzed to identify aerosol types in the atmospheric column. Identification/classification is carried out on the basis of dominant airflow patterns, and the method of discrimination of aerosol types on the basis of relation between aerosol optical depth (AOD500 nm) and Ångström exponent (AE, α). Five potential advection pathways viz., NW/N, SW/S, N, SE/E and L have been identified over the observing site by employing the NOAA-HYSPLIT air mass back trajectory analysis. Based on AE against AOD500 nm scatter plot and advection pathways followed five major aerosol types viz., continental average (CA), marine continental average (MCA), urban/industrial and biomass burning (UB), desert dust (DD) and indeterminate or mixed type (MT) have been identified. In winter, sector SE/E, a representative of air masses traversed over Bay of Bengal and Eastern continental Indian region has relatively small AOD (τpλ = 0.43 ± 0.13) and high AE (α = 1.19 ± 0.15). These values imply the presence of accumulation/sub-micron size anthropogenic aerosols. During pre-monsoon, aerosols from the NW/N sector have high AOD (τpλ = 0.61 ± 0.21), and low AE (α = 0.54 ± 0.14) indicating an increase in the loading of coarse-mode particles over Pune. Dominance of UB type in winter season for all the years (i.e. 2010-2013) may be attributed to both local/transported aerosols. During pre-monsoon seasons, MT is the dominant aerosol type followed by UB and DD, while the background aerosols are insignificant.

  4. Characterization of new particle and secondary aerosol formation during summertime in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y. M.; Zhang, X. Y.; Sun, J. Y.; Lin, W. L.; Gong, S. L.; Shen, X. J.; Yang, S.

    2011-07-01

    Size-resolved aerosol number and mass concentrations and the mixing ratios of O3 and various trace gases were continuously measured at an urban station before and during the Beijing Olympic and Paralympic Games (5 June to 22 September, 2008). 23 new particle formation (NPF) events were identified; these usually were associated with changes in wind direction and/or rising concentrations of gas-phase precursors or after precipitation events. Most of the NPF events started in the morning and continued to noon as particles in the nucleation mode grew into the Aitken mode. From noon to midnight, the aerosols grew into the accumulation mode through condensation and coagulation. Ozone showed a gradual rise starting around 10:00 local time, reached its peak around 15:00 and then declined as the organics increased. The dominant new particle species were organics (40-75% of PM1) and sulphate; nitrate and ammonium were more minor contributors.

  5. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  7. Organic aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Penner, J.E.

    1994-01-01

    Organic aerosols scatter solar radiation. They may also either enhance or decrease concentrations of cloud condensation nuclei. This paper summarizes observed concentrations of aerosols in remote continental and marine locations and provides estimates for the sources of organic aerosol matter. The anthropogenic sources of organic aerosols may be as large as the anthropogenic sources of sulfate aerosols, implying a similar magnitude of direct forcing of climate. The source estimates are highly uncertain and subject to revision in the future. A slow secondary source of organic aerosols of unknown origin may contribute to the observed oceanic concentrations. The role of organic aerosols acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) is described and it is concluded that they may either enhance or decrease the ability of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols to act as CCN.

  8. The role of the equatorial ligands for the redox behavior, mode of cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of platinum(IV) prodrugs.

    PubMed

    Göschl, Simone; Varbanov, Hristo P; Theiner, Sarah; Jakupec, Michael A; Galanski, Markus; Keppler, Bernhard K

    2016-07-01

    The current study aims to elucidate the possible reasons for the significantly different pharmacological behavior of platinum(IV) complexes with cisplatin-, carboplatin- or nedaplatin-like cores and how this difference can be related to their main physicochemical properties. Chlorido-containing complexes are reduced fast (within hours) by ascorbate and are able to unwind plasmid DNA in the presence of ascorbate, while their tri- and tetracarboxylato analogs are generally inert under the same conditions. Comparison of the lipophilicity, cellular accumulation and cytotoxicity of the investigated platinum compounds revealed the necessity to define new structure-property/activity relationships (SPRs and SARs). The higher activity and improved accumulation of platinum(IV) complexes bearing Cl(-) in equatorial position cannot only be attributed to passive diffusion facilitated by their lipophilicity. Therefore, further platinum accumulation experiments under conditions where active/facilitated transport mechanisms are suppressed were performed. Under hypothermic conditions (4°C), accumulation of dichloridoplatinum(IV) complexes is reduced down to 10% of the amount determined at 37°C. These findings suggest the involvement of active and/or facilitated transport in cellular uptake of platinum(IV) complexes with a cisplatin-like core. Studies with ATP depletion mediated by oligomycin and low glucose partially confirmed these observations, but their feasibility was severely limited in the adherent cell culture setting. PMID:27055943

  9. Aerosol-Cloud Interaction at the Land Site of VOCALS-REx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fochesatto, Javier; Shaw, Glenn; Krejci, Radovan; Chand, Duli; Gallarado, Laura; Cordova, Ana

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol-Cloud-Ocean interactions in the South-East Pacific represent one of the best natural laboratories to study aerosol-cloud-climate processes thanks to stable large scale atmospheric and oceanic circulation and large anthropogenic sources associated mainly with copper industry. This article discuss the microphysical and optical characteristics of aerosols in the marine boundary layer (MBL) and the free troposphere(FT) related to the coastal MBL dynamics, stratocumulus cloud formation and dissipation in an environment influenced by air pollution sources in the FT and MBL. The analysis is based on observations from the Land Sites of VOCALS-REx at Paposo (25 S, 70 W, 700 masl) on the Pacific ocean coast, about 150 km south of Antofagasta in Chile and from free tropospheric site at ESO Paranal Observatory located inland at 2435 masl some 40 km NE from Paposo site. Combination of the in situ measurements from both, free troposphere and MBL together with lidar observations provides comprehensive insight into MBL-free troposphere interactions. The aerosol properties in FT are to a large degree controlled by sulfate-dominated aerosol from copper industry in northern Chile. The free tropospheric aerosol close to the coast has very stable accumulation mode dominated size distribution with mode diameter ~0.1 µm, but the aerosol number density for particles > 0.01 µm as well as for particles > 0.26 µm show large variability between 300 and 1600 cm-3 and 5 and 50 cm-3, respectively. The large variability can be attributed to changing influence from individual emission sources due to changing intensity of the coastal jet flow and diurnal ventilation of the shallow boundary layer in hilly region of the Atacama Desert mountain plateau. Polluted aerosols from FT are transported to the MBL along the Andes western slope through katabatic flows and downward mixed into the MBL most intensively in a narrow band along the coast.

  10. Optimization of the Mode of the Uranium-233 Accumulation for Application in Thorium Self-Sufficient Fuel Cycle of Candu Power Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Bergelson, Boris; Gerasimov, Alexander; Tikhomirov, Georgy

    2006-07-01

    Results of calculation studies of the first stage of self-sufficient thorium cycle for CANDU reactor are presented in the paper. The first stage is preliminary accumulation of {sup 233}U in the CANDU reactor itself. Parameters of active core and scheme of fuel reloading were accepted the same as those for CANDU reactor. It was assumed for calculations, that enriched {sup 235}U or plutonium was used as additional fissile material to provide neutrons for {sup 233}U production. Parameters of 10 different variants of the elementary cell of active core were calculated for the lattice pitch, geometry of fuel channels, and fuel assembly of the CANDU reactor. The results presented in the paper allow to determine the time of accumulation of the required amount of {sup 233}U and corresponding number of targets going into processing for {sup 233}U extraction. Optimum ratio of the accumulation time to number of processed targets can be determined using the cost of electric power produced by the reactor and cost of targets along with their processing. (authors)

  11. Mass size distributions of elemental aerosols in industrial area

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Mona; Mohamed, Amer; Ahmed, Abdel-Rahman; Nazmy, Hyam

    2014-01-01

    Outdoor aerosol particles were characterized in industrial area of Samalut city (El-minia/Egypt) using low pressure Berner cascade impactor as an aerosol sampler. The impactor operates at 1.7 m3/h flow rate. Seven elements were investigated including Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu, Mn and Pb using atomic absorption technique. The mean mass concentrations of the elements ranged from 0.42 ng/m3 (for Ba) to 89.62 ng/m3 (for Fe). The mass size distributions of the investigated elements were bi-modal log normal distribution corresponding to the accumulation and coarse modes. The enrichment factors of elements indicate that Ca, Ba, Fe, K, Cu and Mn are mainly emitted into the atmosphere from soil sources while Pb is mostly due to anthropogenic sources. PMID:26644919

  12. Molecular characterization of S- and N-containing organic constituents in ambient aerosols by negative ion mode high-resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-01

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using negative ion mode Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day (6 h each) were collected in Bakersfield, CA on 20-24 June. Four characteristic groups were identified: molecules composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen- (CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). The chemical formula and elemental ratios were consistent with the presence of organonitrates, organosulfate, and nitroxy organosulfates in the negative ion mode mass spectra. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes during the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHONS and CHON) had greater numbers of compounds in the early morning (midnight to 6 A.M.) and night (6 P.M. to midnight) samples, respectively, consistent with nitrate radical chemistry as a likely source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of the number of CHON compounds was bimodal, potentially indicating two types of sources. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources. These data are complementary to previous results from positive ion mode nano-DESI/MS analysis of a subset of the same samples providing a more complete view of aerosol chemical composition at Bakersfield.

  13. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties Among Aerocom Models of a Range of Complexity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, K.; Ghan, S. J.; Easter, R. C.; Liu, X.; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S. E.; Tsigaridis, K.; van Noije, T. P. C.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.

    2014-01-01

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by 12 global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the multimodel- mean data set simulates the global variation of the particle size distribution with a good degree of skill, suggesting

  14. Microspectroscopic Analysis of Anthropogenic- and Biogenic-Influenced Aerosol Particles during the SOAS Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Bondy, A. L.; Nhliziyo, M. V.; Bertman, S. B.; Pratt, K.; Shepson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer, the southeastern United States experiences a cooling haze due to the interaction of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosol sources. An objective of the summer 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) was to improve our understanding of how trace gases and aerosols are contributing to this relative cooling through light scattering and absorption. To improve understanding of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions through secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on primary aerosol cores requires detailed physicochemical characterization of the particles after uptake and processing. Our measurements focus on single particle analysis of aerosols in the accumulation mode (300-1000 nm) collected using a multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) at the Centreville, Alabama SEARCH site. Particles were characterized using an array of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, including: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Raman microspectroscopy. These analyses provide detailed information on particle size, morphology, elemental composition, and functional groups. This information is combined with mapping capabilities to explore individual particle spatial patterns and how that impacts structural characteristics. The improved understanding will be used to explore how sources and processing (such as SOA coating of soot) change particle structure (i.e. core shell) and how the altered optical properties impact air quality/climate effects on a regional scale.

  15. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  16. Aerosol size distribution seasonal characteristics measured in Tiksi, Russian Arctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asmi, E.; Kondratyev, V.; Brus, D.; Laurila, T.; Lihavainen, H.; Backman, J.; Vakkari, V.; Aurela, M.; Hatakka, J.; Viisanen, Y.; Uttal, T.; Ivakhov, V.; Makshtas, A.

    2016-02-01

    Four years of continuous aerosol number size distribution measurements from the Arctic Climate Observatory in Tiksi, Russia, are analyzed. Tiksi is located in a region where in situ information on aerosol particle properties has not been previously available. Particle size distributions were measured with a differential mobility particle sizer (in the diameter range of 7-500 nm) and with an aerodynamic particle sizer (in the diameter range of 0.5-10 μm). Source region effects on particle modal features and number, and mass concentrations are presented for different seasons. The monthly median total aerosol number concentration in Tiksi ranges from 184 cm-3 in November to 724 cm-3 in July, with a local maximum in March of 481 cm-3. The total mass concentration has a distinct maximum in February-March of 1.72-2.38 μg m-3 and two minimums in June (0.42 μg m-3) and in September-October (0.36-0.57 μg m-3). These seasonal cycles in number and mass concentrations are related to isolated processes and phenomena such as Arctic haze in early spring, which increases accumulation and coarse-mode numbers, and secondary particle formation in spring and summer, which affects the nucleation and Aitken mode particle concentrations. Secondary particle formation was frequently observed in Tiksi and was shown to be slightly more common in marine, in comparison to continental, air flows. Particle formation rates were the highest in spring, while the particle growth rates peaked in summer. These results suggest two different origins for secondary particles, anthropogenic pollution being the important source in spring and biogenic emissions being significant in summer. The impact of temperature-dependent natural emissions on aerosol and cloud condensation nuclei numbers was significant: the increase in both the particle mass and the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) number with temperature was found to be higher than in any previous study done over the boreal forest region. In addition

  17. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2012-02-01

    internally mixed in the accumulation mode peaking at ∼500-600 nm. The enhancement of organics in traffic emissions mainly occurred at ultrafine mode dominated by HOA, with little relation to the OOA-dominated accumulation mode. From Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS) measurements, a large increase in number concentration at ∼10 nm (mobility number mean diameter, Dm) was also found due to traffic influence; though these particles typically contribute a minor fraction of total particle mass. The observed rapid variations of aerosol chemistry and microphysics may have significant implications for near-highway air pollution characterization and exposure assessments.

  18. A comparison of similar aerosol measurements made on the NASA P3-B, DC-8, and NSF C-130 aircraft during TRACE-P and ACE-Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, K. G.; Clarke, A. D.; Kapustin, V. N.; McNaughton, C.; Anderson, B. E.; Winstead, E. L.; Weber, R.; Ma, Y.; Lee, Y. N.; Talbot, R.; Dibb, J.; Anderson, T.; Doherty, S.; Covert, D.; Rogers, D.

    2004-08-01

    Two major aircraft experiments occurred off the Pacific coast of Asia during spring 2001: the NASA sponsored Transport and Chemical Evolution over the Pacific (TRACE-P) and the National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored Aerosol Characterization Experiment-Asia (ACE-Asia). Both experiments studied emissions from the Asian continent (biomass burning, urban/industrial pollution, and dust). TRACE-P focused on trace gases and aerosol during March/April and was based primarily in Hong Kong and Yokota Air Force Base, Japan, and involved two aircraft: the NASA DC-8 and the NASA P3-B. ACE-Asia focused on aerosol and radiation during April/May and was based in Iwakuni Marine Corps Air Station, Japan, and involved the NSF C-130. This paper compares aerosol measurements from these aircraft including aerosol concentrations, size distributions (and integral properties), chemistry, and optical properties. Best overall agreement (generally within RMS instrumental uncertainty) was for physical properties of the submircron aerosol, including condensation nuclei concentrations, scattering coefficients, and differential mobility analyzer and optical particle counter (OPC) accumulation mode size distributions. Larger differences (typically outside of the RMS uncertainty) were often observed for parameters related to the supermicron aerosols (total scattering and absorption coefficients, coarse mode Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe and OPC size distributions/integral properties, and soluble chemical species usually associated with the largest particles, e.g., Na+, Cl-, Ca2+, and Mg2+), where aircraft sampling is more demanding. Some of the observed differences reflect different inlets (e.g., low-turbulence inlet enhancement of coarse mode aerosol), differences in sampling lines, and instrument configuration and design. Means and variances of comparable measurements for horizontal legs were calculated, and regression analyses were performed for each platform and allow for an

  19. Light absorption, optical and microphysical properties of trajectory-clustered aerosols at two AERONET sites in West Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fawole, O. G.; Cai, X.; MacKenzie, A. R.

    2015-12-01

    an indicator of high BC content. Extinction Angstrom exponent, is an indicator of the particle size. EAE values of 0.95-1.32 for aerosol in the GF cluster shows that the aerosols are mainly fine or accumulation mode while values of EAE (0.36-0.6) for the other cluster indicate coarse mode domination of the aerosol. See table 1 for a summary of result.

  20. Direct analysis of highly oxidised organic aerosol constituents by on-line ion trap mass spectrometry in the negative-ion mode.

    PubMed

    Warscheid, Bettina; Hoffmann, Thorsten

    2002-01-01

    On-line ion trap mass spectrometry (ITMS) enables the characterisation of constituents of biogenic secondary organic aerosols in complex organic reaction mixtures. This real-time analysis is achieved by directly introducing the airborne particles into the ion source of the mass spectrometer. Negative-ion chemical ionisation at atmospheric pressure (APCI(-)) was used as the ionisation method of choice. The aerosols were generated from the gas-phase ozonolysis of two C10H16-terpenes (alpha-pinene and limonene), and investigated by performing on-line APCI(-)-ITMS(n). Highly oxidised compounds were tentatively identified as important particle-phase products. Based on recent investigations of low-energy collision-induced dissociation pathways of a wide range of deprotonated multifunctional carboxylic acid species derived from monoterpene precursors (Warscheid B, Hoffmann T. Rapid Commun. Mass Spectrom. 2001; 15: 2259), the formation of structurally different C10H16O5 and C10H16O6 species, such as acidic esters from alpha-pinene and aldo-hydroxycarboxylic acids from limonene, is proposed. PMID:11870886

  1. Benchmark study on fine-mode aerosol in a big urban area and relevant doses deposited in the human respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Avino, Pasquale; Protano, Carmela; Vitali, Matteo; Manigrasso, Maurizio

    2016-09-01

    It is well-known that the health effects of PM increase as particle size decreases: particularly, great concern has risen on the role of UltraFine Particles (UFPs). Starting from the knowledge that the main fraction of atmospheric aerosol in Rome is characterized by significant levels of PM2.5 (almost 75% of PM10 fraction is PM2.5), the paper is focused on submicron particles in such great urban area. The daytime/nighttime, work-/weekdays and cold/hot seasonal trends of submicron particles will be investigated and discussed along with NOx and total PAH drifts demonstrating the primary origin of UFPs from combustion processes. Furthermore, moving from these data, the total dose of submicron particles deposited in the respiratory system (i.e., head, tracheobronchial and alveolar regions in different lung lobes) has been estimated. Dosimeter estimates were performed with the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model (MPPD v.2.1). The paper discusses the aerosol doses deposited in the respiratory system of individuals exposed in proximity of traffic. During traffic peak hours, about 6.6 × 10(10) particles are deposited into the respiratory system. Such dose is almost entirely made of UFPs. According to the greater dose estimated, right lung lobes are expected to be more susceptible to respiratory pathologies than left lobes. PMID:27325547

  2. The MESSy aerosol submodel MADE3 (v2.0b): description and a box model test

    SciTech Connect

    Kaiser, J. C.; Hendricks, J.; Righi, M.; Riemer, N.; Zaveri, R. A.; Metzger, S.; Aquila, V.

    2014-01-01

    We introduce MADE3 (Modal Aerosol Dynamics model for Europe, adapted for global applications, 3rd generation; version: MADE3v2.0b), an aerosol dynamics submodel for application within the MESSy framework (Modular Earth Submodel System). MADE3 builds on the predecessor aerosol submodels MADE and MADE-in. Its main new features are the explicit representation of coarse mode particle interactions both with other particles and with condensable gases, and the inclusion of hydrochloric acid (HCl) / chloride (Cl) partitioning between the gas and condensed phases. The aerosol size distribution is represented in the new submodel as a superposition of nine lognormal modes: one for fully soluble particles, one for insoluble particles, and one for mixed particles in each of three size ranges (Aitken, accumulation, and coarse mode size ranges). In order to assess the performance of MADE3 we compare it to its predecessor MADE and to the much more detailed particle-resolved aerosol model PartMC-MOSAIC in a box model simulation of an idealised marine boundary layer test case. MADE3 and MADE results are very similar, except in the coarse mode, where the aerosol is dominated by sea spray particles. Cl is reduced in MADE3 with respect to MADE due to the HCl / Cl partitioning that leads to Cl removal from the sea spray aerosol in our test case. Additionally, the aerosol nitrate concentration is higher in MADE3 due to the condensation of nitric acid on coarse mode particles. MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC show substantial differences in the fine particle size distributions (sizes ≲ 2 μm) that could be relevant when simulating climate effects on a global scale. Nevertheless, the agreement between MADE3 and PartMC-MOSAIC is very good when it comes to coarse particle size distributions (sizes ≳ 2 μm), and also in terms of aerosol composition. Finally, considering these results and the well-established ability of MADE in reproducing observed aerosol loadings and composition, MADE3 seems

  3. Comparing the mechanism of water condensation and evaporation in glassy aerosol.

    PubMed

    Bones, David L; Reid, Jonathan P; Lienhard, Daniel M; Krieger, Ulrich K

    2012-07-17

    Atmospheric models generally assume that aerosol particles are in equilibrium with the surrounding gas phase. However, recent observations that secondary organic aerosols can exist in a glassy state have highlighted the need to more fully understand the kinetic limitations that may control water partitioning in ambient particles. Here, we explore the influence of slow water diffusion in the condensed aerosol phase on the rates of both condensation and evaporation, demonstrating that significant inhibition in mass transfer occurs for ultraviscous aerosol, not just for glassy aerosol. Using coarse mode (3-4 um radius) ternary sucrose/sodium chloride/aqueous droplets as a proxy for multicomponent ambient aerosol, we demonstrate that the timescale for particle equilibration correlates with bulk viscosity and can be ≫10(3) s. Extrapolation of these timescales to particle sizes in the accumulation mode (e.g., approximately 100 nm) by applying the Stokes-Einstein equation suggests that the kinetic limitations imposed on mass transfer of water by slow bulk phase diffusion must be more fully investigated for atmospheric aerosol. Measurements have been made on particles covering a range in dynamic viscosity from < 0.1 to > 10(13) Pa s. We also retrieve the radial inhomogeneities apparent in particle composition during condensation and evaporation and contrast the dynamics of slow dissolution of a viscous core into a labile shell during condensation with the slow percolation of water during evaporation through a more homogeneous viscous particle bulk. PMID:22753520

  4. The global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM, version 2: sensitivity to improvements in process representations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, K.; O'Donnell, D.; Kazil, J.; Stier, P.; Kinne, S.; Lohmann, U.; Ferrachat, S.; Croft, B.; Quaas, J.; Wan, H.; Rast, S.; Feichter, J.

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces and evaluates the second version of the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAM. Major changes have been brought into the model, including new parameterizations for aerosol nucleation and water uptake, an explicit treatment of secondary organic aerosols, modified emission calculations for sea salt and mineral dust, the coupling of aerosol microphysics to a two-moment stratiform cloud microphysics scheme, and alternative wet scavenging parameterizations. These revisions extend the model's capability to represent details of the aerosol lifecycle and its interaction with climate. Nudged simulations of the year 2000 are carried out to compare the aerosol properties and global distribution in HAM1 and HAM2, and to evaluate them against various observations. Sensitivity experiments are performed to help identify the impact of each individual update in model formulation. Results indicate that from HAM1 to HAM2 there is a marked weakening of aerosol water uptake in the lower troposphere, reducing the total aerosol water burden from 75 Tg to 51 Tg. The main reason is the newly introduced κ-Köhler-theory-based water uptake scheme uses a lower value for the maximum relative humidity cutoff. Particulate organic matter loading in HAM2 is considerably higher in the upper troposphere, because the explicit treatment of secondary organic aerosols allows highly volatile oxidation products of the precursors to be vertically transported to regions of very low temperature and to form aerosols there. Sulfate, black carbon, particulate organic matter and mineral dust in HAM2 have longer lifetimes than in HAM1 because of weaker in-cloud scavenging, which is in turn related to lower autoconversion efficiency in the newly introduced two-moment cloud microphysics scheme. Modification in the sea salt emission scheme causes a significant increase in the ratio (from 1.6 to 7.7) between accumulation mode and coarse mode emission fluxes of aerosol number concentration. This

  5. In situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions: Impact of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei mode aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, F.; Brock, C. A.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M.

    2000-08-01

    In situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt ATTAS research jet (Rolls-Royce/Snecma M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM International 56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 s after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56, or 118mg kg-1. Particle size distributions of from 3- to 60-nm diameter were determined by using condensationnuclei-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60mg kg-1, reaching minimum values of about 2×1017kg-1 and 2×1016kg-1 for particles >3nm and >5nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60mg kg-1. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4×1014kg-1) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8×1015kg-1). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors of 2-10 depending on particle size. These and previously published data are consistent with volatile particle emissions of 2.4×1017kg-1 independent of environmental conditions, engine type and FSCs ranging between 2.6 and 2700mg kg-1. There are clear experimental indications that

  6. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products and Validation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.; Mattoo, S.; Chu, D. A.; Martins, J. V.; Li, R.-R.; Ichoku, C.; Levy, R. C.; Kleidman, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard both NASA's Terra and Aqua satellites is making near global daily observations of the earth in a wide spectral range. These measurements are used to derive spectral aerosol optical thickness and aerosol size parameters over both land and ocean. The aerosol products available over land include aerosol optical thickness at three visible wavelengths, a measure of the fraction of aerosol optical thickness attributed to the fine mode and several derived parameters including reflected spectral solar flux at top of atmosphere. Over ocean, the aerosol optical thickness is provided in seven wavelengths from 0.47 microns to 2.13 microns. In addition, quantitative aerosol size information includes effective radius of the aerosol and quantitative fraction of optical thickness attributed to the fine mode. Spectral aerosol flux, mass concentration and number of cloud condensation nuclei round out the list of available aerosol products over the ocean. The spectral optical thickness and effective radius of the aerosol over the ocean are validated by comparison with two years of AERONET data gleaned from 133 AERONET stations. 8000 MODIS aerosol retrievals colocated with AERONET measurements confirm that one-standard deviation of MODIS optical thickness retrievals fall within the predicted uncertainty of delta tauapproximately equal to plus or minus 0.03 plus or minus 0.05 tau over ocean and delta tay equal to plus or minus 0.05 plus or minus 0.15 tau over land. 271 MODIS aerosol retrievals co-located with AERONET inversions at island and coastal sites suggest that one-standard deviation of MODIS effective radius retrievals falls within delta r_eff approximately equal to 0.11 microns. The accuracy of the MODIS retrievals suggests that the product can be used to help narrow the uncertainties associated with aerosol radiative forcing of global climate.

  7. Aerosol Transport to the Greenland Summit Site, June, 2003 to August 2004

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, T. A.; Cliff, S. S.; Jimenez-Cruz, M. P.; Portnoff, L.; Perry, K.; McConnell, J.; Burkhart, J.; Bales, R. C.

    2004-12-01

    With the resumption of year-round staffing of the Summit Greenland Environmental Observatory (GEOSummit) in 2003, we were able to sample aerosols year round by size (8 size modes), time (3 hr to 24 hr), and composition (mass, optical attenuation, and elements H, Na to Mo, plus lead) for association with particulate layers in snow, firn and ice. Sampling was accomplished using a 10 L/min slotted 8-stage rotating drum impactor (DELTA 8 DRUM, http://delta.ucdavis.edu)in the clean sector 0.5 km upwind from the main camp pollution sources. The air intake was approximately 2m above the snow surface. The rotation rate of the DRUM was slowed to 0.5 mm/day, allowing continuous sampling for 48 weeks with 12-hr time resolution on a single set of lightly greased 480 ?g/cm2 Mylar substrates. Early results show transport of relatively coarse (12 to 5 ?m aerodynamic diameter) soil aerosols to the site in spring, 2003, in well -defined plumes of 1- to 2-day duration. Trajectory analysis shows potential Asian sources. Sulfur-containing aerosols, also seen in plumes of short duration, occur in two size modes, a typical accumulation mode aerosol (0.75?0.34 ?m) and a very fine aerosol mode ( 0.34?0.09 ?m), the latter likely stratospheric in origin. We wish to acknowledge the excellent on-site support of the GEOSummit staff, including M. Lewis, R. Abbott, B. Torrison, and K. Hess, and T. Wood.

  8. Chemical Composition and Cloud Condensation Nuclei Properties of Marine Aerosols during the 2005 Marine Stratus Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Y.; Hudson, J.; Daum, P.; Springston, S.; Wang, J.; Senum, G.; Alexander, L.; Jayne, J.; Hubbe, J.

    2006-12-01

    Marine aerosol chemical composition and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) spectrum were determined on board the DOE G1 aircraft during the Marine Stratus Experiment conducted over the coastal waters between Point Reyes National Seashore and Monterey Bay, California, in July 2005. Aerosol components, including sea-salt- (sodium, chloride, magnesium, methansulfonate) and terrestrial/pollution-derived (ammonium, sulfate, nitrate, organics, potassium, and calcium) were measured using the particle-into-liquid sampler-ion chromatography technique and an Aerodyne AMS at a time resolution of 4 min and 30 s, respectively, both covering the size range of ~0.08 to 1.5 micrometers. The CCN spectrum was determined at a 1-s time resolution covering a supersaturation range between 0.02% and 1%. The accumulation mode particle size- number distribution was measured using a passive cavity aerosol spectrometer probe; the cloud droplet size- number distribution was determined using a Cloud Aerosol Probe. During the campaign sulfate/organic aerosols were always present, sea-salt aerosols were observed on half of the flights, and no dust or biomass burning contribution was noted as calcium and potassium were always below their limits-of-detection. Based on CCN spectra and cloud droplet number concentrations, the typical supersaturation of the marine stratus clouds was ~0.06%, corresponding to a CCN critical diameter between 0.1 and 0.2 micrometer. This large critical diameter makes the aerosol chemical composition measured appropriate for investigating the CCN properties and marine stratus clouds. We note that while sea-salt aerosols and sulfate aerosols were most likely externally mixed, the ensemble exhibits similar CCN properties irrespective of the relative mass concentrations of these two types of aerosols, owing partly to the similar activation properties of NaCl and (NH4)2SO4 aerosols, and that sea-salt particles were larger but fewer, accounting for a small fraction of cloud

  9. Assessing regional scale predictions of aerosols, marine stratocumulus, and their interactions during VOCALS-REx using WRF-Chem

    SciTech Connect

    Yang Q.; Lee Y.; Gustafson Jr., W. I.; Fast, J. D.; Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Morrison, H.; Chapman, E. G.; Spak, S. N.; Mena-Carrasco, M. A.

    2011-12-02

    in AERO, compared to the MET simulation. Nevertheless, biases in some of the simulated meteorological quantities (e.g., MBL temperature and humidity) and aerosol quantities (e.g., underestimations of accumulation mode aerosol number) might affect simulated stratocumulus and energy fluxes over the Southeastern Pacific, and require further investigation. The well-simulated timing and outflow patterns of polluted and clean episodes demonstrate the model's ability to capture daily/synoptic scale variations of aerosol and cloud properties, and suggest that the model is suitable for studying atmospheric processes associated with pollution outflow over the ocean. The overall performance of the regional model in simulating mesoscale clouds and boundary layer properties is encouraging and suggests that reproducing gradients of aerosol and cloud droplet concentrations and coupling cloud-aerosol-radiation processes are important when simulating marine stratocumulus over the Southeast Pacific.

  10. Sensitivity of Aerosol Radiative Forcing to Mixing State and Non-Sphericity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, P.; Dey, S.; Srivastava, A.; Singh, S.; Agarwal, P.

    2014-12-01

    Mixing state and particle non-sphericity of aerosols are two major sources of uncertainties in estimation of aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF). To examine the sensitivity of optical properties to the mixing state, aerosols were collected on filter papers and analyzed for detailed chemical composition in Delhi national capital region (NCR) during 2007-2008. Black carbon, BC was measured directly by Aethalometer. They are grouped into four major aerosol species - dust, water soluble (WS), water insoluble (WINS) and BC. Eight different mixing cases - external mixing, internal mixing, and six combinations of core-shell type which includes two modes of dust (accumulation and coarse) have been considered for the present study. Core-shell mixing cases are BC over dust, WS over dust, BC over WS and, WS over BC. These core shell mixed components are then externally mixed with rest of the aerosol species. The aerosol optical properties for each of the mixing state cases are utilized to estimate the radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The surface-reaching fluxes for each of the cases are compared with measured clear-sky surface radiation. MISR aerosol product were analyzed to understand the seasonal variations of the bulk aerosol properties that may help in interpreting the sensitivity results. We observed that for the winter season (DJF), core-shell mixed case; BC over dust (accumulation) (207.7±4.28 Wm-2) and BC over WS (207.25±8.4 Wm-2) are almost comparable with measured surface flux (206.46±70.06 Wm-2), while for the monsoon season (JAS) external mixing is closest to observations. None of the mixing cases show compatible comparison, for the pre-monsoon (MAMJ) and post-monsoon season (ON). The remaining discrepancy may be attributed to the assumption of uniform vertical distribution (calculated from CALIPSO data) for each individual aerosol species, whereas ideally different vertical profile should be considered. Secondly, dust is assumed to be

  11. Intercomparison and Evaluation of Global Aerosol Microphysical Properties among AeroCom Models of a Range of Complexity

    SciTech Connect

    Mann, G. W.; Carslaw, K. S.; Reddington, C. L.; Pringle, K. J.; Schulz, M.; Asmi, A.; Spracklen, D. V.; Ridley, D. A.; Woodhouse, M. T.; Lee, L. A.; Zhang, Kai; Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.; Liu, Xiaohong; Stier, P.; Lee, Y. H.; Adams, P. J.; Tost, H.; Lelieveld, J.; Bauer, S.; Tsigaridis, Kostas; van Noije, T.; Strunk, A.; Vignati, E.; Bellouin, N.; Dalvi, M.; Johnson, C. E.; Bergman, T.; Kokkola, H.; Von Salzen, Knut; Yu, Fangqun; Luo, Gan; Petzold, A.; Heintzenberg, J.; Clarke, A. D.; Ogren, J. A.; Gras, J.; Baltensperger, Urs; Kaminski, U.; Jennings, S. G.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Harrison, R. M.; Beddows, D. C.; Kulmala, M.; Viisanen, Y.; Ulevicius, V.; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Zdimal, V.; Fiebig, M.; Hansson, H. C.; Swietlicki, E.; Henzing, J. S.

    2014-05-13

    Many of the next generation of global climate models will include aerosol schemes which explicitly simulate the microphysical processes that determine the particle size distribution. These models enable aerosol optical properties and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentrations to be determined by fundamental aerosol processes, which should lead to a more physically based simulation of aerosol direct and indirect radiative forcings. This study examines the global variation in particle size distribution simulated by twelve global aerosol microphysics models to quantify model diversity and to identify any common biases against observations. Evaluation against size distribution measurements from a new European network of aerosol supersites shows that the mean model agrees quite well with the observations at many sites on the annual mean, but there are some seasonal biases common to many sites. In particular, at many of these European sites, the accumulation mode number concentration is biased low during winter and Aitken mode concentrations tend to be overestimated in winter and underestimated in summer. At high northern latitudes, the models strongly underpredict Aitken and accumulation particle concentrations compared to the measurements, consistent with previous studies that have highlighted the poor performance of global aerosol models in the Arctic. In the marine boundary layer, the models capture the observed meridional variation in the size distribution, which is dominated by the Aitken mode at high latitudes, with an increasing concentration of accumulation particles with decreasing latitude. Considering vertical profiles, the models reproduce the observed peak in total particle concentrations in the upper troposphere due to new particle formation, although modelled peak concentrations tend to be biased high over Europe. Overall, the results suggest that most global aerosol microphysics models simulate the global variation of the particle size distribution

  12. Derivation of Aerosol Columnar Mass from MODIS Optical Depth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gasso, Santiago; Hegg, Dean A.

    2003-01-01

    In order to verify performance, aerosol transport models (ATM) compare aerosol columnar mass (ACM) with those derived from satellite measurements. The comparison is inherently indirect since satellites derive optical depths and they use a proportionality constant to derive the ACM. Analogously, ATMs output a four dimensional ACM distribution and the optical depth is linearly derived. In both cases, the proportionality constant requires a direct intervention of the user by prescribing the aerosol composition and size distribution. This study introduces a method that minimizes the direct user intervention by making use of the new aerosol products of MODIS. A parameterization is introduced for the derivation of columnar aerosol mass (AMC) and CCN concentration (CCNC) and comparisons between sunphotometer, MODIS Airborne Simulator (MAS) and in-measurements are shown. The method still relies on the scaling between AMC and optical depth but the proportionality constant is dependent on the MODIS derived r$_{eff}$,\\eta (contribution of the accumulation mode radiance to the total radiance), ambient RH and an assumed constant aerosol composition. The CCNC is derived fkom a recent parameterization of CCNC as a function of the retrieved aerosol volume. By comparing with in-situ data (ACE-2 and TARFOX campaigns), it is shown that retrievals in dry ambient conditions (dust) are improved when using a proportionality constant dependent on r$ {eff}$ and \\eta derived in the same pixel. In high humidity environments, the improvement inthe new method is inconclusive because of the difficulty in accounting for the uneven vertical distribution of relative humidity. Additionally, two detailed comparisons of AMC and CCNC retrieved by the MAS algorithm and the new method are shown. The new method and MAS retrievals of AMC are within the same order of magnitude with respect to the in-situ measurements of aerosol mass. However, the proposed method is closer to the in-situ measurements than

  13. A biogenic source of oxalic acid in marine aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Facchini, M.; Rinaldi, M.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C.; Sciare, J.; Burrows, J. P.

    2010-12-01

    Oxalic acid has been often observed in marine aerosol, nevertheless, given the ubiquitous character and the high concentrations found in polluted environments, its origin has often been attributed to continental sources. In this work, we present the results of oxalic acid analyses, on aerosol samples collected at Mace Head (Ireland, 53°20’N, 9°54’W) and Amsterdam Island (Indian Ocean, 37°48’S, 77°34’E), supporting the existence of a biogenic source of oxalic acid over the oceans. Measurements cover the year 2006, at the Northern Hemisphere site, and the period 2003-2007, at the Southern Hemisphere one. Aerosol oxalic acid was detected in clean marine air masses in concentrations ranging from 2.7 to 39 ng m-3, at Mace Head, and from 0.31 to 17 ng m-3, at Amsterdam Island. In both hemispheres, oxalic acid concentration showed a clear seasonal trend, with maxima in spring-summer and minima in the fall-winter period, in analogy with other marine biogenic aerosol components (e.g., MSA and amines). Oxalic acid was distributed along the whole aerosol size spectrum, with the major contribution given by the 1.0-2.0 µm size range, and by the lower accumulation mode (0.25-0.5 µm). Given the observed size distributions, marine aerosol oxalic acid can be assumed as the result of the combination of different formation processes, among which in-cloud oxidation of gaseous precursors [1] and photochemical degradation of biogenic unsaturated fatty acids [2] are likely the most important. Among aerosol oxalic acid precursors, glyoxal is the most likely candidate in the marine boundary layer, as a source of glyoxal over the oceans has recently been discovered by satellite observations [3] and confirmed by in situ measurements [4]. In support of this hypothesis, SCIAMACHY satellite retrieved glyoxal column concentrations, over the two sampling sites, resulted characterized by a clear seasonal trend, resembling the aerosol oxalic acid one. [1] Warneck, Atmospheric

  14. A Strategy to Assess Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing of Climate Using Satellite Radiation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)tau = - 25 +/- 5 W/sq m. Ground based data give forcing at the surface of (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)taur = -80 +/- 5 W/sq m. In TARFOX a mixture of maritime and regional pollution aerosol resulted in a varied forcing at the top of the atmosphere, (Delta)F(sub 24hr)/(Delta)tau, between -26 W/sq 2 and -50 W/sq m depending on mixture of coarse and accumulation modes, for Angstrom exponents of 1.0 and 0.2 respectively.

  15. “APEC Blue”: Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-01-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61–67% and 51–57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2–3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as “APEC Blue”. We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution. PMID:26891104

  16. Aerosol observations and growth rates downwind of the anvil of a deep tropical thunderstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waddicor, D. A.; Vaughan, G.; Choularton, T. W.; Bower, K. N.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M.; Williams, P. I.; Flynn, M.; Volz-Thomas, A.; Pätz, H.-W.; Isaac, P.; Hacker, J.; Arnold, F.; Schlager, H.; Whiteway, J. A.

    2012-07-01

    We present a case study of Aitken and accumulation mode aerosol observed downwind of the anvil of a deep tropical thunderstorm. The measurements were made by condensation nuclei counters flown on the Egrett high-altitude aircraft from Darwin during the ACTIVE campaign, in monsoon conditions producing widespread convection over land and ocean. Maximum measured concentrations of aerosol with diameter greater than 10 nm were 25 000 cm-3 (STP). By calculating back-trajectories from the observations, and projecting onto infrared satellite images, the time since the air exited cloud was estimated. In this way a time scale of about 3 hours was derived for the Aitken aerosol concentration to reach its peak. We examine the hypothesis that the growth in aerosol concentrations can be explained by production of sulphuric acid from SO2 followed by particle nucleation and coagulation. Estimates of the sulphuric acid production rate show that the observations are only consistent with this hypothesis if the particles coagulate to sizes >10 nm much more quickly than is suggested by current theory. Alternatively, other condensible gases (possibly organic) drive the growth of aerosol particles in the TTL.

  17. “APEC Blue”: Secondary Aerosol Reductions from Emission Controls in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yele; Wang, Zifa; Wild, Oliver; Xu, Weiqi; Chen, Chen; Fu, Pingqing; Du, Wei; Zhou, Libo; Zhang, Qi; Han, Tingting; Wang, Qingqing; Pan, Xiaole; Zheng, Haitao; Li, Jie; Guo, Xiaofeng; Liu, Jianguo; Worsnop, Douglas R.

    2016-02-01

    China implemented strict emission control measures in Beijing and surrounding regions to ensure good air quality during the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit. We conducted synchronous aerosol particle measurements with two aerosol mass spectrometers at different heights on a meteorological tower in urban Beijing to investigate the variations in particulate composition, sources and size distributions in response to emission controls. Our results show consistently large reductions in secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA) of 61-67% and 51-57%, and in secondary organic aerosol (SOA) of 55% and 37%, at 260 m and ground level, respectively, during the APEC summit. These changes were mainly caused by large reductions in accumulation mode particles and by suppression of the growth of SIA and SOA by a factor of 2-3, which led to blue sky days during APEC commonly referred to as “APEC Blue”. We propose a conceptual framework for the evolution of primary and secondary species and highlight the importance of regional atmospheric transport in the formation of severe pollution episodes in Beijing. Our results indicate that reducing the precursors of secondary aerosol over regional scales is crucial and effective in suppressing the formation of secondary particulates and mitigating PM pollution.

  18. Observed aerosol optical depth and angstrom exponent in urban area of Nanjing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shu; Wang, Tijian; Xie, Min; Han, Yong; Zhuang, Bingliang

    2015-12-01

    Aerosol optical properties at Gulou station in Nanjing, China were measured and analyzed from April 2011 to April 2012. The annual median of aerosol optical depth (hereafter called as AOD) at 440 nm was 0.73 and the corresponding annual median of angstrom exponent (hereafter called as AE) between 440 nm and 870 nm was 1.28. The monthly median of AOD440nm presented a seasonal variation, which revealed a maximum in August (1.22) and a minimum in February (0.51), while the monthly median of AE showed a minimum in May (0.79) and a maximum in December (1.42). AOD and AE accumulated mainly between 0.40-0.90 (68%) and 1.20-1.50 (68%) respectively in Nanjing. The observation data showed that high AODs (>1.00) were clustered in the fine mode growth wing and the coarse mode. Comparison was made between two typical cases under different weather conditions and the results showed that Nanjing is influenced by the dust aerosol from Northwest China and Mongolia under dust weather in spring and the anthropogenic aerosol from local emission and surrounding industrialization region under haze weather.

  19. Global Aerosols

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... sizes and from multiple sources, including biomass burning, mineral dust, sea salt and regional industrial pollution. A color scale is ... desert source region. Deserts are the main sources of mineral dust, and MISR obtains aerosol optical depth at visible wavelengths ...

  20. Heterogeneous Chemistry: Understanding Aerosol/Oxidant Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Joyce E. Penner

    2005-03-14

    Global radiative forcing of nitrate and ammonium aerosols has mostly been estimated from aerosol concentrations calculated at thermodynamic equilibrium or using approximate treatments for their uptake by aerosols. In this study, a more accurate hybrid dynamical approach (DYN) was used to simulate the uptake of nitrate and ammonium by aerosols and the interaction with tropospheric reactive nitrogen chemistry in a three-dimensional global aerosol and chemistry model, IMPACT, which also treats sulfate, sea salt and mineral dust aerosol. 43% of the global annual average nitrate aerosol burden, 0.16 TgN, and 92% of the global annual average ammonium aerosol burden, 0.29 TgN, exist in the fine mode (D<1.25 {micro}m) that scatters most efficiently. Results from an equilibrium calculation differ significantly from those of DYN since the fraction of fine-mode nitrate to total nitrate (gas plus aerosol) is 9.8%, compared to 13% in DYN. Our results suggest that the estimates of aerosol forcing from equilibrium concentrations will be underestimated. We also show that two common approaches used to treat nitrate and ammonium in aerosol in global models, including the first-order gas-to-particle approximation based on uptake coefficients (UPTAKE) and a hybrid method that combines the former with an equilibrium model (HYB), significantly overpredict the nitrate uptake by aerosols especially that by coarse particles, resulting in total nitrate aerosol burdens higher than that in DYN by +106% and +47%, respectively. Thus, nitrate aerosol in the coarse mode calculated by HYB is 0.18 Tg N, a factor of 2 more than that in DYN (0.086 Tg N). Excessive formation of the coarse-mode nitrate in HYB leads to near surface nitrate concentrations in the fine mode lower than that in DYN by up to 50% over continents. In addition, near-surface HNO{sub 3} and NO{sub x} concentrations are underpredicted by HYB by up to 90% and 5%, respectively. UPTAKE overpredicts the NO{sub x} burden by 56% and near

  1. Size segregated mass concentration and size distribution of near surface aerosols over a tropical Indian semi-arid station, Anantapur: Impact of long range transport.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra Kumar, K; Narasimhulu, K; Balakrishnaiah, G; Suresh Kumar Reddy, B; Rama Gopal, K; Reddy, R R; Moorthy, K Krishna; Suresh Babu, S

    2009-10-15

    Regular measurements of size segregated as well as total mass concentration and size distribution of near surface composite aerosols, made using a ten-channel Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM) cascade impactor during the period of September 2007-May 2008 are used to study the aerosol characteristics in association with the synoptic meteorology. The total mass concentration varied from 59.70+/-1.48 to 41.40+/-1.72 microg m(-3), out of which accumulation mode dominated by approximately 50%. On a synoptic scale, aerosol mass concentration in the accumulation (submicron) mode gradually increased from an average low value of approximately 26.92+/-1.53 microg m(-3) during the post monsoon season (September-November) to approximately 34.95+/-1.32 microg m(-3) during winter (December-February) and reaching a peak value of approximately 43.56+/-1.42 microg m(-3) during the summer season (March-May). On the contrary, mass concentration of aerosols in the coarse (supermicron) mode increased from approximately 9.23+/-1.25 microg m(-3)during post monsoon season to reach a comparatively high value of approximately 25.89+/-1.95 microg m(-3) during dry winter months and a low value of approximately 8.07+/-0.76 microg m(-3) during the summer season. Effective radius, a parameter important in determining optical (scattering) properties of aerosol size distribution, varied between 0.104+/-0.08 microm and 0.167+/-0.06 microm with a mean value of 0.143+/-0.01 microm. The fine mode is highly reduced during the post monsoon period and the large and coarse modes continue to remain high (replenished) so that their relative dominance increases. It can be seen that among the two parameters measured, correlation of total mass concentration with air temperature is positive (R(2)=0.82) compared with relative humidity (RH) (R(2)=0.75). PMID:19640569

  2. Sudden changes in aerosol and gas concentrations in the central Arctic marine boundary layer: Causes and consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigg, E. Keith; Leck, Caroline; Nilsson, E. Douglas

    2001-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol number size distributions and concentrations of the precursor gases dimethyl sulfide, sulfur dioxide and ammonia were made within the pack ice region of the central Arctic Ocean during July and August 1996 from the icebreaker Oden. Changes in concentration, sometimes exceeding the entire seasonal variation, often occurred within an hour and attempts to find the reasons for them are described. Vertical profiles of aerosol concentration in Aitken and accumulation mode particles obtained on helicopter flights revealed intense concentration gradients in the lowest 1000 m. Those below 100 m were common. Concentrations of accumulation mode particles were usually greater near the surface than at 100 m. Four representative case studies for which vertical aerosol profiles were obtained are presented. Observations of rapid large changes in near-surface concentration of aerosols in different size ranges are compared with the vertical profiles, meteorological information, and acoustic or optical remote sensing to infer processes causing the changes. Comparison of simultaneous variations in aerosols and precursor gas concentrations are used to define the vertical profiles of the gases. It was found that dimethyl sulfide and ammonia concentrations usually must have been strongly depleted near the surface relative to concentrations at about 100 m. Sulfur dioxide profiles appeared to be more complex. Turbulence or vertical air motions initiated by atmospheric wave motions trapped within the stable boundary layer appeared to be directly responsible for many of the sudden concentration changes, through interaction with concentration gradients close to the surface. The presence of low-level jets also had direct or indirect influences on mixing in the lowest few hundred meters. The extent to which aerosols measured near the surface can determine the microphysics of central Arctic marine boundary layer clouds is examined.

  3. Aerosol properties and associated radiative effects over Cairo (Egypt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Metwally, M.; Alfaro, S. C.; Wahab, M. M. Abdel; Favez, O.; Mohamed, Z.; Chatenet, B.

    2011-02-01

    Cairo is one of the largest megacities in the World and the particle load of its atmosphere is known to be particularly important. In this work we aim at assessing the temporal variability of the aerosol's characteristics and the magnitude of its impacts on the transfer of solar radiation. For this we use the level 2 quality assured products obtained by inversion of the instantaneous AERONET sunphotometer measurements performed in Cairo during the Cairo Aerosol CHaracterization Experiment (CACHE), which lasted from the end of October 2004 to the end of March 2006. The analysis of the temporal variation of the aerosol's optical depth (AOD) and spectral dependence suggests that the aerosol is generally a mixture of at least 3 main components differing in composition and size. This is confirmed by the detailed analysis of the monthly-averaged size distributions and associated optical properties (single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter). The components of the aerosol are found to be 1) a highly absorbing background aerosol produced by daily activities (traffic, industry), 2) an additional, 'pollution' component produced by the burning of agricultural wastes in the Nile delta, and 3) a coarse desert dust component. In July, an enhancement of the accumulation mode is observed due to the atmospheric stability favoring its building up and possibly to secondary aerosols being produced by active photochemistry. More generally, the time variability of the aerosol's characteristics is due to the combined effects of meteorological factors and seasonal production processes. Because of the large values of the AOD achieved during the desert dust and biomass burning episodes, the instantaneous aerosol radiative forcing (RF) at both the top (TOA) and bottom (BOA) of the atmosphere is maximal during these events. For instance, during the desert dust storm of April 8, 2005 RF BOA, RF TOA, and the corresponding atmospheric heating rate peaked at - 161.7 W/m 2, - 65.8 W/m 2

  4. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  5. Effect of Dust and Anthropogenic Aerosols on Columnar Aerosol Optical Properties over Darjeeling (2200 m asl), Eastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2012-01-01

    Background The loading of atmospheric particulate matter (aerosol) in the eastern Himalaya is mainly regulated by the locally generated anthropogenic aerosols from the biomass burning and by the aerosols transported from the distance sources. These different types of aerosol loading not only affect the aerosol chemistry but also produce consequent signature on the radiative properties of aerosol. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive study has been made to study the seasonal variations in aerosol components of fine and coarse mode aerosols and black carbon along with the simultaneous measurements of aerosol optical depth on clear sky days over Darjeeling, a high altitude station (2200 masl) at eastern Himalayas during the year 2008. We observed a heavy loading of fine mode dust component (Ca2+) during pre-monsoon (Apr – May) which was higher by 162% than its annual mean whereas during winter (Dec – Feb), the loading of anthropogenic aerosol components mainly from biomass burning (fine mode SO42− and black carbon) were higher (76% for black carbon and 96% for fine mode SO42−) from their annual means. These high increases in dust aerosols during pre-monsoon and anthropogenic aerosols during winter enhanced the aerosol optical depth by 25 and 40%, respectively. We observed that for every 1% increase in anthropogenic aerosols, AOD increased by 0.55% during winter whereas for every 1% increase in dust aerosols, AOD increased by 0.46% during pre-monsoon. Conclusion/Significance The natural dust transport process (during pre-monsoon) plays as important a role in the radiation effects as the anthropogenic biomass burning (during winter) and their differential effects (rate of increase of the AOD with that of the aerosol concentration) are also very similar. This should be taken into account in proper modeling of the atmospheric environment over eastern Himalayas. PMID:22792264

  6. Surface Chemical Composition of Size-fractionated Urban Walkway Aerosols Determined by XPS and ToF-SIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wenjuan, Cheng; Lu-Tao, Weng; Yongjie, Li; Arthur, Lau; Chak, Chan; Chi-Ming, Chan

    2013-04-01

    In this study, aerosol particles with sizes ranging from 0.056 to 10 ?m were collected using a ten-stage impactor sampler (MOUDI) from a busy walkway of Hong Kong. The aerosol samples of each stage were examined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Size dependent distributions of the detected six key elements (N, S, Ca, Si, O, and C) were revealed together with the chemical states of N, S and C. The results indicated that aliphatic hydrocarbons were the dominant species on the surface of all particles while a small portion of graphitic carbon (due to elemental and aromatic hydrocarbons) was also detected on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.056 to 0.32 ?m. Organic oxygen- and nitrogen-containing surface groups as well as sulfates were more abundant on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.32 to 1 μm. Organic oxygen- and nitrogen-containing surface groups as well as sulfates were more abundant on the surface of the particles with sizes ranging from 0.32 to 1 μm. Inorganic salts and nitrates were found in coarse-mode particles. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) was used for detailed surface and near surface composition analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) of the ToF-SIMS spectra confirmed the XPS results that aromatic hydrocarbons were associated with the nucleation-mode particles. Aliphatic hydrocarbons with O- and N-containing functional groups were associated with accumulation-mode particles and inorganic salts were related to the coarse-mode particles. Depth-profiling experiments were performed on three specific sets of samples (nucleation-, accumulation- and coarse-mode particles) to study their near-surface structures. It showed that organic compounds were concentrated on the very top surface of the coarse-mode particles with inorganics in the core. The accumulation-mode particles had thick coatings of diverse organic compositions. The nucleation-mode particles, which contained

  7. Aerosol backscatter studies supporting LAWS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothermel, Jeffry

    1989-01-01

    Optimized Royal Signals and Radar Establishment (RSRE), Laser True Airspeed System (LATAS) algorithm for low backscatter conditions was developed. The algorithm converts backscatter intensity measurements from focused continuous-wave (CW) airborne Doppler lidar into backscatter coefficients. The performance of optimized algorithm under marginal backscatter signal conditions was evaluated. The 10.6 micron CO2 aerosol backscatter climatologies were statistically analyzed. Climatologies reveal clean background aerosol mode near 10(exp -10)/kg/sq m/sr (mixing ratio units) through middle and upper troposhere, convective mode associated with planetary boundary layer convective activity, and stratospheric mode associated with volcanically-generated aerosols. Properties of clean background mode are critical to design and simulation studies of Laser Atmospheric Wind Sounder (LAWS), a MSFC facility Instrument on the Earth Observing System (Eos). Previous intercomparisons suggested correlation between aerosol backscatter at CO2 wavelength and water vapor. Field measurements of backscatter profiles with MSFC ground-based Doppler lidar system (GBDLS) were initiated in late FY-88 to coincide with independent program of local rawinsonde releases and overflights by Multi-spectral Atmospheric Mapping Sensor (MAMS), a multi-channel infrared radiometer capable of measuring horizontal and vertical moisture distributions. Design and performance simulation studies for LAWS would benefit from the existence of a relationship between backscatter and water vapor.

  8. MIRAGE: Model Description and Evaluation of Aerosols and Trace Gases

    SciTech Connect

    Easter, Richard C.; Ghan, Steven J.; Zhang, Yang; Saylor, Rick D.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Laulainen, Nels S.; Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Bian, Xindi; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2004-10-27

    The MIRAGE (Model for Integrated Research on Atmospheric Global Exchanges) modeling system, designed to study the impacts of anthropogenic aerosols on the global environment, is described. MIRAGE consists of a chemical transport model coupled on line with a global climate model. The chemical transport model simulates trace gases, aerosol number, and aerosol chemical component mass [sulfate, MSA, organic matter, black carbon (BC), sea salt, mineral dust] for four aerosol modes (Aitken, accumulation, coarse sea salt, coarse mineral dust) using the modal aerosol dynamics approach. Cloud-phase and interstitial aerosol are predicted separately. The climate model, based on the CCM2, has physically-based treatments of aerosol direct and indirect forcing. Stratiform cloud water and droplet number are simulated using a bulk microphysics parameterization that includes aerosol activation. Aerosol and trace gas species simulated by MIRAGE are presented and evaluated using surface and aircraft measurements. Surface-level SO2 in N. American and European source regions is higher than observed. SO2 above the boundary layer is in better agreement with observations, and surface-level SO2 at marine locations is somewhat lower than observed. Comparison with other models suggests insufficient SO2 dry deposition; increasing the deposition velocity improves simulated SO2. Surface-level sulfate in N. American and European source regions is in good agreement with observations, although the seasonal cycle in Europe is stronger than observed. Surface-level sulfate at high-latitude and marine locations, and sulfate above the boundary layer, are higher than observed. This is attributed primarily to insufficient wet removal; increasing the wet removal improves simulated sulfate at remote locations and aloft. Because of the high sulfate bias, radiative forcing estimates for anthropogenic sulfur in Ghan et al. [2001c] are probably too high. Surface-level DMS is {approx}40% higher than observed

  9. Validation of MODIS Aerosol Retrieval Over Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Tanre, Didier; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Ichoku, Charles; Mattoo, Shana; Levy, Robert; Chu, D. Allen; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Ahmad, Ziauddin; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) algorithm for determining aerosol characteristics over ocean is performing with remarkable accuracy. A two-month data set of MODIS retrievals co-located with observations from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based sunphotometer network provides the necessary validation. Spectral radiation measured by MODIS (in the range 550 - 2100 nm) is used to retrieve the aerosol optical thickness, effective particle radius and ratio between the submicron and micron size particles. MODIS-retrieved aerosol optical thickness at 660 nm and 870 nm fall within the expected uncertainty, with the ensemble average at 660 nm differing by only 2% from the AERONET observations and having virtually no offset. MODIS retrievals of aerosol effective radius agree with AERONET retrievals to within +/- 0.10 micrometers, while MODIS-derived ratios between large and small mode aerosol show definite correlation with ratios derived from AERONET data.

  10. Aerosol Models for the CALIPSO Lidar Inversion Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Omar, Ali H.; Winker, David M.; Won, Jae-Gwang

    2003-01-01

    We use measurements and models to develop aerosol models for use in the inversion algorithms for the Cloud Aerosol Lidar and Imager Pathfinder Spaceborne Observations (CALIPSO). Radiance measurements and inversions of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET1, 2) are used to group global atmospheric aerosols using optical and microphysical parameters. This study uses more than 105 records of radiance measurements, aerosol size distributions, and complex refractive indices to generate the optical properties of the aerosol at more 200 sites worldwide. These properties together with the radiance measurements are then classified using classical clustering methods to group the sites according to the type of aerosol with the greatest frequency of occurrence at each site. Six significant clusters are identified: desert dust, biomass burning, urban industrial pollution, rural background, marine, and dirty pollution. Three of these are used in the CALIPSO aerosol models to characterize desert dust, biomass burning, and polluted continental aerosols. The CALIPSO aerosol model also uses the coarse mode of desert dust and the fine mode of biomass burning to build a polluted dust model. For marine aerosol, the CALIPSO aerosol model uses measurements from the SEAS experiment 3. In addition to categorizing the aerosol types, the cluster analysis provides all the column optical and microphysical properties for each cluster.

  11. Chemical Composition, Seasonal Variation and Size distribution of Atmospheric Aerosols at an Alpine Site in Guanzhong Plain, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J.

    2015-12-01

    PM10 and size-segregated aerosol samples were collected at Mt. Hua (2065 a.s.m) in central China, and determined for carbonaceous fraction, ions and organic composition. The concentration of most chemical compositions in summer are lower than those in winter, due to decreased emissions of biomass and coal burning for house heating. High temperature and relative humidity (RH) conditions are favorable for secondary aerosol formation, resulting in higher concentrations of SO42- and NH4+ in summer. Non-dehydrated sugars are increased in summer because of the enhanced metabolism. Carbon preference index results indicate that n-alkanes at Mt. Hua are derived mostly by plant wax. Low Benzo(a)pyrene/Benzo(a)pyrene ratios indicate that mountain aerosols are more aged. Concentrations of biogenic (BSOA, the isoprene/pinene/caryophyllene oxidation products) and anthropogenic (ASOA, mainly aromatic acids) SOA positively correlated with temperature . However, a decreasing trend of BSOA concentration with an increase in RH was observed during the sampling period, although a clear trend between ASOA and RH was not found. Based on the AIM Model calculation, we found that during the sampling period an increase in RH resulted in a decrease in the aerosol acidity and thus reduced the effect of acid-catalysis on BSOA formation. Size distributions of K+ and NH4+ present as an accumulation mode, in contrast to Ca2+ and Mg2+, which are mainly existed in coarse particles. SO42- and NO3- show a bimodal pattern. Dehydrated sugars, fossil fuel derived n-alkanes and PAHs presented unimode size distribution, whereas non-dehydrated sugars and plant wax derived n-alkanes showed bimodal pattern. Most of the determined BSOA are formed in the aerosol phase and enriched in the fine mode except for cis-pinonic acid, which is formed in the gas phase and subsequently partitioned into aerosol phase and thus presents a bimodal pattern with a major peak in the coarse mode.

  12. Tropospheric Aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buseck, P. R.; Schwartz, S. E.

    2003-12-01

    It is widely believed that "On a clear day you can see forever," as proclaimed in the 1965 Broadway musical of the same name. While an admittedly beautiful thought, we all know that this concept is only figurative. Aside from Earth's curvature and Rayleigh scattering by air molecules, aerosols - colloidal suspensions of solid or liquid particles in a gas - limit our vision. Even on the clearest day, there are billions of aerosol particles per cubic meter of air.Atmospheric aerosols are commonly referred to as smoke, dust, haze, and smog, terms that are loosely reflective of their origin and composition. Aerosol particles have arisen naturally for eons from sea spray, volcanic emissions, wind entrainment of mineral dust, wildfires, and gas-to-particle conversion of hydrocarbons from plants and dimethylsulfide from the oceans. However, over the industrial period, the natural background aerosol has been greatly augmented by anthropogenic contributions, i.e., those produced by human activities. One manifestation of this impact is reduced visibility (Figure 1). Thus, perhaps more than in other realms of geochemistry, when considering the composition of the troposphere one must consider the effects of these activities. The atmosphere has become a reservoir for vast quantities of anthropogenic emissions that exert important perturbations on it and on the planetary ecosystem in general. Consequently, much recent research focuses on the effects of human activities on the atmosphere and, through them, on the environment and Earth's climate. For these reasons consideration of the geochemistry of the atmosphere, and of atmospheric aerosols in particular, must include the effects of human activities. (201K)Figure 1. Impairment of visibility by aerosols. Photographs at Yosemite National Park, California, USA. (a) Low aerosol concentration (particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 2.5 μm, PM2.5=0.3 μg m-3; particulate matter of aerodynamic diameter less than 10

  13. Variations in Aerosol Size and Number during Discover-Aq

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winstead, E.; Thornhill, K. L.; Beyersdorf, A. J.; Hudgins, C.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.

    2011-12-01

    as short as 1 km. Over the entire experiment, UCN values ranged from 700 to 130,000 cm-3 while particles in the 90 to 1000 nm size range varied from less than 50 to more than 7500 cm-3. The high UCN values typically occurred at times when aerosol scattering and hence surface area was relatively low. Values also tended to increase during the day as gas phase precursors were photochemically oxidized to form less volatile species, which in turn condensed to form new particles. This process was more pronounced on days when background aerosol surface area was relatively low. Accumulation mode number concentrations often increased during the day, as the nucleation mode particles coagulated and aerosol surface increased to the point where deposition of low volatility precursors on existing particles was favored over new particle formation. Particle number concentrations and size also varied considerably from site to site across the 100- by 30-mile study area as a consequence of variations in local sources, humidity, clouds and orographic features. This presentation examines the causes of the variability in more detail and assesses its impact on deriving surface PM properties from satellite observations.

  14. Multiwavelength In-Situ Aerosol Scattering and Absorption During the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 Field Campaign: Aerosol Classification, Case Studies, and Data Interpretation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierau, B.; Covert, D.; Coffman, D.; Quinn, P.; Bates, T.

    2005-12-01

    In-situ, three wavelength measurements of aerosol scattering and absorption of the New York and Boston urban pollution outflow were carried out aboard the NOAA research vessel Ronald H. Brown during the NEAQS-ITCT 2004 (New England Air Quality Study-Intercontinental Transport and Chemical Transformation Study) field campaign during July 2004 in the Gulf of Maine. Aerosol scattering, backscattering and absorption-coefficients were measured using integrating nephelometers and multiwavelength, filter-based absorption photometers (PSAPs) at ~55-60% RH (nephelometers). Two data sets were collected, one for particles with diameters dp<10μm and one for particles <1μm. The purpose of the latter was to focus on the largely pollution related accumulation mode and to minimize the uncertainty due to highly variable near-surface sea salt aerosol. Combining the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients σsp and σap yields the derived, intensive parameters, single-scattering albedo, ω=σsp/(σsp+σap), Ångström exponents, å, for σsp, and σap, the hemispheric backscattering ratio, and the fine mode fraction of the aerosol, FMF =σsp(dp<1μm)/σsp(dp<10μm). These are key parameters in estimating aerosol direct radiative forcing and they provide constraints on model building and closure studies with physical and chemical aerosol properties. They are important for relating in-situ optical properties to those sensed remotely, e.g., optical depth from ground- or aircraft-based sun photometry or optical depth from satellite, and to the FMF retrieved from satellite data. The measured and derived data will be classified based on a trajectory analysis of the sampled air masses to identify distinct aerosol populations and sources. Case studies describing the aging of pollution plumes are calculated and analyzed in context of other measurements and the prevailing meteorology and the upwind sources. The obtained relationship between in-situ Ångström and FMF will be compared

  15. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in central Siberia (61° N, 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical compositions of aerosol particles were analyzed by x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38 % of particulate matter (PM) in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water-soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8 % of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34 % in the accumulation mode vs. ~ 47 % in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4 % RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same relative humidity (RH), starting at ~ 70 %, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35 % RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50 % RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15 % RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4 % RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv,ws value related to the water-soluble (ws

  16. Accuracy of near-surface aerosol extinction determined from columnar aerosol optical depth measurements in Reno, NV, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loría-Salazar, S. Marcela; Arnott, W. Patrick; Moosmüller, Hans

    2014-10-01

    The aim of the present work is a detailed analysis of aerosol columnar optical depth as a tool to determine near-surface aerosol extinction in Reno, Nevada, USA, during the summer of 2012. Ground and columnar aerosol optical properties were obtained by use of in situ Photoacoustic and Integrated Nephelometer and Cimel CE-318 Sun photometer instruments, respectively. Both techniques showed that seasonal weather changes and fire plumes had enormous influence on local aerosol optics. The apparent optical height followed the shape but not magnitude of the development of the convective boundary layer when fire conditions were not present. Back trajectory analysis demonstrated that a local flow known as the Washoe Zephyr circulation often induced aerosol transport from Northern California over the Sierra Nevada Mountains that increased the aerosol optical depth at 500 nm during afternoons when compared with mornings. Aerosol fine mode fraction indicated that afternoon aerosols in June and July and fire plumes in August were dominated by submicron particles, suggesting upwind urban plume biogenically enhanced evolution toward substantial secondary aerosol formation. This fine particle optical depth was inferred to be beyond the surface, thereby complicating use of remote sensing measurements for near-ground aerosol extinction measurements. It is likely that coarse mode depletes fine mode aerosol near the surface by coagulation and condensation of precursor gases.

  17. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; et al

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water solublemore » fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ~ 0.15 for the

  18. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ∼34% in the accumulation vs. ∼47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ∼70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ∼35% RH for submicron particles vs. ∼50% RH for supermicron particles. This ∼15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ∼0.15 for

  19. Aerosol temporal characteristics and its impact on shortwave radiative forcing at a location in the northeast of India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, Binita; Kalita, Gayatry; Bhuyan, K.; Bhuyan, P. K.; Moorthy, K. Krishna

    2010-10-01

    Measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and mass concentration of composite and black carbon (BC) aerosols made with collocated instruments over Dibrugarh in Northeast India are used to estimate the aerosol radiative forcing for the period June 2008 to May 2009. AOD shows seasonal variation with maximum in premonsoon (0.69 ± 0.13 at 500 nm in March 2009) and minimum in the retreating monsoon (0.08 ± 0.01 at 500 nm in October 2008). Ångström coefficients α and β are highest in monsoon and premonsoon season and are lowest in premonsoon and retreating monsoon, respectively. The size segregated mass concentration is minimum in the monsoon season for all the three modes nucleation, accumulation, and coarse and maximum in winter for accumulation and coarse and in premonsoon for nucleation mode. The BC mass concentration is highest 16.3 ± 1.4 μg m-3 in winter and lowest 3.4 ± 0.9 μg m-3 in monsoon. The estimated aerosol radiative forcing of the atmosphere, using Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) outputs as inputs for Santa Barbara Discrete Ordinate Atmospheric Radiative Transfer (SBDART), is maximum in premonsoon followed by that in winter and minimum in retreating monsoon. Negative forcing is observed at the surface, whereas the top of the atmosphere (TOA) forcing is nearly zero in retreating monsoon and is negative in rest of the seasons. The forcing efficiency and heating rate were highest during winter and premonsoon, respectively.

  20. Aerosol lidar ``M4``

    SciTech Connect

    Shelevoy, C.D.; Andreev, Y.M. |

    1994-12-31

    Small carrying aerosol lidar in which is used small copper vapor laser ``Malachite`` as source of sounding optical pulses is described. The advantages of metal vapor laser and photon counting mode in acquisition system of lidar gave ability to get record results: when lidar has dimensions (1 x .6 x .3 m) and weight (65 kg), it provides the sounding of air industrial pollutions at up to 20 km range in scanning sector 90{degree}. Power feed is less than 800 Wt. Lidar can be disposed as stationary so on the car, helicopter, light plane. Results of location of smoke tails and city smog in situ experiments are cited. Showed advantages of work of acquisition system in photon counting mode when dynamic range of a signal is up to six orders.

  1. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2015-02-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA (Sectional Aerosol module for Large Scale Applications) in the European-scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The modeled PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at four measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at northern and central European sites and accumulation-mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. The low nucleation rate coefficient used in this study is an important reason for the underestimation. On the other hand, the model performs well for particle mass (including secondary inorganic aerosol components), while elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation. Updating the biogenic secondary organic aerosol (SOA) scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation.

  2. Aerosol- and updraft-limited regimes of cloud droplet formation: influence of particle number, size and hygroscopicity on the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reutter, P.; Su, H.; Trentmann, J.; Simmel, M.; Rose, D.; Gunthe, S. S.; Wernli, H.; Andreae, M. O.; Pöschl, U.

    2009-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of cloud droplets under pyro-convective conditions using a cloud parcel model with detailed spectral microphysics and with the κ-Köhler model approach for efficient and realistic description of the cloud condensation nucleus (CCN) activity of aerosol particles. Assuming a typical biomass burning aerosol size distribution (accumulation mode centred at 120 nm), we have calculated initial cloud droplet number concentrations (NCD) for a wide range of updraft velocities (w=0.25-20 m s-1) and aerosol particle number concentrations (NCN=200-105 cm-3) at the cloud base. Depending on the ratio between updraft velocity and particle number concentration (w/NCN), we found three distinctly different regimes of CCN activation and cloud droplet formation: (1) An aerosol-limited regime that is characterized by high w/NCN ratios (>≈10-3 m s-1 cm3), high maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax>≈0.5%), and high activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCN/NCN>≈90%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to NCN and practically independent of w. (2) An updraft-limited regime that is characterized by low w/NCN ratios (<≈10-4 m s-1 cm3), low maximum values of water vapour supersaturation (Smax<≈0.2%), and low activated fractions of aerosol particles (NCD/NCN<≈20%). In this regime NCD is directly proportional to w and practically independent of NCN. (3) An aerosol- and updraft-sensitive regime (transitional regime), which is characterized by parameter values in between the two other regimes and covers most of the conditions relevant for pyro-convection. In this regime NCD depends non-linearly on both NCN and w. In sensitivity studies we have tested the influence of aerosol particle size distribution and hygroscopicity on NCD. Within the range of effective hygroscopicity parameters that is characteristic for continental atmospheric aerosols (κ≈0.05-0.6), we found that NCD depends rather weakly on the actual value of κ

  3. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  4. Variability and Trends of Aerosol Properties over Kanpur, Northern India using AERONET Data (2001-10)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Singh, Ramesh.P.; Gautam, Ritesh; Sharma, Manish; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.

    2012-01-01

    Natural and anthropogenic aerosols over northern India play an important role in influencing the regional radiation budget, causing climate implications to the overall hydrological cycle of South Asia. In the context of regional climate change and air quality, we discuss aerosol loading variability and trends at Kanpur AERONET station located in the central part of the Indo-Gangetic plains (IGP), during the last decade (2001-10). Ground-based radiometric measurements show an overall increase in column-integrated aerosol optical depth (AOD) on a yearly basis. This upward trend is mainly due to a sustained increase in the seasonal/monthly averaged AOD during the winter (Dec-Feb) and post-monsoon (Oct-Nov) seasons (dominated by anthropogenic emissions). In contrast, a neutral to weak declining trend is observed during late pre-monsoon (Mar-May) and monsoon (Jun-Sep) months, mainly influenced by inter-annual variations of dust outbreaks. A general decrease in coarse-mode aerosols associated with variable dust activity is observed, whereas the statistically significant increasing post-monsoon/winter AOD is reflected in a shift of the columnar size distribution towards relatively larger particles in the accumulation mode. Overall, the present study provides an insight into the pronounced seasonal behavior in aerosol loading trends and, in general, is in agreement with that associating the findings with those recently reported by satellite observations (MODIS and MISR) over northern India. Our results further suggest that anthropogenic emissions (due mainly to fossil-fuel and biomass combustion) over the IGP have continued to increase in the last decade.

  5. Aerosol hygroscopicity and CCN activity during the AC3Exp campaign: Implications for CCN parameterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Fang; Li, Yanan; Li, Zhanqing

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosol particles acting as CCN are pivotal elements of the hydrological cycle and climate change. In this study, we measured and characterized NCCN in relatively clean and polluted air during the AC3Exp campaign conducted at Xianghe, China during summer 2013. The aim was to examine CCN activation properties under high aerosol loading conditions in a polluted region and to assess the impacts of particle size and chemical composition on the CCN AR which acts as a proxy of the total number of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. A gradual increase in size-resolved AR with particle diameter suggests that aerosol particles have different hygroscopicities. For particles in the accumulation mode, values of κapa range from 0.31-0.38 under background conditions, which is about 20% higher than that derived under polluted conditions. For particles in the nucleation or Aitken mode, κ range from 0.20-0.34 under both background and polluted conditions. Larger particles were on average more hygroscopic than smaller particles. However, the case is more complex for particles originating from heavy pollution due to the diversity in particle composition and mixing state. The low R2 for the NPO CCN closure test suggests a 30%-40% uncertainty in total NCCN estimation. Using bulk chemical composition data from ACSM measurements, the relationship between bulk AR and the physical and chemical properties of atmospheric aerosols is investigated. Based on a case study, it has been concluded that one cannot use a parameterized formula using only total NCN to estimate total NCCN. Our results showed a possibility of using bulk κchem and f44 in combination with bulk NCN > 100 nm to parameterize CCN number concentrations.

  6. Aerosol physicochemical properties and implications for visibility during an intense haze episode during winter in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Y. H.; Liu, Z. R.; Zhang, J. K.; Hu, B.; Ji, D. S.; Yu, Y. C.; Wang, Y. S.

    2015-03-01

    The evolution of physical, chemical and optical properties of urban aerosol particles was characterized during an extreme haze episode in Beijing, PRC, from 24 through 31 January 2013 based on in situ measurements. The average mass concentrations of PM1, PM2.5 and PM10 were 99 ± 67 μg m-3 (average ± SD), 188 ± 128 μg m-3 and 265 ± 157 μg m-3, respectively. A significant increase in PM1-2.5 fraction was observed during the most heavily polluted period. The average scattering coefficient at 550 nm was 877 ± 624 Mm-1. An increasing relative amount of coarse particles can be deduced from the variations of backscattering ratios, asymmetry parameter and scattering Ångström exponent. Particle number-size distributions between 14 and 2500 nm diameter showed high number concentrations, particularly in the nucleation mode and accumulation mode. Size-resolved chemical composition of submicron aerosol from a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer showed that the mass concentrations of organic, sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and chlorine mainly resided on particles between 500 and 800 nm (vacuum diameter), and nitrate and ammonium contributed greatly to particle growth during the heavily polluted day (28 January). Increasing relative humidity and stable synoptic conditions on 28 January combined with heavy pollution on 28 January, leading to enhanced water uptake by the hygroscopic submicron particles and formation of secondary aerosol, which might be the main reasons for the severity of the haze episode. Light-scattering apportionment showed that organic, sulfate, ammonium nitrate and ammonium chloride compounds contributed to light-scattering fractions of 54, 24, 12 and 10%, respectively. This study indicated that the organic component in submicron aerosol played an important role in visibility degradation during the haze episode in Beijing.

  7. Aerosol Indirect Effects on Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Adams, A.; Toohey, D. W.; Anderson, J.; Shank, L.; Howell, S.; Clarke, A. D.; Wood, R.

    2009-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world’s largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. Anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles such as smelters, power plants and urban pollution are expected to impact properties of the eastern portion of the stratocumulus deck. During the VOCALS (VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) field experiment, aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer, an aerosol mass spectrometer, and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights and about forty individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. This applied for particles larger than 0.05 and 0.1 µm in diameter, but not for total particles larger than 0.01 µm diameter. This suggests pollution contributed aged accumulation-mode aerosols to the stratocumulus layer, but fresher nuclei-mode particles were generated from other sources as well. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Aerosol number concentration in the >0.05 and >0.1 µm size range was correlated with droplet number concentration, and anti-correlated with droplet effective radius. These variables were especially well correlated on individual flights with near constant liquid water content (LWC), but were also statistically significant for the data set as a whole. When data were stratified into different LWC

  8. Contrasting the Evaporation and Condensation of Water from Glassy and Amorphous Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, J. P.; Bones, D. L.; Power, R.; Lienhard, D.; Krieger, U. K.

    2012-04-01

    The partitioning of water between the condensed and gas phases in atmospheric aerosol is usually assumed to occur instantaneously and to be regulated by solution thermodynamics. However, the persistence of high viscosity, glassy and amorphous aerosol to low relative humidity without crystallisation occurring is now widely recognised, suggesting that the timescale for water transport to or from the particle during condensation or evaporation may be significant. A kinetic limitation on water transport could have important implications for understanding hygroscopic growth measurements made on ambient particles, the ability of particles to act as ice nuclei or cloud condensation nuclei, the kinetics of chemical aging/heterogeneous chemistry, and the rate or condensation/evaporation of semi-volatile organic components. In this study we will report on measurements of the timescale of water transport to and from glassy aerosol and ultra-high viscosity solution droplets using aerosol optical tweezers to investigate the time-response of single particles to changes in relative humidity. As a benchmark system, mixed component aerosol particles containing sucrose and sodium chloride have been used; varying the mole fractions of the two solutes allows a wide range of solution viscosities to be studied. We will show that coarse particles can take many thousands of seconds to equilibrate in size and that the timescale correlates with the estimated bulk viscosity of the particle. We will also confirm that significant inhomogeneities in particle composition can be established during evaporation or condensation. Using the experimental data to benchmark a model for equilibration time, predictions can be made of the timescale for the equilibration of accumulation mode particles during water condensation or evaporation and these predictions will be described and their significance explored. Finally, the coalescence dynamics of highly viscous aerosol particles will be reported

  9. Global Analysis of Aerosol Properties Above Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waquet, F.; Peers, F.; Ducos, F.; Goloub, P.; Platnick, S. E.; Riedi, J.; Tanre, D.; Thieuleux, F.

    2013-01-01

    The seasonal and spatial varability of Aerosol Above Cloud (AAC) properties are derived from passive satellite data for the year 2008. A significant amount of aerosols are transported above liquid water clouds on the global scale. For particles in the fine mode (i.e., radius smaller than 0.3 m), including both clear sky and AAC retrievals increases the global mean aerosol optical thickness by 25(+/- 6%). The two main regions with man-made AAC are the tropical Southeast Atlantic, for biomass burning aerosols, and the North Pacific, mainly for pollutants. Man-made AAC are also detected over the Arctic during the spring. Mineral dust particles are detected above clouds within the so-called dust belt region (5-40 N). AAC may cause a warming effect and bias the retrieval of the cloud properties. This study will then help to better quantify the impacts of aerosols on clouds and climate.

  10. Particle Size Distributions of Water Soluble Species and Nutrient Elements in Aerosols over the Southern Ocean and Coastal East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Gao, Y.

    2012-12-01

    The particle size is an important parameter to determin the chemical and physical properties of aerosols of marine origin, especially the fine mode particles that may act as cloud condenstation neuclei (CCN), affecting cloud microphysics and consequently climate. The air-to-sea deposition of aerosol particles are also dependent on particle sizes, which are important for the calculation of atmospheric nutrient fluxes to the ocean. To characterize the size distributions of water-soluble inorganic, organic aerosol species (including Na+, non-sea-salt (nss) sulfate, methane sulfonate (MSA), oxalate and succinate) of marine origin and nutrient elements (inlcuding Cu, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn and Cd) over the Southern Ocean and coastal East Antarctica, size-segregated aerosols were collected from 40°S, 100°E to 69°S, 76°E and between 69°S, 76°E and 66°S, 110°E during a cruise from November 2010 to March 2011. Results indicate that sea salt particles, a major aerosol component and generated by strong westerly winds, existed mainly in the coarse mode with a concentration peak at >3.0 μm over the Southern Ocean. However, the nss-sulfate, a secondary aerosol species, existed mainly in the fine mode, with a single peak at <0.49 μm over the Southern Ocean, and in a bimodal distribution, peaking at 0.10 - 0.18 μm and 0.32 - 0.56 μm over coastal East Antarctic seas. Over the Southern Ocean, MSA showed a bimodal distribution, a large peak at 0.32-0.56 μm and a small peak at 3.0-7.2 μm, while over coastal East Antarctica, MSA was enriched in particles of 0.32-0.56 μm. Oxalate and formate existed in the fine mode, while succinate showed a bimodal distribution. Nutrient elements including Fe, Mn and Cd showed a bimodal distribution, at both submicron and supermicron size ranges. While Zn was mainly accumulated at 1.0-3.2 μm over coastal East Antarctica, both Zn and Cd mainly existed in the fine mode with a concentration peak at <0.49 μm over the Southern Ocean. Different

  11. Atmospheric Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Lawless, James G. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Aerosols, defined as particles and droplets suspended in air, are always present in the atmosphere. They are part of the earth-atmosphere climate system, because they interact with both incoming solar and outgoing terrestrial radiation. They do this directly through scattering and absorption, and indirectly through effects on clouds. Submicrometer aerosols usually predominate in terms of number of particles per unit volume of air. They have dimensions close to the wavelengths of visible light, and thus scatter radiation from the sun very effectively. They are produced in the atmosphere by chemical reactions of sulfur-, nitrogen- and carbon-containing gases of both natural and anthropogenic origins. Light absorption is dominated by particles containing elemental carbon (soot), produced by incomplete combustion of fossil fuels and by biomass burning. Light-scattering dominates globally, although absorption can be significant at high latitudes, particularly over highly reflective snow- or ice-covered surfaces. Other aerosol substances that may be locally important are those from volcanic eruptions, wildfires and windblown dust.

  12. Thermal Infrared Radiative Forcing By Atmospheric Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Narayan

    The work mainly focuses on the study of thermal infrared (IR) properties of atmospheric greenhouse gases and aerosols, and the estimation of the aerosol-induced direct longwave (LW) radiative forcing in the spectral region 5-20 mum at the Earth's surface (BOA; bottom of the atmosphere) and the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in cloud-free atmospheric conditions. These objectives were accomplished by conducting case studies on clear sky, smoky, and dusty conditions that took place in the Great Basin of the USA in 2013. Both the solar and thermal IR measurements and a state-of-the-science radiative transfer model, the LBLDIS, a combination of the Line-By-Line Radiative Transfer Model and the Discrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer (DISORT) solver were employed for the study. The LW aerosol forcing is often not included in climate models because the aerosol effect on the LW is often assumed to be negligible. We lack knowledge of aerosol characteristics in the LW region, and aerosol properties exhibit high variability. We have found that the LW TOA radiative forcing due to fine mode aerosols, mainly associated with small biomass burning smoke particles, is + 0.4 W/m2 which seems to be small, but it is similar to the LW radiative forcing due to increase in CO2 concentration in the Earth's atmosphere since the preindustrial era of 1750 (+ 1.6 W/m 2). The LW radiative forcing due to coarse mode aerosols, associated with large airborne mineral dust particles, was found to be as much as + 5.02 W/m2 at the surface and + 1.71 W/m2 at the TOA. All of these significant positive values of the aerosol radiative forcing both at the BOA and TOA indicate that the aerosols have a heating effect in the LW range, which contributes to counterbalancing the cooling effect associated with the aerosol radiative forcing in the shortwave (SW) spectral region. In the meantime, we have found that LW radiative forcing by aerosols is highly sensitive to particle size and complex refractive indices of

  13. Five-years of atmospheric aerosol number size distribution measurements in Eastern Mediterranean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalivitis, Nikolaos; Kouvarakis, Giorgos; Bougiatioti, Aikaterini; Stavroulas, Iasonas; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos

    2014-05-01

    The first long term measurements of atmospheric particle size distributions from the Eastern Mediterranean region are reported. Atmospheric aerosol number size distributions have been measured at the environmental research station of University of Crete at Finokalia, Crete, Greece (35° 20' N, 25° 40' E, 250m a.s.l) on a continuous base since 2008. A custom built (TROPOS type) scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) is used covering size ranges from 8 to 900 nm. The system is humidity controlled so that relative humidity is kept below 40% most of the time. Throughout the measuring period the average number concentration of the particles in the studied size range was found to be 2354 ± 1332 cm-3 (median of 2098 cm-3). Maximum concentrations are observed during summer while minimum during winter, reflecting the effectiveness of the removal processes in the region. Clear annual circles are found for the number concentrations of nucleation, Aitken and accumulation mode particles. Nucleation mode is presenting different pattern from the other two modes, with the highest concentrations during winter (and March) and the lowest during summer. New particle formation events are more frequently observed during March and October. The number size distributions present different seasonal patterns. During summer, unimodal distributions centering on the lower end of the accumulation mode size range are dominant in our observations. The prevailing meteorology characterized by the Etesian winds (Meltemi) and the lack of precipitation along the trajectory results to the arrival of well mixed air masses at Finokalia, carrying aged aerosol mainly from central and Eastern Europe. Regarding the other seasons, the shape of the distributions is more variable and strongly dependent on the air mass history: When the air masses are of marine origin or precipitation has affected them, the size distributions are mainly bimodal (peaking both in Aitken and in Accumulation mode). These

  14. Characterization of marine boundary layer aerosol from North Atlantic and European sources: Physical and chemical properties and climate forcing parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dusek, Ulrike

    . The variability in the fine particle number concentration can explained by particle nucleation in the morning hours and subsequent particle growth to larger sizes. On the other hand the number concentration of particles in the accumulation mode size range is mostly determined by long range transport.

  15. Aerosol composition, oxidation properties, and sources in Beijing: results from the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation summit study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Chen, C.; Du, W.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhao, X. J.; Zhou, L. B.; Ji, D. S.; Wang, P. C.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-12-01

    The mitigation of air pollution in megacities remains a great challenge because of the complex sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles. The 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing serves as a unique experiment to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation properties. Herein, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed in urban Beijing for real-time measurements of size-resolved non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species from 14 October to 12 November 2014, along with a range of collocated measurements. The average (±σ) PM1 was 41.6 (±38.9) μg m-3 during APEC, which was decreased by 53 % compared with that before APEC. The aerosol composition showed substantial changes owing to emission controls during APEC. Secondary inorganic aerosol (SIA: sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) showed significant reductions of 62-69 %, whereas organics presented much smaller decreases (35 %). The results from the positive matrix factorization of organic aerosol (OA) indicated that highly oxidized secondary organic aerosol (SOA) showed decreases similar to those of SIA during APEC. However, primary organic aerosol (POA) from cooking, traffic, and biomass-burning sources were comparable to those before APEC, indicating the presence of strong local source emissions. The oxidation properties showed corresponding changes in response to OA composition. The average oxygen-to-carbon level during APEC was 0.36 (±0.10), which is lower than the 0.43 (±0.13) measured before APEC, demonstrating a decrease in the OA oxidation degree. The changes in size distributions of primary and secondary species varied during APEC. SIA and SOA showed significant reductions in large accumulation modes with peak diameters shifting from ~ 650 to 400 nm during APEC, whereas those of POA remained relatively unchanged. The changes in aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation

  16. The Effects of Aerosols on Intense Convective Precipitation in the Northeastern U.S.

    SciTech Connect

    Ntelekos, Alexandros A.; Smith, James S.; Donner, Leo J.; Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Krajewski, Witold F.

    2009-08-03

    A fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol mesoscale model (WRF-Chem) is used to assess the effects of aerosols on intense convective precipitation over the northeastern United States. Numerical experiments are performed for three intense convective storm days and for two scenarios representing “typical” and “low” aerosol conditions. The results of the simulations suggest that increasing concentrations of aerosols can lead to either enhancement or suppression of precipitation. Quantification of the aerosol effect is sensitive to the metric used due to a shift of rainfall accumulation distribution when realistic aerosol concentrations are included in the simulations. Maximum rainfall accumulation amounts and areas with rainfall accumulations exceeding specified thresholds provide robust metrics of the aerosol effect on convective precipitation. Storms developing over areas with medium to low aerosol concentrations showed a suppression effect on rainfall independent of the meteorologic environment. Storms developing in areas of relatively high particulate concentrations showed enhancement of rainfall when there were simultaneous high values of CAPE, relative humidity and wind shear. In these cases, elevated aerosol concentrations resulted in stronger updrafts and downdrafts and more coherent organization of convection. For the extreme case, maximum rainfall accumulation differences exceeded 40 mm. The modeling results suggest that areas of the northeastern U.S. urban corridor that are close or downwind of intense sources of aerosols, could be more favorable for rainfall enhancement due to aerosols for the aerosol concentrations typical of this area.

  17. MODIS Retrieval of Dust Aerosol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, Lorraine A.; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, operationally, on a nearly global basis every day. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations. However, the validation in regions dominated by desert dust is less accurate than in regions dominated by fine mode aerosol or background marine sea salt. The discrepancy is most apparent in retrievals of aerosol size parameters over ocean. In dust situations, the MODIS algorithm tends to under predict particle size because the reflectances at top of atmosphere measured by MODIS exhibit the stronger spectral signature expected by smaller particles. This pattern is consistent with the angular and spectral signature of non-spherical particles. All possible aerosol models in the MODIS Look-Up Tables were constructed from Mie theory, assuming a spherical shape. Using a combination of MODIS and AERONET observations, in regimes dominated by desert dust, we construct phase functions, empirically, with no assumption of particle shape. These new phase functions are introduced into the MODIS algorithm, in lieu of the original options for large dust-like particles. The results will be analyzed and examined.

  18. Observation of low single scattering albedo of aerosols in the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas during the inflow of dust aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khatri, Pradeep; Takamura, Tamio; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sugimoto, Nobuo

    2014-01-01

    We analyzed data observed at Fukue-jima (32.752°N, 128.682°E), the downwind of the East Asian desert and urban areas, during the spring season (March-April) of 2008-2011 aiming to understand the light-absorption capacity of Asian dust aerosols, which is a topic of controversy. We observed the decreasing tendency of single-scattering albedo (SSA) with the decrease of Ångström exponent and the increase of the ratio of dust aerosol optical thickness to total aerosol optical thickness, suggesting the important role of coarse-mode dust aerosols on observed low SSAs. The observational data further indicated that the low SSAs during strong dust events were less likely due to the effect of only strong light-absorbing carbonaceous aerosols, such as black carbon (BC), indicating the association of aerosol size distribution on modulating SSA. Such observational results are justified by numerical calculations showing that aerosol size distribution can be the key factor on modulating SSA even without any change in relative amount of light-absorbing aerosol as well as total aerosol optical thickness. Therefore, the observed low SSAs in the downwind regions during dust events could be partially due to the dominance of coarse-mode aerosols over fine-mode aerosols, which are usual in dust events, along with the effect of mixed light-absorbing aerosols. The study further suggests that such effect of aerosol size distribution on SSA can be one of the important reasons for the low SSAs of dust aerosols in the source region as reported by some studies, if coarse-mode aerosols dominate fine-mode aerosols.

  19. Identification of columnar aerosol types under high aerosol optical depth conditions for a single AERONET site in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Yongjoo; Ghim, Young Sung; Holben, B. N.

    2016-02-01

    Dominant aerosol types were classified using level 2 inversion products for the Anmyon Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Korea for the period 1999-2007. The aerosol types were mineral dust (MD), MD mixed with carbon, and black carbon mixed coarse particles (BCCP) for coarse mode aerosols, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and secondary inorganic ions (SII) for fine mode aerosols, and mixed particles between. The classification was carried out using a clustering method based on parameters, including single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE), and fine mode volume fraction (FMVF). Among the seven aerosol types, MD was distinct, with the highest AAE and a very low FMVF and SII with the highest SSA and FMVF. BCCP was introduced to designate coarse particles mixed with BC, of which the AAE was lower than 1, despite a low FMVF. In addition to a large difference in AAE between BC and OC, the SSA of OC was larger than that of BC, indicating the effects of the white smoke produced from the smoldering phase of biomass burning. Monthly variations of the aerosol types were well interpreted by meteorology and emissions and coincided with those in the previous studies. Applying our results to well-characterized global AERONET sites, we confirmed that the aerosol types at Anmyon were valid at other sites. However, the results also showed that the mean properties for aerosol types were influenced by the specific aerosols prevalent at the study sites.

  20. Aerosol Chemistry of Furfural and Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srithawirat, T.; Brimblecombe, P.

    2008-12-01

    Furfural and sugars (as levoglucosan equivalent) are derived from biomass burning and contribute to aerosol composition. This study examined the potential of furfural and levoglucosan to be tracers of biomass burning. Furfural is likely to be oxidized quickly so comparison with levoglucosan may give a sense of the age of the aerosols in forest fire smoke. However, few furfural emissions are available for biomass combustion. Furfural and sugars were determined in coarse aerosols (>2.4μm aerodynamic diameter) and fine aerosols (<2.4μm aerodynamic diameter) collected in 24 hour periods during different seasons in the United Kingdom and PM10 collected from Thailand and Malaysia including haze episodes. Also total suspended particulate matter (TSP) samples were collected from Taiwan. Furfural and sugars dominated in fine fractions, especially in the UK autumn. Sugars were found at 5.96-18.37 nmol m-3 in fine mode and 1.36-5.75 nmol m-3 in coarse mode aerosols in the UK. Furfural was found at 0.18-0.91 nmol m-3 and 0.05-0.51 nmol m-3 respectively in the same aerosols. Sugars were a dominant contributor to aerosol derived from biomass burning. Sugars and furfural were about 10 and 20 times higher during haze episodes in Malaysia. Laboratory experimental simulation suggested furfural is more rapid destroyed by UV and sunlight than levoglucosan.

  1. Size and mass distributions of ground-level sub-micrometer biomass burning aerosol from small wildfires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okoshi, Rintaro; Rasheed, Abdur; Chen Reddy, Greeshma; McCrowey, Clinton J.; Curtis, Daniel B.

    2014-06-01

    Biomass burning emits large amounts of aerosol particles globally, influencing human health and climate, but the number and size of the particles is highly variable depending on fuel type, burning and meteorological conditions, and secondary reactions in the atmosphere. Ambient measurements of aerosol during wildfire events can therefore improve our understanding of particulate matter produced from biomass burning. In this study, time-resolved sub-micrometer ambient aerosol size and mass distributions of freshly emitted aerosol were measured for three biomass burning wildfire events near Northridge, California, located in the highly populated San Fernando Valley area of Los Angeles. One fire (Marek) was observed during the dry Santa Ana conditions that are typically present during large Southern California wildfires, but two smaller fires (Getty and Camarillo) were observed during the more predominant non-Santa Ana weather conditions. Although the fires were generally small and extinguished quickly, they produced particle number concentrations as high as 50,000 cm-3 and mass concentrations as large as 150 μg cm-3, well above background measurements and among the highest values observed for fires in Southern California. Therefore, small wildfires can have a large impact on air quality if they occur near urban areas. Particle number distributions were lognormal, with peak diameters in the accumulation mode at approximately 100 nm. However, significant Aitken mode and nucleation mode particles were observed in bimodal distributions for one fire. Significant variations in the median diameter were observed over time, as particles generally became smaller as the fires were contained. The results indicate that it is likely that performing mass measurements alone could systematically miss detection of the smaller particles and size measurements may be better suited for studies of ambient biomass burning events. Parameters of representative unimodal and bimodal lognormal

  2. Aerosol Impacts on Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Stratocumulus Clouds in the Southeast Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Anderson, J. R.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R.; Wood, R.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2011-12-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, cloud droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties along an E-W track from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. The effect extends ~800 to 1000 km from shore. The additional particles are mainly sulfates from anthropogenic sources. Liquid water content and drizzle concentration tended to increase with distance from shore, but exhibited much greater variability. Analysis of the droplet residual measurements showed that not only were there more residual nuclei near shore, but that they tended to be larger than those offshore. Single particle analysis over a broad particle size range was used to reveal types and sources of CCN, which were primarily sulfates near shore. Differences in the size distribution of droplet residual particles and ambient aerosol particles were observed due to the preferential activation of large aerosol particles. By progressively excluding small droplets from the CVI sample, we were able to show that the larger drops, which initiate drizzle, contain the largest aerosol particles. However, the scavenging efficiency is not sharp as expected from a simple parcel activation model. A wide range of

  3. Long-term measurements of aerosols and carbon monoxide at the ZOTTO tall tower to characterize polluted and pristine air in the Siberian Taiga

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, X.; Winderlich, J.; Mayer, J.-C.; Panov, A. V.; Heimann, M.; Birmili, W.; Heintzenberg, J.; Cheng, Y.; Andreae, M. O.

    2013-07-01

    Siberia is one of few background regions in the Northern Hemisphere where the atmosphere may sometimes approach pristine conditions. We present the time series of aerosol and carbon monoxide (CO) measurements between September~2006 and December 2010 at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 90° E). We investigate the seasonal, weekly and diurnal variations of aerosol properties (including absorption and scattering coefficients and derived parameters, like equivalent black carbon (BCe), Ångström exponent, single scattering albedo, and backscattering ratio) and the CO mixing ratios. Criteria were established to distinguish polluted and near-pristine air masses and characterize them separately. Depending on the season, 15-47% of the sampling time at ZOTTO was representative of a clean atmosphere. The summer pristine data indicates that primary biogenic and/or secondary organic aerosol formation are quite strong particle sources in the Siberian Taiga. The summer seasons 2007-2008 are dominated by an Aitken mode of 80 nm size, whereas the summer 2009 with prevailing easterly winds produced aerosols in the accumulation mode around 200 nm size. We found these differences mainly related to air temperature, in parallel with production rates of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOC). In winter, the footprint and aerosol size distribution (with a peak at 160 nm) of the clean background air are characteristic for aged aerosols from anthropogenic sources at great distances from ZOTTO and diluted biofuel burning emissions from heating. The wintertime polluted air originates from the large cities to the south and southwest of the site; these aerosols have a dominant mode around 100 nm, and the Δ BCe/Δ CO ratio of 7-11 ng m-3 ppb-1 suggests dominant contributions from coal and biofuel burning for heating. During summer, anthropogenic emissions are the dominant contributor to the pollution aerosols at ZOTTO, while only 12% of the polluted

  4. Characterization of the inorganic aerosol in Barcelona site during DAURE 2009 field campaigns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, Javier; Gómez-Moreno, Francisco J.; Aránzazu Revuelta, M.; Coz, Esther; Moreno, Natalia; Pujadas, Manuel; Artíñano, Begoña.

    2010-05-01

    Inorganic compounds account for a significant mass of the ambient aerosol. However this contribution varies with time and aerosol size fraction, depending on the influence of source emissions and ambient conditions, which can be relevant in the formation processes of secondary species. Time series of particulate nitrate, 10 m time resolution, have been obtained during the February-March and July 2009 DAURE (Determination of the sources of atmospheric Aerosols in Urban and Rural Environments in the western Mediterranean) field campaigns in the urban area of Barcelona by means of an R&P8400N monitor. Meteorological conditions during these periods were relevant for the photochemical formation and accumulation of secondary species. Ambient concentrations were higher in winter, specially coinciding with development of atmospheric stagnant episodes that enhanced the accumulation of pollutants including particulate nitrate that reached concentrations of 25 µgm-3 in some occasions, day or night, under these conditions. High humidity periods favored in occasions the formation of nitrates at submicronic scale. Variations in wind direction resulted in transport of particulate nitrate from near emission areas. Size segregated aerosol was sampled during the winter campaign with a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI) using eleven size stages with aluminum substrates and a quartz fiber backup filter. Samples were collected twice per day for day/night periods. The first sampling period tried to collect secondary aerosol as it started after the early morning emission period. The second sample collected the night aerosol and the emission period. Soluble ions (sulfate, nitrate, ammonium and calcium) were later analyzed by IC. The nitrate mass was concentrated in two modes, the accumulation one around 0.75 µm and the coarse one around 3.90 µm. The sulfate and ammonium masses were concentrated in the accumulation mode, around 0.50 µm, although a small peak close to 5 µm

  5. Insights into a dust event transported through Beijing in spring 2012: Morphology, chemical composition and impact on surface aerosols.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Niu, Hongya; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Chen, Chen; Wu, Yusheng; Shang, Dongjie; Hu, Min

    2016-09-15

    Multiple approaches were used to investigate the evolution of surface aerosols in Beijing during the passage of a dust event at high altitude, which was from the Gobi areas of southern Mongolia and covered a wide range of North China. Single particle analysis with electron microscope showed that the majority of coarse particles were mineral ones, and most of them were in the size range of 1-7μm with a peak of number concentration at about 3.5μm. Based on elemental composition and morphology, the mineral particles could be classified into several groups, including Si-rich (71%), Ca-rich (15%), Fe-rich (6%), and halite-rich (2%), etc., and they were the main contributors to the aerosol optical depth as the dust occurred. The size distributions of surface aerosols were significantly affected by the dust intrusion. The average number concentration of accumulation mode particles during the event was about 400cm(-3), which was much lower than that in heavily polluted days (6300cm(-3)). At the stage of floating dust, the number concentration of accumulation mode particles decreased, and coarse particles contributed to total volume concentration of particulate matter as much as 90%. The accumulation mode particles collected in this stage were mostly in the size range of 0.2-0.5μm, and were rectangular or spherical. They were considered to be particles consisting of ammonium sulfate. New particle formation (NPF) was observed around noon in the three days during the dust event, indicating that the passage of the dust was probably favorable for NPF. PMID:27177135

  6. Modal structure of chemical mass size distribution in the high Arctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillamo, Risto; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Aurela, Minna; MäKelä, Timo; Maenhaut, Willy; Leek, Caroline

    2001-11-01

    Chemical mass size distributions of aerosol particles were measured in the remote marine boundary layer over the central Arctic Ocean as part of the Atmospheric Research Program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996 (AOE-96). An inertial impaction method was used to classify aerosol particles into different size classes for subsequent chemical analysis. The particle chemical composition was determined by ion chromatography and by the particle-induced X-ray emission technique. Continuous particle size spectra were extracted from the raw data using a data inversion method. Clear and varying modal structures for aerosols consisting of primary sea-salt particles or of secondary particles related to dimethyl sulfide emissions were found. Concentration levels of all modes decreased rapidly when the distance from open sea increased. In the submicrometer size range the major ions found by ion chromatography were sulfate, methane sulfonate, and ammonium. They had most of the time a clear Aitken mode and one or two accumulation modes, with aerodynamic mass median diameters around 0.1 μm, 0.3 μm, and between 0.5-1.0 μm, respectively. The overall submicron size distributions of these three ions were quite similar, suggesting that they were internally mixed over most of this size range. The corresponding modal structure was consistent with the mass size distributions derived from the particle number size distributions measured with a differential mobility particle sizer. The Aitken to accumulation mode mass ratio for nss-sulfate and MSA was substantially higher during clear skies than during cloudy periods. Primary sea-salt particles formed a mode with an aerodynamic mass median diameter around 2 μm. In general, the resulting continuous mass size distributions displayed a clear modal structure consistent with our understanding of the two known major source mechanisms. One is the sea-salt aerosol emerging from seawater by bubble bursting. The other is related to

  7. Formation and Growth of New Organic Aerosol Particles over the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, C. A.; Murphy, D. M.; Bahreini, R.; Middlebrook, A. M.; De Gouw, J. A.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured in June 2010 downwind of the surface oil slick produced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Rapid condensation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons was responsible for formation of a plume of secondary organic aerosol downwind of the spill region. New particles were nucleated upwind of the freshest surface oil but downwind of oil that surfaced less than 100 hours previously. These new particles grew by condensation at rates of ~20 nm hr-1; preexisting accumulation mode particles grew by ~10 nm hr-1. The gas-phase concentration of a condensing species necessary to support the observed growth rate assuming irreversible adsorption with unit accommodation coefficient is estimated to be ~0.04-0.09 μg m-3 (~3-8 pptv). The ratio of growth rates for newly formed particles to accumulation mode particles was consistent within error limits with irreversible condensation. Because new particle formation did not occur in areas away from the <100 hr-old oil slick, these results indicate that the oxidation products of VOC species, probably C14-C16 compounds, were directly involved in the growth of the new particles. While a unique and extreme environment, the oil spill plume provides insight into similar processes that may occur in urban and industrial areas where petrochemical products are produced and consumed.

  8. Formation and growth of organic aerosols downwind of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Murphy, Daniel M.; Bahreini, Roya; Middlebrook, Ann M.

    2011-09-01

    Aerosol size distributions were measured in June 2010 downwind of the surface oil slick produced by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. Previous work has shown that rapid condensation of partially oxidized hydrocarbons was responsible for formation of a plume of secondary organic aerosol downwind of the spill region. Here we examine new particle formation and growth kinetics. New particles were formed upwind of the freshest oil but downwind of oil that surfaced less than about 100 hours previously. Four nm particles formed at a rate of ˜3 cm-3 s-1 and subsequently grew by condensation at a rate of ˜20 nm hr-1 preexisting accumulation mode particles grew by ˜10 nm hr-1. The gas-phase concentration of a condensing species necessary to support irreversible growth with unit accommodation coefficient is estimated to be ˜0.04-0.09 μg m-3 (˜3-8 pptv). Gas-phase concentrations may have been higher if condensation were limited by volatility. The ratio of growth rates for newly formed particles to accumulation mode particles was consistent within error limits with irreversible condensation. The absence of new particle formation away from the <100 hr-old oil slick indicates that the oxidation products of gas-phase hydrocarbon species were directly involved in the formation and growth of new particles.

  9. Evaluation of Observed and Modelled Aerosol Lifetimes Using Radioactive Tracers of Opportunity and an Ensemble of 19 Global Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivie, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Sovde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Shindell, D.

    2016-01-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (Cs-137) and xenon-133 (Xe-133) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. Cs-137 size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, Cs-137 can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas Xe-133 behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of Cs-137that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and Xe-133 emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled Cs-137and Xe-133 concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime e, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  10. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2015-09-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulphate aerosols were the main carriers for the cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulphate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulphate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulphate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 37Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between two and nine weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days

  11. Evaluation of observed and modelled aerosol lifetimes using radioactive tracers of opportunity and an ensemble of 19 global models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristiansen, N. I.; Stohl, A.; Olivié, D. J. L.; Croft, B.; Søvde, O. A.; Klein, H.; Christoudias, T.; Kunkel, D.; Leadbetter, S. J.; Lee, Y. H.; Zhang, K.; Tsigaridis, K.; Bergman, T.; Evangeliou, N.; Wang, H.; Ma, P.-L.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.; Liu, X.; Pitari, G.; Di Genova, G.; Zhao, S. Y.; Balkanski, Y.; Bauer, S. E.; Faluvegi, G. S.; Kokkola, H.; Martin, R. V.; Pierce, J. R.; Schulz, M.; Shindell, D.; Tost, H.; Zhang, H.

    2016-03-01

    Aerosols have important impacts on air quality and climate, but the processes affecting their removal from the atmosphere are not fully understood and are poorly constrained by observations. This makes modelled aerosol lifetimes uncertain. In this study, we make use of an observational constraint on aerosol lifetimes provided by radionuclide measurements and investigate the causes of differences within a set of global models. During the Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear power plant accident of March 2011, the radioactive isotopes cesium-137 (137Cs) and xenon-133 (133Xe) were released in large quantities. Cesium attached to particles in the ambient air, approximately according to their available aerosol surface area. 137Cs size distribution measurements taken close to the power plant suggested that accumulation-mode (AM) sulfate aerosols were the main carriers of cesium. Hence, 137Cs can be used as a proxy tracer for the AM sulfate aerosol's fate in the atmosphere. In contrast, the noble gas 133Xe behaves almost like a passive transport tracer. Global surface measurements of the two radioactive isotopes taken over several months after the release allow the derivation of a lifetime of the carrier aerosol. We compare this to the lifetimes simulated by 19 different atmospheric transport models initialized with identical emissions of 137Cs that were assigned to an aerosol tracer with each model's default properties of AM sulfate, and 133Xe emissions that were assigned to a passive tracer. We investigate to what extent the modelled sulfate tracer can reproduce the measurements, especially with respect to the observed loss of aerosol mass with time. Modelled 137Cs and 133Xe concentrations sampled at the same location and times as station measurements allow a direct comparison between measured and modelled aerosol lifetime. The e-folding lifetime τe, calculated from station measurement data taken between 2 and 9 weeks after the start of the emissions, is 14.3 days (95

  12. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  13. Aerosol Direct Radiative Forcing over Delhi NCR, India: Sensitivity to Mixing State and Particle Shape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Parul; Dey, Sagnik; Srivastava, Atul; Singh, Sachchidanand; Agarwal, Poornima

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol properties changes with the change in mixing state of aerosols and thus aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF). The problem is important in the Indo-Gangetic Basin, Northern India, where various aerosol types mix and show strong seasonal variations. A detailed chemical composition analysis of aerosols for Delhi National capital region (NCR) is carried out during 2007-2008. These results were used to examine the sensitivity of optical properties to the aerosol mixing state. Black carbon, BC was measured directly by Aethalometer. The species are grouped into four major components; dust, water soluble (WS), water insoluble (WINS) and BC. To infer the probable mixing state of aerosols in the Delhi NCR, eight different mixing cases, external mixing, internal mixing, and six combinations of core- shell type mixing which includes two modes of dust (accumulation and coarse) have been considered. Core-shell mixing cases are considered to be as follows - BC over dust, WS over dust, BC over WS and, WS over BC. These core shell mixed components are then externally mixed with rest of the aerosol species. The spectral aerosol optical properties - extinction coefficient, single scattering albedo (SSA) and asymmetry parameter (g) for each of the mixing state cases are calculated. These optical properties are utilized to estimate the radiative forcing using a radiative transfer model. The surface-reaching fluxes for each of the cases are compared with MERRA downward shortwave surface flux. MISR aerosol products were also analyzed to understand the seasonal variations of the bulk aerosol properties that may help in interpreting the sensitivity results. We observed that for the pre-monsoon season (MAMJ), core shell mixed case; BC coated over WS (surface DRF is -10.52 Wm-2) and BC over coarse dust (surface DRF is -2.81 Wm-2) are the most probable mixing states. For monsoon season (JAS,) BC coated over coarse dust (often referred to as polluted dust) (surface DRF is -0.60 Wm-2

  14. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    monitoring station (55˚ 26'26"N; 26˚ 03'60"E) in the eastern part of Lithuania in the Aukštaitija national park during 2-24 July, 2008. The Rugšteliškis station is located in a remote relatively clean forested area. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), developed at Aerodyne Research, was used to obtain real-time quantitative information on particle size-resolved mass loadings for volatile and semi-volatile chemical components present in/on ambient aerosol. The AMS inlet system allows 100 % transmission efficiency for particles with size diameter between 60 to 600 nm and partial transmission down to 20 nm and up to 2000 nm. The aerosol sampling was also carried out using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) model 110. The flow rate was 30 l/min, and the 50% aerodynamic cutoff diameters of the 10 stages were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.10 and 0.056 m. Aluminum foil was used as the impaction surface. The aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon using the elemental analyzer (Flash EA1112). Besides, samples were analyzed for ^13C/12C ratio by the isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus Advantage) (Norman et al., 1999; Garbaras et al., 2008). During campaign the dynamic behavior of aerosols was measured and quantitatively compared with meteorological conditions and air mass transport. The submicron aerosol was predominately sulphate and organic material. The AMS was able to discriminate and quantify mixed organic/inorganic accumulation mode particles (300 - 400 nm), which appeared to be dominated by regional sources and were of the origin similar to those seen in the more remote areas. The particulate organic fraction was also investigated in detail using the mass spectral data. By combining the organic matter size distribution (measured with AMS) with the total carbon (TC) size distribution (measured with MOUDI) we were able to report organic carbon to total carbon (OC/TC) ratio in different size particles

  15. Climatology of Aerosol Optical Properties in Southern Africa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Queface, Antonio J.; Piketh, Stuart J.; Eck, Thomas F.; Tsay, Si-Chee

    2011-01-01

    A thorough regionally dependent understanding of optical properties of aerosols and their spatial and temporal distribution is required before we can accurately evaluate aerosol effects in the climate system. Long term measurements of aerosol optical depth, Angstrom exponent and retrieved single scattering albedo and size distribution, were analyzed and compiled into an aerosol optical properties climatology for southern Africa. Monitoring of aerosol parameters have been made by the AERONET program since the middle of the last decade in southern Africa. This valuable information provided an opportunity for understanding how aerosols of different types influence the regional radiation budget. Two long term sites, Mongu in Zambia and Skukuza in South Africa formed the core sources of data in this study. Results show that seasonal variation of aerosol optical thicknesses at 500 nm in southern Africa are characterized by low seasonal multi-month mean values (0.11 to 0.17) from December to May, medium values (0.20 to 0.27) between June and August, and high to very high values (0.30 to 0.46) during September to November. The spatial distribution of aerosol loadings shows that the north has high magnitudes than the south in the biomass burning season and the opposite in none biomass burning season. From the present aerosol data, no long term discernable trends are observable in aerosol concentrations in this region. This study also reveals that biomass burning aerosols contribute the bulk of the aerosol loading in August-October. Therefore if biomass burning could be controlled, southern Africa will experience a significant reduction in total atmospheric aerosol loading. In addition to that, aerosol volume size distribution is characterized by low concentrations in the non biomass burning period and well balanced particle size contributions of both coarse and fine modes. In contrast high concentrations are characteristic of biomass burning period, combined with

  16. In situ acidity and pH of size-fractionated aerosols during a recent smoke-haze episode in Southeast Asia.

    PubMed

    Behera, Sailesh N; Cheng, Jinping; Balasubramanian, Rajasekhar

    2015-10-01

    The characterization of aerosol acidity has received increased attention in recent years due to its influence on atmospheric visibility, climate change and human health. Distribution of water soluble inorganic (WSI) ions in 12 different size fractions of aerosols was investigated under two different atmospheric conditions (smoke-haze and non-haze periods) in 2012 using the Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) and nano-MOUDI for the first time in Singapore. To estimate the in situ acidity ([H(+)]Ins) and in situ aerosol pH (pHIS), the Aerosol Inorganic Model version-IV under deliquescent mode of airborne particles was used at prevailing ambient temperature and relative humidity. The study revealed an increase in the levels of airborne particulate matter (PM) mass and concentrations of WSI ions for all size fractions during the smoke-haze period, which was caused by the trans-boundary transport of biomass burning-impacted air masses from Indonesia. A bimodal distribution was observed for concentrations of SO4(2-), NO3(-), Cl(-), K(+) and Na(+), whereas concentrations of NH4(+), Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) showed a single mode distribution. The concentration of WSI ions in PM1.8 during the smoke-haze period increased by 3.8 (for SO4(2-)) to 10.5 (for K(+)) times more than those observed during the non-haze period. The pHIS were observed to be lower during the smoke-haze period than that during the non-haze period for all size fractions of PM, indicating that atmospheric aerosols were more acidic due to the influence of biomass burning emissions. The particles in the accumulation mode were more acidic than those in the coarse mode. PMID:25432456

  17. The impact of residential combustion emission on Arctic aerosol concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckhardt, Sabine; Stohl, Andreas; Olivie, Dirk J. L.; Grini, Alf

    2016-04-01

    Arctic haze is a seasonal phenomenon with high concentrations of accumulation-mode aerosols occurring in the Arctic in winter and early spring. It has been challenging to reproduced this cylce and concentration levels with atmospheric transport and climate models. However, simulations have been improving recently and it has been shown, that a better scavenging parametrization as well as more realistic emissions are important to obtain better results. In this study we focus on the emission from residential heating, which depend on air temperature, as heating demand is higher on cold days. Varying this emission shows a clear effect on modeled Arctic concentrations. Arctic-mean and annual-mean concentrations of black carbon from Arctic domestic combustion emissions due to heating requirements, are nearly 70% higher when accounting for diurnal emission variability relative to constant emissions (Stohl et al., 2013). Emissions are high when ambient temperatures are low and cold air is transported to the Arctic. In order to capture this systematic effect, we created an interactive emission module for NorESM, a climate model, using the heating degree-day concept. Domestic combustion emissions of BC and other species are scaled interactively with the modeled ambient air temperatures, while securing that levels of annual total emissions from emission scenarios are reproduced. We compare the modeled aerosol concentration in the Arctic to observations and show the level of improvements achieved by using varying emission.

  18. Global model simulations of the impact of ocean-going ships on aerosols, clouds, and the radiation budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauer, A.; Eyring, V.; Hendricks, J.; Jöckel, P.; Lohmann, U.

    2007-07-01

    International shipping contributes significantly to the fuel consumption of all transport related activities. Specific emissions of pollutants such as sulfur dioxide (SO2) per kg of fuel emitted are higher than for road transport or aviation. Besides gaseous pollutants, ships also emit various types of particulate matter. The aerosol impacts the Earth's radiation budget directly by scattering and absorbing incoming solar radiation and indirectly by changing cloud properties. Here we use ECHAM5/MESSy1-MADE, a global climate model with detailed aerosol and cloud microphysics, to show that emissions from ships significantly increase the cloud droplet number concentration of low maritime water clouds. Whereas the cloud liquid water content remains nearly unchanged in these simulations, effective radii of cloud droplets decrease, leading to cloud optical thickness increase up to 5-10%. The sensitivity of the results is estimated by using three different emission inventories for present day conditions. The sensitivity analysis reveals that shipping contributes with 2.3% to 3.6% to the total sulfate burden and 0.4% to 1.4% to the total black carbon burden in the year 2000. In addition to changes in aerosol chemical composition, shipping increases the aerosol number concentration, e.g. up to 25% in the size range of the accumulation mode (typically >0.1 μm) over the Atlantic. The total aerosol optical thickness over the Indian Ocean, the Gulf of Mexico and the Northeastern Pacific increases up to 8-10% depending on the emission inventory. Changes in aerosol optical thickness caused by the shipping induced modification of aerosol particle number concentration and chemical composition lead to a change of the net top of the atmosphere (ToA) clear sky radiation of about -0.013 W/m2 to -0.036 W/m2 on global annual average. The estimated all-sky direct aerosol effect calculated from these changes ranges between -0.009 W/m2 and -0.014 W/m2. The indirect aerosol effect of ships

  19. Spectral aerosol optical depths over Bay of Bengal and Chennai: II—sources, anthropogenic influence and model estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramachandran, S.; Jayaraman, A.

    reproduced by models having water-soluble and soot particles of anthropogenic origin. The higher α values over Bay of Bengal and Chennai when compared to the Arabian Sea arise due to the direct impact of anthropogenically produced submicron aerosols which is evident from the higher number concentrations of water-soluble and soot particles found necessary to fit the measured AODs. The southern Indian Ocean AOD spectra is ably captured by models having water-soluble and sea-salt particles in the accumulation and coarse modes.

  20. Environmental Snapshots for Satellite Multi-Angle Aerosol Retrieval Validation During the ACE-Asia Field Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph; Anderson, Jim; Anderson, Theodore L.; Bates, Tim; Brechtel, Fred; Clarke, Antony; Dutton, Ellsworth; Flagan, Richard; Fouin, Robert; Fukushima, Hajime

    2003-01-01

    On five occasions spanning the ACE-Asia field experiment in spring 2001, the multi-angle imaging MISR instrument, flying aboard the NASA Earth Observing System s Terra satellite, took quarter-kilometer data over a 400-km-wide swath, coincident with high-quality observations by multiple instruments on two or more participating surface and airborne platforms. The cases capture a range of clean, polluted, and dusty aerosol conditions. They represent some of the best opportunities during ACE- Asia for comparative studies among intensive and extensive aerosol observations in their environmental context. We inter-compare related measurements and discuss the implications of apparent discrepancies for each case, at a level of detail appropriate to the analysis of satellite observations. With a three-stage optical modeling process, we synthesize data from multiple sources into layer-by-layer snapshots that summarize what we know about the state of the atmosphere and surface at key locations during each event, to be used for satellite vicarious calibration and aerosol retrieval validation. Aerosols within a few kilometers of the surface were composed primarily of pollution and Asian dust mixtures, as expected. Accumulation and coarse-mode particle size distributions varied little among the events studied, but column aerosol optical depth changed by more than a factor of four, and the near-surface proportion of dust ranged from about 25% to 50%. The amount of absorbing material in the sub-micron fraction was highest when near-surface winds crossed Beijing and the Korean Peninsula, and was considerably lower for all other cases. Ambiguities remain in segregating size distributions by composition; having simultaneous single scattering albedo measurements at more than a single wavelength would significantly reduce the resulting optical model uncertainties, as would integral constraints from surface and atmospheric radiative flux observations. The consistency of component

  1. Development of a global aerosol microphysics model driven by assimilated meteorology and evaluation against field campaign data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trivitayanurak, Win

    We implement the TwO-Moment Aerosol Sectional (TOMAS) microphysics model into the GEOS-Chem CTM that is driven by assimilated meteorology. TOMAS has 30 size sections covering 0.01 --- 10 mum diameter with conservation equation for both aerosol mass and number. The implementation enables GEOS-Chem to simulate aerosol microphysics, size distributions, mass and number concentrations. In the first stage of development, sulfate and sea-salt aerosol model results from GEOS-Chem with TOMAS are intercompared with global models with sectional microphysics: GISS GCM-II' and GLOMAP. Predictions of CN10 and CCN(0.2%) by all models agree well within a factor of two in the boundary layer but differ more at altitudes. Comparison with marine boundary layer observations of CN10 and CCN(0.2%) shows that all models perform well with average errors of 30 -- 50%. Differences among models stress the need for updated emission inventories and accurate meteorology and oxidant fields. The second stage encompasses implementation of carbonaceous aerosols, including organic mass (OM), elemental carbon (EC), and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Sensitivity of CCN prediction to the uncertain POA-SOA contribution to the total OA budget is examined by artificially shifting OA sources from POA emission to SOA production rate. The different microphysical pathways of POA and SOA resulting in decreased CCN(0.2%) everywhere as the model changes from POA to SOA because SOA condenses onto mostly accumulation mode. POA is twice as effective per unit mass compared to SOA at CCN production at the model surface. Completely changing from POA to SOA results in 20% CCN(0.2%) reduction at the surface as well as globally. The fully developed TOMAS aerosol microphysics model with sulfate, sea-salt, OM, EC, and dust is evaluated against observations from ACE-Asia field campaign. This is the first highly time-resolved aerosol microphysics evaluation. The Napari et al. (2002) ternary nucleation captures PBL

  2. Global Atmospheric Aerosol Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, Johannes; Aquila, Valentina; Righi, Mattia

    2012-01-01

    Global aerosol models are used to study the distribution and properties of atmospheric aerosol particles as well as their effects on clouds, atmospheric chemistry, radiation, and climate. The present article provides an overview of the basic concepts of global atmospheric aerosol modeling and shows some examples from a global aerosol simulation. Particular emphasis is placed on the simulation of aerosol particles and their effects within global climate models.

  3. Global 2-D intercomparison of sectional and modal aerosol modules

    SciTech Connect

    Weisenstein, D K; Penner, J E; Herzog, M; Liu, Xiaohong

    2007-05-08

    We present an intercomparison of two aerosol modules, one sectional, one modal, in a global 2-D model in order to differentiate their behavior for tropospheric and stratospheric applications. We model only binary sulfuric acid-water aerosols in this study. Two versions of the sec-tional model and three versions of the modal model are used to test the sensitivity of background aerosol mass and size distribution to the number of bins or modes and to the pre-scribed width of the largest mode. We find modest sensitivity to the number of bins (40 vs 150) used in the sectional model. Aerosol mass is found to be reduced in a modal model if care is not taken in selecting the width of the largest lognormal mode, reflecting differences in sedimentation in the middle stratosphere. The size distributions calculated by the sec-tional model can be better matched by a modal model with four modes rather than three modes in most but not all sit-uations. A simulation of aerosol decay following the 1991 eruption of Mt. Pinatubo shows that the representation of the size distribution can have a signflcant impact on model-calculated aerosol decay rates in the stratosphere. Between 1991 and 1995, aerosol mass and surface area density calcu-lated by two versions of the modal model adequately match results from the sectional model. Calculated effective radius for the same time period shows more intermodel variability.

  4. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    LLPS in accumulation-sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode particles of the same composition would allow proving that LLPS indeed occurs in particles of accumulation mode size. Up to now LLPS has not been studied for particles in this size range. References: 1. Bertram, et al. Atmos. Chem & Phys, 11(21), 10995-11006, 2011.
 2. Krieger, et al. Chemical Society Reviews, 41(19), 6631-6662, 2012 
3. Song, M. et al. Geophys Res Lett, 39(19), 2012b 4. Smith et al. Atmos Chem & Phys, 12(20), 9613- 9628, 2012.
 5. You, Y. et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(33), 13188-13193, 2012.

  5. Autumn-time post-harvest biomass burning in Punjab causing aerosol perturbation over Central Himalayas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, S.; Naja, M. K.; Singh, N.; Phani, D. V.; Dumka, U. C.; Pant, V.; Jefferson, A.; Pant, P.; Sagar, R.; Satheesh, S.; Moorthy, K.; Kotamarthi, V. R.

    2013-12-01

    Extensive in-situ observations of aerosol absorption, scattering and number-concentration, along with back-air trajectories and satellite based fire-counts, have been used to demonstrate the influence of Punjab-region post-harvest biomass burning (PHBB) over the Central Himalayan region during autumn (2011). As part of Ganges Valley Aerosol Experiment (GVAX), aerosol (sub-10 μm size) absorption and scattering coefficients (σap and σsp; 19×13 Mm-1 and 235×196 Mm-1 ), back-scatter fraction (β; 0.09×0.01), single scattering albedo (ω; 0.91×0.02), absorption angstrom exponent (åap; 1.12×0.14; 3rd Quartile value: 1.25), scattering angstrom exponent (åsp; 0.89×0.15) and number concentration (NCN; 2608×1146 cm-3) over Manora Peak (Nainital, India; 29.37°N, 79.45°E, 1958 m amsl) during the autumn 2011, were found to be moderate compared to those over highly polluted urban centres in the region, but significantly different than those observed over similar mountain sites in the region. Aerosol carbonaceous components are estimated, and aerosols with contrasting physico-chemistry, demonstrating organic enrichment and secondary nature have been identified during the season over Manora Peak. This enrichment resulted in aerosol size-scaling to predominantly accumulation mode, causing them to get brighter during the season. Statistically significant seasonal and size variations in σap, σsp, ω, β, åap and åsp supports the autumn-time typicalities observed over the site. Back-air trajectory arrays distinctly represent ';Punjab region' as the potential air-mass source-region during the season. The dependency of σsp (over Manora Peak) on the satellite fire-count (over Punjab region) has been established that confirms the impact of the autumn-time PHBB over the Central Himalayan site. The event has been shown to be annually recurring. In this instance, the entrapment of the organically rich air mass over the Central Himalayan region extending up to the winter

  6. Aerosol Climate Time Series in ESA Aerosol_cci

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popp, Thomas; de Leeuw, Gerrit; Pinnock, Simon

    2016-04-01

    Within the ESA Climate Change Initiative (CCI) Aerosol_cci (2010 - 2017) conducts intensive work to improve algorithms for the retrieval of aerosol information from European sensors. Meanwhile, full mission time series of 2 GCOS-required aerosol parameters are completely validated and released: Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from dual view ATSR-2 / AATSR radiometers (3 algorithms, 1995 - 2012), and stratospheric extinction profiles from star occultation GOMOS spectrometer (2002 - 2012). Additionally, a 35-year multi-sensor time series of the qualitative Absorbing Aerosol Index (AAI) together with sensitivity information and an AAI model simulator is available. Complementary aerosol properties requested by GCOS are in a "round robin" phase, where various algorithms are inter-compared: fine mode AOD, mineral dust AOD (from the thermal IASI spectrometer, but also from ATSR instruments and the POLDER sensor), absorption information and aerosol layer height. As a quasi-reference for validation in few selected regions with sparse ground-based observations the multi-pixel GRASP algorithm for the POLDER instrument is used. Validation of first dataset versions (vs. AERONET, MAN) and inter-comparison to other satellite datasets (MODIS, MISR, SeaWIFS) proved the high quality of the available datasets comparable to other satellite retrievals and revealed needs for algorithm improvement (for example for higher AOD values) which were taken into account for a reprocessing. The datasets contain pixel level uncertainty estimates which were also validated and improved in the reprocessing. For the three ATSR algorithms the use of an ensemble method was tested. The paper will summarize and discuss the status of dataset reprocessing and validation. The focus will be on the ATSR, GOMOS and IASI datasets. Pixel level uncertainties validation will be summarized and discussed including unknown components and their potential usefulness and limitations. Opportunities for time series extension

  7. Aerosol gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorensen, Christopher M. (Inventor); Chakrabarti, Amitabha (Inventor); Dhaubhadel, Rajan (Inventor); Gerving, Corey (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An improved process for the production of ultralow density, high specific surface area gel products is provided which comprises providing, in an enclosed chamber, a mixture made up of small particles of material suspended in gas; the particles are then caused to aggregate in the chamber to form ramified fractal aggregate gels. The particles should have a radius (a) of up to about 50 nm and the aerosol should have a volume fraction (f.sub.v) of at least 10.sup.-4. In preferred practice, the mixture is created by a spark-induced explosion of a precursor material (e.g., a hydrocarbon) and oxygen within the chamber. New compositions of matter are disclosed having densities below 3.0 mg/cc.

  8. The MODIS Aerosol Algorithm, Products, Validation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Remer, L. A.; Kaufman, Y. J.; Tanre, D.

    2003-01-01

    The MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) currently aboard both the Terra and Aqua satellites produces a suite of products designed to characterize global aerosol distribution, optical thickness and particle size. Never before has a space-borne instrument been able to provide such detailed information, complementing field and modeling efforts to produce a comprehensive picture of aerosol characteristics. The three years of Terra-MODIS data have been validated by comparing with co-located AERONET observations of aerosol optical thickness and derivations of aerosol size parameters. Some 8000 comparison points located at 133 AERONET sites around the globe show that the MODIS aerosol optical thickness retrievals are accurate to within the pre-launch expectations. MODIS-derived size parameters are also compared with AERONET retrievals and found to agree well for fine-mode dominated aerosol regimes. Aerosol regimes dominated by dust aerosol are less accurate, attributed to what is thought to be nonsphericity. Errors due to nonsphericity will be reduced by introducing a new set of empirical phase functions, derived without any assumptions of particle shape. The major innovation that MODIS bring to the field of remote sensing of aerosol is the measure of particle size and the separation of finemode and coarsemode dominated aerosol regimes. Particle size can separate finemode man-made aerosols created during combustion, from larger natural aerosols originating from salt spray or wind erosion. This separation allows for the calculation of aerosol radiative effect and the estimation of the man-made aerosol radiative forcing. MODIS can also be used in regional studies of aerosol-cloud interaction that affect the global radiative and hydrological cycles.

  9. The optical and physical properties of atmospheric aerosols over the Indian Antarctic stations during southern hemispheric summer of the International Polar Year 2007-2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaubey, Jai Prakash; Krishna Moorthy, K.; Babu, S. Suresh; Nair, Vijayakumar S.

    2011-01-01

    The properties of background aerosols and their dependence on meteorological, geographical and human influence are examined using measured spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD), total mass concentration (MT) and derived number size distribution (NSD) over two distinct coastal locations of Antarctica; Maitri (70° S, 12° E, 123 m m.s.l.) and Larsemann Hills (LH; 69° S, 77° E, 48 m m.s.l.) during southern hemispheric summer of 2007-2008 as a part of the 27th Indian Scientific Expedition to Antarctica (ISEA) during International Polar Year (IPY). Our investigations showed comparable values for the mean columnar AOD at 500 nm over Maitri (0.034±0.005) and LH (0.032±0.006) indicating good spatial homogeneity in the columnar aerosol properties over the coastal Antarctica. Estimation of Angstrom exponent α showed accumulation mode dominance at Maitri (α~1.2±0.3) and coarse mode dominance at LH (0.7±0.2). On the other hand, mass concentration (MT) of ambient aerosols showed relatively high values (≈8.25±2.87 μg m-3) at Maitri in comparison to LH (6.03±1.33 μg m-3).

  10. Aerosol climatology at Delhi in the western Indo-Gangetic Plain: Microphysics, long-term trends, and source strengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lodhi, Neelesh K.; Beegum, S. Naseema; Singh, Sachchidanand; Kumar, Krishan

    2013-02-01

    present the climatology of aerosol microphysics, its trends, and impact of potential sources based on the long term measurements (for a period of 11.5 years from December 2001 to May 2012) of aerosol optical depths (AOD) in the spectral range 340-1020 nm from an urban center Delhi (28.6°N, 77.3°E, 238 m mean sea level) in the western Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). The study is the first ever long-term characterization of aerosols over the western IGP from the ground-based measurements. AODs are known to affect the air quality, visibility, radiative balance, and cloud microphysics of the region and IGP is one of the highest populated and polluted regions of the world. Our measurements show consistently high AOD during the entire period of observation. The seasonal variations of spectral AODs and Angstrom parameters are generally consistent every year. The AODs show a weak but statistically significant (in 95% confidence level) decreasing trend approximately -0.02/year at 500 nm, possibly, modulated by the pre-monsoon heavy dust loading during the first half of the observation period. The climatological monthly mean AOD at shorter wavelengths peaks twice, during June and November, while at longer wavelengths it shows only one peak in June. The annual variations of Angstrom exponent, α and its derivative, α' suggest the prevalence of multi-modal aerosol size distributions at Delhi. The coarse-mode aerosols dominate during summer (March-June) and monsoon (July-September) seasons, whereas fine/accumulation mode enhances during post-monsoon (October-November) and winter (December-February) seasons. Potential advection pathways have been identified using concentration weighted trajectory (CWT) analysis of the 5 day isentropic air mass back trajectories at the observation site and their seasonal variations are discussed.

  11. Remote sensing of aerosol properties during CARES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kassianov, Evgueni; Barnard, James; Pekour, Mikhail; Flynn, Connor; Ferrare, Richard; Hostetler, Chris; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram T.

    2011-11-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small (~0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 μm) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  12. Remote Sensing of Aerosol Properties during CARES

    SciTech Connect

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Flynn, Connor J.; Ferrare, R.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Hair, John; Jobson, Bertram Thomas

    2011-10-01

    One month of MFRSR data collected at two sites in the central California (USA) region during the CARES campaign are processed and the MFRSR-derived AODs at 500 nm wavelength are compared with available AODs provided by AERONET measurements. We find that the MFRSR and AERONET AODs are small ({approx}0.05) and comparable. A reasonable quantitative agreement between column aerosol size distributions (up to 2 um) from the MFRSR and AERONET retrievals is illustrated as well. Analysis of the retrieved (MFRSR and AERONET) and in situ measured aerosol size distributions suggests that the contribution of the coarse mode to aerosol optical properties is substantial for several days. The results of a radiative closure experiment performed for the two sites and one-month period show a favorable agreement between the calculated and measured broadband downwelling irradiances (bias does not exceed about 3 Wm-2), and thus imply that the MFRSR-derived aerosol optical properties are reasonable.

  13. Aerosol variability and weather regimes over the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabat, Pierre; Somot, Samuel; Mallet, Marc; Michou, Martine

    2015-04-01

    The Mediterranean region is characterized by the accumulation of aerosols from different sources: industrial and urban aerosols from Europe and North African towns, biomass burning, from Eastern Europe, dust aerosols from Africa, and marine particles from the sea. These aerosols show a strong spatio-temporal variability and a resulting large variety in aerosol optical properties over this basin. Maximal aerosol loads are observed in spring and summer, namely in the dry season favouring a longer residence time for atmospheric aerosols. Besides, dust outbreaks characterized by large plumes of Saharan desert dust particles, are more frequent in this season. This study realized in the framework of the ChArMEx initiative aims at explaining this aerosol variability and the relationship between aerosol loads and weather conditions. We consider here an approach based on weather regimes and regional modeling. From a multi-year (1979-2013) regional simulation carried out with the ALADIN-climate model (50 km resolution, ERA-Interim forcing) including an interactive aerosol scheme for the main species present in this region (desert dust, sea-salt, sulfates and carbonaceous particles), we have identified typical synoptic conditions that favour high aerosol loads over the Mediterranean, or on the contrary that are opposed to these high aerosol loads. These weather regimes are based on a statistical method of automated classification realized from surface pressure data. They are also related to the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO). In this work, we characterize the presence of the different aerosol types over the Mediterranean for each weather regime, as well as their effects on climate. Thus, anomalies in the occurrence of the regimes favourable to high aerosol loads could explain the frequent dust outbreaks observed during the ChArMEx campaigns in 2012 and 2013.

  14. Aerosol typing - key information from aerosol studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mona, Lucia; Kahn, Ralph; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Holzer-Popp, Thomas; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    Aerosol typing is a key source of aerosol information from ground-based and satellite-borne instruments. Depending on the specific measurement technique, aerosol typing can be used as input for retrievals or represents an output for other applications. Typically aerosol retrievals require some a priori or external aerosol type information. The accuracy of the derived aerosol products strongly depends on the reliability of these assumptions. Different sensors can make use of different aerosol type inputs. A critical review and harmonization of these procedures could significantly reduce related uncertainties. On the other hand, satellite measurements in recent years are providing valuable information about the global distribution of aerosol types, showing for example the main source regions and typical transport paths. Climatological studies of aerosol load at global and regional scales often rely on inferred aerosol type. There is still a high degree of inhomogeneity among satellite aerosol typing schemes, which makes the use different sensor datasets in a consistent way difficult. Knowledge of the 4d aerosol type distribution at these scales is essential for understanding the impact of different aerosol sources on climate, precipitation and air quality. All this information is needed for planning upcoming aerosol emissions policies. The exchange of expertise and the communication among satellite and ground-based measurement communities is fundamental for improving long-term dataset consistency, and for reducing aerosol type distribution uncertainties. Aerosol typing has been recognized as one of its high-priority activities of the AEROSAT (International Satellite Aerosol Science Network, http://aero-sat.org/) initiative. In the AEROSAT framework, a first critical review of aerosol typing procedures has been carried out. The review underlines the high heterogeneity in many aspects: approach, nomenclature, assumed number of components and parameters used for the

  15. Temporal heterogeneity in aerosol characteristics and the resulting radiative impact at a tropical coastal station - Part 1: Microphysical and optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishna Moorthy, K.; Babu, S. Suresh; Satheesh, S. K.

    2007-11-01

    In Part 1 of this two-part paper, we present the results of extensive and collocated measurements of the columnar and near-surface (in the well mixed region) properties of atmospheric aerosol particles at a tropical coastal location, Trivandrum (8.55° N; 76.97° E), located close to the southwest tip of Indian peninsula. These are used to evolve average, climatological pictures of the optical and microphysical properties and to delineate the distinct changes associated with the contrasting monsoon seasons as well as the transition from one season to the other. Our observations show a dramatic change in the columnar aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra, being steep during winter monsoon season (WMS, months of December through March) and becoming quite flat during summer monsoon season (SMS, June through September). The derived Ångström exponent (α) decreases from a mean value of 1.1±0.03 in WMS to 0.32±0.02 in SMS, signifying a change in columnar aerosol size spectrum from an accumulation mode dominance in WMS to a coarse mode dominance in SMS. The composite aerosols near the surface follow suit with the share of the accumulation mode to the total mass concentration decreasing from ~70% to 34% from WMS to SMS. The overall mass burden also decreases in tandem. The changes in α are well correlated to those in the accumulation fraction of the mass concentration. Long-term measurements of the concentration of aerosol black carbon (BC), show prominent annual variations, with its mean value decreasing from as high as 6 μg m-3 in WMS to 2 μg m-3 in SMS. Correspondingly, its mass mixing ratio to the composite aerosols comes down from 11% to 4%. The changes in AOD and α are significantly positively correlated to those of BC concentration. The columnar properties are, in general well associated with the features near the surface. The implications of these changes to the optical properties and single scattering albedo and the resulting impact on direct radiative

  16. Evaluations of tropospheric aerosol properties simulated by the community earth system model with a sectional aerosol microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pengfei; Toon, Owen B.; Bardeen, Charles G.; Mills, Michael J.; Fan, Tianyi; English, Jason M.; Neely, Ryan R.

    2015-06-01

    A sectional aerosol model (CARMA) has been developed and coupled with the Community Earth System Model (CESM1). Aerosol microphysics, radiative properties, and interactions with clouds are simulated in the size-resolving model. The model described here uses 20 particle size bins for each aerosol component including freshly nucleated sulfate particles, as well as mixed particles containing sulfate, primary organics, black carbon, dust, and sea salt. The model also includes five types of bulk secondary organic aerosols with four volatility bins. The overall cost of CESM1-CARMA is approximately ˜2.6 times as much computer time as the standard three-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM3) and twice as much computer time as the seven-mode aerosol model in CESM1 (CESM1-MAM7) using similar gas phase chemistry codes. Aerosol spatial-temporal distributions are simulated and compared with a large set of observations from satellites, ground-based measurements, and airborne field campaigns. Simulated annual average aerosol optical depths are lower than MODIS/MISR satellite observations and AERONET observations by ˜32%. This difference is within the uncertainty of the satellite observations. CESM1/CARMA reproduces sulfate aerosol mass within 8%, organic aerosol mass within 20%, and black carbon aerosol mass within 50% compared with a multiyear average of the IMPROVE/EPA data over United States, but differences vary considerably at individual locations. Other data sets show similar levels of comparison with model simulations. The model suggests that in addition to sulfate, organic aerosols also significantly contribute to aerosol mass in the tropical UTLS, which is consistent with limited data.

  17. Revisiting AVHRR tropospheric aerosol trends using principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-03-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite instruments provide a nearly 25 year continuous record of global aerosol properties over the ocean. It offers valuable insights into the long-term change in global aerosol loading. However, the AVHRR data record is heavily influenced by two volcanic eruptions, El Chichon on March 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on June 1991. The gradual decay of volcanic aerosols may last years after the eruption, which potentially masks the estimation of aerosol trends in the lower troposphere, especially those of anthropogenic origin. In this study, we show that a principal component analysis approach effectively captures the bulk of the spatial and temporal variability of volcanic aerosols into a single mode. The spatial pattern and time series of this mode provide a good match to the global distribution and decay of volcanic aerosols. We further reconstruct the data set by removing the volcanic aerosol component and reestimate the global and regional aerosol trends. Globally, the reconstructed data set reveals an increase of aerosol optical depth from 1985 to 1990 and decreasing trend from 1994 to 2006. Regionally, in the 1980s, positive trends are observed over the North Atlantic and North Arabian Sea, while negative tendencies are present off the West African coast and North Pacific. During the 1994 to 2006 period, the Gulf of Mexico, North Atlantic close to Europe, and North Africa exhibit negative trends, while the coastal regions of East and South Asia, the Sahel region, and South America show positive trends.

  18. Revisiting AVHRR Tropospheric Aerosol Trends Using Principal Component Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jing; Carlson, Barbara E.; Lacis, Andrew A.

    2014-01-01

    The advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR) satellite instruments provide a nearly 25 year continuous record of global aerosol properties over the ocean. It offers valuable insights into the long-term change in global aerosol loading. However, the AVHRR data record is heavily influenced by two volcanic eruptions, El Chichon on March 1982 and Mount Pinatubo on June 1991. The gradual decay of volcanic aerosols may last years after the eruption, which potentially masks the estimation of aerosol trends in the lower troposphere, especially those of anthropogenic origin. In this study, we show that a principal component analysis approach effectively captures the bulk of the spatial and temporal variability of volcanic aerosols into a single mode. The spatial pattern and time series of this mode provide a good match to the global distribution and decay of volcanic aerosols. We further reconstruct the data set by removing the volcanic aerosol component and reestimate the global and regional aerosol trends. Globally, the reconstructed data set reveals an increase of aerosol optical depth from 1985 to 1990 and decreasing trend from 1994 to 2006. Regionally, in the 1980s, positive trends are observed over the North Atlantic and North Arabian Sea, while negative tendencies are present off the West African coast and North Pacific. During the 1994 to 2006 period, the Gulf of Mexico, North Atlantic close to Europe, and North Africa exhibit negative trends, while the coastal regions of East and South Asia, the Sahel region, and South America show positive trends.

  19. Dominant Aerosol Particle Type/Mixture Identification at Worldwide Locations Using the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giles, D. M.; Holben, B.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Slutsker, I.; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Aerosol absorption results in atmospheric heating for various forms of particulate matter - we address means of partitioning mineral dust, pollution (e.g., black and brown carbon), and mixtures of the two using remote sensing techniques. Remotely sensed spectral aerosol optical depth (AOD) and single scattering albedo (SSA) derived from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun photometer measurements can be used to calculate the absorption aerosol optical depth (AAOD) at 440, 675, and 870 nm. The spectral change in AAOD with wavelength on logarithmic scales provides the absorption Angstrom exponent (AAE). Recently, a few studies have shown that the relationship between aerosol absorption (i.e., AAE or SSA) and aerosol size [i.e., Angstrom exponent (AE) or fine mode fraction (FMF) of the AOD] can estimate the dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures (i.e., dust, pollution, and dust and pollution mixtures) [Bergstrom et al., 2007; Russell et al., 2010; Lee et al. 2010; Giles et al., 2011]. To evaluate these methods, approximately 20 AERONET sites were grouped into various aerosol categories (i.e., dust, mixed, urban/industrial, and biomass burning) based on aerosol types/mixtures identified in previous studies. For data collected between 1999 and 2010, the long-term data set was analyzed to determine the magnitude of spectral AAOD, perform a sensitivity study on AAE by varying the spectral AOD and SSA, and identify dominant aerosol particle types/mixtures. An assessment of the spectral AAOD showed, on average, that the mixed (dust and pollution) category had the highest absorption (AAE ~1.5) followed by biomass burning (AAE~1.3), dust (AAE~1.7), and urban/industrial (AAE~1.2) categories with AAOD (440 nm) varying between 0.03 and 0.09 among these categories. Perturbing input parameters based on the expected uncertainties for AOD (±0.01) and SSA [±0.03; for cases where AOD(440 nm)>0.4], the sensitivity study showed the perturbed AAE mean varied from the unperturbed

  20. Global Aerosol Remote Sensing from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ichoku, Charles; Kaufman, Yoram J.; Remer, Lorraine A.; Chu, D. Allen; Mattoo, Shana; Tanre, Didier; Levy, Robert; Li, Rong-Rong; Martins, Jose V.; Lau, William K. M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The physical characteristics, composition, abundance, spatial distribution and dynamics of global aerosols are still very poorly known, and new data from satellite sensors have long been awaited to improve current understanding and to give a boost to the effort in future climate predictions. The derivation of aerosol parameters from the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) sensors aboard the Earth Observing System (EOS) Terra and Aqua polar-orbiting satellites ushers in a new era in aerosol remote sensing from space. Terra and Aqua were launched on December 18, 1999 and May 4, 2002 respectively, with daytime equator crossing times of approximately 10:30 am and 1:30 pm respectively. Several aerosol parameters are retrieved at 10-km spatial resolution (level 2) from MODIS daytime data. The MODIS aerosol algorithm employs different approaches to retrieve parameters over land and ocean surfaces, because of the inherent differences in the solar spectral radiance interaction with these surfaces. The parameters retrieved include: aerosol optical thickness (AOT) at 0.47, 0.55 and 0.66 micron wavelengths over land, and at 0.47, 0.55, 0.66, 0.87, 1.2, 1.6, and 2.1 micron over ocean; Angstrom exponent over land and ocean; and effective radii, and the proportion of AOT contributed by the small mode aerosols over ocean. To ensure the quality of these parameters, a substantial part of the Terra-MODIS aerosol products were validated globally and regionally, based on cross correlation with corresponding parameters derived from ground-based measurements from AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun photometers. Similar validation efforts are planned for the Aqua-MODIS aerosol products. The MODIS level 2 aerosol products are operationally aggregated to generate global daily, eight-day (weekly), and monthly products at one-degree spatial resolution (level 3). MODIS aerosol data are used for the detailed study of local, regional, and global aerosol concentration

  1. Aerodynamic size associations of 212Pb and 214Pb in ambient aerosols.

    PubMed

    Papastefanou, C; Bondietti, E A

    1987-11-01

    The aerodynamic size distributions of short-lived Rn daughters (reported as 214Pb and 212Pb) in ambient aerosol particles were measured using low-pressure as well as conventional low-volume and high-volume impactors. The activity distribution of 214Pb and 212Pb, measured by alpha spectroscopy, was largely associated with submicron aerosols in the accumulation mode (0.08 to 2 microns). The activity median aerodynamic diameter ranged from 0.09 to 0.37 micron (mean 0.16 micron) for 214Pb and from 0.07 to 0.25 micron (mean 0.13 micron) for 212Pb. The mean values of the geometric standard deviation (sigma g) were 2.97 and 2.86, respectively. By comparison, the median diameters of cosmogenic 7Be and ambient SO4(2-) were about 0.24 micron higher. In almost 70% of the low-pressure impactor measurements, the activity distribution of 214Pb showed a small shift to larger particle sizes relative to 212Pb. This shift probably results from alpha-recoil detachment of parent 218Po, which preferentially depletes 214Pb from smaller particles. The subsequent recondensation of 214Pb causes an enrichment of larger aerosols. Early morning and afternoon measurements indicated that similar size associations of 214Pb occur, despite humidity differences and the potential for fresh particle production in the afternoon. Health physics implications of the results are also discussed. PMID:3667271

  2. Global scale emission and distribution of sea-spray aerosol: Sea-salt and organic enrichment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignati, E.; Facchini, M. C.; Rinaldi, M.; Scannell, C.; Ceburnis, D.; Sciare, J.; Kanakidou, M.; Myriokefalitakis, S.; Dentener, F.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2010-02-01

    The chemical composition of marine aerosols as a function of their size is an important parameter for the evaluation of their impact on the global climate system. In this work we model fine particle organic matter emitted by sea spray processes and its influence on the aerosol chemical properties at the global scale using the off-line global Chemistry-Transport Model TM5. TM5 is coupled to a microphysical aerosol dynamics model providing size resolved information on particle masses and numbers. The mass of the emitted sea spray particles is partitioned between water insoluble organic matter (WIOM) and sea salt components in the accumulation mode using a function that relates the emitted organic fraction to the surface ocean chlorophyll- a concentrations. The global emission in the sub-micron size range of organic matter by sea spray process is 8.2 Tg yr -1, compared to 24 Tg fine yr -1 sea-salt emissions. When the marine sources are included, the concentrations of modelled primary particulate organic matter (POM) increase mainly over the oceans. The model predictions of WIOM and sea salt are evaluated against measurements carried out at Mace Head (Northern Hemisphere) and Amsterdam Island (Southern Hemisphere), showing that in clean marine conditions WIOM marine emissions contribute significantly to POM values.

  3. Information Content of Aerosol Retrievals in the Sunglint Region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ottaviani, M.; Knobelspiesse, K.; Cairns, B.; Mishchenko, M.

    2013-01-01

    We exploit quantitative metrics to investigate the information content in retrievals of atmospheric aerosol parameters (with a focus on single-scattering albedo), contained in multi-angle and multi-spectral measurements with sufficient dynamical range in the sunglint region. The simulations are performed for two classes of maritime aerosols with optical and microphysical properties compiled from measurements of the Aerosol Robotic Network. The information content is assessed using the inverse formalism and is compared to that deriving from observations not affected by sunglint. We find that there indeed is additional information in measurements containing sunglint, not just for single-scattering albedo, but also for aerosol optical thickness and the complex refractive index of the fine aerosol size mode, although the amount of additional information varies with aerosol type.

  4. Mass size distributions of soluble sulfate, nitrate and ammonium in the Madrid urban aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plaza, J.; Pujadas, M.; Gómez-Moreno, F. J.; Sánchez, M.; Artíñano, B.

    2011-09-01

    This paper analyzes the mass size distribution of some inorganic species present in the atmospheric aerosol from a field campaign carried out in Madrid throughout a complete year (February 2007-February 2008). Samplings were performed by means of a micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor (MOUDI). Ambient air was sampled during consecutive nocturnal and diurnal periods, and diurnal/nocturnal behaviors were compared for the twenty night-day sampling pairs that were gathered. Annual and seasonal averages were obtained, and some case studies under specific atmospheric conditions are discussed in the paper. Results have shown that the sulfate and ammonium mass was concentrated in the accumulation mode, between 0.18 and 0.56 μm, so that gas-phase and condensation processes for secondary aerosol formation prevailed during the sampling periods in this area. An exception to this behavior was found during a fog event when distributions for these two species were centered in the 0.56-1 and 1-1.8 μm size stages, corresponding to the droplet mode. In most of the samples, the ammonium mass measured in these size ranges was enough or almost enough to neutralize inorganic acidity by formation of ammonium sulfate and nitrate. However, a significant sulfate mass not neutralized by ammonium was found in the impactor backup quartz filter (aerodynamic diameter < 0.056 μm). The concentration of this sulfate and its contribution to the ultrafine fraction mass was higher under good dispersive conditions, prevailing in summer, when particle growth processes are not so favored due to the higher atmospheric dilution factors. The origin of this ultrafine sulfate has been attributed to direct emissions from traffic, associated to the nucleation mode. Regarding the nitrate concentration, it was found higher in the coarse mode than in the accumulation mode on an annual basis. The highest concentrations were measured in winter episodic situations. The marked seasonal variability shown in the

  5. Aerosol composition, oxidative properties, and sources in Beijing: results from the 2014 Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation Summit study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W. Q.; Sun, Y. L.; Chen, C.; Du, W.; Han, T. T.; Wang, Q. Q.; Fu, P. Q.; Wang, Z. F.; Zhao, X. J.; Zhou, L. B.; Ji, D. S.; Wang, P. C.; Worsnop, D. R.

    2015-08-01

    The mitigation of air pollution in megacities remains a great challenge because of the complex sources and formation mechanisms of aerosol particles. The 2014 Asia- Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) summit in Beijing serves as a unique experiment to study the impacts of emission controls on aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidative properties. Herein, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer was deployed in urban Beijing for real-time measurements of size-resolved non-refractory submicron aerosol (NR-PM1) species from 14 October to 12 November 2014, along with a range of collocated measurements. The average (±σ) PM1 was 41.6 (±38.9) μg m-3 during APEC, which was decreased by 53 % compared with that before APEC. The aerosol composition showed substantial changes owing to emission controls during APEC. Secondary inorganic aerosols (SIA = sulfate + nitrate + ammonium) showed significant reductions of 62-69 %, whereas organics presented much smaller decreases (35 %). The results from the positive matrix factorization of organic aerosols (OA) indicated that highly oxidized secondary OA (SOA) showed decreases similar to those of SIA during APEC. However, primary OA (POA) from cooking, traffic, and biomass burning sources were comparable to those before APEC, indicating the presence of strong local source emissions. The oxidation properties showed corresponding changes in response to OA composition. The average oxygen-to-carbon level during APEC was 0.36 (±0.10), which is lower than the 0.43 (±0.13) measured before APEC, demonstrating a decrease in the OA oxidation degree. The changes in size distributions of primary and secondary species varied during APEC. SIA and SOA showed significant reductions in large accumulation modes with peak diameters shifting from ~ 650 to 400 nm during APEC, whereas those of POA remained relatively unchanged. The changes in aerosol composition, size distributions, and oxidation degrees during the aging

  6. Aerosol mobility size spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Jian; Kulkarni, Pramod

    2007-11-20

    A device for measuring aerosol size distribution within a sample containing aerosol particles. The device generally includes a spectrometer housing defining an interior chamber and a camera for recording aerosol size streams exiting the chamber. The housing includes an inlet for introducing a flow medium into the chamber in a flow direction, an aerosol injection port adjacent the inlet for introducing a charged aerosol sample into the chamber, a separation section for applying an electric field to the aerosol sample across the flow direction and an outlet opposite the inlet. In the separation section, the aerosol sample becomes entrained in the flow medium and the aerosol particles within the aerosol sample are separated by size into a plurality of aerosol flow streams under the influence of the electric field. The camera is disposed adjacent the housing outlet for optically detecting a relative position of at least one aerosol flow stream exiting the outlet and for optically detecting the number of aerosol particles within the at least one aerosol flow stream.

  7. Reallocation in modal aerosol models: impacts on predicting aerosol radiative effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korhola, T.; Kokkola, H.; Korhonen, H.; Partanen, A.-I.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.

    2014-01-01

    Atmospheric models often represent the aerosol particle size distribution with a modal approach, in which particles are described with log-normal modes within predetermined size ranges. This approach reallocates particles numerically from one mode to another for example during particle growth, potentially leading to artificial changes in the aerosol size distribution. In this study we analysed how the modal reallocation affects climate-relevant variables: cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC), aerosol-cloud interaction parameter (ACI) and light extinction coefficient (qext). The ACI parameter gives the response of CDNC to a change in total aerosol number concentration. We compared these variables between a modal model (with and without reallocation routines) and a high resolution sectional model, which was considered a reference model. We analysed the relative differences in the chosen variables in four experiments designed to assess the influence of atmospheric aerosol processes. We find that limiting the allowed size ranges of the modes, and subsequent remapping of the distribution, leads almost always to an underestimation of cloud droplet number concentrations (by up to 100%) and an overestimation of light extinction (by up to 20%). On the other hand, the aerosol-cloud interaction parameter can be either over- or underestimated by the reallocating model, depending on the conditions. For example, in the case of atmospheric new particle formation events followed by rapid particle growth, the reallocation can cause on average a 10% overestimation of the ACI parameter. Thus it is shown that the reallocation affects the ability of a model to estimate aerosol climate effects accurately, and this should be taken into account when using and developing aerosol models.

  8. AEROSOL AND GAS MEASUREMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Measurements provide fundamental information for evaluating and managing the impact of aerosols on air quality. Specific measurements of aerosol concentration and their physical and chemical properties are required by different users to meet different user-community needs. Befo...

  9. Aerosols and environmental pollution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colbeck, Ian; Lazaridis, Mihalis

    2010-02-01

    The number of publications on atmospheric aerosols has dramatically increased in recent years. This review, predominantly from a European perspective, summarizes the current state of knowledge of the role played by aerosols in environmental pollution and, in addition, highlights gaps in our current knowledge. Aerosol particles are ubiquitous in the Earth’s atmosphere and are central to many environmental issues; ranging from the Earth’s radiative budget to human health. Aerosol size distribution and chemical composition are crucial parameters that determine their dynamics in the atmosphere. Sources of aerosols are both anthropogenic and natural ranging from vehicular emissions to dust resuspension. Ambient concentrations of aerosols are elevated in urban areas with lower values at rural sites. A comprehensive understanding of aerosol ambient characteristics requires a combination of measurements and modeling tools. Legislation for ambient aerosols has been introduced at national and international levels aiming to protect human health and the environment.

  10. Influence of crustal dust and sea spray supermicron particle concentrations and acidity on inorganic NO3- aerosol during the 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Hannah M.; Draper, Danielle C.; Ayres, Benjamin R.; Ault, Andrew P.; Bondy, Amy L.; Takahama, S.; Modini, Robert; Baumann, K.; Edgerton, Eric S.; Knote, Christoph; Laskin, Alexander; Wang, Bingbing; Fry, Juliane L.

    2015-09-25

    The inorganic aerosol composition was measured in the southeastern United States, a region that exhibits high aerosol mass loading during the summer, as part of the 1 June to 15 July 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) campaign. Measurements using a Monitor for AeRosols and GAses (MARGA), an ion chromatograph coupled with a wet rotating denuder and a steam-jet aerosol collector for monitoring of ambient inorganic gas and aerosol species, revealed two periods of high aerosol nitrate (NO3 ) concentrations during the campaign. These periods of high nitrate were correlated with increased concentrations of coarse mode mineral or sea spray aerosol species, particularly Na+ and Ca2+, and with a shift towards aerosol with larger (1 to 2.5 um) diameters. We suggest this nitrate aerosol forms by multiphase reactions of HNO3 and particles, reactions that are facilitated by transport of mineral dust and sea spray aerosol from a source within the United States. The observed high aerosol acidity prevents the formation of NH4NO3, the inorganic nitrogen species often dominant in fine-mode aerosol at higher pH. Calculation of the rate of the heterogeneous uptake of HNO3 on mineral aerosol supports the conclusion that aerosol NO3 is produced primarily by this process, and is likely limited by the availability of mineral dust surface area. Modeling of NO3 and HNO3 by thermodynamic equilibrium models (ISORROPIA II and E-AIM) reveals the importance of including mineral cations in the southeastern United States to accurately balance ion species and predict gas/aerosol phase partitioning.

  11. Simulations of the Aerosol Index and the Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth and Comparisons with OMI Retrievals During ARCTAS-2008 Campaign

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    We have computed the Aerosol Index (AI) at 354 nm, useful for observing the presence of absorbing aerosols in the atmosphere, from aerosol simulations conducted with the Goddard Chemistry, Aerosol, Radiation, and Transport (GOCART) module running online the GEOS-5 Atmospheric GCM. The model simulates five aerosol types: dust, sea salt, black carbon, organic carbon and sulfate aerosol and can be run in replay or data assimilation modes. In the assimilation mode, information's provided by the space-based MODIS and MISR sensors constrains the model aerosol state. Aerosol optical properties are then derived from the simulated mass concentration and the Al is determined at the OMI footprint using the radiative transfer code VLIDORT. In parallel, model derived Absorption Aerosol Optical Depth (AAOD) is compared with OMI retrievals. We have focused our study during ARCTAS (June - July 2008), a period with a good sampling of dust and biomass burning events. Our ultimate goal is to use OMI measurements as independent validation for our MODIS/MISR assimilation. Towards this goal we document the limitation of OMI aerosol absorption measurements on a global scale, in particular sensitivity to aerosol vertical profile and cloud contamination effects, deriving the appropriate averaging kernels. More specifically, model simulated (full) column integrated AAOD is compared with model derived Al, this way identifying those regions and conditions under which OMI cannot detect absorbing aerosols. Making use of ATrain cloud measurements from MODIS, C1oudSat and CALIPSO we also investigate the global impact on clouds on OMI derived Al, and the extent to which GEOS-5 clouds can offer a first order representation of these effects.

  12. Aerosol distribution apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, W.D.

    An apparatus for uniformly distributing an aerosol to a plurality of filters mounted in a plenum, wherein the aerosol and air are forced through a manifold system by means of a jet pump and released into the plenum through orifices in the manifold. The apparatus allows for the simultaneous aerosol-testing of all the filters in the plenum.

  13. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  14. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  15. Solid aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  16. Long term aerosol and trace gas measurements in Central Amazonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artaxo, Paulo; Barbosa, Henrique M. J.; Ferreira de Brito, Joel; Carbone, Samara; Rizzo, Luciana V.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Martin, Scot T.

    2016-04-01

    The central region of the Amazonian forest is a pristine region in terms of aerosol and trace gases concentrations. In the wet season, Amazonia is actually one of the cleanest continental region we can observe on Earth. A long term observational program started 20 years ago, and show important features of this pristine region. Several sites were used, between then ATTO (Amazon Tall Tower Observatory) and ZF2 ecological research site, both 70-150 Km North of Manaus, receiving air masses that traveled over 1500 km of pristine tropical forests. The sites are GAW regional monitoring stations. Aerosol chemical composition (OC/EC and trace elements) is being analysed using filters for fine (PM2.5) and coarse mode aerosol as well as Aerodyne ACSM (Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitors). VOCs are measured using PTR-MS, while CO, O3 and CO2 are routinely measured. Aerosol absorption is being studied with AE33 aethalometers and MAAP (Multi Angle Absorption Photometers). Aerosol light scattering are being measured at several wavelengths using TSI and Ecotech nephelometers. Aerosol size distribution is determined using scanning mobility particle sizer at each site. Lidars measure the aerosol column up to 12 Km providing the vertical profile of aerosol extinction. The aerosol column is measures using AERONET sun photometers. In the wet season, organic aerosol comprises 75-85% of fine aerosol, and sulfate and nitrate concentrations are very low (1-3 percent). Aerosols are dominated by biogenic primary particles as well as SOA from biogenic precursors. Black carbon in the wet season accounts for 5-9% of fine mode aerosol. Ozone in the wet season peaks at 10-12 ppb at the middle of the day, while carbon monoxide averages at 50-80 ppb. Aerosol optical thickness (AOT) is a low 0.05 to 0.1 at 550 nm in the wet season. Sahara dust transport events sporadically enhance the concentration of soil dust aerosols and black carbon. In the dry season (August-December), long range transported

  17. An Analysis of AERONET Aerosol Absorption Properties and Classifications Representative of Aerosol Source Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, David M.; Holben, Brent N.; Eck, Thomas F.; Sinyuk, Aliaksandr; Smirnov, Alexander; Slutsker, Ilya; Dickerson, R. R.; Thompson, A. M.; Schafer, J. S.

    2012-01-01

    Partitioning of mineral dust, pollution, smoke, and mixtures using remote sensing techniques can help improve accuracy of satellite retrievals and assessments of the aerosol radiative impact on climate. Spectral aerosol optical depth (tau) and single scattering albedo (omega (sub 0) ) from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements are used to form absorption [i.e., omega (sub 0) and absorption Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub abs))] and size [i.e., extinction Angstrom exponent (alpha(sub ext)) and fine mode fraction of tau] relationships to infer dominant aerosol types. Using the long-term AERONET data set (1999-2010), 19 sites are grouped by aerosol type based on known source regions to: (1) determine the average omega (sub 0) and alpha(sub abs) at each site (expanding upon previous work); (2) perform a sensitivity study on alpha(sub abs) by varying the spectral omega (sub 0); and (3) test the ability of each absorption and size relationship to distinguish aerosol types. The spectral omega (sub 0) averages indicate slightly more aerosol absorption (i.e., a 0.0 < delta omega (sub 0) <= 0.02 decrease) than in previous work and optical mixtures of pollution and smoke with dust show stronger absorption than dust alone. Frequency distributions of alpha(sub abs) show significant overlap among aerosol type categories and at least 10% of the alpha(sub abs) retrievals in each category are below 1.0. Perturbing the spectral omega (sub 0) by +/- 0.03 induces significant alpha(sub abs) changes from the unperturbed value by at least approx. +/- 0.6 for Dust, approx. +/-0.2 for Mixed, and approx. +/-0.1 for Urban/Industrial and Biomass Burning. The omega (sub 0)440nm and alpha(sub ext) 440-870nm relationship shows the best separation among aerosol type clusters, providing a simple technique for determining aerosol type from surface- and future space-based instrumentation.

  18. Characterization of aerosol particles at the forested site in Lithuania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimselyte, I.; Garbaras, A.; Kvietkus, K.; Remeikis, V.

    2009-04-01

    monitoring station (55˚ 26'26"N; 26˚ 03'60"E) in the eastern part of Lithuania in the Aukštaitija national park during 2-24 July, 2008. The Rugšteliškis station is located in a remote relatively clean forested area. An aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS), developed at Aerodyne Research, was used to obtain real-time quantitative information on particle size-resolved mass loadings for volatile and semi-volatile chemical components present in/on ambient aerosol. The AMS inlet system allows 100 % transmission efficiency for particles with size diameter between 60 to 600 nm and partial transmission down to 20 nm and up to 2000 nm. The aerosol sampling was also carried out using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) model 110. The flow rate was 30 l/min, and the 50% aerodynamic cutoff diameters of the 10 stages were 18, 10, 5.6, 3.2, 1.8, 1.0, 0.56, 0.32, 0.18, 0.10 and 0.056 m. Aluminum foil was used as the impaction surface. The aerosol samples were analyzed for total carbon using the elemental analyzer (Flash EA1112). Besides, samples were analyzed for ^13C/12C ratio by the isotopic ratio mass spectrometer (Thermo Finnigan Delta Plus Advantage) (Norman et al., 1999; Garbaras et al., 2008). During campaign the dynamic behavior of aerosols was measured and quantitatively compared with meteorological conditions and air mass transport. The submicron aerosol was predominately sulphate and organic material. The AMS was able to discriminate and quantify mixed organic/inorganic accumulation mode particles (300 - 400 nm), which appeared to be dominated by regional sources and were of the origin similar to those seen in the more remote areas. The particulate organic fraction was also investigated in detail using the mass spectral data. By combining the organic matter size distribution (measured with AMS) with the total carbon (TC) size distribution (measured with MOUDI) we were able to report organic carbon to total carbon (OC/TC) ratio in different size particles

  19. Sources of Size Segregated Sulfate Aerosols in the Arctic Summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghahremaninezhadgharelar, R.; Norman, A. L.; Abbatt, J.; Levasseur, M.

    2015-12-01

    Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor fitted to a high volume sampler was used for this study and was modified to permit collection of SO2 after aerosols were removed from the gas stream. The isotopic composition of sulfate aerosols and SO2 was measured and apportionment calculations have been performed to quantify the contribution of biogenic as well as anthropogenic sources to the growth of different aerosol size fractions in the atmosphere. The presence of sea salt sulfate aerosols was especially high in coarse mode aerosols as expected. The contribution of biogenic sulfate concentration in this study was higher than anthropogenic sulfate. Around 70% of fine aerosols (<0.49 μm) and 86% of SO2 were from biogenic sources. Concentrations of biogenic sulfate for fine aerosols, ranging from 18 to 625 ng/m3, were five times higher than total biogenic sulfate concentrations measured during Fall in the same region (Rempillo et al., 2011). A comparison of the isotope ratio for SO2 and fine aerosols offers a way to determine aerosol growth from local SO2 oxidation. For some samples, the values for SO2 and fine aerosols were close together suggesting the same source for SO2 and aerosol sulfur.Aerosols drive significant radiative forcing and affect Arctic climate. Despite the importance of these particles in Arctic climate change, there are some key uncertainties in the estimation of their effects and sources. Aerosols in six size fractions between <0.49 to 7.0 microns in diameter were collected on board the Canadian Coast Guard Ship (CCGS) Amundsen in the Arctic, during July 2014. A cascade impactor

  20. The Angstrom Exponent and Bimodal Aerosol Size Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuster, Gregory L.; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent H.

    2005-01-01

    Powerlaws have long been used to describe the spectral dependence of aerosol extinction, and the wavelength exponent of the aerosol extinction powerlaw is commonly referred to as the Angstrom exponent. The Angstrom exponent is often used as a qualitative indicator of aerosol particle size, with values greater than two indicating small particles associated with combustion byproducts, and values less than one indicating large particles like sea salt and dust. In this study, we investigate the relationship between the Angstrom exponent and the mode parameters of bimodal aerosol size distributions using Mie theory calculations and Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) retrievals. We find that Angstrom exponents based upon seven wavelengths (0.34, 0.38, 0.44, 0.5, 0.67, 0.87, and 1.02 micrometers) are sensitive to the volume fraction of aerosols with radii less then 0.6 micrometers, but not to the fine mode effective radius. The Angstrom exponent is also known to vary with wavelength, which is commonly referred to as curvature; we show how the spectral curvature can provide additional information about aerosol size distributions for intermediate values of the Angstrom exponent. Curvature also has a significant effect on the conclusions that can be drawn about two-wavelength Angstrom exponents; long wavelengths (0.67, 0.87 micrometers) are sensitive to fine mode volume fraction of aerosols but not fine mode effective radius, while short wavelengths (0.38, 0.44 micrometers) are sensitive to the fine mode effective radius but not the fine mode volume fraction.

  1. The Regional Environmental Impacts of Atmospheric Aerosols over Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakey, Ashraf; Ibrahim, Alaa

    2015-04-01

    due to airborne particles washed out by rain events. Conversely, the AOD increases in summer because particle accumulation is favored by the absence of precipitation during this season. Moreover, in summer, photochemical processes in the atmosphere lead to slight increases in the values of aerosol optical characteristics, despite lower wind speeds [hence less wind-blown dust] relative to other seasons. This study has been conducted under the PEER 2-239 research project titled "the Impact of Biogenic and Anthropogenic Atmospheric Aerosols to Climate in Egypt". Project website: CleanAirEgypt.org

  2. [Size distributions of aerosol particles and the impact on visibility in winter of Nanjing].

    PubMed

    Shang, Qian; Li, Zi-Hua; Yang, Jun; Pu, Mei-Juan

    2011-09-01

    increased in comparison with sunny day. Scavenging action of rain and fog to particles of different sizes from high to low was that coarse particles > nuclei mode particles > accumulation mode particles. In haze day, the peak of number concentration distribution moved toward a higher value. Compared to sunny day, the number concentration of aerosol particles ranging from 0.03 to 0.1 microm decreased, and aerosol particles between 0.1 and 2.7 microm increased in haze day. Based on Mie theory, the correlation between visibility and surface area concentration with different particle sizes indicated that particles between 0.1 and 2 microm in diameter shows a good correlation with visibility, which was the major contributor to visibility degradation in Nanjing. PMID:22165248

  3. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOIs-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more there was sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics (ELVOCs) concentration and the HGF of particles of any size.

  4. Aerosol Correction for Improving OMPS/LP Ozone Retrieval

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Zhong; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Loughman, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite Limb Profiler (OMPS-LP) on board the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (SNPP) satellite was launched on Oct. 28, 2011. Limb profilers measures the radiance scattered from the Earth's atmospheric in limb viewing mode from 290 to 1000 nm and infer ozone profiles from tropopause to 60 km. The recently released OMPS-LP Version 2 data product contains the first publicly released ozone profiles retrievals, and these are now available for the entire OMPS mission, which extends from April, 2012. The Version 2 data product retrievals incorporate several important improvements to the algorithm. One of the primary changes is to turn off the aerosol retrieval module. The aerosol profiles retrieved inside the ozone code was not helping the ozone retrieval and was adding noise and other artifacts. Aerosols including polar stratospheric cloud (PSC) and polar mesospheric clouds (PMC) have a detectable effect on OMPS-LP data. Our results show that ignoring the aerosol contribution would produce an ozone density bias of up to 10 percent in the region of maximum aerosol extinction. Therefore, aerosol correction is needed to improve the quality of the retrieved ozone concentration profile. We provide Aerosol Scattering Index (ASI) for detecting aerosols-PMC-PSC, defined as ln(Im-Ic) normalized at 45km, where Im is the measured radiance and Ic is the calculated radiance assuming no aerosols. Since ASI varies with wavelengths, latitude and altitude, we can start by assuming no aerosol profiles in calculating the ASIs and then use the aerosol profile to see if it significantly reduces the residuals. We also discuss the effect of aerosol size distribution on the ozone profile retrieval process. Finally, we present an aerosol-PMC-PSC correction scheme.

  5. Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering.

    PubMed

    Keith, David W

    2010-09-21

    Aerosols could be injected into the upper atmosphere to engineer the climate by scattering incident sunlight so as to produce a cooling tendency that may mitigate the risks posed by the accumulation of greenhouse gases. Analysis of climate engineering has focused on sulfate aerosols. Here I examine the possibility that engineered nanoparticles could exploit photophoretic forces, enabling more control over particle distribution and lifetime than is possible with sulfates, perhaps allowing climate engineering to be accomplished with fewer side effects. The use of electrostatic or magnetic materials enables a class of photophoretic forces not found in nature. Photophoretic levitation could loft particles above the stratosphere, reducing their capacity to interfere with ozone chemistry; and, by increasing particle lifetimes, it would reduce the need for continual replenishment of the aerosol. Moreover, particles might be engineered to drift poleward enabling albedo modification to be tailored to counter polar warming while minimizing the impact on equatorial climates. PMID:20823254

  6. Photophoretic levitation of engineered aerosols for geoengineering

    PubMed Central

    Keith, David W.

    2010-01-01

    Aerosols could be injected into the upper atmosphere to engineer the climate by scattering incident sunlight so as to produce a cooling tendency that may mitigate the risks posed by the accumulation of greenhouse gases. Analysis of climate engineering has focused on sulfate aerosols. Here I examine the possibility that engineered nanoparticles could exploit photophoretic forces, enabling more control over particle distribution and lifetime than is possible with sulfates, perhaps allowing climate engineering to be accomplished with fewer side effects. The use of electrostatic or magnetic materials enables a class of photophoretic forces not found in nature. Photophoretic levitation could loft particles above the stratosphere, reducing their capacity to interfere with ozone chemistry; and, by increasing particle lifetimes, it would reduce the need for continual replenishment of the aerosol. Moreover, particles might be engineered to drift poleward enabling albedo modification to be tailored to counter polar warming while minimizing the impact on equatorial climates. PMID:20823254

  7. Impact of Cloud-Borne Aerosol Representation on Aerosol Direct and Indirect Effects

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.; Easter, Richard C.

    2006-09-21

    Aerosol particles attached to cloud droplets are much more likely to be removed from the atmosphere and are much less efficient at scattering sunlight than if unattached. Models used to estimate direct and indirect effects of aerosols employ a variety of representations of such cloud-borne particles. Here we use a global aerosol model with a relatively complete treatment of cloud-borne particles to estimate the sensitivity of simulated aerosol, cloud and radiation fields to various approximations to the representation of cloud-borne particles. We find that neglecting transport of cloud-borne particles introduces little error, but that diagnosing cloud-borne particles produces global mean biases of 20% and local errors of up to 40% for many variables of interest. A treatment that predicts the total mass concentration of cloud-borne particles for each mode yields smaller errors and runs 20% faster than the complete treatment.

  8. Detecting cross-equatorial wind change as a fingerprint of climate response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai; Xie, Shang-Ping; Tokinaga, Hiroki; Liu, Qinyu; Kosaka, Yu

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are a major driver of the twetieth century climate change. In climate models, the aerosol forcing, larger in the Northern than Southern Hemispheres, induces an interhemispheric Hadley circulation. In support of the model result, we detected a robust change in the zonal mean cross-equatorial wind over the past 60 years from ship observations and reanalyses, accompanied by physically consistent changes in atmospheric pressure and marine cloud cover. Single-forcing experiments indicate that the observed change in cross-equatorial wind is a fingerprint of aerosol forcing. This zonal mean mode follows the evolution of global aerosol forcing that is distinct from regional changes in the Atlantic sector. Atmospheric simulations successfully reproduce this interhemispheric mode, indicating the importance of sea surface temperature mediation in response to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. As societies awaken to reduce aerosol emissions, a phase reversal of this interhemispheric mode is expected in the 21st century.

  9. Aged boreal biomass burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2014-09-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number size-distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over Eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size-distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ∼1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in Northwestern Ontario. The composite median size-distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter), σ = 1.7, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.05-0.18 μg m-3 ppbv-1 with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size-distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We estimate that the fresh-plume median diameter was in the range of 59-94 nm with modal widths in the range of 1.7-2.8 (the ranges are due to uncertainty in the entrainment rate). Thus, the size of the freshly emitted particles is relatively unconstrained due to the uncertainties in

  10. Evaluation of aerosol properties simulated by the high resolution global coupled chemistry-aerosol-microphysics model C-IFS-GLOMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhomse, Sandip; Mann, Graham; Carslaw, Ken; Flemming, Johannes; Morcrette, Jean-Jacques; Engelen, Richard; Remy, Samuel; Boucher, Olivier; Benduhn, Francois; Hewson, Will; Woodhouse, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    The EU Framework Programme GEMS and MACC consortium projects co-ordinated by the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) have developed an operational global forecasting and reanalysis system (Composition-IFS) for atmospheric composition including greenhouse gases, reactive gases and aerosol. The current operational C-IFS system uses a mass-based aerosol model coupled to data assimilation of Aerosol Optical Depth measured by satellite (MODIS) to predict global aerosol properties. During MACC, the GLOMAP-mode aerosol microphysics scheme was added to the system, providing information on aerosol size and number for improved representation of aerosol-radiation and aerosol-cloud interactions, accounting also for simulated global variations in size distribution and internally-mixed particle composition. The IFS-GLOMAP system has recently been upgraded to couple with the sulphur cycle simulated in the online TM5 tropospheric chemistry module for global reactive gases. This C-IFS-GLOMAP system is also being upgraded to use a new "nitrate-extended" version of GLOMAP which realistically treats the size-resolved gas-particle partitioning of semi volatile gases ammonia and nitric acid. In this poster we described C-IFS-GLOMAP and present an evaluation of the global sulphate aerosol distribution simulated in this coupled aerosol-chemistry C-IFS-GLOMAP, comparing to surface observations in Europe, North America and the North Atlantic and contrasting to the fixed timescale sulphate production scheme developed in GEMS. We show that the coupling to the TM5 sulphur chemistry improves the seasonal cycle of sulphate aerosol, for example addressing a persistent wintertime sulphate high bias in northern Europe. The improved skill in simulated sulphate aerosol seasonal cycle is a pre-requisite to realistically characterise nitrate aerosol since biases in sulphate affect the amount of free ammonia available to form ammonium nitrate.

  11. Aerosol Backscatter from Airborne Continuous Wave CO2 Lidars over Western North America and the Pacific Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jarzembski, Maurice A.; Srivastava, Vandana; Rothermel, Jeffry

    1999-01-01

    Aerosol backscatter measurements using two continuous wave CO2 Doppler lidars were obtained over western North America and the Pacific Ocean during a 1995 NASA airborne mission. Similarities and differences for aerosol loading over land and ocean were observed. Mid-tropospheric aerosol backscatter background mode was approximately 6 x 10(exp -11)/m.sr, consistent with previous lidar datasets.

  12. A Physically-Based Estimate of Radiative Forcing by Anthropogenic Sulfate Aerosol

    SciTech Connect

    Ghan, Steven J.); Easter, Richard C.); Chapman, Elaine G.); Abdul-Razzak, Hayder; Zhang, Yang ); Leung, Ruby ); Laulainen, Nels S.); Saylor, Rick D.); Zaveri, Rahul A.)

    2001-04-01

    Estimates of direct and indirect radiative forcing by anthropogenic sulfate aerosols from an integrated global aerosol and climate modeling system are presented. A detailed global tropospheric chemistry and aerosol model that predicts concentrations of oxidants as well as aerosols and aerosol precursors, is coupled to a general circulation model that predicts both cloud water mass and cloud droplet number. Both number and mass of several externally-mixed aerosol size modes are predicted, with internal mixing assumed for the different aerosol components within each mode. Predicted aerosol species include sulfate, organic and black carbon, soil dust, and sea salt. The models use physically-based treatments of aerosol radiative properties (including dependence on relative humidity) and aerosol activation as cloud condensation nuclei. Parallel simulations with and without anthropogenic sulfate aerosol are performed for a global domain. The global and annual mean direct and indirect radiative forcing due to anthropogenic sulfate are estimated to be -0.3 to -0.5 and -1.5 to -3.0 W m-2, respectively. The radiative forcing is sensitive to the model's horizontal resolution, the use of predicted vs. analyzed relative humidity, the prediction vs. diagnosis of aerosol number and droplet number, and the parameterization of droplet collision/coalescence. About half of the indirect radiative forcing is due to changes in droplet radius and half to increased cloud liquid water.

  13. Assessment of the aerosol optics component of the coupled WRF-CMAQ model using CARES field campaign data and a single column model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Chuen Meei; Binkowski, Francis; Pleim, Jonathan; Xing, Jia; Wong, David; Mathur, Rohit; Gilliam, Robert

    2015-08-01

    The Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study (CARES), a field campaign held in central California in June 2010, provides a unique opportunity to assess the aerosol optics modeling component of the two-way coupled Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) - Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model. This campaign included comprehensive measurements of aerosol composition and optical properties at two ground sites and aloft from instrumentation on-board two aircraft. A single column model (SCM) was developed to evaluate the accuracy and consistency of the coupled model using both observation and model information. Two cases (June 14 and 24, 2010) are examined in this study. The results show that though the coupled WRF-CMAQ estimates of aerosol extinction were underestimated relative to these measurements, when measured concentrations and characteristics of ambient aerosols were used as input to constrain the SCM calculations, the estimated extinction profiles agreed well with aircraft observations. One of the possible causes of the WRF-CMAQ extinction errors is that the simulated sea-salt (SS) in the accumulation mode in WRF-CMAQ is very low in both cases while the observations indicate a considerable amount of SS. Also, a significant amount of organic carbon (OC) is present in the measurement. However, in the current WRF-CMAQ model all OC is considered to be insoluble whereas most secondary organic aerosol is water soluble. In addition, the model does not consider external mixing and hygroscopic effects of water soluble OC which can impact the extinction calculations. In conclusion, the constrained SCM results indicate that the scattering portion of the aerosol optics calculations is working well, although the absorption calculation could not be effectively evaluated. However, a few factors such as greatly underestimated accumulation mode SS, misrepresentation of water soluble OC, and incomplete mixing state representation in the full coupled model

  14. Optical modeling of aerosol extinction for remote sensing in the marine environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloshin, G. A.

    2013-05-01

    A microphysical model is presented for the surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols that is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles in different geographic sites. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of the ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, altitudes above sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U) and relative humidity (RH) are investigated. The spectral profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficients calculated by MaexPro (Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles) are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results obtained from the Navy Aerosol Model (NAM) and the Advanced Navy Aerosol Model (ANAM). Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable tool for investigation of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols.

  15. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  16. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  17. Natural versus anthropogenic inhalable aerosol chemistry of transboundary East Asian atmospheric outflows into western Japan.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Teresa; Kojima, Tomoko; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Amato, Fulvio; Gibbons, Wes

    2012-05-01

    The eastward transport of aerosols exported from mainland Asia strongly influences air quality in the Japanese archipelago. The bulk of the inhalable particulate matter (PM(10)) in these intrusions comprises either natural, desert-derived minerals (mostly supermicron silicates) or anthropogenic pollutants (mostly submicron sulphates), in various states of mixing. We analyse PM(10) collected in Kumamoto, SW Japan, during three contrasting types of aerosol intrusions, the first being dominated by desert PM which became increasingly mixed with anthropogenic components as time progressed, the second being a relatively minor event mixing fine, distal desert PM with anthropogenic materials, and the third being dominated by anthropogenic pollutants. Whereas the chemistry of the natural mineral component is characterised by "crustal" elements (Si, Al, Fe, Mg, K, Li, P, Sc, V, Rb, Sr, Zr, Th, lanthanoids), the anthropogenic component is rich in secondary inorganic compounds and more toxic metallic elements (NH(4)(+), SO(4)(2-), As, Pb, Cd, Cu, Zn, Sn, Bi, Sb, and Ge). Some desert-dust (Kosa) intrusions are more calcareous than others, implicating geologically different source areas, and contain enhanced levels of NO(3)(-), probably as supermicron Ca(NO(3))(2) particles produced by chemical reaction between NOx pollutants (mostly from industry and traffic) and carbonate during atmospheric transport. The overall trace element chemistry of aerosol intrusions into Kumamoto shows low V/Rb, low NO(3)(-)/SO(4)(2-), enhanced As levels, and unfractionated La/Ce values, which are all consistent with anthropogenic sources including coal emissions rather than those derived from the refining and combustion of oil fractionates. Geographically dispersed, residual sulphatic plumes of this nature mix with local traffic (revealed by OC and EC concentrations) and industrial emissions and dissipate only slowly, due to the dominance of submicron accumulation mode PM which is atmospherically

  18. Aerosols in polluted versus nonpolluted air masses Long-range transport and effects on clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pueschel, R. F.; Van Valin, C. C.; Castillo, R. C.; Kadlecek, J. A.; Ganor, E.

    1986-01-01

    To assess the influence of anthropogenic aerosols on the physics and chemistry of clouds in the northeastern United States, aerosol and cloud-drop size distributions, elemental composition of aerosols as a function of size, and ionic content of cloud water were measured on Whiteface Mountain, NY, during the summers of 1981 and 1982. In several case studies, the data were cross-correlated with different air mass types - background continental, polluted continental, and maritime - that were advected to the sampling site. The results are the following: (1) Anthropogenic sources hundreds of kilometers upwind cause the small-particle (accumulation) mode number to increase from hundreds of thousands per cubic centimeter and the mass loading to increase from a few to several tens of micrograms per cubic meter, mostly in the form of sulfur aerosols. (2) A significant fraction of anthropogenic sulfur appears to act as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) to affect the cloud drop concentration. (3) Clouds in Atlantic maritime air masses have cloud drop spectra that are markedly different from those measured in continental clouds. The drop concentration is significantly lower, and the drop size spectra are heavily skewed toward large drops. (4) Effects of anthropogenic pollutants on cloud water ionic composition are an increase of nitrate by a factor of 50, an increase of sulfate by more than one order of magnitude, and an increase of ammonium ion by a factor of 7. The net effect of the changes in ionic concentrations is an increase in cloud water acidity. An anion deficit even in maritime clouds suggests an unknown, possibly biogenic, source that could be responsible for a pH below neutral, which is frequently observed in nonpolluted clouds.

  19. Functional Group Composition of Semivolatile Compounds Present in Submicron Organic Aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggeri, G.; Modini, R. L.; Iannarelli, R.; Rossi, M. J.; Takahama, S.

    2014-12-01

    Semivolatile organic compounds can partition between gas and particle phase in atmospheric conditions and can be volatilized and lost when the aerosol sampling is performed onto PTFE filters (Eatough et al., 1993). In this work, semivolatile compounds are collected onto carbon impregnated glass fiber-cellulose filters placed in series after an activated carbon denuder and PTFE filter which collects submicron aerosol particles of low volatility (Subramanian et al., 2004). The semivolatile compounds accumulated on the cellulose-glass fiber filters are desorbed by vacuum and injected into a stainless steel chamber that enables cold-trapping. The vapors in this chamber are condensed onto a low-temperature silicon window, and the composition of deposited vapors are analysed by transmission-mode Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy (Delval and Rossi, 2004). Functional group composition of semivolatile compounds that can be desorbed from the aerosol phase and its relationship with the apparent low-volatile fraction composition will be presented. Eatough, D.J., Wadsworth, A., Eatough, D.A., Crawford, J.W., Hansen, L.D., Lewis, E.A., 1993. A multiple-system, multi-channel diffusion denuder sampler for the determination of fine-particulate organic material in the atmosphere. Atmospheric Environment. Part A. General Topics 27, 1213-1219. Subramanian, R., Khlystov, A.Y., Cabada, J.C., Robinson, A.L., 2004. Positive and negative artifacts in particulate organic carbon measurements with denuded and undenuded sampler configurations. Aerosol Science and Technology 38, 27-48. Delval, C., Rossi, M.J., 2004. The kinetics of condensation and evaporation of H2O from pure ice in the range 173-223 K: a quartz crystal microbalance study. Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics 6, 4665-4676.

  20. Correlated IR spectroscopy and visible light scattering measurements of mineral dust aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meland, B.; Kleiber, P. D.; Grassian, V. H.; Young, M. A.

    2010-10-01

    A combined infrared spectroscopy and visible light scattering study of the optical properties of quartz aerosol, a major component of atmospheric dust, is reported. Scattering phase function and polarization measurements for quartz dust at three visible wavelengths (470, 550, 660 nm) are compared with results from T-matrix theory simulations using a uniform spheroid model for particle shape. Aerosol size distributions were measured simultaneously with light scattering. Particle shape distributions were determined in two ways: (1) analysis of electron microscope images of the dust, and (2) spectral fitting of infrared resonance extinction features. Since the aerosol size and shape distributions were measured, experimental scattering data could be directly compared with T-matrix simulations with no adjustable parameters. χ2 analysis suggests that T-matrix simulations based on a uniform spheroid approximation can be used to model the optical properties of irregularly shaped dust particles in the accumulation mode size range, provided the particle shape distribution can be reliably determined. Particle shape distributions derived from electron microscope image analysis give poor fits, indicating that two-dimensional images may not give an accurate representation of the shape distribution for three-dimensional particles. However, simulations based on particle shape models inferred from IR spectral analysis give excellent fits to the experimental data. Our work suggests that correlated IR spectral and visible light scattering measurements, together with the use of theoretical light scattering models, may offer a more accurate method for characterizing atmospheric dust loading, and aerosol composition, size, and shape distributions, which are of great importance in climate modeling.

  1. Size distributions of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in suburban PM episode and non-episodic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Li-Ying; Kuo, Su-Ching; Chen, Chien-Lung; Tsai, Ying I.

    The distribution of nano/micron dicarboxylic acids and inorganic ions in size-segregated suburban aerosol of southern Taiwan was studied for a PM episode and a non-episodic pollution period, revealing for the first time the distribution of these nanoscale particles in suburban aerosols. Inorganic species, especially nitrate, were present in higher concentrations during the PM episode. A combination of gas-to-nuclei conversion of nitrate particles and accumulation of secondary photochemical products originating from traffic-related emissions was likely a crucial cause of the PM episode. Sulfate, ammonium, and oxalic acid were the dominant anion, cation, and dicarboxylic acid, respectively, accounting for a minimum of 49% of the total anion, cation or dicarboxylic acid mass. Peak concentrations of these species occurred at 0.54 μm in the droplet mode during both non-episodic and PM episode periods, indicating an association with cloud-processed particles. On average, sulfate concentration was 16-17 times that of oxalic acid. Oxalic acid was nevertheless the most abundant dicarboxylic acid during both periods, followed by succinic, malonic, maleic, malic and tartaric acid. The mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) of oxalic acid was 0.77 μm with a bi-modal presence at 0.54 μm and 18 nm during non-episodic pollution and an MMAD of 0.67 μm with mono-modal presence at 0.54 μm in PM episode aerosol. The concomitant formation of malonic acid and oxalic acid was attributed to in-cloud processes. During the PM episode in the 5-100 nm nanoscale range, an oxalic acid/sulfate mass ratio of 40.2-82.3% suggested a stronger formation potential for oxalic acid than for sulfate in the nuclei mode. For total cations (TC), total inorganic anions (TIA) and total dicarboxylic acids (TDA), major contributing particles were in the droplet mode, with least in the nuclei mode. The ratio of TDA to TIA in the nuclei mode increased greatly from 8.40% during the non-episodic pollution

  2. Synoptic conditions favouring the occurrence of strong aerosol episodes over the broader Mediterranean basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gkikas, A.; Houssos, E. E.; Bartzokas, A.; Hatzianastassiou, N.

    2010-09-01

    The present work aims at determining the synoptic conditions that favour the occurrence of strong aerosol episodes over the broader Mediterranean basin. In a first step, an objective and dynamic algorithm was set up to identify the strong aerosol episodes, based on daily aerosol optical depth values at 550nm (AOD550nm) from MODIS-Terra satellite database over the period 2000-2007. According to the algorithm, strong aerosol episodes occurred in each geographical cell (1o x 1o spatial resolution) of the study area whenever AODmean+2STDV≤AOD550nmaerosol episodes occurred at the pixel-level over the study region. Finally, the total number of selected days with strong aerosol episodes was equal to 219. In order to study the synoptic conditions, prevailing during the days of strong aerosol episodes, the fields of geopotential height at 500mb and mean sea level pressure (SLP) taken from the NCEP/NCAR reanalysis project, were used. At first, Factor analysis (S-mode) has been applied, in order to decrease the dimensionality of the raw atmospheric field data (500hPa and SLP). In a further step, Cluster Analysis was also applied to identify/classify the prevailing atmospheric circulation types during the aerosol episodes, into 7 representative clusters. The intra-annual variation of the frequency of occurrence, for each cluster, reveals that strong aerosol episodes mostly occur during spring and summer (89%). This can be attributed either to the stable atmospheric conditions and to the small precipitation amounts (especially in summer) that lead to the accumulation of aerosol particles in the atmosphere or to the prevailing synoptic conditions

  3. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  4. Development and validation of a size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme for application in aerosol transport models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petroff, A.; Zhang, L.

    2010-12-01

    A size-resolved particle dry deposition scheme is developed for inclusion in large-scale air quality and climate models where the size distribution and fate of atmospheric aerosols is of concern. The "resistance" structure is similar to what is proposed by Zhang et al. (2001), while a new "surface" deposition velocity (or surface resistance) is derived by simplification of a one-dimensional aerosol transport model (Petroff et al., 2008b, 2009). Compared to Zhang et al.'s model, the present model accounts for the leaf size, shape and area index as well as the height of the vegetation canopy. Consequently, it is more sensitive to the change of land covers, particularly in the accumulation mode (0.1-1 micron). A drift velocity is included to account for the phoretic effects related to temperature and humidity gradients close to liquid and solid water surfaces. An extended comparison of this model with experimental evidence is performed over typical land covers such as bare ground, grass, coniferous forest, liquid and solid water surfaces and highlights its adequate prediction. The predictions of the present model differ from Zhang et al.'s model in the fine mode, where the latter tends to over-estimate in a significant way the particle deposition, as measured by various investigators or predicted by the present model. The present development is thought to be useful to modellers of the atmospheric aerosol who need an adequate parameterization of aerosol dry removal to the earth surface, described here by 26 land covers. An open source code is available in Fortran90.

  5. Aerosol property retrieval from geostationary observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Govaerts, Yves

    The Meteosat satellites play an important role for the generation of consistent long time series of aerosol properties. This importance relies on (i) the long duration of past (Meteosat First Generation, MFG) starting in 1982, present (Meteosat Second Generation, MSG) and future (Meteosat Third Generation, MTG) missions and (ii) their frequent cycle of acquisition that can be used to document the anisotropy of the surface and therefore the lower boundary condition for aerosol retrieval over land surfaces. Hence, a similar approach is used for the processing of each Meteosat generation based on a joint retrieval of surface reflectance and aerosol properties using an Optimal Estimation approach. Daily accumulation of the frequent Meteosat observations is used to discriminate the radiative effects that result from the surface anisotropy, from those caused by the aerosol scattering. The inverted forward model explicitly accounts for the surface anisotropy and the multiple scattering for the coupled surface-atmosphere system. Pinty et al. (2000) pioneered with the development of an original method to characterise simultaneously surface anisotropy and atmospheric scattering properties for the processing of MFG. Although these observations are limited to one single large VIS band poorly characterised, the main advantage of MFG relies in the duration of the archive (1982 - 2006), knowing that prior to 2000 space observations were very scarce. Despite these radiometric limitations, it is possible to detect major aerosol events like dust storms, fire plumes or pollution events, even over land surfaces. SEVIRI, on-board MSG, offers additional capabilities with its three solar channels and 15 min repeat cycle. AOD retrieval is much more accurate than with MFG and it is possible to discriminate among various aerosol classes. The additional FCI solar channels on-board MTG will offer improved capabilities with respect to MSG/SEVIRI for the retrieval of aerosol concentration and

  6. Use of atmospheric elemental size distributions in estimating aerosol sources in the Helsinki area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakkanen, Tuomo A.; Kerminen, Veli-Matti; Korhonen, Christina H.; Hillamo, Risto E.; Aarnio, Päivi; Koskentalo, Tarja; Maenhaut, Willy

    In June 1996-June 1997 Berner impactors were used in the Helsinki area to measure size distributions of atmospheric aerosols simultaneously at an urban and at a rural site. Ten sample pairs were collected in the size range of 0.03-15.7 μm of equivalent aerodynamic diameter (EAD). Average size distributions at the two sites were calculated for 29 elements, particulate mass, and sulphate. At both sites especially sulphate, As, B, Bi, Cd, Ni, Tl, and V were enriched in fine particles (EAD<2.3 μm). In order to estimate local fine-particle sources of the various chemical components, the similarities and dissimilarities in the accumulation-mode parameters were studied separately for both sites. It was observed that often in different samples, different components had similar accumulation modes. At both sites, particulate mass, As, and Pb had similar accumulation modes to sulphate which suggests that long-range transport (LRT) is important for these components. V, Ni, Mo, and Co formed another group of similar accumulation modes at both sites suggesting that these elements largely originated from local and regional oil combustion. In addition, other groups of similar accumulation modes were observed but these groups were different between the sites. The meteorological parameters indicated that seven sample pairs formed a subset of the data in which the local emissions of the Helsinki area were transported to the urban site but not to the rural site. For this subset the rural fine-particle concentrations were considered to represent an upper limit estimate for the LRT. These upper limit LRT estimations were further improved by utilising the quantitative relative size distributions (QRSD) method at the rural site. The QRSD method supposes that in the fine-particle size range the LRT fractions of all chemical components have a similar shape in their size distributions. Fine-particle sulphate is typically long-range transported, and was therefore selected as the model

  7. Characterization of near-highway submicron aerosols in New York City with a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Y. L.; Zhang, Q.; Schwab, J. J.; Chen, W.-N.; Bae, M.-S.; Hung, H.-M.; Lin, Y.-C.; Ng, N. L.; Jayne, J.; Massoli, P.; Williams, L. R.; Demerjian, K. L.

    2011-11-01

    internally mixed in the accumulation mode peaking at ~500-600 nm. The enhancement of organics in traffic emissions mainly occurred at ultrafine mode dominated by HOA, with little relation to the OOA-dominated accumulation mode. From Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS)measurements, a large increase in number concentration at ~10 nm (mobility number mean diameter, Dm) was also found due to traffic influence; though these particles typically contribute a minor fraction of total particle mass. Results here may have significant implications for near-highway air pollution characterization and exposure assessments. Our results suggest that exposure assessments must take into account the rapid variations of aerosol chemistry over short distances near roadways, and also that long-term monitoring of air pollutants throughout the day on different types of days is necessary to accurately gauge exposure to individuals.

  8. Molecular Characterization of S- and N-containing Organic Constituents in Ambient Aerosols by negative ion mode High-Resolution Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry: CalNex 2010 field study

    SciTech Connect

    O'Brien, Rachel E.; Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Julia; Rubitschun, Caitlin L.; Surratt, Jason D.; Goldstein, Allen H.

    2014-11-27

    Samples of ambient aerosols from the 2010 California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) field study were analyzed using Nanospray Desorption Electrospray Ionization High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (nano-DESI/MS). Four samples per day were collected in Bakersfield, CA on June 20-24 with a collection time of 6 hours per sample. Four characteristic groups of organic constituents were identified in the samples: compounds containing carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen only (CHO), sulfur- (CHOS), nitrogen-(CHON), and both nitrogen- and sulfur-containing organics (CHONS). Within the groups, organonitrates, organosulfates, and nitroxy organosulfates were assigned based on accurate mass measurements and elemental ratio comparisons. Changes in the chemical composition of the aerosol samples were observed throughout the day. The number of observed CHO compounds increased in the afternoon samples, suggesting regional photochemical processing as a source. The average number of CHOS compounds had the smallest changes throughout the day, consistent with a more broadly distributed source. Both of the nitrogen-containing groups (CHON and CHONS) had greater numbers of compounds in the night and morning samples, indicating that nitrate radical chemistry was likely a source for those compounds. Most of the compounds were found in submicron particles. The size distribution of CHON compounds was bimodal. We conclude that the majority of the compounds observed were secondary in nature with both biogenic and anthropogenic sources.

  9. MATCH-SALSA - Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and CHemistry model coupled to the SALSA aerosol microphysics model - Part 1: Model description and evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, C.; Bergström, R.; Bennet, C.; Robertson, L.; Thomas, M.; Korhonen, H.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Kokkola, H.

    2014-05-01

    We have implemented the sectional aerosol dynamics model SALSA in the European scale chemistry-transport model MATCH (Multi-scale Atmospheric Transport and Chemistry). The new model is called MATCH-SALSA. It includes aerosol microphysics, with several formulations for nucleation, wet scavenging and condensation. The model reproduces observed higher particle number concentration (PNC) in central Europe and lower concentrations in remote regions. The model PNC size distribution peak occurs at the same or smaller particle size as the observed peak at five measurement sites spread across Europe. Total PNC is underestimated at Northern and Central European sites and accumulation mode PNC is underestimated at all investigated sites. On the other hand the model performs well for particle mass, including secondary inorganic aerosol components. Elemental and organic carbon concentrations are underestimated at many of the sites. Further development is needed, primarily for treatment of secondary organic aerosol, both in terms of biogenic emissions and chemical transformation, and for nitrogen gas-particle partitioning. Updating the biogenic SOA scheme will likely have a large impact on modeled PM2.5 and also affect the model performance for PNC through impacts on nucleation and condensation. An improved nitrogen partitioning model may also improve the description of condensational growth.

  10. Size distributions and source function of sea spray aerosol over the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Yingjia; Sheng, Lifang; Liu, Qian; Zhao, Dongliang; Jia, Nan; Kong, Yawen

    2016-08-01

    The number concentrations in the radius range of 0.06-5 μm of aerosol particles and meteorological parameters were measured on board during a cruise in the South China Sea from August 25 to October 12, 2012. Effective fluxes in the reference height of 10 m were estimated by steady state dry deposition method based on the observed data, and the influences of different air masses on flux were discussed in this paper. The number size distribution was characterized by a bimodal mode, with the average total number concentration of (1.50 ± 0.76)×103 cm-3. The two mode radii were 0.099 µm and 0.886 µm, both of which were within the scope of accumulation mode. A typical daily average size distribution was compared with that measured in the Bay of Bengal. In the whole radius range, the number concentrations were in agreement with each other; the modes were more distinct in this study than that abtained in the Bay of Bengal. The size distribution of the fluxes was fitted with the sum of log-normal and power-law distribution. The impact of different air masses was mainly on flux magnitude, rather than the shape of spectral distribution. A semiempirical source function that is applicable in the radius range of 0.06 µm< r 80<0.3 µm with the wind speed varying from 1.00 m s-1 to 10.00 m s-1 was derived.

  11. Parameter sensitivity study of Arctic aerosol vertical distribution in CAM5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiao, C.; Flanner, M.

    2015-12-01

    Arctic surface temperature response to light-absorbing aerosols (black carbon, brown carbon and dust) depends strongly on their vertical distributions. Improving model simulations of three dimensional aerosol fields in the remote Arctic region will therefore lead to improved projections of the climate change caused by aerosol emissions. In this study, we investigate how different physical parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5 (CAM5) influence the simulated vertical distribution of Arctic aerosols. We design experiments to test the sensitivity of the simulated aerosol fields to perturbations of selected aerosol process-related parameters in the Modal Aerosol Module with seven lognormal modes (MAM7), such as those govern aerosol aging, in-cloud and below-cloud scavenging, aerosol hygroscopicity and so on. The simulations are compared with observed aerosol vertical distributions and total optical depth to assess model performance and quantify uncertainties associated with these model parameterizations. Observations applied here include Arctic aircraft measurements of black carbon and sulfate vertical profiles, along with Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) optical depth measurements. We also assess the utility of using High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) measurements from the ARM Barrow site to infer vertical profiles of aerosol extinction. The sensitivity study explored here will provide guidance for optimizing global aerosol simulations.

  12. Aerosol optical depth over a remote semi-arid region of South Africa from spectral measurements of the daytime solar extinction and the nighttime stellar extinction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Formenti, P.; Winkler, H.; Fourie, P.; Piketh, S.; Makgopa, B.; Helas, G.; Andreae, M. O.

    Spectral daytime aerosol optical depths have been measured at Sutherland, South Africa (32°22'S, 20°48'E), from January 1998 to November 1999. Sutherland is located in the semi-arid Karoo desert, approximately 400-km northeast from Cape Town. The site, remote from major sources of aerosols, hosts the South African Astronomical Observatory (SAAO), where nighttime stellar extinction is being measured. The comparison of daytime and nighttime measurements for the years 1998-1999 makes it possible to validate the astronomical dataset of aerosol optical depth ( τa) dating back to 1991. The 1998 and 1999 annually averaged daytime τa at 500 nm are 0.04±0.04 and 0.06±0.06, respectively. Half-day averages vary between 0.03 and 0.44, with peak values in August-September. This pronounced seasonality is linked to the biomass-burning season in the Southern Hemisphere. Smoke haze layers transported to Sutherland originated primarily on the African landmass at latitudes between 10° and 20°S and passed over Namibia and Angola. On one occasion, aerosols from fires in Brazil transported across the Atlantic Ocean were likely detected. The haze layers reaching Sutherland are therefore at least 2-3 days old. The spectral dependence of the aerosol optical depth for the smoke layers supports the bimodality of the volume size distribution for biomass burning aerosols. The accumulation mode has a volume modal diameter of 0.32 μm, consistent with the hypothesis of aged haze. The stellar measurements (1991-2001) show that, due to the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo, the atmospheric extinction depth at 550 nm in the years 1991-1993 increased by 33% with respect to the average value (0.14±0.03) for the period 1994-2001. Outside the Pinatubo event, extinction is largest in the period 1997-1999.

  13. The size distribution of chemical elements of atmospheric aerosol at a semi-rural coastal site in Venice (Italy). The role of atmospheric circulation.

    PubMed

    Masiol, Mauro; Squizzato, Stefania; Ceccato, Daniele; Pavoni, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    The concentrations of selected elemental tracers were determined in the aerosol of a semi-rural coastal site near Venice (Italy). Size-segregated aerosol samples were collected using an 8-stage cascade impactor set at 15m above ground, during the cold season (late autumn and winter), when high levels of many pollutants are known to cause risks for human health. From the experimental data, information was extracted on potential pollutant sources by investigating the relationships between elements in the different size fractions. Moreover, an approach to highlight the importance of local atmospheric circulation and air mass origin in influencing the PM composition and fractional distribution is proposed. Anthropogenic elements are strongly inter-correlated in the submicrometric (<1 μm) (S, K, Mn, Cu, Fe and Zn) and intermediate mode (1-4 μm) (Mn, Cu, Zn, Ni) and their relationships highlight the presence of several sources (combustions, secondary aerosol, road traffic). In the intermediate mode, associations having geochemical significance exist between marine (Na, Cl and Mg) and crustal (Si, Mg, Ca, Al, Ti and K) elements. In the coarse mode (>4 μm) Fe and Zn are well correlated and are probably linked to tire and brake wear emissions. Regarding atmospheric circulation, results show increasing levels of elements related to pollution sources (S, K, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn) when air masses come from Central and Eastern Europe direction and on the ground wind blows from NWN-N-NE (from mainland Venice). Low wind speed and high percentage of wind calm hours favor element accumulation in the submicrometric and intermediate modes. Furthermore, strong winds favor the formation of sea-spray and the increase of Si in the coarse mode due to the resuspension of sand fine particles. PMID:25063963

  14. Amazon basin ozone and aerosol: Wet season observations

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, G.L.; Browell, E.V.; Warren, L.S.; Hudgins, C.H. )

    1990-09-20

    The tropical environment is recognized as having a major impact on global tropospheric chemistry. The data show that the wet season Amazon Basin is an effective sink for ozone and a net source for aerosols. Mixed layer ozone at 150-m altitude averaged 8.5 ppbv compared to about 18 ppbv at 3-km altitude. In addition, a negative ozone gradient (decreasing value to the surface) was observed within the mixed layer. The averaged wet season mixed layer ozone was about 7 ppbv lower than observed during the dry season. This is attributed to the enhanced convective activity associated with the wet season and the change in mixed layer photochemistry from net ozone production (dry season) to a net destruction (wet season). The net sink characteristics of the wet season mixed layer are seen throughout the troposphere of the Amazon Basin in that ozone (3- to 4-km altitude) is typically 15-25 ppbv as compared to dry season values of 30-35 ppbv. In terms of the aerosol source characteristics of the Amazon Basin, mixed layer aerosols (0.1- to 0.4-{mu}m diameter) are a factor of 5-10 higher than observed in the troposphere with mixed layer values of 100-200 aerosols/cm{sup 3}. Analyses of both tropospheric and mixed layer aerosol samples show aerosols which are multisource. Tropospheric samples have size distributions which are trimodal and show modes at aerosol diameters which suggest the aerosols are (1) of lifetimes <1 hour, (2) of lifetimes of days, and (3) mechanically generated elements (e.g., wind-blow dust). Mixed layer data show two of the three modes with no mode which represent aerosols with lifetimes of days.

  15. How robust are models of precipitation response to aerosols?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carslaw, Ken; Johnson, Jill; Cui, Zhiqiang

    2016-04-01

    Models of cloud-aerosol interaction and effects on precipitation are complex and therefore slow to run, so our understanding mostly relies on case studies and a very limited exploration of model uncertainties. Here we address the concept of cloud model robustness. A robust model is one that is reliable under different conditions in spite of uncertainties in the underlying processes. To assess model robustness, we quantify how the accumulated precipitation from a mixed-phase convective cloud responds to changes in aerosol accounting for the combined uncertainties in ten microphysical processes. Sampling across the full uncertainty space is achieved using statistical emulators, which essentially enable tens of thousands of cloud-resolving model simulations to be performed. Overall, precipitation increases with aerosol when aerosol concentrations are low and decreases when aerosol concentrations are high. However, when we account for uncertainties across the ten-dimensional parameter space of microphysical processes, the direction of response can no longer be defined with confidence except under some rather narrow aerosol conditions. To assess robustness of the modelled precipitation response to aerosols, we select a set of model "variants" that display a particular response in one aerosol environment and use this subset of models to predict precipitation response in other aerosol environments. Despite essentially tight model tuning, the model has very little reliability in predicting precipitation responses in different aerosol environments. Based on these results, we argue that the neglect of model uncertainty and a narrow case-study approach using highly complex cloud models may lead to false confidence in our understanding of aerosol-cloud-precipitation interactions.

  16. A global model simulation of present and future nitrate aerosols and their direct radiative forcing of climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hauglustaine, D. A.; Balkanski, Y.; Schulz, M.

    2014-03-01

    The ammonia cycle and nitrate particle formation have been introduced in the LMDz-INCA global model. Both fine nitrate particles formation in the accumulation mode and coarse nitrate forming on existing dust and sea-salt particles are considered. The model simulates distributions of nitrates and related species in agreement with previous studies and observations. The calculated present-day total nitrate direct radiative forcing since the pre-industrial is -0.056 W m-2. This forcing has the same magnitude than the forcing associated with organic carbon particles and represents 18% of the sulfate forcing. Fine particles largely dominate the nitrate forcing representing close to 90% of this value. The model has been used to investigate the future changes in nitrates and direct radiative forcing of climate based on snapshot simulations for the four Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios and for the 2030, 2050 and 2100 time horizons. Due to a decrease in fossil fuel emissions in the future, the concentrations of most of the species involved in the nitrate-ammonium-sulfate system drop by 2100 except for ammonia which originates from agricultural practices and for which emissions significantly increase in the future. Despite the decrease of nitrate surface levels in Europe and Northern America, the global burden of accumulation mode nitrates increases by up to a factor of 2.6 in 2100. This increase in nitrate in the future arises despite decreasing NOx emissions due to increased availability of ammonia to form ammonium nitrate. The total aerosol direct forcing decreases from its present-day value of -0.234 W m-2 to a range of -0.070 to -0.130 W m-2 in 2100 based on the considered scenario. The direct forcing decreases for all aerosols except for nitrates for which the direct negative forcing increases to a range of -0.060 to -0.115 W m-2 in 2100. Including nitrates in the radiative forcing calculations increases the total direct forcing of aerosols by a

  17. Aerosol properties and their influences on marine boundary layer cloud condensation nuclei at the ARM mobile facility over the Azores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan, Timothy; Xi, Baike; Dong, Xiquan

    2014-04-01

    A multiplatform data set from the Clouds, Aerosol, and Precipitation in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL) Graciosa, Azores, 2009-2010 field campaign was used to investigate how continental aerosols can influence MBL cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) number concentration (NCCN). The seasonal variations of aerosol properties have shown that the winter and early spring months had the highest mean surface wind speed (> 5 m s-1) and greatest contribution of sea salt to aerosol optical depth (AOD), while continental fine mode aerosols were the main contributors to AOD during the warm season months (May-September). Five aerosol events consisting of mineral dust, pollution, biomass smoke, and volcanic ash particles were selected as case studies using Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) mobile facility measurements. The aerosols in Case I were found to primarily consist of coarse mode, Saharan mineral dust. For Case II, the aerosols were also coarse mode but consisted of volcanic ash. Case III had fine mode biomass smoke and pollution aerosol influences while Cases IV and V consisted of mixtures of North American pollution and Saharan dust that was advected by an extratropical cyclone to the Azores. Cases I, IV, and V exhibited weak correlations between aerosol loading and NCCN due to mineral dust influences, while Cases II and III had a strong relationship with NCCN likely due to the sulfate content in the volcanic ash and pollution particles. The permanent Eastern North Atlantic ARM facility over the Azores will aid in a future long-term study of aerosol effects on NCCN.

  18. Thermoluminescent aerosol analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogowski, R. S.; Long, E. R., Jr. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A method for detecting and measuring trace amounts of aerosols when reacted with ozone in a gaseous environment was examined. A sample aerosol was exposed to a fixed ozone concentration for a fixed period of time, and a fluorescer was added to the exposed sample. The sample was heated in a 30 C/minute linear temperature profile to 200 C. The trace peak was measured and recorded as a function of the test aerosol and the recorded thermoluminescence trace peak of the fluorescer is specific to the aerosol being tested.

  19. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1997-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included pollution haze layer from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core.

  20. Investigation of aerosol and cloud properties using multiwavelength Raman lidar measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verghese, Sachin John

    Lidar measurements obtained during several field campaigns have provided an extensive dataset for investigating aerosol characteristics and cloud properties. In this thesis we use measurements of multi-wavelength optical extinction measured with a Raman lidar to infer aerosol and cloud particle size variations. Aerosol extinction depends on both size and number density of the scatterers. The optical extinction at different wavelengths depends on the sixth power of the size parameter for aerosols much smaller than the scattering wavelength, and on the second power of the size parameter for aerosols much larger than the wavelength. Changes in the density of a particular size aerosol lead to a proportional response. The extinction profiles at several wavelengths are simultaneously examined to study changes in the aerosol size distribution over an interesting range of sizes corresponding to accumulation-mode particles. Model calculations based on Mie scattering theory are compared with extinction profiles at different wavelengths, water vapor profiles, and other simultaneous measurements, to investigate the formation and dissipation of cloud structures. The optical scattering measurements from aerosols and cloud particles demonstrate that various characteristics of aerosols and visibility can be determined. We demonstrate the capability of the new technique using the multi-wavelength extinction ratios to profile information about changes in CCN particle size in the range of 50 nm to 0.5 mum. Examples taken from three different field campaigns demonstrate that changes in the size of the cloud particles during the different stages of growth and dissipation are observed in the multi-wavelength aerosol extinction using this technique. We also show the relationship that exists between particle size increase or decrease in cloud regions, based on the extinction coefficients and changes in relative humidity. The deliquescence relative humidity (DRH) is found to exert a strong

  1. TIGERZ I: Aerosols, Monsoon and Synergism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holben, B. N.; Tripathi, S. N.; Schafer, J. S.; Giles, D. M.; Eck, T. F.; Sinyuk, A.; Smirnov, A.; Krishnmoorthy, K.; Sorokin, M. G.; Newcomb, W. W.; Tran, A. K.; Sikka, D. R.; Goloub, P.; O'Neill, N. T.; Abboud, I.; Randles, C.; Niranjan, K.; Dumka, U. C.; Tiwari, S.; Devara, P. C.; Kumar, S.; Remer, L. A.; Kleidman, R.; Martins, J. V.; Kahn, R.

    2008-12-01

    The Indo-Gangetic Plain of northern India encompasses a vast complex of urban and rural landscapes, cultures that serve as anthropogenic sources of fine mode aerosols mixed with coarse mode particles transported from SW Asia. The summer monsoon and fall Himalayan snowmelt provide the agricultural productivity to sustain an extremely high population density whose affluence is increasing. Variations in the annual monsoon precipitation of 10% define drought, normal and a wet season; the net effects on the ecosystems and quality of life can be dramatic. Clearly investigation of anthropogenic and natural aerosol impacts on the monsoon, either through the onset, monsoon breaks or end points are a great concern to understand and ultimately mitigate. Many national and international field campaigns are being planned and conducted to study various aspects of the Asian monsoon and some coordinated under the Asian Monsoon Years (AMY) umbrella. A small program called TIGERZ conducted during the pre-monsoon of 2008 in North Central India can serve as a model for contributing significant resources to existing field programs while meeting immediate project goals. This poster will discuss preliminary results of the TIGERZ effort including ground-based measurements of aerosol properties in the I-G from AERONET and synergism with various Indian programs, satellite observations and aerosol modeling efforts.

  2. Aerosol cloud processing with the global model ECHAM5-HAM-SALSA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, T.; Korhonen, H.; Zubair, M.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Lehtinen, K.; Kokkola, H.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric aerosols and their interactions with clouds constitute the largest uncertainty in the radiative forcing of the Earth's atmosphere. Increasing aerosol number concentrations increases the cloud droplet concentration and droplet surface and hence the cloud albedo. This mechanism is called the aerosol indirect effect on climate. Understanding the changes in cloud droplet number concentrations and size by anthropogenic aerosols are the key factors in the study of future climate change. Therefore the aerosols' formation and growth from nanoparticles to cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) must be described accurately. The formation and growth of aerosols are shown to be described more accurately with sectional representations than with bulk (total aerosol mass only), modal (lognormal modes describing mass and number size distribution) or moment (processes tied to different moments of particle number size distribution) approaches. Recently the sectional aerosol models have been implemented to global climate models. However, the resolution of sectional models must be optimised to reduce the computational cost. We have implemented the sectional aerosol model SALSA in ECHAM5-HAM. SALSA describes the aerosol population with 20 size sections. The dynamics are optimised for large scale applications and the model includes an improved moving center sectional method. The particulate mass consists of five compounds: sulphate, organic carbon, black carbon, sea salt and dust. The aerosol processing has been studied extensively and there are many numerical models used to predict CCN number concentrations. However, due to computational limitations many of them are not suitable for utilisation in global climate models. Therefore in most global climate studies on aerosol activation to CCN is examined using cloud activation parameterisations. We study the aerosol cloud processing and its affect on transport of aerosols using Abdul-Razzak-Ghan aerosol cloud activation

  3. Are remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties a suitable proxy for cloud condensation nuclei?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stier, Philip

    2014-05-01

    Aerosol-cloud interactions arguably remain the single greatest uncertainty among anthropogenic perturbations of the climate system. The large uncertainties associated with their representation in global aerosol climate models have emphasised the need for observational studies. In-situ measurements provide a detailed description of aerosol and cloud microphysical properties, providing strong observational constraints on aerosol cloud interactions. However, their spatio-temporal sampling is sparse so that "observational" estimates of global aerosol cloud interactions generally rely on co-located satellite retrievals of aerosol radiative properties and cloud properties. In this study I will critically evaluate the suitability of remote-sensing retrieved aerosol radiative properties, such as aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol index (AI) and aerosol fine mode optical depth, as proxy for cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). This analysis based on the fully self-consistent calculation of aerosol radiative properties and CCN in the aerosol climate model ECHAM-HAM. Correlating simulated aerosol radiative properties with CCN at a range of supersaturations (sampling different sizes/composition of the aerosol spectrum) highlights limitations in the suitability of AOD and AI as proxy for CCN. These discrepancies arise from a range of factors, including the limited representativeness of column-integrated aerosol radiative properties for surface or cloud-base CCN as well as the effects of humidity growth of aerosols, affecting AOD/AI but not CCN. Simulated correlations show a strong regional variability, with significant implications for "observational" estimates of aerosol cloud interactions from remote-sensing as well as in-situ data.

  4. The resolution dependence of cloud effects and ship-induced aerosol-cloud interactions in marine stratocumulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Possner, A.; Zubler, E.; Lohmann, U.; Schär, C.

    2016-05-01

    Measures of aerosol-cloud interactions in stratocumulus have been shown to depend on the resolution of the applied data set. In order to contrast resolution with emission dilution effects in models, a regional numerical weather prediction model is used to simulate ship tracks at a range of spatiotemporal resolutions ranging from the global climate modeling scale (Δx = 50 km, Δt = 180 s) to the convection-resolving scale (Δx = 1 km, Δt = 20 s). The background simulations without ship emissions display a high degree of similarity in the planetary boundary layer and cloud properties at all spatiotemporal resolutions. Simulations assessing the impact of emission dilution show an increasing overestimation of the shortwave (SW) cloud radiative effect (CRE) with degenerating emission resolution. Although mean perturbations in the activation-sized aerosol number concentration (Nact) are similar for all dilution experiments, the variability in Nact is increasingly lost with stronger emission dilution. The enhanced Nact homogeneity in turn leads to an overestimated SW CRE. We show that emission dilution alone accounts for 47% of the overestimated SW CRE simulated at low resolutions. The remainder of the differences is attributed to a combination of locally enhanced aerosol concentrations due to weaker vertical mixing simulated at coarse resolutions, in combination with a faster conversion rate of Aitken to accumulation mode particles by redistribution in these regions.

  5. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

  6. Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds in ECHAM6-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neubauer, David; Lohmann, Ulrike; Hoose, Corinna

    2013-04-01

    Aerosol processing in stratiform clouds by uptake into cloud particles, collision-coalescence, chemical processing inside the cloud particles and release back into the atmosphere has important effects on aerosol concentration, size distribution, chemical composition and mixing state. Aerosol particles can act as cloud condensation nuclei. Cloud droplets can take up further aerosol particles by collisions. Atmospheric gases may also be transferred into the cloud droplets and undergo chemical reactions, e.g. the production of atmospheric sulphate. Aerosol particles are also processed in ice crystals. They may be taken up by homogeneous freezing of cloud droplets below -38° C or by heterogeneous freezing above -38° C. This includes immersion freezing of already immersed aerosol particles in the droplets and contact freezing of particles colliding with a droplet. Many clouds do not form precipitation and also much of the precipitation evaporates before it reaches the ground. The water soluble part of the aerosol particles concentrates in the hydrometeors and together with the insoluble part forms a single, mixed, larger particle, which is released. We have implemented aerosol processing into the current version of the general circulation model ECHAM6 (Stevens et al., 2013) coupled to the aerosol module HAM (Stier et al., 2005). ECHAM6-HAM solves prognostic equations for the cloud droplet number and ice crystal number concentrations. In the standard version of HAM, seven modes are used to describe the total aerosol. The modes are divided into soluble/mixed and insoluble modes and the number concentrations and masses of different chemical components (sulphate, black carbon, organic carbon, sea salt and mineral dust) are prognostic variables. We extended this by an explicit representation of aerosol particles in cloud droplets and ice crystals in stratiform clouds similar to Hoose et al. (2008a,b). Aerosol particles in cloud droplets are represented by 5 tracers for the

  7. Seasonal and diurnal cycling of aerosol particles in and above the canopy in the Amazon rain forest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditas, Florian; Pöhlker, Christopher; Barbosa, Henrique; Brito, Joel; Chi, Xuguang; Krüger, Mira L.; Moran, Daniel; Saturno, Jorge; Su, Hang; Ocimar Manzi, Antonio; Artaxo, Paulo; Pöschl, Ulrich; Andreae, Meinrat O.

    2015-04-01

    The Amazonian rain forest is one of the few continental regions, providing the opportunity to study pristine aerosols approximating a pre-industrial atmosphere. During the wet season, the ambient aerosol is usually unaffected by anthropogenic emission and dominated by a biosphere-atmosphere exchange. In contrast, during the dry season, anthropogenic pollution events (e.g., biomass burning) of regional and/or global character are observed. We will present measurements carried out at a remote research facility in the Amazonian rain forest (ATTO site, S 2° 08' 45'' W 59° 00' 20") approximately 150 km northeast of Manaus. The ATTO site is equipped with a variety of instruments to characterize microphysical and optical particle properties (i.e., particle number size distribution, total particle number concentration, BC mass, scattering coefficients, and chemical composition), which can be operated at two different inlet lines to investigate particles below (5 m) and above canopy (60 m). Since June 2014 a continuous data set of simultaneous particle number size distribution measurements below and above canopy is being collected covering nucleation to coarse mode sizes. The observed particle number size distributions show a pronounced diurnal cycle throughout all size ranges. The number concentration of Aitken and accumulation mode particles exhibits distinct minima before sunrise and a 'growth-like' behavior during daytime, while coarse mode particles show a rather broad minimum and gradual increase during daytime with maximum concentration during nighttime. As already reported by earlier studies, textbook-like new particle formation and growth is not observed in the Amazonian rain forest. Nevertheless, short particle bursts in the nucleation mode size range are regularly observed and show highest abundance in the first half of the night as well as a minimum during daytime. Simultaneous measurements below and above canopy show generally similar results indicating well

  8. Aerosol Retrievals from ARM SGP MFRSR Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Alexandrov, Mikhail

    2008-01-15

    The Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) makes precise simultaneous measurements of the solar direct normal and diffuse horizontal irradiances at six wavelengths (nominally 415, 500, 615, 673, 870, and 940 nm) at short intervals (20 sec for ARM instruments) throughout the day. Time series of spectral optical depth are derived from these measurements. Besides water vapor at 940 nm, the other gaseous absorbers within the MFRSR channels are NO2 (at 415, 500, and 615 nm) and ozone (at 500, 615, and 670 nm). Aerosols and Rayleigh scattering contribute atmospheric extinction in all MFRSR channels. Our recently updated MFRSR data analysis algorithm allows us to partition the spectral aerosol optical depth into fine and coarse modes and to retrieve the fine mode effective radius. In this approach we rely on climatological amounts of NO2 from SCIAMACHY satellite retrievals and use daily ozone columns from TOMS.

  9. Composition and Characteristics of Aerosols in the Southern High Plains of Texas (USA)

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, Thomas E.; Stout, John E.; Peinado, Porfirio

    2009-03-10

    Aerosol samples on polycarbonate filters were collected daily for several years in the Southern High Plains region of western Texas. Selected samples representing a variety of size modes, locations, and air quality conditions were analyzed by PIXE. Silicon and other crustal elements dominated during dust storms and in the coarse mode; sulfur dominated during anthropogenic pollution episodes and in the fine mode. A mixture of both aerosol types was present even during 'clear' conditions. The Al/Si ratio in dust events increases with wind speed. These data provide an initial assessment of aerosol chemistry in the West Texas plains.

  10. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles in Beijing (China) during wintertime: a comparison of three experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Gnauk, T.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.; Min, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-09-01

    The hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols are highly relevant for the quantification of radiative effects in the atmosphere, but also of interest for the assessment of particle health effects upon inhalation. This article reports measurements of aerosol particle hygroscopicity in the highly polluted urban atmosphere of Beijing, China in January 2005. The meteorological conditions corresponded to a relatively cold and dry atmosphere. Three different methods were used: 1) A combination of Humidifying Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (H-DMPS) and Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) measurements, 2) A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA), and 3) A simplistic solubility model fed by chemical particle composition determined from Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) samples. From the H-DMPS and TDMPS particle number size distributions, a size-resolved descriptive hygroscopic growth factor (DHGF) was determined for the relative humidities (RH) 55%, 77% and 90%, and particle diameters between 30 and 400 nm. In Beijing, the highest DHGFs were observed for accumulation mode particles, 1.40 (±0.03) at 90% RH. DHGF decreased significantly with particle size, reaching 1.04 (±0.15) at 30 nm. H-TDMA data also suggest a decrease in growth factor towards the biggest particles investigated (350 nm), associated with an increasing fraction of nearly hydrophobic particles. The agreement between the H-DMPS/TDMPS and H-TDMA methods was satisfactory in the accumulation mode size range (100-400 nm). In the Aitken mode range (<100 nm), the H-DMPS/TDMPS method yielded growth factors lower by up to 0.1 at 90% RH. The application of the solubility model based on measured chemical composition clearly reproduced the size-dependent trend in hygroscopic particle growth observed by the other methods. In the case of aerosol dominated by inorganic ions, the composition-derived growth factors tended to agree (± 0.05) or underestimate (up to

  11. Baseline Maritime Aerosol: Methodology to Derive the Optical Thickness and Scattering Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Smirnov, Alexander; Holben, Brent N.; Dubovik, Oleg; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Satellite Measurements of the global distribution of aerosol and their effect on climate should be viewed in respect to a baseline aerosol. In this concept, concentration of fine mode aerosol particles is elevated above the baseline by man-made activities (smoke or urban pollution), while coarse mode by natural processes (e.g. dust or sea-spray). Using 1-3 years of measurements in 10 stations of the Aerosol Robotic network (ACRONET we develop a methodology and derive the optical thickness and properties of this baseline aerosol for the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. Defined as the median for periods of stable optical thickness (standard deviation < 0.02) during 2-6 days, the median baseline aerosol optical thickness over the Pacific Ocean is 0.052 at 500 am with Angstrom exponent of 0.77, and 0.071 and 1.1 respectively, over the Atlantic Ocean.

  12. The Retrieval of Aerosol Optical Thickness Using the MERIS Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, L.; Rozanov, V. V.; Vountas, M.; Burrows, J. P.; Levy, R. C.; Lotz, W.

    2015-12-01

    Retrieval of aerosol properties for satellite instruments without shortwave-IR spectral information, multi-viewing, polarization and/or high-temporal observation ability is a challenging problem for spaceborne aerosol remote sensing. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT) retrieval algorithm (XBAER: eXtensible Bremen AErosol Retrieval) is presented. XBAER utilizes the global surface spectral library database for the determination of surface properties while the MODIS collection 6 aerosol type treatment is adapted for the aerosol type selection. In order to take the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect into account for the MERIS reduce resolution (1km) retrieval, a modified Ross-Li mode is used. The AOT is determined in the algorithm using lookup tables including polarization created using Radiative Transfer Model SCIATRAN3.4, by minimizing the difference between atmospheric corrected surface reflectance with given AOT and the surface reflectance calculated from the spectral library. The global comparison with operational MODIS C6 product, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) product, Advanced Along-Track Scanning Radiometer (AATSR) aerosol product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results. The current XBAER algorithm is only valid for aerosol remote sensing over land and a similar method will be extended to ocean later.

  13. Aerosol optical depth retrieval using the MERIS observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Linlu; Rozanov, Vladimir; Vountas, Marco; Burrows, John P.

    2015-04-01

    Surface reflectance determination and aerosol type selection are the two main challenges for space-borne aerosol remote sensing, especially for those instruments lacking of near-infrared channels, high-temporal observations, multi-angles abilities and/or polarization information. However, space based instruments like the MEdium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS) and the successor, Ocean and Land Colour Instrument (OLCI) with high calibration accuracy and high spatial resolution provide unique abilities for obtaining valuable aerosol information for a better understanding of the impact of aerosols on climate, which is still one of the largest uncertainties of global climate change evaluation. In this study, a new Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) retrieval algorithm is presented. Global aerosol type and surface spectral dataset were used for the aerosol type selection and surface reflectance determination. A modified Ross-Li mode is used to describe the surface Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) effect. The comparison with operational MODIS C6 product and the validation using AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) show promising results.

  14. Multiangle Implementation of Atmospheric Correction (MAIAC): 2. Aerosol Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyapustin, A.; Wang, Y.; Laszlo, I.; Kahn, R.; Korkin, S.; Remer, L.; Levy, R.; Reid, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    An aerosol component of a new multiangle implementation of atmospheric correction (MAIAC) algorithm is presented. MAIAC is a generic algorithm developed for the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), which performs aerosol retrievals and atmospheric correction over both dark vegetated surfaces and bright deserts based on a time series analysis and image-based processing. The MAIAC look-up tables explicitly include surface bidirectional reflectance. The aerosol algorithm derives the spectral regression coefficient (SRC) relating surface bidirectional reflectance in the blue (0.47 micron) and shortwave infrared (2.1 micron) bands; this quantity is prescribed in the MODIS operational Dark Target algorithm based on a parameterized formula. The MAIAC aerosol products include aerosol optical thickness and a fine-mode fraction at resolution of 1 km. This high resolution, required in many applications such as air quality, brings new information about aerosol sources and, potentially, their strength. AERONET validation shows that the MAIAC and MOD04 algorithms have similar accuracy over dark and vegetated surfaces and that MAIAC generally improves accuracy over brighter surfaces due to the SRC retrieval and explicit bidirectional reflectance factor characterization, as demonstrated for several U.S. West Coast AERONET sites. Due to its generic nature and developed angular correction, MAIAC performs aerosol retrievals over bright deserts, as demonstrated for the Solar Village Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) site in Saudi Arabia.

  15. Urban aerosol effects on surface insolation and surface temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, M.; Burian, S. J.; Remer, L. A.; Shepherd, M. J.

    2007-12-01

    Urban aerosol particulates may play a fundamental role in urban microclimates and city-generated mesoscale circulations via its effects on energy balance of the surface. Key questions that need to be addressed include: (1) How do these particles affect the amount of solar energy reaching the surface and resulting surface temperature? (2) Is the effect the same in all cities? and (3) How does it vary from city to city? Using NASA AERONET in-situ observations, a radiative transfer model, and a regional climate mode (MM5), we assess aerosol effects on surface insolation and surf ace temperature for dense urban-polluted regions. Two big cities, one in a developing country (Beijing, P.R. China) and another in developed country (New York City, USA), are selected for inter-comparison. The study reveals that aerosol effects on surface temperature depends largely on aerosols' optical and chemical properties as well as atmosphere and land surface conditions, such as humidity and land cover. Therefore, the actual magnitudes of aerosol effects differ from city to city. Aerosol measurements from AERONET show both average and extreme cases for aerosol impacts on surface insolation. In general, aerosols reduce surface insolation by 30Wm-2. Nevertheless, in extreme cases, such reduction can exceed 100 Wm-2. Consequently, this reduces surface skin temperature 2-10C in an urban environment.

  16. Characterization of submicron aerosols during a serious pollution month in Beijing (2013) using an aerodyne high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, J. K.; Sun, Y.; Liu, Z. R.; Ji, D. S.; Hu, B.; Liu, Q.; Wang, Y. S.

    2013-07-01

    In January 2013, Beijing experienced several serious haze events. To achieve a better understanding of the characteristics, sources and processes of aerosols during this month, an Aerodyne High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-ToF-AMS) was deployed at an urban site between 1 January and 1 February 2013 to obtain the size-resolved chemical composition of non-refractory submicron particles (NR-PM1). During this period, the mean measured NR-PM1 mass concentration was 87.4 μg m-3 and was composed of organics (49.8%), sulfate (21.4%), nitrate (14.6%), ammonium (10.4%), and chloride (3.8%). Moreover, inorganic matter, such as sulfate and nitrate comprised an increasing fraction of the NR-PM1 load as NR-PM1 loading increased, denoting their key roles in particulate pollution during this month. The average size distributions of the species were all dominated by an accumulation mode peaking at approximately 600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter and organics characterized by an additional smaller size (∼200 nm). Elemental analyses showed that the average O/C, H/C, and N/C (molar ratio) of organic matter were 0.34, 1.44 and 0.015, respectively, corresponding to an OM/OC ratio (mass ratio of organic matter to organic carbon) of 1.60. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analyses of the high-resolution organic mass spectral dataset differentiated the organic aerosol into four components, i.e., oxygenated organic aerosols (OOA), cooking-related (COA), nitrogen-containing (NOA) and hydrocarbon-like (HOA), which on average accounted for 40.0, 23.4, 18.1 and 18.5% of the total organic mass, respectively. Back trajectory clustering analyses indicated that the WNW air masses were associated with the highest NR-PM1 pollution during the campaign. Aerosol particles in southern air masses were especially rich in inorganic and oxidized organic species, whereas northern air masses contained a large fraction of primary species.

  17. Characterization of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens

    SciTech Connect

    Chuan, R.L.; Woods, D.C.; McCormick, M.P.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements of mass concentration and size distribution of aerosols from eruptions of Mount St. Helens as well as morphological and elemental analyses were obtained between 7 April and 7 August 1980. In situ measurements were made in early phreatic and later, minor phreatomagmatic eruption clouds near the vent of the volcano and in plumes injected into the stratosphere from the major eruptions of 18 and 25 May. The phreatic aerosol was characterized by an essentially monomodal size distribution dominated by silicate particles larger than 10 micrometers in diameter. The phreatomagmatic eruption cloud was multimodal; the large size mode consisted of silicate particles and the small size modes were made up of mixtures of sulfuric acid and silicate particles. The stratospheric aerosol from the main eruption exhibited a characteristic narrow single mode with particles less than 1 micrometer in diameter and nearly all of the mass made up of sulfuric acid droplets.

  18. HOUSTON AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    An intensive field study of ambient aerosols was conducted in Houston between September 14 and October 14, 1978. Measurements at 12 sites were made using (1) two relocatable monitoring systems instrumented for aerosol and gaseous pollutants, (2) a network of high volume samplers ...

  19. Global Aerosol Observations

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-19

    ... atmosphere, directly influencing global climate and human health. Ground-based networks that accurately measure column aerosol amount and ... being used to improve Air Quality Models and for regional health studies. To assess the human-health impact of chronic aerosol exposure, ...

  20. Direct Aerosol Forcing Uncertainty

    DOE Data Explorer

    Mccomiskey, Allison

    2008-01-15

    Understanding sources of uncertainty in aerosol direct radiative forcing (DRF), the difference in a given radiative flux component with and without aerosol, is essential to quantifying changes in Earth's radiation budget. We examine the uncertainty in DRF due to measurement uncertainty in the quantities on which it depends: aerosol optical depth, single scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, solar geometry, and surface albedo. Direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere and at the surface as well as sensitivities, the changes in DRF in response to unit changes in individual aerosol or surface properties, are calculated at three locations representing distinct aerosol types and radiative environments. The uncertainty in DRF associated with a given property is computed as the product of the sensitivity and typical measurement uncertainty in the respective aerosol or surface property. Sensitivity and uncertainty values permit estimation of total uncertainty in calculated DRF and identification of properties that most limit accuracy in estimating forcing. Total uncertainties in modeled local diurnally averaged forcing range from 0.2 to 1.3 W m-2 (42 to 20%) depending on location (from tropical to polar sites), solar zenith angle, surface reflectance, aerosol type, and aerosol optical depth. The largest contributor to total uncertainty in DRF is usually single scattering albedo; however decreasing measurement uncertainties for any property would increase accuracy in DRF. Comparison of two radiative transfer models suggests the contribution of modeling error is small compared to the total uncertainty although comparable to uncertainty arising from some individual properties.

  1. Portable Aerosol Contaminant Extractor

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Duane C.; DeGange, John J.; Cable-Dunlap, Paula

    2005-11-15

    A compact, portable, aerosol contaminant extractor having ionization and collection sections through which ambient air may be drawn at a nominal rate so that aerosol particles ionized in the ionization section may be collected on charged plate in the collection section, the charged plate being readily removed for analyses of the particles collected thereon.

  2. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  3. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics, including their significance, from eight flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number that influence droplet concentration. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were smaller in regions of enhanced particles near shore. However, physically thinner clouds, and not just higher droplet number concentrations from pollution, both contributed to the smaller droplets. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually slightly lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths

  4. Fast carry accumulator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Simple iterative accumulator combined with gated-carry, carry-completion detection, and skip-carry circuits produces three accumulators with decreased carry propagation times. Devices are used in machine control, measurement equipment, and computer applications to increase speed of binary addition. NAND gates are used in combining network.

  5. Radiative Effects of Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valero, Francisco P. J.

    1996-01-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, two descents in cloud-free regions allowed comparison of the change in aerosol optical depth as determined by an onboard total-direct-diffuse radiometer (TDDR) to the change calculated from measured size-resolved aerosol microphysics and chemistry. Both profiles included a pollution haze from Europe but the second also included the effect of a Saharan dust layer above the haze. The separate contributions of supermicrometer (coarse) and submicrometer (fine) aerosol were determined and thermal analysis of the pollution haze indicated that the fine aerosol was composed primarily of a sulfate/water mixture with a refractory soot-like core. The soot core increased the calculated extinction by about 10% in the most polluted drier layer relative to a pure sulfate aerosol but had significantly less effect at higher humidities. A 3 km descent through a boundary layer air mass dominated by pollutant aerosol with relative humidities (RH) 10-77% yielded a close agreement between the measured and calculated aerosol optical depths (550 nm) of 0.160 (+/- 0.07) and 0. 157 (+/- 0.034) respectively. During descent the aerosol mass scattering coefficient per unit sulfate mass varied from about 5 to 16 m(exp 2)/g and primarily dependent upon ambient RH. However, the total scattering coefficient per total fine mass was far less variable at about 4+/- 0.7 m(exp 2)/g. A subsequent descent through a Saharan dust layer located above the pollution aerosol layer revealed that both layers contributed similarly to aerosol optical depth. The scattering per unit mass of the coarse aged dust was estimated at 1.1 +/- 0.2 m(exp 2)/g. The large difference (50%) in measured and calculated optical depth for the dust layer exceeded measurements.

  6. Atmospheric lifetime of caesium-137 as an estimate of aerosol lifetime -quantified from global measurements in the months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear accident

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iren Kristiansen, Nina; Stohl, Andreas; Wotawa, Gerhard

    2013-04-01

    Radionuclides like caesium-137 (137Cs) can be emitted to the atmosphere in great quantities during nuclear accidents and are of significant health impact. A global set of radionuclide measurements collected over several months after the accidental release from the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in March 2011 has been used to estimate the atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs. Lifetime is here defined as the e-folding time scale (the time interval in which the exponential decay of the 137Cs quantity has decreased by factor of e). The estimated atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs can also be used as an estimate of the lifetime of aerosols in the atmosphere. This is based on the fact that 137Cs attaches to the ambient accumulation-mode (AM) aerosols and trace their fate in the atmosphere. The 137Cs "tags" the AM aerosols and both the 137Cs and AM aerosols are removed simultaneously from the atmosphere by scavenging within clouds, precipitation and dry deposition. The 137Cs emitted from Fukushima attached mainly to sulphate aerosols in the size range 0.1-2 μm diameter. Measured 137Cs activity concentrations from several stations spread mostly over the Northern Hemisphere were evaluated, and the decrease in activity concentrations over time (after correction for radioactive decay) reflects the removal of aerosols by wet and dry deposition. Corrections for air mass transport were made using measurements of the noble gas xenon-133 (133Xe) which was also released during the accident. This noble gas does not attach to the aerosols and was thus used as a passive tracer of air mass transport. The atmospheric lifetime of 137Cs was estimated to 10.0-13.9 days during April and May 2011. This represents the atmospheric lifetime of a "background" AM aerosol well mixed in the extratropical northern hemisphere troposphere. It is expected that the lifetime of this vertically mixed background aerosol is longer than the lifetime of fresh AM aerosols directly emitted from surface sources

  7. Modelling Aerosol Dispersion in Urban Street Canyons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, B. K.; Jones, D. P.; Gallagher, M. W.; McFiggans, G. B.; Watkins, A. P.

    2009-04-01

    Flow patterns within an urban street canyon are influenced by various micrometeorological factors. It also represents an environment where pollutants such as aerosols accumulate to high levels due to high volumes of traffic. As adverse health effects are being attributed to exposure to aerosols, an investigation of the dispersion of aerosols within such environments is of growing importance. In particular, one is concerned with the vertical structure of the aerosol concentration, the ventilation characteristics of the street canyon and the influence of aerosol microphysical processes. Due to the inherent heterogeneity of the aerosol concentrations within the street canyon and the lack of spatial resolution of measurement campaigns, these issues are an on-going debate. Therefore, a modelling tool is required to represent aerosol dispersion patterns to provide insights to results of past measurement campaigns. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models are able to predict detailed airflow patterns within urban geometries. This capability may be further extended to include aerosol dispersion, by an Euler-Euler multiphase approach. To facilitate the investigation, a two-dimensional, multiphase CFD tool coupled with the k-epsilon turbulence model and with the capability of modelling mixed convection flow regimes arising from both wind driven flows and buoyancy effects from heated walls was developed. Assuming wind blowing perpendicularly to the canyon axis and treating aerosols as a passive scalar, an attempt will be made to assess the sensitivities of aerosol vertical structure and ventilation characteristics to the various flow conditions. Numerical studies were performed using an idealized 10m by 10m canyon to represent a regular canyon and 10m by 5m to represent a deep one. An aerosol emission source was assigned on the centerline of the canyon to represent exhaust emissions. The vertical structure of the aerosols would inform future directives regarding the

  8. MODELING THE FORMATION OF SECONDARY ORGANIC AEROSOL WITHIN A COMPREHENSIVE AIR QUALITY MODEL SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    The aerosol component of the CMAQ model is designed to be an efficient and economical depiction of aerosol dynamics in the atmosphere. The approach taken represents the particle size distribution as the superposition of three lognormal subdistributions, called modes. The proces...

  9. Chemical composition and sources of coastal marine aerosol particles during the 2008 VOCALS-REx campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Y. -N.; Springston, S.; Jayne, J.; Wang, J.; Hubbe, J.; Senum, G.; Kleinman, L.; Daum, P. H.

    2014-01-01

    The chemical composition of aerosol particles (Dp ≤ 1.5 μm) was measured over the southeast Pacific Ocean during the VAMOS (Variability of the American Monsoon Systems) Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study Regional Experiment (VOCALS-Rex) between 16 October and 15 November 2008 using the US Department of Energy (DOE) G-1 aircraft. The objective of these flights was to gain an understanding of the sources and evolution of these aerosols, and of how they interact with the marine stratus cloud layer that prevails in this region of the globe. Our measurements showed that the marine boundary layer (MBL) aerosol mass was dominated by non-sea-salt SO42−, followed by Na+, Cl, Org (total organics), NH4+, and NO3, in decreasing order of importance; CH3SO3 (MSA), Ca2+, and K+ rarely exceeded their limits of detection. Aerosols were strongly acidic with a NH4+ to SO42− equivalents ratio typically < 0.3. Sea-salt aerosol (SSA) particles, represented by NaCl, exhibited Cl deficits caused by both HNO3 and H2SO4, but for the most part were externally mixed with particles, mainly SO42−. SSA contributed only a small fraction of the total accumulation mode particle number concentration. It was inferred that all aerosol species (except SSA) were of predominantly continental origin because of their strong land-to-sea concentration gradient. Comparison of relative changes in median values suggests that (1) an oceanic source of NH3 is present between 72° W and 76° W, (2) additional organic aerosols from biomass burns or biogenic precursors were emitted from coastal regions south of 31° S, with possible cloud processing, and (3) free tropospheric (FT) contributions to MBL gas and aerosol

  10. Retrieval of aerosol parameters from multiwavelength lidar: investigation of the underlying inverse mathematical problem.

    PubMed

    Chemyakin, Eduard; Burton, Sharon; Kolgotin, Alexei; Müller, Detlef; Hostetler, Chris; Ferrare, Richard

    2016-03-20

    We present an investigation of some important mathematical and numerical features related to the retrieval of microphysical parameters [complex refractive index, single-scattering albedo, effective radius, total number, surface area, and volume concentrations] of ambient aerosol particles using multiwavelength Raman or high-spectral-resolution lidar. Using simple examples, we prove the non-uniqueness of an inverse solution to be the major source of the retrieval difficulties. Some theoretically possible ways of partially compensating for these difficulties are offered. For instance, an increase in the variety of input data via combination of lidar and certain passive remote sensing instruments will be helpful to reduce the error of estimation of the complex refractive index. We also demonstrate a significant interference between Aitken and accumulation aerosol modes in our inversion algorithm, and confirm that the solutions can be better constrained by limiting the particle radii. Applying a combination of an analytical approach and numerical simulations, we explain the statistical behavior of the microphysical size parameters. We reveal and clarify why the total surface area concentration is consistent even in the presence of non-unique solution sets and is on average the most stable parameter to be estimated, as long as at least one extinction optical coefficient is employed. We find that for selected particle size distributions, the total surface area and volume concentrations can be quickly retrieved with fair precision using only single extinction coefficients in a simple arithmetical relationship. PMID:27140552

  11. Characteristics of black carbon aerosol from a surface oil burn during the Deepwater Horizon oil spill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Spackman, J. R.; Bahreini, R.; de Gouw, J. A.; Gao, R. S.; Holloway, J. S.; Lack, D. A.; Langridge, J. M.; Peischl, J.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Ryerson, T. B.; Warneke, C.; Watts, L. A.; Fahey, D. W.

    2011-09-01

    Black carbon (BC) aerosol mass mixing ratio and microphysical properties were measured from the NOAA P-3 aircraft during active surface oil burning subsequent to the Deepwater Horizon oil rig explosion in April 2010. Approximately 4% of the combusted material was released into the atmosphere as BC. The total amount of BC introduced to the atmosphere of the Gulf of Mexico via surface burning of oil during the 9-week spill is estimated to be (1.35 ± 0.72) × 106 kg. The median mass diameter of BC particles observed in the burning plume was much larger than that of the non-plume Gulf background air and previously sampled from a variety of sources. The plume BC particles were internally mixed with very little non-refractory material, a feature typical of fresh emissions from fairly efficient fossil-fuel burning sources and atypical of BC in biomass burning plumes. BC dominated the total accumulation-mode aerosol in both mass and number. The BC mass-specific extinction cross-section was 10.2 ± 4.1 and 7.1 ± 2.8 m2/g at 405 and 532 nm respectively. These results help constrain the properties of BC emissions associated with DWH and other large spills.

  12. Observations of the Interaction and/or Transport of Aerosols with Cloud or Fog during DRAGON Campaigns from AERONET Ground-Based Remote Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eck, Thomas; Holben, Brent; Schafer, Joel; Giles, David; Kim, Jhoon; Kim, Young; Sano, Itaru; Reid, Jeffrey; Pickering, Kenneth; Crawford, James; Sinyuk, Alexander; Trevino, Nathan

    2014-05-01

    Ground-based remote sensing observations from Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sun-sky radiometers have recently shown several instances where cloud-aerosol interaction had resulted in modification of aerosol properties and/or in difficulty identifying some major pollution transport events due to aerosols being imbedded in cloud systems. AERONET has established Distributed Regional Aerosol Gridded Observation Networks (DRAGON) during field campaigns that are short-term (~2-3 months) relatively dense spatial networks of ~15 to 45 sun and sky scanning photometers. Recent major DRAGON field campaigns in Japan and South Korea (Spring 2012) and California (Winter 2013) have yielded observations of aerosol transport associated with clouds and/or aerosol properties modification as a result of fog interaction. Analysis of data from the Korean and Japan DRAGON campaigns shows that major fine-mode aerosol transport events are sometimes associated with extensive cloud cover and that cloud-screening of observations often filter out significant pollution aerosol transport events. The Spectral De-convolution Algorithm (SDA) algorithm was utilized to isolate and analyze the fine-mode aerosol optical depth signal for these cases of persistent and extensive cloud cover. Additionally, extensive fog that was coincident with aerosol layer height on some days in both Korea and California resulted in large increases in fine mode aerosol radius, with a mode of cloud-processed or residual aerosol of radius ~0.4-0.5 micron sometimes observed. Cloud processed aerosol may occur much more frequently than AERONET data suggest due to inherent difficulty in observing aerosol properties near clouds from remote sensing observations. These biases of aerosols associated with clouds would likely be even greater for satellite remote sensing retrievals of aerosol properties near clouds due to 3-D effects and sub-pixel cloud contamination issues.

  13. Systematic Relationships among Background SE U.S. Aerosol Optical, Micro-physical, and Chemical Properties-Development of an Optically-based Aerosol Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, J. P.; Link, M. F.; Zhou, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Remote sensing-based retrievals of aerosol composition require known or assumed relationships between aerosol optical properties and types. Most optically-based aerosol classification schemes apply some combination of the spectral dependence of aerosol light scattering and absorption-using the absorption and either scattering or extinction Angstrom exponents (AAE, SAE and EAE), along with single-scattering albedo (SSA). These schemes can differentiate between such aerosol types as dust, biomass burning, and urban/industrial but no such studies have been conducted in the SE U.S., where a large fraction of the background aerosol is a variable mixture of biogenic SOA, sulfates, and black carbon. In addition, AERONET retrievals of SSA are often highly uncertain due to low AOD in the region during most months. The high-elevation, semi-rural AppalAIR facility at Appalachian State University in Boone, NC (1090m ASL, 36.210N, 81.690W) is home to the only co-located NOAA-ESRL and AERONET monitoring sites in the eastern U.S. Aerosol chemistry measured at AppalAIR is representative of the background SE U.S (Link et al. 2014) Dried aerosol light absorption and dried and humidified aerosol light scattering and hemispheric backscattering at 3 visible wavelengths and 2 particle size cuts (sub-1μm and sub-10μm) are measured continuously. Measurements of size-resolved, non-refractory sub-1μm aerosol composition were made by a co-located AMS during the 2012-2013 summers and 2013 winter. Systematic relationships among aerosol optical, microphysical, and chemical properties were developed to better understand aerosol sources and processes and for use in higher-dimension aerosol classification schemes. The hygroscopic dependence of visible light scattering is sensitive to the ratio of sulfate to organic aerosol(OA), as are SSA and AAE. SAE is a less sensitive indicator of fine-mode aerosol size than hemispheric backscatter fraction (b) and is more sensitive to fine-mode aerosol

  14. Multi-modal analysis of aerosol robotic network size distributions for remote sensing applications: dominant aerosol type cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2014-03-01

    To date, size distributions obtained from the aerosol robotic network (AERONET) have been fit with bi-lognormals defined by six secondary microphysical parameters: the volume concentration, effective radius, and the variance of fine and coarse particle modes. However, since the total integrated volume concentration is easily calculated and can be used as an accurate constraint, the problem of fitting the size distribution can be reduced to that of deducing a single free parameter - the mode separation point. We present a method for determining the mode separation point for equivalent-volume bi-lognormal distributions based on optimization of the root mean squared error and the coefficient of determination. The extracted secondary parameters are compared with those provided by AERONET's Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion algorithm for a set of benchmark dominant aerosol types, including desert dust, biomass burning aerosol, urban sulphate and sea salt. The total volume concentration constraint is then also lifted by performing multi-modal fits to the size distribution using nested Gaussian mixture models, and a method is presented for automating the selection of the optimal number of modes using a stopping condition based on Fisher statistics and via the application of statistical hypothesis testing. It is found that the method for optimizing the location of the mode separation point is independent of the shape of the aerosol volume size distribution (AVSD), does not require the existence of a local minimum in the size interval 0.439 μm ≤ r ≤ 0.992 μm, and shows some potential for optimizing the bi-lognormal fitting procedure used by AERONET particularly in the case of desert dust aerosol. The AVSD of impure marine aerosol is found to require three modes. In this particular case, bi-lognormals fail to recover key features of the AVSD. Fitting the AVSD more generally with multi-modal models allows automatic detection of a statistically significant number of aerosol

  15. Sugars in Antarctic aerosol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbaro, Elena; Kirchgeorg, Torben; Zangrando, Roberta; Vecchiato, Marco; Piazza, Rossano; Barbante, Carlo; Gambaro, Andrea

    2015-10-01

    The processes and transformations occurring in the Antarctic aerosol during atmospheric transport were described using selected sugars as source tracers. Monosaccharides (arabinose, fructose, galactose, glucose, mannose, ribose, xylose), disaccharides (sucrose, lactose, maltose, lactulose), alcohol-sugars (erythritol, mannitol, ribitol, sorbitol, xylitol, maltitol, galactitol) and anhydrosugars (levoglucosan, mannosan and galactosan) were measured in the Antarctic aerosol collected during four different sampling campaigns. For quantification, a sensitive high-pressure anion exchange chromatography was coupled with a single quadrupole mass spectrometer. The method was validated, showing good accuracy and low method quantification limits. This study describes the first determination of sugars in the Antarctic aerosol. The total mean concentration of sugars in the aerosol collected at the "Mario Zucchelli" coastal station was 140 pg m-3; as for the aerosol collected over the Antarctic plateau during two consecutive sampling campaigns, the concentration amounted to 440 and 438 pg m-3. The study of particle-size distribution allowed us to identify the natural emission from spores or from sea-spray as the main sources of sugars in the coastal area. The enrichment of sugars in the fine fraction of the aerosol collected on the Antarctic plateau is due to the degradation of particles during long-range atmospheric transport. The composition of sugars in the coarse fraction was also investigated in the aerosol collected during the oceanographic cruise.

  16. Spatial Variability of AERONET Aerosol Optical Properties and Satellite Data in South Korea during NASA DRAGON-Asia Campaign.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyung Joo; Son, Youn-Suk

    2016-04-01

    We investigated spatial variability in aerosol optical properties, including aerosol optical depth (AOD), fine-mode fraction (FMF), and single scattering albedo (SSA), observed at 21 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and satellite remote sensing data in South Korea during the spring of 2012. These dense AERONET networks established in a National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) field campaign enabled us to examine the spatially detailed aerosol size distribution and composition as well as aerosol levels. The springtime particle air quality was characterized by high background aerosol levels and high contributions of coarse-mode aerosols to total aerosols. We found that between-site correlations and coefficient of divergence for AOD and FMF strongly relied on the distance between sites, particularly in the south-north direction. Higher AOD was related to higher population density and lower distance from highways, and the aerosol size distribution and composition reflected source-specific characteristics. The ratios of satellite NO2 to AOD, which indicate the relative contributions of local combustion sources to aerosol levels, represented higher local contributions in metropolitan Seoul and Pusan. Our study demonstrates that the aerosol levels were determined by both local and regional pollution and that the relative contributions of these pollutions to aerosols generated spatial heterogeneity in the particle air quality. PMID:26953969

  17. Comparison of Aerosol Classification Results from Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Measurements and the Calipso Vertical Feature Mask

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, S. P.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.; Hair, J. W.; Rogers, R. R.; Obland, M. D.; Butler, C. F.; Cook, A. L.; Harper, D. B.; Froyd, K. D.; Omar, A.

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the vertical profile, composition, concentration, and size of aerosols is required for assessing the direct impact of aerosols on radiation, the indirect effects of aerosols on clouds and precipitation, and attributing these effects to natural and anthropogenic aerosols. Because anthropogenic aerosols are predominantly submicrometer, fine mode fraction (FMF) retrievals from satellite have been used as a tool for deriving anthropogenic aerosols. Although column and profile satellite retrievals of FMF have been performed over the ocean, such retrievals have not yet been been done over land. Consequently, uncertainty in satellite estimates of the anthropogenic component of the aerosol direct radiative forcing is greatest over land, due in large part to uncertainties in the FMF. Satellite measurements have been used to detect and evaluate aerosol impacts on clouds; however, such efforts have been hampered by the difficulty in retrieving vertically-resolved cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) concentration, which is the most direct parameter linking aerosol and clouds. Recent studies have shown correlations between average satellite derived column aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and in situ measured CCN. However, these same studies, as well as others that use detailed airborne in situ measurements have noted that vertical variability of the aerosol distribution, impacts of relative humidity, and the presence of coarse mode aerosols such as dust introduce large uncertainties in such relations.

  18. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles in Beijing (China) during wintertime: a comparison of three experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Gnauk, T.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.; Min, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-03-01

    This paper presents hygroscopicity measurements of aerosol particles in the urban atmosphere of Beijing carried out in January 2005. Therefore, three different methods were used: 1) Combining Humidifying Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (H-DMPS) and Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) measurements; 2) Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA) technique; 3) Calculating hygroscopic growth factors on the basis of a solubility model quantified by Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) samples. Particle number size distributions from H-DMPS and TDMPS were evaluated to derive size-resolved descriptive hygroscopic growth factors (DHGF) of 30-400 nm particles at relative humidities (RH) of 55%, 77% and 90%. The atmospheric particles in Beijing were rather hydrophobic, with a maximum growth factor in the accumulation mode around 1.40 (±0.03) at 90% RH. The descriptive hygroscopic growth factors decreased significantly towards the lower measurement limit (1.04 (±0.15) at Dp=30 nm). A good agreement was found between the DHGFs and the H-TDMA-derived hygroscopic growth factors in the accumulation mode (100-400 nm), the DHGFs underestimated the values from the H-TDMA in the Aitken mode (<100 nm) by up to 0.1 at 90% RH. The calculation of hygroscopic growth factors based on the measured chemical composition showed that different modes of combining the inorganic ions caused a variation in growth factor of 0.1 at 90% RH. The solubility model was able to reproduce the size-dependent trend in the growth factor found by the other methods. In two cases of ion-dominated aerosol, the composition-derived growth factors tended to agree (±0.05) or underestimate (up to 0.1) the values measured by the other two methods. In the case of the organic-dominated aerosol, the reverse was true, with an overestimation of up to 0.2. The results shed light on the real experimental and methodological uncertainties that are still connected with the

  19. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  20. Profiling Transboundary Aerosols over Taiwan and Assessing Their Radiative Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Sheng-Hsiang; Lin, Neng-Huei; Chou, Ming-Dah; Tsay, Si-Chee; Welton, Ellsworth J.; Hsu, N. Christina; Giles, David M.; Liu, Gin-Rong; Holben, Brent N.

    2010-01-01

    A synergistic process was developed to study the vertical distributions of aerosol optical properties and their effects on solar heating using data retrieved from ground-based radiation measurements and radiative transfer simulations. Continuous MPLNET and AERONET observations were made at a rural site in northern Taiwan from 2005 to 2007. The aerosol vertical extinction profiles retrieved from ground-based lidar measurements were categorized into near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, representing 76% of all cases. Fine-mode (Angstrom exponent, alpha, approx.1.4) and moderate-absorbing aerosols (columnar single-scattering albedo approx.0.93, asymmetry factor approx.0.73 at 440 nm wavelength) dominated in this region. The column-integrated aerosol optical thickness at 500 nm (tau(sub 500nm)) ranges from 0.1 to 0.6 for the near-surface transport type, but can be doubled in the presence of upper-layer aerosol transport. We utilize aerosol radiative efficiency (ARE; the impact on solar radiation per unit change of tau(sub 500nm)) to quantify the radiative effects due to different vertical distributions of aerosols. Our results show that the ARE at the top-of-atmosphere (-23 W/ sq m) is weakly sensitive to aerosol vertical distributions confined in the lower troposphere. On the other hand, values of the ARE at the surface are -44.3, -40.6 and -39.7 W/sq m 38 for near-surface, mixed, and two-layer transport types, respectively. Further analyses show that the impact of aerosols on the vertical profile of solar heating is larger for the near-surface transport type than that of two-layer transport type. The impacts of aerosol on the surface radiation and the solar heating profiles have implications for the stability and convection in the lower troposphere.

  1. Aerosol Measurements from Current and Future EUMETSAT Satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Ruediger; Munro, Rosemary; Kokhanovsky, Alexander; Grzegorski, Michael; Poli, Gabriele; Holdak, Andriy; Retscher, Christian; Marbach, Thierry

    2014-05-01

    EUMETSAT supports the operational monitoring and forecasting of atmospheric composition including various aerosol optical properties through specific products from its geostationary and polar-orbiting satellites. Meteosat imagery is used to characterise aerosols in the atmosphere, including volcanic ash and dust storms at high temporal resolution, while the GOME-2, AVHRR and IASI and instruments on Metop observe aerosol optical properties from the UV/vis to the infra-red spectral region from a polar morning orbit. The role of EUMETSAT in observing aerosol optical properties will expand further towards the 2020 timeframe when EUMETSAT also becomes the operator of the Copernicus Sentinel-3, 4 and 5 missions. This expanding role will be realised through additional atmospheric composition sounding instruments such as the UVN/Sentinel-4 on the Meteosat Third Generation (MTG) geostationary platforms and the 3MI, METimage, and Sentinel-5 instruments on the EPS Second Generation (EPS-SG) satellites. The synergistic use of imager, spectrometer and interferometer data will, with the availability of this new generation of instrumentation and with the need for measuring aerosol optical properties at short-time scales, high spatial resolution and over a broad spectra region, play and increasingly important role in the field of aerosol remote sensing. With its new Polar Multi-mission Aerosol optical properties (PMAp) product, providing aerosol and cloud optical depth information, as well as fine mode, dust and volcanic ash characterisation over ocean and in the future also over land, EUMETSAT has recently been implementing the first framework for such synergistic retrievals for the remote sensing of aerosol optical properties from GOME-2, AVHRR and IASI instruments on Metop. We will present an overview of the ongoing and the future developments at EUMETSAT concerning aerosol remote sensing from Metop as well as from the current MSG geostationary platforms and from the future

  2. Effects of Aerosol PSD on Precipitation in Puerto Rico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bracho, S. M.; Hosannah, N.

    2013-12-01

    The influence of aerosols on clouds and on the climate remains an uncertainty, however, it is of great importance to determine their effects on the formation of clouds and on precipitation. The objective is to study the effects of aerosol particle concentrations on precipitation. The is goal is, by using the aerosols particle size distribution (PSD) data from the Island of Puerto Rico (PR) located in the Caribbean, to better predict precipitation in PR and other Caribbean regions that are heavily exposed to naturally occurring maritime and continental aerosols (ex. Sea Salt, Saharan Dust). The aerosol PSD, and precipitation data values for the study was collected, respectively, from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) and the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). The data from three sites, Mayaguez (Western Region), La Parguera (Southwestern Region) and San Juan (Northeastern Region), was analyzed to determine and formulate seasonal and intra-seasonal relationships. PSD's were analyzed for fine and coarse mode size distributions and seasonal concentrations. Correlations between these variables with precipitation climatologies were identified. Correlations of concentrations of fine/course modes with suppression/enhancement of Caribbean precipitation in early rainfall, mid-summer droughts and rainfall seasons are formulated and hypotheses are established to comprehend these effects. Episodic and mean events are analyzed to justify these observations.

  3. Airborne investigation of the aerosols-cloud interactions in the vicinity and within a marine stratocumulus over the North Sea during EUCAARI (2008)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crumeyrolle, S.; Weigel, R.; Sellegri, K.; Roberts, G.; Gomes, L.; Stohl, A.; Laj, P.; Momboisse, G.; Bourianne, T.; Puygrenier, V.; Burnet, F.; Chosson, F.; Brenguier, J. L.; Etcheberry, J. M.; Villani, P.; Pichon, J. M.; Schwarzenboeck, A.

    2013-12-01

    Within the European Aerosol Cloud Climate and Air Quality Interactions (EUCAARI) project, the Meteo France research aircraft ATR-42 was operated from Rotterdam (Netherlands) airport during May 2008, to perform scientific flights dedicated to the investigation of aerosol-cloud interactions. The objective of this study is to illustrate the impact of cloud processing on the aerosol particle physical and chemical properties. The presented results are retrieved from measurements during flight operation with two consecutive flights, first from Rotterdam to Newcastle (United Kingdom) and subsequently reverse along the same waypoints back to Rotterdam using data measured with compact Time of Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (cToF-AMS) and Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS). Cloud-related measurements during these flights were performed over the North Sea within as well as in close vicinity of a marine stratocumulus cloud layer. Particle physical and chemical properties observed in the close vicinity, below and above the stratocumulus cloud, show strong differences: (1) the averaged aerosol size distributions, observed above and below the cloud layer, are of bimodal character with pronounced minima between Aitken and accumulation mode, very likely due to cloud processing. (2) the chemical composition of aerosol particles is strongly dependent on the position relative to the cloud layer (vicinity or below/above cloud). In general, the nitrate and organic relative mass fractions decrease with decreasing distance to the cloud, in the transit from cloud-free conditions towards the cloud boundaries. This relative mass fraction decrease ranges from a factor of three to ten, thus leading to an increase of the sulfate and ammonium relative mass concentrations while approaching the cloud layer. (3), the chemical composition of cloud droplet residuals, analyzed downstream of a Counterflow virtual Impactor (CVI) inlet indicates increased fractions of mainly soluble chemical

  4. The impact of U.S. continental outflow on ozone and aerosol distributions over the western Atlantic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, B. E.; Gregory, G. L.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Collins, J. E., Jr.; Sachse, G. W.; Bagwell, D.; Shipham, M. C.; Bradshaw, J. D.; Sandholm, S. T.

    1993-01-01

    Aircraft measurements of selected trace gas species, aerosols, and meteorological parameters were performed in the lower troposphere off the U.S. east coast during August and September 1989 as part of the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) Chemical Instrumentation Test and Evaluation (CITE 3) expedition. In this paper, we examine these data to assess the impact of continental outflow on western Atlantic O3 and small aerosol budgets. Results show that mixed layer (ML) O3 concentrations and small aerosol number densities (Np) were enhanced by factors of 3 and 6, respectively, within air masses of predominantly continental origin compared with clean maritime background air. These enhancements exhibited a marked altitude dependence, declining rapidly above the ML to the point where only slight to moderate differences in O3 and Np, respectively, were notable above 2.4 km. Within continentally influenced ML's, both O3 and Np were correlated with CO, exhibiting linear regression slopes averaging 0.4 ppbv (O3)/ppbv(CO) for O3 and 7.7 (particles/cc)/ppbv(CO) for Np and indicating a primarily anthropogenic origin for the observed enhancement of these species. Comparisons between profiles in continental and background maritime air masses suggest that photochemical production below 1.4-km altitude adds over 10% to western Atlantic tropospheric column O3 abundance in continental outflow regimes. For aerosols, eastward advection of low-level continental air contributes an average net flux of 2.8 metric tons of submicron (accumulation mode) particles per kilometer of shoreline per day to the western Atlantic troposphere.

  5. On the concentration and size distribution of sub-micron aerosol in the Galápagos Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorribas, M.; Gómez Martín, J. C.; Hay, T. D.; Mahajan, A. S.; Cuevas, C. A.; Agama Reyes, M. V.; Paredes Mora, F.; Gil-Ojeda, M.; Saiz-Lopez, A.

    2015-12-01

    During the CHARLEX campaign in the Galápagos Islands, a Scanning Particle Mobility Sizer was deployed on San Cristobal Island in July-August 2011 to carry out size-resolved measurements of the concentration of submicron aerosols. To our knowledge these are the first measurements of aerosol concentrations in this unique environment. The particles with marine origin displayed a tri-modal number size distribution with peak diameters of 0.016 μm, 0.050 μm and 0.174 μm and a cloud-processed intermodal minimum at 0.093 μm. The mean total aerosol number concentration for the marine contribution was 470 ± 160 cm-3. A low particle concentration of 70 ± 50 cm-3 for the nucleation size range was measured, but no evidence of new particle production in the atmospheric marine boundary layer (MBL) was observed. The concentration of the Aitken size mode was found to be related to aerosol entrainment from the free troposphere off the coast of Chile followed by transport within the MBL to the Galápagos Islands. Cloud processing may activate the particles in the Aitken size range, growing through 'in-cloud' sulphate production and increasing the particle concentration in the accumulation size range. The 0.093 μm cloud processed minima suggests that the critical supersaturation at which the particle is activated to a cloud droplet is in the 0.14-0.21% range. The daytime marine particle background concentration was influenced by human activity around the sampling site, as well as by new particle formation triggered by biogenic emissions from the vegetation cover of the island's semiarid lowlands. Effective CCN formation may play a role in the formation and properties of the stratus clouds, which permanently cover the top of the windward side of the islands and establish one of their characteristic climatic bands.

  6. Aged boreal biomass-burning aerosol size distributions from BORTAS 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, K. M.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Taylor, J. W.; Duck, T. J.; Pierce, J. R.

    2015-02-01

    Biomass-burning aerosols contribute to aerosol radiative forcing on the climate system. The magnitude of this effect is partially determined by aerosol size distributions, which are functions of source fire characteristics (e.g. fuel type, MCE) and in-plume microphysical processing. The uncertainties in biomass-burning emission number-size distributions in climate model inventories lead to uncertainties in the CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) concentrations and forcing estimates derived from these models. The BORTAS-B (Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellite) measurement campaign was designed to sample boreal biomass-burning outflow over eastern Canada in the summer of 2011. Using these BORTAS-B data, we implement plume criteria to isolate the characteristic size distribution of aged biomass-burning emissions (aged ~ 1-2 days) from boreal wildfires in northwestern Ontario. The composite median size distribution yields a single dominant accumulation mode with Dpm = 230 nm (number-median diameter) and σ = 1.5, which are comparable to literature values of other aged plumes of a similar type. The organic aerosol enhancement ratios (ΔOA / ΔCO) along the path of Flight b622 show values of 0.09-0.17 μg m-3 ppbv-1 (parts per billion by volume) with no significant trend with distance from the source. This lack of enhancement ratio increase/decrease with distance suggests no detectable net OA (organic aerosol) production/evaporation within the aged plume over the sampling period (plume age: 1-2 days), though it does not preclude OA production/loss at earlier stages. A Lagrangian microphysical model was used to determine an estimate of the freshly emitted size distribution corresponding to the BORTAS-B aged size distributions. The model was restricted to coagulation and dilution processes based on the insignificant net OA production/evaporation derived from the ΔOA / ΔCO enhancement ratios. We

  7. Evolution of ozone, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston using a fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fast, Jerome D.; Gustafson, William I.; Easter, Richard C.; Zaveri, Rahul A.; Barnard, James C.; Chapman, Elaine G.; Grell, Georg A.; Peckham, Steven E.

    2006-11-01

    A new fully coupled meteorology-chemistry-aerosol model is used to simulate the urban- to regional-scale variations in trace gases, particulates, and aerosol direct radiative forcing in the vicinity of Houston over a 5 day summer period. Model performance is evaluated using a wide range of meteorological, chemistry, and particulate measurements obtained during the 2000 Texas Air Quality Study. The predicted trace gas and particulate distributions were qualitatively similar to the surface and aircraft measurements with considerable spatial variations resulting from urban, power plant, and industrial sources of primary pollutants. Sulfate, organic carbon, and other inorganics were the largest constituents of the predicted particulates. The predicted shortwave radiation was 30 to 40 W m-2 closer to the observations when the aerosol optical properties were incorporated into the shortwave radiation scheme; however, the predicted hourly aerosol radiative forcing was still underestimated by 10 to 50 W m-2. The predicted aerosol radiative forcing was larger over Houston and the industrial ship channel than over the rural areas, consistent with surface measurements. The differences between the observed and simulated aerosol radiative forcing resulted from transport errors, relative humidity errors in the upper convective boundary layer that affect aerosol water content, secondary organic aerosols that were not yet included in the model, and uncertainties in the primary particulate emission rates. The current model was run in a predictive mode and demonstrates the challenges of accurately simulating all of the meteorological, chemical, and aerosol parameters over urban to regional scales that can affect aerosol radiative forcing.

  8. A 10-year global gridded Aerosol Optical Thickness Reanalysis for climate and applied applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lynch, P.; Reid, J. S.; Zhang, J.; Westphal, D. L.; Campbell, J. R.; Curtis, C. A.; Hegg, D.; Hyer, E. J.; Sessions, W.; Shi, Y.; Turk, J.

    2013-12-01

    While standalone satellite and model aerosol products see wide utilization, there is a significant need of a best-available fused product on a regular grid for numerous climate and applied applications. Remote sensing and modeling technologies have now advanced to a point where aerosol data assimilation is an operational reality at numerous centers. It is inevitable that, like meteorological reanalyses, aerosol reanalyses will see heavy use in the near future. A first long term, 2003-2012 global 1x1 degree and 6-hourly aerosol optical thickness (AOT) reanalysis product has been generated. The goal of this effort is not only for climate applications, but to generate a dataset that can be used by the US Navy to understand operationally hindering aerosol events, aerosol impacts on numerical weather prediction, and application of electro-optical technologies. The reanalysis utilizes Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) at its core and assimilates quality controlled collection 5 Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD with minor corrections from Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRaditometer (MISR). A subset of this product includes Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) lidar assimilation since its launch in mid-2006. Surface aerosol sources, including dust and smoke, in the aerosol model have been regionally tuned so that fine and coarse mode AOTs best match those resolve by ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET). The AOT difference between the model and satellite AOT is then used to adjust other aerosol processes, eg., sources, dry deposition, etc. Aerosol wet deposition is constrained with satellite-retrieved precipitation. The final AOT reanalysis is shown to exhibit good agreement with AERONET. Here we review the development of the reanalysis and consider issues particular to aerosol reanalyses that make them distinct from standard meteorological reanalyses. Considerations are also made for extending such work

  9. Visible and infrared extinction of atmospheric aerosol in the marine and coastal environment.

    PubMed

    Kaloshin, Gennady A

    2011-05-10

    The microphysical model Marine Aerosol Extinction Profiles (MaexPro) for surface layer marine and coastal atmospheric aerosols, which is based on long-term observations of size distributions for 0.01-100 μm particles, is presented. The fundamental feature of the model is a parameterization of amplitudes and widths for aerosol modes of the aerosol size distribution function (ASDF) as functions of fetch and wind speed. The shape of the ASDF and its dependence on meteorological parameters, altitudes above the sea level (H), fetch (X), wind speed (U), and relative humidity is investigated. The model is primarily to characterize aerosols for the near-surface layer (within 25 m). The model is also applicable to higher altitudes within the atmospheric boundary layer, where the change in the vertical profile of aerosol is not very large. In this case, it is only valid for "clean" marine environments, in the absence of air pollution or any other major sources of continental aerosols, such desert dust or smoke from biomass burning. The spectral profiles of the aerosol extinction coefficients calculated by MaexPro are in good agreement with observational data and the numerical results obtained by the well-known Navy Aerosol Model and Advanced Navy Aerosol Model codes. Moreover, MaexPro was found to be an accurate and reliable instrument for investigation of the optical properties of atmospheric aerosols. PMID:21556113

  10. Characteristics of water-soluble inorganic and organic ions in aerosols over the Southern Ocean and coastal East Antarctica during austral summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guojie; Gao, Yuan; Lin, Qi; Li, Wei; Chen, Liqi

    2013-12-01

    characterize the concentrations and size distributions of water-soluble organic and inorganic aerosol species, including Na+, non-sea-salt sulfate (nss SO42-), methane sulfonate (MSA), oxalate, and succinate, over the Southern Ocean (SO) and coastal East Antarctica (CEA), bulk and size-segregated aerosols were collected from 40°S, 100°E to 69°S, 76°E and between 69°S, 76°E and 66°S, 110°E during a cruise from November 2010 to March 2011. Results show that sea salt was the major component of the total aerosol mass, accounting for 72% over the SO and 56% over CEA. The average concentrations of nss SO42- varied from 420 ng m-3 over the SO to 480 ng m-3 over CEA. The concentrations of MSA ranged from 63 to 87 ng m-3 over the SO and from 46 to 170 ng m-3 in CEA. The average concentrations of oxalate were 3.8 ng m-3 over the SO and 2.2 ng m-3 over CEA. The concentrations of formate, acetate, and succinate were lower than those of oxalate. A bimodal size distribution of aerosol mass existed over CEA, peaking at 0.32-0.56 µm and 3.2-5.6 µm. MSA was accumulated in particles of 0.32-0.56 µm over CEA. High chloride depletion was associated with fine-mode particles enriched with nss SO42-, MSA, and oxalate. Higher cation-to-anion and NH4+/nss SO42- ratios in aerosols over CEA compared to that over the SO imply the higher neutralization capacity of the marine atmosphere over CEA.

  11. Coagulation effect on the activity size distributions of long lived radon progeny aerosols and its application to atmospheric residence time estimation techniques.

    PubMed

    Anand, S; Mayya, Y S

    2015-03-01

    The long lived naturally occurring radon progeny species in the atmosphere, namely (210)Pb, (210)Bi and (210)Po, have been used as important tracers for understanding the atmospheric mixing processes and estimating aerosol residence times. Several observations in the past have shown that the activity size distribution of these species peaks at larger particle sizes as compared to the short lived radon progeny species - an effect that has been attributed to the process of coagulation of the background aerosols to which they are attached. To address this issue, a mathematical equation is derived for the activity-size distribution of tracer species by formulating a generalized distribution function for the number of tracer atoms present in coagulating background particles in the presence of radioactive decay and removal. A set of these equations is numerically solved for the progeny chain using Fuchs coagulation kernel combined with a realistic steady-state aerosol size spectrum that includes nucleation, accumulation and coarse mode components. The important findings are: (i) larger shifts in the modal sizes of (210)Pb and (210)Po at higher aerosol concentrations such as that found in certain Asian urban regions (ii) enrichment of tracer specific activity on particles as compared to that predicted by pure attachment laws (iii) sharp decline of daughter-to-parent activity ratios for decreasing particle sizes. The implication of the results to size-fractionated residence time estimation techniques is highlighted. A coagulation corrected graphical approach is presented for estimating the residence times from the size-segregated activity ratios of (210)Bi and (210)Po with respect to (210)Pb. The discrepancy between the residence times predicted by conventional formula and the coagulation corrected approach for specified activity ratios increases at higher atmospheric aerosol number concentrations (>10(10) #/m(3)) for smaller sizes (<1 μm). The results are further

  12. Aerosol Profile Measurements from the NASA Langley Research Center Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obland, Michael D.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Ferrare, Richard A.; Hair, John W.; Roers, Raymond R.; Burton, Sharon P.; Cook, Anthony L.; Harper, David B.

    2008-01-01

    Since achieving first light in December of 2005, the NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Airborne High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) has been involved in seven field campaigns, accumulating over 450 hours of science data across more than 120 flights. Data from the instrument have been used in a variety of studies including validation and comparison with the Cloud- Aerosol Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observation (CALIPSO) satellite mission, aerosol property retrievals combining passive and active instrument measurements, aerosol type identification, aerosol-cloud interactions, and cloud top and planetary boundary layer (PBL) height determinations. Measurements and lessons learned from the HSRL are leading towards next-generation HSRL instrument designs that will enable even further studies of aerosol intensive and extensive parameters and the effects of aerosols on the climate system. This paper will highlight several of the areas in which the NASA Airborne HSRL is making contributions to climate science.

  13. Aerosol Properties and Radiative Forcing over Kanpur during Severe Aerosol Loading Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Sinha, P. R.; Vinoj, V.; Kosmopoulos, P. G.; Tripathi, S. N.; Misra, Amit; Sharma, M.; Singh, R. P.

    2013-11-01

    Atmospheric aerosols over India exhibit large spatio-temporal fluctuation driven by the local monsoon system, emission rates and seasonally-changed air masses. The northern part of India is well-known for its high aerosol loading throughout the year due to anthropogenic emissions, dust influence and biomass burning. On certain circumstances and, under favorable weather conditions, the aerosol load can be severe, causing significant health concerns and climate implications. The present work analyzes the aerosol episode (AE) days and examines the modification in aerosol properties and radiative forcing during the period 2001-2010 based on Kanpur-AERONET sun photometer data. As AEs are considered the days having daily-mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) above the decadal mean + 1 STD (standard deviation); the threshold value is defined at 0.928. The results identify 277 out of 2095 days (13.2%) of AEs over Kanpur, which are most frequently observed during post-monsoon (78 cases, 18.6%) and monsoon (76, 14.7%) seasons due to biomass-burning episodes and dust influence, respectively. On the other hand, the AEs in winter and pre-monsoon are lower in both absolute and percentage values (65, 12.5% and 58, 9.1%, respectively). The modification in aerosol properties on the AE days is strongly related to season. Thus, in post-monsoon and winter the AEs are associated with enhanced presence of fine-mode aerosols and Black Carbon from anthropogenic pollution and any kind of burning, while in pre-monsoon and monsoon seasons they are mostly associated with transported dust. Aerosol radiative forcing (ARF) calculated using SBDART shows much more surface (~-69 to -97 Wm-2) and Top of Atmosphere cooling (-20 to -30 Wm-2) as well as atmospheric heating (~43 to 71 Wm-2) during the AE days compared to seasonal means. These forcing values are mainly controlled by the higher AODs and the modified aerosol characteristics (Angstrom α, SSA) during the AE days in each season and may cause

  14. A three-beam aerosol backscatter correlation lidar for three-component wind profiling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan Mylapore, Anand; Schwemmer, Geary K.; Prasad, Coorg R.; Lee, Sangwoo; Achey, Alexander; Hwang, In Heon; Mehta, Nikhil; Yakshin, Mikhail; Novoselov, Konstantin; Prasad, Narasimha S.

    2014-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of a three-beam elastic lidar that utilizes aerosol backscatter correlation to measure three-component wind profiles for detecting and tracking aircraft wake vortices; turbulence intensity and wind shear profiles. High-resolution time-resolved wind information can currently be obtained with ultrasonic or hot-wire anemometers suitable for local point measurements, or with Doppler wind lidars that only measure line-of-sight wind speeds and have to be scanned over large measurement cone angles for obtaining three-component winds. By tracking the motion of aerosol structures along and between three near-parallel laser beams, our lidar obtains three-component wind speed profiles along the field of view (FOV) of the lidar beams. Our prototype lidar wind profiler (LWP) has three 8-inch transceiver modules placed in a near-parallel configuration on a two-axis pan-tilt scanner to measure winds up to 2km away. Passively q-switched near-infrared (1030nm) Yb:YAG lasers generate 12 - 18ns wide pulses at high repetition rate (about 10KHz) that are expanded and attenuated to eye-safe levels. Sensitive low noise detection is achieved even in daytime using a narrow FOV receiver, together with narrowband interference filters and single photoncounting Geiger-mode Si detectors. A multi-channel scaler retrieves the lidar return with 7.8ns bins (˜1.2m spatial resolution) and stores accumulated counts once every 50ms (20 profiles/sec). We adapted optical flow algorithms to obtain the movement of aerosol structures between the beams. The performance of our prototype LWP was validated using sonic anemometer measurements.

  15. Wintertime aerosol characteristics over the Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP): Impacts of local boundary layer processes and long-range transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nair, Vijayakumar S.; Moorthy, K. Krishna; Alappattu, Denny P.; Kunhikrishnan, P. K.; George, Susan; Nair, Prabha R.; Babu, S. Suresh; Abish, B.; Satheesh, S. K.; Tripathi, Sachchida Nand; Niranjan, K.; Madhavan, B. L.; Srikant, V.; Dutt, C. B. S.; Badarinath, K. V. S.; Reddy, R. Ramakrishna

    2007-07-01

    ventilation coefficient (Vc). The share of BC to total aerosols is highest (˜12%) during early night and lowest (˜4%) in the early morning hours. While an increase in the Vc results in a reduction in the concentration almost simultaneously, an increase in Zimax has its most impact on the concentration after ˜1 day. Accumulation mode aerosols contributed ˜90% to the aerosol concentration at ALB, ˜77 % at KGP and 74% at KNP. The BC mass mixing ratio was ˜10% over all three locations and is comparable to the value reported for Trivandrum, a tropical coastal location in southern India. This indicates presence of submicron aerosols species other than BC (such as sulfate) over KGP and KNP. A cross-correlation analysis showed that the changes in MB at KGP is significantly correlated with those at KNP, located ˜850 km upwind, and ALB after a delay of ˜7 days, while no such delay was seen between ALB and KNP. Back trajectory analyses show an enhancement in MB associated with trajectories arriving from west, the farther from to the west they arrive, the more is the increase. This, along with the ABL characteristics, indicate two possibilities: (1) advection of aerosols from the west Asia and northwest India and (2) movement of a weather phenomena (such as cold air mass) conducive for build up of aerosols from the west to east. As the winter gives way to summer, the change in the wind direction and increased convective mixing lead to a rapid decrease in MB.

  16. Measurements of the Microphysics and Size Distributed Composition of Aerosol Particles at the Kosan Supersite, Jeju Island, Korea During ACE-ASIA and Their Influence on Cloud Microphysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bower, K. N.; Alfarra, R.; Allan, J. D.; Williams, P. I.; McFiggans, G. B.; Flynn, M.; Coe, H.; Gallagher, M. W.; Choularton, T. W.; Fuzzi, S.; Facchini, C.; Berner, A.; Jayne, J. T.; Canagaratne, M. R.; Jimenez, J. L.; Worsnop, D.; Topping, D.; Burgess, R. A.

    2002-12-01

    Measurements of particle number, size distribution and chemical composition of aerosol were made at the Kosan supersite on the island of Jeju during the ACE-ASIA experiment. The measurements of chemical composition included those from an Aerodyne Aerosol Mass Spectrometer, which can deliver quantitative information of the mass of a range of volatile and semi-volatile aerosol components in near real time. These include sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, and the total organic fraction. The instrument also delivers measurements of the size-distributed mass of these components. In addition to the AMS, multi stage Berner impactors were also run for both mass collection on aluminium foil substrates and chemical analysis using Teflon substrates. The substrates were chemically analysed for a range of inorganic species, carbonate, a range of simple organic ions and also the water soluble organic fraction. The latter were subdivided by functionality: neutrals, mono and di carboxylix acids, and poly-carboxylic acids. A second sampling location on the mountain-side of Jeju was used to sample cloud microphysical parameters during the experiment. Measurements were made of liquid water content and cloud droplet number as a function of size during cloud events sampled during the experiment. We will show that the largest contributor to the accumulation mode particle mass is sulfate, with a variable contribution from the organic fraction. The organic is observed to be internally mixed with the sulfate in a mass mode centred at around 400 nm and using AMS data and the analyses from the impactors is oxidised and water soluble. The largest constituents of this component of the aerosol were di and poly carboxylic acids. There was little evidence for a mode of organic particles, typical of urban outflow at Jeju, indicating the particulate had been significantly processed between source and arrival at the sampling site. Little nitrate was observed in the sub micron aerosol at Jeju, but

  17. Volcanic Aerosol Radiative Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Large sporadic volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of sulfur bearing gases into the stratosphere which then get photochemically converted to sulfuric acid aerosol droplets that exert a radiative cooling effect on the global climate system lasting for several years.

  18. Palaeoclimate: Aerosols and rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Jud

    2015-03-01

    Instrumental records have hinted that aerosol emissions may be shifting rainfall over Central America southwards. A 450-year-long precipitation reconstruction indicates that this shift began shortly after the Industrial Revolution.

  19. Aerosol lenses propagation model.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Grégoire; Roy, Gilles

    2011-09-01

    We propose a model based on the properties of cascading lenses modulation transfer function (MTF) to reproduce the irradiance of a screen illuminated through a dense aerosol cloud. In this model, the aerosol cloud is broken into multiple thin layers considered as individual lenses. The screen irradiance generated by these individual layers is equivalent to the point-spread function (PSF) of each aerosol lens. Taking the Fourier transform of the PSF as a MTF, we cascade the lenses MTF to find the cloud MTF. The screen irradiance is found with the Fourier transform of this MTF. We show the derivation of the model and we compare the results with the Undique Monte Carlo simulator for four aerosols at three optical depths. The model is in agreement with the Monte Carlo for all the cases tested. PMID:21886230

  20. The regional aerosol-climate model REMO-HAM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietikäinen, J.-P.; O'Donnell, D.; Teichmann, C.; Karstens, U.; Pfeifer, S.; Kazil, J.; Podzun, R.; Fiedler, S.; Kokkola, H.; Birmili, W.; O'Dowd, C.; Baltensperger, U.; Weingartner, E.; Gehrig, R.; Spindler, G.; Kulmala, M.; Feichter, J.; Jacob, D.; Laaksonen, A.

    2012-03-01

    REMO-HAM is a new regional aerosol-climate model. It is based on the REMO regional climate model and includes all of the major aerosol processes. The structure for aerosol is similar to the global aerosol-climate model ECHAM5-HAM, for example the aerosol module HAM-M7 has been coupled with a two-moment stratiform cloud scheme. In this work, we have evaluated the model and compared the results against ECHAM5-HAM and measurements. Four different measurement sites was chosen for the comparison of total number concentrations, size distributions and gas phase sulfur dioxide concentrations: Hyytiälä in Finland, Melpitz in Germany, Mace Head in Ireland and Jungfraujoch in Switzerland. REMO-HAM is run with two different resolutions: 50×50 km2 and 10×10 km2. Based on our simulations, REMO-HAM can represent the measured values reasonably well. The total number concentrations are slightly underestimated, which is probably due to the missing boundary layer nucleation and online secondary organic aerosol model. The differences in the total number concentrations between REMO-HAM and ECHAM5-HAM can be mainly explained by the difference in the nucleation mode. From the meteorological point of view, REMO-HAM represents the precipitation fields and 2 m temperature profile very well compared to measurement. Overall, we have shown that REMO-HAM is a functional aerosol-climate model, which will be used in further studies.

  1. Influences of external vs. core-shell mixing on aerosol optical properties at various relative humidities.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, S; Srivastava, Rohit

    2013-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties of external and core-shell mixtures of aerosol species present in the atmosphere are calculated in this study for different relative humidities. Core-shell Mie calculations are performed using the values of radii, refractive indices and densities of aerosol species that act as core and shell, and the core-shell radius ratio. The single scattering albedo (SSA) is higher when the absorbing species (black carbon, BC) is the core, while for a sulfate core SSA does not vary significantly as the BC in the shell dominates the absorption. Absorption gets enhanced in core-shell mixing of absorbing and scattering aerosols when compared to their external mixture. Thus, SSA is significantly lower for a core-shell mixture than their external mixture. SSA is more sensitive to core-shell ratio than mode radius when BC is the core. The extinction coefficient, SSA and asymmetry parameter are higher for external mixing when compared to BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell), and water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) mixtures in the relative humidity range of 0 to 90%. Spectral SSA exhibits the behaviour of the species which acts as a shell in core-shell mixing. The asymmetry parameter for an external mixture of water soluble aerosol and BC is higher than BC (core)-water soluble aerosol (shell) mixing and increases as function of relative humidity. The asymmetry parameter for the water soluble aerosol (core)-BC (shell) is independent of relative humidity as BC is hydrophobic. The asymmetry parameter of the core-shell mixture decreases when BC aerosols are involved in mixing, as the asymmetry parameter of BC is lower. Aerosol optical depth (AOD) of core-shell mixtures increases at a higher rate when the relative humidity exceeds 70% in continental clean and urban aerosol models, whereas AOD remains the same when the relative humidity exceeds 50% in maritime aerosol models. The SSA for continental aerosols varies for core-shell mixing of water soluble

  2. Stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.

    I use a general circulation model of Earth's climate to simulate stratospheric geoengineering with black carbon aerosols, varying the altitude of injection, initial particle size, and whether the deposited black carbon modifies ground albedo. 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols injected into the stratosphere each year will cause significant enough surface cooling to negate anthropogenic warming if the aerosols are small (r=0.03 mum) or if the aerosols are injected into the middle stratosphere, although using small aerosols causes large regional cooling effects that would be catastrophic to agriculture. The aerosols cause significant stratospheric heating, resulting in stratospheric ozone destruction and circulation changes, most notably an increase in the Northern Hemisphere polar jet, which forms an Arctic ozone hole and forces a positive mode of the Arctic Oscillation. The hydrologic cycle is perturbed, specifically the summer monsoon system of India, Africa, and East Asia, resulting in monsoon precipitation collapse. Global primary productivity is decreased by 35.5% for the small particle case. Surface cooling causes some sea ice regrowth, but not at statistically significant levels. All of these climate impacts are exacerbated for small particle geoengineering, with high altitude geoengineering with the default particle size (r=0.08 mum) causing a reasonable amount of cooling, and large particle (r=0.15 mum) geoengineering or particle injection into the lower stratosphere causing few of these effects. The modification of ground albedo by the soot particles slightly perturbs the radiative budget but does not cause any distinguishable climate effects. The cheapest means we investigated for placing 1 Tg of black carbon aerosols into the stratosphere by diesel fuel combustion would cost 1.4 trillion initially and 541 billion annual, or 2.0% and 0.8% of GDP, respectively. The additional carbon dioxide released from combusting diesel to produce these aerosols is about 1

  3. Emergency Protection from Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Cristy, G.A.

    2001-11-13

    Expedient methods were developed that could be used by an average person, using only materials readily available, to protect himself and his family from injury by toxic (e.g., radioactive) aerosols. The most effective means of protection was the use of a household vacuum cleaner to maintain a small positive pressure on a closed house during passage of the aerosol cloud. Protection factors of 800 and above were achieved.

  4. MISR Aerosol Typing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.

    2014-01-01

    AeroCom is an open international initiative of scientists interested in the advancement of the understanding of global aerosol properties and aerosol impacts on climate. A central goal is to more strongly tie and constrain modeling efforts to observational data. A major element for exchanges between data and modeling groups are annual meetings. The meeting was held September 20 through October 2, 1014 and the organizers would like to post the presentations.

  5. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOEpatents

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  6. Speciated organic composition of atmospheric aerosols: Development and application of a Thermal desorption Aerosol Gas chromatograph (TAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Brent James

    -associated aerosol comprised greater than 80% of fine-mode organic aerosol mass after only 5--10 hours of photochemical activity. TAG's ability to measure the gas-phase portion of semivolatile organic compounds was evaluated, and SOAR data was further used to compare measured and modeled phase transitioning for several common compound classes. With more quantitative measurements of the gas- and particle-phase of semivolatile organic compounds, the TAG system stands to offer critical information to the modeling efforts of organic aerosol formation and growth.

  7. Aerosol characteristics from the Taiwan aerosol supersite in the Asian yellow-dust periods of 2002

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chung-Te; Chuang, Ming-Tung; Chan, Chang-Chuan; Cheng, Tsun-Jen; Huang, Song-Lih

    The occurrence of Asian dust storms, and the subsequent transport of yellow dust (YD) greatly influences the air quality of lee-side countries such as Korea and Japan. The dust is also frequently transported in a southward direction by a strong cold high-pressure system that affects the air quality in Taiwan. This study reports the aerosol properties that were monitored continuously at the Taiwan aerosol supersite during YD events in 2002. Based on the observations of meteorology and aerosols, we divided the time interval of a YD event into a before period, during period, and after period. Among the seven observed YD events, the second event was marked with the maximum hourly PM 10 level at 502 μg m -3, and with the longest during period for a total of 147 h. The averages of the hourly PM 10 and PM 2.5-10 were much higher in the during period as compared to those in the before period. It is interesting to note that the time lapse in the during period was well correlated with the maximum level of both PM 10 and PM 2.5-10. It must be noted that the PM 2.5 levels were dramatically increased in the after period, which was due to the accumulation of particles influenced by the anticyclonic outflow. The aerosol size distribution in the third YD event verified that supermicron particles dominated in the during period, and that submicron particles were predominant in the before and after periods. For the chemical properties of the aerosols, time series results indicated that sulfates were mostly contributed by the dust transport, and the others were more related to vehicle exhausts. However, they all accumulated in the period of atmospheric stagnancy.

  8. Remote Sensing of Aerosol using MODIS, MODIS+CALIPSO and with the AEROSAT Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, Yoram J.

    2002-01-01

    In the talk I shall review the MODIS use of spectral information to derive aerosol size distribution, optical thickness and reflected spectral flux. The accuracy and validation of the MODIS products will be discussed. A few applications will be shown: inversion of combined MODIS+lidar data, aerosol Anthropogenic direct forcing, and dust deposition in the Atlantic Ocean. I shall also discuss the aerosol information that MODIS is measuring: real ref index, single scattering albedo, size of fine and coarse modes, and describe the AEROSAT concept that uses bright desert and glint to derive aerosol absorption.

  9. Evaluation of aerosol optical depth and aerosol models from MODIS and VIIRS retrieval algorithms over North China Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J.; Zhu, J.; Xia, X.; Chen, H.; Zhang, J.; Xu, X.; Oo, M. M.; Holz, R.; Levy, R. C.

    2015-12-01

    After the launch of Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (S-NPP) equipped with the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suit (VIIRS) instrument in late 2011, the aerosol products of VIIRS have received much attention. Currently there are two aerosol products of VIIRS by using different algorithms: VIIRS Environment Data Record data (VIIRS_EDR) and aerosol products by applying MODIS-like algorithm to VIIRS (VIIRS_ML). In this study, the aerosol optical depth (AOD) at 550nm and properties of aerosol models used in the two VIIRS algorithms (VIIRS_EDR and VIIRS_ML) are compared respectively with their corresponding quantities retrieved from the ground-based Sunphotometer measurements (CE318) during May 2012-March 2014 at three sites over North China Plain (NCP): metropolis-Beijing, suburban-XiangHe and regional background site-Xinglong. The results show that the VIIRS_EDR AOD has a positive mean bias (MB) of 0.04-0.06 and the root mean square error (RMSE) of 0.22-0.24 in NCP region. Among three sites, the largest MB (0.10-0.15) and RMSE (0.27-0.30) are observed in Beijing. The results of evaluation of VIIRS_ML for each site and quality flags analysis are similar to VIIRS_EDR, but in general the VIIRS_ML AOD shows better than VIIRS_EDR except for the MB (0.13-0.14). The model comparisons show that the occurrence percentages of both dust and clean urban aerosol in VIIRS_EDR (82% for Beijing, 73% for XiangHe and 50% for Xinglong) are significantly larger than that for CE318, the latter shows the polluted urban aerosol is the dominant aerosol especially for Beijing (67%) and XiangHe (59%) sites. The values of Single Scattering albedo (SSA) from VIIRS_EDR are higher than from CE318 in all aerosol modes, with a positive bias of 0.03-0.06 for fine mode, 0.18-0.22 for coarse model and 0.03-0.08 for total modes and the aerosol microphysical properties used in the VIIRS_EDR algorithm for AOD retrieval show a large difference with the counterparts from CE318 inversion results

  10. RACORO aerosol data processing

    SciTech Connect

    Elisabeth Andrews

    2011-10-31

    The RACORO aerosol data (cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), condensation nuclei (CN) and aerosol size distributions) need further processing to be useful for model evaluation (e.g., GCM droplet nucleation parameterizations) and other investigations. These tasks include: (1) Identification and flagging of 'splash' contaminated Twin Otter aerosol data. (2) Calculation of actual supersaturation (SS) values in the two CCN columns flown on the Twin Otter. (3) Interpolation of CCN spectra from SGP and Twin Otter to 0.2% SS. (4) Process data for spatial variability studies. (5) Provide calculated light scattering from measured aerosol size distributions. Below we first briefly describe the measurements and then describe the results of several data processing tasks that which have been completed, paving the way for the scientific analyses for which the campaign was designed. The end result of this research will be several aerosol data sets which can be used to achieve some of the goals of the RACORO mission including the enhanced understanding of cloud-aerosol interactions and improved cloud simulations in climate models.

  11. Sulfur aerosol in the clouds of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnopolsky, Vladimir A.

    2016-08-01

    The photochemical model for the middle atmosphere of Venus (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2012] Icarus, 218, 230-246) predicts sulfur aerosol as a product of the OCS photolysis at 55-60 km. The calculated mass loading is much smaller than that of the mode 1 particles in the upper cloud layer. The chemical kinetic model for the lower atmosphere (Krasnopolsky, V.A. [2013], Icarus, 225, 570-580) results in a constant mixing ratio of 20 ppm for OCS + XSX. This means the S8 mixing ratio of 2.5 ppm near the model upper boundary at 47 km. Using this abundance, the calculated profile of the sulfur aerosol has a bottom that coincides with the lower boundary of modes 2 and 3 and constitutes ∼10% of the total mass loading in the lower cloud layer. Sulfur aerosol cannot be the near UV absorber because its abundance is too low at the cloud tops and disagrees with the profile of the absorber observed by Venera 14.

  12. Low power acoustic harvesting of aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Kaduchak, G.; Sinha, D. N.

    2001-01-01

    A new acoustic device for levitation and/or concentration of aerosols and sniall liquid/solid samples (up to several millimeters in diameter) in air has been developed. The device is inexpensive, low-power, and, in its simplest embodiment, does not require accurate alignmen1 of a resonant cavity. It is constructed from a cylindrical PZT tube of outside diameter D = 19.0 mm and thickness-to-radius ratio h/a - 0.03. The lowest-order breathing mode of the tube is tuned to match a resonant mode of the interior air-filled cylindrical cavity. A high Q cavity results that can be driven efficiently. An acoustic standing wave is created in the inteirior cavity of the cylindrical shell where particle concrmtration takes place at the nodal planes of the field. It is shown that drops of water in excess of 1 mm in diameter may be levitated against the force of gravity for approxirnately 100 mW of input electrical power. The main objective of the research is to implement this lowpower device to concentrate and harvest aerosols in a flowing system. Several different cavity geonietries iwe presented for efficient collection of 1 he conaartratetl aerosols. Concentraiion factors greater than 40 iue demonstrated for particles of size 0.7 1.1 in a flow volume of 50 L/minute.

  13. Factors influencing 7Be accumulation on rock varnish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, Willard S.; Liu, Tanzhuo; Broecker, Wallace S.; Finkel, Robert C.; Wright, Allen

    Rocks coated with desert varnish were translocated from Scottsdale, Arizona, and Panamint Valley, California, to a fenced-in plot near Biosphere 2 where they were allowed to accumulate a new crop of the 53 day half life, cosmic ray-produced 7Be. Those exposed to precipitation accumulated several times more of this isotope than those shielded from precipitation. No significant difference in 7Be accumulation was observed between a set which was UV irradiated (in an attempt to kill resident bacteria) and a set which received no UV irradiation. This experiment suggests that 62 ± 10 percent of the beryllium accumulated on the varnish was supplied by precipitation and 38 ± 10 percent by some combination of dew, dust, and aerosols. If bacteria are, as has been proposed, responsible for varnish growth, then either our UV irradiation was inadequate to squelch their activity or the 7Be we measured had not yet been built into the varnish.

  14. MISR Aerosol Product Attributes and Statistical Comparisons with MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, Ralph A.; Nelson, David L.; Garay, Michael J.; Levy, Robert C.; Bull, Michael A.; Diner, David J.; Martonchik, John V.; Paradise, Susan R.; Hansen, Earl G.; Remer, Lorraine A.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer (MISR) aerosol product attributes are described, including geometry and algorithm performance flags. Actual retrieval coverage is mapped and explained in detail using representative global monthly data. Statistical comparisons are made with coincident aerosol optical depth (AOD) and Angstrom exponent (ANG) retrieval results from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) instrument. The relationship between these results and the ones previously obtained for MISR and MODIS individually, based on comparisons with coincident ground-truth observations, is established. For the data examined, MISR and MODIS each obtain successful aerosol retrievals about 15% of the time, and coincident MISR-MODIS aerosol retrievals are obtained for about 6%-7% of the total overlap region. Cloud avoidance, glint and oblique-Sun exclusions, and other algorithm physical limitations account for these results. For both MISR and MODIS, successful retrievals are obtained for over 75% of locations where attempts are made. Where coincident AOD retrievals are obtained over ocean, the MISR-MODIS correlation coefficient is about 0.9; over land, the correlation coefficient is about 0.7. Differences are traced to specific known algorithm issues or conditions. Over-ocean ANG comparisons yield a correlation of 0.67, showing consistency in distinguishing aerosol air masses dominated by coarse-mode versus fine-mode particles. Sampling considerations imply that care must be taken when assessing monthly global aerosol direct radiative forcing and AOD trends with these products, but they can be used directly for many other applications, such as regional AOD gradient and aerosol air mass type mapping and aerosol transport model validation. Users are urged to take seriously the published product data-quality statements.

  15. Secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal in aqueous aerosol mimics - Part 2: Product identification using Aerosol-CIMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sareen, N.; Shapiro, E. L.; Schwier, A. N.; McNeill, V. F.

    2009-07-01

    We used chemical ionization mass spectrometry with a volatilization flow tube inlet (Aerosol-CIMS) to characterize secondary organic material formed by methylglyoxal with ammonium sulfate in aqueous aerosol mimics. Bulk reaction mixtures were diluted and atomized to form submicron aerosol particles. Organics were detected using Aerosol-CIMS in positive and negative ion mode using I- and H3O+·(H2O)n as reagent ions. The results are consistent with aldol condensation products, carbon-nitrogen species, sulfur-containing compounds, and oligomeric species up to 759 amu. These results support previous observations by us and others that ammonium sulfate plays a critical role in the SOA formation chemistry of dicarbonyl compounds.

  16. Aerosol Chemistry over a High Altitude Station at Northeastern Himalayas, India

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Adak, Anandamay; Singh, Ajay K.; Srivastava, Manoj K.; Ghosh, Sanjay K.; Tiwari, Suresh; Devara, Panuganti C. S.; Raha, Sibaji

    2010-01-01

    Background There is an urgent need for an improved understanding of the sources, distributions and properties of atmospheric aerosol in order to control the atmospheric pollution over northeastern Himalayas where rising anthropogenic interferences from rapid urbanization and development is becoming an increasing concern. Methodology/Principal Findings An extensive aerosol sampling program was conducted in Darjeeling (altitude ∼2200 meter above sea level (masl), latitude 27°01′N and longitude 88°15′E), a high altitude station in northeastern Himalayas, during January–December 2005. Samples were collected using a respirable dust sampler and a fine dust sampler simultaneously. Ion chromatograph was used to analyze the water soluble ionic species of aerosol. The average concentrations of fine and coarse mode aerosol were found to be 29.5±20.8 µg m−3 and 19.6±11.1 µg m−3 respectively. Fine mode aerosol dominated during dry seasons and coarse mode aerosol dominated during monsoon. Nitrate existed as NH4NO3 in fine mode aerosol during winter and as NaNO3 in coarse mode aerosol during monsoon. Gas phase photochemical oxidation of SO2 during premonsoon and aqueous phase oxidation during winter and postmonsoon were the major pathways for the formation of SO42− in the atmosphere. Long range transport of dust aerosol from arid regions of western India was observed during premonsoon. The acidity of fine mode aerosol was higher in dry seasons compared to monsoon whereas the coarse mode acidity was higher in monsoon compared to dry seasons. Biomass burning, vehicular emissions and dust particles were the major types of aerosol from local and continental regions whereas sea salt particles were the major types of aerosol from marine source regions. Conclusions/Significance The year-long data presented in this paper provide substantial improvements to the heretofore poor knowledge regarding aerosol chemistry over northeastern Himalayas, and should be useful to

  17. Method for estimating the atmospheric content of sub-micrometer aerosol using direct-sun photometric data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, S.; Filip, L.

    2009-04-01

    It is well known that the aerosol generated by human activity falls in the sub-micrometer rage [1]. The rapid increase of such emissions led to massive accumulations in the planetary boundary layer. Aerosol pollutants influence the quality of life on the Earth in at least two ways: by direct physiological effects following their penetration into living organisms and by the indirect implications on the overall energy balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. For these reasons monitoring the sub-micrometer aerosol on a global scale, become a stringent necessity in protecting the environment. The sun-photometry proved a very efficient way for such monitoring activities, mainly when vast networks of instruments (like AERONET [2]) are used. The size distribution of aerosols is currently a product of AERONET obtained through an inversion algorithm of sky-photometry data [3, 4]. Alternatively, various methods of investigating the aerosol size distribution have been developed through the use of direct-sun photometric data, with the advantages of simpler computation algorithms and a more convenient use [5, 6]. Our research aims to formulate a new simpler way to retrieve aerosol fine and coarse mode volume concentrations, as well as dimensional information, from direct-sun data. As in other works from the literature [3-6], the main hypothesis is that of a bi-modal shape of the size distribution of aerosols that can be reproduced rather satisfactorily by a linear combination of two lognormal functions. Essentially, the method followed in this paper relies on aerosol size information retrieval through fitting theoretical computations to measured aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related data. To this purpose, the experimental spectral dependence of AOD is interpolated and differentiated numerically to obtain the Ǻngström parameter. The reduced (i.e. normalized to the corresponding columnar volumetric content) contributions of the fine and coarse modes to the AOD have also been

  18. Ice sheet mass loss caused by dust and black carbon accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goelles, T.; Bøggild, C. E.; Greve, R.

    2015-09-01

    Albedo is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area of ice sheets and glaciers. Aerosols such as mineral dust and black carbon (soot) accumulate on the ice surface and cause a darker surface and therefore a lower albedo. The darkening effect on the ice surface is currently not included in sea level projections, and the effect is unknown. We present a model framework which includes ice dynamics, aerosol transport, aerosol accumulation and the darkening effect on ice albedo and its consequences for surface melt. The model is applied to a simplified geometry resembling the conditions of the Greenland ice sheet, and it is forced by several temperature scenarios to quantify the darkening effect of aerosols on future mass loss. The effect of aerosols depends non-linearly on the temperature rise due to the feedback between aerosol accumulation and surface melt. According to our conceptual model, accounting for black carbon and dust in future projections of ice sheet changes until the year 3000 could induce an additional volume loss of 7 %. Since we have ignored some feedback processes, the impact might be even larger.

  19. Multi-modal analysis of aerosol robotic network size distributions for remote sensing applications: dominant aerosol type cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, M.; Kazadzis, S.; Gerasopoulos, E.

    2013-12-01

    To date, size distributions obtained from the aerosol robotic network have been fit with bi-lognormals defined by six secondary microphysical parameters: the volume concentration, effective radius, and the variance of fine and coarse particle modes. However, since the total integrated volume concentration is easily calculated and can be used as an accurate constraint, the problem of fitting the size distribution can be reduced to that of deducing a single free parameter - the mode separation point. We present a method for determining the mode separation point for equivalent-volume bi-lognormal distributions based on optimisation of the root mean squared error and the coefficient of determination. The extracted secondary parameters are compared with those provided by AERONET's Level 2.0 Version 2 inversion algorithm for a set of benchmark dominant aerosol types including: desert dust, biomass burning aerosol, urban sulphate and sea salt. The total volume concentration constraint is then also lifted by performing multi-modal fits to the size distribution using nested Gaussian mixture models and a method is presented for automating the selection of the optimal number of modes using a stopping condition based on Fisher statistics and via the application of statistical hypothesis testing. It is found that the method for optimizing the location of the mode separation point is independent of the shape of the AVSD, does not require the existence of a local minimum in the size interval 0.439 μm ≤ r ≤ 0.992 μm, and shows some potential for optimizing the bi-lognormal fitting procedure used by AERONET particularly in the case of desert dust aerosol. The AVSD of impure marine aerosol is found to require 3 modes. In this particular case, bi-lognormals fail to recover key features of the AVSD. Fitting the AVSD more generally with multi-modal models allows automatic detection of a statistically-significant number of aerosol modes, is applicable to a very diverse range of

  20. Seasonality of ultrafine and sub-micron aerosols and the inferences on particle formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Lee, C. S.-L.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the seasonal variations in the physicochemical properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100nm) and submicron particles (PM1, d ≤ 1 μm) in an East-Asian urban area, which are hypothesized to be affected by the interchange of summer and winter monsoons. An observation experiment was conducted at the TARO, an urban aerosol station in Taipei, Taiwan, from October 2012 to August 2013. The measurements included the mass concentration and chemical composition of UFPs and PM1, as well as the particle number concentration (PNC) and size distribution (PSD) with size range of 4-736 nm. The results indicate that the mass concentration of PM1 was elevated during cold seasons with peak level of 18.5 μg m-3 in spring, whereas the highest UFPs concentration was measured in summertime with a seasonal mean of 1.62 μg m-3. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that the UFPs and PM1 were characterized by distinct composition; UFPs were composed mostly of organics, whereas ammonium and sulfate were the major constituents in PM1. The seasonal median of total PNCs ranged from 13.9 × 103 cm-3 in autumn to 19.4 × 103 cm-3 in spring. The PSD information retrieved from the corresponding PNC measurements indicates that the nucleation mode PNC (N4-25) peaked at 11.6 × 103 cm-3 in winter, whereas the Aitken mode (N25-100) and accumulation mode (N100-736) exhibited summer maxima at 6.0 × 103 and 3.1 × 103 cm-3, respectively. The shift in PSD during summertime is attributed to the enhancement in the photochemical production of condensable organic matter that, in turn, contributes to the growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. In addition, remarkable photochemical production of particles was observed in spring and summer seasons, which was characterized with averaged particle growth and formation rates of 4.3 ± 0.8 nm h-1 and 1.6 ± 0.8 cm-3 s-1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF) in summer is

  1. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the Southeast Pacific ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2012-08-01

    The Southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles such as power plants, urban pollution and smelters on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics from seven flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were more numerous and smaller near shore, and there was less drizzle. Higher droplet number concentration and physically thinner clouds both contributed to the smaller droplets near shore. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths there. Differences in the size

  2. A Pure Marine Aerosol Model, for Use in Remote Sensing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sayer, A. M.; Smirnov, A.; Hsu, N. C.; Holben, B. N.

    2011-01-01

    Retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD) and related parameters from satellite measurements typically involve prescribed models of aerosol size and composition, and are therefore dependent on how well these models are able to represent the radiative behaviour of real aerosols, This study uses aerosol volume size distributions retrieved from Sun-photometer measurements at 11 Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) island sites, spread throughout the world's oceans, as a basis to define such a model for unpolluted maritime aerosols. Size distributions are observed to be bimodal and approximately lognormal, although the coarse mode is skewed with a long tail on the low-radius end, The relationship of AOD and size distribution parameters to meteorological conditions is also examined, As wind speed increases, so do coarse-mode volume and radius, The AOD and Angstrom exponent (alpha) show linear relationships with wind speed, although there is considerable scatter in all these relationships, limiting their predictive power. Links between aerosol properties and near-surface relative humidity, columnar water vapor, and sea surface temperature are also explored. A recommended bimodal maritime model, which is able to reconstruct the AERONET AOD with accuracy of order 0.01-0.02, is presented for use in aerosol remote sensing applications. This accuracy holds at most sites and for wavelengths between 340 nm and 1020 nm. Calculated lidar ratios are also provided, and differ significantly from those currently used in Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP) processing.

  3. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode.

    The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments.

    The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was

  4. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  5. Aerosol Properties From Multi-angle Satellite Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahn, R. A.; Martonchik, J. V.; Diner, D. J.; Chen, W. A.; Gaitley, B. J.; Kalashnikova, O. V.; Liu, Y.; Team, T.

    2005-12-01

    Based on pre-launch simulations, we expected that data from the multi-angle, multi-spectral MISR instrument aboard NASA's Terra satellite would contain, in addition to aerosol optical depth (AOT), information about particle size, shape, and single-scattering albedo (SSA). Such information would add a great deal to the global aerosol picture that satellites provide, allowing more meaningful assessments of aerosol direct radiative impact, source attribution, material fluxes, and possibly indirect effects of aerosols on clouds. But particle micro-physical property retrievals are much more difficult to validate than AOT, since there are significant uncertainties in aerosol size, and especially shape and SSA, retrieved from surface-based sun photometers, whereas instrumented aircraft must fly complex patterns to adequately sample all aerosol layers in the entire column seen simultaneously by MISR. Our multi-faceted validation effort, which makes use of ground-based AERONET sun photometers as well as coincident satellite and intensive field observations, has allowed us to quantify MISR data sensitivity to these aerosol micro-physical properties over dark water, and in a few situations, over land. In broad terms, over dark water MISR can distinguish three-to-five aerosol size bins between about 0.1 and 2.5 microns effective diameter, spherical vs. non-spherical particle shapes, plates from grains from spheroids at least in some cases, and two-to-four SSA groupings between 0.75 and 1.0. MISR can also identify several aerosol modes within the column, provided each contributes more than about 20% to the total column mid-visible AOT. These sensitivities diminish for column AOT below about 0.15, and for brighter underlying surfaces. This talk will summarize the current status of the MISR Standard Aerosol Product, the latest MISR Research Aerosol Retrieval validation study results, and our plans for completing aerosol micro-physical property formal validation for the MISR

  6. AEROSOL CHARACTERIZATION WITH CENTRIFUCAL AEROSOL SPECTROMETERS: THEORY AND EXPERIMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    A general mathematical model describing the motion of particles in aerosol centrifuges has been developed. t has been validated by comparisons of theoretically predicted calibration sites with experimental data from tests sizing aerosols in instruments of three different spiral d...

  7. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  8. Easy Aerosol - Robust and non-robust circulation responses to aerosol radiative forcing in comprehensive atmosphere models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voigt, Aiko; Bony, Sandrine; Stevens, Bjorn; Boucher, Olivier; Medeiros, Brian; Pincus, Robert; Wang, Zhili; Zhang, Kai; Lewinschal, Anna; Bellouin, Nicolas; Yang, Young-Min

    2015-04-01

    A number of recent studies illustrated the potential of aerosols to change the large-scale atmospheric circulation and precipitation patterns. It remains unclear, however, to what extent the proposed aerosol-induced changes reflect robust model behavior or are affected by uncertainties in the models' treatment of parametrized physical processes, such as those related to clouds. "Easy Aerosol", a model-intercomparison project organized within the Grand Challenge on Clouds, Circulation and Climate Sensitivity of the World Climate Research Programme, addresses this question by subjecting a suite of comprehensive atmosphere general circulation models with prescribed sea-surface temperatures (SSTs) to the same set of idealized "easy" aerosol perturbations. This contribution discusses the aerosol perturbations as well as their impact on the model's precipitation and surface winds. The aerosol perturbations are designed based on a global aerosol climatology and mimic the gravest mode of the anthropogenic aerosol. Specifically, the meridional and zonal distributions of total aerosol optical depth are approximated by a superposition of Gaussian plumes; the vertical distribution is taken as constant within the lowest 1250m of the atmosphere followed by an exponential decay with height above. The aerosol both scatters and absorbs shortwave radiation, but in order to focus on direct radiative effects aerosol-cloud interactions are omitted. Each model contributes seven simulations. A clean control case with no aerosol-radiative effects at all is compared to six perturbed simulations with differing aerosol loading, zonal aerosol distributions, and SSTs. To estimate the role of natural variability, one of the models, MPI-ESM, contributes a 5-member ensemble for each simulation. If the observed SSTs from years 1979-2005 are prescribed, the aerosol leads to a local depression of precipitation at the Northern Hemisphere center of the aerosol and a northward shift of the

  9. Understanding the Processes Controlling Aerosol-Cloud Interactions in the Arctic Marine Boundary Layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Browse, J.; Carslaw, K. S.; Pringle, K.; Mann, G.; Reddington, C.; Brooks, I. M.; Mulcahy, J.; Young, G.; Allan, J. D.; Liu, D.; Trembath, J.; Dean, A.; Yoshioka, M.

    2015-12-01

    Here we use multiple configurations of the UKCA chemistry and aerosol scheme in a global climate model, capable of simulating cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and cloud droplet number, to understand the processes controlling aerosol-cloud interactions in the marine Arctic boundary layer. Evaluation against an unprecedented number of aerosol and cloud observations made available through the Global Aerosol Synthesis and Science Project (GASSP), International Arctic Systems for Observing the Atmosphere (IASOA) and the 2013 ACCACIA campaign, suggest that Arctic summertime CCN is well represented in the model. Sensitivity studies indicate that DMS derived nucleation events are the primary source of Arctic summertime aerosol increasing mean (median) surface CCN concentrations north of 70N from 21(14) cm-3 to 46(33) cm-3. However, evaluation against observed aerosol size distributions suggests that UKCA overestimates nucleation mode (~10nm) particle concentrations either due to overestimation of boundary layer nucleation rates or underestimation of the Arctic marine boundary layer condensation sink.

  10. FTIR Analysis of Functional Groups in Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri, S. M.; McKenzie, G.; Dransfield, T. J.

    2012-12-01

    Secondary organic aerosols (SOA) are suspensions of particulate matter composed of compounds formed from chemical reactions of organic species in the atmosphere. Atmospheric particulate matter can have impacts on climate, the environment and human health. Standardized techniques to analyze the characteristics and composition of complex secondary organic aerosols are necessary to further investigate the formation of SOA and provide a better understanding of the reaction pathways of organic species in the atmosphere. While Aerosol Mass Spectrometry (AMS) can provide detailed information about the elemental composition of a sample, it reveals little about the chemical moieties which make up the particles. This work probes aerosol particles deposited on Teflon filters using FTIR, based on the protocols of Russell, et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, 114, 2009) and the spectral fitting algorithm of Takahama, et al (submitted, 2012). To validate the necessary calibration curves for the analysis of complex samples, primary aerosols of key compounds (e.g., citric acid, ammonium sulfate, sodium benzoate) were generated, and the accumulated masses of the aerosol samples were related to their IR absorption intensity. These validated calibration curves were then used to classify and quantify functional groups in SOA samples generated in chamber studies by MIT's Kroll group. The fitting algorithm currently quantifies the following functionalities: alcohols, alkanes, alkenes, amines, aromatics, carbonyls and carboxylic acids.

  11. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  12. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  13. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approximate 10 to the 25th g in mass; and a later stage in which the approximately 10 to the 25th g planetesimals accumulate into the final planets. In the terrestrial planet region, an initial planetesimal swarm corresponding to the critical mass of dust layer gravitational instabilities is considered. In order to better understand the accumulation history of Mercury-sized bodies, 19 Monte-Carlo simulations of terrestrial planet growth were calculated. A Monte Carlo technique was used to investigate the orbital evolution of asteroidal collision debris produced interior to 2.6 AU. It was found that there are two regions primarily responsible for production of Earth-crossing meteoritic material and Apollo objects. The same techniques were extended to include the origin of Earth-approaching asteroidal bodies. It is found that these same two resonant mechanisms predict a steady-state number of Apollo-Amor about 1/2 that estimated based on astronomical observations.

  14. Aerosol chemistry in GLOBE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Antony D.; Rothermel, Jeffry; Jarzembski, Maurice A.

    1993-01-01

    This task addresses the measurement and understanding of the physical and chemical properties of aerosol in remote regions that are responsible for aerosol backscatter at infrared wavelengths. Because it is representative of other clean areas, the remote Pacific is of extreme interest. Emphasis is on the determination size dependent aerosol properties that are required for modeling backscatter at various wavelengths and upon those features that may be used to help understand the nature, origin, cycling and climatology of these aerosols in the remote troposphere. Empirical relationships will be established between lidar measurements and backscatter derived from the aerosol microphysics as required by the NASA Doppler Lidar Program. This will include the analysis of results from the NASA GLOBE Survey Mission Flight Program. Additional instrument development and deployment will be carried out in order to extend and refine this data base. Identified activities include participation in groundbased and airborne experiments. Progress to date includes participation in, analysis of, and publication of results from Mauna Loa Backscatter Intercomparison Experiment (MABIE) and Global Backscatter Experiment (GLOBE).

  15. Biological aerosol background characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blatny, Janet; Fountain, Augustus W., III

    2011-05-01

    To provide useful information during military operations, or as part of other security situations, a biological aerosol detector has to respond within seconds or minutes to an attack by virulent biological agents, and with low false alarms. Within this time frame, measuring virulence of a known microorganism is extremely difficult, especially if the microorganism is of unknown antigenic or nucleic acid properties. Measuring "live" characteristics of an organism directly is not generally an option, yet only viable organisms are potentially infectious. Fluorescence based instruments have been designed to optically determine if aerosol particles have viability characteristics. Still, such commercially available biological aerosol detection equipment needs to be improved for their use in military and civil applications. Air has an endogenous population of microorganisms that may interfere with alarm software technologies. To design robust algorithms, a comprehensive knowledge of the airborne biological background content is essential. For this reason, there is a need to study ambient live bacterial populations in as many locations as possible. Doing so will permit collection of data to define diverse biological characteristics that in turn can be used to fine tune alarm algorithms. To avoid false alarms, improving software technologies for biological detectors is a crucial feature requiring considerations of various parameters that can be applied to suppress alarm triggers. This NATO Task Group will aim for developing reference methods for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to improve alarm algorithms for biological detection. Additionally, they will focus on developing reference standard methodology for monitoring biological aerosol characteristics to reduce false alarm rates.

  16. Characteristics of aerosol size distributions and chemical compositions during wintertime pollution episodes in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zirui; Hu, Bo; Zhang, Junke; Yu, Yangchun; Wang, Yuesi

    2016-02-01

    To characterize the features of particle pollution, continuous measurements of particle number size distributions and chemical compositions were performed at an urban site in Beijing in January 2013. The particle number and volume concentration from 14 nm to 1000 nm were (37.4 ± 15.3) × 103 cm- 3 and (85.2 ± 65.6) μm3 cm- 3, respectively. N-Ait (Aitken mode) particles dominated the number concentration, whereas N-Acc (accumulation mode) particles dominated the volume concentration. Submicron particles were generally characterized by a high content of organics and SO42 -, and a low level of NO3- and Cl-. Two types of pollution episodes were observed, characterized by the "explosive growth" (EXP) and "sustained growth" (SUS) of PM2.5. Fine particles greater than 100 nm dominated the volume concentration during the ends of these pollution episodes, shifting the maximum of the number size distribution from 60 nm to greater than 100 nm in a few hours (EXP) or a few days (SUS). Secondary transformation is the main reason for the pollution episodes; SO42 -, NO3- and NH4+ (SNA) accounted for approximately 42% (EXP) and greater than 60% (SUS) of the N-Acc particle mass increase. The size distributions of particulate organics and SNA varied on timescales of hours to days, the characteristics of which changed from bimodal to unimodal during the evolution of haze episodes. The accumulation mode (peaking at approximately 500-700 nm) was domina