Science.gov

Sample records for accumulation mode particle

  1. Chemical composition of nucleation and accumulation mode particles collected in Vienna, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puxbaum, Hans; Wopenka, Brigitte

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected by six-stage low pressure impactors in Vienna downtown. Aerosol particles were deposited on aluminum foils in five size fractions in the size range of 0.04-25 μm AD. The concentration of the components Cl -, Br -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb. Sr, Zn and total C was determined by multi-element analytical methods. A comparison of the relative composition of the size fractions containing nucleation mode and accumulation mode particles showed the components derived from traffic emissions (Pb, Br - and C) to be significantly enriched in the nucleation mode size fraction. On the other hand, each of the components Cl -, SO 42-,Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg and Sr has a similar relative concentration in the nucleation mode and in the accumulation mode size fraction. For all samples collected on days with prevailing westerly winds a strong negative correlation between wind speed and sulfate particle size as well as sulfate concentration was observed.

  2. Are Ambient Ultrafine, Accumulation Mode, and Fine Particles Associated with Adverse Cardiac Responses in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Wojciech; Beckett, William; Hopke, Philip K; Oakes, David; Frampton, Mark W; Bisognano, John; Chalupa, David; Bausch, Jan; O’Shea, Karen; Wang, Yungang; Utell, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms underlying previously reported air pollution and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity associations remain poorly understood. Objectives: We examined associations between markers of pathways thought to underlie these air pollution and CV associations and ambient particle concentrations in postinfarction patients. Methods: We studied 76 patients, from June 2006 to November 2009, who participated in a 10-week cardiac rehabilitation program following a recent (within 3 months) myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Ambient ultrafine particle (UFP; 10–100 nm), accumulation mode particle (AMP; 100–500 nm), and fine particle concentrations (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) were monitored continuously. Continuous Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were made before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. A venous blood sample was collected and blood pressure was measured before sessions. Results: Using mixed effects models, we observed adverse changes in rMSSD [square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals], SDNN (standard deviation of all NN beat intervals), TpTe (time from peak to end of T-wave), heart rate turbulence, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen associated with interquartile range increases in UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at 1 or more lag times within the previous 5 days. Exposures were not associated with MeanNN, heart-rate–corrected QT interval duration (QTc), deceleration capacity, and white blood cell count was not associated with UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at any lag time. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation patients, particles were associated with subclinical decreases in parasympathetic modulation, prolongation of late repolarization duration, increased blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. It is possible that such changes could increase the risk of CV events in this susceptible population. PMID

  3. Effect of wind direction and speed on the dispersion of nucleation and accumulation mode particles in an urban street canyon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Fennell, Paul; Britter, Rex

    2008-08-25

    There have been many studies concerning dispersion of gaseous pollutants from vehicles within street canyons; fewer address the dispersion of particulate matter, particularly particle number concentrations separated into the nucleation (10-30 nm or N10-30) or accumulation (30-300 nm or N30-300) modes either separately or together (N10-300). This study aimed to determine the effect of wind direction and speed on particle dispersion in the above size ranges. Particle number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs) were measured in the 5-2738 nm range continuously (and in real-time) for 17 days between 7th and 23rd March 2007 in a regular (aspect ratio approximately unity) street canyon in Cambridge (UK), using a newly developed fast-response differential mobility spectrometer (sampling frequency 0.5 Hz), at 1.60 m above the road level. The PNCs in each size range, during all wind directions, were better described by a proposed two regime model (traffic-dependent and wind-dependent mixing) than by simply assuming that the PNC was inversely proportional to the wind speed or by fitting the data with a best-fit single power law. The critical cut-off wind speed (Ur,crit) for each size range of particles, distinguishing the boundary between these mixing regimes was also investigated. In the traffic-dependent PNC region (UrUrUr,critUr,crit), concentrations were inversely proportional to Ur irrespective of any particle size range and wind directions. The wind speed demarcating the two regimes (Ur,critUr,crit) was 1.23+/-0.55 m s(-1) for N10-300, (1.47+/-0.72 m s(-1)) for N10-30 but smaller (0.78+/-0.29 m s(-1)) for N30-300.

  4. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  5. Fast particle destabilization of TAE modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.; Gorelenkov, N.N.; Hsu, C.T.

    1995-09-01

    High-n TAE modes are studied based on a kinetic model that includes full thermal ion finite Larmor radius effects, trapped electron collisions and fast particle instability drive. Lower KTAE modes are shown to be non-existent. Like TAE modes, upper KTAE modes are shown to exist due to thermal ion FLR effects in the dissipationless limit. Dissipation effects on the stability of both TAE and upper KTAE modes can be treated perturbatively. However, due to their extended mode structure in the ballooning space, upper KTAE modes usually remain stable or weakly unstable even with large fast particle free energy. On the other hand, TAE modes can be strongly destabilized. A new resonant TAE mode (RTAE) can be excited when the fast particle drive is significantly large. The RTAE mode is a beam-like mode with its frequency determined mainly by the wave-particle resonance condition. The frequency of the RTAE mode can be much less than the TAE gap frequency and may be interpreted as the BAE observed in DIII-D experiments. As plasma {beta} increases, the TAE, RTAE and kinetic ballooning modes strongly couple; the TAE mode changes into the RTAE mode and eventually connects to the kinetic ballooning mode. Numerical results and analytical analysis on the stability of the RTAE and KTAE modes will be presented and compared with the TAE mode stability.

  6. Energetic particle effects on global MHD modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, C.Z.

    1990-01-01

    The effects of energetic particles on MHD type modes are studied by analytical theories and the nonvariational kinetic-MHD stability code (NOVA-K). In particular we address the problems of (1) the stabilization of ideal MHD internal kink modes and the excitation of resonant fishbone'' internal modes and (2) the alpha particle destabilization of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) via transit resonances. Analytical theories are presented to help explain the NOVA-K results. For energetic trapped particles generated by neutral-beam injection (NBI) or ion cyclotron resonant heating (ICRH), a stability window for the n=1 internal kink mode in the hot particle beat space exists even in the absence of core ion finite Larmor radius effect (finite {omega}{sub *i}). On the other hand, the trapped alpha particles are found to resonantly excite instability of the n=1 internal mode and can lower the critical beta threshold. The circulating alpha particles can strongly destabilize TAE modes via inverse Landau damping associated with the spatial gradient of the alpha particle pressure. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Particle Distribution Modification by Low Amplitude Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2009-08-28

    Modification of a high energy particle distribution by a spectrum of low amplitude modes is investigated using a guiding center code. Only through resonance are modes effective in modifying the distribution. Diagnostics are used to illustrate the mode-particle interaction and to find which effects are relevant in producing significant resonance, including kinetic Poincare plots and plots showing those orbits with time averaged mode-particle energy transfer. Effects of pitch angle scattering and drag are studied, as well as plasma rotation and time dependence of the equilibrium and mode frequencies. A specific example of changes observed in a DIII-D deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude experimentally validated Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes is examined in detail. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam profile modification, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold.

  8. Evolution of the alpha particle driven toroidicity induced Alfven mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.; Cheng, C.Z.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of alpha particles with a toroidicity induced Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal harmonics and their radial mode profiles are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. There is no significant alpha particle loss.

  9. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  10. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  11. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  12. Test Particles, Test Modes and Drift Turbulence

    SciTech Connect

    Vlad, Madalina; Spineanu, Florin

    2008-10-15

    Strong electrostatic turbulence in magnetically confined plasmas is characterized by trapping or eddying of test particle trajectories produced by the ExB stochastic drift. Trapping is shown to produce non-standard statistics of trajectories: non-Gaussian distribution, memory effects and quasi-coherence. Two types of effects produced by trapping are analyzed. The first type concerns particle and energy transport and consists in very strong nonlinear modification of the diffusion coefficients. Anomalous diffusion regimes are obtained when the other components of the motion (particle collisions, plasma rotation, the motion along the confining magnetic field) do not destroy trajectory eddying. The second type of effects are evidenced by studying test modes on turbulent plasma. We show that trappyng provides the physical mechanism for the inverse cascade observed in drift turbulence.

  13. Particle accumulation on periodic orbits by repeated free surface collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, Ernst; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2011-07-01

    The motion of small particles suspended in cylindrical thermocapillary liquid bridges is investigated numerically in order to explain the experimentally observed particle accumulation structures (PAS) in steady two- and time-dependent three-dimensional flows. Particles moving in this flow are modeled as perfect tracers in the bulk, which can undergo collisions with the free surface. By way of free-surface collisions the particles are transferred among different streamlines which represents the particle trajectories in the bulk. The inter-streamline transfer-process near the free surface together with the passive transport through the bulk is used to construct an iterative map that can describe the accumulation process as an attraction to a stable fixed point which represents PAS. The flow topology of the underlying azimuthally traveling hydrothermal wave turns out to be of key importance for the existence of PAS. In a frame of reference exactly rotating with the hydrothermal wave the three-dimensional flow is steady and exhibits co-existing regular and chaotic streamlines. We find that particles are attracted to accumulation structures if a closed regular streamline exists in the rotating frame of reference which closely approaches the free surface locally. Depending on the closed streamline and the particle radius PAS can arise as a specific trajectory which winds about the closed regular streamline or as the surface of a particular stream tube containing the closed streamline.

  14. Boat detection using vector accumulation of particle motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuguang; Li, Na; Li, Youyi; Li, Xiaoli

    2014-11-01

    Recently, target detection in sea environment such as boat detection has become a popular research topic which is significant for marine vessels monitoring system. Many target detection methods have been widely applied to practical applications such as frame difference, traditional optical flow and background subtraction method. However, the existing target detection methods are not suitable to deal with the complex conditions of sea surface, such as irregular movement of the waves and illumination changes. In this paper, we developed an approach based on vector accumulation of particle motion mainly aiming at eliminating the effects of irregular movement of waves. Our proposed method applies vector accumulation of particle motion to optical flow field to obtain more accurate detection results under complex conditions. Firstly, the traditional optical flow method is used to acquire motion vector of every particle. Furthermore, the vectors of each flow point are abstracted to represent the recording of a fluid element in the flow over a certain period, succeeding is the accumulation of particle vectors. Finally, we calculate the mean of the vector accumulation to eliminate the effects of irregular movement of waves based on the video. Experimental results show the proposed method can gain better performance than traditional optical flow method.

  15. Origin of particle accumulation structures in liquid bridges: Particle-boundary-interactions versus inertia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muldoon, Frank H.; Kuhlmann, Hendrik C.

    2016-07-01

    The formation of particle-accumulation structures in the flow in a cylindrical liquid bridge driven by the thermocapillary effect is studied with the aim of determining the physical mechanism which forms the structures. The flow is modeled using the incompressible Navier-Stokes and energy equations with the assumption of constant fluid properties except for surface tension, which is assumed to depend linearly on temperature. Different models for the motion of small non-interacting spherical particles at low concentration are employed, taking into account particle inertia due to density differences between fluid and particles and the restricted particle motion near the boundaries of the flow domain. Attention is focused on differences in formation time between particle-accumulation structures arising as a result of inertial effects only, particle-boundary-interaction effects only, and a combination of the two.

  16. Transient Simulation of Accumulating Particle Deposition in Pipe Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hewett, James; Sellier, Mathieu

    2015-11-01

    Colloidal particles that deposit in pipe systems can lead to fouling which is an expensive problem in both the geothermal and oil & gas industries. We investigate the gradual accumulation of deposited colloids in pipe flow using numerical simulations. An Euler-Lagrangian approach is employed for modelling the fluid and particle phases. Particle transport to the pipe wall is modelled with Brownian motion and turbulent diffusion. A two-way coupling exists between the fouled material and the pipe flow; the local mass flux of depositing particles is affected by the surrounding fluid in the near-wall region. This coupling is modelled by changing the cells from fluid to solid as the deposited particles exceed each local cell volume. A similar method has been used to model fouling in engine exhaust systems (Paz et al., Heat Transfer Eng., 34(8-9):674-682, 2013). We compare our deposition velocities and deposition profiles with an experiment on silica scaling in turbulent pipe flow (Kokhanenko et al., 19th AFMC, 2014).

  17. Particle compositions with a pre-selected cell internalization mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decuzzi, Paolo (Inventor); Ferrari, Mauro (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method of formulating a particle composition having a pre-selected cell internalization mode involves selecting a target cell having surface receptors and obtaining particles that have i) surface moieties, that have an affinity for or are capable of binding to the surface receptors of the cell and ii) a preselected shape, where a surface distribution of the surface moieties on the particles and the shape of the particles are effective for the pre-selected cell internalization mode.

  18. Theory of mode-induced beam particle loss in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, R. B.; Goldston, R. J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, Allen H.; Monticello, D. A.; Park, W.

    1983-10-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes are observed to induce significant high-energy beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular netural beam injection on the poloidal divertor experiment (PDX). A Hamiltonian formalism for drift orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  19. Energetic-particle stabilization of ballooning modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, M. N.; Tsai, S. T.; van Dam, J. W.; Engguist, M. G.

    1983-07-01

    Introduction of an anisotropic, highly energetic trapped-particle species into a Tokamak may allow direct stable access to the high-beta regime of second stability. Under certain conditions, the mode at marginal stability acquires a real frequency close to the precessional drift frequency of the energetic particles, perhaps correlating with recent fishbone observations on PDX.

  20. Energetic Particle Stabilization of Ballooning Modes in Tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbluth, M. N.; Tsai, S. T.; van Dam, J. W.; Engquist, M. G.

    1983-11-01

    Introduction of an anisctropic, highly energetic trapped-particle species into a tokamak may allow direct stable access to the high-beta regime of second stability. Under certain conditions, the mode at marginal stability acquires a real frequency close to the precessional drift frequency of the energetic particles, perhaps correlating with recent "fishbone" observations on PDX.

  1. Energetic particle stabilization of ballooning modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenbluth, M.N.; Tsai, S.T.; Van Dam, J.W.; Engquist, M.G.

    1983-11-21

    Introduction of an anisotropic, highly energetic trapped-particle species into a tokamak may allow direct stable access to the high-beta regime of second stability. Under certain conditions, the mode at marginal stability acquires a real frequency close to the precessional drift frequency of the energetic particles, perhaps correlating with recent ''fishbone'' observations on PDX.

  2. Alpha-particle effects on ballooning flute modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Andrushchenko, Z.N.; Bijko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K. )

    1990-11-01

    In this paper a more accurate dispersion equation for ideal ballooning flute modes in a plasma with alpha particles is obtained. It is shown that circulating and trapped alpha particles generate the eigenbranches of the mode oscillations with frequencies {omega} {approx lt} {omega}{sub *i}, where {omega}{sub *i}, is the ion drift frequency. The relevant growth rates and frequencies are found. It is ascertained that in the frequency range {omega}{sub *i} {lt} {omega} {lt} {bar {omega}{sub Db}}, where {bar {omega}{sub Db}} is the magnetic drift frequency average over a bounce period, trapped alpha particles may generate forced oscillations that influence the ideal ballooning flute mode stability boundary. It is shown that the stability may be improved for certain plasma parameters and trapped alpha-particle pressures.

  3. Resuspension of Aerosol Particles from Evaporated Rain Drops to the Coarse Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, H.; Easter, R. C.; Ganguly, D.; Singh, B.; Rasch, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    Precipitation scavenging (i.e., wet removal) has long been recognized as one of the major removal processes for tropospheric aerosol particles, and the dominant one for accumulation-mode size particles. When rain drops evaporate, the aerosol material contained in drops is resuspended, and this process has received much less attention. Unlike the resuspension from evaporated cloud droplets, the aerosol particles resuspended from evaporated rain drops have much larger sizes than most of the aerosol particles that acted as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), became cloud borne, and then were collected by rain drops, because each rain drop generally collects thousands of cloud droplets. Here we present some aspects of this resuspension process obtained from modeling studies. First, we investigate some details of the process using a simple drop-size resolved model of raindrop evaporation in sub-saturated air below cloud base. Using these results, we then investigate different treatments of this process in a global aerosol and climate model that employs a modal aerosol representation. Compared to the model's original treatment of this process in which rain-borne aerosol is resuspended to the mode that it came from with its original size, the new treatment that resuspends to the coarse mode produces notable reductions in global CCN concentrations, as well as sulfate, black carbon, and organic aerosol mass, because the resuspended aerosol particles have much shorter lifetimes due to their larger sizes. Somewhat surprisingly, there are also notable reductions in coarse-mode sea salt and mineral dust burdens. These species are resuspended to the coarse mode in both the original and new treatments, but these resuspended particles are fewer in number and larger in size in the new treatment. This finding highlights some issues of the modal aerosol treatment for coarse mode particles.

  4. High frequency single mode traveling wave structure for particle acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanyan, M. I.; Danielyan, V. A.; Grigoryan, B. A.; Grigoryan, A. H.; Tsakanian, A. V.; Tsakanov, V. M.; Vardanyan, A. S.; Zakaryan, S. V.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the new high frequency slow traveling wave structures is one of the promising directions in accomplishment of charged particles high acceleration gradient. The disc and dielectric loaded structures are the most known structures with slowly propagating modes. In this paper a large aperture high frequency metallic two-layer accelerating structure is studied. The electrodynamical properties of the slowly propagating TM01 mode in a metallic tube with internally coated low conductive thin layer are examined.

  5. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  6. Particle Trajectories and Agglomeration/Accumulation in Branching Arteries subjected to Orbital Atherectomy

    PubMed Central

    Helgeson, Zach L; Jenkins, Jed S; Abraham, John P; Sparrow, Ephraim M

    2011-01-01

    Background: The transport of particles in surrogate and actual arterial geometries has been investigated synergistically by experimentation and numerical simulation. The motivating application for this work is orbital atherectomy which spawns a particle cloud in the process of debulking plaque from arterial walls. Methods: Paired simulations and experiments were performed to prove the capability of the simulation model to predict both fluid and particle motions in branched arterial geometries. The verified model was then employed to predict the pattern of fluid flow in an actual multi-branched arterial geometry, including the flowrates passing through each of the individual branches. These predictions are in very good agreement with experimental data. Focus was then shifted to the issues of particle agglomeration within the flowing fluid and particle accumulation on the vessel walls. Once again, a synergistic approach was used. Flow visualization was employed to track the particle motions and to identify possible particle agglomeration within the fluid. Results and Conclusions: Accumulation of particles on walls was identified by measuring size distributions of effluent and residue within the artery. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) evaluation showed evidence of a size-based sorting as the particles passed through vessels. It was found that plaque-facsimile particles resisted particle-particle agglomeration. They also did not accumulate to the wall of the facsimile artery. In addition, simulations showed that if particle-wall accumulation were to occur, it would be limited to very small regions in the artery branches. PMID:21643425

  7. Equilibrium absorptive partitioning theory between multiple aerosol particle modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crooks, Matthew; Connolly, Paul; Topping, David; McFiggans, Gordon

    2016-10-01

    An existing equilibrium absorptive partitioning model for calculating the equilibrium gas and particle concentrations of multiple semi-volatile organics within a bulk aerosol is extended to allow for multiple involatile aerosol modes of different sizes and chemical compositions. In the bulk aerosol problem, the partitioning coefficient determines the fraction of the total concentration of semi-volatile material that is in the condensed phase of the aerosol. This work modifies this definition for multiple polydisperse aerosol modes to account for multiple condensed concentrations, one for each semi-volatile on each involatile aerosol mode. The pivotal assumption in this work is that each aerosol mode contains an involatile constituent, thus overcoming the potential problem of smaller particles evaporating completely and then condensing on the larger particles to create a monodisperse aerosol at equilibrium. A parameterisation is proposed in which the coupled non-linear system of equations is approximated by a simpler set of equations obtained by setting the organic mole fraction in the partitioning coefficient to be the same across all modes. By perturbing the condensed masses about this approximate solution a correction term is derived that accounts for many of the removed complexities. This method offers a greatly increased efficiency in calculating the solution without significant loss in accuracy, thus making it suitable for inclusion in large-scale models.

  8. Accumulation of heavy particles around a helical vortex filament

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    IJzermans, Rutger H. A.; Hagmeijer, Rob; van Langen, Pieter J.

    2007-10-01

    The motion of small heavy particles near a helical vortex filament in incompressible flow is investigated. Both the configurations of a helical vortex filament in free space and a helical vortex filament in a concentric pipe are considered, and the corresponding helically symmetric velocity fields are expressed in terms of a stream function. Particle motion is assumed to be driven by Stokes drag, and the flow fields are assumed to be independent from the motion of particles. Numerical results show that heavy particles may be attracted to helical trajectories. The stability of these attraction trajectories is demonstrated by linear stability analysis. In addition, the correlation between the attraction trajectories and the streamline topologies is investigated.

  9. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  10. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  11. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  12. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-03-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  13. Compact solid-state neutral particle analyzer in current mode

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Y. B.; Bortolon, A.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Celle, S. L.; Roquemore, A. L.

    2012-10-15

    Solid state neutral particle analyzer (ssNPA) arrays are operated in current mode on the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Compared with conventional pulse-counting NPAs, current-mode operation sacrifices energy resolution to obtain economical, high-bandwidth, pitch-angle resolved measurements. With the success from a new three-channel near-vertical-view current mode ssNPA on DIII-D, the apertures on an existing array on NSTX were expanded to increase the particle influx. The sightlines of both arrays intersect heating beams, enabling both active and passive charge exchange measurements. The spatial resolution at beam intersection is typically 5 cm on both devices. Directly deposited ultra-thin foils on the detector surface block stray photons below the energy of 1 keV and also set low energy threshold about 25 keV for deuterium particle detection. Oscillations in neutral flux produced by high frequency magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are readily detected.

  14. Compact solid-state neutral particle analyzer in current mode.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y B; Bortolon, A; Heidbrink, W W; Celle, S L; Roquemore, A L

    2012-10-01

    Solid state neutral particle analyzer (ssNPA) arrays are operated in current mode on the DIII-D tokamak and the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX). Compared with conventional pulse-counting NPAs, current-mode operation sacrifices energy resolution to obtain economical, high-bandwidth, pitch-angle resolved measurements. With the success from a new three-channel near-vertical-view current mode ssNPA on DIII-D, the apertures on an existing array on NSTX were expanded to increase the particle influx. The sightlines of both arrays intersect heating beams, enabling both active and passive charge exchange measurements. The spatial resolution at beam intersection is typically 5 cm on both devices. Directly deposited ultra-thin foils on the detector surface block stray photons below the energy of 1 keV and also set low energy threshold about 25 keV for deuterium particle detection. Oscillations in neutral flux produced by high frequency magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) instabilities are readily detected.

  15. Self-consistent study of the alpha particle driven TAE mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Y.; White, R.B.

    1994-04-01

    The interaction of high energy particles with an Alfven eigenmode is investigated self-consistently by using a realistic kinetic dispersion relation. All important poloidal mode numbers and their radial mode profiles as calculated with the NOVA-K code are included. A Hamiltonian guiding center code is used to simulate the alpha particle motion. The numerical simulations include particle orbit width, nonlinear particle dynamics and the effects of the modes on the particles. Modification of the particle distribution leading to mode saturation is observed. Particle loss is limited to devices in which the alpha particle gyro radius is a significant fraction of the minor radius.

  16. Nonlinear simulations of particle source effects on edge localized mode

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, J.; Tang, C. J.; Chen, S. Y.; Wang, Z. H.

    2015-12-15

    The effects of particle source (PS) with different intensities and located positions on Edge Localized Mode (ELM) are systematically studied with BOUT++ code. The results show the ELM size strongly decreases with increasing the PS intensity once the PS is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal. The effects of PS on ELM depend on the located position of PS. When it is located at the top of the pedestal, peeling-ballooning (P-B) modes can extract more free energy from the pressure gradient and grow up to be a large filament at the initial crash phase and the broadening of mode spectrum can be suppressed by PS, which leads to more energy loss. When it is located in the middle or bottom of the pedestal, the extraction of free energy by P-B modes can be suppressed, and a small filament is generated. During the turbulence transport phase, the broader mode spectrum suppresses the turbulence transport when PS is located in the middle, while the zonal flow plays an important role in damping the turbulence transport when PS is located at the bottom.

  17. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  18. Characterization of accumulation-mode Si/SiGe triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, T. M.; Zajac, D. M.; Mi, X.; Zhang, S. S.; Petta, J. R.

    The transition from quantum dots fabricated from doped Si/SiGe quantum wells to undoped accumulation-mode structures has greatly improved the performance of few-electron quantum dots. Our accumulation-mode devices are reconfigurable and allow for operation as single, double, or triple quantum dots. In these devices, we measure typical charging energies Ec = 5 . 7 meV, orbital excited state energies as large as Eo = 2.9 meV, and valley splittings of up to Ev = 80 μeV. With the device configured as a triple quantum dot, we easily reach the (1,1,1) charge configuration. The gate architecture allows the interdot tunnel coupling to be tuned over a wide range, which is important for operation as an exchange-only spin qubit. Research sponsored by ARO Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0149.

  19. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  20. NIMROD Modeling of Sawtooth Modes Using Hot-Particle Closures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruger, Scott; Jenkins, T. G.; Held, E. D.; King, J. R.

    2015-11-01

    In DIII-D shot 96043, RF heating gives rise to an energetic ion population that alters the sawtooth stability boundary, replacing conventional sawtooth cycles by longer-period, larger-amplitude `giant sawtooth' oscillations. We explore the use of particle-in-cell closures within the NIMROD code to numerically represent the RF-induced hot-particle distribution, and investigate the role of this distribution in determining the altered mode onset threshold and subsequent nonlinear evolution. Equilibrium reconstructions from the experimental data are used to enable these detailed validation studies. Effects of other parameters on the sawtooth behavior, such as the plasma Lundquist number and hot-particle beta-fraction, are also considered. The fast energetic particles present many challenges for the PIC closure. We review new algorithm and performance improvements to address these challenges, and provide a preliminary assessment of the efficacy of the PIC closure versus a continuum model for energetic particle modeling. We also compare our results with those of, and discuss plans for a more complete validation campaign for this discharge. Supported by US Department of Energy via the SciDAC Center for Extended MHD Modeling (CEMM).

  1. Sediment particle size and initial radiocesium accumulation in ponds following the Fukushima DNPP accident

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2014-01-01

    This study used particle size analysis to investigate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of radiocesium (137Cs) in four irrigation ponds, ~4–5 months after the Fukushima Dai–ichi nuclear power plant (DNPP) accident. Trap efficiency, represented by the inventory of 137Cs in pond sediment to the inventory of radiocesium in soil surrounding the pond (i.e., total 137Cs inventory), was less than 100% for all but one pond. Trap efficiency decreased as sediment particle size increased, indicating that sediments with a smaller particle size accumulate more 137Cs. In ponds showing low trap efficiency, fine sediment containing high concentrations of 137Cs appeared to be removed from the system by hydraulic flushing, leaving behind mostly coarse sediment. The results of this study suggest that sediment particle size can be used to estimate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of 137Cs in pond sediment, as well as the amount lost through hydraulic flushing. PMID:24682011

  2. Sediment particle size and initial radiocesium accumulation in ponds following the Fukushima DNPP accident.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Kazuya; Onda, Yuichi; Fukushima, Takehiko

    2014-03-31

    This study used particle size analysis to investigate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of radiocesium ((137)Cs) in four irrigation ponds, ~4-5 months after the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant (DNPP) accident. Trap efficiency, represented by the inventory of (137)Cs in pond sediment to the inventory of radiocesium in soil surrounding the pond (i.e., total (137)Cs inventory), was less than 100% for all but one pond. Trap efficiency decreased as sediment particle size increased, indicating that sediments with a smaller particle size accumulate more (137)Cs. In ponds showing low trap efficiency, fine sediment containing high concentrations of (137)Cs appeared to be removed from the system by hydraulic flushing, leaving behind mostly coarse sediment. The results of this study suggest that sediment particle size can be used to estimate the initial accumulation and trap efficiency of (137)Cs in pond sediment, as well as the amount lost through hydraulic flushing.

  3. Role of sooty mold fungi in accumulation of fine-particle-associated PAHs and metals on deciduous leaves.

    PubMed

    Jouraeva, Venera A; Johnson, David L; Hassett, John P; Nowak, David J; Shipunova, Natalia A; Barbarossa, Dana

    2006-11-01

    The focus of this research was on elucidation of the role of deciduous tree ecosystems in accumulation of fine-particle-associated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals on leaves of deciduous trees. The studied species were Tilia x euchlora (frequently infested by sooty mold fungi) and Pyrus calleryana (unaffected by sooty mold fungi). The selected species have similar leaf morphology and were exposed to identical environmental conditions. Intra-species comparison showed that moldy linden leaves accumulate significantly higher amounts of PAHs and metals than unaffected linden leaves. Inter-species comparison revealed that in the absence of sooty mold fungi, physico-chemical properties of epicuticular waxes, rather than the amounts of waxes, might play an important role in accumulation of particulate matter on leaves. The accumulation and/or degradation of a number of high-molecular-weight (HMW) PAHs on leaves was temperature dependent. The results show that the presence of sooty mold fungi on deciduous leaves alters either the accumulation modes and/or degradation pathways of PAHs on deciduous leaves.

  4. New modes of particle accelerations techniques and sources. Formal report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    This Report includes copies of transparencies and notes from the presentations made at the Symposium on New Modes of Particle Accelerations - Techniques and Sources, August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara California, that was made available by the authors. Editing, reduction and changes to the authors contributions were made only to fulfill the printing and publication requirements. We would like to take this opportunity and thank the speakers for their informative presentations and for providing copies of their transparencies and notes for inclusion in this Report.

  5. Fast excitation of geodesic acoustic mode by energetic particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Jintao; Qiu, Zhiyong; Zonca, Fulvio

    2015-12-15

    A new mechanism for geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) excitation by a not fully slowed down energetic particle (EP) beam is analyzed to explain experimental observations in Large Helical Device. It is shown that the positive velocity space gradient near the lower-energy end of the EP distribution function can strongly drive the GAM unstable. The new features of this EP-induced GAM (EGAM) are: (1) no instability threshold in the pitch angle; (2) the EGAM frequency can be higher than the local GAM frequency; and (3) the instability growth rate is much larger than that driven by a fully slowed down EP beam.

  6. Beam ion losses due to energetic particle geodesic acoustic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, R. K.; Pace, D. C.; Kramer, G. J.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Nazikian, R.; Heidbrink, W. W.; García-Muñoz, M.

    2012-12-01

    We report the first experimental observations of fast-ion loss in a tokamak due to energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs). A fast-ion loss detector installed on the DIII-D tokamak observes bursts of beam ion losses coherent with the EGAM frequency. The EGAM activity results in a significant loss of beam ions, comparable to the first orbit losses. The pitch angles and energies of the measured fast-ion losses agree with predictions from a full orbit simulation code SPIRAL, which includes scattering and slowing-down.

  7. Positron accumulation effect in particles embedded in a low-density matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2015-02-07

    Systematic studies of the so-called positron accumulation effect for samples with particles embedded in a matrix are reported. This effect is related to energetic positrons which penetrate inhomogeneous medium. Due to differences in the linear absorption coefficient, different amounts of positrons are accumulated and annihilate in the identical volume of both materials. Positron lifetime spectroscopy and Doppler broadening of the annihilation line using Na-22 positrons were applied to the studies of the epoxy resin samples with embedded micro-sized particles of transition metals, i.e., Ni, Sn, Mo, W, and nonmetal particles, i.e., Si and NaF. The significant difference between the determined fraction of positrons annihilating in the particles and the particle volume fraction indicates the positron accumulation effect. The simple phenomenological model and Monte Carlo simulations are able to describe the main features of the obtained dependencies. The aluminum alloy with embedded Sn nanoparticles is also considered for demonstration differences between the accumulation and another related effect, i.e., the positron affinity.

  8. Accumulation of particles on the surface of leaves during leaf expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gong, Huili; Liao, Wenbo; Wang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Plants can effectively remove airborne particles from ambient air and consequently improve air quality and human health. The accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces of three plant species with different epicuticular wax ultrastructures, such as thin films, platelets and tubules, was investigated during leaf expansion in Beijing under extremely high particulate matter (PM) concentration. The accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces after bud break rapidly reached a high amount within 4-7 days. Rainfall occasionally resulted in a considerable increase in the accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces at a high PM concentration, which resulted from the wet deposition of PM, and balanced the amount of PM on the leaf surfaces over a longer period. The equilibrium value of the particle cover area on the adaxial leaf surface of the three test species in this study was 10%-50% compared with 3%-35% on the abaxial leaf surface. The epicuticular wax ultrastructures contributed significantly to the PM adsorption of the leaves. The capability of these ultrastructures to capture PM decreased in the following order: thin films, platelets and tubules. The ridges (at a scale of 1-2 μm) on the leaf surfaces were more efficient at accumulating PM, particularly PM2.5, compared with the roughness (P-V distance) at a 5-20-μm scale. PMID:26093221

  9. Accumulation of particles on the surface of leaves during leaf expansion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Gong, Huili; Liao, Wenbo; Wang, Zhi

    2015-11-01

    Plants can effectively remove airborne particles from ambient air and consequently improve air quality and human health. The accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces of three plant species with different epicuticular wax ultrastructures, such as thin films, platelets and tubules, was investigated during leaf expansion in Beijing under extremely high particulate matter (PM) concentration. The accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces after bud break rapidly reached a high amount within 4-7 days. Rainfall occasionally resulted in a considerable increase in the accumulation of particles on the leaf surfaces at a high PM concentration, which resulted from the wet deposition of PM, and balanced the amount of PM on the leaf surfaces over a longer period. The equilibrium value of the particle cover area on the adaxial leaf surface of the three test species in this study was 10%-50% compared with 3%-35% on the abaxial leaf surface. The epicuticular wax ultrastructures contributed significantly to the PM adsorption of the leaves. The capability of these ultrastructures to capture PM decreased in the following order: thin films, platelets and tubules. The ridges (at a scale of 1-2 μm) on the leaf surfaces were more efficient at accumulating PM, particularly PM2.5, compared with the roughness (P-V distance) at a 5-20-μm scale.

  10. New modes of particle acceleration, techniques & sources symposium. Summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Parsa, Z.

    1996-12-31

    A Symposium on {open_quotes}New Modes of Particle Acceleration Technique and Sources{close_quotes} was held August 19-23, 1996 at the Institute for Theoretical Physics (ITP) in Santa Barbara. This was the first of the 3 symposia hosted by the ITP and supported by its sponsor the National Science Foundation, as part of our {open_quotes}New Ideas for Particle Accelerators{close_quotes} program. The symposia was organized and chaired by Dr. Zohreh Parsa of ITP/Brookhaven National Laboratory. This Symposium provided a perspective on the future direction of the Advanced Accelerator Research. The experimental study of elementary particles has become concentrated at a few large laboratories throughout the world because of the size and cost of the accelerator facilities needed for this work. For example, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, currently under construction, is 27 km in circumference and is being financed by the European membership of CERN plus contributions from non-member nations. An evolutionary approach to construction of ever higher energy colliders will only continue this trend towards high cost and large size.

  11. A fast CMOS array imager for nanosecond light pulse detection in accumulation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, Chantal-V.; Uhring, Wilfried; Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, Jean-P.; Morel, Frederic; Hu, Yann

    2004-09-01

    We designed a camera based on a fast CMOS APS imager for high speed optical detection which produces images simi-larly as a streak camera. This imager produces the intensity information I as function of one spatial dimension and time (I=f(x,t)) from one frame with two spatial dimensions. The time sweeping is obtained by delaying successively the integration phase for each pixel of the same row. For the first FAMOSI (Fast MOs Imager) prototype the start of in-tegration is given by the camera itself. This signal is injected to a laser trigger. This laser emits a 10 nanoseconds light pulse onto the sensor. The temporal evolution of the light pulse is then resolved by the camera with a resolution of 800 ps. In single shot, the maximum dynamic of the camera is estimated to 64 dB and is limited by the readout noise. We decide to work in accumulation mode in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of the camera. But the high laser trigger (about 20 ns rms) does not allow accumulation of several optical events without a large spreading. The camera has been modified in order to be triggered by an external signal delivered by a trigger unit. In this new configuration the laser emit pulses at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A photodiode detect a part of the laser pulse and generate the trigger signal for FAMOSI. The laser pulse is delayed with an optical fibre before being directed to the camera. The trigger jitter obtained is then less than 100 ps and allows accumulation without significant loss of the temporal resolution. With accumulation the readout noise is attenuated by a √N factor. Then with N = 1000 accumulations, the dynamics approach 93 dB. This allows the camera to work similarly as a synchroscan streak camera and then to observe weak signal.

  12. Nonlinear Particle Pinch in Collisionless Trapped Electron Mode Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terry, P. W.; Gatto, R.

    2005-10-01

    Collisionless trapped electron mode turbulence is shown to have an anomalous particle pinch fundamentally unlike pinches identified previously. It arises from a nonlinear fluctuation eigenmode, placing it outside the purview of quasilinear theory. The nonlinear eigenmode develops because the nonlinearity excites a damped linear eigenmode, changing the density- potential correlation. The flux is solved from spectrum balance equations in a complete basis spanning the fluctuation space under a joint expansion in collision frequency and instability threshold parameter. The solution accounts for saturation by anisotropic energy transfer to zonal wavenumbers of the damped eigenmode. To lowest order the pinch is a convective-like flux driven by temperature gradient. It arises from the damped eigenmode energy and the real part of the correlation between damped and growing eigenmodes. The pinch is slightly smaller than the outwardly directed flux associated with the growing eigenmode, making the flux a small fraction of the quasilinear value. Work supported by US DOE.

  13. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, O. V. Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  14. Accumulation of lipids and oxidatively damaged DNA in hepatocytes exposed to particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesterdal, Lise K.; Danielsen, Pernille H.; Folkmann, Janne K.; Jespersen, Line F.; Aguilar-Pelaez, Karin; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Exposure to particles has been suggested to generate hepatosteatosis by oxidative stress mechanisms. We investigated lipid accumulation in cultured human hepatocytes (HepG2) and rat liver after exposure to four different carbon-based particles. HepG2 cells were exposed to particles for 3 h and subsequently incubated for another 18 h to manifest lipid accumulation. In an animal model of metabolic syndrome we investigated the association between intake of carbon black (CB, 14 nm) particles and hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammation and gene expression of Srebp-1, Fasn and Scd-1 involved in lipid synthesis. There was a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular lipid content after exposure to CB in HepG2 cells, which was only observed after co-exposure to oleic/palmitic acid. Similar results were observed in HepG2 cells after exposure to diesel exhaust particles, fullerenes C{sub 60} or pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes. All four types of particles also generated oxidatively damaged DNA, assessed as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites, in HepG2 cells after 3 h exposure. The animal model of metabolic syndrome showed increased lipid load in the liver after one oral exposure to 6.4 mg/kg of CB in lean Zucker rats. This was not associated with increased iNOS staining in the liver, indicating that the oral CB exposure was associated with hepatic steatosis rather than steatohepatitis. The lipid accumulation did not seem to be related to increased lipogenesis because there were unaltered gene expression levels in both the HepG2 cells and rat livers. Collectively, exposure to particles is associated with oxidative stress and steatosis in hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black was associated with hepatosteatosis in rats. • In vitro studies included carbon black, C{sub 60}, diesel exhaust particles and SWCNTs. • Exposure to particles and free fatty acids increased lipid load in HepG2 cells. • Unaltered

  15. Modified lipoprotein-derived lipid particles accumulate in human stenotic aortic valves.

    PubMed

    Lehti, Satu; Käkelä, Reijo; Hörkkö, Sohvi; Kummu, Outi; Helske-Suihko, Satu; Kupari, Markku; Werkkala, Kalervo; Kovanen, Petri T; Oörni, Katariina

    2013-01-01

    In aortic stenosis plasma lipoprotein-derived lipids accumulate in aortic valves. Here, we first compared the lipid compositions of stenotic aortic valves and atherosclerotic plaque cores. Both pathological tissues were found to be enriched in cholesteryl linoleate, a marker of extracellularly accumulated lipoproteins. In addition, a large proportion of the phospholipids were found to contain arachidonic acid, the common precursor of a number of proinflammatory lipid mediators. Next, we isolated and characterized extracellular lipid particles from human stenotic and non-stenotic control valves, and compared them to plasma lipoproteins from the same subjects. The extracellular valvular lipid particles were isolated from 15 stenotic and 14 non-stenotic aortic valves. Significantly more apoB-100-containing lipid particles were found in the stenotic than in the non-stenotic valves. The majority of the lipid particles isolated from the non-stenotic valves had sizes (23±6.2 nm in diameter) similar to those of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) (22±1.5 nm), while the lipid particles from stenotic valves were not of uniform size, their sizes ranging from 18 to more than 500 nm. The lipid particles showed signs of oxidative modifications, and when compared to isolated plasma LDL particles, the lipid particles isolated from the stenotic valves had a higher sphingomyelin/phosphatidylcholine -ratio, and also higher contents of lysophosphatidylcholine and unesterified cholesterol. The findings of the present study reveal, for the first time, that in stenotic human aortic valves, infiltrated plasma lipoproteins have undergone oxidative and lipolytic modifications, and become fused and aggregated. The generated large lipid particles may contribute to the pathogenesis of human aortic stenosis.

  16. Effect of typhoon on atmospheric aerosol particle pollutants accumulation over Xiamen, China.

    PubMed

    Yan, Jinpei; Chen, Liqi; Lin, Qi; Zhao, Shuhui; Zhang, Miming

    2016-09-01

    Great influence of typhoon on air quality has been confirmed, however, rare data especially high time resolved aerosol particle data could be used to establish the behavior of typhoon on air pollution. A single particle aerosol spectrometer (SPAMS) was employed to characterize the particles with particle number count in high time resolution for two typhoons of Soulik (2013) and Soudelor (2015) with similar tracks. Three periods with five events were classified during the whole observation time, including pre - typhoon (event 1 and event 2), typhoon (event 3 and event 4) and post - typhoon (event 5) based on the meteorological parameters and particle pollutant properties. First pollutant group appeared during pre-typhoon (event 2) with high relative contributions of V - Ni rich particles. Pollution from the ship emissions and accumulated by local processes with stagnant meteorological atmosphere dominated the formation of the pollutant group before typhoon. The second pollutant group was present during typhoon (event 3), while typhoon began to change the local wind direction and increase wind speed. Particle number count reached up to the maximum value. High relative contributions of V - Ni rich and dust particles with low value of NO3(-)/SO4(2-) was observed during this period, indicating that the pollutant group was governed by the combined effect of local pollutant emissions and long-term transports. The analysis of this study sheds a deep insight into understand the relationship between the air pollution and typhoon. PMID:27295441

  17. Accumulation of Cu and Zn in discarded antifouling paint particles by the marine gastropod, Littorina littorea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gammon, Melanie; Turner, Andrew; Brown, Murray T.

    2009-10-01

    The short-term (5 day) accumulation of Cu and Zn in different tissues of the marine gastropod, Littorina littorea, has been studied in the presence of ˜10 mg l -1 of antifouling paint particles and pre- or simultaneously contaminated algal food ( Ulva lactuca). Accumulation of Cu was observed in the head-foot, digestive gland-gonad complex and gills to extents dependent on how and when food was contaminated and administered. However, retention of Zn was only observed in the gills and only when L. littorea and U. lactuca were simultaneously exposed to paint particles. Relative to the alga, faecal material was highly enriched in Zn, suggesting that the animal is able to rapidly eliminate this metal, most likely through the formation and egestion of insoluble phosphate granules. Thus, L. littorea is a useful biomonitor of marine contamination by antifouling applications in respect of Cu but not Zn.

  18. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  19. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed.

  20. Measurements of the evaporation and hygroscopic response of single fine-mode aerosol particles using a Bessel beam optical trap.

    PubMed

    Cotterell, Michael I; Mason, Bernard J; Carruthers, Antonia E; Walker, Jim S; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J; Reid, Jonathan P

    2014-02-01

    A single horizontally-propagating zeroth order Bessel laser beam with a counter-propagating gas flow was used to confine single fine-mode aerosol particles over extended periods of time, during which process measurements were performed. Particle sizes were measured by the analysis of the angular variation of light scattered at 532 nm by a particle in the Bessel beam, using either a probe beam at 405 nm or 633 nm. The vapour pressures of glycerol and 1,2,6-hexanetriol particles were determined to be 7.5 ± 2.6 mPa and 0.20 ± 0.02 mPa respectively. The lower volatility of hexanetriol allowed better definition of the trapping environment relative humidity profile over the measurement time period, thus higher precision measurements were obtained compared to those for glycerol. The size evolution of a hexanetriol particle, as well as its refractive index at wavelengths 532 nm and 405 nm, were determined by modelling its position along the Bessel beam propagation length while collecting phase functions with the 405 nm probe beam. Measurements of the hygroscopic growth of sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate have been performed on particles as small as 350 nm in radius, with growth curves well described by widely used equilibrium state models. These are the smallest particles for which single-particle hygroscopicity has been measured and represent the first measurements of hygroscopicity on fine mode and near-accumulation mode aerosols, the size regimes bearing the most atmospheric relevance in terms of loading, light extinction and scattering. Finally, the technique is contrasted with other single particle and ensemble methods, and limitations are assessed. PMID:24346588

  1. Temporal assessment of nanoparticle accumulation after experimental brain injury: Effect of particle size

    PubMed Central

    Bharadwaj, Vimala N.; Lifshitz, Jonathan; Adelson, P. David; Kodibagkar, Vikram D.; Stabenfeldt, Sarah E.

    2016-01-01

    Nanoparticle (NP) based therapeutic and theranostic agents have been developed for various diseases, yet application to neural disease/injury is restricted by the blood-brain-barrier (BBB). Traumatic brain injury (TBI) results in a host of pathological alterations, including transient breakdown of the BBB, thus opening a window for NP delivery to the injured brain tissue. This study focused on investigating the spatiotemporal accumulation of different sized NPs after TBI. Specifically, animal cohorts sustaining a controlled cortical impact injury received an intravenous injection of PEGylated NP cocktail (20, 40, 100, and 500 nm, each with a unique fluorophore) immediately (0 h), 2 h, 5 h, 12 h, or 23 h after injury. NPs were allowed to circulate for 1 h before perfusion and brain harvest. Confocal microscopy demonstrated peak NP accumulation within the injury penumbra 1 h post-injury. An inverse relationship was found between NP size and their continued accumulation within the penumbra. NP accumulation preferentially occurred in the primary motor and somatosensory areas of the injury penumbra as compared to the parietal association and visual area. Thus, we characterized the accumulation of particles up to 500 nm at different times acutely after injury, indicating the potential of NP-based TBI theranostics in the acute period after injury. PMID:27444615

  2. Theory of mode-induced beam-particle loss in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R.B.; Goldston, R.J.; McGuire, K.; Boozer, A.H.; Monticello, D.A.; Park, W.

    1983-04-01

    Large-amplitude rotating magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed to induce significant high-energy-beam particle loss during high-power perpendicular neutral-beam injection on PDX. A Hamiltonian formalism for drift-orbit trajectories in the presence of such modes is used to study induced particle loss analytically and numerically. Results are in good agreement with experiment.

  3. Indoor/outdoor relationships and mass closure of quasi-ultrafine, accumulation and coarse particles in Barcelona schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viana, M.; Rivas, I.; Querol, X.; Alastuey, A.; Sunyer, J.; Álvarez-Pedrerol, M.; Bouso, L.; Sioutas, C.

    2014-05-01

    The mass concentration, chemical composition and sources of quasi-ultrafine (quasi-UFP, PM0.25), accumulation (PM0.25-2.5) and coarse mode (PM2.5-10) particles were determined in indoor and outdoor air at 39 schools in Barcelona (Spain). Quasi-UFP mass concentrations measured (25.6 μg m-3 outdoors, 23.4 μg m-3 indoors) are significantly higher than those reported in other studies, and characterised by higher carbonaceous and mineral matter contents and a lower proportion of secondary inorganic ions. Results suggest that quasi-UFPs in Barcelona are affected by local sources in the schools, mainly human activity (e.g. organic material from textiles, etc., contributing 23-46% to total quasi-UFP mass) and playgrounds (in the form of mineral matter, contributing about 9% to the quasi-UFP mass). The particle size distribution patterns of toxicologically relevant metals and major aerosol components was characterised, displaying two modes for most elements and components, and one mode for inorganic salts (ammonium nitrate and sulfate) and elemental carbon (EC). Regarding metals, Ni and Cr were partitioned mainly in quasi-UFPs and could thus be of interest for epidemiological studies, given their high redox properties. Exposure of children to quasi-UFP mass and chemical species was assessed by comparing the concentrations measured at urban background and traffic areas schools. Finally, three main indoor sources across all size fractions were identified by assessing indoor / outdoor ratios (I / O) of PM species used as their tracers: human activity (organic material), cleaning products, paints and plastics (Cl- source), and a metallic mixed source (comprising combinations of Cu, Zn, Co, Cd, Pb, As, V and Cr). Our results support the need to enforce targeted legislation to determine a minimum "safe" distance between major roads and newly built schools to reduce exposure to traffic-derived metals in quasi-UFPs.

  4. Theory of energetic/alpha particle effects on magnetohydrodynamic modes in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rewoldt, G.; Colestock, P.; Rutherford, P.H.; Chen, Y.P.; Ke, F.J.; Tsai, S.T.; Bussac, M.N.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of energetic particles is shown to qualitatively modify the stability properties of ideal as well as resistive magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) modes in tokamaks. Specifically, we demonstrate that, consistent with highpower ICRF heating experiments in JET, high energy trapped particles can effectively stabilize the sawtooth mode, providing a possible route to stable high current tokamak operation. An alternative stabilization scheme employing barely circulating energetic particles is also proposed. Finally, we present analytical and numerical studies on the excitations of high-n MHD modes via transit resonances with circulating alpha particles. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  5. Accumulation in liver and spleen of metal particles generated at nonbearing surfaces in hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Urban, Robert M; Tomlinson, Michael J; Hall, Deborah J; Jacobs, Joshua J

    2004-12-01

    Systemic migration of metal particles generated at nonbearing surfaces rather than the intended primary bearing was studied in postmortem specimens from 30 patients with total hip arthroplasty. Using light and electron microscopy with x-ray microanalysis, submicrometer metal particles were identified within macrophages in the liver and/or the spleen in 11 of 15 patients with a revised arthroplasty and in 2 of 15 patients with primary hip arthroplasty. The macrophages formed focal aggregates in the organs without apparent toxicity. Fretting at ancillary fixation devices, loose components, and modular connections can generate a substantial volume of debris. These particles are in addition to those generated at the bearing surfaces, further increasing both the local and systemic particulate burdens. While all components can be associated with the distant spread of particles and metal ions, it is the environment of revision arthroplasty that provides the greatest potential for the generation and systemic dissemination of wear debris. The long-term effects of accumulated wear particles in the liver and spleen are unknown. PMID:15578561

  6. Hybrid architecture for shallow accumulation mode AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with epitaxial gates

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Hamilton, A. R.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ritzmann, J.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-01-05

    Accumulation mode devices with epitaxially grown gates have excellent electrical stability due to the absence of dopant impurities and surface states. We overcome typical fabrication issues associated with epitaxially gated structures (e.g., gate leakage and high contact resistance) by using separate gates to control the electron densities in the Ohmic and Hall bar regions. This hybrid gate architecture opens up a way to make ultrastable nanoscale devices where the separation between the surface gates and the 2D electron gas is small. In this work, we demonstrate that the hybrid devices made from the same wafer have reproducible electrical characteristics, with identical mobility and density traces over a large range of 2D densities. In addition, thermal cycling does not influence the measured electrical characteristics. As a demonstration of concept, we have fabricated a hybrid single-electron transistor on a shallow (50 nm) AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure that shows clear Coulomb blockade oscillations in the low temperature conductance.

  7. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc < kT˜ 5μeV) to over-coupled (tc ˜ 0.1 meV) with a bias control of one exchange gate. Sponsored by the United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  8. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  9. Energy and frequency dependence of the alpha particle redistribution produced by internal kink modes

    SciTech Connect

    Farengo, R.; Ferrari, H. E.; Garcia-Martinez, P. L.; Firpo, M.-C.; Ettoumi, W.; Lifschitz, A. F.

    2014-08-15

    The redistribution of alpha particles due to internal kink modes is studied. The exact particle trajectories in the total fields, equilibrium plus perturbation, are calculated. The equilibrium has circular cross section and the plasma parameters are similar to those expected in ITER. The alpha particles are initially distributed according to a slowing down distribution function and have energies between 18 keV and 3.5 MeV. The (1, 1), (2, 2), and (2, 1) modes are included and the effect of changing their amplitude and frequency is studied. When only the (1, 1) mode is included, the spreading of high energy (E≳1 MeV) alpha particles increases slowly with the energy and mode frequency. At lower energies, the redistribution is more sensitive to the mode frequency and particle energy. When a (2, 1) mode is added, the spreading increases significantly and particles can reach the edge of the plasma. Trapped particles are the most affected and the redistribution parameter can have maxima above 1 MeV, depending on the mode frequency. These results can have important implications for ash removal.

  10. Silica uptake by Spartina—evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a critical role in plant functional ecology, protecting plants from multiple environmental stressors. While all terrestrial plants contain some Si, wetland grasses are frequently found to have the highest concentrations, although the mechanisms driving Si accumulation in wetland grasses remain in large part uncertain. For example, active Si accumulation is often assumed to be responsible for elevated Si concentrations found in wetland grasses. However, life stage and differences in Si availability in the surrounding environment also appear to be important variables controlling the Si concentrations of wetland grasses. Here we used original data from five North American salt marshes, as well as all known published literature values, to examine the primary drivers of Si accumulation in Spartina, a genus of prolific salt marsh grasses found worldwide. We found evidence of multiple modes of Si accumulation in Spartina, with passive accumulation observed in non-degraded marshes where Spartina was native, while rejective accumulation was found in regions where Spartina was invasive. Evidence of active accumulation was found in only one marsh where Spartina was native, but was also subjected to nutrient over-enrichment. We developed a conceptual model which hypothesizes that the mode of Si uptake by Spartina is dependent on local environmental factors and genetic origin, supporting the idea that plant species should be placed along a spectrum of Si accumulation. We hypothesize that Spartina exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic plasticity with regard to Si accumulation, allowing these plants to respond to changes in marsh condition. These results provide new insight regarding how salt marsh ecosystems regulate Si exchange at the land-sea interface. PMID:24904599

  11. Small-action Particles in a Tokamak in the Presence of an n = 1 Mode

    SciTech Connect

    R.B. White; V.V. Lutsenko; Ya. I. Kolesnichenko; Yu. V. Yakovenko

    1999-11-01

    It is found that an m = n = 1 mode with the amplitude exceeding a certain threshold can lead to stochastic motion of energetic ions in tokamaks, the large orbit width particles (potatoes) being most easily affected. An n = 1 mode can redistribute particles also in the absence of stochasticity but only when the perturbation is quickly switched on/off, e.g., due to sawtooth crash. In the latter case, the perturbation results in regular motion of particles around a certain helical orbit, at which a resonance driven by the mode but having no amplitude threshold takes place.

  12. Wave-vector dispersion versus angular-momentum dispersion of collective modes in small metal particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekardt, W.

    1987-09-01

    The wave-vector dispersion of collective modes in small particles is investigated within the time-dependent local-density approximation as applied to a self-consistent jellium particle. It is shown that the dispersion of the volume plasmons can be understood from that in an infinite electron gas. For a given multipole an optimum wave vector exists for the quasiresonant excitation of the volume mode but not for the surface mode. It is pointed out that-for the volume modes-the hydrodynamic approximation gives a reasonable first guess for the relation between frequencies and size-quantized wave vectors.

  13. Global Hybrid Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven Modes in Toroidal Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; J. Breslau; E. Fredrickson; W. Park; H.R. Strauss

    2004-12-14

    Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle-driven MHD modes have been carried out for tokamaks and spherical tokamaks using the hybrid code M3D. The numerical results for the National Spherical Tokamak Experiments (NSTX) show that Toroidal Alfven Eigenmodes are excited by beam ions with their frequencies consistent with the experimental observations. Nonlinear simulations indicate that the n=2 mode frequency chirps down as the mode moves out radially. For ITER, it is shown that the alpha-particle effects are strongly stabilizing for internal kink mode when central safety factor q(0) is sufficiently close to unity. However, the elongation of ITER plasma shape reduces the stabilization significantly.

  14. Normal modes of prion proteins: from native to infectious particle.

    PubMed

    Samson, Abraham O; Levitt, Michael

    2011-03-29

    Prion proteins (PrP) are the infectious agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (i.e., mad cow disease). To be infectious, prion proteins must undergo a conformational change involving a decrease in α-helical content along with an increase in β-strand content. This conformational change was evaluated by means of elastic normal modes. Elastic normal modes show a diminution of two α-helices by one and two residues, as well as an extension of two β-strands by three residues each, which could instigate the conformational change. The conformational change occurs in a region that is compatible with immunological studies, and it is observed more frequently in mutant prions that are prone to conversion than in wild-type prions because of differences in their starting structures, which are amplified through normal modes. These findings are valuable for our comprehension of the conversion mechanism associated with the conformational change in prion proteins. PMID:21338080

  15. Simulation study of high-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hao Ido, Takeshi; Osakabe, Masaki; Todo, Yasushi

    2015-09-15

    High-frequency energetic particle driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAM) observed in the large helical device plasmas are investigated using a hybrid simulation code for energetic particles and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Energetic particle inertia is incorporated in the MHD momentum equation for the simulation where the beam ion density is comparable to the bulk plasma density. Bump-on-tail type beam ion velocity distribution created by slowing down and charge exchange is considered. It is demonstrated that EGAMs have frequencies higher than the geodesic acoustic modes and the dependence on bulk plasma temperature is weak if (1) energetic particle density is comparable to the bulk plasma density and (2) charge exchange time (τ{sub cx}) is sufficiently shorter than the slowing down time (τ{sub s}) to create a bump-on-tail type distribution. The frequency of high-frequency EGAM rises as the energetic particle pressure increases under the condition of high energetic particle pressure. The frequency also increases as the energetic particle pitch angle distribution shifts to higher transit frequency. It is found that there are two kinds of particles resonant with EGAM: (1) trapped particles and (2) passing particles with transit frequency close to the mode frequency. The EGAMs investigated in this work are destabilized primarily by the passing particles whose transit frequencies are close to the EGAM frequency.

  16. Microstructure of atmospheric particles revealed by TXM and a new mode of influenza virus transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, L. M.; Zhang, G. L.; Lei, Q. T.; Li, Y.; Li, X. L.; Hwu, Y. K.; Yi, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    For control of influenza, firstly it is important to find the real virus transmission media. Atmospheric aerosol particles are presumably one of the media. In this study, three typical atmospheric inhaled particles in Shanghai were studied by the synchrotron based transmission X-ray microscopes (TXM). Three dimensional microstructure of the particles reveals that there are many pores contained in, particularly the coal combustion fly particles which may be possible virus carrier. The particles can transport over long distance and cause long-range infections due to its light weight. We suggest a mode which is droplet combining with aerosol mode. By this mode the transmission of global and pandemic influenzas and infection between inland avian far from population and poultry or human living in cities along coast may be explained.

  17. Modeling of long range frequency sweeping for energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nyqvist, R. M.; Breizman, B. N.

    2013-04-15

    Long range frequency sweeping events are simulated numerically within a one-dimensional, electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The numerical solution accounts for fast particle trapping and detrapping in an evolving wave field with a fixed wavelength, and it includes three distinct collisions operators: Drag (dynamical friction on the background electrons), Krook-type collisions, and velocity space diffusion. The effects of particle trapping and diffusion on the evolution of holes and clumps are investigated, and the occurrence of non-monotonic (hooked) frequency sweeping and asymptotically steady holes is discussed. The presented solution constitutes a step towards predictive modeling of frequency sweeping events in more realistic geometries.

  18. Multi-mode mitigation in an optofluidic chip for particle manipulation and sensing

    PubMed Central

    Measor, Philip; Kühn, Sergei; Lunt, Evan J.; Phillips, Brian S.; Hawkins, Aaron R.; Schmidt, Holger

    2010-01-01

    A new waveguide design for an optofluidic chip is presented. It mitigates multi-mode behavior in solid and liquid-core waveguides by increasing fundamental mode coupling to 82% and 95%, respectively. Additionally, we demonstrate a six-fold improvement in lateral confinement of optically guided dielectric microparticles and double the detection efficiency of fluorescent particles. PMID:20052144

  19. Mode particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in large tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Kaita, R.; White, R.B.; Morris, A.W.; Fredrickson, E.D.; McGuire, K.M.; Medley, S.S.; Scott, S.D.

    1988-01-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed during neutral beam injection in TFTR and JET. Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker-Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  20. Energetic particle stabilization of m=1 internal kink mode in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    R, J. Hastie; Yanping, Chen; Fujiu, Ke; Shidong, Cai; S, T. Tsai; L, Chen

    1987-12-01

    The stability of m=1 internal kink mode in a tokamak plasma with an anisotropic energetic particle component has been analyzed using the generalized energy principle. It is found that employing barely trapped energetic particles can significantly improve the stability properties.

  1. The effects of sloshing energetic particles on ballooning modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stotler, D. P.; Berk, H. L.

    1987-05-01

    Distributions that give rise to energetic trapped particle pressures peaked in the ``good curvature'' region of a tokamak (sloshing distributions) are examined in an attempt to find stable regimes for both the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) and precessional modes. It is the precessional drift destabilization of ballooning modes that inhibits bridging the unstable gap to second stability by the use of deeply trapped energetic particles unless the hot particles have an extremely large energy (˜0.35 MeV for a tokamak like PDX [Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 326 (1982)]). Unfortunately, our calculations indicate that the sloshing particles do not have a significant stabilizing effect. An analytic treatment shows that stability for the precessional mode can be found only if the sign of the energetic particle magnetic drift frequency can be reversed from its value in vacuum bad curvature without hot species diamagnetism. This is difficult to do in a tokamak because of the destabilizing contribution of the geodesic curvature to the drift frequency. Furthermore, for each of the two sloshing distributions employed (one contains only trapped particles; the other includes trapped and passing particles), a new ``continuum instability'' (where asymptotically along the field line the mode is a propagating plane wave) is found to be driven by geodesic curvature. These results indicate that energetic sloshing particles are not able to bridge the unstable gap to second stability.

  2. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaattovaara, P.; Räsänen, M.; Kühn, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Laaksonen, A.

    2005-06-01

    New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm) and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm) is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer) method to shed light on the presence of organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  3. A method for detecting the presence of organic fraction in nucleation mode sized particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaattovaara, P.; Räsänen, M.; Kühn, T.; Joutsensaari, J.; Laaksonen, A.

    2005-12-01

    New particle formation and growth has a very important role in many climate processes. However, the overall knowlegde of the chemical composition of atmospheric nucleation mode (particle diameter, d<20 nm) and the lower end of Aitken mode particles (d≤50 nm) is still insufficient. In this work, we have applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer) method to shed light on the presence of an organic fraction in the nucleation mode size class in different atmospheric environments. The basic principle of the organic fraction detection is based on our laboratory UFO-TDMA measurements with organic and inorganic compounds. Our laboratory measurements indicate that the usefulness of the UFO-TDMA in the field experiments would arise especially from the fact that atmospherically the most relevant inorganic compounds do not grow in subsaturated ethanol vapor, when particle size is 10 nm in diameter and saturation ratio is about 86% or below it. Furthermore, internally mixed particles composed of ammonium bisulfate and sulfuric acid with sulfuric acid mass fraction ≤33% show no growth at 85% saturation ratio. In contrast, 10 nm particles composed of various oxidized organic compounds of atmospheric relevance are able to grow in those conditions. These discoveries indicate that it is possible to detect the presence of organics in atmospheric nucleation mode sized particles using the UFO-TDMA method. In the future, the UFO-TDMA is expected to be an important aid to describe the composition of atmospheric newly-formed particles.

  4. Collection efficiency of ultrafine particles by an electrostatic precipitator under DC and pulse operating modes

    SciTech Connect

    Zukeran, Akinori; Looy, P.C.; Chakrabarti, A.; Berezin, A.A.; Jayaram, S.; Cross, J.D.; Ito, Tairo; Chang, J.S.

    1999-10-01

    High particle collection efficiency in terms of particle weight/volume mg/m{sup 3} is well achieved by a conventional electrostatic precipitator (ESP). However, the collection efficiencies in terms of number density for the ultrafine (particle size between 0.01--0.1 {micro}m) or submicrometer particles by a conventional ESP are still relatively low. Therefore, it is necessary to improve the collection efficiency for ultrafine particles. In this paper, attempts have been made to improve the ultrafine particle collection efficiency by controlling dust loading, as well as using the short pulse energizations. The present version of the ESP consists of three sets of wire-plate-type electrodes. For the ESP under dc operation modes, experimental results show that the collection efficiency for dc applied voltage decreases with increasing dust loading when particle density is larger than 2.5 x 10{sup 10} particles/m{sup 3} due to inefficient collections of ultrafine particles. However, under pulse operating modes without dc bias, high particle collection efficiency for ultrafine particles was obtained, which is thought to be due to the enhancement of particle charging by electrons.

  5. Suppression of 1/f Noise in Accumulation Mode FD-SOI MOSFETs on Si(100) and (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Gaubert, P.; Teramoto, A.; Tye, C.; Sugawa, S.; Ohmi, T.

    2009-04-23

    In this paper, a new approach to reduce the 1/f noise levels in the MOSFETs on varied silicon orientations, such as Si(100) and (110) surfaces, has been carried out. We focus on the Accumulation-mode (AM) FD-SOI device structure and demonstrate that the 1/f noise levels in this AM FD-SOI MOSFETs are obviously reduced on both the Si(100) and (110) surfaces.

  6. [Effects of different nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium fertilization modes on carbon- and nitrogen accumulation and allocation in rice plant].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Tong, Cheng-li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-shui; Chen, An-lei; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Based on a 20-year field site-specific fertilization experiment in Taoyuan Experimental Station of Agriculture Ecosystems under Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN), this paper studied the effects of different fertilization modes of N, P, and K on the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant. The fertilization mode N-only showed the highest C and N contents (433 g kg(-1) and 18.9 g kg(-1), respectively) in rice grain, whereas the modes balanced fertilization of chemical N, P and K (NPK) and its combination with organic mature recycling (NPKC) showed the highest storage of C and N in rice plant. In treatments NPK and NPKC, the C storage in rice grain and in stem and leaf was 1960 kg hm(-2) and 2015 kg hm(-2), and 2002 kg hm(-2) and 2048 kg hm(-2), and the N storage in rice grain was 80.5 kg hm(-2) and 80.6 kg hm(-2), respectively. Treatment NPK had the highest N storage (59.3 kg hm(-2)) in stem and leaf. Balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K combined with organic manure recycling increased the accumulation of C and N in rice plant significantly. Comparing with applying N only, balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K was more favorable to the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant during its growth period.

  7. In-out asymmetry of divertor particle flux in H-mode with edge localized modes on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J. B.; Guo, H. Y.; Wang, L.; Xu, G. S.; Xia, T. Y.; Liu, S. C.; Xu, X. Q.; Li, Jie; Chen, L.; Yan, N.; Wang, H. Q.; Xu, J. C.; Feng, W.; Shao, L. M.; Deng, G. Z.; Liu, H.; EAST Probe Team

    2016-06-01

    The in-out divertor asymmetry in the Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak (EAST), as manifested by particle fluxes measured by the divertor triple Langmuir probe arrays, is significantly enhanced during type-I edge localized modes (ELMs), favoring the inner divertor in lower single null (LSN) for the normal toroidal field (B t) direction, i.e. with the ion B  ×  \

  8. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon.

  9. Commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pramod; Gupta, N C

    2016-01-15

    A public health concern is to understand the linkages between specific pollution sources and adverse health impacts. Commuting can be viewed as one of the significant-exposure activity in high-vehicle density areas. This paper investigates the commuter exposure to inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles in various transportation modes in Delhi, India. Air pollution levels are significantly contributed by automobile exhaust and also in-vehicle exposure can be higher sometime than ambient levels. Motorcycle, auto rickshaw, car and bus were selected to study particles concentration along two routes in Delhi between Kashmere Gate and Dwarka. The bus and auto rickshaw were running on compressed natural gas (CNG) while the car and motorcycle were operated on gasoline fuel. Aerosol spectrometer was employed to measure inhalable, thoracic and alveolic particles during morning and evening rush hours for five weekdays. From the study, we observed that the concentration levels of these particles were greatly influenced by transportation modes. Concentrations of inhalable particles were found higher during morning in auto rickshaw (332.81 ± 90.97 μg/m(3)) while the commuter of bus exhibited higher exposure of thoracic particles (292.23 ± 110.45 μg/m(3)) and car commuters were exposed to maximum concentrations of alveolic particles (222.37 ± 26.56 μg/m(3)). We observed that in evening car commuters experienced maximum concentrations of all sizes of particles among the four commuting modes. Interestingly, motorcycle commuters were exposed to lower levels of inhalable and thoracic particles during morning and evening hours as compared to other modes of transport. The mean values were found greater than the median values for all the modes of transport suggesting that positive skewed distributions are characteristics of naturally occurring phenomenon. PMID:26439646

  10. Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Junhui; Yang, Jianbo; Xu, Jun

    2004-12-01

    Ultrasonic trapping of small particles by sharp edges vibrating in a flexural mode is reported. Two rectangular metal plates with a sharp edge are mechanically excited to vibrate in a flexural mode by the piezoelectric rings which are pressed between them by a bolt structure. Small particles such as mint seeds and flying color seeds can be attracted to the sharp edges of the plates. Relationship between input power applied to the piezoelectric rings and the number of trapped particles is experimentally investigated for mint seeds and flying color seeds in water and air. The result shows that for a given type of particle, there exists an input power at which the number of trapped particles is a maximum. Mechanism analysis shows that nodes or antinodes of acoustic pressure of the sound field near the sharp edges are responsible for the trapping.

  11. Observation of nucleation mode particle burst and new particle formation events at an urban site in Hong Kong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dawei; Guo, Hai; Cheung, Kalam; Gan, Fuxing

    2014-12-01

    Particle number (PN) concentrations and particle size distributions (PSD) in the size range of 5.5-350 nm were continuously measured from 22 December 2010 to 20 January 2011 at an urban site in Hong Kong when northeastern monsoon prevailed. Apart from the PN peaks appeared in traffic rush hours (i.e. 08:00-09:00 and 17:00-18:00), a distinct peak of PN concentrations in the afternoon (11:00-16:00) was observed during the sampling period. Concurrent measurement data of PSD, ozone (O3) and proxy sulfuric acid (H2SO4) concentrations revealed that the afternoon peaks observed were likely due to new particle formation (NPF) via photochemical reactions. These NPF events were frequently observed under a clean and dry weather in Hong Kong. The occurrence of NPF was closely associated with high solar radiation (SR), low relative humidity (RH) and low condensation sink (CS) in the atmosphere. Besides the NPF events, we also found four nucleation mode particle burst events, typically with increased number concentrations of nucleation mode particles (Nnuc) without growth to larger size particles. These burst events were generally accompanied by high-level primary air pollutants, i.e. sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxide (NOx) and carbon monoxide (CO), low SR and high CS conditions. The very different characteristics of the burst events from those of the NPF events indicated that these nucleation mode particle burst events were not caused by the photochemical reactions, but by the primary emission from the local combustion source(s).

  12. Effect of dynamical friction on nonlinear energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Lilley, M. K.; Breizman, B. N.; Sharapov, S. E.

    2010-09-15

    A fully nonlinear model is developed for the bump-on-tail instability including the effects of dynamical friction (drag) and velocity space diffusion on the energetic particles driving the wave. The results show that drag provides a destabilizing effect on the nonlinear evolution of waves. Specifically, in the early nonlinear phase of the instability, the drag facilitates the explosive scenario of the wave evolution, leading to the creation of phase space holes and clumps that move away from the original eigenfrequency. Later in time, the electric field associated with a hole is found to be enhanced by the drag, whereas for a clump it is reduced. This leads to an asymmetry of the frequency evolution between holes and clumps. The combined effect of drag and diffusion produces a diverse range of nonlinear behaviors including hooked frequency chirping, undulating, and steady state regimes. An analytical model is presented, which explains the aforementioned diversity. A continuous production of hole-clump pairs in the absence of collisions is also observed.

  13. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  14. Experimental investigation of the radial structure of energetic particle driven modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horváth, L.; Papp, G.; Lauber, Ph.; Por, G.; Gude, A.; Igochine, V.; Geiger, B.; Maraschek, M.; Guimarais, L.; Nikolaeva, V.; Pokol, G. I.; the ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2016-11-01

    Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) and energetic particle modes (EPMs) are often excited by energetic particles (EPs) in tokamak plasmas. One of the main open questions concerning EP driven instabilities is the non-linear evolution of the mode structure. The aim of the present paper is to investigate the properties of beta-induced AEs (BAEs) and EP driven geodesic acoustic modes (EGAMs) observed in the ramp-up phase of off-axis NBI heated ASDEX Upgrade (AUG) discharges. This paper focuses on the changes in the mode structure of BAEs/EGAMs during the non-linear chirping phase. Our investigation has shown that in the case of the observed down-chirping BAEs the changes in the radial structure are smaller than the uncertainty of our measurement. This behaviour is most probably the consequence of the fact that BAEs are normal modes, thus their radial structure strongly depends on the background plasma parameters rather than on the EP distribution. In the case of rapidly upward chirping EGAMs the analysis consistently shows shrinkage of the mode structure. The proposed explanation is that the resonance in the velocity space moves towards more passing particles which have narrower orbit widths.

  15. Experimental aspects of effects of high-energy particles on Alfven modes

    SciTech Connect

    Heidbrink, W.W.

    1994-10-01

    Global Alfven modes are observed in a number of tokamaks, including DIII-D and TFTR. Instabilities occur during neutral-beam injection and during fast-wave ICRF heating, and may recently have been observed during alpha-particle heating. Identification of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE) is based primarily on the scaling of the real frequency of the mode. Other modes, including the beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE), are also observed. The stability threshold of TAE modes agree (to within a factor of two) with theoretical predictions. Toroidal mode numbers of n = 2-6 are usually most unstable, as theoretically expected. Measurements of the poloidal and radial mode structure are consistent with theoretical predictions, but the uncertainties are large. Both TAE and BAE modes can cause large, concentrated losses of fast ions. Phenomenologically, beam-driven Alfven modes usually {open_quotes}saturate{close_quotes} through bursts that expel beam ions, while modes observed during ICPF heating approach a steady saturation amplitude.

  16. Modes of reproduction and the accumulation of deleterious mutations with multiplicative fitness effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haccou, Patsy; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Mutational load depends not only on the number and nature of mutations but also on the reproductive mode. Traditionally, only a few specific reproductive modes are considered in the search of explanations for the maintenance of sex. There are, however, many alternatives. Including these may give radically different conclusions. The theory on deterministic deleterious mutations states that in large populations segregation and recombination may lead to a lower load of deleterious mutations, provided that there are synergistic interactions. Empirical research suggests that effects of deleterious mutations are often multiplicative. Such situations have largely been ignored in the literature, since recombination and segregation have no effect on mutation load in the absence of epistasis. However, this is true only when clonal reproduction and sexual reproduction with equal male and female ploidy are considered. We consider several alternative reproductive modes that are all known to occur in insects: arrhenotoky, paternal genome elimination, apomictic thelytoky, and automictic thelytoky with different cytological mechanisms to restore diploidy. We give a method that is based on probability-generating functions, which provides analytical and numerical results on the distributions of deleterious mutations. Using this, we show that segregation and recombination do make a difference. Furthermore, we prove that a modified form of Haldane's principle holds more generally for thelytokous reproduction. We discuss the implications of our results for evolutionary transitions between different reproductive modes in insects. Since the strength of Muller's ratchet is reduced considerably for several forms of automictic thelytoky, many of our results are expected to be also valid for initially small populations. PMID:15020489

  17. Influence of surface morphology on the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of hematite particles

    SciTech Connect

    Hiranuma, N.; Hoffmann, N.; Kiselev, A.; Dreyer, A.; Zhang, K.; Kulkarni, G.; Koop, T.; Möhler, O.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the effect of the morphological modification of aerosol particles with respect to heterogeneous ice nucleation is comprehensively investigated for laboratory-generated hematite particles as a model substrate for atmospheric dust particles. The surface-area-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of monodisperse cubic hematite particles and milled hematite particles were measured with a series of expansion cooling experiments using the Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) cloud simulation chamber. Complementary offline characterization of physico-chemical properties of both hematite subsets were also carried out with scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering (DLS), and an electro-kinetic particle charge detector to further constrain droplet-freezing measurements of hematite particles. Additionally, an empirical parameterization derived from our laboratory measurements was implemented in the single-column version of the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 (CAM5) to investigate the model sensitivity in simulated ice crystal number concentration on different ice nucleation efficiencies. From an experimental perspective, our results show that the immersion mode ice nucleation efficiency of milled hematite particles is almost an order of magnitude higher at -35.2 °C < T < -33.5 °C than that of the cubic hematite particles, indicating a substantial effect of morphological irregularities on immersion mode freezing. Our modeling results similarly show that the increased droplet-freezing rates of milled hematite particles lead to about one order magnitude higher ice crystal number in the upper troposphere than cubic hematite particles. Finally and overall, our results suggest that the surface irregularities and associated active sites lead to greater ice activation through droplet freezing.

  18. Determination of Plasma Sheath and Dust Parameters from Dust Particle Oscillation Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Smith, Bernard; Cook, Mike; Schmoke, Jimmy; Hyde, Truell

    2007-11-01

    The fundamental parameters of a complex dusty plasma system, including particle charge and dust Debye length, can be determined from the thermally excited oscillation modes of an arbitrary number of dust particles (either a dust cluster or plasma crystal) confined on a 2D plane within the plasma sheath produced above the lower electrode of a GEC reference cell [Ref. 1-2]. This paper will discuss an experimental technique allowing the strength of the confining potential well on the horizontal direction to be determined in the same manner. This technique will be further applied to systems of dust grains comprised of both melamine formaldehyde and ferromagnetic monodisperse particles.

  19. Microbial community composition of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating organisms in full-scale wastewater treatment plants operated in fully aerobic mode.

    PubMed

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11-18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5-38.2 mg-C g-VSS(-1) h(-1)). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  20. Model for Quasinormal Mode Excitation by a Particle Plunging into a Black Hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mark, Zachary; Zimmerman, Aaron; Yang, Huan; Chen, Yanbei

    2016-03-01

    It is known that the late time gravitational waveform produced by a particle plunging into a Kerr black hole is well described by a sum of quasinormal modes. However it is not yet understood how the early part of the waveform gives way to the quasinormal mode description, which diverges at early times, nor how the inhomogenous part of the waveform contributes. Motivated by, we offer a model for quasinormal mode excitation by a particle plunging into a Schwarzschild black hole. To develop our model we study approximations to the Regge-Wheeler equation that allow for a closed-form expression for the frequency-domain Green's function, which we use to isolate the component of the waveform that should be identified with quasinormal ringing. Our description of quasinormal ringing does not diverge at early times and reveals that quasinormal ringing should be understood in analogy with a damped harmonic oscillator experiencing a transient driving source.

  1. The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability

    SciTech Connect

    Berkery, J. W. Sabbagh, S. A.; Betti, R.; Guazzotto, L.; Manickam, J.

    2014-11-15

    The effect of an anisotropic pressure of thermal particles on resistive wall mode stability in tokamak fusion plasmas is derived through kinetic theory and assessed through calculation with the MISK code [B. Hu et al., Phys. Plasmas 12, 0 57301 (2005)]. The fluid anisotropy is treated as a small perturbation on the plasma equilibrium and modeled with a bi-Maxwellian distribution function. A complete stability treatment without an assumption of high frequency mode rotation leads to anisotropic kinetic terms in the dispersion relation in addition to anisotropy corrections to the fluid terms. With the density and the average pressure kept constant, when thermal particles have a higher temperature perpendicular to the magnetic field than parallel, the fluid pressure-driven ballooning destabilization term is reduced. Additionally, the stabilizing kinetic effects of the trapped thermal ions can be enhanced. Together these two effects can lead to a modest increase in resistive wall mode stability.

  2. Particle-in-cell δf gyrokinetic simulations of the microtearing mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, J.; Chen, Yang; Wan, Weigang; Parker, Scott E.; Guttenfelder, W.; Canik, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    The linear stability properties of the microtearing mode are investigated in the edge and core regimes of the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) using the particle-in-cell method based gyrokinetic code GEM. The dependence of the mode on various equilibrium quantities in both regions is compared. While the microtearing mode in the core depends upon the electron-ion collisions, in the edge region, it is found to be weakly dependent on the collisions and exists even when the collision frequency is zero. The electrostatic potential is non-negligible in each of the cases. It plays opposite roles in the core and edge of NSTX. While the microtearing mode is partially stabilized by the electrostatic potential in the core, it has substantial destabilizing effect in the edge. In addition to the spherical tokamak, we also study the microtearing mode for parameters relevant to the core of a standard tokamak. The fundamental characteristics of the mode remain the same; however, the electrostatic potential in this case is destabilizing as opposed to the core of NSTX. The velocity dependence of the collision frequency, which is crucial for the mode to grow in slab calculations, is not required to destabilize the mode in toroidal devices.

  3. Method of particle energy determination based on measurement of waveguide mode frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyukhtin, A. V.

    2012-05-01

    A new method of determination of charged particle energy is developed. This method consists in use of dependency of waveguide mode frequencies on Lorenz factor of particle. For this method it is principal that the particle bunch generates radiation in waveguide and the mode frequencies depend essentially on the Lorenz factor. Three variants of realization of such technique are considered. The first variant consists in use of a thin dielectric layer in a waveguide. The second variant is based on use of a waveguide containing a system of wires coated with a dielectric material. The third version consists in application of a circular waveguide having a grid wall. For all cases analytical solutions of the problems are obtained (in the case of grid waveguide we use the averaged boundary conditions). Some typical results of computations are given. Advantages and disadvantages of different variants are discussed. It is noted that the grid waveguide can be used as well for generation of microwave radiation.

  4. Cancellation of drift kinetic effects between thermal and energetic particles on the resistive wall mode stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, S. C.; Liu, Y. Q.; Xu, X. Y.; Wang, Z. R.

    2016-07-01

    Drift kinetic stabilization of the resistive wall mode (RWM) is computationally investigated using MHD-kinetic hybrid code MARS-K following the non-perturbative approach (Liu et al 2008 Phys. Plasmas 15 112503), for both reversed field pinch (RFP) and tokamak plasmas. Toroidal precessional drift resonance effects from trapped energetic ions (EIs) and various kinetic resonances between the mode and the guiding center drift motions of thermal particles are included into the self-consistent toroidal computations. The results show cancellation effects of the drift kinetic damping on the RWM between the thermal particles and EIs contributions, in both RFP and tokamak plasmas, even though each species alone can provide damping and stabilize RWM instability by respective kinetic resonances. The degree of cancellation generally depends on the EIs equilibrium distribution, the particle birth energy, as well as the toroidal flow speed of the plasma.

  5. Ultrastructural Characterization of Turnip Mosaic Virus-Induced Cellular Rearrangements Reveals Membrane-Bound Viral Particles Accumulating in Vacuoles

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Juan; Basu, Kaustuv; Mui, Jeannie; Vali, Hojatollah; Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Positive-strand RNA [(+) RNA] viruses remodel cellular membranes to facilitate virus replication and assembly. In the case of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), the viral membrane protein 6K2 plays an essential role in endomembrane alterations. Although 6K2-induced membrane dynamics have been widely studied by confocal microscopy, the ultrastructure of this remodeling has not been extensively examined. In this study, we investigated the formation of TuMV-induced membrane changes by chemical fixation and high-pressure freezing/freeze substitution (HPF/FS) for transmission electron microscopy at different times of infection. We observed the formation of convoluted membranes connected to rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) early in the infection process, followed by the production of single-membrane vesicle-like (SMVL) structures at the midstage of infection. Both SMVL and double-membrane vesicle-like structures with electron-dense cores, as well as electron-dense bodies, were found late in the infection process. Immunogold labeling results showed that the vesicle-like structures were 6K2 tagged and suggested that only the SMVL structures were viral RNA replication sites. Electron tomography (ET) was used to regenerate a three-dimensional model of these vesicle-like structures, which showed that they were, in fact, tubules. Late in infection, we observed filamentous particle bundles associated with electron-dense bodies, which suggests that these are sites for viral particle assembly. In addition, TuMV particles were observed to accumulate in the central vacuole as membrane-associated linear arrays. Our work thus unravels the sequential appearance of distinct TuMV-induced membrane structures for viral RNA replication, viral particle assembly, and accumulation. IMPORTANCE Positive-strand RNA viruses remodel cellular membranes for different stages of the infection process, such as protein translation and processing, viral RNA synthesis, particle assembly, and virus

  6. M3D Simulations of Energetic Particle-driven MHD Mode with Unstructured Mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, G. Y.; Park, W.; Strauss, H. R.

    2001-10-01

    The energetic particle-driven MHD modes are studied using a multi-level extended MHD code M3D(W. Park et al., Phys. Plasmas 6, 1796 (1999)). In a Extended-MHD model, the plasma is divided into the bulk part and the energetic particle component. The bulk plasma is treated as either a single fluid or two fluids. The energetic particles are described by gyrokinetic particles following the self-consistent electromagnetic field. The model is self-consistent, including nonlinear effects of hot particles on the MHD dynamics and the nonlinear MHD mode coupling. Previously we had shown the results of nonlinear saturation of TAEfootnote G.Y. Fu and W. Park, Phys. Rev. Lett. 74, 1594 (1995), energetic particle stabilization of an internal kink and excitation of fishbone^2, and nonlinear saturation of fishbone in circular tokamaks (G.Y. Fu et al, 2000 Sherwood Meeting, Paper 2C2.). In this work, we extend the simulations to general geometry using unstructured mesh(H.R. Strauss and W. Park, Phys. Plasmas 5, 2676 (1998). We also use a gyrofluid model for fishbone in order to study the role of MHD nonlinearity in saturation near the marginal stability. Results of applications to tokamaks and spherical tokamaks will be presented.

  7. Hybrid simulation of energetic particle effects on tearing modes in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Cai Huishan; Fu Guoyong

    2012-07-15

    The effects of energetic ions on stability of tearing mode are investigated by global kinetic/MHD hybrid simulations in a low beta tokamak plasma. The kinetic effects of counter circulating energetic ions from the non-adiabatic response are found to be strongly destabilizing while the effects from the adiabatic response are stabilizing. The net effect with both adiabatic and non-adiabatic contributions is destabilizing. On the other hand, the kinetic effects of co-circulating energetic ions from the non-adiabatic response are calculated to be weakly stabilizing while the corresponding adiabatic contribution is destabilizing for small energetic ion beta. The net effect is weakly stabilizing. The dependence of kinetic effects on energetic ion beta, gyroradius, and speed is studied systematically and the results agree in large part with the previous analytic results for the kinetic effects of circulating particles. For trapped energetic ions, their effects on tearing mode stability are dominated by the adiabatic response due to large banana orbit width and strong poloidal variation of particle pressure. The net effect of trapped energetic particles on tearing modes is much more destabilizing as compared to that of counter circulating particles at the same beta value.

  8. Global Hybrid Simulations of Energetic Particle Effects on the n=1 Mode in Tokamaks: Internal Kink and Fishbone Instability

    SciTech Connect

    G.Y. Fu; W. Park; H.R. Strauss; J. Breslau; J. Chen; S. Jardin; L.E. Sugiyama

    2005-08-09

    Global hybrid simulations of energetic particle effects on the n=1 internal kink mode have been carried out for tokamaks. For the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) [ITER Physics Basis Editors et al., Nucl. Fusion 39:2137 (1999)], it is shown that alpha particle effects are stabilizing for the internal kink mode. However, the elongation of ITER reduces the stabilization effects significantly. Nonlinear simulations of the precessional drift fishbone instability for circular tokamak plasmas show that the mode saturates due to flattening of the particle distribution function near the resonance region. The mode frequency chirps down rapidly as the flattening region expands radially outward. Fluid nonlinearity reduces the saturation level.

  9. Measurement and accumulation of electric charge on a single dielectric particle trapped in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haesung; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2016-03-01

    Normally occurring charges on small particles provide a means to control the motion of the particles. Using a piezoelectric transducer to launch microparticles into a trap, we can vary particle-surface interactions to transfer charge to the particle via contact electrification. This allows more detailed studies of contact electrification itself as well generation of higher charge states for precision measurements of force or nonlinear dynamics using electric field modulation. In practice, particles may be repeatedly landed on the substrate and relaunched during loading. This leads to charge transfer so that the net charge on the polystyrene (PS) particle becomes sufficient to allow electrostatic forcing to drive ballistic motion over a range of displacement two orders of magnitude greater than thermal fluctuations. An increase in charge from 1000 to 3000 electrons is demonstrated and the induced motion of the trapped particle is accurately described using simple classical mechanics in phase space.

  10. Meteoric Dust as Condensation Nuclei of Small-Mode Particles in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C.; Yung, Y. L.

    2012-12-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express have revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 2009). In this work, we posit that the large mode is made up of cloud particles that have diffused upwards from the cloud deck below, while the smaller mode is generated by the in situ nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded to version 3.0 by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapor production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes below 55 km (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). The resulting size distribution of cloud particles shows two distinct modes, qualitatively matching the observations of Pioneer Venus. We also observe a third mode in our results with a size of a few microns at 48 km altitude, which appears to support the existence of the controversial third mode in the Pioneer Venus data. This mode disappears if coagulation is not included in the simulation. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal-like distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of the two distinct modes. We test our hypothesis by simulating the

  11. Microbial Community Composition of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Accumulating Organisms in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants Operated in Fully Aerobic Mode

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11–18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5–38.2 mg-C g-VSS−1 h−1). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  12. A uniform doping ultra-thin SOI LDMOS with accumulation-mode extended gate and back-side etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Hui, Zhang; Jie, Wei; Chao, Yin; Qiao, Tan; Jian-Ping, Liu; Peng-Cheng, Li; Xiao-Rong, Luo

    2016-02-01

    A uniform doping ultra-thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) lateral-double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) with low specific on-resistance (Ron,sp) and high breakdown voltage (BV) is proposed and its mechanism is investigated. The proposed LDMOS features an accumulation-mode extended gate (AG) and back-side etching (BE). The extended gate consists of a P- region and two diodes in series. In the on-state with VGD > 0, an electron accumulation layer is formed along the drift region surface under the AG. It provides an ultra-low resistance current path along the whole drift region surface and thus the novel device obtains a low temperature distribution. The Ron,sp is nearly independent of the doping concentration of the drift region. In the off-state, the AG not only modulates the surface electric field distribution and improves the BV, but also brings in a charge compensation effect to further reduce the Ron,sp. Moreover, the BE avoids vertical premature breakdown to obtain high BV and allows a uniform doping in the drift region, which avoids the variable lateral doping (VLD) and the “hot-spot” caused by the VLD. Compared with the VLD SOI LDMOS, the proposed device simultaneously reduces the Ron,sp by 70.2% and increases the BV from 776 V to 818 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176069 and 61376079).

  13. Measurements of fast-ion transport by mode-particle resonances on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muscatello, C. M.; Grierson, B. A.; Harvey, R. W.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Pace, D. C.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2012-10-01

    Magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) instabilities in tokamak plasmas manifest in a variety of ways, characterized by different scale lengths and mode frequencies. MHD activity can cause significant degradation of plasma performance due to transport of particles, energy and current. Among the many different types of MHD, arguably fishbones, sawteeth and Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs) are observed to cause the largest fluxes of superthermal ions. DIII-D's expansive suite of diagnostics makes it possible to rigorously characterize these instabilities and study their interaction with fast ions. This review paper first presents an overview of the recent additions to DIII-D's collection of fast-ion diagnostics. The extended diagnostic capabilities are employed in a series of experiments to investigate fast-ion dynamics in the presence of fishbones, sawteeth and AEs. Results from these seemingly unrelated studies are highlighted, and they reveal that mode-particle resonances play the central role in the observed deterioration of fast-ion confinement.

  14. Rapid Frequency Chirps of TAE mode due to Finite Orbit Energetic Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Herb; Wang, Ge

    2013-10-01

    The tip model for the TAE mode in the large aspect ratio limit, conceived by Rosenbluth et al. in the frequency domain, together with an interaction term in the frequency domain based on a map model, has been extended into the time domain. We present the formal basis for the model, starting with the Lagrangian for the particle wave interaction. We shall discuss the formal nonlinear time domain problem and the procedure that needs to obtain solutions in the adiabatic limit.

  15. Particle simulation on radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror. I. Parallel antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Kadoya, Y.; Abe, H.

    1988-04-01

    A two- and one-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code (PS2M) (H. Abe and S. Nakajima, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 53, xxx (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied parallel to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The parallel electric field E/sub parallel/ perturbs the electron velocity v/sub parallel/ parallel to the magnetic field and also induces a perpendicular magnetic field perturbation B/sub perpendicular/. The unstable growth of the flute mode in the absence of such a radio frequency electric field is first studied as a basis for comparison. The ponderomotive force originating from the time-averaged product is then shown to stabilize the flute modes. The stabilizing wave power threshold, the frequency dependency, and the dependence on delchemically bondE/sub parallel/chemically bond all agree with the theoretical predictions.

  16. Observation of Energetic Particle Driven Modes Relevant to Advanced Tokamak Regimes

    SciTech Connect

    R. Nazikian; B. Alper; H.L. Berk; D. Borba; C. Boswell; R.V. Budny; K.H. Burrell; C.Z. Cheng; E.J. Doyle; E. Edlund; R.J. Fonck; A. Fukuyama; N.N. Gorelenkov; C.M. Greenfield; D.J. Gupta; M. Ishikawa; R.J. Jayakumar; G.J. Kramer; Y. Kusama; R.J. La Haye; G.R. McKee; W.A. Peebles; S.D. Pinches; M. Porkolab; J. Rapp; T.L. Rhodes; S.E. Sharapov; K. Shinohara; J.A. Snipes; W.M. Solomon; E.J. Strait; M. Takechi; M.A. Van Zeeland; W.P. West; K.L. Wong; S. Wukitch; L. Zeng

    2004-10-21

    Measurements of high-frequency oscillations in JET [Joint European Torus], JT-60U, Alcator C-Mod, DIII-D, and TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor] plasmas are contributing to a new understanding of fast ion-driven instabilities relevant to Advanced Tokamak (AT) regimes. A model based on the transition from a cylindrical-like frequency-chirping mode to the Toroidal Alfven Eigenmode (TAE) has successfully encompassed many of the characteristics seen in experiments. In a surprising development, the use of internal density fluctuation diagnostics has revealed many more modes than has been detected on edge magnetic probes. A corollary discovery is the observation of modes excited by fast particles traveling well below the Alfven velocity. These observations open up new opportunities for investigating a ''sea of Alfven Eigenmodes'' in present-scale experiments, and highlight the need for core fluctuation and fast ion measurements in a future burning-plasma experiment.

  17. ACCUMULATION AND TISSUE DISPOSITION OF PARTICLE ASSOCIATED ELEMENTS IN THE RAT AFTER REPEATED INTRATRACHAEL ADMINISTRATION OF SOURCE PARTICLES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to determine the fate of source particle tracer elements following repeated intratracheal instillation (IT) to rats. PM samples comprised Mt. St. Helens ash (MSH) with no water-soluble metals, and oil flyash emission PM (EPM) with water-leachable solubl...

  18. Partitioning of Black Carbon between ultrafine and fine particle modes in an urban airport vs. urban background environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costabile, F.; Angelini, F.; Barnaba, F.; Gobbi, G. P.

    2015-02-01

    In this work, we characterize the Black Carbon (BC) aerosol in an urban airport vs. urban background environment with the objective to evaluate when and how the ultrafine BC dominates the bulk aerosol. Aerosol optical and microphysical properties were measured in a Mediterranean urban area (Rome) at sites impacted by BC sources including fossil fuels (FF), and biomass burning (BB). Experimental BC data were interpreted through measurement-constrained simulations of BC microphysics and optical properties. A "scheme" to separate the ultrafine BC was experimented on the basis of the relation found between changes in the BC partitioning between Aitken and accumulation mode particles, and relevant changes in particle size distribution and optical properties of the bulk aerosol. This separation scheme, applied to experimental data, proved useful to reveal the impact of airport and road traffic emissions. Findings may have important atmospheric implications. The experimented scheme can help separating different BC sources (FF, BB, "aged" BC) when BC size distributions may be very difficult to obtain (satellite, columnar observations, routine monitoring). Indeed, separating the ultrafine BC from the fine BC may provide significant benefits in addressing BC impact on air quality and climate.

  19. Influence of mileage accumulation on the particle mass and number emissions of two gasoline direct injection vehicles.

    PubMed

    Maricq, M Matti; Szente, Joseph J; Adams, Jack; Tennison, Paul; Rumpsa, Todd

    2013-10-15

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) is a new engine technology intended to improve fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions as required by recently enacted legislative and environmental regulations. The development of this technology must also ensure that these vehicles meet new LEV III and Tier 3 emissions standards as they phase in between 2017 and 2021. The aim of the present paper is to examine, at least for a small set, how the PM emissions from GDI vehicles change over their lifetime. The paper reports particle mass and number emissions of two GDI vehicles as a function of mileage up to 150K miles. These vehicles exhibit PM emissions that are near or below the upcoming 3 mg/mi FTP and 10 mg/mi US06 mass standards with little, if any, deterioration over 150K miles. Particle number emissions roughly follow the previously observed 2 × 10(12) particles/mg correlation between solid particle number and PM mass. They remained between the interim and final EU stage 6 solid particle count standard for gasoline vehicles throughout the mileage accumulation study. These examples demonstrate feasibility to meet near-term 3 mg/mi and interim EU solid particle number standards, but continued development is needed to ensure that this continues as further fuel economy improvements are made. PMID:24040936

  20. Influence of mileage accumulation on the particle mass and number emissions of two gasoline direct injection vehicles.

    PubMed

    Maricq, M Matti; Szente, Joseph J; Adams, Jack; Tennison, Paul; Rumpsa, Todd

    2013-10-15

    Gasoline direct injection (GDI) is a new engine technology intended to improve fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions as required by recently enacted legislative and environmental regulations. The development of this technology must also ensure that these vehicles meet new LEV III and Tier 3 emissions standards as they phase in between 2017 and 2021. The aim of the present paper is to examine, at least for a small set, how the PM emissions from GDI vehicles change over their lifetime. The paper reports particle mass and number emissions of two GDI vehicles as a function of mileage up to 150K miles. These vehicles exhibit PM emissions that are near or below the upcoming 3 mg/mi FTP and 10 mg/mi US06 mass standards with little, if any, deterioration over 150K miles. Particle number emissions roughly follow the previously observed 2 × 10(12) particles/mg correlation between solid particle number and PM mass. They remained between the interim and final EU stage 6 solid particle count standard for gasoline vehicles throughout the mileage accumulation study. These examples demonstrate feasibility to meet near-term 3 mg/mi and interim EU solid particle number standards, but continued development is needed to ensure that this continues as further fuel economy improvements are made.

  1. Growth of nucleation mode particles in the summertime Arctic: a case study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Megan D.; Burkart, Julia; Thomas, Jennie L.; Köllner, Franziska; Schneider, Johannes; Bozem, Heiko; Hoor, Peter M.; Aliabadi, Amir A.; Schulz, Hannes; Herber, Andreas B.; Leaitch, W. Richard; Abbatt, Jonathan P. D.

    2016-06-01

    The summertime Arctic lower troposphere is a relatively pristine background aerosol environment dominated by nucleation and Aitken mode particles. Understanding the mechanisms that control the formation and growth of aerosol is crucial for our ability to predict cloud properties and therefore radiative balance and climate. We present an analysis of an aerosol growth event observed in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago during summer as part of the NETCARE project. Under stable and clean atmospheric conditions, with low inversion heights, carbon monoxide less than 80 ppbv, and black carbon less than 5 ng m-3, we observe growth of small particles, < 20 nm in diameter, into sizes above 50 nm. Aerosol growth was correlated with the presence of organic species, trimethylamine, and methanesulfonic acid (MSA) in particles ˜ 80 nm and larger, where the organics are similar to those previously observed in marine settings. MSA-to-sulfate ratios as high as 0.15 were observed during aerosol growth, suggesting an important marine influence. The organic-rich aerosol contributes significantly to particles active as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN, supersaturation = 0.6 %), which are elevated in concentration during aerosol growth above background levels of ˜ 100 to ˜ 220 cm-3. Results from this case study highlight the potential importance of secondary organic aerosol formation and its role in growing nucleation mode aerosol into CCN-active sizes in this remote marine environment.

  2. Modulation of energetic particle fluxes by a mixed mode of transverse and compressional waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, C. S.; Parks, G. K.

    1982-01-01

    Modulation characteristics of particle fluxes in the presence of a mixed mode of compressional and transverse magnetic waves at hydromagnetic frequencies are investigated through kinetic perturbation of the distribution function. The magnetospheric medium where the particles are modulated contains both the magnetic and pressure gradients. The modulation features are found to be strongly dependent on the energy and pitch angle of the particles. Drifting particles can resonate with waves whose phase velocities are close to their drift velocities. When this occurs, the modulation amplitudes become significantly large and large phase shifts will occur. It is pointed out that resonance is important for particles with mid pitch angles (40-70 deg). The phase shift between the particle modulations and the magnetic field oscillations are strongly controlled by the combined effects of transverse and compressional wave components and/or the occurrence of drift resonance. Numerical calculations are performed using the dispersion relation of drift mirror Alfven waves as an example of waves with both compressional and transverse components.

  3. Binding of ethidium to the nucleosome core particle. 2. Internal and external binding modes

    SciTech Connect

    McMurray, C.T.; Small, E.W.; van Holde, K.E. )

    1991-06-11

    The authors have previously reported that the binding of ethidium bromide to the nucleosome core particle results in a stepwise dissociation of the structure which involves the initial release of one copy each of H2A and H2B. In this report, they have examined the absorbance and fluorescence properties of intercalated and outside bound forms of ethidium bromide. From these properties, they have measured the extent of external, electrostatic binding of the dye versus internal, intercalation binding to the core particle, free from contribution by linker DNA. They have established that dissociation is induced by the intercalation mode of binding to DNA within the core particle DNA, and not by binding to the histones or by nonintercalative binding to DNA. The covalent binding of ({sup 3}H)-8-azidoethidium to the core particle clearly shows that < 1.0 adduct is formed per histone octamer over a wide range of input ratios. Simultaneously, analyses of steady-state fluorescence enhancement and fluorescence lifetime data from bound ethidium complexes demonstrate extensive intercalation binding. Combined analyses from steady-state fluorescence intensity with equilibrium dialysis or fluorescence lifetime data revealed that dissociation began when {approximately}14 ethidium molecules are bound by intercalation to each core particle and < 1.0 nonintercalated ion pair was formed per core particle.

  4. Comparison of sulfur measurements from a regional fine particle network with concurrent acid modes network results

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, R.L.; Stockburger, L.; Barnes, H.M.

    1994-01-01

    The Fine Particle Network (FPN), a system of fine particle (less than 2.5 micrometers) samplers, was operated at 41 sites selected from the Enviromental Protection Agency Acid MODES program during the two year period in 1988-90. The 24-hour sample results included fine particle mass and the most predominant chemical element concentrations determined by wavelength dispersive x-ray fluorescence analysis. Statistical summaries of the fine mass and sulfur concentrations by site and season were prepared. The availability of simultaneous particulate sulfate measurements from independent collection and analytical procedures provided an opportunity to examine their agreement and provide a more reliable data base for evaluation of regional particulate models and estimation of contribution to urban aerosol concentration.

  5. Size-dependent accumulation of particles in lysosomes modulates dendritic cell function through impaired antigen degradation

    PubMed Central

    Seydoux, Emilie; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara; Nita, Izabela M; Balog, Sandor; Gazdhar, Amiq; Stumbles, Philip A; Petri-Fink, Alke; Blank, Fabian; von Garnier, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Nanosized particles may enable therapeutic modulation of immune responses by targeting dendritic cell (DC) networks in accessible organs such as the lung. To date, however, the effects of nanoparticles on DC function and downstream immune responses remain poorly understood. Methods Bone marrow–derived DCs (BMDCs) were exposed in vitro to 20 or 1,000 nm polystyrene (PS) particles. Particle uptake kinetics, cell surface marker expression, soluble protein antigen uptake and degradation, as well as in vitro CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokine production were analyzed by flow cytometry. In addition, co-localization of particles within the lysosomal compartment, lysosomal permeability, and endoplasmic reticulum stress were analyzed. Results The frequency of PS particle–positive CD11c+/CD11b+ BMDCs reached an early plateau after 20 minutes and was significantly higher for 20 nm than for 1,000 nm PS particles at all time-points analyzed. PS particles did not alter cell viability or modify expression of the surface markers CD11b, CD11c, MHC class II, CD40, and CD86. Although particle exposure did not modulate antigen uptake, 20 nm PS particles decreased the capacity of BMDCs to degrade soluble antigen, without affecting their ability to induce antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation. Co-localization studies between PS particles and lysosomes using laser scanning confocal microscopy detected a significantly higher frequency of co-localized 20 nm particles as compared with their 1,000 nm counterparts. Neither size of PS particle caused lysosomal leakage, expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress gene markers, or changes in cytokines profiles. Conclusion These data indicate that although supposedly inert PS nanoparticles did not induce DC activation or alteration in CD4+ T-cell stimulating capacity, 20 nm (but not 1,000 nm) PS particles may reduce antigen degradation through interference in the lysosomal compartment. These findings emphasize the

  6. Fluid electron, gyrokinetic ion simulations of linear internal kink and energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Michael Mishchenko, Alexey; Könies, Axel; Kleiber, Ralf; Borchardt, Matthias

    2014-07-15

    The internal kink mode is an important plasma instability responsible for a broad class of undesirable phenomena in tokamaks, including the sawtooth cycle and fishbones. To predict and discover ways to mitigate this behaviour in current and future devices, numerical simulations are necessary. The internal kink mode can be modelled by reduced magnetohydrodynamics (MHD). Fishbone modes are an inherently kinetic and non-linear phenomenon based on the n = 1 Energetic Particle Mode (EPM), and have been studied using hybrid codes that combine a reduced MHD bulk plasma model with a kinetic treatment of fast ions. In this work, linear simulations are presented using a hybrid model which couples a fluid treatment of electrons with a gyrokinetic treatment of both bulk and fast ions. Studies of the internal kink mode in geometry relevant to large tokamak experiments are presented and the effect of gyrokinetic ions is considered. Interaction of the kink with gyrokinetic fast ions is also considered, including the destabilisation of the linear n = 1 EPM underlying the fishbone.

  7. Single-particle imaging reveals intraflagellar transport–independent transport and accumulation of EB1 in Chlamydomonas flagella

    PubMed Central

    Harris, J. Aaron; Liu, Yi; Yang, Pinfen; Kner, Peter; Lechtreck, Karl F.

    2016-01-01

    The microtubule (MT) plus-end tracking protein EB1 is present at the tips of cilia and flagella; end-binding protein 1 (EB1) remains at the tip during flagellar shortening and in the absence of intraflagellar transport (IFT), the predominant protein transport system in flagella. To investigate how EB1 accumulates at the flagellar tip, we used in vivo imaging of fluorescent protein–tagged EB1 (EB1-FP) in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. After photobleaching, the EB1 signal at the flagellar tip recovered within minutes, indicating an exchange with unbleached EB1 entering the flagella from the cell body. EB1 moved independent of IFT trains, and EB1-FP recovery did not require the IFT pathway. Single-particle imaging showed that EB1-FP is highly mobile along the flagellar shaft and displays a markedly reduced mobility near the flagellar tip. Individual EB1-FP particles dwelled for several seconds near the flagellar tip, suggesting the presence of stable EB1 binding sites. In simulations, the two distinct phases of EB1 mobility are sufficient to explain its accumulation at the tip. We propose that proteins uniformly distributed throughout the cytoplasm like EB1 accumulate locally by diffusion and capture; IFT, in contrast, might be required to transport proteins against cellular concentration gradients into or out of cilia. PMID:26631555

  8. Particle confinement of pellet-fuelled H-mode plasmas in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valovič, M.; Axon, K.; Garzotti, L.; Saarelma, S.; Thyagaraja, A.; Akers, R.; Gurl, C.; Kirk, A.; Lloyd, B.; Maddison, G. P.; Patel, A.; Shibaev, S.; Scannell, R.; Taylor, D.; Walsh, M.; MAST Team

    2008-07-01

    This paper quantifies the particle confinement of pellet-fuelled plasmas in the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The dataset is restricted mostly to neutral beam heated plasmas and to shallow pellets launched from the high field side. It is shown that the pellet deposition can be explained only by invoking the ∇B drift of the pellet ablatant. The pellet creates a zone with positive density gradient and increased temperature gradient. Simulations show that these changes could increase the level of micro-turbulence and thus enhance further the penetration of pellet-deposited particles towards the core. Post-pellet dynamics of the density profile is characterised by the pellet retention time τpel. It is shown that τpel correlates with the status of the edge transport barrier (L-mode or H-mode) and decreases rapidly for pellet deposition radius rpel approaching the plasma edge. For ELMy H-mode and ITER-like pellets, rpel ≈ 0.8a, the pellet retention time is about 20% of the energy confinement time. The fuelling requirement by the pellets for ITER is discussed.

  9. Collisionless microinstabilities in stellarators. I. Analytical theory of trapped-particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Helander, P.; Proll, J. H. E.; Plunk, G. G.

    2013-12-15

    This is the first in a series of papers about collisionless, electrostatic micro-instabilities in stellarators, with an emphasis on trapped-particle modes. It is found that, in so-called maximum-J configurations, trapped-particle instabilities are absent in large regions of parameter space. Quasi-isodynamic stellarators have this property (approximately), and the theory predicts that trapped electrons are stabilizing to all eigenmodes with frequencies below the electron bounce frequency. The physical reason is that the bounce-averaged curvature is favorable for all orbits, and that trapped electrons precess in the direction opposite to that in which drift waves propagate, thus precluding wave-particle resonance. These considerations only depend on the electrostatic energy balance and are independent of all geometric properties of the magnetic field other than the maximum-J condition. However, if the aspect ratio is large and the instability phase velocity differs greatly from the electron and ion thermal speeds, it is possible to derive a variational form for the frequency showing that stability prevails in a yet larger part of parameter space than what follows from the energy argument. Collisionless trapped-electron modes should therefore be more stable in quasi-isodynamic stellarators than in tokamaks.

  10. Energetic-particle-induced electromagnetic geodesic acoustic mode in tokamak plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingfeng; Dong, J. Q.; He, Zhixiong; He, Hongda; Shen, Y.

    2014-07-01

    Energetic-particle-induced kinetic electromagnetic geodesic acoustic modes (EKEGAMs) are numerically studied in low β (=plasma pressure/magnetic pressure) tokamak plasmas. The parallel component of the perturbed vector potential is considered along with the electrostatic potential perturbation. The effects of finite Larmor radius and finite orbit width of the bulk and energetic ions as well as electron parallel dynamics are all taken into account in the dispersion relation. Systematic harmonic and ordering analysis are performed for frequency and growth rate spectra of the EKEGAMs, assuming ( k ρ i ) ˜ q - 3 ˜ β ≪ 1, where q, k, and ρi are the safety factor, radial component of the EKEGAMs wave vector, and the Larmor radius of the ions, respectively. It is found that there exist critical βh/βi values, which depend, in particular, on pitch angle of energetic ions and safety factor, for the mode to be driven unstable. The EKEGAMs may also be unstable for pitch angle λ 0 B < 0.4 in certain parameter regions. Finite β effect of the bulk ions is shown to have damping effect on the EKEGAMs. Modes with higher radial wave vectors have higher growth rates. The damping from electron dynamics is found decreasing with decrease of the temperature ratio Te/Ti. The modes are easily to be driven unstable in low safety factor q region and high temperature ratio Th/Ti region. The harmonic features of the EKEGAMs are discussed as well.

  11. Nonlinear evolution of two fast-particle-driven modes near the linear stability threshold

    SciTech Connect

    Zalesny, Jaroslaw; Marczynski, Slawomir; Berczynski, Pawel; Berczynski, Stefan; Galant, Grzegorz; Lisak, Mietek; Galkowski, Andrzej

    2011-06-15

    A system of two coupled integro-differential equations is derived and solved for the non-linear evolution of two waves excited by the resonant interaction with fast ions just above the linear instability threshold. The effects of a resonant particle source and classical relaxation processes represented by the Krook, diffusion, and dynamical friction collision operators are included in the model, which exhibits different nonlinear evolution regimes, mainly depending on the type of relaxation process that restores the unstable distribution function of fast ions. When the Krook collisions or diffusion dominate, the wave amplitude evolution is characterized by modulation and saturation. However, when the dynamical friction dominates, the wave amplitude is in the explosive regime. In addition, it is found that the finite separation in the phase velocities of the two modes weakens the interaction strength between the modes.

  12. Distribution of the concentration of heavy metals associated with the sediment particles accumulated on road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zafra, C A; Temprano, J; Tejero, I

    2011-07-01

    The heavy metal pollution caused by road run-off water constitutes a problem in urban areas. The metallic load associated with road sediment must be determined in order to study its impact in drainage systems and receiving waters, and to perfect the design of prevention systems. This paper presents data regarding the sediment collected on road surfaces in the city of Torrelavega (northern Spain) during a period of 65 days (132 samples). Two sample types were collected: vacuum-dried samples and those swept up following vacuuming. The sediment loading (g m(-2)), particle size distribution (63-2800 microm) and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The data showed that the concentration of heavy metals tends to increase with the reduction in the particle diameter (exponential tendency). The concentrations ofPb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Fe, Mn and Co in the size fraction <63 microm were 350, 630, 124, 57, 56, 38, 3231, 374 and 51 mg kg(-1), respectively (average traffic density: 3800 vehicles day(-1)). By increasing the residence time of the sediment, the concentration increases, whereas the ratio of the concentration between the different size fractions decreases. The concentration across the road diminishes when the distance between the roadway and the sampling siteincreases; when the distance increases, the ratio between size fractions for heavy metal concentrations increases. Finally, the main sources of heavy metals are the particles detached by braking (brake pads) and tyre wear (rubber), and are associated with particle sizes <125 microm.

  13. Mode of Myosin Transportation in Living Cells Studied by Single Particle Tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zhang-yi; Xu, Ning; Guan, Ying-hua; Zhang, You-yi; Zhao, Xin-sheng

    2007-08-01

    The transport of internalized α1A-adrenergic receptor (α1A-AR) by myosin protein in live cells was studied. The technique of single particle tracking by fluorescence imaging with high temporal and spatial resolution was used. The endosomes of α1A-AR were transported along actin filaments in a step-by-step mode. The average step-size in different time resolutions is consistent with the step-size of myosin assay in vitro. With the simulation of the stepwise traces in different time resolutions, we found that the kinetic process of each step is in coherence with the single myosin assay in vitro.

  14. Mode confinement in photonic quasicrystal point-defect cavities for particle accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Gennaro, E.; Savo, S.; Andreone, A.; Galdi, V.; Castaldi, G.; Pierro, V.; Masullo, M. Rosaria

    2008-10-01

    In this letter, we present a study of the confinement properties of point-defect resonators in finite-size photonic-bandgap structures composed of aperiodic arrangements of dielectric rods, with special emphasis on their use for the design of cavities for particle accelerators. Specifically, for representative geometries, we study the properties of the fundamental mode (as a function of the filling fraction, structure size, and losses) via two-dimensional and three-dimensional full-wave numerical simulations, as well as microwave measurements at room temperature. Results indicate that for reduced-size structures, aperiodic geometries exhibit superior confinement properties by comparison with periodic ones.

  15. Wave-particle dualism and complementarity unraveled by a different mode.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Ralf; Puhlmann, Dirk; Heuer, Axel; Schleich, Wolfgang P

    2012-06-12

    The precise knowledge of one of two complementary experimental outcomes prevents us from obtaining complete information about the other one. This formulation of Niels Bohr's principle of complementarity when applied to the paradigm of wave-particle dualism--that is, to Young's double-slit experiment--implies that the information about the slit through which a quantum particle has passed erases interference. In the present paper we report a double-slit experiment using two photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion where we observe interference in the signal photon despite the fact that we have located it in one of the slits due to its entanglement with the idler photon. This surprising aspect of complementarity comes to light by our special choice of the TEM(01) pump mode. According to quantum field theory the signal photon is then in a coherent superposition of two distinct wave vectors giving rise to interference fringes analogous to two mechanical slits.

  16. Mapping out spin and particle conductances of a single-mode channel with tunable interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrat, Martin; Krinner, Sebastian; Grenier, Charles; Husmann, Dominik; Häusler, Samuel; Nakajima, Shuta; Brantut, Jean-Philippe; Esslinger, Tilman

    2016-05-01

    We study particle and spin transport in a single-mode quantum point contact, shaped by light potentials onto a charge neutral, quantum degenerate gas of 6 Li fermions with tunable interactions. The spin and particle conductances are measured as a function of chemical potential or confinement, covering weak attraction, where quantized conductance is observed, to the strongly interacting superfluid regime. Spin conductance exhibits a broad maximum when varying the chemical potential at moderate interactions, which signals the emergence of superfluidity. In contrast, the particle conductance is unexpectedly enhanced even before the gas is expected to turn into a superfluid: it shows conductance plateaus at non-universal values continuously increasing from 1/h to 4/h, as the interaction strength is increased from weak to intermediate. For strong interactions, the particle conductance plateaus disappear and the spin conductance gets suppressed, confirming the spin-insulating character of a superfluid. Our observations document the breakdown of universal conductance quantization as many-body correlations appear. This anomalous quantization is incompatible with a Fermi liquid description, shedding new light on the nature of the strongly attractive Fermi gas in the normal phase.

  17. Profiling of fine- and coarse-mode particles with LIRIC (LIdar/Radiometer Inversion Code)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perrone, M. R.; Burlizzi, P.; De Tomasi, F.; Chaikovsky, A.

    2014-08-01

    The paper investigates numerical procedures that allow determining the dependence on altitude of aerosol properties from multi wavelength elastic lidar signals. In particular, the potential of the LIdar/Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC) to retrieve the vertical profiles of fine and coarse-mode particles by combining 3-wavelength lidar measurements and collocated AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) sun/sky photometer measurements is investigated. The used lidar signals are at 355, 532 and 1064 nm. Aerosol extinction coefficient (αL), lidar ratio (LRL), and Ångstrom exponent (ÅL) profiles from LIRIC are compared with the corresponding profiles (α, LR, and Å) retrieved from a Constrained Iterative Inversion (CII) procedure to investigate the LIRIC retrieval ability. Then, an aerosol classification framework which relies on the use of a graphical framework and on the combined analysis of the Ångstrom exponent (at the 355 and 1064 nm wavelength pair, Å(355, 1064)) and its spectral curvature (ΔÅ = Å(355, 532)-Å(532, 1064)) is used to investigate the ability of LIRIC to retrieve vertical profiles of fine and coarse-mode particles. The Å-ΔÅ aerosol classification framework allows estimating the dependence on altitude of the aerosol fine modal radius and of the fine mode contribution to the whole aerosol optical thickness, as discussed in Perrone et al. (2014). The application of LIRIC to three different aerosol scenarios dealing with aerosol properties dependent on altitude has revealed that the differences between αL and α vary with the altitude and on average increase with the decrease of the lidar signal wavelength. It has also been found that the differences between ÅL and corresponding Å values vary with the altitude and the wavelength pair. The sensitivity of Ångstrom exponents to the aerosol size distribution which vary with the wavelength pair was responsible for these last results. The aerosol classification framework has revealed that the

  18. Interaction of high-energy trapped particles with ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-. beta. plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mikhailovskii, A. B.; Novakovaskii, S. V.; Smolyakov, A. I.

    1988-12-01

    A theory is derived for the interaction of high-energy trapped particleswith ballooning modes in a tokamak with a high-..beta.. plasma. A dispersionrelation is derived to describe the ballooning modes in the presence ofsuch particles; the effects of the high plasma ..beta.. are taken into account.The stability boundary for ballooning modes with zero and finite frequenciesis studied. The effects of finite bananas on the stability of ballooningmodes with zero frequencies are determined.

  19. Energetic Particle Effects Can Explain the Low Frequency of Alfvin Modes in the DIII-D Tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelenkov, N.N.; Heidbrink, W.W.

    2001-01-31

    During beam injection in the DIII-D tokamak, modes with lower frequencies than expected for toroidicity-induced Alfvin eigenmodes (TAE) are often observed. We present the analysis of one of these ''beta-induced Alfvin eigenmodes'' (BAE) with a high-n stability code HINST that includes the effect of the energetic ions on the mode frequency. It shows that the ''BAE'' could be the theoretically predicted resonant-TAE (RTAE), which is also called an energetic-particle mode (EPM).

  20. Anaerobic granule-based biofilms formation reduces propionate accumulation under high H2 partial pressure using conductive carbon felt particles.

    PubMed

    Xu, Heng; Wang, Cuiping; Yan, Kun; Wu, Jing; Zuo, Jiane; Wang, Kaijun

    2016-09-01

    Syngas based co-digestion is not only more economically attractive than separate syngas methanation but also able to upgrade biogas and increase overall CH4 amount simultaneously. However, high H2 concentration in the syngas could inhibit syntrophic degradation of propionate, resulting in propionate accumulation and even failure of the co-digestion system. In an attempt to reduce propionate accumulation via enhancing both H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) and direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) pathways, layered granule-based biofilms induced by conductive carbon felt particles (CCFP) was employed. The results showed that propionate accumulation was effectively reduced with influent COD load up to 7gL(-1)d(-1). Two types of granule-based biofilms, namely biofilm adhered to CCFP (B-CCFP) and granules formed by self-immobilization (B-SI) were formed in the reactor. Clostridium, Syntrophobacter, Methanospirillum were possibly involved in HIT and Clostridium, Geobacter, Anaerolineaceae, Methanosaeta in DIET, both of which might be responsible for the high-rate propionate degradation. PMID:27289059

  1. Delta-f particle-in-cell simulation of X-B mode conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, N.; Cary, J. R.; Barnes, D. C.; Carlsson, J.

    2006-04-01

    Low-noise, delta-f particle-in-cell algorithm has been implemented in VORPAL, a massive parallel, hybrid plasma modeling code (Chet Nieter and John. R. Cary, J. Comp. Physics 196, 448 (2004)). This computation method allows us to simulate the mode conversion between the extraordinary wave (X) and electron Bernstein wave (EBW) in both linear and nonlinear regimes. In the linear regime, it is found that a full X-B mode conversion can be obtained for optimized parameters as φ/φce<2 (φ is the driving frequency and φce is the electron cyclotron frequency). No 100% conversion is found for φ/φce moderately larger than 2. The simulation results agree with the predictions of Ram's theory (Ram & Schultz, Phys. Plasma 4084 (2000)). The agreement indicates that X-B mode conversion can be well described by the quadratic wave equation based on cold plasma approximation, and this is consistent with the phase-space picture of mode conversion. It is also shown that the conversion efficiency is significantly affected by the gradient of magnetic fields. When the amplitude of the incident X wave increases, it is shown that the nonlinear self-interaction of the electron converted EBW gives rise to the second harmonic generation at a pump power as low as three orders smaller than the electron thermal energy. If the fundamental EBW is sufficiently large, the non-propagating third and fourth harmonic modes are also generated. *The work was supported by DOE Contract No.DE-FG02-04ER54735.

  2. POWER RECYCLING OF BURST-MODE LASER PULSES FOR LASER PARTICLE INTERACTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yun

    2016-01-01

    A number of laser-particle interaction experiments such as the laser assisted hydrogen ion beam stripping or X-/ -ray generations via inverse-Compton scattering involve light sources operating in a burst mode to match the tem-poral structure of the particle beam. To mitigate the laser power challenge, it is important to make the interaction inside an optical cavity to recycle the laser power. In many cases, conventional cavity locking techniques will not work since the burst normally has a very small duty factor and low repetition rate and it is impossible to gen-erate an effective control signal. This work reports on the development of a doubly-resonant optical cavity scheme and its locking techniques that enables a simultaneous resonance of two laser beams with different spectra and/or temporal structures. We demonstrate that such a cavity can be used to recycle burst-mode ultra-violet laser pulses with arbitrary burst lengths and repetition rates.

  3. Particle-size dependent accumulation and trophic transfer of cerium oxide through a terrestrial food chain.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Joseph; De la Torre Roche, Roberto; Xing, Baoshan; Newman, Lee A; Ma, Xingmao; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge; White, Jason C

    2014-11-18

    The accumulation and trophic transfer of nanoparticle (NP) or bulk CeO2 through a terrestrial food chain was evaluated. Zucchini (Cucurbita pepo L.) was planted in soil with 0 or 1228 μg/g bulk or NP CeO2. After 28 d, zucchini tissue Ce content was determined by ICP-MS. Leaf tissue from each treatment was used to feed crickets (Acheta domesticus). After 14 d, crickets were analyzed for Ce content or were fed to wolf spiders (family Lycosidae). NP CeO2 significantly suppressed flower mass relative to control and bulk treatments. The Ce content of zucchini was significantly greater when exposure was in the NP form. The flowers, leaves, stems, and roots of zucchini exposed to bulk CeO2 contained 93.3, 707, 331, and 119,000 ng/g, respectively; NP-exposed plants contained 153, 1510, 479, and 567 000 ng/g, respectively. Crickets fed NP CeO2-exposed zucchini leaves contained significantly more Ce (33.6 ng/g) than did control or bulk-exposed insects (15.0-15.2 ng/g). Feces from control, bulk, and NP-exposed crickets contained Ce at 248, 393, and 1010 ng/g, respectively. Spiders that consumed crickets from control or bulk treatments contained nonquantifiable Ce; NP-exposed spiders contained Ce at 5.49 ng/g. These findings show that NP CeO2 accumulates in zucchini at greater levels than equivalent bulk materials and that this greater NP intake results in trophic transfer and possible food chain contamination. PMID:25340623

  4. Comparison of resonant magnetic perturbation-induced particle transport changes in H-mode (DIII-D) and L-mode (MAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mordijck, S.; Moyer, R. A.; Kirk, A.; Tamain, P.; Temple, D.; McKee, G. R.; Nardon, E.

    2011-12-01

    Recent experiments show the impact of resonant magnetic perturbations (RMPs) on the density (Schmitz et al 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124029, Evans et al 2008 Nucl. Fusion 48 024002, Kirk et al 2008 Nucl. Fusion 50 024002, Liang et al 2007 Phys. Rev. Lett. 98 265004), leading to a so-called density pump-out. Previous comparisons between DIII-D and TEXTOR have focused on the similarities of the deformation of the separatrix and the creation of striations at the intersection of the main chamber wall (Schmitz et al 2008 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 50 124029; Schmitz et al 2009 Phys. Rev. Lett. 103 165005). In this paper, we compare the difference in magnitude of the experimentally observed density pump-out in L-mode with H-mode in two diverted tokamaks: MAST and DIII-D. In order to address the differences in magnetic field from the coils, plasma shape and q95 between the two devices, we compute a weighted magnetic diffusion coefficient with a vacuum field line tracing code. This allows us to compare the changes in density pump-out with the weighted magnetic diffusion coefficient, using a simple particle diffusion model. We find that the density pump-out is vastly different in the two confinement regimes, suggesting different particle transport mechanisms. Since one main difference in transport characteristics between L- and H-mode is turbulence, we compare turbulent particle characteristics. We find that in L-mode (MAST) the fluctuations and E × B shear increase at the plasma edge, whereas in H-mode (DIII-D) the fluctuations decrease at the plasma edge. Deeper inside the core, the E × B shear remains similar in L-mode (MAST), whereas a large decrease that quickly saturates with RMP strength is observed in H-mode (DIII-D). These results suggest that the RMP-induced particle transport at the plasma edge in L-mode (MAST) is the result from increases in turbulent particle transport, whereas the results in H-mode (DIII-D) suggest a decrease in turbulent

  5. Mode-particle resonances during near-tangential neutral beam injection in the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaita, R.; White, R. B.; Morris, A. W.; Fredrickson, E. D.; McGuire, K. M.; Medley, S. S.; Murphy, T. J.; Scott, S. D.

    1990-07-01

    Coherent magnetohydrodynamic modes have been observed previously during neutral beam injection in the PDX tokamak [Phys. Rev. Lett. 50, 891 (1983)] and they have now been seen in the TFTR tokamak [Phys. Fluids 26, 2958 (1983)]. Periodic bursts of oscillations were detected with several plasma diagnostics, and Fokker-Planck calculations show that the populations of trapped particles in both tokamaks are sufficient to account for fishbone destabilization if a resonant interaction, between the mode and the beam ions, is assumed. Estimates of mode parameters are in reasonable agreement with the experiments, and they indicate that the fishbone mode may continue to affect the performance of intensely heated tokamaks.

  6. Helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in small ferrite particles and singular metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kamenetskii, E O

    2010-12-01

    Small ferrite-disk particles with magnetostatic (magneto-dipole) oscillations are characterized by the topological-phase states-the vortex states. In a recently published paper (Kamenetskii et al 2010 Phys. Rev. A 81 053823), it was shown that such magnetic vortices act as traps, providing purely subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields. The symmetry properties of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite disks allow one to propose new-type subwavelength microwave structures. In this paper it is demonstrated that the unique topological properties of the fields in a ferrite disk are intimately related to the symmetry breaking effects of magnetostatic oscillations. This analysis is based on postulates about a physical meaning of the magnetostatic-potential function ψ(r, t) as a complex scalar wavefunction, which presumes a long-range phase coherence in magnetic dipole-dipole interactions. The proper solutions are found based on an analysis of magnetostatic-wave propagation in a helical coordinate system. It is shown that while a composition of two helical waves may acquire a geometrical phase over-running of 2π during a period, every separate helical wave has a dynamical phase over-running of π and so behaves as a double-valued function. This results in the appearance of helical-mode magnetostatic resonances in quasi-2D ferrite disks. The solutions give magnetostatic-wave power-flow-density vortices with cores at the disk center and azimuthally running waves of magnetization. The near fields of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles are characterized by space-time symmetry violation. For incident electromagnetic waves, such particles, with sizes much less than the free-space electromagnetic wavelength, appear as local singular regions. From the properties of a composition of magnetostatic-vortex ferrite-disk particles, one may propose novel metamaterials-singular metamaterials. PMID:21406763

  7. Measurements of Nucleation-Mode Particle Size Distributions in Aircraft Plumes during SULFUR 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brock, Charles A.; Bradford, Deborah G.

    1999-01-01

    This report summarizes the participation of the University of Denver in an airborne measurement program, SULFUR 6, which was undertaken in late September and early October of 1998 by the Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und Raumfahrt (DLR). Scientific findings from two papers that have been published or accepted and from one manuscript that is in preparation are presented. The SULFUR 6 experiment was designed to investigate the emissions from subsonic aircraft to constrain calculations of possible atmospheric chemical and climatic effects. The University of Denver effort contributed toward the following SULFUR 6 goals: (1) To investigate the relationship between fuel sulfur content (FSC--mass of sulfur per mass of fuel) and particle number and mass emission index (El--quantity emitted per kg of fuel burned); (2) To provide upper and lower limits for the mass conversion efficiency (nu) of fuel sulfur to gaseous and particulate sulfuric acid; (3) To constrain models of volatile particle nucleation and growth by measuring the particle size distribution between 3 and 100 nm at aircraft plume ages ranging from 10(exp -1) to 10(exp 3) s; (4) To determine microphysical and optical properties and bulk chemical composition of soot particles in aircraft exhaust; and (5) To investigate the differences in particle properties between aircraft plumes in contrail and non-contrail situations. The experiment focused on emissions from the ATTAS research aircraft (a well characterized, but older technology turbojet) and from an in-service Boeing 737-300 aircraft provided by Lufthansa, with modem, high-bypass turbofan engines. Measurements were made from the DLR Dassault Falcon 900 aircraft, a modified business jet. The Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Program (AEAP) provided funding to operate an instrument, the nucleation-mode aerosol size spectrometer (N-MASS), during the SULFUR 6 campaign and to analyze the data. The N-MASS was developed at the University of Denver with the support of

  8. Global particle simulation of lower hybrid wave propagation and mode conversion in tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.

    2015-12-10

    Particle-in-cell simulation of lower hybrid (LH) waves in core plasmas is presented with a realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio in toroidal geometry. Due to the fact that LH waves mainly interact with electrons to drive the current, ion dynamic is described by cold fluid equations for simplicity, while electron dynamic is described by drift kinetic equations. This model could be considered as a new method to study LH waves in tokamak plasmas, which has advantages in nonlinear simulations. The mode conversion between slow and fast waves is observed in the simulation when the accessibility condition is not satisfied, which is consistent with the theory. The poloidal spectrum upshift and broadening effects are observed during LH wave propagation in the toroidal geometry.

  9. Effect of high-energy particles on ballooning flute modes in a tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Boiko, A.Y.; Cheremnykh, O.K.

    1988-08-01

    A dispersion relation for ideal ballooning flute modes is derived for a tokamak with a finite pressure (..beta../sub theta/approx. =1), a large aspect ratio, circular magnetic surfaces, and a group of high-energy particles assuming that the potential wells are shallow. In addition to waves which are already known, this dispersion relation describes two neutrally stable natural wave branches with frequencies ..omega..approx. <..omega../sub */, where ..omega../sub */ is the ion drift frequency. Either untrapped or trapped ions can excited one of these branches (with the higher frequency) and can damp the other (with the lower frequency). Analytic expressions are derived for the growth rate and the damping rate. The results found here can be used to explain the fishbone oscillations which have been observed experimentally.

  10. Velocity Measurement in a Dual-Mode Supersonic Combustor using Particle Image Velocimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, C. P.; McDaniel, J. C.; Krauss, R. H.; Day, S. W.; Reubush, D. E. (Technical Monitor); McClinton, C. R. (Technical Monitor); Reubush, D. E.

    2001-01-01

    Temporally and spatially-resolved, two-component measurements of velocity in a supersonic hydrogen-air combustor are reported. The combustor had a single unswept ramp fuel injector and operated with an inlet Mach number of 2 and a flow total temperature approaching 1200 K. The experiment simulated the mixing and combustion processes of a dual-mode scramjet operating at a flight Mach number near 5. The velocity measurements were obtained by seeding the fuel with alumina particles and performing Particle Image Velocimetry on the mixing and combustion wake of the ramp injector. To assess the effects of combustion on the fuel air-mixing process, the distribution of time-averaged velocity and relative turbulence intensity was determined for the cases of fuel-air mixing and fuel-air reacting. Relative to the mixing case, the near field core velocity of the reacting fuel jet had a slower streamwise decay. In the far field, downstream of 4 to 6 ramp heights from the ramp base, the heat release of combustion resulted in decreased flow velocity and increased turbulence levels. The reacting measurements were also compared with a computational fluid dynamics solution of the flow field. Numerically predicted velocity magnitudes were higher than that measured and the jet penetration was lower.

  11. Wave-particle dualism and complementarity unraveled by a different mode

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Ralf; Puhlmann, Dirk; Heuer, Axel; Schleich, Wolfgang P.

    2012-01-01

    The precise knowledge of one of two complementary experimental outcomes prevents us from obtaining complete information about the other one. This formulation of Niels Bohr’s principle of complementarity when applied to the paradigm of wave-particle dualism—that is, to Young’s double-slit experiment—implies that the information about the slit through which a quantum particle has passed erases interference. In the present paper we report a double-slit experiment using two photons created by spontaneous parametric down-conversion where we observe interference in the signal photon despite the fact that we have located it in one of the slits due to its entanglement with the idler photon. This surprising aspect of complementarity comes to light by our special choice of the TEM01 pump mode. According to quantum field theory the signal photon is then in a coherent superposition of two distinct wave vectors giving rise to interference fringes analogous to two mechanical slits. PMID:22628561

  12. Using graphene nano-particle embedded in photonic crystal fiber for evanescent wave mode-locking of fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yung-Hsiang; Yang, Chun-Yu; Liou, Jia-Hong; Yu, Chin-Ping; Lin, Gong-Ru

    2013-07-15

    A photonic crystal fiber (PCF) with high-quality graphene nano-particles uniformly dispersed in the hole cladding are demonstrated to passively mode-lock the erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) by evanescent-wave interaction. The few-layer graphene nano-particles are obtained by a stabilized electrochemical exfoliation at a threshold bias. These slowly and softly exfoliated graphene nano-particle exhibits an intense 2D band and an almost disappeared D band in the Raman scattering spectrum. The saturable phenomena of the extinction coefficient β in the cladding provides a loss modulation for the intracavity photon intensity by the evanescent-wave interaction. The evanescent-wave mode-locking scheme effectively enlarges the interaction length of saturable absorption with graphene nano-particle to provide an increasing transmittance ΔT of 5% and modulation depth of 13%. By comparing the core-wave and evanescent-wave mode-locking under the same linear transmittance, the transmittance of the graphene nano-particles on the end-face of SMF only enlarges from 0.54 to 0.578 with ΔT = 3.8% and the modulation depth of 10.8%. The evanescent wave interaction is found to be better than the traditional approach which confines the graphene nano-particles at the interface of two SMF patchcords. When enlarging the intra-cavity gain by simultaneously increasing the pumping current of 980-nm and 1480-nm pumping laser diodes (LDs) to 900 mA, the passively mode-locked EDFL shortens its pulsewidth to 650 fs and broadens its spectral linewidth to 3.92 nm. An extremely low carrier amplitude jitter (CAJ) of 1.2-1.6% is observed to confirm the stable EDFL pulse-train with the cladding graphene nano-particle based evanescent-wave mode-locking.

  13. Heavy Particle Mode as the Signature of the I-Regime*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, T.; Coppi, B.

    2010-11-01

    Key features [1] of the I-Regime investigated by the Alcator C-Mod can be explained by the excitation of a new heavy particle (e.g. impurity) mode [2] at the plasma edge. This mode involves both density and magnetic fluctuations. The impurity is treated as collisional. Considering a plane geometry, the dispersion relation has a unstable root for ηi≡(dTi/dr) ni/(Tidni/dr)>2/3 and dnI/dr>0. The marginal stability point is reached for a maximum d nI/dr such that Î**=φIA=φ, where Î**≡c kyTI(dnI/dr)/(Ze B nI) and φIA≡(5/3) k^2 TI/mI. The instability condition is Î**<φIA. Re,/Î**>0 indicates that the mode phase velocity(vph)is in the electron diamagnetic direction, a feature consistent[3]with the observation that the plasma spontaneous rotation is in the ion diamagnetic direction. This predicted direction of vph has been confirmed by the experiments. The impurity flux evaluated from the quasi-linear theory is =ni/(Z Ti) ˜-ni(dTi/dr)/(Z Tik^2 vth iλi) [1-2/(3ηi)] .<|vEx|^2>>0 for ηi>2/3, where λi is the effective main ion mean free path. This shows that both the main ion thermal energy and the impurity are transported outwards. These features are consistent with a mode with frequency ˜200,Hz observed in the I- Regime and with the fact that impurities are confined at the edge in this regime. *Sponsored by the DOE. [1] E. Marmar, B. Lipschultz, A. Dominguez, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 54 (2009) 97 [2] B. Coppi, H. Furth, M. Rosenbluth and R. Sagdeev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 17 (1966) 377-379 [3] B. Coppi, Nucl. Fusion 42 (2002) 1-4

  14. Ultrafiltration of wastewater: effects of particles, mode of operation, and backwash effectiveness.

    PubMed

    Bourgeous, K N; Darby, J L; Tchobanoglous, G

    2001-01-01

    The effects that wastewater quality and mode of operation have on the performance of an asymmetric, hollow fiber, polysulfone, ultrafiltration (UF) membrane with a molecular weight cutoff of 100,000 Daltons were investigated. Performance was assessed through monitoring membrane flux, transmembrane pressure, effluent biochemical oxygen demand, and operational cost of the experimental system while treating filtered secondary, secondary, and filtered primary effluents. Fluxes achieved for filtered secondary (129-173 l/m2 h), secondary (101-158 l/m2 h), and filtered primary (20-41 l/m2 h) effluents were compared to those obtained at three other locations where similar UF systems were operated. A conceptual model of the impact of an insufficient backwash and of operating the UF system at constant flux on membrane performance is presented to explain the differences in fluxes. Employing pre-membrane granular filtration to remove a portion of the problematic particles in secondary effluent prior to UF led to optimal operational conditions. The costs associated with the operation of pre-membrane granular filtration were offset by the increase in production achieved. Although the use of recirculation could increase maintainable flux when treating a concentrated feed (e.g., filtered primary effluent), the associated costs were high. Improved UF performance was found to result from allowing flux to decline naturally, rather than using a constant flux mode of operation. The effluents produced when filtered secondary and secondary effluents were the feeds would be equivalent to an oxidized, coagulated, clarified, and filtered wastewater as per Title 22 California Wastewater Reclamation Criteria. PMID:11257896

  15. The composition of nucleation and Aitken modes particles during coastal nucleation events: evidence for marine secondary organic contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaattovaara, P.; Huttunen, P. E.; Yoon, Y. J.; Joutsensaari, J.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; O'Dowd, C. D.; Laaksonen, A.

    2006-04-01

    Newly-formed nanometer-sized particles have been observed at coastal and marine environments worldwide. Interestingly, organic species have so far not been detected in those newly-formed nucleation mode particles. In this study, we applied the UFO-TDMA (ultrafine organic tandem differential mobility analyzer) method to study the possible existence of an organic fraction in recently formed coastal nucleation mode particles (d<20 nm) at the Mace Head research station. Furthermore, effects of those nucleation events to potential CCN (cloud condensation nuclei) were studied. The coastal events were typical for the Mace Head region and they occurred at low tide conditions during efficient solar radiation and high biological activity (HBA, i.e. a high mass concentration of chlorophyll a of the ocean) in spring 2002. Additionally, a PHA-UCPC (pulse height analyzer ultrafine condensation particle counter) technique was used to study the composition of newly-formed particles formed in low tide conditions during a lower biological activity (LBA, i.e. a lower mass concentration of chlorophyll a of the ocean) in October 2002. The overall results of the UFO-TDMA and the PHA-UCPC measurements indicate that those coastally/marinely formed nucleation mode particles include a remarkable fraction of secondary organic products, beside iodine oxides, which are likely to be responsible for the nucleation. During clean marine air mass conditions, the origin of those secondary organic oxidation compounds can be related to marine/coastal biota and thus a major fraction of the organics may originate from biosynthetic production of alkenes such as isoprene and their oxidation by iodine, hydroxyl radical, and ozone. During modified marine conditions, also anthropogenic secondary organic compounds may contribute to the nucleation mode organic mass, in addition to biogenic secondary organic compounds. Thus, the UFO-TDMA results suggest that the secondary organic compounds may, in addition to

  16. How to reliably detect molecular clusters and nucleation mode particles with Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manninen, Hanna E.; Mirme, Sander; Mirme, Aadu; Petäjä, Tuukka; Kulmala, Markku

    2016-08-01

    To understand the very first steps of atmospheric particle formation and growth processes, information on the size where the atmospheric nucleation and cluster activation occurs, is crucially needed. The current understanding of the concentrations and dynamics of charged and neutral clusters and particles is based on theoretical predictions and experimental observations. This paper gives a standard operation procedure (SOP) for Neutral cluster and Air Ion Spectrometer (NAIS) measurements and data processing. With the NAIS data, we have improved the scientific understanding by (1) direct detection of freshly formed atmospheric clusters and particles, (2) linking experimental observations and theoretical framework to understand the formation and growth mechanisms of aerosol particles, and (3) parameterizing formation and growth mechanisms for atmospheric models. The SOP provides tools to harmonize the world-wide measurements of small clusters and nucleation mode particles and to verify consistent results measured by the NAIS users. The work is based on discussions and interactions between the NAIS users and the NAIS manufacturer.

  17. Particle sorting during sediment redistribution processes and the effect on 230Th-normalized mass accumulation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcantonio, Franco; Lyle, Mitchell; Ibrahim, Rami

    2014-08-01

    The 230Th method of determining mass accumulation rates (MARs) assumes that little to no fractionation occurs during sediment redistribution processes at the seafloor. We examine 230Th inventories in radiocarbon-dated multicore sediments from paired winnowed and focused sites at Cocos and Carnegie Ridges, Panama Basin. Radiocarbon-derived sand MARs, which likely represent the vertical rain of particles poorly transported by bottom currents, are similar at each of the paired sites but are different using 230Th normalization. 230Th-normalized MARs are about 60% lower at focused sites and likely underestimate vertical MARs, while the reverse is true for winnowed sites. We hypothesize that size fractionation occurs most frequently at lower current velocities, resulting in the coarse fraction being left behind and primarily the fine 230Th-rich grains being transported downslope. 230Th-normalization works well for recording fine-grained (detrital and opal), but not coarse-grained (carbonate), fluxes in regions that have undergone sediment redistribution.

  18. The Implicit Contribution of Slab Modes to the Perpendicular Diffusion Coefficient of Particles Interacting with Two-component Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalchi, A.

    2016-10-01

    We explore the transport of energetic particles in two-component turbulence in which the stochastic magnetic field is assumed to be a superposition of slab and two-dimensional modes. It is known that in magnetostatic slab turbulence, the motion of particles across the mean magnetic field is subdiffusive. If a two-dimensional component is added, diffusion is recovered. It was also shown before that in two-component turbulence, the slab modes do not explicitly contribute to the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. In the current paper, the implicit contribution of slab modes is explored and it is shown that this contribution leads to a reduction of the perpendicular diffusion coefficient. This effect improves the agreement between simulations and analytical theory. Furthermore, the obtained results are relevant for investigations of diffusive shock acceleration.

  19. Fluid electrons with kinetic closure for long wavelength energetic particles driven modes

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Yang; Parker, Scott E.

    2011-05-15

    A kinetic electron closure scheme is presented for the fluid electron model that has been implemented in the GEM code [J. Lang, Y. Chen, S. E. Parker, and G.-Y. Fu, Phys. Plasmas 16, 102101 (2009)]. The most important element of the closure scheme is a complete Ohm's law for the parallel electric field E{sub ||}, derived by combining the quasineutrality condition, the Ampere's equation and the v{sub ||} moment of the gyrokinetic equations. A discretization method for the closure scheme is presented and studied in detail for a three-dimensional shearless slab plasma. It is found that for long wavelength shear Alfven waves the kinetic closure scheme is both more accurate and more robust than the previous GEM algorithm [Y. Chen and S. E. Parker, J. Comput. Phys. 189, 463 (2003)], whereas for the ion-gradient-driven instability the previous algorithm is more efficient. The fluid electron model with kinetic electron closure is useful for studying energetic particles driven modes with electron kinetic damping effects.

  20. Thermomechanically coupled conduction mode laser welding simulations using smoothed particle hydrodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Haoyue; Eberhard, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Process simulations of conduction mode laser welding are performed using the meshless Lagrangian smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) method. The solid phase is modeled based on the governing equations in thermoelasticity. For the liquid phase, surface tension effects are taken into account to simulate the melt flow in the weld pool, including the Marangoni force caused by a temperature-dependent surface tension gradient. A non-isothermal solid-liquid phase transition with the release or absorption of additional energy known as the latent heat of fusion is considered. The major heat transfer through conduction is modeled, whereas heat convection and radiation are neglected. The energy input from the laser beam is modeled as a Gaussian heat source acting on the initial material surface. The developed model is implemented in Pasimodo. Numerical results obtained with the model are presented for laser spot welding and seam welding of aluminum and iron. The change of process parameters like welding speed and laser power, and their effects on weld dimensions are investigated. Furthermore, simulations may be useful to obtain the threshold for deep penetration welding and to assess the overall welding quality. A scalability and performance analysis of the implemented SPH algorithm in Pasimodo is run in a shared memory environment. The analysis reveals the potential of large welding simulations on multi-core machines.

  1. The triaxial particle plus rotor model and wobbling mode: A semiclassical view

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Rajiv; Malik, S. S.; Jain, A. K.; Jain, S. R.

    2010-11-24

    A systematic analysis of the triaxial particle rotor model with single-j shell configuration is carried out to explain the prominent features of observed wobbling excitations in odd A nuclei. The equations of motion for the angular momentum vectors I-vector and j-vector generate two types of equilibrium (i.e., (i) the axes aligned and (ii) the planar) states. The planar equilibrium states involve mainly the orientation degree of freedom {gamma} and their Jacobian matrix J gives purely imaginary eigenvalues in conjugate pairs. Also, our dynamical results show a substantial projection of angular momentum vectors on all the three principal axes, which implies that the resultant angular momentum lies outside the planes of three axes. Both these signatures confirm the spontaneous breakdown of time reversal (T) plus rotation by 180 deg. (R{sub {pi}}) i.e., R{sub {pi}T} symmetry and as a result nearly two identical bands consisting of even and odd spins emerge. We have tested our dynamical formalism for the wobbling mode observed in {sup 163}Lu.

  2. Particle simulation of radio frequency stabilization of the flute mode in a tandem mirror. II. Perpendicular antenna

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, H.; Kadoya, Y.

    1988-10-01

    A two-and-a-half-dimensional electromagnetic particle code PS2M (J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 56, 3899 (1987)) is used to study how an electric field applied perpendicularly to the magnetic field affects the radio frequency stabilization of flute modes in a tandem mirror plasma. The electric field perpendicular to the magnetic field stabilizes or destabilizes the flute mode through the mechanism of the ponderomotive force acting on electrons and ions and through the mechanism of sideband coupling. In the simulations two typical examples have been shown: (i) when the sideband coupling effects (in which the electron terms are dominant) stabilize the flute modes and (ii) when the perpendicular ponderomotive force acting on the electrons destabilizes the flute modes.

  3. Investigation of Particle Accumulation, Chemosensitivity and Thermosensitivity for Effective Solid Tumor Therapy Using Thermosensitive Liposomes and Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Lokerse, Wouter J.M.; Bolkestein, Michiel; ten Hagen, Timo L.M.; de Jong, Marion; Eggermont, Alexander M.M.; Grüll, Holger; Koning, Gerben A.

    2016-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) loaded thermosensitive liposomes (TSLs) have shown promising results for hyperthermia-induced local drug delivery to solid tumors. Typically, the tumor is heated to hyperthermic temperatures (41-42 °C), which induced intravascular drug release from TSLs within the tumor tissue leading to high local drug concentrations (1-step delivery protocol). Next to providing a trigger for drug release, hyperthermia (HT) has been shown to be cytotoxic to tumor tissue, to enhance chemosensitivity and to increase particle extravasation from the vasculature into the tumor interstitial space. The latter can be exploited for a 2-step delivery protocol, where HT is applied prior to i.v. TSL injection to enhance tumor uptake, and after 4 hours waiting time for a second time to induce drug release. In this study, we compare the 1- and 2-step delivery protocols and investigate which factors are of importance for a therapeutic response. In murine B16 melanoma and BFS-1 sarcoma cell lines, HT induced an enhanced Dox uptake in 2D and 3D models, resulting in enhanced chemosensitivity. In vivo, therapeutic efficacy studies were performed for both tumor models, showing a therapeutic response for only the 1-step delivery protocol. SPECT/CT imaging allowed quantification of the liposomal accumulation in both tumor models at physiological temperatures and after a HT treatment. A simple two compartment model was used to derive respective rates for liposomal uptake, washout and retention, showing that the B16 model has a twofold higher liposomal uptake compared to the BFS-1 tumor. HT increases uptake and retention of liposomes in both tumors models by the same factor of 1.66 maintaining the absolute differences between the two models. Histology showed that HT induced apoptosis, blood vessel integrity and interstitial structures are important factors for TSL accumulation in the investigated tumor types. However, modeling data indicated that the intraliposomal Dox fraction did not

  4. Characterization of satellite-based proxies for estimating nucleation mode particles over South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundström, A.-M.; Nikandrova, A.; Atlaskina, K.; Nieminen, T.; Vakkari, V.; Laakso, L.; Beukes, J. P.; Arola, A.; van Zyl, P. G.; Josipovic, M.; Venter, A. D.; Jaars, K.; Pienaar, J. J.; Piketh, S.; Wiedensohler, A.; Chiloane, E. K.; de Leeuw, G.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-05-01

    Proxies for estimating nucleation mode number concentrations and further simplification for their use with satellite data have been presented in Kulmala et al. (2011). In this paper we discuss the underlying assumptions for these simplifications and evaluate the resulting proxies over an area in South Africa based on a comparison with a suite of ground-based measurements available from four different stations. The proxies are formulated in terms of sources (concentrations of precursor gases (NO2 and SO2) and UVB radiation intensity near the surface) and a sink term related to removal of the precursor gases due to condensation on pre-existing aerosols. A-Train satellite data are used as input to compute proxies. Both the input data and the resulting proxies are compared with those obtained from ground-based measurements. In particular, a detailed study is presented on the substitution of the local condensation sink (CS) with satellite aerosol optical depth (AOD), which is a column-integrated parameter. One of the main factors affecting the disagreement between CS and AOD is the presence of elevated aerosol layers. Overall, the correlation between proxies calculated from the in situ data and observed nucleation mode particle number concentrations (Nnuc) remained low. At the time of the satellite overpass (13:00-14:00 LT) the highest correlation is observed for SO2/CS (R2 = 0.2). However, when the proxies are calculated using satellite data, only NO2/AOD showed some correlation with Nnuc (R2 = 0.2). This can be explained by the relatively high uncertainties related especially to the satellite SO2 columns and by the positive correlation that is observed between the ground-based SO2 and NO2 concentrations. In fact, results show that the satellite NO2 columns compare better with in situ SO2 concentration than the satellite SO2 column. Despite the high uncertainties related to the proxies calculated using satellite data, the proxies calculated from the in situ data did

  5. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-09-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations.

  6. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations.

  7. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles

    PubMed Central

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V.; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D.; Schuck, P. James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  8. Fano-like resonance emerging from magnetic and electric plasmon mode coupling in small arrays of gold particles.

    PubMed

    Bakhti, Saïd; Tishchenko, Alexandre V; Zambrana-Puyalto, Xavier; Bonod, Nicolas; Dhuey, Scott D; Schuck, P James; Cabrini, Stefano; Alayoglu, Selim; Destouches, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    In this work we theoretically and experimentally analyze the resonant behavior of individual 3 × 3 gold particle oligomers illuminated under normal and oblique incidence. While this structure hosts both dipolar and quadrupolar electric and magnetic delocalized modes, only dipolar electric and quadrupolar magnetic modes remain at normal incidence. These modes couple into a strongly asymmetric spectral response typical of a Fano-like resonance. In the basis of the coupled mode theory, an analytical representation of the optical extinction in terms of singular functions is used to identify the hybrid modes emerging from the electric and magnetic mode coupling and to interpret the asymmetric line profiles. Especially, we demonstrate that the characteristic Fano line shape results from the spectral interference of a broad hybrid mode with a sharp one. This structure presents a special feature in which the electric field intensity is confined on different lines of the oligomer depending on the illumination wavelength relative to the Fano dip. This Fano-type resonance is experimentally observed performing extinction cross section measurements on arrays of gold nano-disks. The vanishing of the Fano dip when increasing the incidence angle is also experimentally observed in accordance with numerical simulations. PMID:27580515

  9. Non-perturbative modelling of energetic particle effects on resistive wall mode: Anisotropy and finite orbit width

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yueqiang Chapman, I. T.; Hao, G. Z.; Wang, Z. R.; Menard, J. E.; Okabayashi, M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A.

    2014-05-15

    A non-perturbative magnetohydrodynamic-kinetic hybrid formulation is developed and implemented into the MARS-K code [Liu et al., Phys. Plasmas 15, 112503 (2008)] that takes into account the anisotropy and asymmetry [Graves et al., Nature Commun. 3, 624 (2012)] of the equilibrium distribution of energetic particles (EPs) in particle pitch angle space, as well as first order finite orbit width (FOW) corrections for both passing and trapped EPs. Anisotropic models, which affect both the adiabatic and non-adiabatic drift kinetic energy contributions, are implemented for both neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron resonant heating induced EPs. The first order FOW correction does not contribute to the precessional drift resonance of trapped particles, but generally remains finite for the bounce and transit resonance contributions, as well as for the adiabatic contributions from asymmetrically distributed passing particles. Numerical results for a 9MA steady state ITER plasma suggest that (i) both the anisotropy and FOW effects can be important for the resistive wall mode stability in ITER plasmas; and (ii) the non-perturbative approach predicts less kinetic stabilization of the mode, than the perturbative approach, in the presence of anisotropy and FOW effects for the EPs. The latter may partially be related to the modification of the eigenfunction of the mode by the drift kinetic effects.

  10. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODE-CHOICE SIMULATOR WITH THE LOG DATA ACCUMULATED IN ON-DEMAND BUS SERVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Kota; Yamato, Hiroyuki; Hiekata, Kazuo

    The new simulator which can estimate the mode-choi ce in the area was developed and evaluated in the field test. The characteristic of the developed simulato r is to be able to estimate the number of demand and demand pattern in high-accuracy with the real operation log data of the On-demand Bus. The simulator is devided into micro-simulator whose passenger agents choose their transpor t mode by the sacrifice model. The developed simulator is evaluated in the real fi eld test in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture. The new transportation like LRT (Light Rail Transit) and On-demand Bus is eval uated by the simulator and the result of simulation is confirmed to be reliable by the local government officers.

  11. Dynamics of energetic particle driven modes and MHD modes in wall-stabilized high-β plasmas on JT-60U and DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsunaga, G.; Okabayashi, M.; Aiba, N.; Boedo, J. A.; Ferron, J. R.; Hanson, J. M.; Hao, G. Z.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Holcomb, C. T.; In, Y.; Jackson, G. L.; Liu, Y. Q.; Luce, T. C.; McKee, G. R.; Osborne, T. H.; Pace, D. C.; Shinohara, K.; Snyder, P. B.; Solomon, W. M.; Strait, E. J.; Turnbull, A. D.; Van Zeeland, M. A.; Watkins, J. G.; Zeng, L.; the DIII-D Team; the JT-60 Team

    2013-12-01

    In the wall-stabilized high-β plasmas in JT-60U and DIII-D, interactions between energetic particle (EP) driven modes (EPdMs) and edge localized modes (ELMs) have been observed. The interaction between the EPdM and ELM are reproducibly observed. Many EP diagnostics indicate a strong correlation between the distorted waveform of the EPdM and the EP transport to the edge. The waveform distortion is composed of higher harmonics (n ⩾ 2) and looks like a density snake near the plasma edge. According to statistical analyses, ELM triggering by the EPdMs requires a finite level of waveform distortion and pedestal recovery. ELM pacing by the EPdMs occurs when the repetition frequency of the EPdMs is higher than the natural ELM frequency. EPs transported by EPdMs are thought to contribute to change the edge stability.

  12. Potential lipid accumulation and growth characteristic of the green alga Chlorella with combination cultivation mode of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Han, Fangxin; Xu, Hua; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Feng, Bo; Zeng, Hongyan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential lipid accumulation of an oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides by combination cultivation mode of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Under co-deficiency of N and P, the largest lipid content (55.8%) was accomplished in C. protothecoides, which was higher than either sole P-deficiency (32.77%) or N-deficiency (52.5%), or co-repletion of N and P (control) (22.17%). However, the highest lipid productivity (224.14mg/L/day) with combination mode of N-deficiency and P-repletion represented 1.19-3.70-fold more than that of control, P-deficiency/limitation, and co-deficiency of N and P, respectively. This indicating N-deficiency plus P-repletion was a promising lipid trigger to motivate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides cells. Further, difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE)-based proteomics was employed to reveal the molecular pathways associated with lipid biosynthesis. These results provide the foundation to develop engineering strategies targeting lipid productivity for industrial production of microalgae-based biodiesel.

  13. Chemometric analysis of multi-sensor hyperspectral images of coarse mode aerosol particles for the image-based investigation on aerosol particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ofner, Johannes; Kamilli, Katharina A.; Eitenberger, Elisabeth; Friedbacher, Gernot; Lendl, Bernhard; Held, Andreas; Lohninger, Hans

    2015-04-01

    Multi-sensor hyperspectral imaging is a novel technique, which allows the determination of composition, chemical structure and pure components of laterally resolved samples by chemometric analysis of different hyperspectral datasets. These hyperspectral datasets are obtained by different imaging methods, analysing the same sample spot and superimposing the hyperspectral data to create a single multi-sensor dataset. Within this study, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Raman and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) images were obtained from size-segregated aerosol particles, sampled above Western Australian salt lakes. The particles were collected on aluminum foils inside a 2350 L Teflon chamber using a Sioutas impactor, sampling aerosol particles of sizes between 250 nm and 10 µm. The complex composition of the coarse-mode particles can be linked to primary emissions of inorganic species as well as to oxidized volatile organic carbon (VOC) emissions. The oxidation products of VOC emissions are supposed to form an ultra-fine nucleation mode, which was observed during several field campaigns between 2006 and 2013. The aluminum foils were analysed using chemical imaging and electron microscopy. A Horiba LabRam 800HR Raman microscope was used for vibrational mapping of an area of about 100 µm x 100 µm of the foils at a resolution of about 1 µm. The same area was analysed using a Quanta FEI 200 electron microscope (about 250 nm resolution). In addition to the high-resolution image, the elemental composition could be investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The obtained hyperspectral images were combined into a multi-sensor dataset using the software package Imagelab (Epina Software Labs, www.imagelab.at). After pre-processing of the images, the multi-sensor hyperspectral dataset was analysed using several chemometric methods such as principal component analysis (PCA), hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and other multivariate methods. Vertex

  14. Parameterizing ice nucleation ability of mineral dust particles in the deposition mode: Numerical investigations using large eddy simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savre, J.; Ekman, A. M. L.; Svensson, G.; Tjernström, M.

    2013-05-01

    A parameterization for heterogeneous ice nucleation of dust particles in the deposition mode is proposed and implemented in a Large Eddy Simulation model. The approach based on Classical Nucleation Theory relies on the definition of contact angle PDFs based on experimental data to characterize nucleation ability of the aerosol population. A bin approach is used to discretize the contact angle PDFs in order to account for the fact that the most efficient ice nuclei will form ice crystals quickly leaving only the least efficient nuclei as simulation progresses. The nucleation scheme is evaluated against a single-layer mixed-phase cloud observed over Barrow during the ISDAC campaign. As a matter of fact, analysis of the data collected onboard the aircraft during flight 31 suggests that dust particles are most likely the dominant source of newly nucleated ice crystals, acting in the deposition mode.

  15. Linear benchmarks between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC to study energetic particle driven Alfvénic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogaccia, G.; Vlad, G.; Briguglio, S.

    2016-11-01

    Resonant interaction between energetic particles (EPs), produced by fusion reactions and/or additional heating systems, and shear Alfvén modes can destabilize global Alfvénic modes enhancing the EP transport. In order to investigate the EP transport in present and next generation fusion devices, numerical simulations are recognized as a very important tool. Among the various numerical models, the hybrid MHD gyrokinetic one has shown to be a valid compromise between a sufficiently accurate wave-particle interaction description and affordable computational resource requirements. This paper presents a linear benchmark between the hybrid codes HYMAGYC and HMGC. The HYMAGYC code solves the full, linear MHD equations in general curvilinear geometry for the bulk plasma and describes the EP population by the nonlinear gyrokinetic Vlasov equation. On the other side, HMGC solves the nonlinear, reduced O≤ft(ε 03\\right) , pressureless MHD equations ({ε0} being the inverse aspect ratio) for the bulk plasma and the drift kinetic Vlasov equation for the EPs. The results of the HYMAGYC and HMGC codes have been compared both in the MHD limit and in a wide range of the EP parameter space for two test cases (one of which being the so-called TAE n  =  6 ITPA Energetic Particle Group test case), both characterized by {ε0}\\ll 1 . In the first test case (test case A), good qualitative agreement is found w.r.t. real frequencies, growth rates and spatial structures of the most unstable modes, with some quantitative differences for the growth rates. For the so-called ITPA test case (test case B), at the nominal energetic particle density value, the disagreement between the two codes is, on the contrary, also qualitative, as a different mode is found as the most unstable one.

  16. First detection of Cherenkov light from cosmic-particle-induced air showers by Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biland, A.; Britvitch, I.; Lorenz, E.; Otte, N.; Pauss, F.; Renker, D.; Ritt, S.; Roeser, U.; Schneebeli, M.

    2007-10-01

    We report on first tests of Geiger-mode APDs (G-APD) to detect Cherenkov light from cosmic particle induced air showers. The motivation for this study stems from the requirement to improve the sensitivity of large imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes (IACT) by replacing the photomultipliers (PMT) by high detection efficiency G-APDs. Three tests have been carried out, confirming sufficiently high light sensitivity of blue-sensitive G-APDs as future replacement of PMTs in IACTs.

  17. Variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation of nonlinear mode conversion from extraordinary waves to Bernstein waves

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Jianyuan; Liu, Jian; Qin, Hong; Yu, Zhi; Xiang, Nong

    2015-09-15

    In this paper, the nonlinear mode conversion of extraordinary waves in nonuniform magnetized plasmas is studied using the variational symplectic particle-in-cell simulation. The accuracy of the nonlinear simulation is guaranteed by the long-term accuracy and conservativeness of the symplectic algorithm. The spectra of the electromagnetic wave, the evolution of the wave reflectivity, the energy deposition profile, and the parameter-dependent properties of radio-frequency waves during the nonlinear mode conversion are investigated. It is illustrated that nonlinear effects significantly modify the physics of the radio-frequency injection in magnetized plasmas. The evolutions of the radio-frequency wave reflectivity and the energy deposition are observed, as well as the self-interaction of the Bernstein waves and mode excitations. Even for waves with small magnitude, nonlinear effects can also become important after continuous wave injections, which are common in the realistic radio-frequency wave heating and current drive experiments.

  18. Retrieval of spheroid particle size distribution from spectral extinction data in the independent mode using PCA approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Hong; Lin, Jian-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    An improved anomalous diffraction approximation (ADA) method is presented for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroids firstly. In this approach, the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles can be calculated with good accuracy and high efficiency in a wider size range by combining the Latimer method and the ADA theory, and this method can present a more general expression for calculating the extinction efficiency of spheroid particles with various complex refractive indices and aspect ratios. Meanwhile, the visible spectral extinction with varied spheroid particle size distributions and complex refractive indices is surveyed. Furthermore, a selection principle about the spectral extinction data is developed based on PCA (principle component analysis) of first derivative spectral extinction. By calculating the contribution rate of first derivative spectral extinction, the spectral extinction with more significant features can be selected as the input data, and those with less features is removed from the inversion data. In addition, we propose an improved Tikhonov iteration method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions in the independent mode. Simulation experiments indicate that the spheroid particle size distributions obtained with the proposed method coincide fairly well with the given distributions, and this inversion method provides a simple, reliable and efficient method to retrieve the spheroid particle size distributions from the spectral extinction data.

  19. Turbulent particle transport as a function of toroidal rotation in DIII-D H-mode plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, X.; Mordijck, S.; Zeng, L.; Schmitz, L.; Rhodes, T. L.; Doyle, E. J.; Groebner, R.; Meneghini, O.; Staebler, G. M.; Smith, S. P.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we show how changes in toroidal rotation, by controlling the injected torque, affect particle transport and confinement. The toroidal rotation is altered using the co- and counter neutral beam injection (NBI) in low collisionality H-mode plasmas on DIII-D (Luxon 2002 Nucl. Fusion 42 614) with dominant electron cyclotron heating (ECH). We find that there is no correlation between the toroidal rotation shear and the inverse density gradient, which is observed on AUG when {{T}\\text{e}}/{{T}\\text{i}} is varied using ECH (Angioni et al 2011 Phys. Rev. Lett. 107 215003). In DIII-D, we find that in a discharge with balanced torque injection, the E× B shear is smaller than the linear gyrokinetic growth rate for small {{k}θ}{ρs} for ρ =0.6 -0.85. This results in lower particle confinement. In the co- and counter- injected discharges the E× B shear is larger or close to the linear growth rate at the plasma edge and both configurations have higher particle confinement. In order to measure particle transport, we use a small periodic perturbative gas puff. This gas puff perturbs the density profiles and allows us to extract the perturbed diffusion and inward pinch coefficients. We observe a strong increase in the inward particle pinch in the counter-torque injected plasma. Finally, the calculated quasi-linear particle flux, nor the linear growth rates using TGLF (Staebler et al 2005 Phys. Plasmas 12 102508) agree with experimental observations.

  20. Comparison between mass spectra of individual organic particles generated by UV laser ablation and in the IR/UV two-step mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenyuk, Alla; Yang, Juan; Imre, Dan

    2009-04-01

    In ablation-based single particle mass spectrometry it is common to find that the mass spectra of particles with identical compositions exhibit significant particle-to-particle fluctuations and high degree of fragmentation. This is particularly true when it comes to particles containing organic compounds. At laser fluence that is sufficient to ionize sulfates, mass spectra of the identical organic particles are classified into multitude of classes, some of which are indistinguishable from elemental carbon. In contrast, the individual particle mass spectra generated in two-step mode, in which an IR laser pulse is used to evaporate the semivolatile particle components and a time delayed UV laser pulse is used to ionize the evaporating plume, exhibit greatly diminished particle-to-particle fluctuations and significantly improved mass spectral quality. Since individual particle mass spectra must first be classified and only then can be averaged and analyzed, the IR/UV mode greatly improves the capability to properly quantify particle compositions. We present an experimental investigation of the properties and behavior of individual particle mass spectra of organic particles that are generated by ablation and in the two-step mode as function of UV laser fluence and the delay between the two lasers. The study shows that the two-step mode yields highly reproducible mass spectra that contain sufficient detail to allow molecular identification. In addition it produces significantly higher mass spectral intensities that are linearly related to the mass of organics in the particles. In contrast, ablation generated mass spectra were found to exhibit high degree of fragmentation and large particle-to-particle fluctuations.

  1. What is a particle-conserving Topological Superfluid? The fate of Majorana modes beyond mean-field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Gerardo; Cobanera, Emilio

    2016-09-01

    We investigate Majorana modes of number-conserving fermionic superfluids from both basic physics principles, and concrete models perspectives. After reviewing a criterion for establishing topological superfluidity in interacting systems, based on many-body fermionic parity switches, we reveal the emergence of zero-energy modes anticommuting with fermionic parity. Those many-body Majorana modes are constructed as coherent superpositions of states with different number of fermions. While realization of Majorana modes beyond mean field is plausible, we show that the challenge to quantum-control them is compounded by particle-conservation, and more realistic protocols will have to balance engineering needs with astringent constraints coming from superselection rules. Majorana modes in number-conserving systems are the result of a peculiar interplay between quantum statistics, fermionic parity, and an unusual form of spontaneous symmetry breaking. We test these ideas on the Richardson-Gaudin-Kitaev chain, a number-conserving model solvable by way of the algebraic Bethe ansatz, and equivalent in mean field to a long-range Kitaev chain.

  2. Uptake and accumulation of bulk and nanosized cerium oxide particles and ionic cerium by radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weilan; Ebbs, Stephen D; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Gao, Cunmei; Ma, Xingmao

    2015-01-21

    The potential toxicity and accumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in agricultural crops has become an area of great concern and intense investigation. Interestingly, although below-ground vegetables are most likely to accumulate the highest concentrations of ENMs, little work has been done investigating the potential uptake and accumulation of ENMs for this plant group. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate how different forms of cerium (bulk cerium oxide, cerium oxide nanoparticles, and the cerium ion) affected the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and accumulation of cerium in radish tissues. Ionic cerium (Ce(3+)) had a negative effect on radish growth at 10 mg CeCl3/L, whereas bulk cerium oxide (CeO2) enhanced plant biomass at the same concentration. Treatment with 10 mg/L cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) had no significant effect on radish growth. Exposure to all forms of cerium resulted in the accumulation of this element in radish tissues, including the edible storage root. However, the accumulation patterns and their effect on plant growth and physiological processes varied with the characteristics of cerium. This study provides a critical frame of reference on the effects of CeO2 NPs versus their bulk and ionic counterparts on radish growth.

  3. Generation of Small-Mode Particles via Nucleation of Meteoric Dust in the Upper Haze of Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yung, Yuk; Gao, P.; Zhang, X.; Crisp, D.; Bardeen, C. G.

    2012-10-01

    Observations by the SPICAV/SOIR instruments aboard Venus Express has revealed that the Upper Haze of Venus is populated by two particle modes, as reported by Wilquet et al. (J. Geophys. Res., 114, E00B42, 13pp, 2009). In this work we posit that the large mode is due to the upwelling of cloud particles, while the smaller mode is generated by the nucleation of meteoric dust. We test this hypothesis by using version 3.0 of the Community Aerosol and Radiation Model for Atmospheres, first developed by Turco et al. (J. Atmos. Sci., 36, 699-717, 1979) and upgraded by Bardeen et al. (The CARMA 3.0 microphysics package in CESM, Whole Atmosphere Working Group Meeting, 2011). Using the meteoric dust production profile of Kalashnikova et al. (Geophys. Res. Lett., 27, 3293-3296, 2000), the sulfur/sulfate condensation nuclei production profile of Imamura and Hashimoto (J. Atmos. Sci., 58, 3597-3612, 2001), and sulfuric acid vapour production profile of Zhang et al. (Icarus, 217, 714-739, 2012), we numerically simulate a column of the Venus atmosphere from 40 to 100 km above the surface. Our aerosol number density results agree well with Pioneer Venus data from Knollenberg and Hunten (J. Geophys. Res., 85, 8039-8058, 1980), while our gas distribution results match that of Kolodner and Steffes (Icarus, 132, 151-169, 1998). There is a mediocre agreement between our cloud deck size distribution and Pioneer Venus data. The Upper Haze size distribution shows two lognormal distributions overlapping each other, possibly indicating the presence of two modes, though more analysis is required at this time. Finally, we treat the simulated aerosol particles as Mie scatterers and compute their optical parameters. The results show a minimum in the optical depth at a wavelength of 300 nm, comparable to the results of Lacis (J. Atmos. Sci., 32, 1107-1124, 1975).

  4. Recrystallization of bulk and plasma-coated tungsten with accumulated thermal energy relevant to Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Lim, Sun-Taek; Jin, Younggil; Lee, Jin Young; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The recrystallization of bulk tungsten is investigated under various thermal loads that are relevant to the accumulation energy during Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation. A thermal plasma torch is used to examine only the thermal load effect on the material; therefore, the charge and atomic effects are ignored. In this condition, recrystallization is observed in bulk W with a surface temperature above 1700 °C. The effect becomes severe with a finite recrystallization thickness near the surface, which introduces vertical cracking along grain boundaries with increasing thermal load. However, plasma-sprayed tungsten (PS-W) is not crystallized because neighboring lamellas merge, destroying their interlayer and producing no vertical cracks. This is attributed to an annealing effect in PS-W. Therefore, these results suggest that a multilayer W structure is advantageous in the fabrication of W, especially for long pulse operation in a future fusion reactor.

  5. On the temporal variation of leaf magnetic parameters: seasonal accumulation of leaf-deposited and leaf-encapsulated particles of a roadside tree crown.

    PubMed

    Hofman, Jelle; Wuyts, Karen; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Samson, Roeland

    2014-09-15

    Understanding the accumulation behaviour of atmospheric particles inside tree leaves is of great importance for the interpretation of biomagnetic monitoring results. In this study, we evaluated the temporal variation of the saturation isothermal remanent magnetisation (SIRM) of leaves of a roadside urban Platanus × acerifolia Willd. tree in Antwerp, Belgium. We hereby examined the seasonal development of the total leaf SIRM signal as well as the leaf-encapsulated fraction of the deposited dust, by washing the leaves before biomagnetic analysis. On average 38% of the leaf SIRM signal was exhibited by the leaf-encapsulated particles. Significant correlations were found between the SIRM and the cumulative daily average atmospheric PM10 and PM2.5 measurements. Moreover, a steady increase of the SIRM throughout the in-leaf season was observed endorsing the applicability of biomagnetic monitoring as a proxy for the time-integrated PM exposure of urban tree leaves. Strongest correlations were obtained for the SIRM of the leaf-encapsulated particles which confirms the dynamic nature of the leaf surface-accumulated particles.

  6. Separation of cannabinoids on three different mixed-mode columns containing carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer superficially porous particles.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chuan-Hsi; Zukowski, Janusz; Jensen, David S; Miles, Andrew J; Sulak, Clayton; Dadson, Andrew E; Linford, Matthew R

    2015-09-01

    Three mixed-mode high-performance liquid chromatography columns packed with superficially porous carbon/nanodiamond/amine-polymer particles were used to separate mixtures of cannabinoids. Columns evaluated included: (i) reversed phase (C18 ), weak anion exchange, 4.6 × 33 mm, 3.6 μm, and 4.6 × 100 mm, 3.6 μm, (ii) reversed phase, strong anion exchange (quaternary amine), 4.6×33 mm, 3.6 μm, and (iii) hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography, 4.6 × 150 mm, 3.6 μm. Different selectivities were achieved under various mobile phase and stationary phase conditions. Efficiencies and peak capacities were as high as 54 000 N/m and 56, respectively. The reversed phase mixed-mode column (C18 ) retained tetrahydrocannabinolic acid strongly under acidic conditions and weakly under basic conditions. Tetrahydrocannabinolic acid was retained strongly on the reversed phase, strong anion exchange mixed-mode column under basic polar organic mobile phase conditions. The hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography column retained polar cannabinoids better than the (more) neutral ones under basic conditions. A longer reversed phase (C18 ) mixed-mode column (4.6 × 100 mm) showed better resolution for analytes (and a contaminant) than a shorter column. Fast separations were achieved in less than 5 min and sometimes 2 min. A real world sample (bubble hash extract) was also analyzed by gradient elution. PMID:26075936

  7. Electromagnetic particle simulation of the effect of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, J.; Lin, Z.; Kuley, A.; Wang, Z. X.

    2016-06-01

    Effects of toroidicity on linear mode conversion and absorption of lower hybrid (LH) waves in fusion plasmas have been studied using electromagnetic particle simulation. The simulation confirms that the toroidicity induces an upshift of parallel refractive index when LH waves propagate from the tokamak edge toward the core, which affects the radial position for the mode conversion between slow and fast LH waves. Furthermore, moving LH antenna launch position from low field side toward high field side leads to a larger upshift of the parallel refractive index, which helps the slow LH wave penetration into the tokamak core. The broadening of the poloidal spectrum of the wave-packet due to wave diffraction is also verified in the simulation. Both the upshift and broadening effects of the parallel spectrum of the wave-packet modify the parallel phase velocity and thus the linear absorption of LH waves by electron Landau resonance.

  8. VUV 157nm laser ablation of spherical particles and modelling of whispering gallery mode optical antenna structures

    SciTech Connect

    Walton, C. D.; Cockcroft, S.; Metheringham, W. J.

    2012-07-30

    We report on VUV 157nm F{sub 2} laser irradiation of CR-39 polymer substrates that have been intentionally seeded with spherical glass particles. We discuss the importance of adhesive forces for realizing spherical cavity structures by laser ablation. Strong optical absorption at 157nm in CR-39 enables precise control of pedestal height by controlling the laser fluence and the number of laser pulses. Resonant modes for free-standing spherical cavities have been calculated and we discuss briefly the potential applications for use as optical sources on-board lab-on-chip devices.

  9. Instability Thresholds for Oblique Alfvén/Cyclotron Modes in the Presence of an Alpha Particle Beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verscharen, D.; Chandran, B. D.

    2012-12-01

    Fully-ionized helium particles are the most abundant particle species after the protons and electrons in the solar wind. Observations of alpha particles in the fast wind show that they typically drift with respect to the protons at a speed of order the Alfvén speed. Since the Alfvén speed in the solar wind decreases with increasing heliocentric distance, the alpha particles undergo a continuous deceleration process. It is thought that this deceleration results from the action of Alfvénic instabilities, which are excited if the alpha particle drift velocity (or "beam speed") and density are sufficiently large. Numerical solutions of the hot plasma dispersion relation have previously shown that the minimum speed required to excite such instabilities is significantly smaller for oblique modes with ěc k× ěc B0≠q 0 than for parallel-propagating modes with ěc k× ěc B0=0, where ěc k is the wavevector and ěc B0 is the background magnetic field. In this presentation, we explain this result using analytical theory. We derive the cold-plasma dispersion relation for oblique Alfvén/ion-cyclotron and fast/whistler waves in the presence of an ion beam and discuss the instability thresholds within the framework of quasilinear theory. The dispersion, polarization, energy state, and phase speed of the waves determine the instability thresholds, which are found to be in agreement with observations and nonlinear simulations. We discuss the relevance of this work to alpha particles in the solar wind and its implications as a wave excitation mechanism.; Dispersion and polarization of oblique waves with a relative drift speed of 1.1v_{mathrm A} and an angle of 45o between ěc k and ěc B0. The color coding describes the polarization of the waves (+1 is right-handed and -1 is left-handed for positive frequencies). The straight (red) lines show the cyclotron-resonance conditions for alpha particles. The (blue) dashed line represents an upper limit for unstable waves.

  10. Full-f Neoclassical Simulations toward a Predictive Model for H-mode Pedestal Ion Energy, Particle and Momentum Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, D. J.; Boedo, J. A.; Burrell, K. H.; Chang, C. S.; Canik, J. M.; deGrassie, J. S.; Gerhardt, S. P.; Grierson, B. A.; Groebner, R. J.; Maingi, Rajesh; Smith, S. P.

    2014-09-01

    Energy and particle transport rates are decoupled in the H-mode edge since the ion thermal transport rate is primarily set by the neoclassical transport of the deuterium ions in the tail of the thermal energy distribution, while the net particle transport rate is set by anomalous transport of the colder bulk ions. Ion orbit loss drives the energy distributions away from Maxwellian, and describes the anisotropy, poloidal asymmetry and local minimum near the separatrix observed in the Ti profile. Non-Maxwellian distributions also drive large intrinsic edge flows, and the interaction of turbulence at the top of the pedestal with the intrinsic edge flow can generate an intrinsic core torque. The primary driver of the radial electric field (Er) in the pedestal and scrapeoff layer (SOL) are kinetic neoclassical effects, such as ion orbit loss of tail ions and parallel electron loss to the divertor. This paper describes the first multi-species kinetic neoclassical transport calculations for ELM-free H-mode pedestal and scrape-off layer on DIII-D using XGC0, a 5D full-f particle-in-cell drift-kinetic solver with self-consistent neutral recycling and sheath potentials. Quantitative agreement between the flux-driven simulation and the experimental electron density, impurity density and orthogonal measurements of impurity temperature and flow profiles is achieved by adding random-walk particle diffusion to the guiding-center drift motion. This interpretative technique quantifies the role of neoclassical, anomalous and neutral transport to the overall pedestal structure, and consequently illustrates the importance of including kinetic effects self-consistently in transport calculations around transport barriers.

  11. Particle-area dependence of mineral dust in the immersion mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-05-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured by using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows to freely suspending single drops in air without electrical charges thereby avoiding any electrical influences which may affect the freezing process. Heterogeneous nucleation caused by several mineral dust particles (montmorillonite, two types of illite) was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 \\unit{mm} in radius were monitored by a video camera during cooling down to -28 °C to simulate the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was remotely determined with an infra-red thermometer so that the onset of freezing was indicated. For comparisons, measurements with one particle type were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 \\unit{{μ}m} radius freely suspended. The data were interpreted regarding the particle surfaces immersed in the drops. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C in dependence of particle type and surface area per drop. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model.

  12. Interpretation of the I-Regime and transport associated with relevant heavy particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Coppi, B.; Zhou, T.

    2012-01-15

    The excitation of a novel kind of heavy particle [B. Coppi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 17, 377 (1966); B. Coppi and T. Zhou, MIT(LNS) Report HEP 09/04, 2009, Cambridge, MA [Phys. Lett. A 375, 2916 (2011)

  13. Early Size Distributions of Chondrule Subgroups Overprinted by the Final Accumulation Process of Particle Components in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCain, K. A.; Simon, J. I.; Cuzzi, J. N

    2015-01-01

    Populations of compositionally distinct particles are fundamental components of undifferentiated chondritic meteorites. Many theories explain the formation of chondrites, one class of which includes mechanisms for sorting the component particles in the solar nebula prior to their accretion. Mechanisms include sorting by mass, turbulent concentration, X-winds, and photophoresis, which will produce characteristic distributions of observable properties such as particle size. Distinguishing processes that occur in specific astrophysical environments requires characterization of particle types, which include refractory Ca-Al-rich Inclusions (CAIs) and less-refractory chondrules. Previous investigations of modal abundances of CAIs and chondrules exist, but differences within and between these two groups, both of which are made up of diverse subgroups with different thermal histories and chemical compositions, remain mostly unstudied. The presence of rims, a significant event occurring after the formation of at least some chondrules, have also yet to be considered with respect to sorting. Here we present the sizes of CAIs and chondrules in Allende with attention to the smallest sizes, subgroups, and particle rims.

  14. A branch of energetic-particle driven geodesic acoustic modes due to magnetic drift resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, M.; Kasuya, N.; Itoh, K.; Hallatschek, K.; Lesur, M.; Kosuga, Y.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-10-01

    Eigenmode analysis of geodesic acoustic modes (GAMs) driven by fast ions is performed, based on a set of gyrokinetic equations. Resonance to the magnetic drift of the fast ions can destabilize GAMs. A new branch is found in the family of GAMs, whose frequency is close to the magnetic drift frequency of the fast ions. The poloidal eigenfunction of this branch has bump structures in the poloidal direction where the resonance of the magnetic drift with the mode is strong. The ion heating rate by the GAMs is evaluated in the framework of quasi-linear theory. The heating is localized poloidally around the resonance locations. Owing to the bumps in the eigenfunction, the magnitude of the heating is much larger than that estimated without the magnetic drift resonance.

  15. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes

    PubMed Central

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface. PMID:27451935

  16. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-07-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.

  17. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface. PMID:27451935

  18. Nonlinear force dependence on optically bound micro-particle arrays in the evanescent fields of fundamental and higher order microfibre modes.

    PubMed

    Maimaiti, Aili; Holzmann, Daniela; Truong, Viet Giang; Ritsch, Helmut; Nic Chormaic, Síle

    2016-01-01

    Particles trapped in the evanescent field of an ultrathin optical fibre interact over very long distances via multiple scattering of the fibre-guided fields. In ultrathin fibres that support higher order modes, these interactions are stronger and exhibit qualitatively new behaviour due to the coupling of different fibre modes, which have different propagation wave-vectors, by the particles. Here, we study one dimensional longitudinal optical binding interactions of chains of 3 μm polystyrene spheres under the influence of the evanescent fields of a two-mode microfibre. The observation of long-range interactions, self-ordering and speed variation of particle chains reveals strong optical binding effects between the particles that can be modelled well by a tritter scattering-matrix approach. The optical forces, optical binding interactions and the velocity of bounded particle chains are calculated using this method. Results show good agreement with finite element numerical simulations. Experimental data and theoretical analysis show that higher order modes in a microfibre offer a promising method to not only obtain stable, multiple particle trapping or faster particle propulsion speeds, but that they also allow for better control over each individual trapped object in particle ensembles near the microfibre surface.

  19. Mott physics and collective modes: An atomic approximation of the four-particle irreducible functional

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayral, Thomas; Parcollet, Olivier

    2016-08-01

    We discuss a generalization of the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) for strongly correlated systems close to a Mott transition based on a systematic approximation of the fully irreducible four-point vertex. It is an atomic-limit approximation of a functional of the one- and two-particle Green functions, built with the second Legendre transform of the free energy with respect to the two-particle Green function. This functional is represented diagrammatically by four-particle irreducible (4PI) diagrams. Like the dynamical vertex approximation (D Γ A ), the fully irreducible vertex is computed from a quantum impurity model whose bath is self-consistently determined by solving the parquet equations. However, in contrast with D Γ A and DMFT, the interaction term of the impurity model is also self-consistently determined. The method interpolates between the parquet approximation at weak coupling and the atomic limit, where it is exact. It is applicable to systems with short-range and long-range interactions.

  20. Three-dimensional particle trajectories and waste beam losses in injection dump beam line of SNS accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang; Plum, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    The SNS ring injection dump beam line has been suffering high beam losses since its commissioning. In order to understand the mechanisms of the beam losses, we have performed 3D simulation studies of the beam line. The 3D models consist of three injection chicane dipoles and one injection dump septum magnet. 3D particle trajectories in the models are computed. We then extend particle optics calculations to the injection dump. Our studies have clearly shown some design and operation problems, that cause beam losses in the injection dump beam line. These include incorrect chicane dipole settings, incorrect position of a chicane dipole, too small aperture of injection dump septum, and inadequate focusing downstream. This paper reports our findings and the remedies to the injection beam loss problems.

  1. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-24

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal-vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid-solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid-vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid-solid transitions challenges existing theories of surface

  2. Modes of surface premelting in colloidal crystals composed of attractive particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Di; Peng, Yi; Ni, Ran; Han, Yilong

    2016-03-01

    Crystal surfaces typically melt into a thin liquid layer at temperatures slightly below the melting point of the crystal. Such surface premelting is prevalent in all classes of solids and is important in a variety of metallurgical, geological and meteorological phenomena. Premelting has been studied using X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry, but the lack of single-particle resolution makes it hard to elucidate the underlying mechanisms. Colloids are good model systems for studying phase transitions because the thermal motions of individual micrometre-sized particles can be tracked directly using optical microscopy. Here we use colloidal spheres with tunable attractions to form equilibrium crystal–vapour interfaces, and study their surface premelting behaviour at the single-particle level. We find that monolayer colloidal crystals exhibit incomplete premelting at their perimeter, with a constant liquid-layer thickness. In contrast, two- and three-layer crystals exhibit conventional complete melting, with the thickness of the surface liquid diverging as the melting point is approached. The microstructures of the surface liquids differ in certain aspects from what would be predicted by conventional premelting theories. Incomplete premelting in the monolayer crystals is triggered by a bulk isostructural solid–solid transition and truncated by a mechanical instability that separately induces homogeneous melting within the bulk. This finding is in contrast to the conventional assumption that two-dimensional crystals melt heterogeneously from their free surfaces (that is, at the solid–vapour interface). The unexpected bulk melting that we observe for the monolayer crystals is accompanied by the formation of grain boundaries, which supports a previously proposed grain-boundary-mediated two-dimensional melting theory. The observed interplay between surface premelting, bulk melting and solid–solid transitions challenges existing theories of

  3. Gas accumulation in particle-rich suspensions and implications for bubble populations in crystal-rich magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belien, Isolde B.; Cashman, Katharine V.; Rempel, Alan W.

    2010-08-01

    Gas mobility plays an important role in driving volcanic eruptions and controlling eruption style. The explosivity of an eruption depends, among other factors, on how easily gas can escape from the magma. Many magmatic systems have high concentrations of suspended crystals that inhibit gas migration through the melt. We use suspensions of plastic beads in corn syrup to investigate interactions between rising bubbles and particles. We observe different interaction styles as the ratio ψ of bubble to particle size is varied. Large bubbles (ψ > 1) deform and sometimes break up as they move around particles. Small bubbles (ψ < 1) are frequently trapped within the suspension, increasing the concentration of gas held within the system. We compare our experiments to bubble populations in tephra from Stromboli volcano, Italy. We show that these samples typically have bubbles and crystals of similar sizes and suggest that crystals might play a role in controlling bubble size in this natural system as well as in our experiments. Because small bubbles (ψ < 1) get trapped within the suspension, and can be formed by breakup of larger bubbles, we expect that an increase in gas flux will result in an increase in the population of small bubbles. Changes in bubble number density and vesicularity in tephra erupted during periods of different eruptive intensity may thus provide a way of tracking changes in gas flux through the magma prior to eruption.

  4. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the non-interacting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders. Supported by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation's EPiQS Initiative (Grant GBMF4307 (ACP), the Quantum Materials Program at LBNL (RV), NSF Grant DMR-1455366 and UCOP Research Catalyst Award No. CA-15-327861 (SAP).

  5. Particle-hole symmetry, many-body localization, and topological edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasseur, Romain; Friedman, Aaron J.; Parameswaran, S. A.; Potter, Andrew C.

    2016-04-01

    We study the excited states of interacting fermions in one dimension with particle-hole symmetric disorder (equivalently, random-bond XXZ chains) using a combination of renormalization group methods and exact diagonalization. Absent interactions, the entire many-body spectrum exhibits infinite-randomness quantum critical behavior with highly degenerate excited states. We show that though interactions are an irrelevant perturbation in the ground state, they drastically affect the structure of excited states: Even arbitrarily weak interactions split the degeneracies in favor of thermalization (weak disorder) or spontaneously broken particle-hole symmetry, driving the system into a many-body localized spin glass phase (strong disorder). In both cases, the quantum critical properties of the noninteracting model are destroyed, either by thermal decoherence or spontaneous symmetry breaking. This system then has the interesting and counterintuitive property that edges of the many-body spectrum are less localized than the center of the spectrum. We argue that our results rule out the existence of certain excited state symmetry-protected topological orders.

  6. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  7. Modeling the potential influence of particle deposition on the accumulation of organic contaminants by submerged aquatic vegetation.

    PubMed

    Armitage, James M; Franco, Amaya; Gomez, Sonia; Cousins, Ian T

    2008-06-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation can act as both a mitigating factor(e.g., reducing downstream impacts of pesticides following runoff/spray drift) and mobilizing factor (e.g., remobilization of contaminants from sediments) influencing the fate and distribution of organic contaminants in the environment. Consequently, there has been wide scientific and regulatory interest in assessing the role of these plants in different contamination scenarios. Mechanistic models describing the environmental fate of contaminants in submerged aquatic vegetation are useful tools for interpreting laboratory and field measurements in addition to providing valuable information to risk assessors. In this study, we developed a fugacity-based model to investigate the influence of particle deposition to plant surfaces on the fate and distribution of two substances in small ponds. The main motivation for conducting this study was to address the fact that the potential contribution of this process is not typically considered by many types of models describing contaminant dynamics in submerged aquatic vegetation. For the hydrophobic substance included in this evaluation (lambda-cyhalothrin), model performance was greatly improved by including this process. The model was also applied in a generic context to compare the importance of particle deposition versus directwater uptake as a function of chemical properties (log Kow) and concentration of suspended solids in the water column. The generic application demonstrated that contaminant mass transfer is dominated by particle deposition for chemicals with log Kow greater than approximately 5.5--6 across a wide range of suspended solid concentrations and can be important even for low log Kow substances in some circumstances. Further empirical and modeling studies are recommended to explore this process more comprehensively. PMID:18589965

  8. Accumulation and transport of microbial-size particles in a pressure protected model burn unit: CFD simulations and experimental evidence

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Controlling airborne contamination is of major importance in burn units because of the high susceptibility of burned patients to infections and the unique environmental conditions that can accentuate the infection risk. In particular the required elevated temperatures in the patient room can create thermal convection flows which can transport airborne contaminates throughout the unit. In order to estimate this risk and optimize the design of an intensive care room intended to host severely burned patients, we have relied on a computational fluid dynamic methodology (CFD). Methods The study was carried out in 4 steps: i) patient room design, ii) CFD simulations of patient room design to model air flows throughout the patient room, adjacent anterooms and the corridor, iii) construction of a prototype room and subsequent experimental studies to characterize its performance iv) qualitative comparison of the tendencies between CFD prediction and experimental results. The Electricité De France (EDF) open-source software Code_Saturne® (http://www.code-saturne.org) was used and CFD simulations were conducted with an hexahedral mesh containing about 300 000 computational cells. The computational domain included the treatment room and two anterooms including equipment, staff and patient. Experiments with inert aerosol particles followed by time-resolved particle counting were conducted in the prototype room for comparison with the CFD observations. Results We found that thermal convection can create contaminated zones near the ceiling of the room, which can subsequently lead to contaminate transfer in adjacent rooms. Experimental confirmation of these phenomena agreed well with CFD predictions and showed that particles greater than one micron (i.e. bacterial or fungal spore sizes) can be influenced by these thermally induced flows. When the temperature difference between rooms was 7°C, a significant contamination transfer was observed to enter into the positive

  9. [Characterization of ultrafine particle size distribution in the urban atmosphere of Hangzhou in spring].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Continuous measurement and analysis of the atmospheric ultrafine particle number concentration were performed in Hangzhou from March to May, 2012 by using the fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The result showed that daily number concentration of nucleation mode (5.6-20 nm), Aitken mode (20-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100-560 nm) particles, and total particles were 0.84 x 10(4), 1.08 x 10(4), 0.47 x 10(4) and 2.38 x 10(4) cm(-3) respectively. The concentration of Aitken mode particles was higher than that of other mode particles in sunny day. The nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles usually started to increase around 10:00-11:00 and ended up after 3-4 h. This indicated the solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. Human activities caused the concentration distribution of each mode particles having an obvious difference between workdays and weekends. Combined with the meteorological factors, analysis showed that the wind speed and wind direction also directly influenced particulate concentration. The analysis of particulate concentration and visibility showed that the concentration of accumulation mode particles had a negative relationship with the atmospheric visibility, while those of nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles had a slight influence on it. PMID:24812930

  10. [Characterization of ultrafine particle size distribution in the urban atmosphere of Hangzhou in spring].

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiao-Fang; Sun, Zai; Yang, Wen-Jun

    2014-02-01

    Continuous measurement and analysis of the atmospheric ultrafine particle number concentration were performed in Hangzhou from March to May, 2012 by using the fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS). The result showed that daily number concentration of nucleation mode (5.6-20 nm), Aitken mode (20-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100-560 nm) particles, and total particles were 0.84 x 10(4), 1.08 x 10(4), 0.47 x 10(4) and 2.38 x 10(4) cm(-3) respectively. The concentration of Aitken mode particles was higher than that of other mode particles in sunny day. The nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles usually started to increase around 10:00-11:00 and ended up after 3-4 h. This indicated the solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. Human activities caused the concentration distribution of each mode particles having an obvious difference between workdays and weekends. Combined with the meteorological factors, analysis showed that the wind speed and wind direction also directly influenced particulate concentration. The analysis of particulate concentration and visibility showed that the concentration of accumulation mode particles had a negative relationship with the atmospheric visibility, while those of nucleation mode and Aitken mode particles had a slight influence on it.

  11. Wave-particle interaction and the nonlinear saturation of the electron temperature gradient mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vadlamani, Srinath; Parker, Scott E.; Chen, Yang; Howard, James E.

    2004-11-01

    It has been proposed that the electron temperature gradient (ETG) driven turbulence is responsible for experimentally relevant electron thermal transport in tokamak plasmas. Significant transport levels are possible by the creation of radially elongated vortices or ``streamers" [1,2], which are sustained by the nonlinear saturation of the instability and are not susceptible to shear flow destruction, as is the case with the ion temperature gradient (ITG) mode. We present a dynamical system to explore the dependence of saturation level due to E × B and E_\\| motion, as well as the effect of radial elongation. With this model, we can predict the nonlinear saturation level of the ETG streamers. We compare our theoretical predictions with a 2D shear-less slab gyrokinetic electron code that includes the E_\\| nonlinearity. [1]F. Jenko, W. Dorland, M Kotschenreuther, and B.N. Rogers, Phys. Plasmas 7, 1904 (2000). [2]C. Holland, and P.H. Diamond, Phys. Plasmas 9, 3857 (2002). [3]W. M. Manheimer, Phys. Fluids 14, 579 (1971). [4]R. A. Smith, John A. Krommes, and W. W. Lee, Phys. Fluids 28, 1069 (1985).

  12. Influence of the ambient humidity on the concentration of natural deposition-mode ice-nucleating particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López, M. L.; Ávila, E. E.

    2016-01-01

    This study reports measurements of deposition-mode ice-nucleating particle (INP) concentrations at ground level during the period July-December 2014 in Córdoba, Argentina. Ambient air was sampled into a cloud chamber where the INP concentration was measured at a temperature of -25 °C and a 15 % supersaturation over ice. Measurements were performed on days with different thermodynamic conditions, including rainy days. The effect of the relative humidity at ground level (RHamb) on the INP concentration was analyzed. The number of INPs activated varied from 1 L-1 at RHamb of 25 % to 30 L-1 at RHamb of 90 %. In general, a linear trend between the INP concentration and the RHamb was found, suggesting that this variability must be related to the effectiveness of the aerosols acting as INPs. From the backward trajectories analysis, it was found that the link between INP concentration and RHamb is independent of the origin of the air masses. The role of biological INPs and nucleation occurring in pores and cavities was discussed as a possible mechanism to explain the increase of the INP concentration during high ambient relative humidity events. This work provides valuable measurements of deposition-mode INP concentrations from the Southern Hemisphere where INP data are sparse so far.

  13. Source-receptor matrix calculation with a Lagrangian particle dispersion model in backward mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seibert, P.; Frank, A.

    2003-04-01

    A method for the calculation of source-receptor (s-r) relationships (sensitivity of a trace substance concentration at some place and time to emission at some place and time) with Lagrangian particle models has been derived and presented previously (Air Pollution Modeling and its Application XIV, Proc. of ITM Boulder 2000). Now, the generalisation to any linear s-r relationship, including dry and wet deposition, decay etc., is presented. It was implemented in the model FLEXPART and tested extensively in idealised set-ups. These tests turned out to be very useful for finding minor model bugs and inaccuracies, and can be recommended generally for model testing. Recently, a convection scheme has been integrated in FLEXPART which was also tested. Both source and receptor can be specified in mass mixing ratio or mass units. Properly taking care of this is quite relevant for sources and receptors at different levels in the atmosphere. Furthermore, we present a test with the transport of aerosol-bound Caesium-137 from the areas contaminated by the Chernobyl disaster to Stockholm during one month.

  14. Electromagnetic particle simulation of the linear mode conversion and the nonlinear parametric decay instability of lower hybrid waves in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Jian; Lin, Zhihong; Kuley, Animesh; Wang, Zhixuan

    2015-11-01

    An electromagnetic fluid-kinetic model is developed to study the lower hybrid (LH) waves in tokamaks with low numerical noise, in which electron density is pushed forward by the continuity equation, and the kinetic markers are introduced for closure. A generalized weight-based particle-in-cell scheme is also applied to the simulation for the local high resolution in phase space. This new model has been successfully implemented into the global gyro-kinetic toroidal code (GTC), and the electromagnetic particle simulations of the LH waves have been carried out with a realistic electron-to-ion mass ratio. The simulation shows that toroidal effects induce an upshift of the parallel reflective index when LH waves propagate from the tokamak edge toward the core, which modifies the radial position for the mode conversion between slow and fast LH waves. The broadening of the poloidal spectrum of the wave-packet due to the wave diffraction is also observed in the simulation of LH wave propagation, and both the toroidal upshift and broadening effects of the wave-packet spectrum modify the parallel phase velocity and thus the linear absorption of LH waves by electrons through Landau resonance. In the nonlinear simulation, the LH wave can drive a net current during the propagation when its phase velocity gets closed to the local electron thermal speed. Finally, the parametric decay instability is observed when we increase the power of LH waves, in which a LH sideband and a low frequency ion plasma waves are generated.

  15. Particle-in-cell method for parallel dynamics in magnetized electron plasmas: Study of high-amplitude BGK modes

    SciTech Connect

    Peinetti, F.; Peano, F.; Coppa, G. . E-mail: gianni.coppa@polito.it; Wurtele, J.

    2006-10-10

    The present paper describes the numerical technique that has been developed, in the framework of the particle-in-cell (PIC) method, to study the dynamics of a nonneutral plasma along the magnetic field lines. In particular, the technique has been employed to simulate the formation and long-term evolution of large-amplitude electrostatic waves experimentally observed in electron plasmas confined in a Penning trap [W. Bertsche, J. Fajans, L. Friedland, Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 265003]. Due to the peculiar features of the physical system, namely the existence of different time scales and the presence of a perturbative oscillating potential, ad hoc numerical techniques have been developed. In particular, with a suitable radial decomposition all important two-dimensional phenomena are fully taken into account while keeping the computational effort to that of a standard one-dimensional PIC codes. Moreover, a novel particle loading technique (ergodic loading) has been developed, which ensures a significant reduction of numerical noise. The results obtained with the present technique are in excellent agreement with the experiments [F. Peinetti, W. Bertsche, J. Fajans, J. Wurtele, L. Friedland, Phys. Plasmas 12 (2005) 062112]. Moreover, results presented here furnish clear evidences of the close relationship between the observed nonlinear structures and the Bernstein-Greene-Kruskal modes.

  16. Magnetometer Application for GAMMA-400 Telescope Switching into the Mode with Increased Low Energy Charged Particles Intensity Registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khyzhniak, E. V.; Arkhangelskaja, I. V.; Chasovikov, E. N.; Arkhangelskiy, A. I.; Topchiev, N. P.

    GAMMA-400 is an international project of a high apogee orbital astrophysical observatory for studying the characteristics of high-energy gamma-emission, electrons/positrons and light nuclei fluxes. The energy range for γ-rays and electrons/positrons registration in the main aperture is from ∼0.1 GeV to ∼3.0 TeV. Also, this aperture allows high energy light nuclei fluxes characteristics investigation. Moreover, special aperture configuration allows registering of gamma-quanta, electrons (positrons) and light nuclei from the lateral directions too. The spacecraft GAMMA-400 orbit will be located in the Earth's magnetosphere and will pass front shock wave from magnetosphere interaction with the solar wind, turbulent-transition region, magnetopause and so on. During the satellite's movement through various Earth's magnetosphere regions its anticoincidence detectors will register high intensity fluxes of low energy charged particles captured by the magnetic field. The working area sections of GAMMA-400 detector systems used as anticoincidence shield are about 1 m2 each. The high intensity low energy charged particles flux influence on anticoincidence detectors should be taken into account during particle identification. This article presents a comparison between Earth's magnetosphere theoretical model according to SPENVIIS package and real data measured by detectors onboard THEMIS series satellites. The differences between these two datasets indicate that the calculated data are not sufficient to make short time predictions of variations of magnetic induction in the outer magnetosphere. A special trigger marker flag will be produced by GAMMA-400 counting and triggers signals formation system accordingly to the data of two onboard magnetometers. This flag's presence leads to special algorithms execution start, putting the plastic detectors into a dedicated working mode taking into account possible high count rates of external detector layers.

  17. Single particle ICP-MS method development for the determination of plant uptake and accumulation of CeO2 nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dan, Yongbo; Ma, Xingmao; Zhang, Weilan; Liu, Kun; Stephan, Chady; Shi, Honglan

    2016-07-01

    Cerium dioxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) are among the most broadly used engineered nanoparticles that will be increasingly released into the environment. Thus, understanding their uptake, transportation, and transformation in plants, especially food crops, is critical because it represents a potential pathway for human consumption. One of the primary challenges for the endeavor is the inadequacy of current analytical methodologies to characterize and quantify the nanomaterial in complex biological samples at environmentally relevant concentrations. Herein, a method was developed using single particle-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (SP-ICP-MS) technology to simultaneously detect the size and size distribution of particulate Ce, particle concentration, and dissolved cerium in the shoots of four plant species including cucumber, tomato, soybean, and pumpkin. An enzymatic digestion method with Macerozyme R-10 enzyme previously used for gold nanoparticle extraction from the tomato plant was adapted successfully for CeO2NP extraction from all four plant species. This study is the first to report and demonstrate the presence of dissolved cerium in plant seedling shoots exposed to CeO2NPs hydroponically. The extent of plant uptake and accumulation appears to be dependent on the plant species, requiring further systematic investigation of the mechanisms. PMID:27129977

  18. Profile distribution and accumulation characteristics of organic carbon in a karst hillslope based on particle-size fractionation and stable isotope analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Taoze; Zhao, Zhiqi; Lang, Yunchao; Ding, Hu

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies have highlighted tight coupling between soil aggregate fractions and soil organic carbon (SOC) turnover. However, large uncertainties remain and a mechanistic understanding of geomorphic and land use change effects on carbon storage in soil is still lacking. Taking typical slope of vegetation recovery in karst area as object, the present study analyzed organic carbon content and stable carbon isotope composition (δ13C value) of soil organic matter in bulk and particle size separates of soil on profiles at different topographic positions. The results showed that SOC content decreased gradually in downhill direction. Organic carbon content of sandy soil (50-2000 μm) accounted above 50% in the upper slope positions but in the middle and lower slope soil profiles, organic carbon was mainly stored in silts (2-50 μm) and clays (< 2 μm) which belonged to stable and highly humified SOC. The composition difference of δ13C values in soil profiles reflected the input of plant residues and accumulation characteristics. Organic matter was deposited in different soil particle sizes owing to different degrees of decomposition. Hence, δ13C value can help in identifying the storage and decomposition rates of soil organic matter.

  19. Detectors for alpha particles and X-rays operating in ambient air in pulse counting mode or/and with gas amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charpak, G.; Benaben, P.; Breuil, P.; Peskov, V.

    2008-02-01

    Ionization chambers working in ambient air in current detection mode are attractive due to their simplicity and low cost and are widely used in several applications such as smoke detection, dosimetry, therapeutic beam monitoring and so on. The aim of this work was to investigate if gaseous detectors can operate in ambient air in pulse counting mode as well as with gas amplification which potentially offers the highest possible sensitivity in applications like alpha particle detection or high energy X-ray photon or electron detection. To investigate the feasibility of this method two types of open- end gaseous detectors were build and successfully tested. The first one was a single wire or multiwire cylindrical geometry detector operating in pulse mode at a gas gain of one (pulse ionization chamber). This detector was readout by a custom made wide -band charge sensitive amplifier able to deal with slow induced signals generated by slow motion of negative and positive ions. The multiwire detector was able to detect alpha particles with an efficiency close to 22%. The second type of an alpha detector was an innovative GEM-like detector with resistive electrodes operating in air in avalanche mode at high gas gains (up to 104). This detector can also operate in a cascaded mode or being combined with other detectors, for example with MICROMEGAS. This detector was readout by a conventional charge -sensitive amplifier and was able to detect alpha particles with 100% efficiency. This detector could also detect X-ray photons or fast electrons. A detailed comparison between these two detectors is given as well as a comparison with commercially available alpha detectors. The main advantages of gaseous detectors operating in air in a pulse detection mode are their simplicity, low cost and high sensitivity. One of the possible applications of these new detectors is alpha particle background monitors which, due to their low cost can find wide application not only in houses, but

  20. Vertical distribution of trace-element concentrations and occurrence of metallurgical slag particles in accumulated bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.; Bell, P.R.; Lowther, J.S.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    observed in cores from along the pre-reservoir Columbia River. Particles of slag, which have physical and chemical characteristics of slag discharged to the Columbia River by a lead-zinc smelter upstream of the reservoir at Trail, British Columbia, were found in sediments of Lake Roosevelt. Slag particles are more common in the upstream reaches of the reservoir. The chemical composition of the interior matrix of slag collected from Lake Roosevelt closely approximated the reported elemental concentrations of fresh smelter slag, although evidence of slag weathering was observed. Exfoliation flakes were observed on the surface of weathered slag particles isolated from the core sediments. The concentrations of zinc on the exposed surface of slag grains were smaller than concentrations on interior surfaces. Weathering rinds also were observed in the cross section of weathered slag grains, indicating that the glassy slag material was undergoing hydration and chemical weathering. Trace elements observed in accumulated sediments in the middle and lower reaches of the reservoir are more likely due to the input from liquid effluent discharges compared to slag discharges from the upstream smelter.

  1. Particles in the lower troposphere over the High Plains of the United States. I - Size distributions, elemental compositions and morphologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobbs, P. V.; Radke, W. F.; Bowdle, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne measurements of particle size distributions obtained during the spring and summer of 1975-1976 at various locations in the high plains of the U.S. are presented. The instrumentation and techniques used to collect the data are described. Particle number, surface area, and volume distribution are measured; differences in particle concentrations are investigated. Variables in particle size are related to changes in strength of ground sources of Aitken nuclei, age of the particle population, and presence or absence of rain. An accumulation mode between particles diameters of 0.1-1 micron, a coarse particle mode between particle diameters between 10-20 microns, and a nucleation mode at particle diameters less than 0.1 micron are detected. The control of the accommodation and coarse particle modes and their influence on particle concentration are studied. The elemental composition of the particles is analyzed and the morphologies are examined with an electron scanner microscope.

  2. Flux and accumulation of sedimentary particles off the continental slope of Pakistan: a comparison of water column and seafloor estimates from the oxygen minimum zone, NE Arabian Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz, H.; von Rad, U.

    2013-07-01

    Due to the lack of bioturbation, the laminated muds from the oxygen-minimum zone (OMZ) off Pakistan provide a unique opportunity to precisely determine the vertical and lateral sediment fluxes in the near shore part of the northeastern Arabian Sea, and to explore the effects of the margin topography and the low oxygen conditions on the accumulation of organic matter and other particles. West of Karachi, in the Hab river area of EPT and WPT (Eastern and Western PAKOMIN Traps), 16 short sediment profiles from water depths between 250 m and 1970 m on a depth transect crossing the OMZ (~ 120 to ~ 1200 m water depth) were investigated, and correlated on the basis of a thick, light-gray- to reddish-colored turbidite layer. Varve counting yielded a date for this layer of AD 1905 to 1888. We adopted the young age which agrees with 210Pb- dating, and used this isochronous stratigraphic marker bed to calculate sediment accumulation rates, that we could directly compare with the flux rates from the sediment traps installed within the water column above. All traps in the area show exceptionally high, pulsed winter fluxes of up to 5000 mg m-2 d-1 in this margin environment. The lithic flux at the sea floor is as high as 4000 mg m-2 d-1 , and agrees remarkably well with the bulk winter flux of material. This holds as well for the individual bulk components (organic carbon, calcium carbonate, opal, lithic fraction). However, the high winter flux events (HFE) by their extreme mass of remobilized matter terminated the recording in the shallow traps by clogging the funnels. Based on our comparisons, we argue that HFE for the past 5000 yr most likely occurred as regular events within the upper OMZ off Pakistan. Coarse fraction and foraminiferal accumulation rates from sediment surface samples along the Hab transect show distribution patterns that seem to be a function of water depth and distance from the shelf. Some of these sediment fractions show sudden shifts at the lower boundary

  3. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  4. Particules metadiscursives et autres modes langagieres: des cas de changement linguistique (Metadiscursive Particles and Other Language Modes: Cases of Linguistic Change).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vincent, Diane; Martel, Guylaine

    2001-01-01

    This article focuses on the use of metadiscursive expressions and discourse particles that are produced in great numbers by two groups of Montreal French speakers in different time periods and that have generally been regarded as language ticks. Elements of the first group make explicit the conscious state of speakers with respect to their…

  5. Single-particle and collective mode couplings associated with 1- and 2-directional electronic ordering in metallic RTe3 (R = Ho, Dy, Tb)

    SciTech Connect

    Yusupov, R.V.; Mertelj, T.; Chu, J.-H.; Fisher, I.R.; Mihailovic, D.; /Stefan Inst., Ljubljana

    2010-02-15

    The coupling of phonons with collective modes and single-particle gap excitations associated with one (1d) and two-directional (2d) electronically-driven charge-density wave (CDW) ordering in metallic RTe{sub 3} is investigated as a function of rare-earth ion chemical pressure (R = Tb, Dy, Ho) using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy. From the T-dependence of the CDW gap {Delta}{sub CDW} and the amplitude mode (AM) we find that while the transition to a 1d-CDW ordered state at Tc1 initially proceeds in an exemplary mean-field (MF)-like fashion, below T{sub c1}, {Delta}{sub CDW} is depressed and departs from the MF behavior. The effect is apparently triggered by resonant mode-mixing of the amplitude mode (AM) with a totally symmetric phonon at 1.75 THz. At low temperatures, when the state evolves into a 2d-CDW ordered state at T{sub c2} in the DyTe{sub 3} and HoTe{sub 3}, additional much weaker mode mixing is evident but no soft mode is observed.

  6. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  7. Airborne Coarse Mode Aerosol Measurements with the CAS-DPOL Instrument: Effects of Particle Shape and Refractive Index and Implications for Radiative Transfer Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, D. N.; Weinzierl, B.; Gasteiger, J.; Spanu, A.; Freudenthaler, V.; Gross, S.

    2015-12-01

    Each year huge amounts of mineral dust are mobilized in deserts and arid regions of the world and transported over large distances forming thick elevated aerosol layers with a substantial fraction of coarse mode particles. Optical properties of mineral dust, including the absorptive refractive index of some components, cause a significant effect on the atmospheric radiative energy balance from optical to infrared wavelengths. The aerosol characteristics, in particular its coarse mode size distribution, are modified during long-range transport by aging and deposition processes. This also affects the aerosol optical properties and therefore the effect on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties are essential to characterize those effects in order to be implemented in global climate models in parametrized form. However, in-situ measurements of airborne coarse mode aerosols such as mineral dust and volcanic ash are challenging and the measurements are usually affected by substantial uncertainties. In this work we use airborne measurements of mineral dust from our optical light-scattering spectrometer CAS-DPOL during SALTRACE 2013 to discuss the analysis of such data. We cover the effects of varying refractive index and particle shapes and develop recommendations for the configuration of the CAS-DPOL for aerosol studies. We also present an inversion method to derive coarse mode size distributions from light-scattering probes for mixtures of non-spherical, absorbing aerosols. The size distributions retrieved from the in-situ measurements are then validated using an independent analysis with a combination of sun-photometer and lidar data. We apply these methods to investigate the Saharan mineral dust particle size distributions measured on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean and discuss the influence of aerosol aging on the atmospheric radiative energy budget. With this example we also assess how the uncertainties

  8. Verification of gyrokinetic particle simulation of current-driven instability in fusion plasmas. I. Internal kink mode

    SciTech Connect

    McClenaghan, J.; Lin, Z.; Holod, I.; Deng, W.; Wang, Z.

    2014-12-15

    The gyrokinetic toroidal code (GTC) capability has been extended for simulating internal kink instability with kinetic effects in toroidal geometry. The global simulation domain covers the magnetic axis, which is necessary for simulating current-driven instabilities. GTC simulation in the fluid limit of the kink modes in cylindrical geometry is verified by benchmarking with a magnetohydrodynamic eigenvalue code. Gyrokinetic simulations of the kink modes in the toroidal geometry find that ion kinetic effects significantly reduce the growth rate even when the banana orbit width is much smaller than the radial width of the perturbed current layer at the mode rational surface.

  9. Evidence for the Importance of Trapped Particle Resonances for Resistive Wall Mode Stability in High Beta Tokamak Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Reimerdes, H.; Berkery, J. W.; Lanctot, M. J.; Sabbagh, S. A.; Garofalo, A. M.; Strait, E. J.; Hanson, J. M.; In, Y.; Okabayashi, M.

    2011-05-27

    Active measurements of the plasma stability in tokamak plasmas reveal the importance of kinetic resonances for resistive wall mode stability. The rotation dependence of the magnetic plasma response to externally applied quasistatic n=1 magnetic fields clearly shows the signatures of an interaction between the resistive wall mode and the precession and bounce motions of trapped thermal ions, as predicted by a perturbative model of plasma stability including kinetic effects. The identification of the stabilization mechanism is an essential step towards quantitative predictions for the prospects of ''passive'' resistive wall mode stabilization, i.e., without the use of an ''active'' feedback system, in fusion-alpha heated plasmas.

  10. Seasonal variations of number size distributions and mass concentrations of atmospheric particles in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jianhua; Guinot, Benjamin; Yu, Tong; Wang, Xin; Liu, Wenqing

    2005-06-01

    Particle number and mass concentrations were measured in Beijing during the winter and summer periods in 2003, together with some other parameters including black carbon (BC) and meteorological conditions. Particle mass concentrations exhibited low seasonality, and the ratio of PM2.5/PM10 in winter was higher than that in summer. Particle number size distribution (PSD) was characterized by four modes and exhibited low seasonality. BC was well correlated with the number and mass concentrations of accumulation and coarse particles, indicating these size particles are related to anthropogenic activities. Particle mass and number concentrations (except ultra-fine and nucleation particles) followed well the trends of BC concentration for the majority of the day, indicating that most particles were associated with primary emissions. The diurnal number distributions of accumulation and coarse mode particles were characterized by two peaks.

  11. Switches in the mode of transmission select for or against a poorly aphid-transmissible strain of potato virus Y with reduced helper component and virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Legavre, T; Maia, I G; Casse-Delbart, F; Bernardi, F; Robaglia, C

    1996-07-01

    A poorly aphid-transmissible potato virus Y (PVY-PAT) variant emerged after several cycles of mechanical transmission of an initially aphid-transmissible (AT) isolate. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal region of the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) gene revealed a Lys to Glu change at a position previously found to abolish the HC-Pro aphid transmission activity in several potyviruses. Two cycles of aphid transmission allowed the virus population to evolve towards an AT form (PVY-ATnew) where a Glu to Lys change was observed. PVY-PAT produced lower amounts of coat protein and the accumulation of its HC-Pro in infected plants decreased from 7 to 28 days post-inoculation, as compared to PVY-ATnew. RT-PCR and restriction analysis showed that the two virus populations co-existed in the PVY-AT isolate and that the AT form was counter-selected during mechanical transmission. These observations suggest that the Lys to Glu substitution leads to decreased stability of HC-Pro resulting in poor transmissions by aphids, and further strengthen the idea that HC-Pro is involved in the accumulation of potyvirus in infected plants.

  12. Hygroscopic Fine Mode Particle Deposition on Electronic Circuitsand Resulting Degradation of Circuit Performance: An ExperimentalStudy

    SciTech Connect

    Litvak, Andres; Gadgil, A.; Fisk, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    A portion of electronic equipment failures is a consequenceof particle deposition on electronic circuits in normal indoorenvironments. Deposited hygroscopic particles reduce the electricalisolation (EI) between conductors. In laboratory experiments, weinvestigated the mechanisms, locations, and effects of particledeposition on electronic circuits with surface mounted chips (SMCs) andalso on small television sets. One set of electronics was exposed for 281h to an unusually high concentration of artificially-generated ammoniumsulfate particles while a second set (experimental controls) was exposedto normal indoor particles. The particle mass concentration in thehigh-exposure chamber was 500 times higher than normal. Televisionreliability was observed and the changes in EI between adjacent legs ofSMCs were measured. The experiments demonstrate the strong influence ofelectrostatic forces on the locations and rates of particle deposition.Although televisions did not fail after exposure to concentratedaerosols, the EI between adjacent legs of the SMCs was, in many cases,greatly diminished. Relative humidity had a very strong influence on themagnitude of EI. A qualitative explanation of the mechanisms of particledeposition and circuit degradation is proposed, including the role offibers. Finally, a potential method to reduce particle deposition onelectronic components is discussed.

  13. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Bol, K.; Couture, P.; Gammel, G.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.

    1986-07-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Zeff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n/sub met//n/sub e/ approx. = 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm/sup 3/, consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft x-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6 x 10/sup 10/ and 10 x 10/sup 10/ particles/cm/sup 2/s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3 x 10/sup 12/ and 1 x 10/sup 12/ particles/cm/sup 2/s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained.

  14. ITER Plasma at Ion Cyclotron Frequency Domain: The Fusion Alpha Particles Diagnostics Based on the Stimulated Raman Scattering of Fast Magnetosonic Wave off High Harmonic Ion Bernstein Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2014-10-01

    A novel method for alpha particle diagnostics is proposed. The theory of stimulated Raman scattering, SRS, of the fast wave and ion Bernstein mode, IBM, turbulence in multi-ion species plasmas, (Stefan University Press, La Jolla, CA, 2008). is utilized for the diagnostics of fast ions, (4)He (+2), in ITER plasmas. Nonlinear Landau damping of the IBM on fast ions near the plasma edge leads to the space-time changes in the turbulence level, (inverse alpha particle channeling). The space-time monitoring of the IBM turbulence via the SRS techniques may prove efficient for the real time study of the fast ion velocity distribution function, spatial distribution, and transport. Supported by Nikola Tesla Labs., La Jolla, CA 92037.

  15. Simulations of flow mode distributions on rough fracture surfaces using a parallelized Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kordilla, J.; Shigorina, E.; Tartakovsky, A. M.; Pan, W.; Geyer, T.

    2015-12-01

    Under idealized conditions (smooth surfaces, linear relationship between Bond number and Capillary number of droplets) steady-state flow modes on fracture surfaces have been shown to develop from sliding droplets to rivulets and finally (wavy) film flow, depending on the specified flux. In a recent study we demonstrated the effect of surface roughness on droplet flow in unsaturated wide aperture fractures, however, its effect on other prevailing flow modes is still an open question. The objective of this work is to investigate the formation of complex flow modes on fracture surfaces employing an efficient three-dimensional parallelized SPH model. The model is able to simulate highly intermittent, gravity-driven free-surface flows under dynamic wetting conditions. The effect of surface tension is included via efficient pairwise interaction forces. We validate the model using various analytical and semi-analytical relationships for droplet and complex flow dynamics. To investigate the effect of surface roughness on flow dynamics we construct surfaces with a self-affine fractal geometry and roughness characterized by the Hurst exponent. We demonstrate the effect of surface roughness (on macroscopic scales this can be understood as a tortuosity) on the steady-state distribution of flow modes. Furthermore we show the influence of a wide range of natural wetting conditions (defined by static contact angles) on the final distribution of surface coverage, which is of high importance for matrix-fracture interaction processes.

  16. The influence of toroidal Alfvén modes on the confinement of fast particles in the Globus-M spherical tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrov, Yu. V.; Bakharev, N. N.; Gusev, V. K.; Minaev, V. B.; Kornev, V. A.; Mel'nik, A. D.; Patrov, M. I.; Sakharov, N. V.; Tolstyakov, S. Yu.; Kurskiev, G. S.; Chernyshev, F. V.; Shchegolev, P. B.

    2014-12-01

    Neutral beam injection into the Globus-M spherical tokamak at the early stage of discharge leads to the development of instabilities in a frequency range of 50-200 kHz, which have been identified as toroidal Alfvén eigenmodes (TAEs) [1]. The influence of these modes on the confinement of fast particles has been studied with the aid of a neutral particle analyzer (NPA) and a neutron detector. The isotope effect was studied using hydrogen and deuterium both in the injected beam and in the target plasma. A correlation analysis of signals from magnetic probes showed that the observed modes in most cases contain a single harmonic with toroidal number n = 1. Upon the injection of deuterium into deuterium plasma, the development of TAEs led to a decrease in the neutron flux by 25%, whereas the fluxes of high-energy recharge atoms decreased by 75%. After the injection of hydrogen, a decrease in the flux measured by NPA did not exceed 25%.

  17. Alfvén mode stability and wave particle interaction in the JET tokamak: prospects for scenario development and control schemes in burning plasma experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Testa, D.; Fasoli, A.; Borba, D.; de Baar, M.; Bigi, M.; Brzozowski, J.; de Vries, P.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2004-07-01

    We have investigated the effect of different ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating schemes, of error field modes, of the plasma shape and edge magnetic shear, and of the ion nablaB drift direction on the stability of Alfvén eigenmodes (AEs). The use of multi-frequency or 2nd harmonic minority ICRF heating at high plasma density gives rise to a lower fast ion pressure gradient in the plasma core and to a reduced mode activity in the Alfvén frequency range. Externally excited low-amplitude error fields lead to a much larger AE instability threshold, which we attribute to a moderate radial redistribution of the fast ions. The edge plasma shape has a clear stabilizing effect on high-n, radially localized AEs. The damping rate of n = 1 toroidal AEs is a factor 3 higher when the ion nablaB drift is directed towards the divertor. These results represent a useful step towards the extrapolation of current scenarios to the inclusion of fusion-born alpha particles in ITER, with possible application for feedback control schemes for the various ITER operating regimes. Based on an invited talk given at the 8th International Atomic Energy Agency Technical Meeting on Energetic Particles in Magnetic Confinement Systems San Diego, USA, 6-8 October 2003.

  18. Auto-accumulation method using simulated annealing enables fully automatic particle pickup completely free from a matching template or learning data.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Toshihiko; Sato, Chikara

    2004-06-01

    Single-particle analysis is a 3-D structure determining method using electron microscopy (EM). In this method, a large number of projections is required to create 3-D reconstruction. In order to enable completely automatic pickup without a matching template or a training data set, we established a brand-new method in which the frames to pickup particles are randomly shifted and rotated over the electron micrograph and, using the total average image of the framed images as an index, each frame reaches a particle. In this process, shifts are selected to increase the contrast of the average. By iterated shifts and further selection of the shifts, the frames are induced to shift so as to surround particles. In this algorithm, hundreds of frames are initially distributed randomly over the electron micrograph in which multi-particle images are dispersed. Starting with these frames, one of them is selected and shifted randomly, and acceptance or non-acceptance of its new position is judged using the simulated annealing (SA) method in which the contrast score of the total average image is adopted as an index. After iteration of this process, the position of each frame converges so as to surround a particle and the framed images are picked up. This method is the first unsupervised fully automatic particle picking method which is applicable to EM of various kinds of proteins, especially to low-contrasted cryo-EM protein images.

  19. Multi-species particle transport in GYRO simulations of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkelsen, D. R.; Greenwald, M.; Waltz, R.; Candy, J.

    2009-11-01

    Experimental results from Alcator C-Mod have confirmed earlier AUG and JET findings that spontaneous peaking of the density profile in H-mode plasmas depends on collisionality. Previously reported nonlinear, 'full-radius' GYRO simulations [1] of low-collisionality, peaked-density H-mode plasmas in C-Mod generated a particle pinch that was produced exclusively by higher-k modes. Nonlinear simulations of AUG have a similar character [2], and recent detailed linear analyses [2,3] suggest that density peaking may be common in low collisionality plasmas. Here we increase the number of ion species in the simulations to determine whether impurity pinches are also expected, and whether the degree of density peaking is predicted to differ for the three hydrogen isotopes. These simulations include experimentally relevant levels of several impurities, and a range of H/D and D/T mixes.[4pt] [1] D.R. Mikkelsen, et al., Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 52, (2007) No. 16, 221, NP8.71 [0pt] [2] C. Angioni, et al., Phys. Plasmas 16 (2009) 060702 [0pt] [3] M. Maslov, et al., Nucl. Fusion 49 (2009) 075037

  20. A particle-in-cell mode beam dynamics simulation of medium energy beam transport for the SSC-Linac

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chen; He, Yuan; Yuan, You-Jin; Lu, Yuan-Rong; Liu, Yong; Wang, Zhi-Jun; Du, Xiao-Nan; Yao, Qing-Gao; Liu, Ge; Xu, Meng-Xin; He, Shou-Bo; Xia, Jia-Wen

    2012-01-01

    A new linear accelerator system, called the SSC-Linac injector, is being designed at HIRFL (the heavy ion research facility of Lanzhou). As part of the SSC-Linac, the medium energy beam transport (MEBT) consists of seven magnetic quadrupoles, a re-buncher and a diagnose box. The total length of this segment is about 1.75 m. The beam dynamics simulation in MEBT has been studied using the TRACK 3D particle-in-cell code, and the simulation result shows that the beam accelerated from the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) matches well with the acceptance of the following drift tube linac (DTL) in both the transverse and longitudinal phase spaces, and that most of the particles can be captured by the final sector focusing cyclotron for further acceleration. The longitudinal emittance of the RFQ and the longitudinal acceptance of the DTL was calculated in detail, and a multi-particle beam dynamics simulation from the ion source to the end of the DTL was done to verify the original design.

  1. Ultrafine-Particle Emission Factors as a Function of Vehicle Mode of Operation for LDVs Based on Near-Roadway Monitoring.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Wenjuan; Wen, Dongqi; Xiang, Sheng; Hu, Zhice; Noll, Kenneth E

    2016-01-19

    This paper presents ultrafine-particle (UFP) emission factors (EFs) as a function of vehicle mode of operation (free flow and congestion) using (1) concurrent 5 min measurements of UFPs and carbon monoxide (CO) concentration, wind speed and direction, traffic volume and speed near a roadway that is restricted to light-duty vehicles (LDVs) and (2) inverse dispersion model calculations. Short-term measurements are required to characterize the highly variable and rapidly changing UFP concentration generated by vehicles. Under congestion conditions, the UFP vehicle EFs increased from 0.5 × 10(13) to 2 × 10(13) (particles km(-1) vehicle(-1)) when vehicle flow increased from 5500 to 7500 vehicles/h. For free-flow conditions, the EF is constant at 1.5 × 10(13) (particles km(-1) vehicle(-1)). The analysis is based on the assumption that air-quality models adequately describe the dilution process due to both traffic and atmospheric turbulence. The approach used to verify this assumption was to use an emission factor model to determine EFs for CO and then estimate dilution factors using measured CO concentrations. This procedure eliminates the need to rely only on air quality models to generate dilution factors. The EFs are suitable for fleet emissions under real-world traffic conditions. PMID:26674658

  2. Particle surface area dependence of mineral dust in immersion freezing mode: investigations with freely suspended drops in an acoustic levitator and a vertical wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diehl, K.; Debertshäuser, M.; Eppers, O.; Schmithüsen, H.; Mitra, S. K.; Borrmann, S.

    2014-11-01

    The heterogeneous freezing temperatures of supercooled drops were measured using an acoustic levitator. This technique allows one to freely suspend single drops in the air without any wall contact. Heterogeneous nucleation by two types of illite (illite IMt1 and illite NX) and a montmorillonite sample was investigated in the immersion mode. Drops of 1 mm in radius were monitored by a video camera while cooled down to -28 °C to simulate freezing within the tropospheric temperature range. The surface temperature of the drops was contact-free, determined with an infrared thermometer; the onset of freezing was indicated by a sudden increase of the drop surface temperature. For comparison, measurements with one particle type (illite NX) were additionally performed in the Mainz vertical wind tunnel with drops of 340 μm radius freely suspended. Immersion freezing was observed in a temperature range between -13 and -26 °C as a function of particle type and particle surface area immersed in the drops. Isothermal experiments in the wind tunnel indicated that after the cooling stage freezing still proceeds, at least during the investigated time period of 30 s. The results were evaluated by applying two descriptions of heterogeneous freezing, the stochastic and the singular model. Although the wind tunnel results do not support the time-independence of the freezing process both models are applicable for comparing the results from the two experimental techniques.

  3. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  4. Mode instabilities and dynamic patterns in a colony of self-propelled surfactant particles covering a thin liquid layer.

    PubMed

    Pototsky, Andrey; Thiele, Uwe; Stark, Holger

    2016-05-01

    We consider a colony of point-like self-propelled surfactant particles (swimmers) without direct interactions that cover a thin liquid layer on a solid support. The particles predominantly swim normal to the free film surface with only a small component parallel to the film surface. The coupled dynamics of the swimmer density and film height profile is captured in a long-wave model allowing for diffusive and convective transport of the swimmers (including rotational diffusion). The dynamics of the film height profile is determined by i) the upward pushing force of the swimmers onto the liquid-gas interface, ii) the solutal Marangoni force due to gradients in the swimmer concentration, and iii) the rotational diffusion of the swimmers together with the in-plane active motion. After reviewing and extending the analysis of the linear stability of the uniform state, we analyse the fully nonlinear dynamic equations and show that point-like swimmers, which only interact via long-wave deformations of the liquid film, self-organise in highly regular (standing, travelling, and modulated waves) and various irregular patterns. PMID:27145959

  5. Accumulation and breakdown of RNA-deficient intracellular virus particles in interferon-treated NIH 3T3 cells chronically producing Moloney murine leukemia virus.

    PubMed Central

    Aboud, M; Hassan, Y

    1983-01-01

    Interferon treatment of NIH 3T3 cells chronically infected with Moloney murine leukemia virus inhibited about 95% of virus release. This inhibition was accompanied by a three- to twofold accumulation of intracellular virions. However, this accumulation could be demonstrated only be exogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay or radioactive labeling of the assembled viral proteins. It could not be shown by the endogenous reverse transcriptase reaction assay, which depended on endogenous viral RNA, or by labeling the encapsidated viral RNA. It was therefore evident that most of the intracellular virions accumulated in interferon-treated cells were RNA deficient. Hybridization analysis revealed that these virions were deficient of genomic viral RNA, whereas size analysis by gel electrophoresis suggested that the deficiency of 4S RNA normally packaged in Moloney murine leukemia virus was even stronger. Our data also suggested that this RNA deficiency was not due to degradation of the encapsidated RNA, but more likely to a defect in virus assembly. RNA-lacking intracellular virions were unstable; they were found to collapse before being released. PMID:6187933

  6. Surgical smoke and ultrafine particles

    PubMed Central

    Brüske-Hohlfeld, Irene; Preissler, Gerhard; Jauch, Karl-Walter; Pitz, Mike; Nowak, Dennis; Peters, Annette; Wichmann, H-Erich

    2008-01-01

    Background Electrocautery, laser tissue ablation, and ultrasonic scalpel tissue dissection all generate a 'surgical smoke' containing ultrafine (<100 nm) and accumulation mode particles (< 1 μm). Epidemiological and toxicological studies have shown that exposure to particulate air pollution is associated with adverse cardiovascular and respiratory health effects. Methods To measure the amount of generated particulates in 'surgical smoke' during different surgical procedures and to quantify the particle number concentration for operation room personnel a condensation particle counter (CPC, model 3007, TSI Inc.) was applied. Results Electro-cauterization and argon plasma tissue coagulation induced the production of very high number concentration (> 100000 cm-3) of particles in the diameter range of 10 nm to 1 μm. The peak concentration was confined to the immediate local surrounding of the production side. In the presence of a very efficient air conditioning system the increment and decrement of ultrafine particle occurrence was a matter of seconds, with accumulation of lower particle number concentrations in the operation room for only a few minutes. Conclusion Our investigation showed a short term very high exposure to ultrafine particles for surgeons and close assisting operating personnel – alternating with longer periods of low exposure. PMID:19055750

  7. Possibilities of new generation columns packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles in gradient elution mode.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2013-12-13

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the practical possibilities in gradient elution mode of a column packed with 1.3μm core-shell particles recently released on the market. For this purpose, two types of analytes possessing different diffusion coefficients were selected (small molecule and peptide). It appears that the new 1.3μm material was particularly well suited for fast separations, compared to other existing core-shell particle dimensions in gradient mode. The new material systematically outperforms the other existing ones for peak capacity up to 300 for small molecules and 700 (corresponding to t0=15min) for peptides. Based on these cut-off values, the advantage of column packed with 1.3μm was much more obvious for peptides vs. small molecules analysis. Further improvements in terms of column mechanical stability and system upper pressure capability could expand the limits of separation speed and efficiency to a different level. Again, because of the current pressure limitation and low permeability, a column length of more than 5-8cm is never desired for small molecules analysis in gradient elution. On the contrary, longer columns were useful for peptide analysis. As example, a column of 28cm packed with 1.3μm particles provides a peak capacity of 1000 in the case of peptides analysis. All the predicted values were experimentally confirmed using a standardized extract of Ginkgo biloba and a tryptic digest of a monoclonal antibody (Panitumumab). For the plant extract, the better performance was always achieved with a 5cm long column (P=267 and 268 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). Finally, in the case of peptide mapping, a 15cm long column packed with 1.3μm particles was the best choice (P=176 and 311 for the 5 and 15cm, respectively, using a gradient time of 10 and 40min, respectively). PMID:24210304

  8. Characteristics of particle number and mass emissions during heavy-duty diesel truck parked active DPF regeneration in an ambient air dilution tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungju; Quiros, David C.; Dwyer, Harry A.; Collins, John F.; Burnitzki, Mark; Chernich, Donald; Herner, Jorn D.

    2015-12-01

    Diesel particle number and mass emissions were measured during parked active regeneration of diesel particulate filters (DPF) in two heavy-duty diesel trucks: one equipped with a DPF and one equipped with a DPF + SCR (selective catalytic reduction), and compliant with the 2007 and 2010 emission standards, respectively. The emission measurements were conducted using an ambient air dilution tunnel. During parked active regeneration, particulate matter (PM) mass emissions measured from a 2007 technology truck were significantly higher than the emissions from a 2010 technology truck. Particle number emissions from both trucks were dominated by nucleation mode particles having a diameter less than 50 nm; nucleation mode particles were orders of magnitude higher than accumulation mode particles having a diameter greater than 50 nm. Accumulation mode particles contributed 77.8 %-95.8 % of the 2007 truck PM mass, but only 7.3 %-28.2 % of the 2010 truck PM mass.

  9. Influence of breathing mode and activity level on the regional deposition of inhaled particles and implications for regulatory standards

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Martonen, T.B.; Menache, M.G.; Spektor, D.M.; Lippmann, M.

    1985-09-01

    Particulate size-selective sampling is an important consideration in determining ambient air quality standards and threshold limit values for workplace exposures. Hazard evaluations, as well as risk analyses, can benefit from an improved understanding of factors affecting regional respiratory tract deposition of particles in man. Here, thoracic deposition and its component parts are examined, as a function of particulate size, for ventilation rates ranging from normal respiration to heavy exercise in individuals who are habitual mouth breathers and in those who normally employ oronasal breathing when minute ventilations exceed approximately 35 1/Lmin. The logistic models yielded significantly improved fits of the experimental data compared to previously used linear regression models. The analyses demonstrate that the activity level of the exposed population should be taken into account to assess the potential health consequences from ambient or workplace exposures.

  10. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  11. Scaling behavior of quantum nanosystems: emergence of quasi-particles, collective modes, and mixed exchange symmetry states.

    PubMed

    Shreif, Zeina; Ortoleva, Peter

    2011-03-14

    Examples of quantum nanosystems are graphene nanoribbons, molecular wires, and superconducting nanoparticles. The objective of the multiscale theory presented here is to provide a new perspective on the coupling of processes across scales in space and time underlying the dynamics of these systems. The long range objective for this multiscale approach is to serve as an efficient computational algorithm. Long space-time dynamics is derived using a perturbation expansion in the ratio ɛ of the nearest-neighbor distance to a nanometer-scale characteristic length and a theorem on the equivalence of long time-averages and expectation values. This dynamics is shown to satisfy a coarse-grained wave equation (CGWE) which takes a Schrödinger-like form with modified masses and interactions. The scaling of space and time is determined by the orders of magnitude of various contributions to the N-body potential. If the spatial scale of the coarse-graining is too large, the CGWE would imply an unbounded growth of gradients; if it is too short, the system's size would display uncontrolled growth inappropriate for the bound states of interest, i.e., collective motion or migration within a stable nanoassembly. The balance of these two extremes removes arbitrariness in the choice of the scaling of space-time. Since the long-scale dynamics of each Fermion involves its interaction with many others, we hypothesize that the solutions of the CGWE have mean-field character to good approximation, i.e., can be factorized into single-particle functions. This leads to a coarse-grained mean-field approximation that is distinct in character from traditional Hartree-Fock theory. A variational principle is used to derive equations for the single-particle functions. This theme is developed and used to derive an equation for low-lying disturbances from the ground state corresponding to long wavelength density disturbances or long-scale migration. An algorithm for the efficient simulation of

  12. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere—Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tianhao; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Xiang, Hao; Fang, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm) attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm–661 nm), meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm–30 nm), Aitken mode (30 nm–100 nm), and accumulation mode (100 nm–661 nm) reached 4923 cm−3, 12193 cm−3 and 4801 cm−3, respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of “repeated, short-lived” nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in industrial cities of

  13. Characteristics of Fine Particles in an Urban Atmosphere-Relationships with Meteorological Parameters and Trace Gases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianhao; Zhu, Zhongmin; Gong, Wei; Xiang, Hao; Fang, Ruimin

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particles (diameter < 1 μm) attract a growing global health concern and have increased in urban areas that have a strong link to nucleation, traffic emissions, and industrial emissions. To reveal the characteristics of fine particles in an industrial city of a developing country, two-year measurements of particle number size distribution (15.1 nm-661 nm), meteorological parameters, and trace gases were made in the city of Wuhan located in central China from June 2012 to May 2014. The annual average particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode (15.1 nm-30 nm), Aitken mode (30 nm-100 nm), and accumulation mode (100 nm-661 nm) reached 4923 cm(-3), 12193 cm(-3) and 4801 cm(-3), respectively. Based on Pearson coefficients between particle number concentrations and meteorological parameters, precipitation and temperature both had significantly negative relationships with particle number concentrations, whereas atmospheric pressure was positively correlated with the particle number concentrations. The diurnal variation of number concentration in nucleation mode particles correlated closely with photochemical processes in all four seasons. At the same time, distinct growth of particles from nucleation mode to Aitken mode was only found in spring, summer, and autumn. The two peaks of Aitken mode and accumulation mode particles in morning and evening corresponded obviously to traffic exhaust emissions peaks. A phenomenon of "repeated, short-lived" nucleation events have been created to explain the durability of high particle concentrations, which was instigated by exogenous pollutants, during winter in a case analysis of Wuhan. Measurements of hourly trace gases and segmental meteorological factors were applied as proxies for complex chemical reactions and dense industrial activities. The results of this study offer reasonable estimations of particle impacts and provide references for emissions control strategies in industrial cities of developing

  14. Chronic exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to iron oxide nanoparticles: Effects of particle morphology on accumulation, elimination, hematology and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Kaya, Hasan; Yılmaz, Sevdan; Camas, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Effects of chronic exposure to alpha and gamma iron oxide nanoparticles (α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 NPs) were investigated through exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0mg/L (9.2×10(-4), 4.6×10(-3) and 9.2×10(-3)mM) aqueous suspensions for 60days. Fish were then transferred to NP-free freshwater and allowed to eliminate ingested NPs for 30days. The organs, including gills, liver, kidney, intestine, brain, spleen, and muscle tissue of the fish were analyzed to determine the accumulation, physiological distribution and elimination of the Fe2O3 NPs. Largest accumulation occurred in spleen followed by intestine, kidney, liver, gills, brain and muscle tissue. Fish exposed to γ-Fe2O3 NPs possessed significantly higher Fe in all organs. Accumulation in spleen was fast and independent of NP concentration reaching to maximum levels by the end of the first sampling period (30th day). Dissolved Fe levels in water were very negligible ranging at 4-6μg/L for α-Fe2O3 and 17-21μg/L for γ-Fe2O3 NPs (for 1mg/L suspensions). Despite that, Fe levels in gills and brain reflect more dissolved Fe accumulation from metastable γ-Fe2O3 polymorph. Ingested NPs cleared from the organs completely within 30-day elimination period, except the liver and spleen. Liver contained about 31% of α- and 46% of γ-Fe2O3, while spleen retained about 62% of α- and 35% of the γ-polymorph. No significant disturbances were observed in hematological parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell and white blood cell counts (p>0.05). Serum glucose (GLU) levels decreased in treatments exposed to 1.0mg/L of γ-Fe2O3 NPs at day 30 (p<0.05). In contrast, GLU levels increased during the elimination period for 1.0mg/L α-Fe2O3 NPs treatments (p<0.05). Transient increases occurred in glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Serum Fe levels did not change during exposure (p>0.05), but increased

  15. Chronic exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to iron oxide nanoparticles: Effects of particle morphology on accumulation, elimination, hematology and immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri; Kaya, Hasan; Yılmaz, Sevdan; Camas, Mustafa

    2016-08-01

    Effects of chronic exposure to alpha and gamma iron oxide nanoparticles (α-Fe2O3 and γ-Fe2O3 NPs) were investigated through exposure of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus) to 0.1, 0.5 and 1.0mg/L (9.2×10(-4), 4.6×10(-3) and 9.2×10(-3)mM) aqueous suspensions for 60days. Fish were then transferred to NP-free freshwater and allowed to eliminate ingested NPs for 30days. The organs, including gills, liver, kidney, intestine, brain, spleen, and muscle tissue of the fish were analyzed to determine the accumulation, physiological distribution and elimination of the Fe2O3 NPs. Largest accumulation occurred in spleen followed by intestine, kidney, liver, gills, brain and muscle tissue. Fish exposed to γ-Fe2O3 NPs possessed significantly higher Fe in all organs. Accumulation in spleen was fast and independent of NP concentration reaching to maximum levels by the end of the first sampling period (30th day). Dissolved Fe levels in water were very negligible ranging at 4-6μg/L for α-Fe2O3 and 17-21μg/L for γ-Fe2O3 NPs (for 1mg/L suspensions). Despite that, Fe levels in gills and brain reflect more dissolved Fe accumulation from metastable γ-Fe2O3 polymorph. Ingested NPs cleared from the organs completely within 30-day elimination period, except the liver and spleen. Liver contained about 31% of α- and 46% of γ-Fe2O3, while spleen retained about 62% of α- and 35% of the γ-polymorph. No significant disturbances were observed in hematological parameters, including hemoglobin, hematocrit, red blood cell and white blood cell counts (p>0.05). Serum glucose (GLU) levels decreased in treatments exposed to 1.0mg/L of γ-Fe2O3 NPs at day 30 (p<0.05). In contrast, GLU levels increased during the elimination period for 1.0mg/L α-Fe2O3 NPs treatments (p<0.05). Transient increases occurred in glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT), and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Serum Fe levels did not change during exposure (p>0.05), but increased

  16. Particle-size distribution of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and its implications for health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Y.; Xu, T.; Li, X.; Cheng, T.; Yang, X.; Sun, X.; Chen, J.

    2015-12-01

    In order better to understand the particle-size distribution of particulate PBDEs and their deposition pattern in human respiratory tract, we made an one year campaign 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved aerosol particles at Shanghai urban site. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increased, accumulation mode peak intensity increased while coarse mode peak intensity decreased. This change was the consistent with the variation of PBDEs' sub-cooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption process dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. Evaluated deposition flux of Σ13PBDE was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In associated with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  17. Size distribution of particle-associated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their implications for health

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Yan; Xu, Tingting; Li, Xiang; Cheng, Tiantao; Yang, Xin; Sun, Xiaomin; Chen, Jianmin

    2016-03-01

    In order to better understand the size distribution of particle-associated PBDEs and their deposition pattern in the human respiratory tract, we carried out a 1-year campaign during 2012-2013 for the measurement of size-resolved particles at the urban site of Shanghai. The results showed that particulate PBDEs exhibited a bimodal distribution with a mode peak in the accumulation particle size range and the second mode peak in the coarse particle size ranges. As the number of bromine atoms in the molecule increases, accumulation-mode peak intensity increased while coarse-mode peak intensity decreased. This change was consistent with the variation of PBDEs' subcooled vapor pressure. Absorption and adsorption processes dominated the distribution of PBDEs among the different size particles. The evaluated deposition flux of Σ13 PBDEs was 26.8 pg h-1, in which coarse particles contributed most PBDEs in head and tracheobronchial regions, while fine-mode particles contributed major PBDEs in the alveoli region. In association with the fact that fine particles can penetrate deeper into the respiratory system, fine-particle-bound highly brominated PBDEs can be inhaled more deeply into human lungs and cause a greater risk to human health.

  18. Effect of wood combustion conditions on the morphology of freshly emitted fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torvela, T.; Tissari, J.; Sippula, O.; Kaivosoja, T.; Leskinen, J.; Virén, A.; Lähde, A.; Jokiniemi, J.

    2014-04-01

    The physical and chemical properties of biomass combustion-originated particles produced under controlled conditions (efficient, intermediate, and smouldering combustion) were studied. Transmission electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy was used to study the morphology and chemical composition of the size-classified samples collected from the flue gas. In addition, online-measured particle number size distributions, chemical analyses of the PM samples, and thermodynamic equilibrium calculations were used to interpret the results. The particles were composed of inorganic species and carbonaceous matter. Zinc oxide particles with an average diameter of <13 nm acted as seeds for the condensation of inorganic vapours and organic material, forming ash particles with a nested structure. The outer layer was composed mainly of alkali salts. Soot and gaseous hydrocarbons were formed in high concentrations during the impaired combustion conditions. Two modes of particle size distribution were observed, with each exhibiting distinctive features. The main particle type found in the ultrafine particle size mode (<100 nm) was ash. Impairing the combustion conditions increased the release of soot and condensable organics into the PM, found mainly in the accumulation particle size mode (>100 nm). TEM observations of the size-classified samples revealed that condensed organic matter influenced the ash particle size and appearance. The soot morphology was also found to change, even after short periods of time, due to the presence of OM; changes in the primary particle diameter and the appearance of the agglomerates were observed. As external mixtures, the soot and ash particles were separated into two particle size modes, but both could be found as internally mixed from the accumulation mode. This result extends the current knowledge of particle formation in wood combustion, showing that the particle formation processes of ash and soot particles are largely

  19. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  20. Risk assessment of arsenic and other metals via atmospheric particles, and effects of atmospheric exposure and other demographic factors on their accumulations in human scalp hair in urban area of Guangzhou, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minjuan; Chen, Xunwen; Shao, Dingding; Zhao, Yinge; Wang, Wei; Wong, Ming Hung

    2014-04-01

    Eighty-eight scalp hair samples were collected from Guangzhou (GZ) urban population (15-65 years) to investigate the accumulation of As and other metals (Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb, Hg and Pb). Demographic information, including body weight, height, age, gender, habits of smoking and drinking, types of drinking water, duration of stay in GZ, days of stay in GZ per year (days/year), and hours spent in indoor environment per day (h/day), were also recorded during hair sampling to refine the uncertainty of risk assessment derived from exposures to elements via dust and airborne particles. No significant non-carcinogenic risk was found. However, the cancer risks of Cr and As for both ingestion and inhalation exceeded the most tolerable regulated level (1.0×10(-6)). The environmental exposures to urban dust and airborne particles were observed significantly correlated to accumulations of Cd (R=0.306, p=0.005) and Ni (R=0.333, p=0.002) in scalp hair. Furthermore, the hair burden of elements was also significantly (p<0.05) dependent on gender (Mn, Ni, Zn, As, Sn and Hg), age (Cr, As, Cd and Hg), duration of stay in GZ (Hg) as well as nutritional and physical status, reflected by BMI and BSA (Cr, Ni, Cd, Sb and Hg). Nutritional and physical status was observed as the exclusive important factor influencing As speciation in human scalp hair. However, habits of smoking and alcohol drinking as well as types of drinking water were not identified as the significant influencing factors on any element (p>0.05).

  1. Study of the L-mode tokamak plasma “shortfall” with local and global nonlinear gyrokinetic δf particle-in-cell simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, J.; Wan, Weigang; Chen, Yang; Parker, Scott E.; Groebner, Richard J.; Holland, C.; Howard, N. T.

    2014-11-15

    The δ f particle-in-cell code GEM is used to study the transport “shortfall” problem of gyrokinetic simulations. In local simulations, the GEM results confirm the previously reported simulation results of DIII-D [Holland et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 052301 (2009)] and Alcator C-Mod [Howard et al., Nucl. Fusion 53, 123011 (2013)] tokamaks with the continuum code GYRO. Namely, for DIII-D the simulations closely predict the ion heat flux at the core, while substantially underpredict transport towards the edge; while for Alcator C-Mod, the simulations show agreement with the experimental values of ion heat flux, at least within the range of experimental error. Global simulations are carried out for DIII-D L-mode plasmas to study the effect of edge turbulence on the outer core ion heat transport. The edge turbulence enhances the outer core ion heat transport through turbulence spreading. However, this edge turbulence spreading effect is not enough to explain the transport underprediction.

  2. Soot particles at an elevated site in eastern China during the passage of a strong cyclone.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Shao, Longyi; Zhang, Daizhou

    2012-07-15

    Atmospheric particles larger than 0.2 μm were collected at the top of Mt. Tai (36.25°N, 117.10°E, 1534 m a.s.l.) in eastern China in May 2008 during the passage of a strong cyclone. The particles were analyzed with electron microscopes and characterized by morphology, equivalent diameter and elemental composition. Soot particles with coating (coated soot particles) and those without apparent coating (naked soot particles) were predominant in the diameter range smaller than 0.6 μm in all samples. The number-size distribution of the relative abundance of naked soot particles in the prefrontal air was similar to that in the postfrontal air and their size modes were around 0.2-0.3 μm. However, the distribution of inclusions of coated soot particles showed a mode in the range of 0.1-0.3 μm. The coating degree of coated soot particles, which was defined by the ratio of the diameter of inclusion to the diameter of particle body, showed a mode around 0.5 with the range of 0.3-0.6. These results indicate that the status of soot particles in the prefrontal and postfrontal air was similar although air pollution levels were dramatically different. In addition, the relative abundance of accumulation mode particles increased with the decrease of soot particles after the front passage.

  3. Particle preconcentrator

    SciTech Connect

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr

    2000-07-11

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a previous screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  4. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  5. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  6. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, Kevin L.; Conrad, Frank J.; Custer, Chad A.; Rhykerd, Jr., Charles L.

    2005-09-20

    An apparatus and method for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents.

  7. Particle preconcentrator

    DOEpatents

    Linker, K.L.; Conrad, F.J.; Custer, C.A.; Rhykerd, C.L. Jr.

    1998-12-29

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for preconcentrating particles and vapors. The preconcentrator apparatus permits detection of highly diluted amounts of particles in a main gas stream, such as a stream of ambient air. A main gas stream having airborne particles entrained therein is passed through a pervious screen. The particles accumulate upon the screen, as the screen acts as a sort of selective particle filter. The flow of the main gas stream is then interrupted by diaphragm shutter valves, whereupon a cross-flow of carrier gas stream is blown parallel past the faces of the screen to dislodge the accumulated particles and carry them to a particle or vapor detector, such as an ion mobility spectrometer. The screen may be heated, such as by passing an electrical current there through, to promote desorption of particles therefrom during the flow of the carrier gas. Various types of screens are disclosed. The apparatus and method of the invention may find particular utility in the fields of narcotics, explosives detection and chemical agents. 3 figs.

  8. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  9. Wave-wave and wave-particle interactions in the inner magnetosphere measured with Van Allen Probes: cross coupling between wave modes and its effect on radiation belt dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colpitts, C. A.; Cattell, C. A.; Broughton, M.; Engebretson, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    We will show observations of waveform bursts using the Electric Field and Waves (EFW) burst data on the Van Allen Probes satellites with intermediate frequency waves such as whistler mode, magnetosonic and lower hybrid. These observations show very strong modulation of these waves by lower frequency waves such as EMIC or ULF. We are analyzing the burst data and cross coupling between wave modes to determine how prevalent the cross coupling between wave modes is and under what conditions it occurs. To supplement the EFW data, each satellite is also equipped with a full complement of particle instruments, including the HOPE instrument measuring lower energy (1 eV - 50 keV) particles and MagEIS instruments measuring higher energy (20 keV - 5 MeV) particles. The energy and angular resolution of these detectors are sufficient to resolve the scattering and energization arising from the distinct wave modes, using the signatures in the trapped electron populations predicted by theory for the various mechanisms. Comparison of the burst waveform data with the electron data from HOPE and MagEIS, for times with and without coupling between the wave modes, will allow us to identify how the cross coupling affects electron dynamics in the radiation belts. The significance of wave-particle interactions in the formation and depletion of the radiation belts has long been established, but is still not completely understood. Specifically, pitch angle scattering from waves such as plasmaspheric hiss and electromagnetic ion cyclotron [EMIC] waves near the duskside plasmapause is known to contribute to electron loss from the radiation belts, primarily through precipitation into the atmosphere. Higher frequency waves such as whistler mode chorus and magnetosonic waves observed near the equator in the lower hybrid frequency range are widely believed to be primary means for electron energization. However, these and other competing processes often occur simultaneously, and an accurate model

  10. Taming the post-Newtonian expansion: Simplifying the modes of the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity for a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson-McDaniel, Nathan K.

    2014-07-01

    High-order terms in the post-Newtonian (PN) expansions of various quantities for compact binaries exhibit a combinatorial increase in complexity, with an ever-increasing number of terms, including more transcendentals and logarithms of the velocity, higher powers of these transcendentals and logarithms, and larger and larger rational numbers as coefficients. Here we consider the gravitational wave energy flux at infinity from a point particle in a circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole, which is known to 22PN [O(v44), where v is the particle's orbital velocity] beyond the lowest-order Newtonian prediction, at which point each order has over 1000 terms. We introduce a factorization that considerably simplifies the spherical harmonic modes of the energy flux (and thus also the amplitudes of the spherical harmonic modes of the gravitational waves); it is likely that much of the complexity this factorization removes is due to wave propagation on the Schwarzschild spacetime (e.g., tail effects). For the modes with azimuthal number ℓ≥7, this factorization reduces the expressions for the modes that enter the 22PN total energy flux to pure integer PN series with rational coefficients, which amounts to a reduction of up to a factor of ˜150 in the total number of terms in a given mode (and also in the size of the entire expression for the mode). The reduction in complexity becomes less dramatic for smaller ℓ, due to the structure of the expansion, and one only obtains purely rational coefficients up to some order, though the factorization is still able to remove all the half-integer PN terms. For the 22PN ℓ=2 modes, this factorization still reduces the total number of terms (and size) by a factor of ˜10 and gives purely rational coefficients through 8PN. This factorization also improves the convergence of the series, though we find the exponential resummation introduced for the full energy flux in [Isoyama et al., Phys. Rev. D 87, 024010 (2013)] to be

  11. [Distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiu-Fang; Sun, Zai; Xie, Xiao-Fang

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) were monitored with fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) in continuous haze weather and the haze fading process during December 6 to 11, 2013 in Hangzhou. Particle concentration and size distribution were studied associated with meteorological factors. The results showed that number concentrations were the highest at night and began to reduce in the morning. There was a small peak at 8 o'clock in the morning and 18 o'clock in the afternoon. It showed an obvious peak traffic source, which indicated that traffic emissions played a great role in the atmospheric pollution. During haze weather, the highest number concentration of UFPs reached 8 x 10(4) cm(-3). Particle size spectrum distribution was bimodal, the peak particle sizes were 15 nm and 100 nm respectively. Majority of UFPs were Aitken mode and Accumulation mode and the size of most particles concentrated near 100 nm. Average CMD(count medium diameter) was 85.89 nm. During haze fading process, number concentration and particles with size around 100 nm began to reduce and peak size shifted to small size. Nuclear modal particles increased and were more than accumulation mode. Average CMD was 58.64 nm. Meteorological factors such as the visibility and wind were negatively correlated with the particle number concentration. Correlation coefficient R were -0.225 and - 0.229. The humidity was correlated with number concentration. Correlation coefficient R was 0.271. The atmosphere was stable in winter and the level temperature had small correlation with number concentration. Therefore, study on distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather had the significance on the formation mechanism and control of haze weather. PMID:25338351

  12. [Distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather in Hangzhou].

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiu-Fang; Sun, Zai; Xie, Xiao-Fang

    2014-08-01

    Atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs) were monitored with fast mobility particle sizer (FMPS) in continuous haze weather and the haze fading process during December 6 to 11, 2013 in Hangzhou. Particle concentration and size distribution were studied associated with meteorological factors. The results showed that number concentrations were the highest at night and began to reduce in the morning. There was a small peak at 8 o'clock in the morning and 18 o'clock in the afternoon. It showed an obvious peak traffic source, which indicated that traffic emissions played a great role in the atmospheric pollution. During haze weather, the highest number concentration of UFPs reached 8 x 10(4) cm(-3). Particle size spectrum distribution was bimodal, the peak particle sizes were 15 nm and 100 nm respectively. Majority of UFPs were Aitken mode and Accumulation mode and the size of most particles concentrated near 100 nm. Average CMD(count medium diameter) was 85.89 nm. During haze fading process, number concentration and particles with size around 100 nm began to reduce and peak size shifted to small size. Nuclear modal particles increased and were more than accumulation mode. Average CMD was 58.64 nm. Meteorological factors such as the visibility and wind were negatively correlated with the particle number concentration. Correlation coefficient R were -0.225 and - 0.229. The humidity was correlated with number concentration. Correlation coefficient R was 0.271. The atmosphere was stable in winter and the level temperature had small correlation with number concentration. Therefore, study on distribution of atmospheric ultrafine particles during haze weather had the significance on the formation mechanism and control of haze weather.

  13. Effects of continuously regenerating diesel particulate filters on regulated emissions and number-size distribution of particles emitted from a diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhihua; Shah, Asad Naeem; Ge, Yunshan; Ding, Yan; Tan, Jianwei; Jiang, Lei; Yu, Linxiao; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Chu; Zeng, Tao

    2011-01-01

    The effects of continuously regenerating diesel particulate filter (CRDPF) systems on regulated gaseous emissions, and number-size distribution and mass of particles emanated from a diesel engine have been investigated in this study. Two CRDPF units (CRDPF-1 and CRDPF-2) with different specifications were separately retrofitted to the engine running with European steady-state cycle (ESC). An electrical low pressure impactor (ELPI) was used for particle number-size distribution measurement and mass estimation. The conversion/reduction rate (R(CR)) of hydrocarbons (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) across CRDPF-1 was 83% and 96.3%, respectively. Similarly, the R(CR) of HC and CO and across CRDPF-2 was 91.8% and 99.1%, respectively. The number concentration of particles and their concentration peaks; nuclei mode, accumulation mode and total particles; and particle mass were highly reduced with the CRDPF units. The nuclei mode particles at downstream of CRDPF-1 and CRDPF-2 decreased by 99.9% to 100% and 97.8% to 99.8% respectively; and the particle mass reduced by 73% to 92.2% and 35.3% to 72.4%, respectively, depending on the engine conditions. In addition, nuclei mode particles increased with the increasing of engine speed due to the heterogeneous nucleation initiated by the higher exhaust temperature, while accumulation mode particles were higher at higher loads due to the decrease in the air-to-fuel ratio (A/F) at higher loads.

  14. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in an urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-09-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan, during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM1 (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (NAitken), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 13.9 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 6.1 × 103 cm-3, and 6.6 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 91% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc / NOx ratio of 192.4 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times of the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Averages (± 1σ) of the diameter growth rate (GR) and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10, were 11.9 ± 10.6 nm h-1 and 6.9 ± 3.0 cm-3 s-1, respectively. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB · SO2/CS, for new particle formation (NPF) events suggested that photooxidation of SO2 was likely one of the major mechanisms for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, it was revealed that the

  15. FAST MODES AND DUSTY HORSESHOES IN TRANSITIONAL DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, Tushar; Chiang, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    The brightest transitional protoplanetary disks are often azimuthally asymmetric: their millimeter-wave thermal emission peaks strongly on one side. Dust overdensities can exceed ∼100:1, while gas densities vary by factors less than a few. We propose that these remarkable ALMA observations—which may bear on how planetesimals form—reflect a gravitational global mode in the gas disk. The mode is (1) fast—its pattern speed equals the disk's mean Keplerian frequency; (2) of azimuthal wavenumber m = 1, displacing the host star from the barycenter; and (3) Toomre-stable. We solve for gas streamlines including the indirect stellar potential in the frame rotating with the pattern speed, under the drastic simplification that gas does not feel its own gravity. Near corotation, the gas disk takes the form of a horseshoe-shaped annulus. Dust particles with aerodynamic stopping times much shorter or much longer than the orbital period are dragged by gas toward the horseshoe center. For intermediate stopping times, dust converges toward a ∼45° wide arc on the corotation circle. Particles that do not reach their final accumulation points within disk lifetimes, either because of gas turbulence or long particle drift times, conform to horseshoe-shaped gas streamlines. Our mode is not self-consistent because we neglect gas self-gravity; still, we expect that trends between accumulation location and particle size, similar to those we have found, are generically predicted by fast modes and are potentially observable. Unlike vortices, global modes are not restricted in radial width to the pressure scale height; their large radial and azimuthal extents may better match observations.

  16. In situ studies on volatile jet exhaust particle emissions: Impact of fuel sulfur content and environmental conditions on nuclei mode aerosols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schröder, F.; Brock, C. A.; Baumann, R.; Petzold, A.; Busen, R.; Schulte, P.; Fiebig, M.

    2000-08-01

    In situ measurements of ultrafine aerosol particle emissions were performed at cruise altitudes behind the Deutsches Zentrum für Luft-und Raumfahrt ATTAS research jet (Rolls-Royce/Snecma M45H M501 engines) and a B737-300 aircraft (CFM International 56-3B1 engines). Measurements were made 0.15-20 s after emission as the source aircraft burned fuel with sulfur contents (FSC) of 2.6, 56, or 118mg kg-1. Particle size distributions of from 3- to 60-nm diameter were determined by using condensationnuclei-counters with varying lower size detection limits. Volatile particle concentrations in the aircraft plumes strongly increased as diameter decreased toward the sizes of large molecular clusters, illustrating that apparent particle emissions are extremely sensitive to the smallest particle size detectable by the instrument used. Environmental conditions and plume age alone could influence the number of detected ultrafine (volatile) aerosols within an order of magnitude, as well. The observed volatile particle emissions decreased nonlinearly as FSC decreased to 60mg kg-1, reaching minimum values of about 2×1017kg-1 and 2×1016kg-1 for particles >3nm and >5nm, respectively. Volatile particle emissions did not change significantly as FSCs were further reduced below 60mg kg-1. Volatile particle emissions did not differ significantly between the two studied engine types. In contrast, soot particle emissions from the modern CFM56-3B1 engines were 4-5 times less (4×1014kg-1) than from the older RR M45H M501 engines (1.8×1015kg-1). Contrail processing has been identified as an efficient sink/quenching parameter for ultrafine particles and reduces the remaining interstitial aerosol by factors of 2-10 depending on particle size. These and previously published data are consistent with volatile particle emissions of 2.4×1017kg-1 independent of environmental conditions, engine type and FSCs ranging between 2.6 and 2700mg kg-1. There are clear experimental indications that

  17. Physical characterization of aerosol particles during the Chinese New Year’s firework events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Min; Wang, Xuemei; Chen, Jianmin; Cheng, Tiantao; Wang, Tao; Yang, Xin; Gong, Youguo; Geng, Fuhai; Chen, Changhong

    2010-12-01

    Measurements for particles 10 nm to 10 μm were taken using a Wide-range Particle Spectrometer during the Chinese New Year (CNY) celebrations in 2009 in Shanghai, China. These celebrations provided an opportunity to study the number concentration and size distribution of particles in an especial atmospheric pollution situation due to firework displays. The firework activities had a clear contribution to the number concentration of small accumulation mode particles (100-500 nm) and PM 1 mass concentration, with a maximum total number concentration of 3.8 × 10 4 cm -3. A clear shift of particles from nucleation and Aitken mode to small accumulation mode was observed at the peak of the CNY firework event, which can be explained by reduced atmospheric lifetimes of smaller particles via the concept of the coagulation sink. High particle density (2.7 g cm -3) was identified as being particularly characteristic of the firework aerosols. Recalculated fine particles PM 1 exhibited on average above 150 μg m -3 for more than 12 hours, which was a health risk to susceptible individuals. Integral physical parameters of firework aerosols were calculated for understanding their physical properties and further model simulation.

  18. Short- and long-lived radionuclide particle size measurements in a uranium mine

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, Keng-Wu; Fisenne, I.M.; Hutter, A.R.

    1997-04-01

    The radon-222 progeny and long-lived radionuclide measurements were done in a wet underground uranium mine in Saskatchewan, Canada, on Nov. 8-12, 1995. Radon-222 in the mine varied from 2 kBq/m{sup 3} at 90 m below surface to 12 kBq/m{sup 3} in the mining areas, 240 m below surface. Radon-222 progeny activity and potential alpha energy concentration appear affected by the airborne particle number concentration and size distribution. Particle number was up to 200x10{sup 3}/cm{sup 3}. Only an accumulation mode (30-1000 nm) and some bimodal size distributions in this accumulation size range were significant. Diesel particles and combustion particles from burning propane caused a major modal diameter shift to a smaller size range (50-85 nm) compared with previous values (100-200 nm). The high particle number reduced the unattached progeny (0.5-2 nm) to >5%. The nuclei mode (2-30 nm) in this test was nonexistent, and the coarse mode (>1000 nm), except from the drilling areas and on the stopes, was mostly not measurable. Airborne particle total mass and long- lived radionuclide alpha activity concentrations were very low (80- 100 {mu}g/m{sup 3} and 4-5 mBq/m{sup 3}) owing to high ventilation rates. Mass-weighted size distributions were trimodal, with the major mode at the accumulation size region, which accounts for 45-50% of the mass. The coarse model contains the the least mass, about 20%. The size spectra from gross alpha activities were bimodal with major mode in the coarse region (>1000 nm) and a minor accumulation mode in the 50-900 nm size range. These size spectra were different from the {sup 222}Rn progeny that showed a single accumulation mode in the 50- 85 nm size region. The accumulation mode in the long-lived radionuclide size spectrum was not found in previous studies in other uranium mines.

  19. Sensitivity of aerosol properties to new particle formation mechanism and to primary emissions in a continental-scale chemical transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Chang,L.S.; Schwartz, S.E.; McGraw, R.; Lewis, E.R.

    2009-04-02

    Four theoretical formulations of new particle formation (NPF) and one empirical formulation are used to examine the sensitivity of observable aerosol properties to NPF formulation and to properties of emitted particles in a continental-scale model for the United States over a 1-month simulation (July 2004). For each formulation the dominant source of Aitken mode particles is NPF with only a minor contribution from primary emissions, whereas for the accumulation mode both emissions and transfer of particles from the Aitken mode are important. The dominant sink of Aitken mode number is coagulation, whereas the dominant sink of accumulation mode number is wet deposition (including cloud processing), with a minor contribution from coagulation. The aerosol mass concentration, which is primarily in the accumulation mode, is relatively insensitive to NPF formulation despite order-of-magnitude differences in the Aitken mode number concentration among the different parameterizations. The dominant sensitivity of accumulation mode number concentration is to the number of emitted particles (for constant mass emission rate). Comparison of modeled aerosol properties with aircraft measurements shows, as expected, better agreement in aerosol mass concentration than in aerosol number concentration for all NPF formulations considered. These comparisons yield instances of rather accurate simulations in the planetary boundary layer, with poor model performance in the free troposphere attributed mainly to lack of representation of biomass burning and/or to long-range transport of particles from outside the model domain. Agreement between model results and measurements is improved by using smaller grid cells (12 km versus 60 km).

  20. Comparison of the accuracy of aerosol refractive index measurements from single particle and ensemble techniques.

    PubMed

    Mason, Bernard J; King, Simon-John; Miles, Rachael E H; Manfred, Katherine M; Rickards, Andrew M J; Kim, Jin; Reid, Jonathan P; Orr-Ewing, Andrew J

    2012-08-23

    The ability of two techniques, aerosol cavity ring down spectroscopy (A-CRDS) and optical tweezers, to retrieve the refractive index of atmospherically relevant aerosol was compared through analysis of supersaturated sodium nitrate at a range of relative humidities. Accumulation mode particles in the diameter range 300-600 nm were probed using A-CRDS, with optical tweezer measurements performed on coarse mode particles several micrometers in diameter. A correction for doubly charged particles was applied in the A-CRDS measurements. Both techniques were found to retrieve refractive indices in good agreement with previously published results from Tang and Munkelwitz, with a precision of ±0.0012 for the optical tweezers and ±0.02 for the A-CRDS technique. The coarse mode optical tweezer measurements agreed most closely with refractive index predictions made using a mass-weighted linear mixing rule. The uncertainty in the refractive index retrieved by the A-CRDS technique prevented discrimination between predictions using both mass-weighted and volume-weighted linear mixing rules. No efflorescence or kinetic limitations on water transport between the particle and the gas phase were observed at relative humidities down to 14%. The magnitude of the uncertainty in refractive index retrieved using the A-CRDS technique reflects the challenges in determining particle optical properties in the accumulation mode, where the extinction efficiency varies steeply with particle size.

  1. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, A M A; Tamaki, K; Moriizumi, J; Yamazawa, H; Iida, T

    2011-07-01

    This study was performed to measure the activity size distribution of aerosol particles associated with short-lived radon decay products in indoor air at Nagoya University, Nagoya, Japan. The measurements were performed using a low pressure Andersen cascade impactor under variable meteorological conditions. The results showed that the greatest activity fraction was associated with aerosol particles in the accumulation size range (100-1000 nm) with a small fraction of nucleation mode (10-100 nm). Regarding the influence of the weather conditions, the decrease in the number of accumulation particles was observed clearly after rainfall without significant change in nucleation particles, which may be due to a washout process for the large particles.

  2. Chemical Composition of Laboratory Generated Seafoam Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyree, C. A.; Alexandrova, O. A.; Allen, J. O.

    2005-12-01

    Remote marine aerosols include a significant number of sea-salt particles that may be effective cloud condensation nuclei. For example, O`Dowd and Smith (1993) found that remote marine aerosols in the particle size range 0.1-3.0 μm were dominated by sea-salt particles in the case of moderate-to-high wind speeds. Measurements of the flux of sub-micron sea-salt particles for the same wind speed vary by orders of magnitude, which indicate that other parameters, for example, may have a role in their production (Reid et al., 2001). Previous laboratory experiments using artificial seawater have shown that organic content (Garrett, 1968) and salinity (Mortensson et al., 2003) affect sea-salt particle production. We present laboratory measurements of sea-salt particles generated from seawater foams and compare them to measurements of remote marine particles. Foam droplets were generated by bubbling air through a fine pore diffuser into aqueous media in a precleaned glass column. The effect of salinity was studied by varying the salinity of artificial seawater over the range 0-3.5%. The effect of organic content was also studied by diluting filtered seawater with artificial seawater. Size distributions of dried seafoam droplets were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer. Seafoam particles were also size segregated and collected using a Micro-Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor. Collected material was analyzed for sodium, chloride, sulfate, and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Sub-micron particle size distributions were unimodal with a mean diameter of ~100 nm in agreement with recent seafoam laboratory experiments (Martensson et al., 2003). This mode is comparable to the "accumulation" mode particles typical of the remote marine environment and known to contain significant amounts of sea-salt (Bates et al., 1998). The size and number of seafoam particles were dependent on salinity; mean droplet size and total number concentration increased with salinity

  3. Diagnosing in-flight ρR implosion asymmetry at low and intermediate mode numbers with charged particles at the NIF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zylstra, A.; Seguin, F.; Li, C. K.; Frenje, J.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M.; Rinderknecht, H.; Manuel, M.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R.; Amendt, P.; Bionta, R.; Bradley, D.; Callahan, D.; Friedrich, S.; Glenn, S.; Heeter, R.; Hicks, D.; Izumi, N.; Landen, O.; London, R.; MacKinnon, A.; Meezan, N.; Weber, S.

    2013-10-01

    J. DELETTREZ, V. GLEBOV, P. RADHA, T. SANGSTER, LLE, R. OLSON, SNL, J. KLINE, G. KYRALA, R. LEEPER, D. WILSON, LANL, J. KILKENNY, A. NIKROO, GA - The Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers were developed for OMEGA and transferred to the NIF as National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostics. In tuning-campaign implosions containing D and 3He gas, the WRFs are used to measure the spectrum of protons from D-3He reactions. From the measured energy downshift of these protons, the total ρR is inferred through the plasma stopping power. Data from WRFs fielded simultaneously on the pole and equator indicate low-mode polar ρR asymmetries at shock burn. Significant swings in ρR P2/P0 are also observed in the ignition campaign data set, attributed to low-mode x-ray drive inhomogeneity. The data set also allows studies of intermediate mode symmetry. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DOE, LLNL and LLE.

  4. Characterization of ultrafine particle number concentration and new particle formation in urban environment of Taipei, Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Huang, W.-R.; Tsai, C.-Y.

    2013-04-01

    An intensive aerosol characterization experiment was performed at the Taipei Aerosol and Radiation Observatory (TARO, 25.02° N, 121.53° E) in the urban area of Taipei, Taiwan during July 2012. Number concentration and size distribution of aerosol particles were measured continuously, which were accompanied by concurrent measurements of mass concentration of submicron particles, PM (d ≤ 1 μm), and photolysis rate of ozone, J(O1D). The averaged number concentrations of total (Ntotal), accumulation mode (Nacu), Aitken mode (Ntotal), and nucleation mode (Nnuc) particles were 7.6 × 103 cm-3, 1.2 × 103 cm-3, 4.4 × 103 cm-3, and 1.9 × 103 cm-3, respectively. Accordingly, the ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100 nm) accounted for 83% of the total number concentration of particles measured in this study (10 ≤ d ≤ 429 nm), indicating the importance of UFPs to the air quality and radiation budget in Taipei and its surrounding areas. An averaged Nnuc/NOx ratio of ~60 cm-3 ppbv-1 was derived from nighttime measurements, which was suggested to be the characteristic of vehicle emissions that contributed to the "urban background" of nucleation mode particles throughout a day. On the contrary, it was found that the number concentration of nucleation mode particles was independent of NOx and could be elevated up to 10 times the "urban background" levels during daytime, suggesting a substantial amount of nucleation mode particles produced from photochemical processes. Consistency in the time series of the nucleation mode particle concentration and the proxy of H2SO4 production, UVB·SO2, for new particle formation (NPF) events showed that photo-oxidation of SO2 was responsible for the formation of new particles in our study area. Moreover, analysis upon the diameter growth rate, GR, and formation rate of nucleation mode particles, J10-25, found that the values of GR (8.5 ± 6.8 nm h-1) in Taipei were comparable to other urban areas, whereas the values of J10-25 (2.2 ± 1

  5. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jiawei; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Qi; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Huang, Wenhua

    2015-03-01

    A dual-cavity TM02-TM01 mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM01 mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM01 mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM01 mode feedback.

  6. [Ultrafine particle number concentration and size distribution measurements in a street canyon].

    PubMed

    Li, Xin-Ling; Huang, Zhen; Wang, Jia-Song; Tu, Xiao-Dong; Ye, Chun

    2007-04-01

    A field experiment was conducted to measure concentrations and size distributions of particle (10 nm < D(p) < 487 nm) at four heights in an asymmetric street canyon on Beijing East Road in Shanghai, China. It shows that particle number size distributions are bimodal or trimodal lognormal in form. At a certain height in the range from 1.5 to 20 m, particle number concentrations and size distributions significantly vary with the height. Particle number concentrations in nuclei mode drop significantly and the mode diameters shift to the larger diameter. The variations of particle number concentration and size distribution in accumulation mode are less significant than that in nuclei mode. Particle number concentrations and size distributions slightly change with increasing the height in the range from 20 to 38 m. Concentrations of CO and PM(2.5) were also measured. Power laws are found to be well fitted for the concentration decay of total particle number, total particle volume, CO and PM(2.5). Due to the effect of the wind speed and direction, the total particle volume, PM(2.5) and CO concentrations are lower for Test I (high wind speed and step-up street canyon) than for test II (low wind speed and wind channeling along the canyon), at the meantime, the decay rates of the total particle number, the total particle volume, CO and PM(2.5) concentrations for test I are lower than for test II . No matter how the wind direction changes, the decay rates of the total particle number concentrations are larger than those of CO and PM(2.5), which clearly shows that coagulation and deposition besides dilution processes affect the total particle number concentration.

  7. Excursions through KK modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this article we study Kaluza-Klein (KK) dimensional reduction of massive Abelian gauge theories with charged matter fields on a circle. Since local gauge transformations change position dependence of the charged fields, the decomposition of the charged matter fields into KK modes is gauge dependent. While whole KK mass spectrum is independent of the gauge choice, the mode number depends on the gauge. The masses of the KK modes also depend on the field value of the zero-mode of the extra dimensional component of the gauge field. In particular, one of the KK modes in the KK tower of each massless 5D charged field becomes massless at particular values of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field. When the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field is identified with the inflaton, this structure leads to recursive cosmological particle productions.

  8. Impact of the Pedestal on Global Performance and Confinement Scalings in I-mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walk, John; Hughes, Jerry; Hubbard, Amanda; Whyte, Dennis; White, Anne; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2015-11-01

    The I-mode is a novel high-confinement regime pioneered on Alcator C-Mod, notable for its strong temperature pedestal without the accompanying density pedestal found in conventional H-modes. This separation in transport channels gives the desired improved energy confinement while maintaining low particle confinement, avoiding excessive impurity accumulation. Moreover, I-mode operation is naturally free of deleterious Edge-Localized Modes (ELMs). Recent experiments on Alcator C-Mod have characterized the pedestal structure in I-mode. The impact of the pedestal response (particularly to fueling and heating power) and core profile stiffness on global performance and confinement have demonstrated confinement metrics competitive with H-mode operation on Alcator C-Mod, and consistent with concepts for I-mode access & operation on ITER. Following the practice of the ITER89 and ITER98 scaling laws for L- and H-mode energy confinement, an initial, illustrative attempt at an I-mode confinement scaling has also been developed. The initial characterization from C-Mod data is consistent with the observed pedestal properties in I-mode, particularly the weak degradation of energy confinement with heating power, and comparatively strong positive response to fueling and increased magnetic field. Supported by U.S. Department of Energy award DE-FC02-99ER54512, using Alcator C-Mod, a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

  9. Acute pulmonary effects of ultrafine particles in rats and mice.

    PubMed

    Oberdörster, G; Finkelstein, J N; Johnston, C; Gelein, R; Cox, C; Baggs, R; Elder, A C

    2000-08-01

    Ambient fine particles consist of ultrafine particles (< 100 nm) and accumulation-mode particles (approximately 100 to 1,000 nm). Our hypothesis that ultrafine particles can have adverse effects in humans is based on results of our earlier studies with particles of both sizes and on the finding that urban ultrafine particles can reach mass concentrations of 40 to 50 micrograms/m3, equivalent to number concentrations of 3 to 4 x 10(5) particles/cm3. The objectives of the exploratory studies reported here were to (1) evaluate pulmonary effects induced in rats and mice by ultrafine particles of known high toxicity (although not occurring in the ambient atmosphere) in order to obtain information on principles of ultrafine particle toxicology; (2) characterize the generation and coagulation behavior of ultrafine particles that are relevant for urban air; (3) study the influence of animals' age and disease status; and (4) evaluate copollutants as modifying factors. We used ultrafine Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene [PTFE]*) fumes (count median diameter [CMD] approximately 18 nm) generated by heating Teflon in a tube furnace to 486 degrees C to evaluate principles of ultrafine particle toxicity that might be helpful in understanding potential effects of ambient ultrafine particles. Teflon fumes at ultrafine particle concentrations of approximately 50 micrograms/m3 are extremely toxic to rats when inhaled for only 15 minutes. We found that neither the ultrafine Teflon particles alone when generated in argon nor the Teflon fume gas-phase constituents when generated in air were toxic after 25 minutes of exposure. Only the combination of both phases when generated in air caused high toxicity, suggesting the existence of either radicals on the particle surface or a carrier mechanism of the ultrafine particles for adsorbed gas-phase compounds. We also found rapid translocation of the ultrafine Teflon particles across the epithelium after their deposition, which appears to be an

  10. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  11. Aerosol number size distributions over a coastal semi urban location: Seasonal changes and ultrafine particle bursts.

    PubMed

    Babu, S Suresh; Kompalli, Sobhan Kumar; Moorthy, K Krishna

    2016-09-01

    Number-size distribution is one of the important microphysical properties of atmospheric aerosols that influence aerosol life cycle, aerosol-radiation interaction as well as aerosol-cloud interactions. Making use of one-yearlong measurements of aerosol particle number-size distributions (PNSD) over a broad size spectrum (~15-15,000nm) from a tropical coastal semi-urban location-Trivandrum (Thiruvananthapuram), the size characteristics, their seasonality and response to mesoscale and synoptic scale meteorology are examined. While the accumulation mode contributed mostly to the annual mean concentration, ultrafine particles (having diameter <100nm) contributed as much as 45% to the total concentration, and thus constitute a strong reservoir, that would add to the larger particles through size transformation. The size distributions were, in general, bimodal with well-defined modes in the accumulation and coarse regimes, with mode diameters lying in the range 141 to 167nm and 1150 to 1760nm respectively, in different seasons. Despite the contribution of the coarse sized particles to the total number concentration being meager, they contributed significantly to the surface area and volume, especially during transport of marine air mass highlighting the role of synoptic air mass changes. Significant diurnal variation occurred in the number concentrations, geometric mean diameters, which is mostly attributed to the dynamics of the local coastal atmospheric boundary layer and the effect of mesoscale land/sea breeze circulation. Bursts of ultrafine particles (UFP) occurred quite frequently, apparently during periods of land-sea breeze transitions, caused by the strong mixing of precursor-rich urban air mass with the cleaner marine air mass; the resulting turbulence along with boundary layer dynamics aiding the nucleation. These ex-situ particles were observed at the surface due to the transport associated with boundary layer dynamics. The particle growth rates from

  12. Influence of breathing mode and activity level on the regional deposition of inhaled particles and implications for regulatory standards (March 1986)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, F.J.; Martonen, T.B.; Menache, M.G.; Graham, R.C.; Spektor, D.M.

    1986-03-01

    Particulate-size-selective sampling is an important consideration in determining ambient air-quality standards and threshold limit values for workplace exposures. Hazard evaluations, as well as risk analyses, can benefit from an improved understanding of factors affecting regional respiratory tract deposition of particles in man. Here, thoracic deposition and its component parts are examined, as a function of particulate size, for ventilation rates ranging from normal respiration to heavy exercise in individuals who are habitual mouth breathers and in those who normally employ oronasal breathing when minute ventilations exceed approximately 35 Lmin-1. Nonlinear regression techniques were used to fit logistic models of the form Y = (1+e alpha+beta log X)-1 to data from tests measuring extrathoracic (ET) and tracheobronchial (TB) deposition.

  13. Modeled deposition of fine particles in human airway in Beijing, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaoying; Yan, Caiqing; Patterson, Regan F.; Zhu, Yujiao; Yao, Xiaohong; Zhu, Yifang; Ma, Shexia; Qiu, Xinghua; Zhu, Tong; Zheng, Mei

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to simulate depositions of size-segregated particles in human airway in Beijing, China during seasons when fine particulate matter concentrations are high (December 2011 and April 2012). Particle size distributions (5.6-560 nm, electrical mobility diameter) near a major road in Beijing were measured by the TSI Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). The information of size distributions provided by FMPS was applied in the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry model (MPPD) to quantify number and mass depositions of particles in human airway including extrathoracic (ET), tracheobronchial (TB), and pulmonary (PUL) regions of exposed Chinese in Beijing. Our results show that under ambient conditions, particle number concentration (NC) deposition in PUL is the highest in the three major regions of human airway. The total particle NC deposition in human airway in winter is higher than that in spring, especially for ultrafine particles (1.8 times higher) while particle mass concentration (MC) deposition is higher in spring. Although particle MC in clean days are much lower than that in heavily polluted days, total particle NC deposition in human airway in clean days is comparable to that in heavily polluted days. NC deposition for nucleation mode particles (10-20 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in clean days is higher than that in heavily polluted days. MC deposition for accumulation mode particles (100-641 nm, aerodynamic diameter) in heavily polluted days is much higher than that in clean days, while that of nucleation mode is negligible. The temporal variation shows that the arithmetic mean and the median values of particle NC and MC depositions in the evening are both the highest, followed by morning and noon, and it is most likely due to increased contribution from traffic emissions.

  14. In-vehicle particle air pollution and its mitigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tartakovsky, L.; Baibikov, V.; Czerwinski, J.; Gutman, M.; Kasper, M.; Popescu, D.; Veinblat, M.; Zvirin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This work presents results of particle mass, number and size measurements inside passenger cars (PCs), vans and urban buses. Effects of the in-cabin air purifier on particle concentrations and average size inside a vehicle are studied. Use of the air purifier leads to a dramatic reduction, by 95-99%, in the measured ultrafine particles number concentration inside a vehicle compared with outside readings. Extremely low particle concentrations may be reached without a danger of vehicle occupants' exposure to elevated CO2 levels. The lowest values of particle concentrations inside a PC without air purifier are registered under the recirculation ventilation mode, but the issue of CO2 accumulation limits the use of this mode to very short driving events. Lower PM concentrations are found inside newer cars, if this ventilation mode is used. Great differences by a factor of 2.5-3 in PM10 concentrations are found between the PCs and the buses. Smoking inside a car leads to a dramatic increase, by approximately 90 times, in PM2.5 concentrations.

  15. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54%) and combustion aerosol (27%) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33%) and accumulation mode aerosol (37%) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49% during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45%) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing. PMID:26667647

  16. Source appointment of fine particle number and volume concentration during severe haze pollution in Beijing in January 2013.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zirui; Wang, Yuesi; Hu, Bo; Ji, Dongsheng; Zhang, Junke; Wu, Fangkun; Wan, Xin; Wang, Yonghong

    2016-04-01

    Extreme haze episodes repeatedly shrouded Beijing during the winter of 2012-2013, causing major environmental and health problems. To better understand these extreme events, particle number size distribution (PNSD) and particle chemical composition (PCC) data collected in an intensive winter campaign in an urban site of Beijing were used to investigate the sources of ambient fine particles. Positive matrix factorization (PMF) analysis resolved a total of eight factors: two traffic factors, combustion factors, secondary aerosol, two accumulation mode aerosol factors, road dust, and long-range transported (LRT) dust. Traffic emissions (54%) and combustion aerosol (27%) were found to be the most important sources for particle number concentration, whereas combustion aerosol (33%) and accumulation mode aerosol (37%) dominated particle volume concentrations. Chemical compositions and sources of fine particles changed dynamically in the haze episodes. An enhanced role of secondary inorganic species was observed in the formation of haze pollution. Regional transport played an important role for high particles, contribution of which was on average up to 24-49% during the haze episodes. Secondary aerosols from urban background presented the largest contributions (45%) for the rapid increase of fine particles in the severest haze episode. In addition, the invasion of LRT dust aerosols further elevated the fine particles during the extreme haze episode. Our results showed a clear impact of regional transport on the local air pollution, suggesting the importance of regional-scale emission control measures in the local air quality management of Beijing.

  17. The effect of local sources on particle size and chemical composition and their role in aerosol-cloud interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portin, H.; Leskinen, A.; Hao, L.; Kortelainen, A.; Miettinen, P.; Jaatinen, A.; Laaksonen, A.; Lehtinen, K. E. J.; Romakkaniemi, S.; Komppula, M.

    2013-12-01

    The effects of local pollutant sources and particle chemical composition on aerosol-cloud interactions were investigated by measuring cloud interstitial and total aerosol size distributions, particle chemical composition and hygroscopic growth factors and cloud droplet size distributions on an observation tower, with a special focus on comparing clean air masses with those affected by local sources. The polluted air masses contained more particles than the clean air masses in all size classes, excluding the accumulation mode. This was caused by cloud processing, which was also observed for the polluted air but to a lesser extent. Some, mostly minor, differences in the particle chemical composition between the air masses were observed. The average size and number concentration of activating particles were quite similar for both air masses, producing average droplet populations with only minor distinctions. As a case study, a long cloud event was analyzed in detail regarding emissions from local sources, including a paper mill and a heating plant. Clear differences in the total and accumulation mode particle concentrations, particle hygroscopicity and chemical composition during the cloud event were observed. Particularly, larger particles, higher hygroscopicities and elevated amounts of inorganic constituents, especially SO4, were linked with the pollutant plumes. In the air masses affected by traffic and domestic wood combustion, a bimodal particle hygroscopicity distribution was observed, indicating externally mixed aerosol. The variable conditions during the event had a clear impact on cloud droplet formation.

  18. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a.

  19. Sources and characteristics of fine particles over the Yellow Sea and Bohai Sea using online single particle aerosol mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Fu, Huaiyu; Zheng, Mei; Yan, Caiqing; Li, Xiaoying; Gao, Huiwang; Yao, Xiaohong; Guo, Zhigang; Zhang, Yuanhang

    2015-03-01

    Marine aerosols over the East China Seas are heavily polluted by continental sources. During the Chinese Comprehensive Ocean Experiment in November 2012, size and mass spectra of individual atmospheric particles in the size range from 0.2 to 2.0 μm were measured on board by a single particle aerosol mass spectrometer (SPAMS). The average hourly particle number (PN) was around 4560±3240 in the South Yellow Sea (SYS), 2900±3970 in the North Yellow Sea (NYS), and 1700±2220 in the Bohai Sea (BS). PN in NYS and BS varied greatly over 3 orders of magnitude, while that in SYS varied slightly. The size distributions were fitted with two log-normal modes. Accumulation mode dominated in NYS and BS, especially during episodic periods. Coarse mode particles played an important role in SYS. Particles were classified using an adaptive resonance theory based neural network algorithm (ART-2a). Six particle types were identified with secondary-containing, aged sea-salt, soot-like, biomass burning, fresh sea-salt, and lead-containing particles accounting for 32%, 21%, 18%, 16%, 4%, and 3% of total PN, respectively. Aerosols in BS were relatively enriched in particles from anthropogenic sources compared to SYS, probably due to emissions from more developed upwind regions and indicating stronger influence of continental outflow on marine environment. Variation of source types depended mainly on origins of transported air masses. This study examined rapid changes in PN, size distribution and source types of fine particles in marine atmospheres. It also demonstrated the effectiveness of high-time-resolution source apportionment by ART-2a. PMID:25766014

  20. Chemical characteristics and source of size-fractionated atmospheric particle in haze episode in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Jihua; Duan, Jingchun; Zhen, Naijia; He, Kebin; Hao, Jiming

    2016-01-01

    The abundance, behavior, and source of chemical species in size-fractionated atmospheric particle were studied with a 13-stage low pressure impactor (ELPI) during high polluted winter episode in Beijing. Thirty three elements (Al, Ca, Fe, K, Mg, Na, Si, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Sr, Zr, Mo, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb, Cs, Ba, Hg, Tl, and Pb) and eight water soluble ions (Cl-, NO3-, SO42 -, NH4+, Na+, K+, Ca2 +, and Mg2 +) were determined by ICP/MS and IC, respectively. The size distribution of TC (OC + EC) was reconstructed. Averagely, 51.5 ± 5.3% and 74.1 ± 3.7% of the total aerosol mass was distributed in the sub-micron (PM1) and fine particle (PM2.5), respectively. A significant shift to larger fractions during heavy pollution episode was observed for aerosol mass, NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, K, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, and Pb. The mass size distributions of NH4+, SO42 -, NO3-, and K were dominated by accumulation mode. Size distributions of elements were classified into four main types: (I) elements were enriched within the accumulation mode (< 1 μm, Ge, Se, Ag, Sn, Sb, Cs, Hg, Ti, and Pb); (II) those mass (K, Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Mo, and Cd) was resided mainly within the accumulation mode, ranged from 1 to 2 μm; (III) Na, V, Co, Ni, and Ga were distributed among fine, intermediate, and coarse modes; and (IV) those which were mainly found within particles larger than 2.7 μm (Al, Mg, Si, Ca, Sc, Tl, Fe, Sr, Zr, and Ba). [H+]cor showed an accumulation mode at 600-700 nm and the role of Ca2 + should be fully considered in the estimation of acidity. The acidity in accumulation mode particles suggested that generally gaseous NH3 was not enough to neutralize sulfate completely. PMF method was applied for source apportionment of elements combined with water soluble ions. Dust, vehicle, aged coal combustion, and sea salt were identified, and the size resolved source apportionments were discussed. Aged coal combustion was the important source of fine particles and

  1. Hygroscopicity of aerosol particles and CCN activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in the urban atmosphere over Japan during summer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Shuhei; Setoguchi, Yoshitaka; Kawana, Kaori; Nakayama, Tomoki; Ikeda, Yuka; Sawada, Yuuki; Matsumi, Yutaka; Mochida, Michihiro

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the hygroscopicity of 150 nm particles and the number-size distributions and the cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) activity of nearly hydrophobic particles in aerosols over Nagoya, Japan, during summer. We analyzed the correlations between the number concentrations of particles in specific hygroscopic growth factor (g) ranges and the mass concentrations of chemical components. This analysis suggests the association of nearly hydrophobic particles with hydrocarbon-like organic aerosol, elemental carbon and semivolatile oxygenated organic aerosol (SV-OOA), that of less hygroscopic particles with SV-OOA and nitrate and that of more hygroscopic particles with low-volatile oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) and sulfate. The hygroscopicity parameter (κ) of organics was derived based on the g distributions and chemical composition of 150 nm particles. The κ of the organics correlated positively with the fraction of the total organic mass spectral signal at m/z 44 and the volume fraction of the LV-OOA to the organics, indicating that organics with highly oxygenated structures including carboxylic acid groups contribute to the water uptake. The number-size distributions of the nearly hydrophobic particles with g around 1.0 and 1.1 correlated with the mass concentrations of chemical components. The results show that the chemical composition of the particles with g around 1.0 was different between the Aitken mode and the accumulation mode size ranges. An analysis for a parameter Fmax of the curves fitted to the CCN efficiency spectra of the particles with g around 1.0 suggests that the coating by organics associated with SV-OOA elevated the CCN activity of these particles.

  2. Variations of fine particle physiochemical properties during a heavy haze episode in the winter of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Guo, Song; Pian, Wei; Cheng, Wenjing; Hu, Min

    2016-11-15

    Chemical composition, morphology, size and mixture of fine particles were measured in a heavy haze and the post-haze air in Beijing in January 2012. With the occurrence of haze, the concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium grew gradually. The hourly averaged PM2.5 concentration increased from 118μgm(-3) to 402μgm(-3) within 12h. In contrast, it was less than 10μgm(-3) in the post-haze air. Occupying approximately 46% in mass, organics were the major component of PM1 in both the haze and post-haze air. Analysis of individual particles in the size range of 0.2-1.1μm revealed that secondary-like particles and soot particles were always the majority, and most soot particles had a core-shell structure. The number ratio of secondary-like particles to soot particles in accumulation mode in the haze air was about 2:1, and that in the post-haze air was 8:1. These results indicate both secondary particle formation and primary emission contributed substantially to the haze. The mode size of the haze particles was about 0.7μm, and the mode size of the post-haze particles was 0.4μm, indicating the remarkable growth of particles in haze. However, the ratios of the core size to shell size of core-shell structure soot particles in the haze were similar to those in the post-haze air, suggesting a quick aging of soot particles in either the haze air or the post-haze air. PMID:27470669

  3. Variations of fine particle physiochemical properties during a heavy haze episode in the winter of Beijing.

    PubMed

    Niu, Hongya; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Daizhou; Wu, Zhijun; Guo, Song; Pian, Wei; Cheng, Wenjing; Hu, Min

    2016-11-15

    Chemical composition, morphology, size and mixture of fine particles were measured in a heavy haze and the post-haze air in Beijing in January 2012. With the occurrence of haze, the concentrations of gaseous and particulate pollutants including organics, sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium grew gradually. The hourly averaged PM2.5 concentration increased from 118μgm(-3) to 402μgm(-3) within 12h. In contrast, it was less than 10μgm(-3) in the post-haze air. Occupying approximately 46% in mass, organics were the major component of PM1 in both the haze and post-haze air. Analysis of individual particles in the size range of 0.2-1.1μm revealed that secondary-like particles and soot particles were always the majority, and most soot particles had a core-shell structure. The number ratio of secondary-like particles to soot particles in accumulation mode in the haze air was about 2:1, and that in the post-haze air was 8:1. These results indicate both secondary particle formation and primary emission contributed substantially to the haze. The mode size of the haze particles was about 0.7μm, and the mode size of the post-haze particles was 0.4μm, indicating the remarkable growth of particles in haze. However, the ratios of the core size to shell size of core-shell structure soot particles in the haze were similar to those in the post-haze air, suggesting a quick aging of soot particles in either the haze air or the post-haze air.

  4. Simultaneous determination of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates from building materials used in Central Italy with accumulation chambers and a continuous solid state alpha detector: influence of particle size, humidity and precursors concentration.

    PubMed

    Tuccimei, P; Moroni, M; Norcia, D

    2006-02-01

    A method to determine simultaneously the rates of 222Rn and 220Rn released from building materials quarried in Central Italy is presented. The method makes use of a continuous monitor equipped with a solid state alpha detector, in-line connected to a small accumulation chamber. The effects of chamber leakage and back diffusion on 222Rn free exhalation rate is evaluated. The influence of available exhalation surface, humidity content and precursors concentration on radon and thoron exhalation rates is investigated.

  5. Particle number size distribution in the eastern Mediterranean: Formation and growth rates of ultrafine airborne atmospheric particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopanakis, I.; Chatoutsidou, S. E.; Torseth, K.; Glytsos, T.; Lazaridis, M.

    2013-10-01

    Particle number concentration was measured between June 2009 and June 2010 at Akrotiri research station in a rural/suburban region of western Crete (Greece). Overall, the available data covered 157 days during the aforementioned period of measurements. The objectives were to study the number size distribution characteristics of ambient aerosols and furthermore to identify new particle formation events and to evaluate particle formation rates and growth rates of the newborn particles. Aerosol particles with mobility diameters between 10 and 1100 nm were measured using a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) system. Measurements were performed at ambient relative humidities. The median total particle number concentration was 525 #/cm3 whereas the number concentration ranged between 130 #/cm3 and 9597 #/cm3. The average percentage of particles with diameters between 10 nm and 100 nm (N10-100) to total particles was 53% during summer and spring, but reached 80% during winter. Maximum average contribution of nano-particles (10 nm < Dp < 50 nm) to total particles was recorded also in winter and was attributed partly to the effect of local heating. Furthermore, back trajectories (HYSPLIT model) showed that different air mass origins are linked to different levels of particle number concentrations, with higher values associated with air masses passing from polluted areas before reaching the Akrotiri station. Modal analysis of the measured size distribution data revealed a strong nucleation mode during winter (15-25 nm), which can be correlated with emissions from local sources (domestic heating). The nucleation mode was observed also during the spring campaigns and was partly linked to new particle formation events. On the contrary, an accumulation mode (80-120 nm) prevailed in the measurements during summer campaigns, when the station area was influenced by polluted air masses arriving mainly from Eastern Europe. In total, 13 new particle formation events were recorded

  6. Comparison of particle mass and solid particle number (SPN) emissions from a heavy-duty diesel vehicle under on-road driving conditions and a standard testing cycle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhongqing; Durbin, Thomas D; Xue, Jian; Johnson, Kent C; Li, Yang; Hu, Shaohua; Huai, Tao; Ayala, Alberto; Kittelson, David B; Jung, Heejung S

    2014-01-01

    It is important to understand the differences between emissions from standard laboratory testing cycles and those from actual on-road driving conditions, especially for solid particle number (SPN) emissions now being regulated in Europe. This study compared particle mass and SPN emissions from a heavy-duty diesel vehicle operating over the urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS) and actual on-road driving conditions. Particle mass emissions were calculated using the integrated particle size distribution (IPSD) method and called MIPSD. The MIPSD emissions for the UDDS and on-road tests were more than 6 times lower than the U.S. 2007 heavy-duty particulate matter (PM) mass standard. The MIPSD emissions for the UDDS fell between those for the on-road uphill and downhill driving. SPN and MIPSD measurements were dominated by nucleation particles for the UDDS and uphill driving and by accumulation mode particles for cruise and downhill driving. The SPN emissions were ∼ 3 times lower than the Euro 6 heavy-duty SPN limit for the UDDS and downhill driving and ∼ 4-5 times higher than the Euro 6 SPN limit for the more aggressive uphill driving; however, it is likely that most of the "solid" particles measured under these conditions were associated with a combination release of stored sulfates and enhanced sulfate formation associated with high exhaust temperatures, leading to growth of volatile particles into the solid particle counting range above 23 nm. Except for these conditions, a linear relationship was found between SPN and accumulation mode MIPSD. The coefficient of variation (COV) of SPN emissions of particles >23 nm ranged from 8 to 26% for the UDDS and on-road tests.

  7. [Experimental study on ultrafine particle characteristics exhausted from various fuelled vehicles].

    PubMed

    Wang, Jia-song; Chan, T L; Ning, Zhi; Cheung, C S; Huang, Zhen

    2006-12-01

    The fine particle size distribution characteristics obtained from a diesel taxi, a diesel light bus, a gasoline private car and a liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) fuelled taxi were carried out on a chassis dynamometer system. The measurements were performed at different driving modes, i.e. , with low and high idling and from 10 kmxh(-1) to 70 kmxh(-1), 4 cruise operations using the instrument SMPS for collecting particles of 0.015-0.7microm diameter in range. It was found that different fuelled vehicles and different driving modes characterize considerable differences in size number and mass concentration distributions. Diesel vehicles contribute much more nuclei and accumulation mode particles of 30 - 150 nm, while LPG and gasoline fuelled vehicles exhaust much more nuclei mode particles of 15-30 nm. Overall, diesel-fuelled vehicles exhaust much more particles number and mass than gasoline and LPG fuelled vehicles; In the present study, diesel vehicles exhaust the ranges of total SMPS particle number, mass concentration with (0.3-3.6) x 10(8) number x cm(-3), 0.03 - 0.6 microg cm(- 3) respectively, and gasoline and LPG fuelled vehicles exhaust 2.3 x 10(4) - 1.2 x 10(7) number x cm(-3), 8 x 10(-5)-0.1 microgxcm(-3); 8.2 x 10(3)8.8 x 10(6) number x cm(-3), 1.7 x 10(-5) -0.09 microg x cm(-3), respectively; For all types of vehicles, the particle number and mass concentrations are small at low-idle and low-speed-driving modes, and are large at high-idle and high-speed-driving modes. They generally increase with the vehicle speed increasing from 10 to 70 kmx h(-1).

  8. Dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a roadway tunnel.

    PubMed

    Mishra, V K; Aggarwal, M L; Berghmans, P; Frijns, E; Int Panis, L; Chacko, K M

    2015-12-01

    Size-segregated ultrafine particles from motor vehicles were investigated in the Craeybeckx tunnel (E19 motorway, Antwerp, Belgium) at two measurement sites, at 100 and 300 m inside the tunnel, respectively, during March 2008. It was observed that out of the three size modes, nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation, Aitken mode was the most dominant size fraction inside the tunnel. The diurnal variation in ultrafine particle (UFP) levels closely follows the vehicular traffic inside the tunnel, which was maximum during office rush hours, both in the morning and evening and minimum during night-time around 3 am. The tunnel data showed very high growth rates in comparison with free atmosphere. The average condensation sink during the growth period was 14.1-17.3 × 10(-2) s(-1). The average growth rate (GR) of geometric mean diameter was found to be 18.6 ± 2.45 nm h(-1). It was observed that increase in Aitken mode was related to the numbers of heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), as they emit mainly in the Aitken mode. The higher Aitken mode during traffic jams correlated well with HDV numbers. At the end of the tunnel, sudden dilution leading to fast coagulation was responsible for the sudden drop in the UFP number concentration.

  9. Dynamics of ultrafine particles inside a roadway tunnel.

    PubMed

    Mishra, V K; Aggarwal, M L; Berghmans, P; Frijns, E; Int Panis, L; Chacko, K M

    2015-12-01

    Size-segregated ultrafine particles from motor vehicles were investigated in the Craeybeckx tunnel (E19 motorway, Antwerp, Belgium) at two measurement sites, at 100 and 300 m inside the tunnel, respectively, during March 2008. It was observed that out of the three size modes, nucleation, Aitken, and accumulation, Aitken mode was the most dominant size fraction inside the tunnel. The diurnal variation in ultrafine particle (UFP) levels closely follows the vehicular traffic inside the tunnel, which was maximum during office rush hours, both in the morning and evening and minimum during night-time around 3 am. The tunnel data showed very high growth rates in comparison with free atmosphere. The average condensation sink during the growth period was 14.1-17.3 × 10(-2) s(-1). The average growth rate (GR) of geometric mean diameter was found to be 18.6 ± 2.45 nm h(-1). It was observed that increase in Aitken mode was related to the numbers of heavy-duty vehicles (HDV), as they emit mainly in the Aitken mode. The higher Aitken mode during traffic jams correlated well with HDV numbers. At the end of the tunnel, sudden dilution leading to fast coagulation was responsible for the sudden drop in the UFP number concentration. PMID:26577216

  10. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Shiraishi, Maresuke E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio r{sub v} and the spectral index n{sub v} of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ΛCDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in χ{sup 2} between the vector and tensor models is Δχ{sup 2} = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create O(10{sup -22})-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  11. Particle and gaseous emissions from commercial aircraft at each stage of the landing and takeoff cycle.

    PubMed

    Mazaheri, M; Johnson, G R; Morawska, L

    2009-01-15

    A novel technique was used to measure emission factors for commonly used commercial aircraft including a range of Boeing and Airbus airframes under real world conditions. Engine exhaust emission factors for particles in terms of particle number and mass (PM2.5), along with those for CO2 and NOx, were measured for over 280 individual aircraft during the various modes of landing/takeoff (LTO) cycle. Results from this study show that particle number, and NOx emission factors are dependent on aircraft engine thrust level. Minimum and maximum emissions factors for particle number, PM2.5, and NOx emissions were found to be in the range of 4.16 x 10(15)-5.42 x 10(16) kg(-1), 0.03-0.72 g.kg(-1), and 3.25-37.94 g.kg(-1), respectively, for all measured airframes and LTO cycle modes. Number size distributions of emitted particles for the naturally diluted aircraft plumes in each mode of LTO cycle showed that particles were predominantly in the range of 4-100 nm in diameter in all cases. In general, size distributions exhibit similar modality during all phases of the LTO cycle. A very distinct nucleation mode was observed in all particle size distributions, except for taxiing and landing of A320 aircraft. Accumulation modes were also observed in all particle size distributions. Analysis of aircraft engine emissions during LTO cycle showed that aircraft thrust level is considerably higher during taxiing than idling suggesting that International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO) standards need to be modified as the thrust levels for taxi and idle are considered to be the same (7% of total thrust) (Environmental Protection, Annex 16, Vol. II, Aircraft Engine Emissions, 2nd ed.; ICAO--International Civil Aviation Organization: Montreal, 1993).

  12. Infernal Fishbone Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2003-02-11

    A new kind of fishbone instability associated with circulating energetic ions is predicted. The considered instability is essentially the energetic particle mode; it is characterized by m/n not equal to 1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). The mode is localized inside the flux surface where the safety factor (q) is q* = m/n, its amplitude being maximum near q*. The instability arises in plasmas with small shear inside the q* surface and q(0) > 1. A possibility to explain recent experimental observations of the m = 2 fishbone oscillations accompanied by strong changes of the neutron emission during tangential neutral-beam injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] is shown.

  13. Number-size distribution of aerosol particles and new particle formation events in tropical and subtropical Pacific Oceans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, S.; Miura, K.; Kawata, R.; Furutani, H.; Uematsu, M.; Omori, Y.; Tanimoto, H.

    2016-10-01

    Number-size distributions of aerosol particles with diameters of 10-500 nm in the marine boundary layer were observed continually onboard the R/V Hakuho Maru over the equatorial and subtropical North Pacific and South Pacific during December 2011-March 2012. Number-size distributions over each area were parameterized using a sum of up to three lognormal functions. Bi-modal size distributions with peak diameters at 30-80 nm (Aitken mode) and 100-200 nm (accumulation mode) were observed frequently. Larger peak diameters of Aitken and accumulation modes were observed over the eastern equator, where 5-day backward trajectories showed that the air masses had derived from high-chlorophyll oceanic regions without precipitation. Smaller peak diameters and low concentrations were often observed over the North Pacific. The trajectories show that such air mass originated from oceanic regions with less chlorophyll, exhibiting high precipitation frequency. New particle formation (NPF) events have often been observed over the mid-latitude eastern South Pacific with a low condensation sink (CS) and some dimethyl sulfide, although none was observed over the equator, where CS was higher. The lesser CS condition at NPF events was mostly correlated with local precipitation or precipitation along the trajectories within 1 day. These results suggest that differences of the number-size distribution and occasions of NPF events among sea areas most closely accord with precipitation along the trajectories.

  14. Effect of open channel filter on particle emissions of modern diesel engine.

    PubMed

    Heikkilä, Juha; Rönkkö, Topi; Lähde, Tero; Lemmetty, Mikko; Arffman, Anssi; Virtanen, Annele; Keskinen, Jorma; Pirjola, Liisa; Rothe, Dieter

    2009-10-01

    Particle emissions of modern diesel engines are of a particular interest because of their negative health effects. The special interest is in nanosized solid particles. The effect of an open channel filter on particle emissions of a modern heavy-duty diesel engine (MAN D2066 LF31, model year 2006) was studied. Here, the authors show that the open channel filter made from metal screen efficiently reduced the number of the smallest particles and, notably, the number and mass concentration of soot particles. The filter used in this study reached 78% particle mass reduction over the European Steady Cycle. Considering the size-segregated number concentration reduction, the collection efficiency was over 95% for particles smaller than 10 nm. The diffusion is the dominant collection mechanism in small particle sizes, thus the collection efficiency decreased as particle size increased, attaining 50% at 100 nm. The overall particle number reduction was 66-99%, and for accumulation-mode particles the number concentration reduction was 62-69%, both depending on the engine load.

  15. Plasma Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  16. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  17. Evaluation of the particle measurement programme (PMP) protocol to remove the vehicles' exhaust aerosol volatile phase.

    PubMed

    Giechaskiel, B; Chirico, R; Decarlo, P F; Clairotte, M; Adam, T; Martini, G; Heringa, M F; Richter, R; Prevot, A S H; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C

    2010-10-01

    European regulation for Euro 5/6 light duty emissions introduced the measurement of non-volatile particles with diameter >23 nm. The volatile phase is removed by using a heated dilution stage (150 degrees C) and a heated tube (at 300-400 degrees C). We investigated experimentally the removal efficiency for volatile species of the specific protocol by conducting measurements with two Euro 3 diesel light duty vehicles, a Euro 2 moped, and a Euro III heavy duty vehicle with the system's heaters on and off. The particle number distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was used to identify the non-refractory chemical composition of the particles. A Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was used to measure the black carbon concentration. The results showed that the condensed material in the accumulation mode (defined here as particles in the diameter range of approximately 50-500 nm) was removed with an efficiency of 50-90%. The (volatile) nucleation mode was also completely evaporated or was decreased to sizes <23 nm; thus these particles wouldn't be counted from the particle counter, indicating the robustness of the protocol.

  18. Evaluation of the particle measurement programme (PMP) protocol to remove the vehicles' exhaust aerosol volatile phase.

    PubMed

    Giechaskiel, B; Chirico, R; Decarlo, P F; Clairotte, M; Adam, T; Martini, G; Heringa, M F; Richter, R; Prevot, A S H; Baltensperger, U; Astorga, C

    2010-10-01

    European regulation for Euro 5/6 light duty emissions introduced the measurement of non-volatile particles with diameter >23 nm. The volatile phase is removed by using a heated dilution stage (150 degrees C) and a heated tube (at 300-400 degrees C). We investigated experimentally the removal efficiency for volatile species of the specific protocol by conducting measurements with two Euro 3 diesel light duty vehicles, a Euro 2 moped, and a Euro III heavy duty vehicle with the system's heaters on and off. The particle number distributions were measured with a Scanning Mobility Particle Sizer (SMPS) and a Fast Mobility Particle Sizer (FMPS). An Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (AMS) was used to identify the non-refractory chemical composition of the particles. A Multi-Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) was used to measure the black carbon concentration. The results showed that the condensed material in the accumulation mode (defined here as particles in the diameter range of approximately 50-500 nm) was removed with an efficiency of 50-90%. The (volatile) nucleation mode was also completely evaporated or was decreased to sizes <23 nm; thus these particles wouldn't be counted from the particle counter, indicating the robustness of the protocol. PMID:20692024

  19. Particle back-transport and permeate flux behavior in crossflow membrane filters

    SciTech Connect

    Chellam, S.; Wiesner, M.R.

    1997-03-01

    Particle residence time distributions in a membrane channel are interpreted to elucidate mechanisms of particle transport and colloidal fouling in membrane filtration. A comparison of particle size distributions in the membrane feed suspensions and deposited cakes provides evidence for selective particle transport and accumulation on membranes. These data support a previously hypothesized minimum in particle back-transport from the membrane as a function of particle size. The back-transport of smaller particles is apparently due to Brownian diffusion, while larger macrocolloids are controlled by an orthokinetic mechanism such as shear-induced diffusion. In all cases, cake specific resistances measured in the dead-end mode were higher than those of the corresponding feed suspensions. Also, cake specific resistances measured under a crossflow were higher than those in the dead-end mode. Further, the specific resistance of particle deposits on membranes increased with shear rate and decreased as the initial permeation rate increased, suggesting that cake morphology is an important parameter in determining permeate flux. Thus, the effects of hydrodynamics on cake resistance needs to be established before a comprehensive model for crossflow filtration can be derived. 17 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  1. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  2. [Research on NEDC ultrafine particle emission characters of a port fuel injection gasoline car].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jin; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Lou, Di-Ming

    2012-12-01

    A Santana gasoline car with multi-port fuel injection (PFI) system was used as the research prototype and an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) was employed to investigate the exhaust ultrafine particle number and size distribution characters of the tested vehicle in new European driving cycle (NEDC). The tested results showed that the vehicle's nuclear particle number, accumulation particle number, as well as the total particle number emission increased when the car drove in accelerated passage, and the vehicle's particle number emission was high during the first 40 seconds after test started and when the speed was over 90 km x h(-1) in extra urban driving cycle (EUDC) in NEDC. The ultrafine particle distribution of the whole NEDC showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, with diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameter was 24 nm. The ultrafine particle distribution of the urban driving cycle named by the economic commission for Europe (ECE) e. g. ECE I, ECE II - IV, the extra urban driving cycle e. g. EUDC, and the idling, constant speed, acceleration, deceleration operation conditions of NEDC all showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, also with particle diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameters of different driving cycle and different driving mode were from 14 nm to 42 nm. Therefore, the ultrafine particle emissions of the tested PFI gasoline car were mainly consisted of nuclear mode particles with a diameter of less than 50 nm. PMID:23379140

  3. [Research on NEDC ultrafine particle emission characters of a port fuel injection gasoline car].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Li, Jin; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Lou, Di-Ming

    2012-12-01

    A Santana gasoline car with multi-port fuel injection (PFI) system was used as the research prototype and an engine exhaust particle sizer (EEPS) was employed to investigate the exhaust ultrafine particle number and size distribution characters of the tested vehicle in new European driving cycle (NEDC). The tested results showed that the vehicle's nuclear particle number, accumulation particle number, as well as the total particle number emission increased when the car drove in accelerated passage, and the vehicle's particle number emission was high during the first 40 seconds after test started and when the speed was over 90 km x h(-1) in extra urban driving cycle (EUDC) in NEDC. The ultrafine particle distribution of the whole NEDC showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, with diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameter was 24 nm. The ultrafine particle distribution of the urban driving cycle named by the economic commission for Europe (ECE) e. g. ECE I, ECE II - IV, the extra urban driving cycle e. g. EUDC, and the idling, constant speed, acceleration, deceleration operation conditions of NEDC all showed a single peak logarithmic distribution, also with particle diameters of the peak particle number emission ranging from 10 nm to 30 nm, and the geometric mean diameters of different driving cycle and different driving mode were from 14 nm to 42 nm. Therefore, the ultrafine particle emissions of the tested PFI gasoline car were mainly consisted of nuclear mode particles with a diameter of less than 50 nm.

  4. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-08-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in central Siberia (61° N, 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical compositions of aerosol particles were analyzed by x-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38 % of particulate matter (PM) in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water-soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8 % of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34 % in the accumulation mode vs. ~ 47 % in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4 % RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same relative humidity (RH), starting at ~ 70 %, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35 % RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50 % RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15 % RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4 % RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv,ws value related to the water-soluble (ws

  5. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  6. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  7. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  8. Particle-depletion dynamics in axisymmetric thermocapillary flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuhlmann, H. C.; Lemée, T.

    2015-03-01

    The removal of suspended particles from the interior of a thermocapillary liquid bridge via a finite-particle-size effect restricting the particle motion near the free surface is analyzed in the framework of a model flow. The particle depletion occurs on the same short time scale as does the particle accumulation in experiments. Furthermore, the time scale diverges in a similar manner for decreasing particle size. The dependence of the time scale for particle accumulation on the particle size is explained in terms of a diverging return time to the free surface for those finite-size particles which are subject to the particle-free surface-interaction.

  9. Seasonal variation of atmospheric particle number concentrations, new particle formation and atmospheric oxidation capacity at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quynh T.; Glasius, Marianne; Sørensen, Lise L.; Jensen, Bjarne; Skov, Henrik; Birmili, Wolfram; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Kristensson, Adam; Nøjgaard, Jacob K.; Massling, Andreas

    2016-09-01

    This work presents an analysis of the physical properties of sub-micrometer aerosol particles measured at the high Arctic site Villum Research Station, Station Nord (VRS), northeast Greenland, between July 2010 and February 2013. The study focuses on particle number concentrations, particle number size distributions and the occurrence of new particle formation (NPF) events and their seasonality in the high Arctic, where observations and characterization of such aerosol particle properties and corresponding events are rare and understanding of related processes is lacking.A clear accumulation mode was observed during the darker months from October until mid-May, which became considerably more pronounced during the prominent Arctic haze months from March to mid-May. In contrast, nucleation- and Aitken-mode particles were predominantly observed during the summer months. Analysis of wind direction and wind speed indicated possible contributions of marine sources from the easterly side of the station to the observed summertime particle number concentrations, while southwesterly to westerly winds dominated during the darker months. NPF events lasting from hours to days were mostly observed from June until August, with fewer events observed during the months with less sunlight, i.e., March, April, September and October. The results tend to indicate that ozone (O3) might be weakly anti-correlated with particle number concentrations of the nucleation-mode range (10-30 nm) in almost half of the NPF events, while no positive correlation was observed. Calculations of air mass back trajectories using the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model for the NPF event days suggested that the onset or interruption of events could possibly be explained by changes in air mass origin. A map of event occurrence probability was computed, indicating that southerly air masses from over the Greenland Sea were more likely linked to those events.

  10. Landscape Evolution and Carbon Accumulation: Uniformitarianism Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbloom, N. A.; Harden, J. W.; Neff, J. C.; Schimel, D. S.

    2003-12-01

    What is the role of hillslope transport in long-term carbon accumulation in soils? How do parent material, climate, and landform interact to produce the landscapes we observe today and to what extent can we use present day conditions to infer the dominant processes of the past? We use the CREEP [Rosenbloom, N.A. et al., 2001] process-response model to ask these questions, exploring the time-evolution of landscape form, soil distribution, and carbon accumulation in an undisturbed prairie site in western Iowa [Harden, J.W. et al., 2002]. The CREEP model simulates differential transport of soil particles, blanket deposition of atmospheric 10Be with eolian dust, and passive advection of soil carbon and 10Be, enabling the preferential enrichment and burial of rapidly moving soil constituents. By comparing landscape-wide average accumulations of 10Be to borehole observations at three hillslope positions, we conclude that the distribution of clay-adsorbed 10Be cannot be explained by co-transport with clay particles alone. Rather, 10Be appears to behave as a more complex tracer than originally assumed, requiring an explicit, independent parameterization of wet deposition and transport. By comparison, model carbon accumulation strongly reflects patterns of clay redistribution indicating that in situ carbon turnover is faster than redistribution. Observed vertical distributions of soil properties, including 10Be, could only be explained by assuming variations in deposition and erosion rates, specifically periods of accumulation, followed by periods of transport. This effect might not be apparent if only landform shape, geometry, and soil depth were considered and vertical distributions of soil properties were not explicitly simulated. The current landscape reflects a history of strong shifts in erosion and accumulation rates that cannot be simulated using a uniform parameterization of long-term landscape-evolution processes.

  11. The spectrum of vibration modes in soft opals.

    PubMed

    Cheng, W; Wang, J J; Jonas, U; Steffen, W; Fytas, G; Penciu, R S; Economou, E N

    2005-09-22

    Numerous vibrational modes of spherical submicrometer particles in fabricated soft opals are experimentally detected by Brillouin light scattering and theoretically identified by their spherical harmonics by means of single-phonon scattering-cross-section calculations. The particle size polydispersity is reflected in the line shape of the low-frequency modes, whereas lattice vibrations are probably responsible for the observed overdamped transverse mode.

  12. Nonmodal instability of a stratified plane-channel suspension flow with fine particles.

    PubMed

    Boronin, Sergei A; Osiptsov, Alexander N

    2016-03-01

    We consider the nonmodal instability and transient growth of small disturbances in a plane-channel suspension flow with a nonuniform concentration profile of fine noncolloidal particles accumulated in two localized layers, symmetric about the channel axis. A single-velocity model of an effective Newtonian fluid with a finite particle volume fraction is employed. It is established that fine particles distributed nonuniformly in the main flow significantly modify the growth rate of the first mode in a wide range of governing parameters. The most pronounced destabilizing effect is produced by the particles localized in the vicinity of the walls. A parametric study of the so-called optimal disturbances showed that they are streaks elongated in the flow direction, similar to the optimal disturbances in the flow devoid of particles. The transverse wave number of the optimal disturbances depends strongly on the location of the particle layers. Even when the particle mass concentration (averaged over the channel cross section) is small (of the order of a percent) and the particles are localized in the middle between the walls and the channel axis, the energy of the optimal disturbances is by several orders of magnitude larger than in dusty-gas and pure-fluid flows. When the particle layers are located in the vicinity of the walls or the channel axis, the nonmodal instability mechanism is less pronounced, as compared to the flow devoid of particles. PMID:27078447

  13. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J.-D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; Weigand, M.; Kilcoyne, A. L. D.; Andreae, M. O.

    2015-03-01

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water soluble fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ∼34% in the accumulation vs. ∼47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5-99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ∼70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ∼35% RH for submicron particles vs. ∼50% RH for supermicron particles. This ∼15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5-99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ∼0.15 for

  14. Chemical composition, microstructure, and hygroscopic properties of aerosol particles at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO), Siberia, during a summer campaign

    DOE PAGES

    Mikhailov, E. F.; Mironov, G. N.; Pöhlker, C.; Chi, X.; Krüger, M. L.; Shiraiwa, M.; Förster, J. -D.; Pöschl, U.; Vlasenko, S. S.; Ryshkevich, T. I.; et al

    2015-03-16

    In this study we describe the hygroscopic properties of accumulation- and coarse-mode aerosol particles sampled at the Zotino Tall Tower Observatory (ZOTTO) in Central Siberia (61° N; 89° E) from 16 to 21 June 2013. The hygroscopic growth measurements were supplemented with chemical analyses of the samples, including inorganic ions and organic/elemental carbon. In addition, the microstructure and chemical composition of aerosol particles were analyzed by X-ray micro-spectroscopy (STXM-NEXAFS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). A mass closure analysis indicates that organic carbon accounted for 61 and 38% of PM in the accumulation mode and coarse mode, respectively. The water solublemore » fraction of organic matter was estimated to be 52 and 8% of PM in these modes. Sulfate, predominantly in the form of ammoniated sulfate, was the dominant inorganic component in both size modes: ~ 34% in the accumulation vs. ~ 47% in the coarse mode. The hygroscopic growth measurements were conducted with a filter-based differential hygroscopicity analyzer (FDHA) over the range of 5–99.4% RH in the hydration and dehydration operation modes. The FDHA study indicates that both accumulation and coarse modes exhibit pronounced water uptake approximately at the same RH, starting at ~ 70%, while efflorescence occurred at different humidities, i.e., at ~ 35% RH for submicron particles vs. ~ 50% RH for supermicron particles. This ~ 15% RH difference was attributed to higher content of organic material in the submicron particles, which suppresses water release in the dehydration experiments. The kappa mass interaction model (KIM) was applied to characterize and parameterize non-ideal solution behavior and concentration-dependent water uptake by atmospheric aerosol samples in the 5–99.4% RH range. Based on KIM, the volume-based hygroscopicity parameter, κv, was calculated. The κv, ws value related to the water soluble (ws) fraction was estimated to be ~ 0.15 for the

  15. Particle exposures and infections.

    PubMed

    Ghio, A J

    2014-06-01

    Particle exposures increase the risk for human infections. Particles can deposit in the nose, pharynx, larynx, trachea, bronchi, and distal lung and, accordingly, the respiratory tract is the system most frequently infected after such exposure; however, meningitis also occurs. Cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, agricultural work, environmental tobacco smoke (ETS), wood stoves, traffic-related emissions, gas stoves, and ambient air pollution are all particle-related exposures associated with an increased risk for respiratory infections. In addition, cigarette smoking, burning of biomass, dust storms, mining, and ETS can result in an elevated risk for tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis. One of the mechanisms for particle-related infections includes an accumulation of iron by surface functional groups of particulate matter (PM). Since elevations in metal availability are common to every particle exposure, all PM potentially contributes to these infections. Therefore, exposures to wood stove emissions, diesel exhaust, and air pollution particles are predicted to increase the incidence and prevalence of tuberculosis, atypical mycobacterial infections, and meningitis, albeit these elevations are likely to be small and detectable only in large population studies. Since iron accumulation correlates with the presence of surface functional groups and dependent metal coordination by the PM, the risk for infection continues as long as the particle is retained. Subsequently, it is expected that the cessation of exposure will diminish, but not totally reverse, the elevated risk for infection.

  16. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L. Q.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-10-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-Aerosols-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a high-resolution aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics concentration (ELVOC) and the HGF of particles of any size.

  17. Relating the hygroscopic properties of submicron aerosol to both gas- and particle-phase chemical composition in a boreal forest environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, J.; Kim, J.; Nieminen, T.; Duplissy, J.; Ehn, M.; Äijälä, M.; Hao, L.; Nie, W.; Sarnela, N.; Prisle, N. L.; Kulmala, M.; Virtanen, A.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of the hygroscopicity of 15-145 nm particles in a boreal forest environment were conducted using two Hygroscopicity Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (HTDMA) systems during the Pan-European Gas-AeroSOIs-climate interaction Study (PEGASOS) campaign in spring 2013. Measurements of the chemical composition of non-size segregated particles were also performed using a High-Resolution Aerosol Mass Spectrometer (HR-AMS) in parallel with hygroscopicity measurements. On average, the hygroscopic growth factor (HGF) of particles was observed to increase from the morning until afternoon. In case of accumulation mode particles, the main reasons for this behavior were increases in the ratio of sulfate to organic matter and oxidation level (O : C ratio) of the organic matter in the particle phase. Using an O : C dependent hygroscopic growth factor of organic matter (HGForg), fitted using the inverse Zdanovskii-Stokes-Robinson (ZSR) mixing rule, clearly improved the agreement between measured HGF and that predicted based on HR-AMS composition data. Besides organic oxidation level, the influence of inorganic species was tested when using the ZSR mixing rule to estimate the hygroscopic growth factor of organics in the aerosols. While accumulation and Aitken mode particles were predicted fairly well by the bulk aerosol composition data, the hygroscopicity of nucleation mode particles showed little correlation. However, we observed them to be more sensitive to the gas phase concentration of condensable vapors: the more there was sulfuric acid in the gas phase, the more hygroscopic the nucleation mode particles were. No clear dependence was found between the extremely low-volatility organics (ELVOCs) concentration and the HGF of particles of any size.

  18. Accumulator with preclosing preventer

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, R.R.; Rice, B.J.

    1981-11-24

    A guided-float accumulator suitable for use with a hydraulic system for an oil well blowout preventer is provided with a wing shut-off valve. Radially inwardly directed outlet parts are aimed at the bottom of the valve wing to generate unbalanced reaction forces which oppose the bernoulli effect forces caused by rapid movement of fluid through the chamber of the shut-off valve, thus preventing premature closing of the valve.

  19. Dual-cavity mode converter for a fundamental mode output in an over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jiawei; Huang, Wenhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Bai, Xianchen; Zhang, Yuchuan; Zhang, Xiaowei; Shao, Hao; Chen, Changhua; Zhu, Qi

    2015-03-16

    A dual-cavity TM{sub 02}–TM{sub 01} mode converter is designed for a dual-mode operation over-moded relativistic backward-wave oscillator. With the converter, the fundamental mode output is achieved. Particle-in-cell simulation shows that the efficiency of beam-wave conversion was over 46% and a pureTM{sub 01} mode output was obtained. Effects of end reflection provided by the mode converter were studied. Adequate TM{sub 01} mode feedback provided by the converter enhances conversion efficiency. The distance between the mode converter and extraction cavity critically affect the generation of microwaves depending on the reflection phase of TM{sub 01} mode feedback.

  20. Observation of new particle formation over a mid-latitude forest facing the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yuemei; Iwamoto, Yoko; Nakayama, Tomoki; Kawamura, Kimitaka; Hussein, Tareq; Mochida, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    The number size distributions of aerosol particles were measured using a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) at a mid-latitude forest in Japan during 20-30 August 2010. Four days during the observation period experienced new particle formation (NPF) under the conditions of low condensation and coagulation sinks. The formation rate of new particles was calculated to be in the range between 0.2 and 1.0 cm-3 s-1 for the NPF events. The growth rates of the newly formed mode of aerosol particles ranged between 5.0 and 15.7 nm h-1. The backward air mass trajectories revealed that the NPF occurred in clean maritime air masses originated from the North Pacific, which is characterized with the low mass concentrations of aerosol components. The results from the classification analysis of backward air mass trajectories indicate that the maritime air mass conditions are frequent at this forest site and are primarily in summer season. Large increases in the number concentrations of accumulation mode particles (above 90 nm) were followed by the increased precipitation rates in the afternoon hours on the NPF event days. Therefore, the newly-formed particles would be involved in the convective cloud formation and precipitation over the studied region.

  1. Numerical simulation of DPF filter for selected regimes with deposited soot particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lávička, David; Kovařík, Petr

    2012-04-01

    For the purpose of accumulation of particulate matter from Diesel engine exhaust gas, particle filters are used (referred to as DPF or FAP filters in the automotive industry). However, the cost of these filters is quite high. As the emission limits become stricter, the requirements for PM collection are rising accordingly. Particulate matters are very dangerous for human health and these are not invisible for human eye. They can often cause various diseases of the respiratory tract, even what can cause lung cancer. Performed numerical simulations were used to analyze particle filter behavior under various operating modes. The simulations were especially focused on selected critical states of particle filter, when engine is switched to emergency regime. The aim was to prevent and avoid critical situations due the filter behavior understanding. The numerical simulations were based on experimental analysis of used diesel particle filters.

  2. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  3. Viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in a constricted microchannel

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xinyu; DuBose, John; Joo, Sang Woo; Qian, Shizhi

    2015-01-01

    Focusing suspended particles in a fluid into a single file is often necessary prior to continuous-flow detection, analysis, and separation. Electrokinetic particle focusing has been demonstrated in constricted microchannels by the use of the constriction-induced dielectrophoresis. However, previous studies on this subject have been limited to Newtonian fluids only. We report in this paper an experimental investigation of the viscoelastic effects on electrokinetic particle focusing in non-Newtonian polyethylene oxide solutions through a constricted microchannel. The width of the focused particle stream is found NOT to decrease with the increase in DC electric field, which is different from that in Newtonian fluids. Moreover, particle aggregations are observed at relatively high electric fields to first form inside the constriction. They can then either move forward and exit the constriction in an explosive mode or roll back to the constriction entrance for further accumulations. These unexpected phenomena are distinct from the findings in our earlier paper [Lu et al., Biomicrofluidics 8, 021802 (2014)], where particles are observed to oscillate inside the constriction and not to pass through until a chain of sufficient length is formed. They are speculated to be a consequence of the fluid viscoelasticity effects. PMID:25713690

  4. Accumulation of radionuclides by plants as a monitor system.

    PubMed Central

    Koranda, J J; Robison, W L

    1978-01-01

    The accumulation of radionuclides by plants acting as a monitoring system in the environment may occur by two modes; foliar absorption by the leaves and shoot of the plant, or by root uptake from the soil. Data on plant accumulation of radionuclides may be obtained from studies of fission product radionuclides deposited as worldwide fallout, and from tracer studies of plant physiology. The epidermal features of plant foliage may exert an effect upon particle retention by leaves, and subsequent uptake of radionuclides from the surface. The transport of radionuclides across the cuticle and epidermis of plant leaves is determined in part by the anatomy of the leaf, and by physiological factors. The foliar uptake of fallout radionuclides, 99Sr, 131I, and 137Cs, is described with examples from the scientific literature. The environmental half-life of 131I, for example, is considerably shorter than its physical half-life because of physical and biological factors which may produce a half-life as short as 0.23/day. 99Sr and 137Cs are readily taken up by the leaf, but 137Cs undergoes more translocation into fruit and seeds than 99Sr which tends to remain in the plant part in which it was initially absorbed. Soil-root uptake is conditioned primarily by soil chemical and physical factors which may selectively retain a radionuclide, such as 137Cs. The presence of organic matter, inorganic colloids (clay), and competing elements will strongly affect the uptake of 99Sr and 137Cs by plants from the soil. The role of plants as monitors of radionuclides is twofold: as monitors of recent atmospheric releases of radionuclides; and as indicators of the long-term behavior of aged deposits of radionuclides in the soil. PMID:367767

  5. Ultrafine particles, and PM 2.5 generated from cooking in homes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Man-Pun; Wu, Chi-Li; Sze To, Gin-Nam; Chan, Tsz-Chun; Chao, Christopher Y. H.

    2011-11-01

    Exposure to airborne particulate matters (PM) emitted during cooking can lead to adverse health effects. An understanding of the exposure to PM during cooking at home provides a foundation for the quantification of possible health risks. The concentrations of airborne particles covering the ultrafine (14.6-100 nm) and accumulation mode (100-661.2 nm) size ranges and PM 2.5 (airborne particulate matters smaller than 2.5 μm in diameter) during and after cooking activities were measured in 12 naturally ventilated, non-smoking homes in Hong Kong, covering a total of 33 cooking episodes. The monitored homes all practiced Chinese-style cooking. Cooking elevated the average number concentrations of ultrafine particles (UFPs) and accumulation mode particles (AMPs) by 10 fold from the background level in the living room and by 20-40 fold in the kitchen. PM 2.5 mass concentrations went up to the maximum average of about 160 μg m -3 in the kitchen and about 60 μg m -3 in the living room. Cooking emitted particles dispersed quickly from the kitchen to the living room indicating that the health impact is not limited to occupants in the kitchen. Particle number and mass concentrations remained elevated for 90 min in the kitchen and for 60 min in the living room after cooking. Particles in cooking emissions were mainly in the ultrafine size range in terms of the number count while AMPs contributed to at least 60% of the surface area concentrations in the kitchen and 73% in the living room. This suggests that AMPs could still be a major health concern since the particle surface area concentration is suggested to have a more direct relationship with inhalation toxicity than with number concentration. Particle number concentration (14.6-661.2 nm) in the living room was about 2.7 times that in the outdoor environment, suggesting that better ventilation could help reduce exposure.

  6. Current Mode Logic Fan Out

    2011-05-07

    Current mode logic is used in high speed timing systems for particle accelerators due to the fast rise time of the electrical signal. This software provides the necessary documentation to produce multiple copies of a single input for distribution to multiple devices. This software supports the DOE mission by providing a method for producing high speed signals in accelerator timing systems.

  7. A case study of urban particle acidity and its influence on secondary organic aerosol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Jimenez, Jose L; Worsnop, Douglas R; Canagaratna, Manjula

    2007-05-01

    Size-resolved indicators of aerosol acidity, including H+ ion concentrations (H+Aer) and the ratio of stoichiometric neutralization are evaluated in submicrometer aerosols using highly time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) data from Pittsburgh. The pH and ionic strength within the aqueous particle phase are also estimated using the Aerosol Inorganics Model (AIM). Different mechanisms that contribute to the presence of acidic particles in Pittsburgh are discussed. The largest H+Aer loadings and lowest levels of stoichiometric neutralization were detected when PM1 loadings were high and dominated by SO4(2-). The average size distribution of H+Aer loading shows an accumulation mode at Dva approximately 600 nm and an enhanced smaller mode that centers at Dva approximately 200 nm and tails into smaller sizes. The acidity in the accumulation mode particles suggests that there is generally not enough gas-phase NH3 available on a regional scale to completely neutralize sulfate in Pittsburgh. The lack of stoichiometric neutralization in the 200 nm mode particles is likely caused by the relatively slow mixing of gas-phase NH3 into SO2-rich plumes containing younger particles. We examined the influence of particle acidity on secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation by comparing the mass concentrations and size distributions of oxygenated organic aerosol (00A--surrogate for SOA in Pittsburgh) during periods when particles are, on average, acidic to those when particles are bulk neutralized. The average mass concentration of ODA during the acidic periods (3.1 +/- 1.7 microg m(-3)) is higher than that during the neutralized periods (2.5 +/- 1.3 microg m(-3)). Possible reasons for this enhancement include increased condensation of SOA species, acid-catalyzed SOA formation, and/or differences in air mass transport and history. However, even if the entire enhancement (approximately 0.6 microg m(-3)) can be attributed to acid catalysis, the upperbound increase of SOA mass

  8. What is Local Mode (LM)? Global Mode (GM)? Calibration Mode?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... measurement in Global Mode (GM), Local Mode (LM), and Calibration. Global Mode is the normal acquisition with pole to pole coverage ... targets approximately 300 km in length Calibration Implemented bi-monthly Spectralon solar ...

  9. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  10. Natural Mode Entanglement as a Resource for Quantum Communication

    SciTech Connect

    Heaney, Libby; Vedral, Vlatko

    2009-11-13

    Natural particle-number entanglement resides between spatial modes in coherent ultracold atomic gases. However, operations on the modes are restricted by a superselection rule that forbids coherent superpositions of different particle numbers. This seemingly prevents mode entanglement being used as a resource for quantum communication. In this Letter, we demonstrate that mode entanglement of a single massive particle can be used for dense coding and quantum teleportation despite the superselection rule. In particular, we provide schemes where the dense coding linear photonic channel capacity is reached without a shared reservoir and where the full quantum channel capacity is achieved if both parties share a coherent particle reservoir.

  11. Volume accumulator design analysis computer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, W. D.; Shimazaki, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    The computer codes, VANEP and VANES, were written and used to aid in the design and performance calculation of the volume accumulator units (VAU) for the 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system. VANEP computes the VAU design which meets the primary coolant loop VAU volume and pressure performance requirements. VANES computes the performance of the VAU design, determined from the VANEP code, at the conditions of the secondary coolant loop. The codes can also compute the performance characteristics of the VAU's under conditions of possible modes of failure which still permit continued system operation.

  12. Guiding center equations for ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2013-04-15

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through {delta}B-vector={nabla} Multiplication-Sign ({xi}-vector Multiplication-Sign B-vector), however, perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories, the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement {xi}-vector are derived which preserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  13. Guiding Center Equations for Ideal Magnetohydrodynamic Modes

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe B. White

    2013-02-21

    Guiding center simulations are routinely used for the discovery of mode-particle resonances in tokamaks, for both resistive and ideal instabilities and to find modifications of particle distributions caused by a given spectrum of modes, including large scale avalanches during events with a number of large amplitude modes. One of the most fundamental properties of ideal magnetohydrodynamics is the condition that plasma motion cannot change magnetic topology. The conventional representation of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes by perturbing a toroidal equilibrium field through δ~B = ∇ X (ξ X B) however perturbs the magnetic topology, introducing extraneous magnetic islands in the field. A proper treatment of an ideal perturbation involves a full Lagrangian displacement of the field due to the perturbation and conserves magnetic topology as it should. In order to examine the effect of ideal magnetohydrodynamic modes on particle trajectories the guiding center equations should include a correct Lagrangian treatment. Guiding center equations for an ideal displacement ξ are derived which perserve the magnetic topology and are used to examine mode particle resonances in toroidal confinement devices. These simulations are compared to others which are identical in all respects except that they use the linear representation for the field. Unlike the case for the magnetic field, the use of the linear field perturbation in the guiding center equations does not result in extraneous mode particle resonances.

  14. Excitation of internal kink modes by trapped energetic beam ions

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, L.; White, R.B.; Rosenbluth, M.N.

    1983-10-01

    Energetic trapped particles are shown to have a destabilizing effect on the internal kink mode in tokamaks. The plasma pressure threshold for the mode is lowered by the particles. The growth rate is near the ideal magnetohydrodynamic value, but the frequency is comparable to the trapped particle precission frequency. A model for the instability cycle gives stability properties, associated particle losses, and neutron emissivity consistent with the fishbone events observed in PDX.

  15. Number concentration and size of particles in urban air: effects on spirometric lung function in adult asthmatic subjects.

    PubMed Central

    Penttinen, P; Timonen, K L; Tiittanen, P; Mirme, A; Ruuskanen, J; Pekkanen, J

    2001-01-01

    Daily variations in ambient particulate air pollution are associated with variations in respiratory lung function. It has been suggested that the effects of particulate matter may be due to particles in the ultrafine (0.01-0.1 microm) size range. Because previous studies on ultrafine particles only used self-monitored peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR), we assessed the associations between particle mass and number concentrations in several size ranges measured at a central site and measured (biweekly) spirometric lung function among a group of 54 adult asthmatics (n = 495 measurements). We also compared results to daily morning, afternoon, and evening PEFR measurements done at home (n = 7,672-8,110 measurements). The median (maximum) 24 hr number concentrations were 14,500/cm(3) (46,500/cm(3)) ultrafine particles and 800/cm(3) (2,800/cm(3)) accumulation mode (0.1-1 microm) particles. The median (maximum) mass concentration of PM(2.5) (particulate matter < 2.5 microm) and PM(10) (particulate matter < 10 microm in aerodynamic diameter) were 8.4 microg/m(3) (38.3 microg/m(3)) and 13.5 microg/m(3) (73.7 microg/m(3)), respectively. The number of accumulation mode particles was consistently inversely associated with PEFR in spirometry. Inverse, but nonsignificant, associations were observed with ultrafine particles, and no associations were observed with large particles (PM(10)). Compared to the effect estimates for self-monitored PEFR, the effect estimates for spirometric PEFR tended to be larger. The standard errors were also larger, probably due to the lower number of spirometric measurements. The present results support the need to monitor the particle number and size distributions in urban air in addition to mass. PMID:11335178

  16. Test Plan - Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.; Fowley, M. D.

    2012-05-10

    This plan documents the highlights of the Solids Accumulations Scouting Studies test; a project, from Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS), that began on February 1, 2012. During the last 12 weeks considerable progress has been made to design and plan methods that will be used to estimate the concentration and distribution of heavy fissile solids in accumulated solids in the Hanford double-shell tank (DST) 241-AW-105 (AW-105), which is the primary goal of this task. This DST will be one of the several waste feed delivery staging tanks designated to feed the Pretreatment Facility (PTF) of the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Note that over the length of the waste feed delivery mission AW-105 is currently identified as having the most fill empty cycles of any DST feed tanks, which is the reason for modeling this particular tank. At SRNL an existing test facility, the Mixing Demonstration Tank, which will be modified for the present work, will use stainless steel particles in a simulant that represents Hanford waste to perform mock staging tanks transfers that will allow solids to accumulate in the tank heel. The concentration and location of the mock fissile particles will be measured in these scoping studies to produce information that will be used to better plan larger scaled tests. Included in these studies is a secondary goal of developing measurement methods to accomplish the primary goal. These methods will be evaluated for use in the larger scale experiments. Included in this plan are the several pretest activities that will validate the measurement techniques that are currently in various phases of construction. Aspects of each technique, e.g., particle separations, volume determinations, topographical mapping, and core sampling, have been tested in bench-top trials, as discussed herein, but the actual equipment to be employed during the full test will need evaluation after fabrication and integration into the test facility.

  17. Electrostatic particle precipitator

    SciTech Connect

    Uchiya, T.; Hikizi, S.; Yabuta, H.

    1984-04-03

    An electrostatic particle precipitator for removing dust particles from a flue gas. The precipitator includes a plurality of collecting electrodes in the shape of plates mounted on endless chains and moving between a first region through which flue gas to be treated flows and a second region where the flow of gas is extremely scarce. A dust removal mechanism is positioned in the second region to remove dust which accumulates on the electrode plates. The moving speed of the collecting electrodes is controlled within a certain range to maintain a prescribed thickness of dust on the electrodes whereby the ocurrence of reverse ionization phenomenon is prevented.

  18. Source apportionment of ambient fine particle size distribution using positive matrix factorization in Erfurt, Germany

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Wei; Stölzel, Matthias; Cyrys, Josef; Pitz, Mike; Heinrich, Joachim; Kreyling, Wolfgang G.; Wichmann, H.-Erich; Peters, Annette; Wang, Sheng; Hopke, Philip K.

    2008-01-01

    Particle size distribution data collected between September 1997 and August 2001 in Erfurt, Germany were used to investigate the sources of ambient particulate matter by positive matrix factorization (PMF). A total of 29,313 hourly averaged particle size distribution measurements covering the size range of 0.01 to 3.0 μm were included in the analysis. The particle number concentrations (cm−3) for the 9 channels in the ultrafine range, and mass concentrations (ng m−3) for the 41 size bins in the accumulation mode and particle up to 3 μm in aerodynamic diameter were used in the PMF. The analysis was performed separately for each season. Additional analyses were performed including calculations of the correlations of factor contributions with gaseous pollutants (O3, NO, NO2, CO and SO2) and particle composition data (sulfate, organic carbon and elemental carbon), estimating the contributions of each factor to the total number and mass concentration, identifying the directional locations of the sources using the conditional probability function, and examining the diurnal patterns of factor scores. These results were used to assist in the interpretation of the factors. Five factors representing particles from airborne soil, ultrafine particles from local traffic, secondary aerosols from local fuel combustion, particles from remote traffic sources, and secondary aerosols from multiple sources were identified in all seasons. PMID:18433834

  19. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Ambient Particle Size Distributions Idealized Distribution Fine Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) Coarse Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) PM2.5/PM10 Ratio FRM...

  20. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Ambient Particle Size Distributions Idealized Distribution Fine Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m 3) Coarse Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m 3) PM 2.5/PM 10 Ratio FRM...

  1. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Ambient Particle Size Distributions Idealized Distribution Fine Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) Coarse Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) PM2.5/PM10 Ratio FRM...

  2. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Ambient Particle Size Distributions Idealized Distribution Fine Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) Coarse Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) PM 2.5/PM 10 Ratio FRM...

  3. 40 CFR Table F-3 to Subpart F of... - Critical Parameters of Idealized Ambient Particle Size Distributions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Ambient Particle Size Distributions Idealized Distribution Fine Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) Coarse Particle Mode MMD (µm) Geo. Std. Dev. Conc. (µg/m3) PM2.5/PM10 Ratio FRM...

  4. Sugar Accumulation in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Gayler, K. R.; Glasziou, K. T.

    1972-01-01

    The rate-limiting reaction for glucose uptake in storage tissue of sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L., appears to be the movement of glucose across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartments. The mechanism for uptake of glucose across this boundary has been studied using 3-O-methyl glucose, an analogue of glucose which is not metabolized by sugar-cane tissue. This analogue is taken up by sugarcane storage tissue at a similar rate to glucose. Its rate of uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Km = 1.9 mm, and it is competitively inhibited by glucose, Ki = 2 to 3 mm. Glucose uptake is similarly inhibited by 3-O-methyl glucose. Uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose is energy-dependent and does not appear to be the result of counterflow of glucose. It is concluded that glucose and 3-O-methyl glucose uptake across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartment in this tissue is mediated by an energy-dependent carrier system capable of accumulating the sugars against a concentration gradient. PMID:16658002

  5. TTX accumulation in pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been detected in a variety of animals. The finding of TTX in the trumpet shell Charonia sauliae strongly suggested that its origin was its food, a TTX-bearing starfish Astropecten polyacanthus. Since then, the food chain has been consistently implicated as the principal means of TTX intoxication. To identify the primary producer of TTX, intestinal bacteria isolated from several TTX-bearers were investigated for their TTX production. The results demonstrated that some of them could produce TTX. Thus the primary TTX producers in the sea are concluded to be marine bacteria. Subsequently, detritus feeders and zooplankton can be intoxicated with TTX through the food chain, or in conjunction with parasitism or symbiosis. The process followed by small carnivores, omnivores or scavengers, and by organisms higher up the food chain would result in the accumulation of higher concentrations of TTX. Finally, pufferfish at the top of the food chain are intoxicated with TTX. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that net cage and land cultures produce non-toxic pufferfish that can be made toxic by feeding with a TTX-containing diet.

  6. Indoor/outdoor radon decay products associated aerosol particle-size distributions and their relation to total number concentrations.

    PubMed

    Moriizumi, Jun; Yamada, Shinya; Xu, Yang; Matsuki, Satoru; Hirao, Shigekazu; Yamazawa, Hiromi

    2014-07-01

    The activity size distributions of indoor and outdoor radioactive aerosol associated with short-lived radon decay products were observed at Nagoya, Japan, for some periods from 2010 to 2012, following the indoor observation by Mostafa et al. [Mostafa, A. M. A., Tamaki, K., Moriizumi, J., Yamazawa, H. and Iida, T. The weather dependence of particle size distribution of indoor radioactive aerosol associated with radon decay products. Radiat. Prot. Dosim. 146: (1-3), 19-22 (2011)]. The tendency of smaller indoor activity median aerodynamic diameter (AMAD) after rainfalls showed in the previous study was not consistently obtained, while the consistent tendency of less indoor radioactive particles with diameters in the accumulation mode was observed again after rainfalls. The indoor aerosols showed activity size distributions similar to the outdoor ones. Non-radioactive aerosol particle concentrations measured with a laser particle counter suggested a somewhat liner relationship with AMAD.

  7. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.

    2012-12-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm-3 stp. Ultra-fine particles as indicators for nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C) to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  8. Rare particles

    SciTech Connect

    Kutschera, W.

    1984-01-01

    The use of Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) to search for hypothetical particles and known particles of rare processes is discussed. The hypothetical particles considered include fractionally charged particles, anomalously heavy isotopes, and superheavy elements. The known particles produced in rare processes discussed include doubly-charged negative ions, counting neutrino-produced atoms in detectors for solar neutrino detection, and the spontaneous emission of /sup 14/C from /sup 223/Ra. 35 references. (WHK)

  9. Size distributions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the atmosphere and estimation of the contribution of ultrafine particles to their lung deposition.

    PubMed

    Kawanaka, Youhei; Tsuchiya, Yoshiteru; Yun, Sun-Ja; Sakamoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-01

    This is the first estimation of the contribution of ultrafine particles to the lung deposition of particle-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the atmosphere. The size distributions of nine PAHs (4-6 rings) were measured at roadside and suburban sites in winter in Japan. Deposition efficiencies and fluxes of PAHs in ultrafine mode (<0.12 microm), accumulation mode (0.12-2.1 microm), and coarse mode (>2.1 microm) to the human respiratory tract were calculated using the LUDEP computer-based model. From 10%-15% and 4.2%-6.9% of target PAHs were distributed in the ultrafine mode in the roadside and suburban atmosphere, respectively. The model calculations showed that as much as 18%-19% and 16%-17% of inhaled PAHs are deposited in the alveolar region of the lung for the roadside and suburban atmosphere, respectively. Total deposition fluxes of target PAHs in the alveolar region were about 1.5-fold greater for the roadside atmosphere than for the suburban atmosphere. Importantly, ultrafine particles were shown to contribute as much as 23%-30% and 10%-16% to PAH deposition in the alveolar region for the roadside and suburban atmosphere, respectively, although the contributions of ultrafine particles to the total particulate matter masswere only 2.3% in the roadside atmosphere and 1.3% in the suburban atmosphere. These results indicated that ultrafine particles are significant contributors to the deposition of PAHs into the alveolar region of the lung.

  10. Dynamics of spheroid particles in channel flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Wenbin; Alexeev, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    The effect of inertia on the dynamics of rigid spheroid microparticles in a pressure-driven channel flow is studied using a hybrid lattice Boltzmann and lattice spring method. We find distinctive behaviors of particles depending on the particle shape, initial orientation, and ratio of particle size to the channel size. Two possible stable modes of motion are found for prolate spheroids. Particles either tumble in a shear plane or spin with the axis parallel to the vortex direction. We present a phase diagram showing the transition between these two modes. Cross-stream migration and equilibrium trajectories of particles are also investigated and found to depend on the particle shape and mode of motion. The simulations results are compared with experimental data showing favorable agreement. Our results will be useful for separating biological and synthetic particles by size and shape.

  11. Emissions of Trace Gases and Particles from Two Ships in the Southern Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinha, Parikhit; Hobbs, Peter V.; Yokelson, Robert J.; Christian, Ted J.; Kirchstetter, Thomas W.; Bruintjes, Roelof

    2003-01-01

    Measurements were made of the emissions of particles and gases from two diesel-powered ships in the southern Atlantic Ocean off the coast of Namibia. The measurements are used to derive emission factors from ships of three species not reported previously, namely, black carbon, accumulation-mode particles, and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), as well as for carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide (CO), methane (CH4), non-methane hydrocarbons, sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitrogen oxides (NOx), and condensation nuclei. The effects of fuel grade and engine power on ship emissions are discussed. The emission factors are combined with fuel usage data to obtain estimates of global annual emissions of various particles and gases from ocean-going ships. Global emissions of black carbon, accumulation- mode particles, and CCN from ocean-going ships are estimated to be 19-26 Gg yr(sup -1), (4.4-6.1) x 10(exp 26) particles yr(sup -1), and (1.0-1.5) x l0(exp 26) particles yr(sup -1), respectively. Black carbon emissions from ocean-going ships are approximately 0.2% of total anthropogenic emissions. Emissions of NOx and SO2 from ocean-going ships are approximately 10-14% and approximately 3-4%, respectively, of the total emissions of these species from the burning of fossil fuels, and approximately 40% and approximately 70%, respectively, of the total emissions of these species from the burning of biomass. Global annual emissions of CO and CH4 from ocean-going ships are approximately 2% and approximately 2-5%, respectively, of natural oceanic emissions of these species.

  12. Particle separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moosmuller, Hans (Inventor); Chakrabarty, Rajan K. (Inventor); Arnott, W. Patrick (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  13. Particle separation

    DOEpatents

    Moosmuller, Hans; Chakrabarty, Rajan K.; Arnott, W. Patrick

    2011-04-26

    Embodiments of a method for selecting particles, such as based on their morphology, is disclosed. In a particular example, the particles are charged and acquire different amounts of charge, or have different charge distributions, based on their morphology. The particles are then sorted based on their flow properties. In a specific example, the particles are sorted using a differential mobility analyzer, which sorts particles, at least in part, based on their electrical mobility. Given a population of particles with similar electrical mobilities, the disclosed process can be used to sort particles based on the net charge carried by the particle, and thus, given the relationship between charge and morphology, separate the particles based on their morphology.

  14. Hygroscopic growth of urban aerosol particles in Beijing (China) during wintertime: a comparison of three experimental methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meier, J.; Wehner, B.; Massling, A.; Birmili, W.; Nowak, A.; Gnauk, T.; Brüggemann, E.; Herrmann, H.; Min, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2009-09-01

    The hygroscopic properties of atmospheric aerosols are highly relevant for the quantification of radiative effects in the atmosphere, but also of interest for the assessment of particle health effects upon inhalation. This article reports measurements of aerosol particle hygroscopicity in the highly polluted urban atmosphere of Beijing, China in January 2005. The meteorological conditions corresponded to a relatively cold and dry atmosphere. Three different methods were used: 1) A combination of Humidifying Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (H-DMPS) and Twin Differential Mobility Particle Sizer (TDMPS) measurements, 2) A Hygroscopic Tandem Differential Mobility Analyzer (H-TDMA), and 3) A simplistic solubility model fed by chemical particle composition determined from Micro Orifice Uniform Deposit Impactor (MOUDI) samples. From the H-DMPS and TDMPS particle number size distributions, a size-resolved descriptive hygroscopic growth factor (DHGF) was determined for the relative humidities (RH) 55%, 77% and 90%, and particle diameters between 30 and 400 nm. In Beijing, the highest DHGFs were observed for accumulation mode particles, 1.40 (±0.03) at 90% RH. DHGF decreased significantly with particle size, reaching 1.04 (±0.15) at 30 nm. H-TDMA data also suggest a decrease in growth factor towards the biggest particles investigated (350 nm), associated with an increasing fraction of nearly hydrophobic particles. The agreement between the H-DMPS/TDMPS and H-TDMA methods was satisfactory in the accumulation mode size range (100-400 nm). In the Aitken mode range (<100 nm), the H-DMPS/TDMPS method yielded growth factors lower by up to 0.1 at 90% RH. The application of the solubility model based on measured chemical composition clearly reproduced the size-dependent trend in hygroscopic particle growth observed by the other methods. In the case of aerosol dominated by inorganic ions, the composition-derived growth factors tended to agree (± 0.05) or underestimate (up to

  15. Characteristics of new particle formation events in Nanjing, China: Effect of water-soluble ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junlin; Wang, Honglei; Shen, Lijuan; Zhu, Bin; Zou, Jianan; Gao, Jinhui; Kang, Hanqing

    2015-05-01

    New particle formation (NPF) events and water-soluble ions were studied at the meteorological building on the campus of the Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology (NUIST), which is located in the western part of the Yangtze River Delta (YRD). A wide-range particle spectrometer (WPS) provided particle number size distributions between 10 nm and 10 μm, whereas water-soluble ions for particles with diameters between 10 nm and 18 μm were measured using a 13-stage Nano-MOUDI aerosol sampler and 850 professional Ion Chromatography (IC). Additionally, meteorological data, trace gas concentrations and mass concentration were recorded. Ten NPF days were captured during the measurement period from 08 July to 02 August 2012. The mean aerosol number concentration, which was primarily composed of Aitken-mode particles, i.e., with diameters of 20-100 nm, was 13,664 cm-3, which was 1.9 times larger than that on non-NPF days. The results suggest that the NPF events were only slightly affected by O3, SO2, and NO2; the primary factors affecting NPF events were meteorological factors and air mass directions. NPF events were found to be favorable during the summer in the presence of high temperatures, strong radiation, low humidity, strong winds and clean air masses originating from the southeastern coast. The mean growth rate (GR), formation rate (J10), condensational sink (CS), condensing vapor rate (Q), and condensation vapor (C) were determined to be 7.6 nm h-1, 3.7 cm-3 s-1, 2.8 × 10-2 s-1, 2.9 × 106 cm-3 s-1, and 10.5 × 107 cm-3, respectively, on NPF days. The largest effects of the studied NPF events were on the mass and water-soluble ion concentrations of Aitken-mode particles, followed by nuclei-mode particles; few contributions to accumulation- and coarse-mode particles were observed. Different water-soluble ions were observed to have distinct interactions with the NPF events. The proportions of NH4+, SO42-, NO3-, K+ and Mg2+ in nuclei- and Aitken-mode

  16. Edge Mode Coupling within a Plasmonic Nanoparticle

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The coupling of plasmonic nanoparticles can strongly modify their optical properties. Here, we show that the coupling of the edges within a single rectangular particle leads to mode splitting and the formation of bonding and antibonding edge modes. We are able to unambiguously designate the modes due to the high spatial resolution of electron microscopy-based electron energy loss spectroscopy and the comparison with numerical simulations. Our results provide simple guidelines for the interpretation and the design of plasmonic mode spectra. PMID:27427962

  17. Dual-Mode Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia has conducted an investigation of the mixing and combustion processes in a hydrogen fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The experiment essentially consisted of the "direct connect" continuous operation of a Mach 2 rectangular combustor with a single unswept ramp fuel injector. The stagnation enthalpy of the test flow simulated a flight Mach number of 5. Measurements were obtained using conventional wall instrumentation and laser based diagnostics. These diagnostics included, pressure and wall temperature measurements, Fuel Plume Imaging (FPI) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A schematic of the combustor configuration and a summary of the measurements obtained are presented. The experimental work at UVa was parallel by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) work at NASA Langley. The numerical and experiment results are compared in this document.

  18. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  19. Heavy duty diesel engine exhaust aerosol particle and ion measurements.

    PubMed

    Lähde, Tero; Rönkkö, Topi; Virtanen, Annele; Schuck, Tanja J; Pirjola, Liisa; Hämeri, Kaarle; Kulmala, Markku; Arnold, Frank; Rothe, Dieter; Keskinen, Jorma

    2009-01-01

    Heavy duty EURO 4 diesel engine exhaust particle and ion size distributions were measured atthetailpipe using dynamometer testing. Measurements of particle volatility and electrical charge were undertaken to clarify diesel exhaust nucleation mode characteristics with different exhaust after-treatment systems. Nucleation mode particle volatility and charging probability were dependent on exhaust after-treatment particles were volatile and uncharged when the engine was equipped with diesel particulate filter and partly volatile and partly charged in exhaust without any after-treatment or with an oxidation catalyst only. The absence of charged particles in the nucleation mode of diesel particulate filtered exhaust excludes the ion mediated process as a nucleation particle formation mechanism.

  20. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  1. Dynamic radioactive particle source

    DOEpatents

    Moore, Murray E.; Gauss, Adam Benjamin; Justus, Alan Lawrence

    2012-06-26

    A method and apparatus for providing a timed, synchronized dynamic alpha or beta particle source for testing the response of continuous air monitors (CAMs) for airborne alpha or beta emitters is provided. The method includes providing a radioactive source; placing the radioactive source inside the detection volume of a CAM; and introducing an alpha or beta-emitting isotope while the CAM is in a normal functioning mode.

  2. Vertical variations of particle number concentration and size distribution in a street canyon in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Li, X L; Wang, J S; Tu, X D; Liu, W; Huang, Z

    2007-06-01

    Measurements of particle number size distribution in the range of 10-487 nm were made at four heights on one side of an asymmetric street canyon on Beijing East Road in Shanghai, China. The result showed that the number size distributions were bimodal or trimodal and lognormal in form. Within a certain height from 1.5 to 20 m, the particle size distributions significantly changed with increasing height. The particle number concentrations in the nucleation mode and in the Aitken mode significantly dropped, and the peaking diameter in the Aitken mode shifted to larger sizes. The variations of the particle number size distributions in the accumulation mode were less significant than those in the nucleation and Aitken modes. The particle number size distributions slightly changed with increasing height ranging from 20 to 38 m. The particle number concentrations in the street canyon showed a stronger association with the pre-existing particle concentrations and the intensity of the solar radiation when the traffic flow was stable. The particle number concentrations were observed higher in Test I than in Test II, probably because the small pre-existing particle concentrations and the intense solar radiation promoted the formation of new particles. The pollutant concentrations in the street canyon showed a stronger association with wind speed and direction. For example, the concentrations of total particle surface area, total particle volume, PM2.5 and CO were lower in Test I (high wind speed and step-up canyon) than in Test II (low wind speed and wind blowing parallel to the canyon). The equations for the normalized concentration curves of the total particle number, CO and PM2.5 in Test I and Test II were derived. A power functions was found to be a good estimator for predicting the concentrations of total particle number, CO and PM2.5 at different heights. The decay rates of PM2.5 and CO concentrations were lower in Test I than in Test II. However, the decay rate of the

  3. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  4. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  5. Particle generator

    DOEpatents

    Hess, Wayne P.; Joly, Alan G.; Gerrity, Daniel P.; Beck, Kenneth M.; Sushko, Peter V.; Shlyuger, Alexander L.

    2005-06-28

    Energy tunable solid state sources of neutral particles are described. In a disclosed embodiment, a halogen particle source includes a solid halide sample, a photon source positioned to deliver photons to a surface of the halide, and a collimating means positioned to accept a spatially defined plume of hyperthermal halogen particles emitted from the sample surface.

  6. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  7. Mutagenicity of airborne particles.

    PubMed

    Chrisp, C E; Fisher, G L

    1980-09-01

    The physical and chemical properties of airborne particles are important for the interpretation of their potential biologic significance as genotoxic hazards. For polydisperse particle size distributions, the smallest, most respirable particles are generally the most mutagenic. Particulate collection for testing purposes should be designed to reduce artifact formation and allow condensation of mutagenic compounds. Other critical factors such as UV irradiation, wind direction, chemical reactivity, humidity, sample storage, and temperature of combustion are important. Application of chemical extraction methods and subsequent class fractionation techniques influence the observed mutagenic activity. Particles from urban air, coal fly ash, automobile and diesel exhaust, agricultural burning and welding fumes contain primarily direct-acting mutagens. Cigarette smoke condensate, smoke from charred meat and protein pyrolysates, kerosene soot and cigarette smoke condensates contain primarily mutagens which require metabolic activation. Fractionation coupled with mutagenicity testing indicates that the most potent mutagens are found in the acidic fractions of urban air, coal fly ash, and automobile diesel exhaust, whereas mutagens in rice straw smoke and cigarette smoke condensate are found primarily in the basic fractions. The interaction of the many chemical compounds in complex mixtures from airborne particles is likely to be important in determining mutagenic or comutagenic potentials. Because the mode of exposure is generally frequent and prolonged, the presence of tumor-promoting agents in complex mixtures may be a major factor in evaluation of the carcinogenic potential of airborne particles.

  8. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  9. Airborne observations of aerosol microphysical properties and particle ageing processes in the troposphere above Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburger, T.; McMeeking, G.; Minikin, A.; Petzold, A.; Coe, H.; Krejci, R.

    2012-08-01

    In-situ measurements of aerosol microphysical properties were performed in May 2008 during the EUCAARI-LONGREX campaign. Two aircraft, the FAAM BAe-146 and DLR Falcon 20, operated from Oberpfaffenhofen, Germany. A comprehensive data set was obtained comprising the wider region of Europe north of the Alps throughout the whole tropospheric column. Prevailing stable synoptic conditions enabled measurements of accumulating emissions inside the continental boundary layer reaching a maximum total number concentration of 19 000 particles cm-3 stp. Nucleation events were observed within the boundary layer during high pressure conditions and after updraft of emissions induced by frontal passages above 8 km altitude in the upper free troposphere. Aerosol ageing processes during air mass transport are analysed using trajectory analysis. The ratio of particles containing a non-volatile core (250 °C) to the total aerosol number concentration was observed to increase within the first 12 to 48 h from the particle source from 50 to 85% due to coagulation. Aged aerosol also features an increased fraction of accumulation mode particles of approximately 40% of the total number concentration. The presented analysis provides an extensive data set of tropospheric aerosol microphysical properties on a continental scale which can be used for atmospheric aerosol models and comparisons of satellite retrievals.

  10. Strong Destabilization of Stable Modes with a Half-Frequency Associated with Chirping Geodesic Acoustic Modes in the Large Helical Device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ido, T.; Itoh, K.; Osakabe, M.; Lesur, M.; Shimizu, A.; Ogawa, K.; Toi, K.; Nishiura, M.; Kato, S.; Sasaki, M.; Ida, K.; Inagaki, S.; Itoh, S.-I.

    2016-01-01

    Abrupt and strong excitation of a mode has been observed when the frequency of a chirping energetic-particle driven geodesic acoustic mode (EGAM) reaches twice the geodesic acoustic mode (GAM) frequency. The frequency of the secondary mode is the GAM frequency, which is a half-frequency of the primary EGAM. Based on the analysis of spatial structures, the secondary mode is identified as a GAM. The phase relation between the secondary mode and the primary EGAM is locked, and the evolution of the growth rate of the secondary mode indicates nonlinear excitation. The results suggest that the primary mode (EGAM) contributes to nonlinear destabilization of a subcritical mode.

  11. Modes and resonances of plasmonic scatterers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkitalo, Jouni; Kauranen, Martti; Suuriniemi, Saku

    2014-04-01

    We present a rigorous full-wave electromagnetic approach to analyze the modes and resonances of dielectric and plasmonic nanoparticles of practically any geometry. Using boundary integral operators, we identify the resonances as inherent properties of the particles and propose a modal expansion for their optical response. We show that the resonance frequencies are isolated points on the complex plane. The approach allows the particles to be analyzed without specifying an incident field, which can be separately tailored for the desired interaction with the modes. We also connect the general theory to the Mie theory in spherical geometry and provide a connection to the quasistatic theory. In comparison to earlier work on modes and resonances of scatterers, our approach has the benefit that modes are defined entirely over a compact boundary surface of the scatterer. Furthermore, the boundary integral operator is of second-kind Fredholm type, enabling the rigorous characterization of the resonances.

  12. Laguerre-Gaussian laser modes for biophotonics and micromanipulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, M. P.; Paterson, L.; Armstrong, G.; Arlt, Jochen; Bryant, P.; Sibbett, Wilson; Dholakia, Kishan

    2003-11-01

    Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) laser modes (annular shaped modes with helical phase fronts) are used to both manipulate and cut microscopic particles. We use holographically produced LG laser modes to manipulate microscopic bubbles. Interference patterns formed from LG modes of opposite phase helicity are used to create 3D structures and to continuously rotate glass rods. The technique of using and LG beam to create microscopic sections of chromosomes is described.

  13. Mode coupling and resonance instabilities in quasi-two-dimensional dust clusters in complex plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Ke; Kong, Jie; Carmona-Reyes, Jorge; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2014-09-01

    Small quasi-two-dimensional dust clusters consisting of three to eleven particles are formed in an argon plasma under varying rf power. Their normal modes are investigated through their mode spectra obtained from tracking the particles' thermal motion. Detailed coupling patterns between their horizontal and vertical modes are detected for particle numbers up to 7 and discrete instabilities are found for dust clusters with particle number ⩾9, as predicted in previous theory on ion-flow induced mode coupling in small clusters. The instabilities are proven to be induced by resonance between coupled horizontal and vertical normal modes.

  14. An optical particle size spectrometer for aircraft-borne measurements in IAGOS-CARIBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, Markus; Weigelt, Andreas; Assmann, Denise; Pfeifer, Sascha; Muller, Thomas; Conrath, Thomas; Voigtlander, Jens; Heintzenberg, Jost; Wiedensohler, Alfred; Martinsson, Bengt G.; Deshler, Terry; Brenninkmeijer, Carl A. M.; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    The particle number size distribution is an important parameter to characterize the atmospheric aerosol and its influence on the Earth's climate. Here we describe a new optical particle size spectrometer (OPSS) for measurements of the accumulation mode particle number size distribution in the tropopause region on board a passenger aircraft (IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory: In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container). A modified KS93 particle sensor from RION Co., Ltd., together with a new airflow system and a dedicated data acquisition system, is the key component of the CARIBIC OPSS. The instrument records individual particle pulse signal curves in the particle size range 130-1110 nm diameter (for a particle refractive index of 1.47-i0.006) together with a time stamp and thus allows the post-flight choice of the time resolution and the size distribution bin width. The CARIBIC OPSS has a 50 % particle detection diameter of 152 nm and a maximum asymptotic counting efficiency of 98 %. The instrument's measurement performance shows no pressure dependency and no particle coincidence for free tropospheric conditions. The size response function of the CARIBIC OPSS was obtained by a polystyrene latex calibration in combination with model calculations. Particle number size distributions measured with the new OPSS in the lowermost stratosphere agreed within a factor of 2 in concentration with balloon-borne measurements over western North America. Since June 2010 the CARIBIC OPSS is deployed once per month in the IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory.

  15. An optical particle size spectrometer for aircraft-borne measurements in IAGOS-CARIBIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermann, M.; Weigelt, A.; Assmann, D.; Pfeifer, S.; Müller, T.; Conrath, T.; Voigtländer, J.; Heintzenberg, J.; Wiedensohler, A.; Martinsson, B. G.; Deshler, T.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Zahn, A.

    2015-11-01

    The particle number size distribution is an important parameter to characterize the atmospheric aerosol and its influence on the Earth's climate. Here we describe a new Optical Particle Size Spectrometer (OPSS) for measurements of the accumulation mode particle number size distribution in the tropopause region onboard a passenger aircraft (IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory (In-service Aircraft for a Global Observing System - Civil Aircraft for Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container)). A modified "KS93 particle sensor" from RION Co., Ltd. together with a new airflow system and a dedicated data acquisition system are the key components of the CARIBIC OPSS. The instrument records individual particle pulses in the particle size range 130-1110 nm diameter (for a particle refractive index of 1.47-i0.006 for an upper tropospheric (UT) aerosol particle) and thus allows the post-flight choice of the time resolution and the size distribution bin width. The CARIBIC OPSS has a 50 % particle detection diameter of 152 nm and a maximum asymptotic counting efficiency of 98 %. The instruments measurement performance shows no pressure dependency and no coincidence for free tropospheric conditions. The size response function of the CARIBIC OPSS was obtained by a polystyrene latex calibration in combination with model calculations. Particle number size distributions measured with the new OPSS in the lowermost stratosphere agreed within a factor of two in concentration with balloon-borne measurements over western North America. Since June 2010 the CARIBIC OPSS is deployed once per month in the IAGOS-CARIBIC observatory.

  16. Particle therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Raju, M.R.

    1993-09-01

    Particle therapy has a long history. The experimentation with particles for their therapeutic application got started soon after they were produced in the laboratory. Physicists played a major role in proposing the potential applications in radiotherapy as well as in the development of particle therapy. A brief review of the current status of particle radiotherapy with some historical perspective is presented and specific contributions made by physicists will be pointed out wherever appropriate. The rationale of using particles in cancer treatment is to reduce the treatment volume to the target volume by using precise dose distributions in three dimensions by using particles such as protons and to improve the differential effects on tumors compared to normal tissues by using high-LET radiations such as neutrons. Pions and heavy ions combine the above two characteristics.

  17. Particle astrophysics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadoulet, Bernard; Cronin, James; Aprile, Elena; Barish, Barry C.; Beier, Eugene W.; Brandenberger, Robert; Cabrera, Blas; Caldwell, David; Cassiday, George; Cline, David B.

    1991-01-01

    The following scientific areas are reviewed: (1) cosmology and particle physics (particle physics and the early universe, dark matter, and other relics); (2) stellar physics and particles (solar neutrinos, supernovae, and unconventional particle physics); (3) high energy gamma ray and neutrino astronomy; (4) cosmic rays (space and ground observations). Highest scientific priorities for the next decade include implementation of the current program, new initiatives, and longer-term programs. Essential technological developments, such as cryogenic detectors of particles, new solar neutrino techniques, and new extensive air shower detectors, are discussed. Also a certain number of institutional issues (the funding of particle astrophysics, recommended funding mechanisms, recommended facilities, international collaborations, and education and technology) which will become critical in the coming decade are presented.

  18. Quantum limited particle sensing in optical tweezers

    SciTech Connect

    Tay, J.W.; Hsu, Magnus T. L.; Bowen, Warwick P.

    2009-12-15

    Particle sensing in optical tweezers systems provides information on the position, velocity, and force of the specimen particles. The conventional quadrant detection scheme is applied ubiquitously in optical tweezers experiments to quantify these parameters. In this paper, we show that quadrant detection is nonoptimal for particle sensing in optical tweezers and propose an alternative optimal particle sensing scheme based on spatial homodyne detection. A formalism for particle sensing in terms of transverse spatial modes is developed and numerical simulations of the efficacies of both quadrant and spatial homodyne detection are shown. We demonstrate that 1 order of magnitude improvement in particle sensing sensitivity can be achieved using spatial homodyne over quadrant detection.

  19. Method for direct detection of pitch angle scattering of energetic electrons caused by whistler mode chorus emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitahara, M.; Katoh, Y.

    2016-06-01

    The Wave-Particle Interaction Analyzer (WPIA), a new instrument proposed by Fukuhara et al. (2009), measures the relative phase angle between the wave magnetic field vector and the velocity vector of each particle and calculates the energy exchange from waves to particles. In this study, we expand its applicability by proposing a method of using the WPIA to directly detect pitch angle scattering of resonant particles by plasma waves by calculating the g values. The g value is defined as the accumulation value of the Lorentz force acting on each particle and indicates the lost momentum of waves. We apply the proposed method to the results of a one-dimensional electron hybrid simulation reproducing the generation of whistler mode chorus emissions around the magnetic equator. Using the wave and particle data obtained at fixed observation points assumed in the simulation system, we conduct a pseudo-observation of the simulation result using the WPIA and analyze the g values. Our analysis yielded significant values indicating the strong pitch angle scattering for electrons in the kinetic energy and pitch angle ranges satisfying the cyclotron resonance condition with the reproduced chorus emissions. The results of this study demonstrate that the proposed method enables us to directly and quantitatively identify the location at which pitch angle scattering occurs in the simulation system and that the method can be applied to the results of space-based observations by the forthcoming Exploration of energization and Radiation in Geospace (ERG) satellite.

  20. Beam distribution modification by Alfven modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-05-15

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude toroidal Alfven eigenmodes and reversed shear Alfven eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison to experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  1. Modeling source contributions to submicron particle number concentrations measured in Rochester, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Ogulei, D.; Hopke, P.K.; Chalupa, D.C.; Utell, M.J.

    2007-02-15

    An advanced receptor model was used to elicit source information based on ambient submicron (0.01-0.47 {mu}m) particle number concentrations, gaseous species, and meteorological variables measured at the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation central monitoring site in Rochester, NY. Four seasonal data sets (winter, spring, summer, and fall) were independently investigated. A total of ten different sources were identified, including two traffic factors, two nucleation factors, industrial emissions, residential/commercial heating, secondary nitrate, secondary sulfate, ozone-rich secondary aerosol, and regionally transported aerosol. The resolved sources were generally characterized by similar number modes for either winter, spring, summer or fall. The size distributions for nucleation were dominated by the smallest particles ({lt}10-30 nm) that gradually grew to larger sizes as could be seen by observing the volume profiles. In addition, the nucleation factors were closely linked to traffic rush hours suggesting that cooling of tail-pipe emissions may have induced nucleation activity in the vicinity of the highways. Industrial emissions were dominated by emissions from coal-fired power plants that were located to the northwest of the sampling site. These facilities represent the largest point emission sources of SO{sub 2}, and probably ultrafine ({lt}0.1 {mu}m) or submicron particles, in Rochester. Regionally transported material was characterized by accumulation mode particles. Air parcel back-trajectories showed transport of air masses from the industrial midwest.

  2. Microspectroscopic Analysis of Anthropogenic- and Biogenic-Influenced Aerosol Particles during the SOAS Field Campaign

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ault, A. P.; Bondy, A. L.; Nhliziyo, M. V.; Bertman, S. B.; Pratt, K.; Shepson, P. B.

    2013-12-01

    During the summer, the southeastern United States experiences a cooling haze due to the interaction of anthropogenic and biogenic aerosol sources. An objective of the summer 2013 Southern Oxidant and Aerosol Study (SOAS) was to improve our understanding of how trace gases and aerosols are contributing to this relative cooling through light scattering and absorption. To improve understanding of biogenic-anthropogenic interactions through secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation on primary aerosol cores requires detailed physicochemical characterization of the particles after uptake and processing. Our measurements focus on single particle analysis of aerosols in the accumulation mode (300-1000 nm) collected using a multi orifice uniform deposition impactor (MOUDI) at the Centreville, Alabama SEARCH site. Particles were characterized using an array of microscopic and spectroscopic techniques, including: scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), and Raman microspectroscopy. These analyses provide detailed information on particle size, morphology, elemental composition, and functional groups. This information is combined with mapping capabilities to explore individual particle spatial patterns and how that impacts structural characteristics. The improved understanding will be used to explore how sources and processing (such as SOA coating of soot) change particle structure (i.e. core shell) and how the altered optical properties impact air quality/climate effects on a regional scale.

  3. Estuarine fine-particle budget determined from radionuclide tracers

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Cutshall, N.H.; Larsen, I.L.; Simpson, H.J.; Trier, R.M.; Bopp, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The sedimentary distributions of radiocesium and plutonium have been used to determine patterns of fine-particle accumulation, estimate net sediment fluxes from different sources, and develop a fine-particle budget for the Hudson-Raritan estuary. It is proposed that the rates and patterns of fine-particle accumulation reflect a sediment surface in dynamic equilibrium with the wave and current regimes. Rates of accumulation in most estuarine areas appear to equal the rate of sea-level rise or land subsidence. Localized areas, which have not yet attained or are presently out of equilibrium, serve as fine particle traps. 13 references, 1 table.

  4. Stabilization of Ballooning Modes by Nonparaxial Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arsenin, V.V.; Zvonkov, A.V.; Skovoroda, A.A.

    2005-01-15

    An analysis is made of the effect of high-curvature stabilizing nonparaxial elements (cells) on the MHD plasma stability in open confinement systems and in confinement systems with closed magnetic field lines. It is shown that the population of particles trapped in such cells has a stabilizing effect not only on convective (flute) modes but also on ballooning modes, which govern the maximum possible {beta} value. In the kinetic approach, which distinguishes between the effects of trapped and passing particles, the maximum possible {beta} values consistent with stability can be much higher than those predicted by the MHD model.

  5. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic polymer particles are formed by swelling porous, polymer particles and impregnating the particles with an aqueous solution of precursor magnetic metal salt such as an equimolar mixture of ferrous chloride and ferric chloride. On addition of a basic reagent such as dilute sodium hydroxide, the metal salts are converted to crystals of magnetite which are uniformly contained througout the pores of the polymer particle. The magnetite content can be increased and neutral buoyancy achieved by repetition of the impregnaton and neutralization steps to adjust the magnetite content to a desired level.

  6. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Experiments and modeling studies have shown that deliquesced aerosols can be present not only as one-phase system containing organics, inorganic salts and water, but often as two-phase systems consisting of a predominantly organic and a predominantly inorganic aqueous phase 1,2. Recent laboratory studies conducted with model mixtures representing tropospheric aerosols1,2,3, secondary organic aerosol (SOA) from smog chamber experiments4, and field measurements5 suggest that liquid- liquid phase separations (LLPS) is indeed a common phenomenon in mixed organic/ ammonium sulfate (AS) particles. During LLPS, particles may adopt different morphologies mainly core- shell and partially engulfed. A core- shell configuration will have consequences for heterogeneous chemistry and hygroscopicity and as a result will alter the optical properties of the particles since the aqueous inorganic-rich phase will be totally enclosed by a probably highly viscous organic coating with low diffusivity for reactants and water. The primary objective of this project is to establish a method for investigating the morphology of mixed inorganic and absorbing organic compounds of atmospheric relevance and study their radiative properties before, during, and after phase transitions mainly during LLPS. This will be the first study looking into the radiative effect of LLPS in detail. In this first experiment, the behavior of single droplets of carminic acid (CA)/ AS/ H2O mixture was monitored during relative humidity (RH) cycles using optical microscopy. The same mixture particle was levitated in an electrodynamic balance (EDB) and the change in its absorption properties was measured at varying RH. We also intend to determine the occurrence of LLPS in accumulation- sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode

  7. Spherical harmonic modes of 5.5 post-Newtonian gravitational wave polarizations and associated factorized resummed waveforms for a particle in circular orbit around a Schwarzschild black hole

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Ryuichi; Iyer, Bala R.

    2010-08-15

    Recent breakthroughs in numerical relativity enable one to examine the validity of the post-Newtonian expansion in the late stages of inspiral. For the comparison between post-Newtonian (PN) expansion and numerical simulations, the waveforms in terms of the spin-weighted spherical harmonics are more useful than the plus and cross polarizations, which are used for data analysis of gravitational waves. Factorized resummed waveforms achieve better agreement with numerical results than the conventional Taylor expanded post-Newtonian waveforms. In this paper, we revisit the post-Newtonian expansion of gravitational waves for a test particle of mass {mu} in circular orbit of radius r{sub 0} around a Schwarzschild black hole of mass M and derive the spherical harmonic components associated with the gravitational wave polarizations up to order v{sup 11} beyond Newtonian. Using the more accurate h{sub lm}'s computed in this work, we provide the more complete set of associated {rho}{sub lm}'s and {delta}{sub lm}'s that form important bricks in the factorized resummation of waveforms with potential applications for the construction of further improved waveforms for prototypical compact binary sources in the future. We also provide ready-to-use expressions of the 5.5PN gravitational waves polarizations h{sub +} and h{sub x} in the test-particle limit for gravitational waves data analysis applications. Additionally, we provide closed analytical expressions for 2.5PN h{sub lm}, 2PN {rho}{sub lm}, and 3PN {delta}{sub lm}, for general multipolar orders l and m in the test-particle limit. Finally, we also examine the implications of the present analysis for compact binary sources in Laser Interferometer Space Antenna.

  8. FINE AND COARSE PARTICLES: CONCENTRATION RELATIONSHIPS RELEVANT TO EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fine particles and coarse particles are defined in terms of the modal structure of particle size distributions typically observed in the atmosphere. Differences among the various modes are discussed. The fractions of fine and coarse particles collected in specific size ranges, ...

  9. List mode multichannel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  10. Maximum likelihood decoding analysis of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-Accumulate (RA) codes are the simplest turbo-like codes that achieve good performance. However, they cannot compete with Turbo codes or low-density parity check codes (LDPC) as far as performance is concerned. The Accumulate Repeat Accumulate (ARA) codes, as a subclass of LDPC codes, are obtained by adding a pre-coder in front of RA codes with puncturing where an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. These codes not only are very simple, but also achieve excellent performance with iterative decoding. In this paper, the performance of these codes with (ML) decoding are analyzed and compared to random codes by very tight bounds. The weight distribution of some simple ARA codes is obtained, and through existing tightest bounds we have shown the ML SNR threshold of ARA codes approaches very closely to the performance of random codes. We have shown that the use of precoder improves the SNR threshold but interleaving gain remains unchanged with respect to RA code with puncturing.

  11. Morphology and Optical Properties of Mixed Aerosol Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, Mehrnoush M.; Krieger, Ulrich; Rudich, Yinon; Marcolli, Claudia; Peter, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    LLPS in accumulation-sized particles and the change in their absorption using a cavity ring down aerosol spectrometer. If LLPS alters the absorptive properties of the suggested model aerosols significantly, absorption measurements of accumulation mode particles of the same composition would allow proving that LLPS indeed occurs in particles of accumulation mode size. Up to now LLPS has not been studied for particles in this size range. References: 1. Bertram, et al. Atmos. Chem & Phys, 11(21), 10995-11006, 2011.
 2. Krieger, et al. Chemical Society Reviews, 41(19), 6631-6662, 2012 
3. Song, M. et al. Geophys Res Lett, 39(19), 2012b 4. Smith et al. Atmos Chem & Phys, 12(20), 9613- 9628, 2012.
 5. You, Y. et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 109(33), 13188-13193, 2012.

  12. Aerosol size distribution and new particle formation in the western Yangtze River Delta of China: 2 years of measurements at the SORPES station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X. M.; Ding, A. J.; Nie, W.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Herrmann, E.; Xie, Y. N.; Zheng, L. F.; Manninen, H.; Aalto, P.; Sun, J. N.; Xu, Z. N.; Chi, X. G.; Huang, X.; Boy, M.; Virkkula, A.; Yang, X.-Q.; Fu, C. B.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-11-01

    Aerosol particles play important roles in regional air quality and global climate change. In this study, we analyzed 2 years (2011-2013) of measurements of submicron particles (6-800 nm) at a suburban site in the western Yangtze River Delta (YRD) of eastern China. The number concentrations (NCs) of particles in the nucleation, Aitken and accumulation modes were 5300 ± 5500, 8000 ± 4400, 5800 ± 3200 cm-3, respectively. The NCs of total particles are comparable to those at urban/suburban sites in other Chinese megacities, such as Beijing, but about 10 times higher than in the remote western China. Long-range and regional transport largely influenced number concentrations and size distributions of submicron particles. The highest and lowest accumulation-mode particle number concentrations were observed in air masses from the YRD and coastal regions, respectively. Continental air masses from inland brought the highest concentrations of nucleation-mode particles. New particle formation (NPF) events, apparent in 44 % of the effective measurement days, occurred frequently in all the seasons except winter. The frequency of NPF in spring, summer and autumn is much higher than other measurement sites in China. Sulfuric acid was found to be the main driver of NPF events. The particle formation rate was the highest in spring (3.6 ± 2.4 cm-3 s-1), whereas the particle growth rate had the highest values in summer (12.8 ± 4.4 nm h-1). The formation rate was typically high in relatively clean air masses, whereas the growth rate tended to be high in the polluted YRD air masses. The frequency of NPF events and the particle growth rates showed a strong year-to-year difference. In the summer of 2013, associated with a multi-week heat wave and strong photochemical processes, NPF events occurred with larger frequency and higher growth rates compared with the same period in 2012. The difference in the location and strength of the subtropical high pressure system, which influences

  13. Lake Spray Aerosol: A Chemical Signature from Individual Ambient Particles.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; May, Nathaniel W; Colón-Bernal, Isabel D; Pratt, Kerri A; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-09-20

    Aerosol production from wave breaking on freshwater lakes, including the Laurentian Great Lakes, is poorly understood in comparison to sea spray aerosol (SSA). Aerosols from freshwater have the potential to impact regional climate and public health. Herein, lake spray aerosol (LSA) is defined as aerosol generated from freshwater through bubble bursting, analogous to SSA from seawater. A chemical signature for LSA was determined from measurements of ambient particles collected on the southeastern shore of Lake Michigan during an event (July 6-8, 2015) with wave heights up to 3.1 m. For comparison, surface freshwater was collected, and LSA were generated in the laboratory. Single particle microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis of field and laboratory-generated samples show that LSA particles are primarily calcium (carbonate) with lower concentrations of other inorganic ions and organic material. Laboratory number size distributions show ultrafine and accumulation modes at 53 (±1) and 276 (±8) nm, respectively. This study provides the first chemical signature for LSA. LSA composition is shown to be coupled to Great Lakes water chemistry (Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+)) and distinct from SSA. Understanding LSA physicochemical properties will improve assessment of LSA impacts on regional air quality, climate, and health. PMID:27548099

  14. Lake Spray Aerosol: A Chemical Signature from Individual Ambient Particles.

    PubMed

    Axson, Jessica L; May, Nathaniel W; Colón-Bernal, Isabel D; Pratt, Kerri A; Ault, Andrew P

    2016-09-20

    Aerosol production from wave breaking on freshwater lakes, including the Laurentian Great Lakes, is poorly understood in comparison to sea spray aerosol (SSA). Aerosols from freshwater have the potential to impact regional climate and public health. Herein, lake spray aerosol (LSA) is defined as aerosol generated from freshwater through bubble bursting, analogous to SSA from seawater. A chemical signature for LSA was determined from measurements of ambient particles collected on the southeastern shore of Lake Michigan during an event (July 6-8, 2015) with wave heights up to 3.1 m. For comparison, surface freshwater was collected, and LSA were generated in the laboratory. Single particle microscopy and mass spectrometry analysis of field and laboratory-generated samples show that LSA particles are primarily calcium (carbonate) with lower concentrations of other inorganic ions and organic material. Laboratory number size distributions show ultrafine and accumulation modes at 53 (±1) and 276 (±8) nm, respectively. This study provides the first chemical signature for LSA. LSA composition is shown to be coupled to Great Lakes water chemistry (Ca(2+) > Mg(2+) > Na(+) > K(+)) and distinct from SSA. Understanding LSA physicochemical properties will improve assessment of LSA impacts on regional air quality, climate, and health.

  15. Special purpose modes in photonic band gap fibers

    DOEpatents

    Spencer, James; Noble, Robert; Campbell, Sara

    2013-04-02

    Photonic band gap fibers are described having one or more defects suitable for the acceleration of electrons or other charged particles. Methods and devices are described for exciting special purpose modes in the defects including laser coupling schemes as well as various fiber designs and components for facilitating excitation of desired modes. Results are also presented showing effects on modes due to modes in other defects within the fiber and due to the proximity of defects to the fiber edge. Techniques and devices are described for controlling electrons within the defect(s). Various applications for electrons or other energetic charged particles produced by such photonic band gap fibers are also described.

  16. Weakly propagating unstable modes in unmagnetized plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Tautz, R. C.; Lerche, I.

    2007-07-15

    The basic theory of isolated kinetic Weibel modes [Tautz et al., J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 39, 13831 (2006)] is extended to include small real frequencies, describing unstable wave modes that propagate while growing. The new method is applicable for all kinds of arbitrary (therefore including symmetric as well as asymmetric) relativistic particle distribution functions, where the axis of wave propagation describes an oblique angle with respect to a symmetry axis. For the two examples of a warm, counterstreaming Cauchy distribution and a cold two-stream distribution it is shown that, although there are now broad regions in wavenumber space of unstable wave modes, the isolated Weibel modes (which, per definition, do not propagate) are recovered. Thus, this phenomenon deserves future investigation, because, in astrophysical plasmas, virtually all distribution functions are likely to be asymmetric, therefore giving rise to isolated Weibel modes.

  17. Preparation of topological modes by Lyapunov control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Z. C.; Zhao, X. L.; Yi, X. X.

    2015-09-01

    By Lyapunov control, we present a proposal to drive quasi-particles into a topological mode in quantum systems described by a quadratic Hamiltonian. The merit of this control is the individual manipulations on the boundary sites. We take the Kitaev’s chain as an illustration for Fermi systems and show that an arbitrary excitation mode can be steered into the Majorana zero mode by manipulating the chemical potential of the boundary sites. For Bose systems, taking the noninteracting Su-Schrieffer-Heeger (SSH) model as an example, we illustrate how to drive the system into the edge mode. The sensitivity of the fidelity to perturbations and uncertainties in the control fields and initial modes is also examined. The experimental feasibility of the proposal and the possibility to replace the continuous control field with square wave pulses is finally discussed.

  18. Size evolution of ultrafine particles: Differential signatures of normal and episodic events.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manish; Khan, Arshad; Anand, S; Sapra, B K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fireworks on the aerosol number characteristics of atmosphere was studied for an urban mega city. Measurements were made at 50 m height to assess the local changes around the festival days. Apart from the increase in total number concentration and characteristic accumulation mode, short-term increase of ultrafine particle concentration was noted. Total number concentration varies an order of magnitude during the measurement period in which peak occurs at a frequency of approximately one per day. On integral scale, it seems not possible to distinguish an episodic (e.g. firework bursting induced aerosol emission) and a normal (ambient atmospheric changes) event. However these events could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis around number concentration peaks. The results are discussed relative to past studies and inferences are drawn towards aerosol signatures of firework bursting. The short-term burst in ultrafine particle concentration can pose an inhalation hazard.

  19. Size evolution of ultrafine particles: Differential signatures of normal and episodic events.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Manish; Khan, Arshad; Anand, S; Sapra, B K

    2016-01-01

    The effect of fireworks on the aerosol number characteristics of atmosphere was studied for an urban mega city. Measurements were made at 50 m height to assess the local changes around the festival days. Apart from the increase in total number concentration and characteristic accumulation mode, short-term increase of ultrafine particle concentration was noted. Total number concentration varies an order of magnitude during the measurement period in which peak occurs at a frequency of approximately one per day. On integral scale, it seems not possible to distinguish an episodic (e.g. firework bursting induced aerosol emission) and a normal (ambient atmospheric changes) event. However these events could be differentiated on the basis of size evolution analysis around number concentration peaks. The results are discussed relative to past studies and inferences are drawn towards aerosol signatures of firework bursting. The short-term burst in ultrafine particle concentration can pose an inhalation hazard. PMID:26552523

  20. Echo particle image velocimetry.

    PubMed

    DeMarchi, Nicholas; White, Christopher

    2012-12-27

    The transport of mass, momentum, and energy in fluid flows is ultimately determined by spatiotemporal distributions of the fluid velocity field.(1) Consequently, a prerequisite for understanding, predicting, and controlling fluid flows is the capability to measure the velocity field with adequate spatial and temporal resolution.(2) For velocity measurements in optically opaque fluids or through optically opaque geometries, echo particle image velocimetry (EPIV) is an attractive diagnostic technique to generate "instantaneous" two-dimensional fields of velocity.(3,4,5,6) In this paper, the operating protocol for an EPIV system built by integrating a commercial medical ultrasound machine(7) with a PC running commercial particle image velocimetry (PIV) software(8) is described, and validation measurements in Hagen-Poiseuille (i.e., laminar pipe) flow are reported. For the EPIV measurements, a phased array probe connected to the medical ultrasound machine is used to generate a two-dimensional ultrasound image by pulsing the piezoelectric probe elements at different times. Each probe element transmits an ultrasound pulse into the fluid, and tracer particles in the fluid (either naturally occurring or seeded) reflect ultrasound echoes back to the probe where they are recorded. The amplitude of the reflected ultrasound waves and their time delay relative to transmission are used to create what is known as B-mode (brightness mode) two-dimensional ultrasound images. Specifically, the time delay is used to determine the position of the scatterer in the fluid and the amplitude is used to assign intensity to the scatterer. The time required to obtain a single B-mode image, t, is determined by the time it take to pulse all the elements of the phased array probe. For acquiring multiple B-mode images, the frame rate of the system in frames per second (fps) = 1/δt. (See 9 for a review of ultrasound imaging.) For a typical EPIV experiment, the frame rate is between 20-60 fps

  1. Pensions and Household Wealth Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Gary V.; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Economists have long suggested that higher private pension benefits "crowd out" other sources of household wealth accumulation. We exploit detailed information on pensions and lifetime earnings for older workers in the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study and employ an instrumental-variable (IV) identification strategy to estimate…

  2. Extracting entanglement from identical particles.

    PubMed

    Killoran, N; Cramer, M; Plenio, M B

    2014-04-18

    Identical particles and entanglement are both fundamental components of quantum mechanics. However, when identical particles are condensed in a single spatial mode, the standard notions of entanglement, based on clearly identifiable subsystems, break down. This has led many to conclude that such systems have limited value for quantum information tasks, compared to distinguishable particle systems. To the contrary, we show that any entanglement formally appearing amongst the identical particles, including entanglement due purely to symmetrization, can be extracted into an entangled state of independent modes, which can then be applied to any task. In fact, the entanglement of the mode system is in one-to-one correspondence with the entanglement between the inaccessible identical particles. This settles the long-standing debate about the resource capabilities of such states, in particular spin-squeezed states of Bose-Einstein condensates, while also revealing a new perspective on how and when entanglement is generated in passive optical networks. Our results thus reveal new fundamental connections between entanglement, squeezing, and indistinguishability.

  3. Accumulation of cadmium from the dissolved and particulate phases by the freshwater mussel, Elliptio complanata

    SciTech Connect

    Yankovich, T.

    1995-12-31

    The primary objective of the current study was to quantify cadmium accumulation by Elliptio complanata from suspended particulates relative to the dissolved phase. Results obtained from this study suggest that particle physico-chemical properties and their associated cadmium concentrations may play a role in cadmium bioaccumulation by E. complanata. This accumulation of cadmium is due to direct uptake from the particulate phase and/or accumulation of dissolved cadmium which has leached off particles. The importance of the particulate phase in cadmium uptake is related to the type of particle to which mussels are exposed. No significant cadmium bioaccumulation was observed when mussels consumed Cd-contaminated kaolinite or illite clay particles. Significant uptake was observed by mussels exposed to Cd-contaminated montmorillonite clay particles at high bound cadmium levels; however, the dissolved phase accounted for all observed Cd accumulation, suggesting that equilibrium partitioning into the aqueous phase represented the key route of cadmium uptake from clay particles. Cadmium uptake did not occur when mussels were exposed to natural sediment particles containing low organic carbon concentrations, but significant bioaccumulation was observed when mussels consumed Cd-contaminated sediments with relatively high organic carbon contents. Dissolved cadmium concentrations present in sediment suspensions with low and high organic carbon contents were similar, suggesting that the particulate phase was the source of cadmium uptake. These results indicate that particle processing and selective feeding behaviors by filter-feeding bivalves may play a key role in determining the relative importance of dissolved and particulate phases in cadmium bioaccumulation.

  4. Saturation of Alfvén modes in tokamaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Roscoe; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Gorelenkova, Marina; Podesta, Mario; Ethier, Stephane; Chen, Yang

    2016-11-01

    Growth of Alfvén modes driven unstable by a distribution of high energy particles up to saturation is investigated with a guiding center code, using numerical eigenfunctions produced by linear theory and a numerical high energy particle distribution, in order to make detailed comparison with experiment and with models for saturation amplitudes and the modification of beam profiles. Two innovations are introduced. First, a very noise free means of obtaining the mode-particle energy and momentum transfer is introduced, and secondly, a spline representation of the actual beam particle distribution is used.

  5. Saturation of Alfvén modes in tokamaks

    DOE PAGES

    White, Roscoe; Gorelenkov, Nikolai; Gorelenkova, Marina; Podesta, Mario; Ethier, Stephane; Chen, Yang

    2016-09-20

    Here, the growth of Alfvén modes driven unstable by a distribution of high energy particles up to saturation is investigated with a guiding center code, using numerical eigenfunctions produced by linear theory and a numerical high energy particle distribution, in order to make detailed comparison with experiment and with models for saturation amplitudes and the modification of beam profiles. Two innovations are introduced. First, a very noise free means of obtaining the mode-particle energy and momentum transfer is introduced, and secondly, a spline representation of the actual beam particle distribution is used.

  6. Assessing the Capacity of Plant Species to Accumulate Particulate Matter in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Li; Ma, Zeyu; Xu, Yansen; Sun, Fengbin; Lun, Xiaoxiu; Liu, Xuhui; Chen, Jungang; Yu, Xinxiao

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution causes serious problems in spring in northern China; therefore, studying the ability of different plants to accumulate particulate matter (PM) at the beginning of the growing season may benefit urban planners in their attempts to control air pollution. This study evaluated deposits of PM on the leaves and in the wax layer of 35 species (11 shrubs, 24 trees) in Beijing, China. Differences in the accumulation of PM were observed between species. Cephalotaxus sinensis, Euonymus japonicus, Broussonetia papyriferar, Koelreuteria paniculata and Quercus variabilis were all efficient in capturing small particles. The plants exhibiting high amounts of total PM accumulation (on leaf surfaces and/or in the wax layer), also showed comparatively high levels of PM accumulation across all particle sizes. A comparison of shrubs and trees did not reveal obvious differences in their ability to accumulate particles based on growth form; a combination of plantings with different growth forms can efficiently reduce airborne PM concentrations near the ground. To test the relationships between leaf traits and PM accumulation, leaf samples of selected species were observed using a scanning electron microscope. Growth forms with greater amounts of pubescence and increased roughness supported PM accumulation; the adaxial leaf surfaces collected more particles than the abaxial surfaces. The results of this study may inform the selection of species for urban green areas where the goal is to capture air pollutants and mitigate the adverse effects of air pollution on human health. PMID:26506104

  7. Measurement of intravenously administered γ-Fe2O3 particle amount in mice tissues using vibrating sample magnetometer.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Mikio; Miyamoto, Ryoichi; Oda, Tatsuya; Ohara, Yusuke; Yanagihara, Hideto; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Kita, Eiji

    2014-12-01

    Dispersions of platelet γ-Fe2O3 particles 30-50nm in size were intravenously administered to mice and the amount of particles accumulated in each tissue was obtained by magnetization measurement using a vibrating sample magnetometer. Background noise was greatly reduced by measuring dried tissues under a magnetic field of 500 Oe so that the effect of diamagnetism was slight. Remarkable particle accumulation was observed in the liver and spleen. Considerable particle accumulation was observed in the lung when a large quantity of γ-Fe2 O3 particles was administered. There was no significant particle accumulation in the kidney and heart.

  8. In Situ Solid Particle Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agui, Juan H.; Vijayakumar, R.

    2013-01-01

    Particle seeding is a key diagnostic component of filter testing and flow imaging techniques. Typical particle generators rely on pressurized air or gas sources to propel the particles into the flow field. Other techniques involve liquid droplet atomizers. These conventional techniques have drawbacks that include challenging access to the flow field, flow and pressure disturbances to the investigated flow, and they are prohibitive in high-temperature, non-standard, extreme, and closed-system flow conditions and environments. In this concept, the particles are supplied directly within a flow environment. A particle sample cartridge containing the particles is positioned somewhere inside the flow field. The particles are ejected into the flow by mechanical brush/wiper feeding and sieving that takes place within the cartridge chamber. Some aspects of this concept are based on established material handling techniques, but they have not been used previously in the current configuration, in combination with flow seeding concepts, and in the current operational mode. Unlike other particle generation methods, this concept has control over the particle size range ejected, breaks up agglomerates, and is gravity-independent. This makes this device useful for testing in microgravity environments.

  9. Magnetic particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Manchium (Inventor); Colvin, Michael S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Richards, Gil F. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Metal oxide containing polymers and particularly styrene, acrylic or protein polymers containing fine, magnetic iron oxide particles are formed by combining a NO.sub.2 -substituted polymer with an acid such as hydrochloric acid in the presence of metal, particularly iron particles. The iron is oxidized to fine, black Fe.sub.3 O.sub.4 particles which deposit selectively on the polymer particles. Nitrated polymers are formed by reacting functionally substituted, nitrated organic compounds such as trinitrobenzene sulfonate or dinitrofluoro benzene with a functionally coreactive polymer such as an amine modified acrylic polymer or a protein. Other transition metals such as cobalt can also be incorporated into polymers using this method.

  10. Particle beam and crabbing and deflecting structure

    DOEpatents

    Delayen, Jean

    2011-02-08

    A new type of structure for the deflection and crabbing of particle bunches in particle accelerators comprising a number of parallel transverse electromagnetic (TEM)-resonant) lines operating in opposite phase from each other. Such a structure is significantly more compact than conventional crabbing cavities operating the transverse magnetic TM mode, thus allowing low frequency designs.

  11. Aerosol size distribution and new particle formation in western Yangtze River Delta of China: two-year measurement at the SORPES station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, X. M.; Ding, A. J.; Nie, W.; Petäjä, T.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Herrmann, E.; Xie, Y. N.; Zheng, L. F.; Manninen, H.; Aalto, P.; Sun, J. N.; Xu, Z. N.; Chi, X. G.; Huang, X.; Boy, M.; Virkkula, A.; Yang, X.-Q.; Fu, C. B.; Kulmala, M.

    2015-04-01

    Aerosol particles play important roles in regional air quality and global climate change. In this study, we analyzed two-year (2011-2013) of measurements of submicron particles (6-800 nm) at a suburban site in western Yangtze River delta (YRD) of East China. The number concentrations (NCs) of particles in the nucleation, Aitken and accumulation modes were 5300 ± 5500, 8000 ± 4400, 5800 ± 3200 cm-3, respectively. Number concentrations and size distributions of submicron particles were also influenced by long-range and regional transport of air masses. The highest and lowest accumulation mode particle number concentrations were observed in air masses from YRD and coastal region, respectively. Continental air masses from inland had the highest concentrations of nucleation mode particles. New particle formation (NPF) events, apparent in 44% of the effective measurement days, occurred frequently in all the seasons except winter. Radiation and pre-existing particles were found to be the main factors influencing the occurrence of NPF events. The particle formation rate was the highest in spring (3.6 ± 2.4 cm-3 s-1), whereas the particle growth rate had the highest values in summer (12.8 ± 4.4 nm h-1). The formation rate was typically high in relatively clean air masses, whereas the growth rate tended to be high in the polluted YRD air masses. The frequency of NPF events and the growth rate showed a strong year-to-year difference. In the summer of 2013, associated with a multi-week heat wave and photochemical pollution, NPF events occurred more frequently and the growth rate was much higher than in the same period of 2012. The difference in the location and strength of sub-tropical High, which influences the air mass transport pathways and solar radiation, seems to be the driving cause for year-to-year differences. This study reported the longest continuous measurement records of submicron particles in the East China and gained a comprehensive understanding of the

  12. Accumulation and phytotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to Cucurbita pepo.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Joseph; Musante, Craig; Sinha, Saion K; White, Jason C

    2012-04-01

    The effect of bulk and engineered nanoparticle (NP) Ag, Au, Cu, Si, and C at 250 and 750 mg/L on zucchini biomass, transpiration, and element content was determined. The pH of bulk and NP solutions prior to plant growth frequently differed. Nanoparticle Cu solution pH was significantly higher than bulk Cu, whereas for Ag and C, the NPs had significantly lower pH. Plants were unaffected by Au, regardless of particle size or concentration. NP Ag reduced plant biomass and transpiration by 49-91% compared to equivalent bulk Ag. NP Si at 750 mg/L reduced plant growth and transpiration by 30-51% relative to bulk Si. Bulk and NP Cu were phytotoxic but much of the effect was alleviated by humic acid. The shoot Ag and Cu content did not differ based on particle size or concentration. The accumulation of bulk Au was greater than the NP, but humic acid increased the accumulation of NP and bulk Au by 5.6-fold and 80%, respectively. The uptake of NP Si was 5.6-6.5-fold greater than observed with the bulk element. These findings show that the NPs may have unique phytotoxicity or accumulation patterns and that solution properties can significantly impact particle fate and effects. PMID:22567722

  13. Accumulation and phytotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to Cucurbita pepo.

    PubMed

    Hawthorne, Joseph; Musante, Craig; Sinha, Saion K; White, Jason C

    2012-04-01

    The effect of bulk and engineered nanoparticle (NP) Ag, Au, Cu, Si, and C at 250 and 750 mg/L on zucchini biomass, transpiration, and element content was determined. The pH of bulk and NP solutions prior to plant growth frequently differed. Nanoparticle Cu solution pH was significantly higher than bulk Cu, whereas for Ag and C, the NPs had significantly lower pH. Plants were unaffected by Au, regardless of particle size or concentration. NP Ag reduced plant biomass and transpiration by 49-91% compared to equivalent bulk Ag. NP Si at 750 mg/L reduced plant growth and transpiration by 30-51% relative to bulk Si. Bulk and NP Cu were phytotoxic but much of the effect was alleviated by humic acid. The shoot Ag and Cu content did not differ based on particle size or concentration. The accumulation of bulk Au was greater than the NP, but humic acid increased the accumulation of NP and bulk Au by 5.6-fold and 80%, respectively. The uptake of NP Si was 5.6-6.5-fold greater than observed with the bulk element. These findings show that the NPs may have unique phytotoxicity or accumulation patterns and that solution properties can significantly impact particle fate and effects.

  14. Accumulations of Ca/P in the core of hairs from Taklamakan desert mummies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallégot, P.; Walter, P.; Cotte, M.; Audinot, J.-N.; Guillot, J.; Migeon, H.-N.; Tallarek, E.; Hagenhoff, B.

    2008-12-01

    Hairs from mummies discovered in the west China Taklamakan desert are investigated by NanoSIMS, ToF-SIMS, Auger and TEM. Intra-medullar accumulations of calcium and phosphorus are described. The present study is an attempt to understand the significance of these accumulations. Their possible exogenous or endogenous origin is debated. Moreover, TEM revealed a particular nature of the accumulation that decorates a fibrilar structure of the medullar. To what extent did molecular control govern the particle growth and does such an accumulation represent a step toward the mineralization of the keratinized fiber?

  15. Auroral particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, David S.

    1987-01-01

    The problems concerning the aurora posed prior to the war are now either solved in principle or were restated in a more fundamental form. The pre-war hypothesis concerning the nature of the auroral particles and their energies was fully confirmed, with the exception that helium and oxygen ions were identified as participating in the auroral particle precipitation in addition to the protons. The nature of the near-Earth energization processes affecting auroral particles was clarified. Charged particle trajectories in various electric field geometries were modeled. The physical problems have now moved from determining the nature and geometry of the electric fields, which accelerate charged particles near the Earth, to accounting for the existence of these electric fields as a natural consequence of the solar wind's interaction with Earth. Ultimately the reward in continuing the work in auroral and magnetospheric particle dynamics will be a deeper understanding of the subtleties of classical electricity and magnetism as applied to situations not blessed with well-defined and invariant geometries.

  16. Cloud condensation nuclei characteristics of Asian dust particles over the western and central North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uematsu, M.; Furutani, H.; Kawata, R.; Nakayama, H.

    2015-12-01

    Marine aerosols, such as sea salt particles, and sulfate and organic particles originated from marine biotas, exist in the marine atmosphere. Additionally, continental aerosols, such as dust and anthropogenic substances are transported over the open oceans. Variation of number concentration of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) depends on the number-size distribution and chemical compositions of aerosols, and affects the lifetime and the reflectivity of clouds over the open oceans. During the R/V Hakuho Maru KH-12-1 cruise from Callao to Tokyo via Honolulu in the Pacific Ocean (23 January - 7 March 2012), aerosol number-size distribution and CCN number concentration were continuously measured, and the marine aerosols for chemical analysis were collected on shipboard. In the marine atmosphere over the Pacific, averaged aerosol total number concentration (TN) was 280 cm-3. Bimodal number-size distributions were observed frequently with peaks at 40-60 nm (Aitken mode) and 160-230 nm (accumulation mode). CCN concentrations were categorized by assuming three types of particles by chemical compositions (i.e., NaCl; a major component of sea salt particles, (NH4)2SO4; a sulfur oxide originated from the marine biotas, and Oxalic acid; a major component among organic carbon (OC) originated from the marine biotas). Activation Rate (AR), which is defined as the ratio of the number concentrations of CCN against TN, varied mainly because of the number-size distribution. Chemical composition was the factor that determined AR values. However, the AR variations caused by changes of the chemical composition were much smaller than those caused changes of the particle size distribution even when Asian dust were observed over the region on 27-29 February. During the long range transport, rapid coagulation among mineral dust, organics and sea salt particles may accelerate the gravitational setting of marine aerosols and supplies the terrestrial substances to the ocean environment.

  17. Redistribution of particle and antiparticle entanglement in noninertial frames

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Martinez, Eduardo; Fuentes, Ivette

    2011-05-15

    We analyze the entanglement tradeoff between particle and antiparticle modes of a Dirac field from the perspective of inertial and uniformly accelerated observers. Our results show that a redistribution of entanglement between particle and antiparticle modes plays a key role in the survival of femionic field entanglement in the infinite-acceleration limit.

  18. Characteristics of SME biodiesel-fueled diesel particle emissions and the kinetics of oxidation.

    PubMed

    Jung, Heejung; Kittelson, David B; Zachariah, Michael R

    2006-08-15

    Biodiesel is one of the most promising alternative diesel fuels. As diesel emission regulations have become more stringent, the diesel particulate filter (DPF) has become an essential part of the aftertreatment system. Knowledge of kinetics of exhaust particle oxidation for alternative diesel fuels is useful in estimating the change in regeneration behavior of a DPF with such fuels. This study examines the characteristics of diesel particulate emissions as well as kinetics of particle oxidation using a 1996 John Deere T04045TF250 off-highway engine and 100% soy methyl ester (SME) biodiesel (B100) as fuel. Compared to standard D2 fuel, this B100 reduced particle size, number, and volume in the accumulation mode where most of the particle mass is found. At 75% load, number decreased by 38%, DGN decreased from 80 to 62 nm, and volume decreased by 82%. Part of this decrease is likely associated with the fact that the particles were more easily oxidized. Arrhenius parameters for the biodiesel fuel showed a 2-3times greater frequency factor and approximately 6 times higher oxidation rate compared to regular diesel fuel in the range of 700-825 degrees C. The faster oxidation kinetics should facilitate regeneration when used with a DPF.

  19. Chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui

    2013-11-15

    Chromoplasts are special organelles that possess superior ability to synthesize and store massive amounts of carotenoids. They are responsible for the distinctive colors found in fruits, flowers, and roots. Chromoplasts exhibit various morphologies and are derived from either pre-existing chloroplasts or other non-photosynthetic plastids such as proplastids, leucoplasts or amyloplasts. While little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast biogenesis, research progress along with proteomics study of chromoplast proteomes signifies various processes and factors important for chromoplast differentiation and development. Chromoplasts act as a metabolic sink that enables great biosynthesis and high storage capacity of carotenoids. The formation of chromoplasts enhances carotenoid metabolic sink strength and controls carotenoid accumulation in plants. The objective of this review is to provide an integrated view on our understanding of chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  20. Designing a VH-mode core/L-mode edge discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Staebler, G.M.; Hinton, F.L.; Wiley, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    An operating mode with a very high confinement core like the VH-mode but a very low power flow to the divertor plates and low edge particle confinement like an L-mode would be beneficial. For a large tokamak like the proposed ITER, the power density at the separatrix is not that far above the scaled H-mode power threshold so not much of the power can be radiated inside of the separatrix without causing a return to L-mode. The thicker scrape-off layer of an L-mode increases the radiating volume of the scrape-off layer and helps shield impurities from the core. This is especially important if the first wall is metallic. In this paper an H-mode transport model based on E x B velocity shear suppression of turbulence will be used to show that it is possible to have a strongly radiating mantle near the separatrix, which keeps the edge in L-mode, while having a VH-mode core with a broad region of suppressed turbulence. The existing results of enhanced L-mode confinement during impurity injection on a number of tokamaks will be surveyed. The operating conditions which will most likely result in the further improvement of the core confinement by control of the heating, fueling, and torque profiles will be identified.

  1. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  2. The Nature of Accelerating Modes in PBG Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Noble, TRobert J.; /SLAC

    2011-05-19

    Transverse magnetic (TM) modes with phase velocities at or just below the speed of light, c, are intended to accelerate relativistic particles in hollow-core, photonic band gap (PBG) fibers. These are so-called 'surface defect modes', being lattice modes perturbed by the defect to have their frequencies shifted into the band gap, and they can have any phase velocity. PBG fibers also support so-called 'core defect modes' which are characterized as having phase velocities always greater than c and never cross the light line. In this paper we explore the nature of these two classes of accelerating modes and compare their properties.

  3. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD. PMID:26819531

  4. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  5. Few-mode fibers for mode division multiplexing transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hirokazu; Morioka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    A study is presented of the fiber properties needed to achieve 10-mode multiplexing transmission. A combination of MIMO processing with optical LP mode separation is proposed to prevent the need for massive MIMO computation. The impact of mode crosstalk, differential mode delay, and the mode dependent loss of the few-mode fibers on mode multiplexing are discussed.

  6. Surface-atmosphere decoupling limits accumulation at Summit, Greenland.

    PubMed

    Berkelhammer, Max; Noone, David C; Steen-Larsen, Hans Christian; Bailey, Adriana; Cox, Christopher J; O'Neill, Michael S; Schneider, David; Steffen, Konrad; White, James W C

    2016-04-01

    Despite rapid melting in the coastal regions of the Greenland Ice Sheet, a significant area (~40%) of the ice sheet rarely experiences surface melting. In these regions, the controls on annual accumulation are poorly constrained owing to surface conditions (for example, surface clouds, blowing snow, and surface inversions), which render moisture flux estimates from myriad approaches (that is, eddy covariance, remote sensing, and direct observations) highly uncertain. Accumulation is partially determined by the temperature dependence of saturation vapor pressure, which influences the maximum humidity of air parcels reaching the ice sheet interior. However, independent proxies for surface temperature and accumulation from ice cores show that the response of accumulation to temperature is variable and not generally consistent with a purely thermodynamic control. Using three years of stable water vapor isotope profiles from a high altitude site on the Greenland Ice Sheet, we show that as the boundary layer becomes increasingly stable, a decoupling between the ice sheet and atmosphere occurs. The limited interaction between the ice sheet surface and free tropospheric air reduces the capacity for surface condensation to achieve the rate set by the humidity of the air parcels reaching interior Greenland. The isolation of the surface also acts to recycle sublimated moisture by recondensing it onto fog particles, which returns the moisture back to the surface through gravitational settling. The observations highlight a unique mechanism by which ice sheet mass is conserved, which has implications for understanding both past and future changes in accumulation rate and the isotopic signal in ice cores from Greenland.

  7. [Particle emission characteristics of diesel bus fueled with bio-diesel].

    PubMed

    Lou, Di-Ming; Chen, Feng; Hu, Zhi-Yuan; Tan, Pi-Qiang; Hu, Wei

    2013-10-01

    With the use of the Engine Exhaust Particle Sizer (EEPS), a study on the characteristics of particle emissions was carried out on a China-IV diesel bus fueled with blends of 5% , 10% , 20% , 50% bio-diesel transformed from restaurant waste oil and China-IV diesel (marked separately by BD5, BD10, BD20, BD50), pure bio-diesel (BD100) and pure diesel (BD0). The results indicated that particulate number (PN) and mass (PM) emissions of bio-diesel blends increased with the increase in bus speed and acceleration; with increasing bio-diesel content, particulate emissions displayed a relevant declining trend. In different speed ranges, the size distribution of particulate number emissions (PNSD) was bimodal; in different acceleration ranges, PNSD showed a gradual transition from bimodal shape to unimodal when bus operation was switched from decelerating to accelerating status. Bio-diesel blends with higher mixture ratios showed significant reduction in PN emissions for accumulated modes, and the particulate number emission peaks moved towards smaller sizes; but little change was obtained in PN emissions for nuclei modes; reduction also occurred in particle geometric diameter (Dg).

  8. Tipping news in information accumulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, J. K.

    2010-05-01

    As a continuous opinion dynamics model, the information accumulation system (IAS) includes three basic mechanisms of the news, the inheritance and the diffusion as contributing to the information accumulation process of a system. A system is composed of agents who diffuse information through internal interaction, while each of them has incomplete memory or inheritance rate. The news comes from external sources of information, such as mass media. Previously the model IAS was studied only for the small news problems. In this study, a tipping news problem is considered. A key question of the problem is: what is the minimum strength of advertisement that can tip the minority opinion to a majority one? Dynamics of the IAS is briefly revisited with a special interest on nonlinear behavior of the model. In particular, it is shown that a discrete map of the IAS for a single color problem can be transformed into a logistic map, from which the dynamics of the IAS can be better understood. To show the applicability of the IAS model, the result is applied to explain the concept of the critical population size, which claims that there is a minimum population size for a social knowledge system to be continuously inherited without being lost. And critical size of the tipping news is found analytically in terms of IAS parameters. Some of the key results from the present study are compared in detail with the results from the Brownian particle model, which is believed to be the most similar model to the IAS. The concept of tipping news is used to show that a traditional society can tip at an exceptionally low inter-community exposure. Finally, the result was applied to the language competition problem.

  9. Environmental applications of the particle analysis system

    SciTech Connect

    Moritz, E.J.; Hoffman, C.R.

    1993-09-28

    This study demonstrates the applicability of particle counting technology for analysis of various water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant. The Particle Analysis System described in this study determined the water quality of samples from environmental remediation, stormwater treatment, and drinking water treatment operations. Samples were measured in either discrete or on-line mode. This data showed filtration efficiencies, particle counts, particle size distributions, and real-time treatment system performance. Particle counting proved more sensitive than the turbidimetric measurement technique commonly used by the water treatment industry. Particle counting is a two-dimensional measurement of counts and sizes, whereas turbidity is a one-dimensional measurement of water clarity. Samples showing identical turbidities could be distinguished easily with the Particle Analysis System. The Particle Analysis System proved to be an efficient and reliable water quality measurement tool, and it is applicable to a variety of water treatment systems at the Rocky Flats Plant.

  10. Particle concentrations and number size distributions in the planetary boundary layer derived from airship based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillmann, Ralf; Zhao, Defeng; Ehn, Mikael; Hofzumahaus, Andreas; Holland, Frank; Rohrer, Franz; Kiendler-Scharr, Astrid; Wahner, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    Atmospheric particles play a key role for regional and global climate due to their direct and indirect radiative forcing effects. The concentration and size of the particles are important variables to these effects. Within the continental planetary boundary layer (PBL) the particle number size distribution is influenced by meteorological parameters, local sinks and sources resulting in variable spatial distributions. However, measurements of particle number size distributions over a broad vertical range of the PBL are rare. The airship ZEPPELIN NT is an ideal platform to measure atmospheric aerosols on a regional scale within an altitude range up to 1000 m. For campaigns in the Netherlands, Northern Italy and South Finland in 2012 and 2013 the airship was deployed with a wide range of instruments, including measurements of different trace gases, short lived radicals, solar radiation, aerosols and meteorological parameters. Flights were carried out at different times of the day to investigate the influence of the diurnal evolution of the PBL on atmospheric trace gases and aerosols. During night and early morning hours the concentration and size distribution of atmospheric particles were found to be strongly influenced by the layered structure of the PBL, i.e. the nocturnal boundary layer and the residual layer. Within the residual layer particle concentrations stay relatively constant as this layer is decoupled from ground sources. The particles persist in the accumulation mode as expected for an aged aerosol. In the nocturnal boundary layer particle concentrations and size are more dynamic with higher concentrations than in the residual layer. A few hours after sunrise, the layered structure of the PBL intermixes. During daytime the PBL is well mixed and a negative concentration gradient with increasing height is observed. Several height profiles at different times of the day and at different locations in Europe were measured. The aerosol measurements will be

  11. Particle Sizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Microspheres are tiny plastic beads that represent the first commercial products manufactured in orbit. An example of how they are used is a new aerodynamic particle sizer designated APS 33B produced by TSI Incorporated. TSI purchased the microspheres from the National Bureau of Standards which certified their exact size and the company uses them in calibration of the APS 33B* instrument, latest in a line of TSI systems for generating counting and weighing minute particles of submicron size. Instruments are used for evaluating air pollution control devices, quantifying environments, meteorological research, testing filters, inhalation, toxicology and other areas where generation or analysis of small airborne particles is required. * The APS 33B is no longer being manufactured. An improved version, APS 3320, is now being manufactured. 2/28/97

  12. Carbon particles

    DOEpatents

    Hunt, Arlon J.

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus whereby small carbon particles are made by pyrolysis of a mixture of acetylene carried in argon. The mixture is injected through a nozzle into a heated tube. A small amount of air is added to the mixture. In order to prevent carbon build-up at the nozzle, the nozzle tip is externally cooled. The tube is also elongated sufficiently to assure efficient pyrolysis at the desired flow rates. A key feature of the method is that the acetylene and argon, for example, are premixed in a dilute ratio, and such mixture is injected while cool to minimize the agglomeration of the particles, which produces carbon particles with desired optical properties for use as a solar radiant heat absorber.

  13. Genotoxicity of poorly soluble particles.

    PubMed

    Schins, Roel P F; Knaapen, Ad M

    2007-01-01

    Poorly soluble particles such as TiO2, carbon black, and diesel exhaust particles have been evaluated for their genotoxicity using both in vitro and in vivo assays, since inhalation of these compounds by rats at high concentrations has been found to lead to tumor formation. Two principle modes of genotoxic action can be considered for particles, referred to as primary and secondary genotoxicity. Primary genotoxicity is defined as genetic damage elicited by particles in the absence of pulmonary inflammation, whereas secondary genotoxicity implies a pathway of genetic damage resulting from the oxidative DNA attack by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species (ROS/RNS), generated during particle-elicited inflammation. Conceptually, primary genotoxicity might operate via various mechanisms, such as the actions of ROS (e.g., as generated from reactive particle surfaces), or DNA-adduct formation by reactive metabolites of particle-associated organic compounds (e.g., polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). Currently available literature data, however, merely indicate that the tumorigenesis of poorly soluble particles involves a mechanism of secondary genotoxicity. However, further research is urgently required, since (1) causality between pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity has not yet been established, and (2) effects of inflammation on fundamental DNA damage responses that orchestrate mutagenesis and carcinogenic outcome,that is, cell cycle arrest, DNA repair, proliferation, and apoptosis, are currently poorly understood. PMID:17886067

  14. Accumulation and inactivation of avian influenza virus by the filter-feeding invertebrate Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Meixell, Brandt W; Borchardt, Mark A; Spencer, Susan K

    2013-12-01

    The principal mode of avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission among wild birds is thought to occur via an indirect fecal-oral route, whereby individuals are exposed to virus from the environment through contact with virus-contaminated water. AIV can remain viable for an extended time in water; however, little is known regarding the influence of the biotic community (i.e., aquatic invertebrates) on virus persistence and infectivity in aquatic environments. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the ability of an aquatic filter-feeding invertebrate, Daphnia magna, to accumulate virus from AIV-dosed water under the hypothesis that they represent a potential vector of AIV to waterfowl hosts. We placed live daphnids in test tubes dosed with low-pathogenicity AIV (H3N8 subtype isolated from a wild duck) and sampled Daphnia tissue and the surrounding water using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) at 3- to 120-min intervals for up to 960 min following dosing. Concentrations of viral RNA averaged 3 times higher in Daphnia tissue than the surrounding water shortly after viral exposure, but concentrations decreased exponentially through time for both. Extracts from Daphnia tissue were negative for AIV by cell culture, whereas AIV remained viable in water without Daphnia present. Our results suggest daphnids can accumulate AIV RNA and effectively remove virus particles from water. Although concentrations of viral RNA were consistently higher in Daphnia tissue than the water, additional research is needed on the time scale of AIV inactivation after Daphnia ingestion to fully elucidate Daphnia's role as a potential vector of AIV infection to aquatic birds.

  15. Accumulation and Inactivation of Avian Influenza Virus by the Filter-Feeding Invertebrate Daphnia magna

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, Mark A.; Spencer, Susan K.

    2013-01-01

    The principal mode of avian influenza A virus (AIV) transmission among wild birds is thought to occur via an indirect fecal-oral route, whereby individuals are exposed to virus from the environment through contact with virus-contaminated water. AIV can remain viable for an extended time in water; however, little is known regarding the influence of the biotic community (i.e., aquatic invertebrates) on virus persistence and infectivity in aquatic environments. We conducted laboratory experiments to investigate the ability of an aquatic filter-feeding invertebrate, Daphnia magna, to accumulate virus from AIV-dosed water under the hypothesis that they represent a potential vector of AIV to waterfowl hosts. We placed live daphnids in test tubes dosed with low-pathogenicity AIV (H3N8 subtype isolated from a wild duck) and sampled Daphnia tissue and the surrounding water using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) at 3- to 120-min intervals for up to 960 min following dosing. Concentrations of viral RNA averaged 3 times higher in Daphnia tissue than the surrounding water shortly after viral exposure, but concentrations decreased exponentially through time for both. Extracts from Daphnia tissue were negative for AIV by cell culture, whereas AIV remained viable in water without Daphnia present. Our results suggest daphnids can accumulate AIV RNA and effectively remove virus particles from water. Although concentrations of viral RNA were consistently higher in Daphnia tissue than the water, additional research is needed on the time scale of AIV inactivation after Daphnia ingestion to fully elucidate Daphnia's role as a potential vector of AIV infection to aquatic birds. PMID:24038705

  16. HZE particle effects in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horneck, Gerda

    Among the various particulate components of ionizing radiation in space, heavy ions (the so-called HZE particles) have been of special concern to radiobiologists. To understand the ways by which HZE particles of cosmic radiation interact with biological systems, methods have been developed to precisely localize the trajectory of an HZE particle relative to the biological object and to correlate the physical data of the particle with the biological effects observed along its path. In a variety of test systems, injuries were traced back to the traversal of a single HZE particle, such as somatic mutations and chromosomal aberrations in plant seeds, development disturbances and malformations in insect and salt shrimp embryos, or cell death in bacterial spores. In the latter case, a long-ranging killing effect around the particle's track was observed. Whereas, from spaceflight experiments, substantial information has been accumulated on single HZE particle effects in resting systems and in a few embryonic systems, there is a paucity of data on cosmic radiation effects in whole tissues or animals, especially mammalians.

  17. HZE particle effects in space.

    PubMed

    Horneck, G

    1994-11-01

    Among the various particulate components of ionizing radiation in space, heavy ions (the so-called HZE particles) have been of special concern to radiobiologists. To understand the ways by which HZE particles of cosmic radiation interact with biological systems, methods have been developed to precisely localize the trajectory of an HZE particle relative to the biological object and to correlate the physical data of the particle with the biological effects observed along its path. In a variety of test systems, injuries were traced back to the traversal of a single HZE particle, such as somatic mutations, and chromosomal aberrations in plant seeds, development disturbances and malformations in insect and salt shrimp embryos, or cell death in bacterial spores. In the latter case, a long-ranging killing effect around the particle's track was observed. Whereas, from spaceflight experiments, substantial infomation has been accumulated on single HZE particle effects in resting systems and in a few embryonic systems, there is a paucity of data on cosmic radiation effects in whole tissues or animals, especially mammalians. PMID:11538453

  18. Organic Nitrate Contribution to New Particle Formation and Growth in Secondary Organic Aerosols from α-Pinene Ozonolysis.

    PubMed

    Berkemeier, Thomas; Ammann, Markus; Mentel, Thomas F; Pöschl, Ulrich; Shiraiwa, Manabu

    2016-06-21

    The chemical kinetics of organic nitrate production during new particle formation and growth of secondary organic aerosols (SOA) were investigated using the short-lived radioactive tracer (13)N in flow-reactor studies of α-pinene oxidation with ozone. Direct and quantitative measurements of the nitrogen content indicate that organic nitrates accounted for ∼40% of SOA mass during initial particle formation, decreasing to ∼15% upon particle growth to the accumulation-mode size range (>100 nm). Experiments with OH scavengers and kinetic model results suggest that organic peroxy radicals formed by α-pinene reacting with secondary OH from ozonolysis are key intermediates in the organic nitrate formation process. The direct reaction of α-pinene with NO3 was found to be less important for particle-phase organic nitrate formation. The nitrogen content of SOA particles decreased slightly upon increase of relative humidity up to 80%. The experiments show a tight correlation between organic nitrate content and SOA particle-number concentrations, implying that the condensing organic nitrates are among the extremely low volatility organic compounds (ELVOC) that may play an important role in the nucleation and growth of atmospheric nanoparticles. PMID:27219077

  19. Time- and size-resolved chemical composition of submicron particles in Pittsburgh: Implications for aerosol sources and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Canagaratna, Manjula R.; Jayne, John T.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    2005-04-01

    An Aerodyne aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) was deployed at the Pittsburgh Environmental Protection Agency Supersite from 7 to 22 September 2002 as part of the Pittsburgh Air Quality Study (PAQS). The main objectives of this deployment were to characterize the concentrations, size distributions, and temporal variations of nonrefractory (NR) chemical species in submicron particles (approximately PM1) and to further develop and evaluate the AMS. Reasonably good agreement was observed on particle concentrations, composition, and size distributions between the AMS data and measurements from collocated instruments (given the difference between the PM1 and PM2.5 size cuts), including TEOM, semicontinuous sulfate, 2-hour- and 24-hour-averaged organic carbon, SMPS, 4-hour-averaged ammonium, and micro-orifice uniform deposit impactor. Total NR-PM1 mass concentration in Pittsburgh accumulates over periods of several days punctuated with rapid cleaning due to rain or air mass changes. Sulfate and organics are the major NR-PM1 components while the concentrations of nitrate and chloride are generally low. Significant amounts of ammonium, which most of the time are consistent with sulfate present as ammonium sulfate, are also present in particles. However, there are periods when the aerosols are relatively acidic and more than 50% of sulfate is estimated to be in the form of ammonium bisulfate. No major enhancement of the organic concentration is observed during these acidic periods, which suggests that acid-catalyzed SOA formation was not an important process during this study. Size distributions of particulate sulfate, ammonium, organics, and nitrate vary on timescales of hours to days, showing unimodal, bimodal and even trimodal characteristics. The accumulation mode (peaking around 350-600 nm in vacuum aerodynamic diameter for the mass distributions) and the ultrafine mode (<100 nm) are observed most frequently. The accumulation mode is dominated by sulfate that appears to

  20. Particle blender

    DOEpatents

    Willey, Melvin G.

    1981-01-01

    An infinite blender that achieves a homogeneous mixture of fuel microspheres is provided. Blending is accomplished by directing respective groups of desired particles onto the apex of a stationary coaxial cone. The particles progress downward over the cone surface and deposit in a space at the base of the cone that is described by a flexible band provided with a wide portion traversing and in continuous contact with the circumference of the cone base and extending upwardly therefrom. The band, being attached to the cone at a narrow inner end thereof, causes the cone to rotate on its arbor when the band is subsequently pulled onto a take-up spool. As a point at the end of the wide portion of the band passes the point where it is tangent to the cone, the blended particles are released into a delivery tube leading directly into a mold, and a plate mounted on the lower portion of the cone and positioned between the end of the wide portion of the band and the cone assures release of the particles only at the tangent point.

  1. Multiperiodic irradiance changes caused by r-modes and g-modes. [of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hickey, John R.

    1987-01-01

    More than 20 real periodicities ranging from 20 days to 2 years modulate the solar irradiance data accumulated since November 1978 by Nimbus 7. Many are quite strong during the first three years (solar maximum) and weak after that. There is a high correspondence between periods in irradiance and 28 periods predicted from the rotation and beating of global solar oscillations (r-modes and g-modes). Angular states l = 1, 2, and 3 are detected as well as some unresolved r-mode power at higher l. The prominence of beat periods implies a nonlinear system whose effective nonlinear power was measured to be about 2. This analysis constitutes a detection of r-modes in the sun, and determines from them a mean sidereal rotation rate for the convective envelope of 459 + or - 4 nHz which converts to a period of 25.2 days (27.1d, synodic).

  2. B-modes from cosmic strings

    SciTech Connect

    Pogosian, Levon; Wyman, Mark

    2008-04-15

    Detecting the parity-odd, or B-mode, polarization pattern in the cosmic microwave background radiation due to primordial gravity waves is considered to be the final observational key to confirming the inflationary paradigm. The search for viable models of inflation from particle physics and string theory has (re)discovered another source for B-modes: cosmic strings. Strings naturally generate as much vector-mode perturbation as they do scalar, producing B-mode polarization with a spectrum distinct from that expected from inflation itself. In a large set of models, B-modes arising from cosmic strings are more prominent than those expected from primordial gravity waves. In light of this, we study the physical underpinnings of string-sourced B-modes and the model dependence of the amplitude and shape of the C{sub l}{sup BB} power spectrum. Observational detection of a string-sourced B-mode spectrum would be a direct probe of post-inflationary physics near the grand unified theory (GUT) scale. Conversely, nondetection would put an upper limit on a possible cosmic string tension of G{mu} < or approx. 10{sup -7} within the next three years.

  3. Some Candidates for Solar Gravity Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomson, David J.

    2015-04-01

    Since the accidental discovery of solar modes in space (Thomson,Maclennan, and Lanzerotti, Nature, 1995) work has continued and there are now a few candidates for identified solar gravity modes using charged particles and interplanetary magnetic field data. Contrary to initial expectations, there is a preference for higher-l modes, typically l = 2 to 5.Second, different frequencies are expected at ACE (at L1) and Ulysses, in an almost sidereal solar-polar orbit. Given a candidate detection at ACE where signal-to-noise ratios are higher, one can then shift frequencies by ±32m nHz and test for agreement at Ulysses.Third, the 7.5 degree inclination of the ecliptic on the solar equator splits odd-parity modes at ACE by32 nHz. The two sub-singlets have a defined phase relation that can be used as a further check on parity. Two such modes are G2,-1 at 296.195 uHz and G3,-2 at 296.887 uHz. Both have all 2l+1 singlets detected on both ACE and Ulysses.The 11 singlets of the G5,-1 mode are also all detected above the 99% level. The mode has a center frequency of 383.812 uHz with a1 ≈ 918 nHz.

  4. Edge-localized mode avoidance and pedestal structure in I-mode plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Walk, J. R. Hughes, J. W.; Hubbard, A. E.; Terry, J. L.; Whyte, D. G.; White, A. E.; Baek, S. G.; Reinke, M. L.; Theiler, C.; Churchill, R. M.; Rice, J. E.; Snyder, P. B.; Osborne, T.; Dominguez, A; Cziegler, I.

    2014-05-15

    I-mode is a high-performance tokamak regime characterized by the formation of a temperature pedestal and enhanced energy confinement, without an accompanying density pedestal or drop in particle and impurity transport. I-mode operation appears to have naturally occurring suppression of large Edge-Localized Modes (ELMs) in addition to its highly favorable scalings of pedestal structure and overall performance. Extensive study of the ELMy H-mode has led to the development of the EPED model, which utilizes calculations of coupled peeling-ballooning MHD modes and kinetic-ballooning mode (KBM) stability limits to predict the pedestal structure preceding an ELM crash. We apply similar tools to the structure and ELM stability of I-mode pedestals. Analysis of I-mode discharges prepared with high-resolution pedestal data from the most recent C-Mod campaign reveals favorable pedestal scalings for extrapolation to large machines—pedestal temperature scales strongly with power per particle P{sub net}/n{sup ¯}{sub e}, and likewise pedestal pressure scales as the net heating power (consistent with weak degradation of confinement with heating power). Matched discharges in current, field, and shaping demonstrate the decoupling of energy and particle transport in I-mode, increasing fueling to span nearly a factor of two in density while maintaining matched temperature pedestals with consistent levels of P{sub net}/n{sup ¯}{sub e}. This is consistent with targets for increased performance in I-mode, elevating pedestal β{sub p} and global performance with matched increases in density and heating power. MHD calculations using the ELITE code indicate that I-mode pedestals are strongly stable to edge peeling-ballooning instabilities. Likewise, numerical modeling of the KBM turbulence onset, as well as scalings of the pedestal width with poloidal beta, indicates that I-mode pedestals are not limited by KBM turbulence—both features identified with the trigger for large ELMs

  5. Kinetic effect of toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, W. Ye, L.; Zhou, D.; Xiao, X.; Wang, S.

    2015-01-15

    Kinetic effects of the toroidal rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode are theoretically investigated. It is found that when the toroidal rotation increases, the damping rate increases in the weak rotation regime due to the rotation enhancement of wave-particle interaction, and it decreases in the strong rotation regime due to the reduction of the number of resonant particles. Theoretical results are consistent with the behaviors of the geodesic acoustic mode recently observed in DIII-D and ASDEX-Upgrade. The kinetic damping effect of the rotation on the geodesic acoustic mode may shed light on the regulation of turbulence through the controlling the toroidal rotation.

  6. Coupled Dust-Lattice Modes in Magnetized Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Farokhi, B.; Shahmansouri, M.

    2008-09-07

    Dust lattice wave modes in a one dimensional plasma crystal (formed by paramagnetic dust particles) suspended in the plasma sheath are studied. The ion flow in the sheath introduces 'ion wakes' below the crystal particles. The wave dispersion relations are found under the influence of inhomogeneous magnetic field, wake charge effect and equilibrium charge gradient. The expression for the wave dispersion relations clearly show that three branches exist as a result of the coupling of longitudinal and transverse modes due to the Lorenz forces, charge gradient and wake charge effect. We observe a new coupling between the dust lattice modes, which have not reported so far.

  7. Continuous Near-Road Monitoring of Ultrafine Particles from 2010-2015 in Toronto, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Y.; Sofowote, U.; Debosz, J.; Munoz, T.

    2015-12-01

    Ultrafine particles (UFPs) have an aerodynamic diameter less than 100 nanometre (nm). Their large surface areas per unit mass favor absorption of toxic chemicals in air. UFPs could penetrate deep into the respiratory or cardiovascular systems and pose adverse health effects. Recent studies showed the association between children exposure to UFPs and their systolic blood pressure. In urban environments, primary sources of UFPs are from road traffic emissions and account for most of the total particle numbers. Controls on UPFs rely on better understanding of their emission sources and environmental behaviour. Ontario Ministry of the Environment and Climate Change have monitored UFPs since 2010 at two near-road stations in Toronto by using TSI 3031 UFP monitors. One station is located in mixed residential and industrial area and 16 meters from a major road with over 20,000 vehicles per day. The other station is surrounded by mixed residential and commercial buildings and 20 meters from a major road with over 20,000 vehicles per day. UFPs concentrations were monitored using six size channels: 20-30nm, 30-50nm, 50-70nm, 70-100nm, 100-200nm, and 200-450nm. The TSI 3031 monitors generally performed well for long-term UFP monitoring. Multi-year measurements of UFPs at the two stations show no apparent inter-annual variation or seasonality. Smaller particles (i.e., 20-50 nm) were found to be composed of over 50% of the measured particles. The observations are generally consistent with the theoretical understanding of particle nuclei mode and accumulation mode. When air mass originated from road traffic, UFPs were elevated in morning traffic hours and to a less extent in the late afternoon. The elevated UFPs number concentrations coincided with other traffic-related air pollutants like nitrogen oxides and black carbon. Moreover, higher number concentrations were found on weekdays than weekends. The observations suggest that UFPs are mostly from vehicle emissions.

  8. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a 'pulsed beam'; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a 'continuous beam.' A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose difference

  9. Visual accumulation tube for size analysis of sands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colby, B.C.; Christensen, R.P.

    1956-01-01

    The visual-accumulation-tube method was developed primarily for making size analyses of the sand fractions of suspended-sediment and bed-material samples. Because the fundamental property governing the motion of a sediment particle in a fluid is believed to be its fall velocity. the analysis is designed to determine the fall-velocity-frequency distribution of the individual particles of the sample. The analysis is based on a stratified sedimentation system in which the sample is introduced at the top of a transparent settling tube containing distilled water. The procedure involves the direct visual tracing of the height of sediment accumulation in a contracted section at the bottom of the tube. A pen records the height on a moving chart. The method is simple and fast, provides a continuous and permanent record, gives highly reproducible results, and accurately determines the fall-velocity characteristics of the sample. The apparatus, procedure, results, and accuracy of the visual-accumulation-tube method for determining the sedimentation-size distribution of sands are presented in this paper.

  10. Fireworks induced particle pollution: A spatio-temporal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, M.; Singh, R. K.; Murari, V.; Singh, A. K.; Singh, R. S.; Banerjee, T.

    2016-11-01

    Diwali-specific firework induced particle pollution was measured in terms of aerosol mass loading, type, optical properties and vertical distribution. Entire nation exhibited an increase in particulate concentrations specifically in Indo-Gangetic Plain (IGP). Aerosol surface mass loading at middle IGP revealed an increase of 56-121% during festival days in comparison to their background concentrations. Space-borne measurements (Aqua and Terra-MODIS) typically identified IGP with moderate to high AOD (0.3-0.8) during pre-festive days which transmutes to very high AOD (0.4-1.8) during Diwali-day with accumulation of aerosol fine mode fractions (0.3-1.0). Most of the aerosol surface monitoring stations exhibited increase in PM2.5 especially on Diwali-day while PM10 exhibited increase on subsequent days. Elemental compositions strongly support K, Ba, Sr, Cd, S and P to be considered as firework tracers. The upper and middle IGP revealed dominance of absorbing aerosols (OMI-AI: 0.80-1.40) while CALIPSO altitude-orbit-cross-section profiles established the presence of polluted dust which eventually modified with association of smoke and polluted continental during extreme fireworks. Diwali-specific these observations have implications on associating fireworks induced particle pollution and human health while inclusion of these observations should improve regional air quality model.

  11. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  12. Rheology behavior and optimal damping effect of granular particles in a non-obstructive particle damper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kai; Chen, Tianning; Wang, Xiaopeng; Fang, Jianglong

    2016-03-01

    To explore the optimal damping mechanism of non-obstructive particle dampers (NOPDs), research on the relationship between the damping performance of NOPDs and the motion mode of damping particles in NOPDs was carried out based on the rheological properties of vibrated granular particles. Firstly, the damping performance of NOPDs under different excitation intensity and gap clearance was investigated via cantilever system experiments, and an approximate evaluation of the effective mass and effective damping of NOPDs was performed by fitting the experimental data to an equivalent single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) system with no damping particles. Then the phase diagrams which could show the motion mode of damping particles under different excitation intensity and gap clearance were obtained via a series of vibration table tests. Moreover, the dissipation characteristic of damping particles was explored by the discrete element method (DEM). The study results indicate that when NOPDs play the optimal damping effect the granular Leidenfrost effect whereby the entire particle bed in NOPDs is levitated above the vibrating base by a layer of highly energetic particles is observed. Finally, the damping characteristics of NOPDs was explained by collisions and frictions between particle-particle and particle-wall based on the rheology behavior of damping particles and a new dissipation mechanism was first proposed for the optimal damping performance of NOPDs.

  13. Whispering Gallery Mode Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Dusty Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Thieme, G.; Basner, R.; Ehlbeck, J.; Roepcke, J.; Maurer, H.; Kersten, H.; Davies, P. B.

    2008-09-07

    Whispering-gallery-mode spectroscopy is being assessed as a diagnostic method for the characterisation of size and chemical composition of spherical particles levitated in a plasma. With a pulsed laser whispering gallery modes (cavity resonances) are excited in individual microspheres leading to enhanced Raman scattering or fluorescence at characteristic wavelengths. This method can be used to gain specific information from the particle surface and is thus of great interest for the characterisation of layers deposited on microparticles, e.g. in molecular plasmas. We present investigations of different microparticles in air and results from fluorescent particles levitated in an Argon rf plasma.

  14. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-07-27

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  15. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments.

    PubMed

    Barnes, David K A; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-07-27

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  16. Accumulation and fragmentation of plastic debris in global environments

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, David K. A.; Galgani, Francois; Thompson, Richard C.; Barlaz, Morton

    2009-01-01

    One of the most ubiquitous and long-lasting recent changes to the surface of our planet is the accumulation and fragmentation of plastics. Within just a few decades since mass production of plastic products commenced in the 1950s, plastic debris has accumulated in terrestrial environments, in the open ocean, on shorelines of even the most remote islands and in the deep sea. Annual clean-up operations, costing millions of pounds sterling, are now organized in many countries and on every continent. Here we document global plastics production and the accumulation of plastic waste. While plastics typically constitute approximately 10 per cent of discarded waste, they represent a much greater proportion of the debris accumulating on shorelines. Mega- and macro-plastics have accumulated in the highest densities in the Northern Hemisphere, adjacent to urban centres, in enclosed seas and at water convergences (fronts). We report lower densities on remote island shores, on the continental shelf seabed and the lowest densities (but still a documented presence) in the deep sea and Southern Ocean. The longevity of plastic is estimated to be hundreds to thousands of years, but is likely to be far longer in deep sea and non-surface polar environments. Plastic debris poses considerable threat by choking and starving wildlife, distributing non-native and potentially harmful organisms, absorbing toxic chemicals and degrading to micro-plastics that may subsequently be ingested. Well-established annual surveys on coasts and at sea have shown that trends in mega- and macro-plastic accumulation rates are no longer uniformly increasing: rather stable, increasing and decreasing trends have all been reported. The average size of plastic particles in the environment seems to be decreasing, and the abundance and global distribution of micro-plastic fragments have increased over the last few decades. However, the environmental consequences of such microscopic debris are still poorly

  17. Beam Distribution Modification by Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-04-03

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  18. Beam Distribution Modification By Alfven Modes

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.; Gorelenkov, N.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Van Zeeland, M. A.

    2010-01-25

    Modification of a deuterium beam distribution in the presence of low amplitude Toroidal Alfven (TAE) eigenmodes and Reversed Shear Alfven (RSAE) eigenmodes in a toroidal magnetic confinement device is examined. Comparison with experimental data shows that multiple low amplitude modes can account for significant modification of high energy beam particle distributions. It is found that there is a stochastic threshold for beam transport, and that the experimental amplitudes are only slightly above this threshold. The modes produce a substantial central flattening of the beam distribution.

  19. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  20. Potential source regions of dust accumulated in northern Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wasowska, S.; Woronko, B.

    2012-04-01

    Sahara is the largest source of the dust in the world. The material sampled from dust storms in Tunisia (Nefta Oasis, El Kantoui Harbor), north Egypt (Alexandria) and Morocco (Mhamid Oasis) (March 2001, March and April 2009) was taken to identify the potential sources of dust accumulation and transport paths in North Africa. The samples were analyzed on grain size, micromorphology of silt grain surfaces in Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), elemental composition of grains and their surface crusts, loss on ignition, mineralogical composition of samples and carbonate content. Additionally the meteorological situation was analyzed during the dust storm occurrences and preceding periods. The results of grain size analyses show that all studied sediments belong to the small dust type, and dust accumulated in Mhamid is the clay mineral agglomerated (CMA) dust. The source of the CMA are the old dry lake beds. Dust particles are mobilized as aggregates of clay minerals, what is controlled by structure (particle packing) of the original lake sediment, and accumulation is dry and wet as well. The results of the analysis of the quartz grain surface micromorphology, the elemental composition and loss on ignition indicate that dust accumulated in Morocco originated from a relatively homogenous sediment source and, on the other hand, dust found in Alexandria comes from a diversified source. Dust sampled in Tunisia is characterized by the highest content of carbonates and organic matter which suggests the intensive dispelling acting on the weathered material from carbonate rocks and local Mediterranean soil covers rich in CaCO3. The analyses of meteorological conditions during the dust storms and the analyses of the textural characteristics of deposits show that it is highly probable that analysed aeolian dust was transported both for shorter and longer distances. Hypothetic source areas of dust accumulated in Mhamid could be the old ergs, some located 300-500 km away like

  1. Relation between energetic and standard geodesic acoustic modes

    SciTech Connect

    Girardo, Jean-Baptiste; Dumont, Rémi; Garbet, Xavier; Sarazin, Yanick; Zarzoso, David; Sharapov, Sergei

    2014-09-15

    Geodesic Acoustic Modes (GAMs) are electrostatic, axisymmetric modes which are non-linearly excited by turbulence. They can also be excited linearly by fast-particles; they are then called Energetic-particle-driven GAMs (EGAMs). Do GAMs and EGAMs belong to the same mode branch? Through a linear, analytical model, in which the fast particles are represented by a Maxwellian bump-on-tail distribution function, we find that the answer depends on several parameters. For low values of the safety factor q and for high values of the fast ion energy, the EGAM originates from the GAM. On the contrary, for high values of q and for low values of the fast ion energy, the GAM is not the mode which becomes unstable when fast particles are added: the EGAM then originates from a distinct mode, which is strongly damped in the absence of fast particles. The impact of other parameters is further explored: ratio of the ion temperature to the electron temperature, width of the fast particle distribution, mass and charge of the fast ions. The ratio between the EGAM and the GAM frequencies was found in experiments (DIII-D) and in non-linear numerical simulations (code GYSELA) to be close to 1/2: the present analytical study allows one to recover this ratio.

  2. Particle acceleration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vlahos, L.; Machado, M. E.; Ramaty, R.; Murphy, R. J.; Alissandrakis, C.; Bai, T.; Batchelor, D.; Benz, A. O.; Chupp, E.; Ellison, D.

    1986-01-01

    Data is compiled from Solar Maximum Mission and Hinothori satellites, particle detectors in several satellites, ground based instruments, and balloon flights in order to answer fundamental questions relating to: (1) the requirements for the coronal magnetic field structure in the vicinity of the energization source; (2) the height (above the photosphere) of the energization source; (3) the time of energization; (4) transistion between coronal heating and flares; (5) evidence for purely thermal, purely nonthermal and hybrid type flares; (6) the time characteristics of the energization source; (7) whether every flare accelerates protons; (8) the location of the interaction site of the ions and relativistic electrons; (9) the energy spectra for ions and relativistic electrons; (10) the relationship between particles at the Sun and interplanetary space; (11) evidence for more than one acceleration mechanism; (12) whether there is single mechanism that will accelerate particles to all energies and also heat the plasma; and (13) how fast the existing mechanisms accelerate electrons up to several MeV and ions to 1 GeV.

  3. Clouds of venus: particle size distribution measurements.

    PubMed

    Knollenberg, R G; Hunten, D M

    1979-02-23

    Data from the Pioneer Venus cloud particle size spectrometer experiment has revealed the Venus cloud system to be a complicated mixture of particles of various chemical composition distinguishable by their multimodal size distributions. The appearance, disappearance, growth, and decay of certain size modes has aided the preliminary identification of both sulfuric acid and free sulfur cloud regions. The discovery of large particles > 30 micrometers, significant particle mass loading, and size spectral features suggest that precipitation is likely produced; a peculiar aerosol structure beneath the lowest cloud layer could be residue from a recent shower.

  4. Accelerator system and method of accelerating particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wirz, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An accelerator system and method that utilize dust as the primary mass flux for generating thrust are provided. The accelerator system can include an accelerator capable of operating in a self-neutralizing mode and having a discharge chamber and at least one ionizer capable of charging dust particles. The system can also include a dust particle feeder that is capable of introducing the dust particles into the accelerator. By applying a pulsed positive and negative charge voltage to the accelerator, the charged dust particles can be accelerated thereby generating thrust and neutralizing the accelerator system.

  5. Multiple photon emission in heavy particle decays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asakimori, K.; Burnett, T. H.; Cherry, M. L.; Christl, M. J.; Dake, S.; Derrickson, J. H.; Fountain, W. F.; Fuki, M.; Gregory, J. C.; Hayashi, T.

    1994-01-01

    Cosmic ray interactions, at energies above 1 TeV/nucleon, in emulsion chambers flown on high altitude balloons have yielded two events showing apparent decays of a heavy particle into one charged particle and four photons. The photons converted into electron pairs very close to the decay vertex. Attempts to explain this decay topology with known particle decays are presented. Unless both events represent a b yields u transition, which is statistically unlikely, then other known decay modes for charmed or bottom particles do not account satisfactorily for these observations. This could indicate, possibly, a new decay channel.

  6. Strain Accumulation in Montenegro Using GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatovic, B.; Vucic, L.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Anastasio, E.; Selvaggi, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of GPS measurements collected from continuous stations belonging to networks deployed for both sceintific and societal purposes. The area is particularly interesting in relationship with the large Mw 7.1 earthquake that affected the Montenegro coastal areas in 1979 and the large uncertainties associated with recurrence times of large events and the present-day rate of strain accumulation. The dataset from the MEPOS (Montenegro), MONTEPOS (Montenegro), AGROS (Serbia) and MAKPOS (Macedonia) networks, combined with data from the RING (http://ring.gm.ingv.it) and other continuous GPS networks in the Mediterranean, Eurasian and African regions, has been analyzed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software package and the precise point positioning method [Zumberge et al., 1997]. Carrier phase ambiguities have been successfully resolved across the entire network using an algorithm based on a fixed-point theorem that closely approximates a full-network resolution [Blewitt, 2008]. Satellite orbit and clock parameters, and daily coordinate transformation parameters into ITRF2005 were provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ITRF2005 positions were transformed into an Eurasia fixed reference frame by performing daily transformations into a frame that is defined by minimizing the horizontal velocities of 30 stations across the stable part of the Eurasian continent (away from areas affected by glacial isostatic adjustments). Common mode errors for this continental scale frame are further reduced by including an additional 60 stations as far away as Iceland, Eastern Eurasia, and Africa in a daily spatial (7 parameters) filter [D'Anastasio et al., 2008]. We estimate velocities from the continuous GPS time-series using the CATS software package [Williams, 2003] while accounting for annual and semi-annual constituents, simultaneously estimating rate uncertainties given the assumption that the error model is dominated by

  7. Seasonality of ultrafine and sub-micron aerosols and the inferences on particle formation processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, H. C.; Chou, C. C.-K.; Chen, M.-J.; Huang, W.-R.; Huang, S.-H.; Tsai, C.-Y.; Lee, C. S.-L.

    2015-08-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the seasonal variations in the physicochemical properties of atmospheric ultrafine particles (UFPs, d ≤ 100nm) and submicron particles (PM1, d ≤ 1 μm) in an East-Asian urban area, which are hypothesized to be affected by the interchange of summer and winter monsoons. An observation experiment was conducted at the TARO, an urban aerosol station in Taipei, Taiwan, from October 2012 to August 2013. The measurements included the mass concentration and chemical composition of UFPs and PM1, as well as the particle number concentration (PNC) and size distribution (PSD) with size range of 4-736 nm. The results indicate that the mass concentration of PM1 was elevated during cold seasons with peak level of 18.5 μg m-3 in spring, whereas the highest UFPs concentration was measured in summertime with a seasonal mean of 1.62 μg m-3. Moreover, chemical analysis revealed that the UFPs and PM1 were characterized by distinct composition; UFPs were composed mostly of organics, whereas ammonium and sulfate were the major constituents in PM1. The seasonal median of total PNCs ranged from 13.9 × 103 cm-3 in autumn to 19.4 × 103 cm-3 in spring. The PSD information retrieved from the corresponding PNC measurements indicates that the nucleation mode PNC (N4-25) peaked at 11.6 × 103 cm-3 in winter, whereas the Aitken mode (N25-100) and accumulation mode (N100-736) exhibited summer maxima at 6.0 × 103 and 3.1 × 103 cm-3, respectively. The shift in PSD during summertime is attributed to the enhancement in the photochemical production of condensable organic matter that, in turn, contributes to the growth of aerosol particles in the atmosphere. In addition, remarkable photochemical production of particles was observed in spring and summer seasons, which was characterized with averaged particle growth and formation rates of 4.3 ± 0.8 nm h-1 and 1.6 ± 0.8 cm-3 s-1, respectively. The prevalence of new particle formation (NPF) in summer is

  8. Model for the incorporation of plant detritus within clastic accumulating interdistributary bays

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.; McCarroll, S.M.; Douglass, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Plant-bearing clastic lithologies interpreted as interdistributary bay deposits are reported from rocks Devonian to Holocene in age. Often, these strata preserve accumulations of discrete, laterally continuous leaf beds or coaly horizons. Investigations within two modern inter-distributary bays in the lower delta plain of the Mobile Delta, Alabama have provided insight into the phytotaphonomic processes responsible for the generation of carbonaceous lithologies, coaly horizons and laterally continuous leaf beds. Delvan and Chacalooche Bays lie adjacent to the Tensaw River distributary channel and differ in the mode of clastic and plant detrital accumulation. Delvan Bay, lying west of the distributary channel, is accumulating detritus solely by overbank deposition. Chacaloochee Bay, lying east of the channel, presently is accumulating detritus by active crevasse-splay activity. Plant detritus is accumulating as transported assemblages in both bays, but the mode of preservation differs. In Delvan Bay, the organic component is highly degraded and incorporated within the clastic component resulting in a carbonaceous silt. Little identifiable plant detritus can be recovered. On the other hand, the organic component in Chacaloochee Bay is accumulating in locally restricted allochthonous peat deposits up to 2 m in thickness, and discrete leaf beds generated by flooding events. In addition, autochthonous plant accumulations occur on subaerially and aerially exposed portions of the crevasse. The resultant distribution of plant remains is a complicated array of transported and non-transported organics.

  9. Ectoine accumulation in Brevibacterium epidermis.

    PubMed

    Onraedt, Annelies; De Muynck, Cassandra; Walcarius, Bart; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2004-10-01

    As a halotolerant bacterial species, Brevibacterium epidermis DSM 20659 can grow at relatively high salinity, tolerating up to 2 M NaCl. It synthesizes ectoine and the intracellular content increases with the medium salinity, with a maximum of 0.14 g ectoine/g CDW at 1 M NaCl. Sugar-stressed cells do not synthesize ectoine. Ectoine synthesis is also affected by the presence of external osmolytes. Added betaine is taken up and completely replaced ectoine, while L-proline is only temporarily accumulated after which ectoine is synthesized. The strain can metabolize ectoine; L-glutamate is a better carbon source for ectoine synthesis than L-aspartate.

  10. Impacts of aerosol particles on the microphysical and radiative properties of stratocumulus clouds over the southeast Pacific Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Twohy, C. H.; Anderson, J. R.; Toohey, D. W.; Andrejczuk, M.; Adams, A.; Lytle, M.; George, R. C.; Wood, R.; Saide, P.; Spak, S.; Zuidema, P.; Leon, D.

    2013-03-01

    The southeast Pacific Ocean is covered by the world's largest stratocumulus cloud layer, which has a strong impact on ocean temperatures and climate in the region. The effect of anthropogenic sources of aerosol particles on the stratocumulus deck was investigated during the VOCALS field experiment. Aerosol measurements below and above cloud were made with a ultra-high sensitivity aerosol spectrometer and analytical electron microscopy. In addition to more standard in-cloud measurements, droplets were collected and evaporated using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI), and the non-volatile residual particles were analyzed. Many flights focused on the gradient in cloud properties on an E-W track along 20° S from near the Chilean coast to remote areas offshore. Mean statistics, including their significance, from eight flights and many individual legs were compiled. Consistent with a continental source of cloud condensation nuclei, below-cloud accumulation-mode aerosol and droplet number concentration generally decreased from near shore to offshore. Single particle analysis was used to reveal types and sources of the enhanced particle number that influence droplet concentration. While a variety of particle types were found throughout the region, the dominant particles near shore were partially neutralized sulfates. Modeling and chemical analysis indicated that the predominant source of these particles in the marine boundary layer along 20° S was anthropogenic pollution from central Chilean sources, with copper smelters a relatively small contribution. Cloud droplets were smaller in regions of enhanced particles near shore. However, physically thinner clouds, and not just higher droplet number concentrations from pollution, both contributed to the smaller droplets. Satellite measurements were used to show that cloud albedo was highest 500-1000 km offshore, and actually slightly lower closer to shore due to the generally thinner clouds and lower liquid water paths