Science.gov

Sample records for accumulation mode range

  1. EMIR high-dynamic range readout modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuñez, Miguel; Gago, Fernando; Garzón, Francisco; Díaz, José J.; Barreto, Mary; Patrón, Jesús; González-Fenández, Carlos; Hammersley, Peter L.; López, Luis; Castro, Nieves

    2012-07-01

    EMIR is the NIR imager and multiobject spectrograph being built as a common user instrument for the GTC and it is currently entering in the integration and verification phase at system level. EMIR is being built by a Consortium of Spanish and French institutes led by the IAC. In this paper we describe the readout modes of EMIR detector, a Hawaii2 FPA, after two full calibrations campaigns. Besides the standard set of modes (reset-read, CDS, Fowler, Follow-up the ramp), the modified SDSU-III hardware and home made software will also offer high dynamic range readout modes, which will improve the ability of the instrument to sound densely populated areas which often are made of objects with large differences in brightness. These new high dynamic range modes are: single readout with very short integration time, window mode and combination of both. The results show that the new modes behave linearly with different exposition times, improve the maximum frame rate and increase the saturation limit in image mode for EMIR instrument.

  2. Ultra-long range surface plasmon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, Charles G.; Collins, Reuben T.; Furtak, Thomas E.; Hollingsworth, Russell E.

    2007-03-01

    It is well known that the propagation length of surface plasmon waves can be extended by exciting the appropriate mode of an isolated noble metal layer. The losses, however, increase substantially as the refractive index of the surrounding medium increases. Using a transfer matrix calculation, we have discovered that a thin, low-index dielectric adjacent to the metal layer can increase the intrinsic propagation length arbitrarily as the bound mode approaches cutoff. This geometry can be implemented in structures that combine metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) fabrication with plasmonic waveguides.

  3. Characterization of accumulation-mode Si/SiGe triple quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hazard, T. M.; Zajac, D. M.; Mi, X.; Zhang, S. S.; Petta, J. R.

    The transition from quantum dots fabricated from doped Si/SiGe quantum wells to undoped accumulation-mode structures has greatly improved the performance of few-electron quantum dots. Our accumulation-mode devices are reconfigurable and allow for operation as single, double, or triple quantum dots. In these devices, we measure typical charging energies Ec = 5 . 7 meV, orbital excited state energies as large as Eo = 2.9 meV, and valley splittings of up to Ev = 80 μeV. With the device configured as a triple quantum dot, we easily reach the (1,1,1) charge configuration. The gate architecture allows the interdot tunnel coupling to be tuned over a wide range, which is important for operation as an exchange-only spin qubit. Research sponsored by ARO Grant No. W911NF-15-1-0149.

  4. Chemical composition of nucleation and accumulation mode particles collected in Vienna, Austria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puxbaum, Hans; Wopenka, Brigitte

    Atmospheric aerosol samples were collected by six-stage low pressure impactors in Vienna downtown. Aerosol particles were deposited on aluminum foils in five size fractions in the size range of 0.04-25 μm AD. The concentration of the components Cl -, Br -, NO 3-, SO 42-, Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Pb. Sr, Zn and total C was determined by multi-element analytical methods. A comparison of the relative composition of the size fractions containing nucleation mode and accumulation mode particles showed the components derived from traffic emissions (Pb, Br - and C) to be significantly enriched in the nucleation mode size fraction. On the other hand, each of the components Cl -, SO 42-,Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg and Sr has a similar relative concentration in the nucleation mode and in the accumulation mode size fraction. For all samples collected on days with prevailing westerly winds a strong negative correlation between wind speed and sulfate particle size as well as sulfate concentration was observed.

  5. Coupled whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range.

    PubMed

    Preu, S; Schwefel, H G L; Malzer, S; Döhler, G H; Wang, L J; Hanson, M; Zimmerman, J D; Gossard, A C

    2008-05-12

    We report on coupling of two whispering gallery mode resonators in the Terahertz frequency range. Due to the long wavelength in the millimeter to submillimeter range, the resonators can be macroscopic allowing for accurate size and shape control. This is necessary to couple specific modes of two or more resonators. Sets of polyethylene (PE) and quartz disk resonators are demonstrated, with medium (loaded) quality (Q)-factors of 40-800. Both exhibit coinciding resonance frequency spectra over more than ten times the free spectral range. Loading effects of single resonators are investigated which provide strong Q-factor degradation and red-shifts of the resonances in the 0.2% range. By coupling two resonators of the same size, we observe mode splitting, in very good agreement with our numerical calculations.

  6. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    Toxic metal pollution of waters and soils is a major environmental problem, and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solutions. The use of plants or plant products to restore or stabilize contaminated sites, collectively known as phytoremediation, takes advantage of the natural abilities of plants to take up, accumulate, store, or degrade organic and inorganic substances. Although not a new concept, phytoremediation is currently being re-examined as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective means of reducing metal contaminated soil. Plants growing on naturally metal-enriched soils are of particular interest in this regard, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations and have an excellent adaptation to this multi-stress environment. Processes include using plants that tolerate and accumulate metals at high levels (phytoextraction) and using plants that can grow under conditions that are toxic to other plants while preventing, for example, soil erosion (phytostabilization). Soil and plant samples were taken at polymetallic mines in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is suggested that Plantago orbignyana Steinheil is a Pb hyperaccumulator. Moreover, unusually elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg‑1) and Translocation Factor (TF) greater than one were also detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens) of a Caroline mine in Perú. Among the grass species (Poaceae), the highest shoot As concentration were found in Paspalum sp. (>1000 μg g-1) and Eriochola ramose (460 μg g-1) from the Cu mine in Peru and in Holcus lanatus and Pennisetum clandestinum (>200 μg g-1) from the silver mine in Ecuador. The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). Paspalum racemosum also

  7. Screening for new accumulator plants in Andes Range mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bech, Jaume; Roca, Núria

    2016-04-01

    Toxic metal pollution of waters and soils is a major environmental problem, and most conventional remediation approaches do not provide acceptable solutions. The use of plants or plant products to restore or stabilize contaminated sites, collectively known as phytoremediation, takes advantage of the natural abilities of plants to take up, accumulate, store, or degrade organic and inorganic substances. Although not a new concept, phytoremediation is currently being re-examined as an environmentally friendly, cost-effective means of reducing metal contaminated soil. Plants growing on naturally metal-enriched soils are of particular interest in this regard, since they are genetically tolerant to high metal concentrations and have an excellent adaptation to this multi-stress environment. Processes include using plants that tolerate and accumulate metals at high levels (phytoextraction) and using plants that can grow under conditions that are toxic to other plants while preventing, for example, soil erosion (phytostabilization). Soil and plant samples were taken at polymetallic mines in Peru, Ecuador and Chile. It is suggested that Plantago orbignyana Steinheil is a Pb hyperaccumulator. Moreover, unusually elevated concentrations of Pb (over 1000 mg kg-1) and Translocation Factor (TF) greater than one were also detected in shoots of 6 different plants species (Ageratina sp., Achirodine alata, Cortaderia apalothica, Epilobium denticulatum, Taraxacum officinalis and Trifolium repens) of a Caroline mine in Perú. Among the grass species (Poaceae), the highest shoot As concentration were found in Paspalum sp. (>1000 μg g-1) and Eriochola ramose (460 μg g-1) from the Cu mine in Peru and in Holcus lanatus and Pennisetum clandestinum (>200 μg g-1) from the silver mine in Ecuador. The shoot accumulation of Zn was highest in Baccharis amdatensis (>1900 μg g-1) and in Rumex crispus (1300 μg g-1) from the Ag mine in Ecuador (Bech et al., 2002). Paspalum racemosum also

  8. Flight mode affects allometry of migration range in birds.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yuuki Y

    2016-08-01

    Billions of birds migrate to exploit seasonally available resources. The ranges of migration vary greatly among species, but the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. I hypothesise that flight mode (flapping or soaring) and body mass affect migration range through their influence on flight energetics. Here, I compiled the tracks of migratory birds (196 species, weighing 12-10 350 g) recorded by electronic tags in the last few decades. In flapping birds, migration ranges decreased with body mass, as predicted from rapidly increasing flight cost with increasing body mass. The species with higher aspect ratio and lower wing loading had larger migration ranges. In soaring birds, migration ranges were mass-independent and larger than those of flapping birds, reflecting their low flight costs irrespective of body mass. This study demonstrates that many animal-tracking studies are now available to explore the general patterns and the underlying mechanisms of animal migration.

  9. Mode-locked laser autocollimator with an expanded measurement range.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Liu; Shimizu, Yuki; Kudo, Yukitoshi; Ito, So; Gao, Wei

    2016-07-11

    A mode-locked laser is employed as the light source of a laser autocollimator, instead of the conventionally employed single-wavelength laser, for an expanded range of tilt angle measurement. A group of the spatially separated diffracted beams from a diffraction grating are focused by a collimator objective to form an array of light spots on the focal plane of the collimator objective where a light position-sensing photodiode is located for detecting the linear displacement of the light spot array corresponding to the tilt angle of the reflector. A prototype mode-locked femtosecond laser autocollimator is designed and constructed for achieving a measurement range of 11000 arc-seconds.

  10. Density dependence of electron mobility in the accumulation mode for fully depleted SOI films

    SciTech Connect

    Naumova, O. V. Zaitseva, E. G.; Fomin, B. I.; Ilnitsky, M. A.; Popov, V. P.

    2015-10-15

    The electron mobility µ{sub eff} in the accumulation mode is investigated for undepleted and fully depleted double-gate n{sup +}–n–n{sup +} silicon-on-insulator (SOI) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFET). To determine the range of possible values of the mobility and the dominant scattering mechanisms in thin-film structures, it is proposed that the field dependence of the mobility µ{sub eff} be replaced with the dependence on the density N{sub e} of induced charge carriers. It is shown that the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) can be approximated by the power functions µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) ∝ N{sub e}{sup -n}, where the exponent n is determined by the chargecarrier scattering mechanism as in the mobility field dependence. The values of the exponent n in the dependences µ{sub eff}(N{sub e}) are determined when the SOI-film mode near one of its surfaces varies from inversion to accumulation. The obtained results are explained from the viewpoint of the electron-density redistribution over the SOI-film thickness and changes in the scattering mechanisms.

  11. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  12. Long-range spin accumulation from heat injection in mesoscopic superconductors with Zeeman splitting.

    PubMed

    Silaev, M; Virtanen, P; Bergeret, F S; Heikkilä, T T

    2015-04-24

    We describe far-from-equilibrium nonlocal transport in a diffusive superconducting wire with a Zeeman splitting, taking into account different spin relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrate that due to the Zeeman splitting, an injection of current in a superconducting wire creates spin accumulation that can only relax via thermalization. This effect leads to a long-range spin accumulation detectable in the nonlocal signal. Our model gives a qualitative explanation and provides accurate fits of recent experimental results in terms of realistic parameters.

  13. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  14. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  15. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-01-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage. PMID:26932790

  16. Conduction Threshold in Accumulation-Mode InGaZnO Thin Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungsik; Nathan, Arokia

    2016-03-01

    The onset of inversion in the metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) takes place when the surface potential is approximately twice the bulk potential. In contrast, the conduction threshold in accumulation mode transistors, such as the oxide thin film transistor (TFT), has remained ambiguous in view of the complex density of states distribution in the mobility gap. This paper quantitatively describes the conduction threshold of accumulation-mode InGaZnO TFTs as the transition of the Fermi level from deep to tail states, which can be defined as the juxtaposition of linear and exponential dependencies of the accumulated carrier density on energy. Indeed, this permits direct extraction and visualization of the threshold voltage in terms of the second derivative of the drain current with respect to gate voltage.

  17. Automatic dynamic range adjustment for ultrasound B-mode imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeonhwa; Kang, Jinbum; Yoo, Yangmo

    2015-02-01

    In medical ultrasound imaging, dynamic range (DR) is defined as the difference between the maximum and minimum values of the displayed signal to display and it is one of the most essential parameters that determine its image quality. Typically, DR is given with a fixed value and adjusted manually by operators, which leads to low clinical productivity and high user dependency. Furthermore, in 3D ultrasound imaging, DR values are unable to be adjusted during 3D data acquisition. A histogram matching method, which equalizes the histogram of an input image based on that from a reference image, can be applied to determine the DR value. However, it could be lead to an over contrasted image. In this paper, a new Automatic Dynamic Range Adjustment (ADRA) method is presented that adaptively adjusts the DR value by manipulating input images similar to a reference image. The proposed ADRA method uses the distance ratio between the log average and each extreme value of a reference image. To evaluate the performance of the ADRA method, the similarity between the reference and input images was measured by computing a correlation coefficient (CC). In in vivo experiments, the CC values were increased by applying the ADRA method from 0.6872 to 0.9870 and from 0.9274 to 0.9939 for kidney and liver data, respectively, compared to the fixed DR case. In addition, the proposed ADRA method showed to outperform the histogram matching method with in vivo liver and kidney data. When using 3D abdominal data with 70 frames, while the CC value from the ADRA method is slightly increased (i.e., 0.6%), the proposed method showed improved image quality in the c-plane compared to its fixed counterpart, which suffered from a shadow artifact. These results indicate that the proposed method can enhance image quality in 2D and 3D ultrasound B-mode imaging by improving the similarity between the reference and input images while eliminating unnecessary manual interaction by the user.

  18. Hybrid architecture for shallow accumulation mode AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructures with epitaxial gates

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, S. J.; See, A. M.; Hamilton, A. R.; Farrer, I.; Ritchie, D. A.; Ritzmann, J.; Ludwig, A.; Wieck, A. D.

    2015-01-05

    Accumulation mode devices with epitaxially grown gates have excellent electrical stability due to the absence of dopant impurities and surface states. We overcome typical fabrication issues associated with epitaxially gated structures (e.g., gate leakage and high contact resistance) by using separate gates to control the electron densities in the Ohmic and Hall bar regions. This hybrid gate architecture opens up a way to make ultrastable nanoscale devices where the separation between the surface gates and the 2D electron gas is small. In this work, we demonstrate that the hybrid devices made from the same wafer have reproducible electrical characteristics, with identical mobility and density traces over a large range of 2D densities. In addition, thermal cycling does not influence the measured electrical characteristics. As a demonstration of concept, we have fabricated a hybrid single-electron transistor on a shallow (50 nm) AlGaAs/GaAs heterostructure that shows clear Coulomb blockade oscillations in the low temperature conductance.

  19. Long-range spin accumulation from heat injection in mesoscopic superconductors with Zeeman splitting.

    PubMed

    Silaev, M; Virtanen, P; Bergeret, F S; Heikkilä, T T

    2015-04-24

    We describe far-from-equilibrium nonlocal transport in a diffusive superconducting wire with a Zeeman splitting, taking into account different spin relaxation mechanisms. We demonstrate that due to the Zeeman splitting, an injection of current in a superconducting wire creates spin accumulation that can only relax via thermalization. This effect leads to a long-range spin accumulation detectable in the nonlocal signal. Our model gives a qualitative explanation and provides accurate fits of recent experimental results in terms of realistic parameters. PMID:25955071

  20. Normativity in Fairy Tales: Scope, Range and Modes of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hohr, Hansjörg

    2013-01-01

    The article studies in three steps how the fairy tale articulates its normative content and what the educational consequence of this kind of communication is. First, the articulation of normativity in fictional literature in general is discussed. Second, the specific mode in which the fairy tale articulates its normativity is studied according to…

  1. Waist location and Rayleigh range for higher-order mode laser beams

    SciTech Connect

    Luxon, J.T.; Parker, D.E.; Karkheck, J.

    1984-07-01

    Self has presented simple equations for Gaussian-mode laser beams for calculating focused waist location and beam waist magnification in terms of the Rayleigh range. Since the Rayleigh range is a purely geometrical quantity. Self's equations can also be applied to higher-order mode beams. A convenient form of the Rayleigh range for Hermite-Gaussian modes is presented along with representative results for Co/sub 2/ laser industrial processing facilities.

  2. Modeling of long range frequency sweeping for energetic particle modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nyqvist, R. M.; Breizman, B. N.

    2013-04-15

    Long range frequency sweeping events are simulated numerically within a one-dimensional, electrostatic bump-on-tail model with fast particle sources and collisions. The numerical solution accounts for fast particle trapping and detrapping in an evolving wave field with a fixed wavelength, and it includes three distinct collisions operators: Drag (dynamical friction on the background electrons), Krook-type collisions, and velocity space diffusion. The effects of particle trapping and diffusion on the evolution of holes and clumps are investigated, and the occurrence of non-monotonic (hooked) frequency sweeping and asymptotically steady holes is discussed. The presented solution constitutes a step towards predictive modeling of frequency sweeping events in more realistic geometries.

  3. Microbial community composition of polyhydroxyalkanoate-accumulating organisms in full-scale wastewater treatment plants operated in fully aerobic mode.

    PubMed

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11-18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5-38.2 mg-C g-VSS(-1) h(-1)). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  4. A fast CMOS array imager for nanosecond light pulse detection in accumulation mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zint, Chantal-V.; Uhring, Wilfried; Casadei, Bruno; Le Normand, Jean-P.; Morel, Frederic; Hu, Yann

    2004-09-01

    We designed a camera based on a fast CMOS APS imager for high speed optical detection which produces images simi-larly as a streak camera. This imager produces the intensity information I as function of one spatial dimension and time (I=f(x,t)) from one frame with two spatial dimensions. The time sweeping is obtained by delaying successively the integration phase for each pixel of the same row. For the first FAMOSI (Fast MOs Imager) prototype the start of in-tegration is given by the camera itself. This signal is injected to a laser trigger. This laser emits a 10 nanoseconds light pulse onto the sensor. The temporal evolution of the light pulse is then resolved by the camera with a resolution of 800 ps. In single shot, the maximum dynamic of the camera is estimated to 64 dB and is limited by the readout noise. We decide to work in accumulation mode in order to increase the signal to noise ratio of the camera. But the high laser trigger (about 20 ns rms) does not allow accumulation of several optical events without a large spreading. The camera has been modified in order to be triggered by an external signal delivered by a trigger unit. In this new configuration the laser emit pulses at a repetition rate of 50 Hz. A photodiode detect a part of the laser pulse and generate the trigger signal for FAMOSI. The laser pulse is delayed with an optical fibre before being directed to the camera. The trigger jitter obtained is then less than 100 ps and allows accumulation without significant loss of the temporal resolution. With accumulation the readout noise is attenuated by a √N factor. Then with N = 1000 accumulations, the dynamics approach 93 dB. This allows the camera to work similarly as a synchroscan streak camera and then to observe weak signal.

  5. Strain accumulation across the Coast Ranges at the latitude of San Francisco, 1994-2000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, J. C.; Gan, W.; Prescott, W. H.; Svarc, J. L.

    2004-03-01

    A 66-monument geodetic array spanning the Coast Ranges near San Francisco has been surveyed more than eight times by GPS between late 1993 and early 2001. The measured horizontal velocities of the monuments are well represented by uniform, right-lateral, simple shear parallel to N29°W. (The local strike of the San Andreas Fault is ˜N34°W.) The observed areal dilatation rate of 6.9 ± 10.0 nstrain yr-1 (quoted uncertainty is one standard deviation and extension is reckoned positive) is not significantly different from zero, which implies that the observed strain accumulation could be released by strike-slip faulting alone. Our results are consistent with the slip rates assigned by the [2003] to the principal faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward-Rodgers Creek, Calaveras-Concord-Green Valley, and Greenville Faults) cutting across the GPS array. The vector sum of those slip rates is 39.8 ± 2.6 mm yr-1 N29.8°W ± 2.8°, whereas the motion across the GPS array (breadth 120 km) inferred from the uniform strain rate approximation is 38.7 ± 1.2 mm yr-1 N29.0°W ± 0.9° right-lateral shear and 0.4 ± 0.9 mm yr-1 N61°E ± 0.9° extension. We interpret the near coincidence of these rates and the absence of significant accumulation of areal dilatation to imply that right-lateral slip on the principal faults can release the accumulating strain; major strain release on reverse faults subparallel to the San Andreas Fault within the Coast Ranges is not required.

  6. Strain accumulation across the Coast Ranges at the latitude of San Francisco, 1994-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savage, J.C.; Gan, Weijun; Prescott, W.H.; Svarc, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    A 66-monument geodetic array spanning the Coast Ranges near San Francisco has been surveyed more than eight times by GIPS between late 1993 and early 2001. The measured horizontal velocities of the monuments are well represented by uniform, right-lateral, simple shear parallel to N29??W. (The local strike of the San Andreas Fault is ???N34??W. The observed areal dilatation rate of 6.9 ?? 10.0 nstrain yr-1 (quoted uncertainty is one standard deviation and extension is reckoned positive) is not significantly different from zero, which implies that the observed strain accumulation could be released by strike-slip faulting alone. Our results are consistent with the slip rates assigned by the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities [2003] to the principal faults (San Gregorio, San Andreas, Hayward-Rodgers Creek, Calaveras-Concord-Green Valley, and Greenville Faults) cutting across the GPS array. The vector sum of those slip rates is 39.8 ?? 2.6 mm yr-1 N29.8??W ?? 2.8??, whereas the motion across the GPS array (breadth 120 km) inferred from the uniform strain rate approximation is 38.7 ?? 1.2 mm yr-1 N29.0?? ?? 0.9?? right-lateral shear and 0.4 ?? 0.9 mm yr-1 N61??E ?? 0.9?? extension. We interpret the near coincidence of these rates and the absence of significant accumulation of areal dilatation to imply that right-lateral slip on the principal faults can release the accumulating strain; major strain release on reverse faults subparallel to the San Andreas Fault within the Coast Ranges is not required. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical union.

  7. Particle simulations of mode conversion between slow mode and fast mode in lower hybrid range of frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Guozhang; Xiang, Nong; Wang, Xueyi; Huang, Yueheng; Lin, Yu

    2016-01-01

    The propagation and mode conversion of lower hybrid waves in an inhomogeneous plasma are investigated by using the nonlinear δf algorithm in a two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation code based on the gyrokinetic electron and fully kinetic ion (GeFi) scheme [Lin et al., Plasma Phys. Controlled Fusion 47, 657 (2005)]. The characteristics of the simulated waves, such as wavelength, frequency, phase, and group velocities, agree well with the linear theoretical analysis. It is shown that a significant reflection component emerges in the conversion process between the slow mode and the fast mode when the scale length of the density variation is comparable to the local wavelength. The dependences of the reflection coefficient on the scale length of the density variation are compared with the results based on the linear full wave model for cold plasmas. It is indicated that the mode conversion for the waves with a frequency of 2.45 GHz (ω ˜ 3ωLH, where ωLH represents the lower hybrid resonance) and within Tokamak relevant amplitudes can be well described in the linear scheme. As the frequency decreases, the modification due to the nonlinear term becomes important. For the low-frequency waves (ω ˜ 1.3ωLH), the generations of the high harmonic modes and sidebands through nonlinear mode-mode coupling provide new power channels and thus could reduce the reflection significantly.

  8. Improving Calculation Accuracies of Accumulation-Mode Fractions Based on Spectral of Aerosol Optical Depths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Zhang; Zhengqiang, Li; Yan, Wang

    2014-03-01

    Anthropogenic aerosols are released into the atmosphere, which cause scattering and absorption of incoming solar radiation, thus exerting a direct radiative forcing on the climate system. Anthropogenic Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) calculations are important in the research of climate changes. Accumulation-Mode Fractions (AMFs) as an anthropogenic aerosol parameter, which are the fractions of AODs between the particulates with diameters smaller than 1μm and total particulates, could be calculated by AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm, and then the anthropogenic AODs are obtained using AMFs. In this study, we present a parameterization method coupled with an AOD spectral deconvolution algorithm to calculate AMFs in Beijing over 2011. All of data are derived from AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) website. The parameterization method is used to improve the accuracies of AMFs compared with constant truncation radius method. We find a good correlation using parameterization method with the square relation coefficient of 0.96, and mean deviation of AMFs is 0.028. The parameterization method could also effectively solve AMF underestimate in winter. It is suggested that the variations of Angstrom indexes in coarse mode have significant impacts on AMF inversions.

  9. Microbial Community Composition of Polyhydroxyalkanoate-Accumulating Organisms in Full-Scale Wastewater Treatment Plants Operated in Fully Aerobic Mode

    PubMed Central

    Oshiki, Mamoru; Onuki, Motoharu; Satoh, Hiroyasu; Mino, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The removal of biodegradable organic matter is one of the most important objectives in biological wastewater treatments. Polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA)-accumulating organisms (PHAAOs) significantly contribute to the removal of biodegradable organic matter; however, their microbial community composition is mostly unknown. In the present study, the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was investigated at 8 full-scale wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), operated in fully aerobic mode, by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and post-FISH Nile blue A (NBA) staining techniques. Our results demonstrated that 1) PHAAOs were in the range of 11–18% in the total number of cells, and 2) the microbial community composition of PHAAOs was similar at the bacterial domain/phylum/class/order level among the 8 full-scale WWTPs, and dominant PHAAOs were members of the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria. The microbial community composition of α- and β-proteobacterial PHAAOs was examined by 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis and further by applying a set of newly designed oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA gene sequences of α- or β-proteobacterial PHAAOs. The results demonstrated that the microbial community composition of PHAAOs differed in the class Alphaproteobacteria and Betaproteobacteria, which possibly resulted in a different PHA accumulation capacity among the WWTPs (8.5–38.2 mg-C g-VSS−1 h−1). The present study extended the knowledge of the microbial diversity of PHAAOs in full-scale WWTPs operated in fully aerobic mode. PMID:23257912

  10. Collective modes in charge-density waves and long-range Coulomb interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virosztek, Attila; Maki, Kazumi

    1993-07-01

    We study theoretically the collective modes in charge-density waves in the presence of long-range Coulomb interaction. We find that earlier works by Takada and his collaborators are inadequate since they introduced inconsistent approximations in evaluating a variety of correlation functions. The amplitude mode is unaffected by the Coulomb interaction, while the phase mode splits into the phason with linear dispersion (i.e., acoustic mode) and the optical mode with an energy gap in the presence of the Coulomb interaction. In particular, we establish the temperature dependence of the phason velocity vφ. A comparison with recent neutron-scattering data on the phason velocity in the charge-density wave of a single crystal of blue bronze K0.3MoO3 indicates that mean-field theory which includes the long-range Coulomb interaction gives an excellent description of the observed phason velocity.

  11. Analysis of the visual artifact in range-gated active imaging, especially in burst mode.

    PubMed

    Matwyschuk, Alexis

    2014-09-20

    After the demonstration of the occurrence of visual artifacts with an active imaging system in burst mode in a previous paper, the analysis of this phenomenon was realized. A visual artifact resulting from a remote zone in the scene can appear in the image of the real visualized zone when the duty cycle of laser pulses is close to 50%, as in the burst mode. Therefore, the elements of this remote zone will create confusion in the image, with erroneous estimated distances. These misinterpretations can be very embarrassing to those attempting to determine the distance of a target in the scene. From the modeling realized and validated in the previous paper, the behavior of the visual artifact was analyzed with two types of burst mode used in active imaging, the duration of the laser pulse being identical to the duration of the temporal aperture of the imager. In the first mode, the width of the visualized zone is set, depending on the distance. The second mode increases the width of the visualized zone so that the foreground of the zone is constantly visible. The results showed that the distance of the visual artifacts in variable mode increased much more quickly than the distance in fixed mode. In both modes, the most intense visual artifacts appear when the range of the visualized zone remains within the first kilometer. When this range is very short, the illuminance of the visual artifact in fixed mode is much more intense than the illuminance in variable mode. On the other hand, for long distances, the illuminance of the visual artifact in variable mode is greater than the illuminance in fixed mode, but decreases quickly beyond a certain distance, making it insignificant.

  12. Target tracking using range-only measurements: application to ISAR mode of Ingara radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristic, Branko; Arulampalam, Sanjeev; McCarthy, James

    2001-11-01

    The problem is on-line target state estimation from range and range-rate measurements. The motivation for this work comes from the need to track a target in the ISAR mode of the DSTO Ingara Multi-Mode Radar during an extended data collection. The paper makes three main contributions. First, the theoretical Cramér-Rao bound for the performance of an unbiased range-only tracking algorithm is derived. Second, three algorithms are developed and compared to the theoretical bounds of performance. Third, the developed techniques are applied to real data collected in the recent trials with the Ingara radar.

  13. Mode tomography using signals from the Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment (LOAPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandrayadula, Tarun K.

    Ocean acoustic tomography uses acoustic signals to infer the environmental properties of the ocean. The procedure for tomography consists of low frequency acoustic transmissions at mid-water depths to receivers located at hundreds of kilometer ranges. The arrival times of the signal at the receiver are then inverted for the sound speed of the background environment. Using this principle, experiments such as the 2004 Long Range Ocean Acoustic Propagation EXperiment have used acoustic signals recorded across Vertical Line Arrays (VLAs) to infer the Sound Speed Profile (SSP) across depth. The acoustic signals across the VLAs can be represented in terms of orthonormal basis functions called modes. The lower modes of the basis set concentrated around mid-water propagate longer distances and can be inverted for mesoscale effects such as currents and eddies. In spite of these advantages, mode tomography has received less attention. One of the important reasons for this is that internal waves in the ocean cause significant amplitude and travel time fluctuations in the modes. The amplitude and travel time fluctuations cause errors in travel time estimates. The absence of a statistical model and the lack of signal processing techniques for internal wave effects have precluded the modes from being used in tomographic inversions. This thesis estimates a statistical model for modes affected by internal waves and then uses the estimated model to design appropriate signal processing methods to obtain tomographic observables for the low modes. In order to estimate a statistical model, this thesis uses both the LOAPEX signals and also numerical simulations. The statistical model describes the amplitude and phase coherence across different frequencies for modes at different ranges. The model suggests that Matched Subspace Detectors (MSDs) based on the amplitude statistics of the modes are the optimum detectors to make travel time estimates for modes up to 250 km. The mean of the

  14. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc < kT˜ 5μeV) to over-coupled (tc ˜ 0.1 meV) with a bias control of one exchange gate. Sponsored by the United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  15. Silica uptake by Spartina—evidence of multiple modes of accumulation from salt marshes around the world

    PubMed Central

    Carey, Joanna C.; Fulweiler, Robinson W.

    2014-01-01

    Silicon (Si) plays a critical role in plant functional ecology, protecting plants from multiple environmental stressors. While all terrestrial plants contain some Si, wetland grasses are frequently found to have the highest concentrations, although the mechanisms driving Si accumulation in wetland grasses remain in large part uncertain. For example, active Si accumulation is often assumed to be responsible for elevated Si concentrations found in wetland grasses. However, life stage and differences in Si availability in the surrounding environment also appear to be important variables controlling the Si concentrations of wetland grasses. Here we used original data from five North American salt marshes, as well as all known published literature values, to examine the primary drivers of Si accumulation in Spartina, a genus of prolific salt marsh grasses found worldwide. We found evidence of multiple modes of Si accumulation in Spartina, with passive accumulation observed in non-degraded marshes where Spartina was native, while rejective accumulation was found in regions where Spartina was invasive. Evidence of active accumulation was found in only one marsh where Spartina was native, but was also subjected to nutrient over-enrichment. We developed a conceptual model which hypothesizes that the mode of Si uptake by Spartina is dependent on local environmental factors and genetic origin, supporting the idea that plant species should be placed along a spectrum of Si accumulation. We hypothesize that Spartina exhibits previously unrecognized phenotypic plasticity with regard to Si accumulation, allowing these plants to respond to changes in marsh condition. These results provide new insight regarding how salt marsh ecosystems regulate Si exchange at the land-sea interface. PMID:24904599

  16. Broad spectral range measurement of chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers using spectral interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hlubina, P.; Ciprian, D.; Martynkien, T.; Mergo, P.; Urbańczyk, W.

    2011-05-01

    Chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in holey fibers is measured over a broad spectral range (e.g. 500-1600 nm) using two white-light spectral interferometric techniques. First, a technique employing an unbalanced Mach-Zehnder interferometer with a fiber in the test arm is used to measure the wavelength dependence of the differential group effective index, or equivalently the chromatic dispersion of one polarization mode supported by the fiber. Second, a technique employing a tandem configuration of a Michelson interferometer and the optical fiber under test is used to measure the group modal birefringence in the fiber. From these measurements, the chromatic dispersion of the other polarization mode supported by the fiber is retrieved. We measured by these techniques the chromatic dispersion of polarization modes in four air-silica holey fibers and revealed the dependence of zero-dispersion wavelength on the geometry of the holey fiber.

  17. Pump power stability range of single-mode solid-state lasers with rod thermal lensing

    SciTech Connect

    De Silvestri, S.; La Porta, P.; Magni, V.

    1987-11-01

    The pump power stability range of solid-state laser resonators operating in the TEM/sub 00/ mode has been thoroughly investigated. It has been shown that, for a very general resonator containing intracavity optical systems, rod thermal lensing engenders a pump power stability range which is a characteristic parameter of laser material and pump cavity, but is independent of resonator configuration. Stability ranges have been calculated and critically discussed for Nd:YAG, Nd:Glasses, Nd:Cr:GSGG, and alexandrite. The independence of the pump power stability range from the resonator configuration has been experimentally demonstrated for a CW Nd:YAG laser.

  18. Effect of wind direction and speed on the dispersion of nucleation and accumulation mode particles in an urban street canyon.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prashant; Fennell, Paul; Britter, Rex

    2008-08-25

    There have been many studies concerning dispersion of gaseous pollutants from vehicles within street canyons; fewer address the dispersion of particulate matter, particularly particle number concentrations separated into the nucleation (10-30 nm or N10-30) or accumulation (30-300 nm or N30-300) modes either separately or together (N10-300). This study aimed to determine the effect of wind direction and speed on particle dispersion in the above size ranges. Particle number distributions (PNDs) and concentrations (PNCs) were measured in the 5-2738 nm range continuously (and in real-time) for 17 days between 7th and 23rd March 2007 in a regular (aspect ratio approximately unity) street canyon in Cambridge (UK), using a newly developed fast-response differential mobility spectrometer (sampling frequency 0.5 Hz), at 1.60 m above the road level. The PNCs in each size range, during all wind directions, were better described by a proposed two regime model (traffic-dependent and wind-dependent mixing) than by simply assuming that the PNC was inversely proportional to the wind speed or by fitting the data with a best-fit single power law. The critical cut-off wind speed (Ur,crit) for each size range of particles, distinguishing the boundary between these mixing regimes was also investigated. In the traffic-dependent PNC region (UrUrrange were approximately constant and independent of wind speed and direction. In the wind speed dependent PNC region (UrUr>Ur,critUr,crit), concentrations were inversely proportional to Ur irrespective of any particle size range and wind directions. The wind speed demarcating the two regimes (Ur,critUr,crit) was 1.23+/-0.55 m s(-1) for N10-300, (1.47+/-0.72 m s(-1)) for N10-30 but smaller (0.78+/-0.29 m s(-1)) for N30-300.

  19. Suppression of 1/f Noise in Accumulation Mode FD-SOI MOSFETs on Si(100) and (110) Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, W.; Gaubert, P.; Teramoto, A.; Tye, C.; Sugawa, S.; Ohmi, T.

    2009-04-23

    In this paper, a new approach to reduce the 1/f noise levels in the MOSFETs on varied silicon orientations, such as Si(100) and (110) surfaces, has been carried out. We focus on the Accumulation-mode (AM) FD-SOI device structure and demonstrate that the 1/f noise levels in this AM FD-SOI MOSFETs are obviously reduced on both the Si(100) and (110) surfaces.

  20. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  1. [Effects of different nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium fertilization modes on carbon- and nitrogen accumulation and allocation in rice plant].

    PubMed

    Feng, Lei; Tong, Cheng-li; Shi, Hui; Wu, Jin-shui; Chen, An-lei; Zhou, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Based on a 20-year field site-specific fertilization experiment in Taoyuan Experimental Station of Agriculture Ecosystems under Chinese Ecosystem Research Network (CERN), this paper studied the effects of different fertilization modes of N, P, and K on the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant. The fertilization mode N-only showed the highest C and N contents (433 g kg(-1) and 18.9 g kg(-1), respectively) in rice grain, whereas the modes balanced fertilization of chemical N, P and K (NPK) and its combination with organic mature recycling (NPKC) showed the highest storage of C and N in rice plant. In treatments NPK and NPKC, the C storage in rice grain and in stem and leaf was 1960 kg hm(-2) and 2015 kg hm(-2), and 2002 kg hm(-2) and 2048 kg hm(-2), and the N storage in rice grain was 80.5 kg hm(-2) and 80.6 kg hm(-2), respectively. Treatment NPK had the highest N storage (59.3 kg hm(-2)) in stem and leaf. Balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K combined with organic manure recycling increased the accumulation of C and N in rice plant significantly. Comparing with applying N only, balanced fertilization of chemical N, P, and K was more favorable to the accumulation and allocation of C and N in rice plant during its growth period.

  2. Drift-insensitive distributed calibration of probe microscope scanner in nanometer range: Virtual mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapshin, Rostislav V.

    2016-08-01

    A method of distributed calibration of a probe microscope scanner is suggested. The main idea consists in a search for a net of local calibration coefficients (LCCs) in the process of automatic measurement of a standard surface, whereby each point of the movement space of the scanner can be characterized by a unique set of scale factors. Feature-oriented scanning (FOS) methodology is used as a basis for implementation of the distributed calibration permitting to exclude in situ the negative influence of thermal drift, creep and hysteresis on the obtained results. Possessing the calibration database enables correcting in one procedure all the spatial systematic distortions caused by nonlinearity, nonorthogonality and spurious crosstalk couplings of the microscope scanner piezomanipulators. To provide high precision of spatial measurements in nanometer range, the calibration is carried out using natural standards - constants of crystal lattice. One of the useful modes of the developed calibration method is a virtual mode. In the virtual mode, instead of measurement of a real surface of the standard, the calibration program makes a surface image "measurement" of the standard, which was obtained earlier using conventional raster scanning. The application of the virtual mode permits simulation of the calibration process and detail analysis of raster distortions occurring in both conventional and counter surface scanning. Moreover, the mode allows to estimate the thermal drift and the creep velocities acting while surface scanning. Virtual calibration makes possible automatic characterization of a surface by the method of scanning probe microscopy (SPM).

  3. Multi-echo processing by a bottlenose dolphin operating in "packet" transmission mode at long range.

    PubMed

    Finneran, James J; Schroth-Miller, Maddie; Borror, Nancy; Tormey, Megan; Brewer, Arial; Black, Amy; Bakhtiari, Kimberly; Goya, Gavin

    2014-11-01

    Bottlenose dolphins performing echolocation tasks at long ranges may utilize a transmission mode where bursts, or "packets," of echolocation clicks are emitted rather than single clicks. The clicks within each packet are separated by time intervals well below the two-way travel time, while the packets themselves are emitted at intervals greater than the two-way travel time. Packet use has been shown to increase with range; however, the exact function of packets and the advantages gained by their utilization remain unknown. In this study, the capability for dolphins to utilize multi-echo processing within packets of echoes was investigated by manipulating the number of available echoes within each packet as a dolphin performed a long-range echolocation task. The results showed an improvement in detectability with an increase in the number of echoes in each packet and suggest that packet use is an adaptation to allow multi-echo processing at long ranges without introducing range ambiguity.

  4. Cramer-Rao lower bound on range error for LADARs with Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Steven E

    2010-08-20

    The Cramer-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on range error is calculated for laser detection and ranging (LADAR) systems using Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes (GMAPDs) to detect reflected laser pulses. For the cases considered, the GMAPD range error CRLB is greater than the CRLB for a photon-counting device. It is also shown that the GMAPD range error CRLB is minimized when the mean energy in the received laser pulse is finite. Given typical LADAR system parameters, a Gaussian-envelope received pulse, and a noise detection rate of less than 4 MHz, the GMAPD range error CRLB is minimized when the quantum efficiency times the mean number of received laser pulse photons is between 2.2 and 2.3. PMID:20733630

  5. Lead accumulation in woodchucks (Marmota monax) at small arms and skeet ranges.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Mark S; Major, Michael A; Casteel, Stan W

    2004-10-01

    Increasing concern regarding the stewardship of US Army lands requires a proactive program to evaluate sites of potential risk. Small arms and upland skeet ranges are a potentially significant source of lead exposure for burrowing mammals. Woodchucks (Marmota monax) were evaluated for lead exposure in a previously used upland skeet range and a small arms range, respective to animals collected at two nearby reference locations. Soil lead concentrations collected at burrow entrances on the firing ranges were compared with blood, bone, kidney, liver, and fecal concentrations of woodchucks collected from the reference areas. No statistical differences were found in the lead concentrations in tissue between woodchucks in reference and firing ranges; concentrations of lead in liver and kidney were below detection limits. Levels in bone, blood, and feces suggest the bioavailability of lead at these various sites, although other factors (e.g., differences in foraging areas, age structure, habitat preferences, and environmental conditions) were also likely to influence exposure. Blood levels were below that which suggests toxicity. Further analysis of other ranges with higher lead concentrations and of small mammal species with smaller home ranges is recommended to further elucidate trends that could be extrapolated to other sites. PMID:15327881

  6. Long-range Ising and Kitaev models: phases, correlations and edge modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vodola, Davide; Lepori, Luca; Ercolessi, Elisa; Pupillo, Guido

    2016-01-01

    We analyze the quantum phases, correlation functions and edge modes for a class of spin-1/2 and fermionic models related to the one-dimensional Ising chain in the presence of a transverse field. These models are the Ising chain with anti-ferromagnetic long-range interactions that decay with distance r as 1/{r}α , as well as a related class of fermionic Hamiltonians that generalize the Kitaev chain, where both the hopping and pairing terms are long-range and their relative strength can be varied. For these models, we provide the phase diagram for all exponents α, based on an analysis of the entanglement entropy, the decay of correlation functions, and the edge modes in the case of open chains. We demonstrate that violations of the area law can occur for α ≲ 1, while connected correlation functions can decay with a hybrid exponential and power-law behavior, with a power that is α-dependent. Interestingly, for the fermionic models we provide an exact analytical derivation for the decay of the correlation functions at every α. Along the critical lines, for all models breaking of conformal symmetry is argued at low enough α. For the fermionic models we show that the edge modes, massless for α ≳ 1, can acquire a mass for α \\lt 1. The mass of these modes can be tuned by varying the relative strength of the kinetic and pairing terms in the Hamiltonian. Interestingly, for the Ising chain a similar edge localization appears for the first and second excited states on the paramagnetic side of the phase diagram, where edge modes are not expected. We argue that, at least for the fermionic chains, these massive states correspond to the appearance of new phases, notably approached via quantum phase transitions without mass gap closure. Finally, we discuss the possibility to detect some of these effects in experiments with cold trapped ions.

  7. Are Ambient Ultrafine, Accumulation Mode, and Fine Particles Associated with Adverse Cardiac Responses in Patients Undergoing Cardiac Rehabilitation?

    PubMed Central

    Zareba, Wojciech; Beckett, William; Hopke, Philip K; Oakes, David; Frampton, Mark W; Bisognano, John; Chalupa, David; Bausch, Jan; O’Shea, Karen; Wang, Yungang; Utell, Mark J

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mechanisms underlying previously reported air pollution and cardiovascular (CV) morbidity associations remain poorly understood. Objectives: We examined associations between markers of pathways thought to underlie these air pollution and CV associations and ambient particle concentrations in postinfarction patients. Methods: We studied 76 patients, from June 2006 to November 2009, who participated in a 10-week cardiac rehabilitation program following a recent (within 3 months) myocardial infarction or unstable angina. Ambient ultrafine particle (UFP; 10–100 nm), accumulation mode particle (AMP; 100–500 nm), and fine particle concentrations (PM2.5; ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter) were monitored continuously. Continuous Holter electrocardiogram (ECG) recordings were made before and during supervised, graded, twice weekly, exercise sessions. A venous blood sample was collected and blood pressure was measured before sessions. Results: Using mixed effects models, we observed adverse changes in rMSSD [square root of the mean of the sum of the squared differences between adjacent normal-to-normal (NN) intervals], SDNN (standard deviation of all NN beat intervals), TpTe (time from peak to end of T-wave), heart rate turbulence, systolic and diastolic blood pressures, C-reactive protein, and fibrinogen associated with interquartile range increases in UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at 1 or more lag times within the previous 5 days. Exposures were not associated with MeanNN, heart-rate–corrected QT interval duration (QTc), deceleration capacity, and white blood cell count was not associated with UFP, AMP, and PM2.5 at any lag time. Conclusions: In cardiac rehabilitation patients, particles were associated with subclinical decreases in parasympathetic modulation, prolongation of late repolarization duration, increased blood pressure, and systemic inflammation. It is possible that such changes could increase the risk of CV events in this susceptible population. PMID

  8. Potential effect of atmospheric warming on grapevine phenology and post-harvest heat accumulation across a range of climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Andrew; Mathews, Adam J.; Holzapfel, Bruno P.

    2016-09-01

    Carbohydrates are accumulated within the perennial structure of grapevines when their production exceeds the requirements of reproduction and growth. The period between harvest and leaf-fall (the post-harvest period) is a key period for carbohydrate accumulation in relatively warmer grape-growing regions. The level of carbohydrate reserves available for utilisation in the following season has an important effect on canopy growth and yield potential and is therefore an important consideration in vineyard management. In a warming climate, the post-harvest period is lengthening and becoming warmer, evidenced through studies in wine regions worldwide that have correlated recent air temperature increases with changing grapevine phenology. Budbreak, flowering, veraison, and harvest have all been observed to be occurring earlier than in previous decades. Additionally, the final stage of the grapevine phenological cycle, leaf-fall, occurs later. This study explored the potential for increased post-harvest carbohydrate accumulation by modelling heat accumulation following harvest dates for the recent climate (1975-2004) and two warmer climate projections with mean temperature anomalies of +1.26 and +2.61 °C. Summaries of post-harvest heat accumulation between harvest and leaf-fall were produced for each of Australia's Geographical Indications (wine regions) to provide comparisons from the base temperatures to projected warmer conditions across a range of climates. The results indicate that for warmer conditions, all regions observe earlier occurring budbreak and harvest as well as increasing post-harvest growing degree days accumulation before leaf-fall. The level of increase varies depending upon starting climatic condition, with cooler regions experiencing the greatest change.

  9. Potential effect of atmospheric warming on grapevine phenology and post-harvest heat accumulation across a range of climates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Andrew; Mathews, Adam J.; Holzapfel, Bruno P.

    2016-01-01

    Carbohydrates are accumulated within the perennial structure of grapevines when their production exceeds the requirements of reproduction and growth. The period between harvest and leaf-fall (the post-harvest period) is a key period for carbohydrate accumulation in relatively warmer grape-growing regions. The level of carbohydrate reserves available for utilisation in the following season has an important effect on canopy growth and yield potential and is therefore an important consideration in vineyard management. In a warming climate, the post-harvest period is lengthening and becoming warmer, evidenced through studies in wine regions worldwide that have correlated recent air temperature increases with changing grapevine phenology. Budbreak, flowering, veraison, and harvest have all been observed to be occurring earlier than in previous decades. Additionally, the final stage of the grapevine phenological cycle, leaf-fall, occurs later. This study explored the potential for increased post-harvest carbohydrate accumulation by modelling heat accumulation following harvest dates for the recent climate (1975-2004) and two warmer climate projections with mean temperature anomalies of +1.26 and +2.61 °C. Summaries of post-harvest heat accumulation between harvest and leaf-fall were produced for each of Australia's Geographical Indications (wine regions) to provide comparisons from the base temperatures to projected warmer conditions across a range of climates. The results indicate that for warmer conditions, all regions observe earlier occurring budbreak and harvest as well as increasing post-harvest growing degree days accumulation before leaf-fall. The level of increase varies depending upon starting climatic condition, with cooler regions experiencing the greatest change.

  10. Long range detection of line-array multi-pulsed coding lidar by combining the Accumulation coherence and Subpixel-energy detection method.

    PubMed

    Su, Jinshan; Wang, Yuanqing; Liang, Dongdong

    2015-06-15

    This paper presents a multi-pulsed line-array push broom lidar, the pixel array scale reaches Geiger mode detectors in time-of-flight (TOF) depth imaging: by using time and space correlation between array elements of array avalanche photo detector (APD), light coding technology and a diode pumped solid-state laser with 10kHz repetition rate and 5µJ per pulses. Two signal enhancement methods, accumulation-coherence and high accuracy energy detection were combined improves the decode effect and realizes further long detection range. Experimental results and theory analysis indicating that the retrieval and denoising results of both simulated and real signals demonstrate that our method is practical and effective; what's more, the increasing scale of array sensor and the code bits can further improve system performance. PMID:26193500

  11. Time range for accumulation of shell middens from Higashimyo (western Japan) and Kimhae (southern Korea) by AMS radiocarbon dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Toshio; Matsui, Akira; Nishida, Iwao; Nakano, Mitsuru; Omori, Takayuki

    2013-01-01

    Numerous large and small shell middens have been reported throughout the world. An interesting question is when the huge and thick shell middens were formed, and how many years were required to build up the whole midden. Shell middens contain not only shell fragments but also organic substances such as bones, nuts, acorn, and plant residues, which are suitable substances with which to establish 14C chronology of the middens. We have conducted 14C dating on terrestrial and marine materials collected from two lowland shell middens, the Higashimyo site in Japan (the Earliest Jomon period) and the Kimhae site in Korea (the Proto-Three Kingdom period), to establish high precision 14C chronologies and determine the time required for shell accumulation. According to Bayesian analysis of 14C ages from terrestrial samples, accumulation of Midden No. 1 at Higashimyo (altitude from -1.1 to -2.3 m a.s.l., Δd = 1.2 m) started at around 8050-7950 cal BP and ended at 7950-7750 cal BP, lasting for ca. 100 cal yr, while accumulation of Midden No. 2 (altitude from -0.5 to -2.0 m a.s.l., Δd = 1.5 m) started at around 8050-7800 cal BP and ended at 7800-7650 cal BP, lasting for ca. 200 cal yr. Thus the Midden No. 1 was abandoned a bit earlier than Midden No. 2, but the time range for sediment accumulation overlaps each other. Accumulation at the Kimhae shell midden (altitude from 5 to 14 m a.s.l., Δd = 9 m) started at around the middle of the 1st C cal BC and ended at around the middle of the 3rd C cal AD, lasting for ca. 250 to 300 cal yr.

  12. Integrated photonic emitter with a wide switching range of orbital angular momentum modes

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Peng; Feng, Xue; Xu, Yuntao; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Due to the nature of infinite dimensionality, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been considered as a new degree of freedom of light and widely expanded the scopes of substantial optical applications such as optical telecommunication, quantum information, particle manipulation and imaging. In recent years, the integrated photonic OAM emitters have been actively investigated due to both compactness and tunability. Essentially, the number of available OAM modes by dynamic switching should be large enough so that the dimensionality of OAM could be explored as much as possible. In this work, an integrated photonic emitter with a wide switching range of OAM modes is theoretically developed, numerically simulated, and experimentally verified. The independence of the micro-ring cavity and the scattering unit provides the flexibility to design the device and optimize the performance. Specifically, the dynamic switching of nine OAM modes (l = −4 ~ 4) with azimuthal polarization has been demonstrated by electrically controlled thermo-optic effect. PMID:26936327

  13. Integrated photonic emitter with a wide switching range of orbital angular momentum modes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Zhao, Peng; Feng, Xue; Xu, Yuntao; Cui, Kaiyu; Liu, Fang; Zhang, Wei; Huang, Yidong

    2016-01-01

    Due to the nature of infinite dimensionality, the orbital angular momentum (OAM) has been considered as a new degree of freedom of light and widely expanded the scopes of substantial optical applications such as optical telecommunication, quantum information, particle manipulation and imaging. In recent years, the integrated photonic OAM emitters have been actively investigated due to both compactness and tunability. Essentially, the number of available OAM modes by dynamic switching should be large enough so that the dimensionality of OAM could be explored as much as possible. In this work, an integrated photonic emitter with a wide switching range of OAM modes is theoretically developed, numerically simulated, and experimentally verified. The independence of the micro-ring cavity and the scattering unit provides the flexibility to design the device and optimize the performance. Specifically, the dynamic switching of nine OAM modes (l = -4 ~ 4) with azimuthal polarization has been demonstrated by electrically controlled thermo-optic effect. PMID:26936327

  14. Modes of reproduction and the accumulation of deleterious mutations with multiplicative fitness effects.

    PubMed Central

    Haccou, Patsy; Schneider, Maria Victoria

    2004-01-01

    Mutational load depends not only on the number and nature of mutations but also on the reproductive mode. Traditionally, only a few specific reproductive modes are considered in the search of explanations for the maintenance of sex. There are, however, many alternatives. Including these may give radically different conclusions. The theory on deterministic deleterious mutations states that in large populations segregation and recombination may lead to a lower load of deleterious mutations, provided that there are synergistic interactions. Empirical research suggests that effects of deleterious mutations are often multiplicative. Such situations have largely been ignored in the literature, since recombination and segregation have no effect on mutation load in the absence of epistasis. However, this is true only when clonal reproduction and sexual reproduction with equal male and female ploidy are considered. We consider several alternative reproductive modes that are all known to occur in insects: arrhenotoky, paternal genome elimination, apomictic thelytoky, and automictic thelytoky with different cytological mechanisms to restore diploidy. We give a method that is based on probability-generating functions, which provides analytical and numerical results on the distributions of deleterious mutations. Using this, we show that segregation and recombination do make a difference. Furthermore, we prove that a modified form of Haldane's principle holds more generally for thelytokous reproduction. We discuss the implications of our results for evolutionary transitions between different reproductive modes in insects. Since the strength of Muller's ratchet is reduced considerably for several forms of automictic thelytoky, many of our results are expected to be also valid for initially small populations. PMID:15020489

  15. Use of a compact range approach to evaluate rf and dual-mode missiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willis, Kenneth E.; Weiss, Yosef

    2000-07-01

    This paper describes a hardware-in-the-loop (HWIL) system developed for testing Radio Frequency (RF), Infra-Red (IR), and Dual-Mode missile seekers. The system consists of a unique hydraulic five-axis (three seeker axes plus two target axes) Flight Motion Table (FMT), an off-axis parabolic reflector, and electronics required to generate the signals to the RF feeds. RF energy that simulates the target is fed into the reflector from three orthogonal feeds mounted on the inner target axis, at the focal point area of the parabolic reflector. The parabolic reflector, together with the three RF feeds (the Compact Range), effectively produces a far-field image of the target. Both FMT target axis motion and electronic control of the RF beams (deflection) modify the simulated line-of-sight target angles. Multiple targets, glint, multi-path, ECM, and clutter can be introduced electronically. To evaluate dual-mode seekers, the center section of the parabolic reflector is replaced with an IR- transparent, but RF-reflective section. An IR scene projector mounts to the FMT target axes, with its image focused on the intersection of the FMT seeker axes. The system eliminates the need for a large anechoic chamber and 'Target Wall' or target motion system used with conventional HWIL systems. This reduces acquisition and operating costs of the facility.

  16. Majorana modes in single channel cold atomic gases with short-ranged attractive interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sau, Jay; Li, Xiaopeng

    2015-03-01

    Majorana modes have been predicted to exist in topological superfluids that generated by a combination of spin-orbit coupling and short-ranged attractive interactions. One dimensional superfluids with intrinsic interactions, however, present a precarious competition between phase fluctuations and topological superfluidity. Previously, it has been argued that the Majorana nature survives with some modification in multi-channel and proximity-induced superfluidity in systems of ultra-cold atoms. This discussion is more subtle in the single channel case because the universal properties of one dimensional fermions with attractive interactions are known to be described by a simple Luttinger liquid in the low-energy limit. In this talk, we will discuss the properties of Galilean invariant one dimensional fermi gases with attractive interactions and show how they display properties consistent with both being a topological (or non-topological) superfluid and a Luttinger liquid. Condensed Matter Theory Center and Joint Quantum Institute at the University of Maryland.

  17. Breakdown of long-range temporal dependence in default mode and attention networks during deep sleep

    PubMed Central

    Tagliazucchi, Enzo; von Wegner, Frederic; Morzelewski, Astrid; Brodbeck, Verena; Jahnke, Kolja; Laufs, Helmut

    2013-01-01

    The integration of segregated brain functional modules is a prerequisite for conscious awareness during wakeful rest. Here, we test the hypothesis that temporal integration, measured as long-term memory in the history of neural activity, is another important quality underlying conscious awareness. For this aim, we study the temporal memory of blood oxygen level-dependent signals across the human nonrapid eye movement sleep cycle. Results reveal that this property gradually decreases from wakefulness to deep nonrapid eye movement sleep and that such decreases affect areas identified with default mode and attention networks. Although blood oxygen level-dependent spontaneous fluctuations exhibit nontrivial spatial organization, even during deep sleep, they also display a decreased temporal complexity in specific brain regions. Conversely, this result suggests that long-range temporal dependence might be an attribute of the spontaneous conscious mentation performed during wakeful rest. PMID:24003146

  18. Ambulatory heart rate range predicts mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation in chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Cubbon, Richard M; Ruff, Naomi; Groves, David; Eleuteri, Antonio; Denby, Christine; Kearney, Lorraine; Ali, Noman; Walker, Andrew M N; Jamil, Haqeel; Gierula, John; Gale, Chris P; Batin, Phillip D; Nolan, James; Shah, Ajay M; Fox, Keith A A; Sapsford, Robert J; Witte, Klaus K; Kearney, Mark T

    2016-01-01

    Objective We aimed to define the prognostic value of the heart rate range during a 24 h period in patients with chronic heart failure (CHF). Methods Prospective observational cohort study of 791 patients with CHF associated with left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Mode-specific mortality and hospitalisation were linked with ambulatory heart rate range (AHRR; calculated as maximum minus minimum heart rate using 24 h Holter monitor data, including paced and non-sinus complexes) in univariate and multivariate analyses. Findings were then corroborated in a validation cohort of 408 patients with CHF with preserved or reduced left ventricular ejection fraction. Results After a mean 4.1 years of follow-up, increasing AHRR was associated with reduced risk of all-cause, sudden, non-cardiovascular and progressive heart failure death in univariate analyses. After accounting for characteristics that differed between groups above and below median AHRR using multivariate analysis, AHRR remained strongly associated with all-cause mortality (HR 0.991/bpm increase in AHRR (95% CI 0.999 to 0.982); p=0.046). AHRR was not associated with the risk of any non-elective hospitalisation, but was associated with heart-failure-related hospitalisation. AHRR was modestly associated with the SD of normal-to-normal beats (R2=0.2; p<0.001) and with peak exercise-test heart rate (R2=0.33; p<0.001). Analysis of the validation cohort revealed AHRR to be associated with all-cause and mode-specific death as described in the derivation cohort. Conclusions AHRR is a novel and readily available prognosticator in patients with CHF, which may reflect autonomic tone and exercise capacity. PMID:26674986

  19. Growth, compatible solute and salt accumulation of five mycorrhizal fungal species grown over a range of NaCl concentrations.

    PubMed

    Bois, G; Bertrand, A; Piché, Y; Fung, M; Khasa, D P

    2006-03-01

    The oil sand industry in northeastern Alberta produces vast areas of severely disturbed land. The sodicity of these anthropic soils is one of the principal constraints that impede their revegetation. Previous in vitro studies have shown that the ectomycorrhizal fungi Laccaria bicolor (Maire) Orton UAMH 8232 and Hebeloma crustuliniforme (Bull) Quel. UAMH 5247 have certain salt-resistant traits and thus are candidate species for the inoculation of tree seedlings to be outplanted on salt-affected soil. In this study, the in vitro development of these fungi was compared to that of three mycorrhizal fungi [Suillus tomentosus (Kauff.) Sing., Snell and Dick; Hymenoscyphus sp. and Phialocephala sp.] isolated from a sodic site created by Syncrude Canada Ltd. Their growth, osmotica and Na/Cl contents were assessed over a range (0, 50, 100, 200 mM) of NaCl concentrations. After 21 days, the two ascomycetes (Hymenoscyphus sp. and Phialocephala sp.) were shown to be more resistant to the NaCl treatments than the three basidiomycete species. Of the basidiomycetes, L. bicolor was the most sensitive to NaCl stress, while H. crustuliniforme showed greater water stress resistance, and the S. tomentosus isolate exhibited greater Na and Cl filtering capacities and had a better biomass yield over the NaCl gradient tested. Both ascomycetes used mechanisms other than carbohydrate accumulation to palliate NaCl stress. While the Hymenoscyphus isolate accumulated proline in response to NaCl treatments, the darker Phialocephala isolate may have used compounds such as melanin. The basidiomycete species accumulated mainly mannitol and/or proline in response to increasing concentrations of NaCl.

  20. Extending the mode-hop-free tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser by synchronous tuning with mode matching.

    PubMed

    Gong, Hai; Liu, Zhigang; Zhou, Yangli; Zhang, Weibo

    2014-11-20

    We present an effective method to extend the mode-hop-free (MHF) tuning range of an external-cavity diode laser (ECDL) by synchronous tuning of the longitudinal modes of the external cavity and the internal cavity, with the mode also matched in the initial state. Both the principle of synchronous tuning and the condition of mode matching in a Littman-configuration ECDL are introduced. The necessary tuning parameters could simply be estimated by the output power curve of the tuning with a single photodiode. By using this tuning method, we increased the MHF tuning range of an ECDL with a nonoptimized reflector pivot position from several gigahertzes to over 78 GHz around 774.5 nm. The tuning performance of the ECDL could meet the requirement of frequency scanned interferometry. PMID:25607863

  1. Optofluidic laser for dual-mode sensitive biomolecular detection with a large dynamic range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiang; Oo, Maung Kyaw Khaing; Reddy, Karthik; Chen, Qiushu; Sun, Yuze; Fan, Xudong

    2014-04-01

    Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is a powerful method for biomolecular analysis. The traditional ELISA employing light intensity as the sensing signal often encounters large background arising from non-specific bindings, material autofluorescence and leakage of excitation light, which deteriorates its detection limit and dynamic range. Here we develop the optofluidic laser-based ELISA, where ELISA occurs inside a laser cavity. The laser onset time is used as the sensing signal, which is inversely proportional to the enzyme concentration and hence the analyte concentration inside the cavity. We first elucidate the principle of the optofluidic laser-based ELISA, and then characterize the optofluidic laser performance. Finally, we present the dual-mode detection of interleukin-6 using commercial ELISA kits, where the sensing signals are simultaneously obtained by the traditional and the optofluidic laser-based ELISA, showing a detection limit of 1 fg ml-1 (38 aM) and a dynamic range of 6 orders of magnitude.

  2. Metal-oxide-semiconductor-compatible ultra-long-range surface plasmon modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durfee, C. G.; Furtak, T. E.; Collins, R. T.; Hollingsworth, R. E.

    2008-06-01

    Long-range surface plasmons traveling on thin metal films have demonstrated promising potential in subwavelength waveguide applications. In work toward device applications that can leverage existing silicon microelectronics technology, it is of interest to explore the propagation of surface plasmons in a metal-oxide-semiconductor geometry. In such a structure, there is a high refractive index contrast between the semiconductor (n ≈3.5 for silicon) and the insulating oxide (typically n ≈1.5-2.5). However, the introduction of dielectrics with disparate refractive indices is known to strongly affect the guiding properties of surface plasmons. In this paper, we analyze the implications of high index contrast in 1D layered surface plasmon structures. We show that it is possible to introduce a thin dielectric layer with a low refractive index positioned next to the metal without adversely affecting the guiding quality. In fact, such a configuration can dramatically increase the propagation length of the conventional long-range mode. While this study is directed at silicon-compatible waveguides working at telecommunications wavelengths, this configuration has general implications for surface plasmon structure design using other materials and operating at alternative wavelengths.

  3. Three explanations for biodiversity hotspots: small range size, geographical overlap and time for species accumulation. An Australian case study.

    PubMed

    Cook, Lyn G; Hardy, Nate B; Crisp, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    To understand the generation and maintenance of biodiversity hotspots, we tested three major hypotheses: rates of diversification, ecological limits to diversity, and time for species accumulation. Using dated molecular phylogenies, measures of species' range size and geographical clade overlap, niche modelling, and lineages-through-time plots of Australian Fabaceae, we compared the southwest Australia Floristic Region (SWAFR; a global biodiversity hotspot) with a latitudinally equivalent non-hotspot, southeast Australia (SEA). Ranges of species (real and simulated) were smaller in the SWAFR than in SEA. Geographical overlap of clades was significantly greater for Daviesia in the SWAFR than in SEA, but the inverse for Bossiaea. Lineage diversification rates over the past 10 Myr did not differ between the SWAFR and SEA in either genus. Interaction of multiple factors probably explains the differences in measured diversity between the two regions. Steeper climatic gradients in the SWAFR probably explain the smaller geographical ranges of both genera there. Greater geographical overlap of clades in the SWAFR, combined with a longer time in the region, can explain why Daviesia is far more species-rich there than in SEA. Our results indicate that the time for speciation and ecological limits hypotheses, in concert, can explain the differences in biodiversity.

  4. A uniform doping ultra-thin SOI LDMOS with accumulation-mode extended gate and back-side etching technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan-Hui, Zhang; Jie, Wei; Chao, Yin; Qiao, Tan; Jian-Ping, Liu; Peng-Cheng, Li; Xiao-Rong, Luo

    2016-02-01

    A uniform doping ultra-thin silicon-on-insulator (SOI) lateral-double-diffused metal-oxide-semiconductor (LDMOS) with low specific on-resistance (Ron,sp) and high breakdown voltage (BV) is proposed and its mechanism is investigated. The proposed LDMOS features an accumulation-mode extended gate (AG) and back-side etching (BE). The extended gate consists of a P- region and two diodes in series. In the on-state with VGD > 0, an electron accumulation layer is formed along the drift region surface under the AG. It provides an ultra-low resistance current path along the whole drift region surface and thus the novel device obtains a low temperature distribution. The Ron,sp is nearly independent of the doping concentration of the drift region. In the off-state, the AG not only modulates the surface electric field distribution and improves the BV, but also brings in a charge compensation effect to further reduce the Ron,sp. Moreover, the BE avoids vertical premature breakdown to obtain high BV and allows a uniform doping in the drift region, which avoids the variable lateral doping (VLD) and the “hot-spot” caused by the VLD. Compared with the VLD SOI LDMOS, the proposed device simultaneously reduces the Ron,sp by 70.2% and increases the BV from 776 V to 818 V. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61176069 and 61376079).

  5. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  6. Geomorphic controls on mercury accumulation in soils from a historically mined watershed, Central California Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holloway, J.M.; Goldhaber, M.B.; Morrison, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    Historic Hg mining in the Cache Creek watershed in the Central California Coast Range has contributed to the downstream transport of Hg to the San Francisco Bay-Delta. Different aspects of Hg mobilization in soils, including pedogenesis, fluvial redistribution of sediment, volatilization and eolian transport were considered. The greatest soil concentrations (>30 mg Hg kg-1) in Cache Creek are associated with mineralized serpentinite, the host rock for Hg deposits. Upland soils with non-mineralized serpentine and sedimentary parent material also had elevated concentrations (0.9-3.7 mg Hg kg-1) relative to the average concentration in the region and throughout the conterminous United States (0.06 mg kg-1). Erosion of soil and destabilized rock and mobilization of tailings and calcines into surrounding streams have contributed to Hg-rich alluvial soil forming in wetlands and floodplains. The concentration of Hg in floodplain sediment shows sediment dispersion from low-order catchments (5.6-9.6 mg Hg kg-1 in Sulphur Creek; 0.5-61 mg Hg kg-1 in Davis Creek) to Cache Creek (0.1-0.4 mg Hg kg-1). These sediments, deposited onto the floodplain during high-flow storm events, yield elevated Hg concentrations (0.2-55 mg Hg kg-1) in alluvial soils in upland watersheds. Alluvial soils within the Cache Creek watershed accumulate Hg from upstream mining areas, with concentrations between 0.06 and 0.22 mg Hg kg-1 measured in soils ~90 km downstream from Hg mining areas. Alluvial soils have accumulated Hg released through historic mining activities, remobilizing this Hg to streams as the soils erode.

  7. Simultaneous ranging and velocimetry of fast moving targets using oppositely chirped pulses from a mode-locked laser.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Mohammad U; Nguyen, Dat; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Delfyett, Peter J

    2011-06-01

    A lidar system based on the coherent detection of oppositely chirped pulses generated using a 20 MHz mode locked laser and chirped fiber Bragg gratings is presented. Sub millimeter resolution ranging is performed with > 25 dB signal to noise ratio. Simultaneous, range and Doppler velocity measurements are experimentally demonstrated using a target moving at > 330 km/h inside the laboratory.

  8. Comparison of broadband mode arrivals at ranges of 3515 km and 5171 km in the North Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wage, Kathleen E.

    2003-04-01

    The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Climate (ATOC) provided an opportunity to observe signals propagating in the low-order modes of the ocean waveguide. Understanding the fluctuations of these mode signals is an important prerequisite to using them for tomography or other applications. In previous work, we characterized the cross-mode coherence and temporal variability of the low-order mode arrivals at 3515 km range [Wage et al., J. Acoust. Soc. Am. (in press)]. This study compares the mode arrivals for two different ranges : 3515 km and 5171 km, using data from the ATOC vertical line arrays at Hawaii and Kiritimati. We discuss the mode intensity and coherence statistics for each of the arrays and examine mean arrival time trends over the year-long deployment. Experimental results are compared to PE simulations of propagation through a realistic background environment perturbed by internal waves of varying strengths. The dependence of mode statistics on the path-dependent changes in the background sound speed and the parameters of the internal wave field is explored. [Work supported by an ONR Ocean Acoustics Young Faculty Award.] a)A. B. Baggeroer, T. G. Birdsall, C. Clark, J. A. Colosi, B. D. Cornuelle, D. Costa, B. D. Dushaw, M. A. Dzieciuch, A. M. G. Forbes, B. M. Howe, D. Menemenlis, J. A. Mercer, K. Metzger, W. H. Munk, R. C. Spindel, P. F. Worcester, and C. Wunsch.

  9. Electron beam excitation of upstream waves in the whistler mode frequency range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, Hung K.; Smith, Charles W.

    1994-01-01

    We examine whistler mode instabilities arising from electron beams in interplanetary space at 1 AU. Both parallel and obliquely propagating solutions are considered. We demonstrate that the generation of two simultaneous whistler mode waves is possible, and even reasonably likely, for beam parameters frequently encountered upstream of the Earth's bow shock and at interplanetary shocks. We also explore the generation of left-hand polarized waves at whistler mode frequencies under these same conditions. We offer both parametric variations derived from numerical solutions of the various instabilities as well as an analytical treatment of the problem which succeeds in unifying the various numerical results.

  10. Design, Fabrication and Prototype testing of a Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator combined On-Board Range Extender

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balakrishnan, A.; Mueller, C.; Reinecke, H.

    2014-11-01

    In this work we present the design, fabrication and prototype testing of Chip Integrated Micro PEM Fuel Cell Accumulator (CIμ-PFCA) combined On-Board Range Extender (O-BRE). CIμ-PFCA is silicon based micro-PEM fuel cell system with an integrated hydrogen storage feature (palladium metal hydride), the run time of CIμ-PFCA is dependent on the stored hydrogen, and in order to extend its run time an O-BRE is realized (catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride, NaBH4. Combining the CIμ-PFCA and O-BRE on a system level have few important design requirements to be considered; hydrogen regulation, gas -liquid separator between the CIμ-PFCA and the O-RE. The usage of traditional techniques to regulate hydrogen (tubes), gas-liquid phase membranes (porous membrane separators) are less desirable in the micro domain, due to its space constraint. Our approach is to use a passive hydrogen regulation and gas-liquid phase separation concept; to use palladium membrane. Palladium regulates hydrogen by concentration diffusion, and its property to selectively adsorb only hydrogen is used as a passive gas-liquid phase separator. Proof of concept is shown by realizing a prototype system. The system is an assembly of CIμ-PFCA, palladium membrane and the O-BRE. The CIμ-PFCA consist of 2 individually processed silicon chips, copper supported palladium membrane realized by electroplating followed by high temperature annealing process under inter atmosphere and the O-BRE is realized out of a polymer substrate by micromilling process with platinum coated structures, which functions as a catalyst for the hydrolysis of NaBH4. The functionality of the assembled prototype system is demonstrated by the measuring a unit cell (area 1 mm2) when driven by the catalytic hydrolysis of chemical hydride (NaBH4 and the prototype system shows run time more than 15 hours.

  11. Dynamic Confinement of ITER Plasma by O-Mode Driver at Electron Cyclotron Frequency Range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefan, V. Alexander

    2009-05-01

    A low B-field side launched electron cyclotron O-Mode driver leads to the dynamic rf confinement, in addition to rf turbulent heating, of ITER plasma. The scaling law for the local energy confinement time τE is evaluated (τE ˜ 3neTe/2Q, where (3/2) neTe is the local plasma thermal energy density and Q is the local rf turbulent heating rate). The dynamics of unstable dissipative trapped particle modes (DTPM) strongly coupled to Trivelpiece-Gould (T-G) modes is studied for gyrotron frequency 170GHz; power˜24 MW CW; and on-axis B-field ˜ 10T. In the case of dynamic stabilization of DTPM turbulence and for the heavily damped T-G modes, the energy confinement time scales as τE˜(I0)-2, whereby I0(W/m^2) is the O-Mode driver irradiance. R. Prater et. al., Nucl. Fusion 48, No 3 (March 2008). E. P. Velikhov, History of the Russian Tokamak and the Tokamak Thermonuclear Fusion Research Worldwide That Led to ITER (Documentary movie; Stefan Studios Int'l, La Jolla, CA, 2008; E. P. Velikhov, V. Stefan.) M N Rosenbluth, Phys. Scr. T2A 104-109 1982 B. B. Kadomtsev and O. P. Pogutse, Nucl. Fusion 11, 67 (1971).

  12. 100-Gbit/s PDM-QPSK coherent receiver with wide dynamic range and excellent common-mode rejection ratio.

    PubMed

    Murata, Koichi; Saida, Takashi; Sano, Kimikazu; Ogawa, Ikuo; Fukuyama, Hiroyuki; Kasahara, Ryoichi; Muramoto, Yoshifumi; Nosaka, Hideyuki; Tsunashima, Satoshi; Mizuno, Takayuki; Tanobe, Hiromasa; Hattori, Kuninori; Yoshimatsu, Toshihide; Kawakami, Hiroto; Yoshida, Eiji

    2011-12-12

    We report the design and fabrication of a hybrid-integration-type coherent receiver. We optimize the receiver building blocks, and achieve a -25-dB common-mode rejection ratio and a 20-dB signal input power dynamic range.

  13. Fabrication and performance of tuneable single-mode VCSELs emitting in the 750- to 1000-nm range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabherr, Martin; Wiedenmann, Dieter; Jaeger, Roland; King, Roger

    2005-03-01

    The growing demand on low cost high spectral purity laser sources at specific wavelengths for applications like tuneable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS) and optical pumping of atomic clocks can be met by sophisticated single-mode VCSELs in the 760 to 980 nm wavelength range. Equipped with micro thermo electrical cooler (TEC) and thermistor inside a small standard TO46 package, the resulting wavelength tuning range is larger than +/- 2.5 nm. U-L-M photonics presents manufacturing aspects, device performance and reliability data on tuneable single-mode VCSELs at 760, 780, 794, 852, and 948 nm lately introduced to the market. According applications are O2 sensing, Rb pumping, Cs pumping, and moisture sensing, respectively. The first part of the paper dealing with manufacturing aspects focuses on control of resonance wavelength during epitaxial growth and process control during selective oxidation for current confinement. Acceptable resonance wavelength tolerance is as small as +/- 1nm and typical aperture size of oxide confined single-mode VCSELs is 3 &mum with only few hundred nm tolerance. Both of these major production steps significantly contribute to yield on wafer values. Key performance data for the presented single-mode VCSELs are: >0.5 mW of optical output power, >30 dB side mode suppression ratio, and extrapolated 10E7 h MTTF at room temperature based on several millions of real test hours. Finally, appropriate fiber coupling solutions will be presented and discussed.

  14. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3-3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10-1 to 101 W cm-3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  15. Transitions between various diffuse discharge modes in atmospheric-pressure helium in the medium-frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boisvert, J.-S.; Margot, J.; Massines, F.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we investigate DBDs in the medium frequency range (MF, 0.3–3 MHz). More precisely, for a 2 inter-dielectric gap in helium at atmospheric pressure, the frequency is varied from 1.0 to 2.7 MHz. The generated discharge shows similarities with both the low-frequency atmospheric-pressure glow discharge (APGD) and the atmospheric pressure capacitively coupled radio-frequency (CCRF) discharge. In the frequency range under investigation, two diffuse discharge modes can be observed depending on the voltage applied between the electrodes. At low applied voltage, the discharge emissions are barely visible and are concentrated in the center of the gas gap similarly to CCRF discharges in the Ω mode where the electron density is concentrated in the bulk. Ohmic heating is the main power transfer mechanism. At higher applied voltage, the discharge emissions are 10 times more intense and are closer to the dielectric surfaces similarly to the more common radio-frequency α mode. These two discharge modes can be observed in the same experimental conditions with the amplitude of the applied voltage as sole control parameter. The gas temperature obtained from N2 impurities rotational spectrum increases from room temperature to about 500 K while the power density rises from 10‑1 to 101 W cm‑3 when the applied voltage is increased. In addition, when the discharge transits back and forth from the Ω to the α mode, a hysteresis is observed. The transition from the Ω to the α mode occurs abruptly with a large RMS current increase while the transition from the α to the Ω mode is rather smooth with no significant discontinuity in the RMS current.

  16. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system.

    PubMed

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-01

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02 mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  17. Blade tip clearance measurement of the turbine engines based on a multi-mode fiber coupled laser ranging system

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Haotian; Duan, Fajie; Wu, Guoxiu; Zhang, Jilong

    2014-11-15

    The blade tip clearance is a parameter of great importance to guarantee the efficiency and safety of the turbine engines. In this article, a laser ranging system designed for blade tip clearance measurement is presented. Multi-mode fiber is utilized for optical transmission to guarantee that enough optical power is received by the sensor probe. The model of the tiny sensor probe is presented. The error brought by the optical path difference of different modes of the fiber is estimated and the length of the fiber is limited to reduce this error. The measurement range in which the optical power received by the probe remains essentially unchanged is analyzed. Calibration experiments and dynamic experiments are conducted. The results of the calibration experiments indicate that the resolution of the system is about 0.02 mm and the range of the system is about 9 mm.

  18. Comment on "Mode Conversion of Waves In The Ion-Cyclotron Frequency Range in Magnetospheric Plasmas"

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Eun; Johnson, J. R.

    2014-02-01

    Recently, Kazakov and Fulop [1] studied mode conversion (MC) at the ion-ion hybrid (IIH) resonance in planetary magnetospheric plasmas by simplifying the dispersion relation of the fast wave (FW) modes to describe a cutoff-resonance (CR) pair near the IIH resonance, which can be reduced to a Budden problem. They suggested that when the IIH resonance frequency (ωS) approaches the crossover frequency (ωcr), and the parallel wavenumber (k∥) is close to the critical wavenumber k* ∥(ωS = ωcr), MC can be efficient for arbitrary heavy ion density ratios. In this Comment, we argue that (a) the FW dispersion relation cannot be simplified to the CR pair especially near ωcr because in many parameter regimes there is a cutoff-resonance-cutoff (CRC) triplet that completely changes the wave absorption; and (b) the maximum MC efficiency does not always occur near k∥ ≈ k*∥∥.

  19. Preliminary results of the ultralong-range sounding of ionospheric irregularities using the ducted mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponyatov, A. A.; Uryadov, V. P.; Batukhtin, V. I.; Ivanov, V. A.; Ivanov, D. V.; Ryabova, N. V.; Chernov, A. G.; Shumaev, V. V.; Anderson, S. J.

    1999-12-01

    We present preliminary experimental results concerning transequatorial propagation (TEP) of HF waves upon chirp sounding over the 11950-km path alice Springs (Australia)-Yoshkar-Ola (Russia). The measurements were made in August, 1998. Two anomalous signals with delays of 3.0 and 4.5 ms with respect to the main mode were observed during night time (21:30 23:00 UT). The maximum observed frequencies (MOF) of these signals were 2 3 MHz greater than the main-mode MOF. Simulations allowed us to identify these signals as the ducted signals trapped in the FE interlayer duct due to radiowave refraction on a negative gradient of the electron density and that escaped from the duct due to the scattering by small-scale field-aligned irregularities of the subpolar ionosphere. We discuss radiophysical and geophysical aspects concerning localization of the irregularities responsible for scattering and perspectives of using the ducted mode for over-the-horizon diagnostics of the inhomogeneous structure of the ionosphere with a global network of chirp sounders and HF radars.

  20. A wide load range, multi-mode synchronous buck DC—DC converter with a dynamic mode controller and adaptive slope compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chunhong, Zhang; Haigang, Yang; Shi, Richard

    2013-06-01

    A synchronous buck DC—DC converter with an adaptive multi-mode controller is proposed. In order to achieve high efficiency over its entire load range, pulse-width modulation (PWM), pulse-skip modulation (PSM) and pulse-frequency modulation (PFM) modes were integrated in the proposed DC—DC converter. With a highly accurate current sensor and a dynamic mode controller on chip, the converter can dynamically change among PWM, PSM and PFM control according to the load requirements. In addition, to avoid power device damage caused by inrush current at the start up state, a soft-start circuit is presented to suppress the inrush current. Furthermore, an adaptive slope compensation (SC) technique is proposed to stabilize the current programmed PWM controller for duty cycle passes over 50%, and improve the degraded load capability due to traditional slope compensation. The buck converter chip was simulated and manufactured under a 0.35 μm standard CMOS process. Experimental results show that the chip can achieve 79% to 91% efficiency over the load range of 0.1 to 1000 mA

  1. 240 GHz pedestal-free colliding-pulse mode-locked laser with a wide operation range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L.; Haji, M.; Marsh, J. H.

    2014-11-01

    A 240 GHz, sixth-harmonic monolithic ~1.55 μm colliding-pulse mode-locked laser is reported using a three-quantum-well active layer design and a passive far-field reduction layer. The device emits 0.88 ps pulses with a peak power of 65 mW and intermediate longitudinal modes suppressed by >30 dB. The device demonstrates a wide operation range compared to the conventional five-quantum-well design as well as having a low divergence angle (12.7° × 26.3°), granting a twofold improvement in butt-coupling efficiency into a flat cleaved single-mode fibre.

  2. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  3. Graphene mode-locked femtosecond Cr2+:ZnS laser with ~300 nm tuning range.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won Bae; Choi, Sun Young; Zhu, Chunhui; Kim, Mi Hye; Kim, Jun Wan; Kim, Jin Sun; Park, Hyung Ju; Shin, Dong Ho; Jung, Moon Youn; Wang, Fengqiu; Rotermund, Fabian

    2016-09-01

    Graphene has proved to be an excellent broadband saturable absorber for mode-locked operation of ultrafast lasers. However, for the mid-infrared (mid-IR) range where broadly tunable sources are in great needs, graphene-based broadly tunable ultrafast mid-IR lasers have not been demonstrated so far. Here, we report on passive mode-locking of a mid-IR Cr:ZnS laser by utilizing a transmission-type monolayer graphene saturable absorber and broad spectral tunability between 2120 nm and 2408 nm, which is the broadest tuning bandwidth ever reported for graphene mode-locked mid-IR solid-state lasers. The recovery time of the saturable absorber is measured to be ~2.4 ps by pump-probe technique at a wavelength of 2350 nm. Stably mode-locked Cr:ZnS laser delivers Fourier transform-limited 220-fs pulses with a pulse energy of up to 7.8 nJ. PMID:27607680

  4. A new mode of radio wave diffraction via the terrestrial surface plasmon on mountain range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Masafumi

    2016-08-01

    It is shown that a new mode of radio wave diffraction occurs at the peak of mountains mediated via the terrestrial surface plasmon. If mobile electrical charges exist on the Earth's surface, the electromagnetic theory predicts strong coupling between the radio wave and the surface plasmon on the ground. If sufficient amount of electrical charges of the same sign appear on the ground as a consequence of some underground preseismic activity, they will be subject to the electrical repulsive forces. The surface electrical charges will then move toward topographic highs of nearby mountain peaks. Radio waves are then shown to interact with such electrical charges and create collective oscillations of the surface charges to induce a surface plasmon. Here it is clarified with numerical analyses on a massively parallel supercomputer that such interactions occur on the peak of mountains, hence causing peculiar phenomena of random diffraction. Depending on the density of the electrical charges on the ground surface, the interaction becomes strong enough to cause intense and random scattering and diffraction of the radio wave from the rough surface of the mountain topography. Mountain peaks thus act as a secondary source of radio waves; unexpectedly, radio waves are reradiated from the peaks into various directions by the anomalous diffraction and scattering, and the reradiated wave can propagate beyond the line of sight over mountains to reach distant locations. Such effects may arise randomly but concurrently with some preseismic activity in the crustal rocks, of which observation may allow statistical analysis of the critical state of crustal rocks over a broad area of a few hundred kilometers.

  5. Excitation of azimuthal surface modes by relativistic flows of electrons in the high-frequency range

    SciTech Connect

    Girka, V. O.; Girka, I. O.; Pavlenko, I. V.

    2011-05-15

    Excitation of extraordinarily polarized azimuthal surface eigenwaves is shown to be possible in the frequency range above the upper hybrid resonance in waveguides with metal walls which are partially filled by cold magnetoactive plasma. Interaction of these waves with flows of electrons which rotate around the plasma column in the narrow gap separating the plasma from the wall of the waveguide is studied. Conditions of resonant interaction of the beam with the mentioned high-frequency azimuthal surface waves are shown by numerical methods to be reachable ones in the case of enough strong external magnetic fields without passing to the field of ultra-relativistic velocities of the beam.

  6. Development and comparison of methods using MS scan and selective ion monitoring modes for a wide range of airborne VOCs.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chunrong; Batterman, Stuart; Chernyak, Sergei

    2006-10-01

    Adsorbent sampling with analysis by thermal desorption, gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) offers many advantages for volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and thus is increasingly used in many applications. For environmental samples and other complex mixtures, the MS detector typically is operated in the scan mode to aid identification of co-eluting compounds. However, scan mode does not achieve the optimal sensitivity, thus compounds occurring at low concentrations may not be detected. This paper develops and evaluates the application of a more sensitive TD/GC/MS method using selective ion monitoring (SIM) that is applicable to VOC mixtures found in ambient and indoor air. Based on toxicity and prevalence, 94 VOCs (including terpenes, aromatic, halogenated and aliphatic compounds) were selected as target compounds. Two analytical methods were developed: a conventional full scan method for ions from 29 to 270 m/z; and a SIM method using 16 time windows and different ions selected for the compounds in each window. Both methods used the same Tenax GR adsorbent sampling tubes, TD and GC parameters, and target and qualifier ions. Laboratory tests determined calibrations, method detection limits (MDLs), precisions, recoveries and storage stability. Field tests compared scan and SIM mode analyses for duplicate samples of indoor air in 51 houses and outdoor air at 41 sites. Statistical analyses included the development of error/precision models. The laboratory tests showed that most compounds demonstrated excellent precision (<10% for concentrations exceeding approximately 0.5 microg m(-3)), good linearity, near identical calibrations for scan and SIM modes, a wide dynamic range (up to 1500 microg m(-3)), and negligible storage losses after 1 month (7 compounds showed moderate losses). SIM mode MDLs ranged from 0.004 to 0.27 microg m(-3), representing a modest (1.1 to 22-fold) improvement compared to scan mode. However, in field tests the SIM method detected

  7. Active accumulation of very diluted biomolecules by nano-dispensing for easy detection below the femtomolar range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grilli, S.; Miccio, L.; Gennari, O.; Coppola, S.; Vespini, V.; Battista, L.; Orlando, P.; Ferraro, P.

    2014-11-01

    Highly sensitive detection of biomolecules is of paramount interest in many fields including biomedicine, safety and eco-pollution. Conventional analyses use well-established techniques with detection limits ~1 pM. Here we propose a pyro-concentrator able to accumulate biomolecules directly onto a conventional binding surface. The operation principle is relatively simple but very effective. Tiny droplets are drawn pyro-electro-dynamically and released onto a specific site, thus increasing the sensitivity. The reliability of the technique is demonstrated in case of labelled oligonucleotides diluted serially. The results show the possibility to detect very diluted oligonucleotides, down to a few hundreds of attomoles. Excellent results are shown also in case of a sample of clinical interest, the gliadin, where a 60-fold improved detection limit is reached, compared with standard ELISA. This method could open the way to a mass-based technology for sensing molecules at very low concentrations, in environmental as well as in diagnostics applications.

  8. Wide range local resistance imaging on fragile materials by conducting probe atomic force microscopy in intermittent contact mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiola, Aymeric; Chrétien, Pascal; Delprat, Sophie; Bouzehouane, Karim; Schneegans, Olivier; Seneor, Pierre; Mattana, Richard; Tatay, Sergio; Geffroy, Bernard; Bonnassieux, Yvan; Mencaraglia, Denis; Houzé, Frédéric

    2016-06-01

    An imaging technique associating a slowly intermittent contact mode of atomic force microscopy (AFM) with a home-made multi-purpose resistance sensing device is presented. It aims at extending the widespread resistance measurements classically operated in contact mode AFM to broaden their application fields to soft materials (molecular electronics, biology) and fragile or weakly anchored nano-objects, for which nanoscale electrical characterization is highly demanded and often proves to be a challenging task in contact mode. Compared with the state of the art concerning less aggressive solutions for AFM electrical imaging, our technique brings a significantly wider range of resistance measurement (over 10 decades) without any manual switching, which is a major advantage for the characterization of materials with large on-sample resistance variations. After describing the basics of the set-up, we report on preliminary investigations focused on academic samples of self-assembled monolayers with various thicknesses as a demonstrator of the imaging capabilities of our instrument, from qualitative and semi-quantitative viewpoints. Then two application examples are presented, regarding an organic photovoltaic thin film and an array of individual vertical carbon nanotubes. Both attest the relevance of the technique for the control and optimization of technological processes.

  9. THE DEVELOPMENT OF MODE-CHOICE SIMULATOR WITH THE LOG DATA ACCUMULATED IN ON-DEMAND BUS SERVER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsubouchi, Kota; Yamato, Hiroyuki; Hiekata, Kazuo

    The new simulator which can estimate the mode-choi ce in the area was developed and evaluated in the field test. The characteristic of the developed simulato r is to be able to estimate the number of demand and demand pattern in high-accuracy with the real operation log data of the On-demand Bus. The simulator is devided into micro-simulator whose passenger agents choose their transpor t mode by the sacrifice model. The developed simulator is evaluated in the real fi eld test in Sakai City, Osaka Prefecture. The new transportation like LRT (Light Rail Transit) and On-demand Bus is eval uated by the simulator and the result of simulation is confirmed to be reliable by the local government officers.

  10. Exploration of Daphnia behavioral effect profiles induced by a broad range of toxicants with different modes of action.

    PubMed

    Chevalier, Julie; Harscoët, Elodie; Keller, Merlin; Pandard, Pascal; Cachot, Jérôme; Grote, Matthias

    2015-08-01

    Behavior is increasingly reported as a sensitive and early indicator of toxicant stress in aquatic organisms. However, the systematic understanding of behavioral effects and comparisons between effect profiles is hampered because the available studies are limited to few chemicals and differ in the exposure conditions and effect parameters examined. The aims of the present study were 1) to explore behavioral responses of Daphnia magna exposed to different toxicants, 2) to compare behavioral effect profiles with regard to chemical modes of action, and 3) to determine the sensitivity and response time of behavioral parameters in a new multi-cell exposure system named Multi-DaphTrack compared with currently utilized tests. Twelve compounds covering different modes of toxic action were selected to sample a wide range of potential effect profiles. Acute standard immobilization tests and 48 h of behavioral tracking were performed in the customized Multi-DaphTrack system and a single-cell commercialized biological early warning system. Contrasting behavioral profiles were observed for average speed (i.e., intensity, time of effect onset, effect duration), but no distinct behavioral profiles could be drawn from the chemical mode of action. Most compounds tested in the Multi-DaphTrack system induced an early and significant average speed increase at concentrations near or below the 10% effective concentration (48 h) of the acute immobilization test, demonstrating that the Multi-DaphTrack system is fast and sensitive. To conclude, behavior endpoints could be used as an alternative or complement to the current acute standard test or chemical analysis for the predictive evaluation of ecotoxic effects of effluents or water bodies.

  11. Potential lipid accumulation and growth characteristic of the green alga Chlorella with combination cultivation mode of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P).

    PubMed

    Li, Yuqin; Han, Fangxin; Xu, Hua; Mu, Jinxiu; Chen, Di; Feng, Bo; Zeng, Hongyan

    2014-12-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the potential lipid accumulation of an oleaginous Chlorella protothecoides by combination cultivation mode of nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). Under co-deficiency of N and P, the largest lipid content (55.8%) was accomplished in C. protothecoides, which was higher than either sole P-deficiency (32.77%) or N-deficiency (52.5%), or co-repletion of N and P (control) (22.17%). However, the highest lipid productivity (224.14mg/L/day) with combination mode of N-deficiency and P-repletion represented 1.19-3.70-fold more than that of control, P-deficiency/limitation, and co-deficiency of N and P, respectively. This indicating N-deficiency plus P-repletion was a promising lipid trigger to motivate lipid accumulation in C. protothecoides cells. Further, difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE)-based proteomics was employed to reveal the molecular pathways associated with lipid biosynthesis. These results provide the foundation to develop engineering strategies targeting lipid productivity for industrial production of microalgae-based biodiesel.

  12. Split-Spectrum Signal Processing for Reduction of the Effect of Dispersive Wave Modes in Long-range Ultrasonic Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedram, S. K.; Haig, A.; Lowe, P. S.; Thornicroft, K.; Gan, L.; Mudge, P.

    This paper presents a Split-Spectrum Signal Processing (SSP) with applications to Long Range Ultrasonic Testing (LRUT). The problem of coherent noise due to Dispersive Wave Modes (DWM) in the context of ultrasonic scattering is addressed and a novel solution by utilizing the SSP technique is proposed for reduction of the effects of DWM in the received signal. The proposed technique investigates the sensitivity of SSP performance to the filter bank parameter values such as processing/filter bandwidth, and filter overlap. Therefore, as a result the optimum values are introduced that improve the signal to noise ratio (SNR) significantly. The proposed method has been compared with conventional approaches for synthesized signals for a 6 inch pipe by applying the different recombination SSP techniques. The Polarity Thresholding (PT) and PT with Minimization (PTM) methods were found to give the best result and substantially improve the SNR performance by an average of 10 dB.

  13. Using the accumulation of CBD-extractable iron and clay content to estimate soil age on stable surfaces and nearby slopes, Front Range, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dethier, David P.; Birkeland, Peter W.; McCarthy, James A.

    2012-11-01

    In many transport-limited environments, morphology, pedogenic iron and clay content provide a basis for estimating the exposure age of soils and associated landforms. We measured citrate-buffered dithionite (CBD)-extractable Fe (Fed) and clay concentration in fresh rock, saprolite, morainal and colluvial materials, and soil horizons from stable surfaces and hillslopes in the Colorado Front Range. Fresh igneous and high-grade metamorphic rocks contain < 1% Fed and 1 to 5% clay. As bedrock and surficial deposits age, Fed and clay accumulate from weathering and dustfall. Late Holocene regolith at warm, dry sites contains small amounts of Fed and clay, but relatively moist soils developed on early Holocene cirque deposits contain as much as 1.5% Fed and 8% clay. Concentrations and total profile accumulation of Fed and clay increase with age in soils developed on stable surfaces of glacial deposits as old as ~ 130 kyr. On stable sites, Fed and clay accumulation from weathering and dust is ~ 0.02 g cm- 2 kyr- 1 and ~ 0.2 g cm- 2 kyr- 1, respectively. We used the Fed and clay inventory in soil profiles at dated, stable Front Range surfaces to calculate accumulation functions, which allowed us to estimate soil age at hillslope sites. Heterogeneous parent material, particularly on hillslopes, and climate-related effects add to variability in measured relations. Mobile regolith in Gordon Gulch, one of the Boulder Creek Critical Zone Observatory (CZO) catchments, yields profile ages from about 0.5 to 5 × 104 yr, comparable to values measured using other techniques. Calculated profile ages are older on a north- vs. south-facing slope and increase from the drainage divide to the footslope. Ages calculated for stabilized colluvium and well-developed buried profiles at nearby hillslope sites (Lefthand, Ward and Rollinsville) suggest that these soils have stabilized over periods > 105 yr. In the absence of radiometric ages, the accumulation of Fed and clay in soils on stable

  14. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N.; Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Wukitch, S.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-01

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with HIPB98(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  15. Lower hybrid current drive and ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating experiments in H-mode plasmas in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, X. J.; Wan, B. N. Zhao, Y. P.; Ding, B. J.; Xu, G. S.; Gong, X. Z.; Li, J. G.; Lin, Y.; Wukitch, S.; Taylor, G.; Noterdaeme, J. M.; Braun, F.; Magne, R.; Litaudon, X.; Kumazawa, R.; Kasahara, H.

    2014-06-15

    An ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) system with power up to 6.0 MW and a lower hybrid current drive (LHCD) system up to 4 MW have been applied for heating and current drive experiments in Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokomak (EAST). Significant progress has been made with ICRF heating and LHCD for realizing the H-mode plasma operation in EAST. During 2010 and 2012 experimental campaigns, ICRF heating experiments were carried out at the fixed frequency of 27MHz, achieving effective ions and electrons heating with the H minority heating (H-MH) mode. The H-MH mode produced good plasma performance, and realized H-mode using ICRF power alone in 2012. In 2010, H-modes were generated and sustained by LHCD alone, where lithium coating and gas puffing near the mouth of the LH launcher were applied to improve the LHCD power coupling and penetration into the core plasmas of H-modes. In 2012, the combination of LHCD and ICRH power extended the H-mode duration up to over 30 s. H-modes with various types of edge localized modes (ELMs) have been achieved with H{sub IPB98}(y, 2) ranging from 0.7 to over unity. A brief overview of LHCD and ICRF Heating experiment and their application in achieving H-mode operation during these two campaigns will be presented.

  16. Dynamic range beyond 100 dB for polarization mode coupling measurement based on white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuang; Yang, Jun; Yu, Zhangjun; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhou, Ai; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Yuan, Libo

    2016-07-25

    This paper presents a method to improve the dynamic range of white light interferometer (WLI) based polarization mode coupling (PMC) measurement system beyond 100 dB. The limitation of interference beat noise is overcame by analyzing in detail the inherent noises that have impacts on the detection sensitivity. An improved PMC measurement system and method are proposed for testing ultra-high polarization extinction ratio (PER) of polarization-related devices. The method can improve dynamic range dramatically through eliminating interference beat noise and enhancing the tested interference intensity simultaneously, which are verified theoretically and experimentally. In addition, a Y-junction with ~80 dB PER of LiNbO3 chip corresponding to a weak signal is tested as an application example. The results demonstrate that the high PER interferogram can be identified clearly and steadily with standard deviation 0.9 dB (3σ) @ ~80 dB. This proposed method is highly beneficial in fabrication and evaluation for polarization devices with ultra-high PER. PMID:27464078

  17. Dynamic range beyond 100 dB for polarization mode coupling measurement based on white light interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuang; Yang, Jun; Yu, Zhangjun; Yuan, Yonggui; Wu, Bing; Peng, Feng; Zhang, Jianzhong; Zhou, Ai; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Zhihai; Yuan, Libo

    2016-07-25

    This paper presents a method to improve the dynamic range of white light interferometer (WLI) based polarization mode coupling (PMC) measurement system beyond 100 dB. The limitation of interference beat noise is overcame by analyzing in detail the inherent noises that have impacts on the detection sensitivity. An improved PMC measurement system and method are proposed for testing ultra-high polarization extinction ratio (PER) of polarization-related devices. The method can improve dynamic range dramatically through eliminating interference beat noise and enhancing the tested interference intensity simultaneously, which are verified theoretically and experimentally. In addition, a Y-junction with ~80 dB PER of LiNbO3 chip corresponding to a weak signal is tested as an application example. The results demonstrate that the high PER interferogram can be identified clearly and steadily with standard deviation 0.9 dB (3σ) @ ~80 dB. This proposed method is highly beneficial in fabrication and evaluation for polarization devices with ultra-high PER.

  18. Speciation of lead, copper, zinc and antimony in water draining a shooting range--time dependant metal accumulation and biomarker responses in brown trout (Salmo trutta L.).

    PubMed

    Heier, Lene Sørlie; Lien, Ivar B; Strømseng, Arnljot E; Ljønes, Marita; Rosseland, Bjørn Olav; Tollefsen, Knut-Erik; Salbu, Brit

    2009-06-15

    The speciation of Pb, Cu, Zn and Sb in a shooting range run-off stream were studied during a period of 23 days. In addition, metal accumulation in gills and liver, red blood cell ALA-D activity, hepatic metallothionine (Cd/Zn-MT) and oxidative stress index (GSSG/ tGSH levels) in brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) exposed to the stream were investigated. Fish, contained in cages, were exposed and sampled after 0, 2, 4, 7, 9, 11 and 23 days of exposure. Trace metals in the water were fractionated in situ according to size (nominal molecular mass) and charge properties. During the experimental period an episode with higher runoff occurred resulting in increased levels of metals in the stream. Pb and Cu were mainly found as high molecular mass species, while Zn and Sb were mostly present as low molecular mass species. Pb, Cu and Sb accumulated on gills, in addition to Al origination from natural sources in the catchment. Pb, Cu and Sb were also detected at elevated concentration in the liver. Blood glucose and plasma Na and Cl levels were significantly altered during the exposure period, and are attributed to elevated concentrations of Pb, Cu and Al. A significant suppression of ALA-D was detected after 11 days. Significant differences were detected in Cd/Zn-MT and oxidative stress (tGSH/GSSG) responses at Day 4. For Pb the results show a clear link between the HMM (high molecular mass) positively charged Pb species, followed by accumulation on gills and liver and a suppression in ALA-D. Thus, high flow episodes can remobilise metals from the catchment, inducing stress to aquatic organisms.

  19. Recrystallization of bulk and plasma-coated tungsten with accumulated thermal energy relevant to Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Su; Lim, Sun-Taek; Jin, Younggil; Lee, Jin Young; Song, Jae-Min; Kim, Gon-Ho

    2015-08-01

    The recrystallization of bulk tungsten is investigated under various thermal loads that are relevant to the accumulation energy during Type-I ELM in ITER H-mode operation. A thermal plasma torch is used to examine only the thermal load effect on the material; therefore, the charge and atomic effects are ignored. In this condition, recrystallization is observed in bulk W with a surface temperature above 1700 °C. The effect becomes severe with a finite recrystallization thickness near the surface, which introduces vertical cracking along grain boundaries with increasing thermal load. However, plasma-sprayed tungsten (PS-W) is not crystallized because neighboring lamellas merge, destroying their interlayer and producing no vertical cracks. This is attributed to an annealing effect in PS-W. Therefore, these results suggest that a multilayer W structure is advantageous in the fabrication of W, especially for long pulse operation in a future fusion reactor.

  20. From fine-scale foraging to home ranges: a semivariance approach to identifying movement modes across spatiotemporal scales.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Chris H; Calabrese, Justin M; Mueller, Thomas; Olson, Kirk A; Leimgruber, Peter; Fagan, William F

    2014-05-01

    Understanding animal movement is a key challenge in ecology and conservation biology. Relocation data often represent a complex mixture of different movement behaviors, and reliably decomposing this mix into its component parts is an unresolved problem in movement ecology. Traditional approaches, such as composite random walk models, require that the timescales characterizing the movement are all similar to the usually arbitrary data-sampling rate. Movement behaviors such as long-distance searching and fine-scale foraging, however, are often intermixed but operate on vastly different spatial and temporal scales. An approach that integrates the full sweep of movement behaviors across scales is currently lacking. Here we show how the semivariance function (SVF) of a stochastic movement process can both identify multiple movement modes and solve the sampling rate problem. We express a broad range of continuous-space, continuous-time stochastic movement models in terms of their SVFs, connect them to relocation data via variogram regression, and compare them using standard model selection techniques. We illustrate our approach using Mongolian gazelle relocation data and show that gazelle movement is characterized by ballistic foraging movements on a 6-h timescale, fast diffusive searching with a 10-week timescale, and asymptotic diffusion over longer timescales.

  1. Single mode operation with mid-IR hollow fibers in the range 5.1-10.5 µm.

    PubMed

    Sampaolo, Angelo; Patimisco, Pietro; Kriesel, Jason M; Tittel, Frank K; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-12

    Single mode beam delivery in the mid-infrared spectral range 5.1-10.5 μm employing flexible hollow glass waveguides of 15 cm and 50 cm lengths, with metallic/dielectric internal layers and a bore diameter of 200 μm were demonstrated. Three quantum cascade lasers were coupled with the hollow core fibers. For a fiber length of 15 cm, we measured losses down to 1.55 dB at 5.4 μm and 0.9 dB at 10.5 μm. The influence of the launch conditions in the fiber on the propagation losses and on the beam profile at the waveguide exit was analyzed. At 10.5 µm laser wavelength we found near perfect agreement between measured and theoretical losses, while at ~5 µm and ~6 µm wavelengths the losses were higher than expected. This discrepancy can be explained considering an additional scattering loss effect, which scales as 1/λ(2) and is due to surface roughness of the metallic layer used to form the high-reflective internal layer structure of the hollow core waveguide. PMID:25835666

  2. Crustal strain accumulation on Southern Basin and Range Province faults modulated by distant plate boundary earthquakes? Evidence from geodesy, seismic imaging, and paleoseismology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bennett, R. A.; Shirzaei, M.; Broermann, J.; Spinler, J. C.; Holland, A. A.; Pearthree, P.

    2014-12-01

    GPS in Arizona reveals a change in the pattern of crustal strain accumulation in 2010 and based on viscoelastic modeling appears to be associated with the distant M7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah (EMC) earthquake in Baja California, Mexico. GPS data collected between 1999 and 2009 near the Santa Rita normal fault in SE Arizona reveal a narrow zone of crustal deformation coincident with the fault trace, delineated by W-NW facing Pleistocene fault scarps of heights 1 to 7 m. The apparent deformation zone is also seen in a preliminary InSAR interferogram. Total motion across the zone inferred using an elastic block model constrained by the pre-2010 GPS measurements is ~1 mm/yr in a sense consistent with normal fault motion. However, continuous GPS measurements throughout Arizona reveal pronounced changes in crustal velocity following the EMC earthquake, such that the relative motion across the Santa Rita fault post-2010 is negligible. Paleoseismic evidence indicates that mapped Santa Rita fault scarps were formed by two or more large magnitude (M6.7 to M7.6) surface rupturing normal-faulting earthquakes 60 to 100 kyrs ago. Seismic refraction and reflection data constrained by deep (~800 m) well log data provide evidence of progressive, possibly intermittent, displacement on the fault through time. The rate of strain accumulation observed geodetically prior to 2010, if constant over the past 60 to 100 kyrs, would imply an untenable minimum slip rate deficit of 60 to 100 m since the most recent earthquake. One explanation for the available geodetic, seismic, and paleoseismic evidence is that strain accumulation is modulated by viscoelastic relaxation associated with frequent large magnitude earthquakes in the Salton Trough region, episodically inhibiting the accumulation of elastic strain required to generate large earthquakes on the Santa Rita and possibly other faults in the Southern Basin and Range. An important question is thus for how long the postseismic velocity changes

  3. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-01

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-3He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-3He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of ˜50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  4. A mode-selective circuit for TE01 gyrotron backward-wave oscillator with wide-tuning range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, N. C.; Yu, C. F.; Yuan, C. P.; Chang, T. H.

    2009-03-01

    This study proposes a mode-selective circuit to suppress the competing modes in a TE01 gyrotron backward-wave oscillator (gyro-BWO). The circuit, also functioning as an interaction structure, comprises of several transverse slices. It eliminates the restrictions of the mode competitions and allows a longer interaction structure to optimize interacting efficiency. Mode-selective effect will be analyzed. Experimental results indicate that the Ka-band TE01 fundamental harmonic gyro-BWO is capable of continuous tuning from 31.4 to 36.4 GHz with a peak efficiency of 23.7%, corresponding to 100 kW at Ib=4.5 A and Vb=93.6 kV.

  5. Characterization of timing jitter spectra in free-running mode-locked lasers with 340  dB dynamic range over 10 decades of Fourier frequency.

    PubMed

    Jung, Kwangyun; Kim, Jungwon

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate a method that enables accurate timing jitter spectral-density characterization of free-running mode-locked laser oscillators over more than 10 decades of Fourier frequency from mHz to tens of MHz range. The method is based on analyzing both the input voltage noise to the slave laser and the output voltage noise from the balanced optical cross-correlator (BOC), when two mode-locked lasers are synchronized in repetition rate by the BOC. As a demonstration experiment, timing jitter spectrum of a free-running mode-locked Er-fiber laser with a dynamic range of >340  dB is measured over Fourier frequency ranging from 1 mHz to 38.5 MHz (Nyquist frequency). The demonstrated method can resolve different noise mechanisms that cause specific jitter characteristics in free-running mode-locked laser oscillators for a vast range of time scales from <100  ns to >1000  s.

  6. Geomagnetic Investigation of Sandstone Dikes of the Colorado Front Range, for Determination of Age and Mode of Emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, D.; Petronis, M. S.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2012-12-01

    In the Colorado Front Range, an array of sandstone dikes has intrigued geologists for over a century (Cross 1894,GSAB, 5, 525). Within their crystalline host, the dikes reach widths >7m and have a lateral extent of 70km along the Ute Pass Fault (UPF). The essential questions of sediment source, emplacement mode, and age of the dikes are unanswered. We present new paleomagnetic, rock magnetic, and anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) results used to determine the age and emplacement behavior of the dikes. The eleven dikes selected for magnetic studies have sharp, planar margins, and share the systematic geometry of the NW striking subvertical dike array. They exhibit little or no overprint by brittle fracturing/shear associated with the UPF. Our approach involved the use of paleomagnetic techniques to isolate the characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM), which we used to limit the age of the dikes' magnetization. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS),arising from alignment of detrital magnetite, serves as a proxy for the orientation of flow during dike emplacement. U-Pb detrital zircon ages, obtained previously, did not provide a useful constraint on emplacement age because the dominant age matches that of the prevalent host,1.03Ga Pikes Peak Granite. IRM acquisition experiments were performed to identify the principal magnetic phases as a mixture of Fe-Ti oxide phases, likely to be low-Ti magnetite and hematite. The sandstone consists of sub-rounded to rounded sand-sized quartz, angular feldspar (<5%), and detrital magnetite; selected samples have uniform grain size and uniform color arising from hematite cement. Although direct cover relationships are not preserved, a portion of the study sites are proximal to in situ near-horizontal sedimentary cover rocks that offer evidence against large tectonic rotation. Cores were collected using a gas-powered drill with a diamond bit and oriented using a sun compass. Where possible, cores were obtained on

  7. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  8. Restraint of range walk error in a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode lidar to acquire high-precision depth and intensity information.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lu; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Yong; Yang, Chenghua; Yang, Xu; Zhao, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    There exists a range walk error in a Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode (Gm-APD) lidar because of the fluctuation in the number of signal photoelectrons. To restrain this range walk error, we propose a new returning-wave signal processing technique based on the Poisson probability response model and the Gaussian functions fitting method. High-precision depth and intensity information of the target at the distance of 5 m is obtained by a Gm-APD lidar using a 6 ns wide pulsed laser. The experiment results show that the range and intensity precisions are 1.2 cm and 0.015 photoelectrons, respectively. PMID:26974630

  9. Efficiency enhancement of dual-mode traveling wave tubes at saturation and in the linear range by use of spent-beam refocusing and multistage depressed collectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramins, P.; Fox, T. A.

    1979-01-01

    An axisymmetric, multistage depressed collector of fixed geometric design was evaluated in conjunction with an octave-bandwidth, dual-mode TWT. The TWT was operated over a wide range of conditions to simulate different applications. The collector was operated in three-, four-, and five-stage configurations, and its performance was optimized (within the constraint of fixed geometric design) over the range of TWT operating conditions covered. For operation of the dual-mode TWT at and near saturation, the collectors increased the TWT overall efficiency by a factor of 2 1/2 to 3 1/2. Collector performance was relatively constant for both the high and low TWT modes and for operation of the TWT across an octave bandwidth. For operation of the TWT in the linear, low-distortion range, collector efficiencies of 90 percent and greater were obtained, leading to a five- to twelvefold increase in the TWT overall efficiency for the range of operating conditions covered and reasonably high (greater than 25 percent) overall efficiencies well below saturation.

  10. Measurements of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode converted wave intensity with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod and comparison with full-wave simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2012-08-15

    Radio frequency waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) are widely used to heat tokamak plasmas. In ICRF heating schemes involving multiple ion species, the launched fast waves convert to ion cyclotron waves or ion Bernstein waves at the two-ion hybrid resonances. Mode converted waves are of interest as actuators to optimise plasma performance through current drive and flow drive. In order to describe these processes accurately in a realistic tokamak geometry, numerical simulations are essential, and it is important that these codes be validated against experiment. In this study, the mode converted waves were measured using a phase contrast imaging technique in D-H and D-{sup 3}He plasmas. The measured mode converted wave intensity in the D-{sup 3}He mode conversion regime was found to be a factor of {approx}50 weaker than the full-wave predictions. The discrepancy was reduced in the hydrogen minority heating regime, where mode conversion is weaker.

  11. Fast, long-scan-range pump-probe measurement based on asynchronous sampling using a dual-wavelength mode-locked fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Zheng, Zheng; Liu, Lei; Wang, Qi; Chen, Haiwei; Liu, Jiansheng

    2012-11-01

    A simple, fast and long-scan-range pump-probe scheme is experimentally demonstrated using a dual-wavelength passively mode-locked fiber laser. The pulse trains from the dual-wavelength laser have a small difference in their repetition frequencies inherently determined by the intracavity dispersion. This enables the realization of the asynchronous sampling scheme with a tens-of-nanosecond-long delay range and a picosecond scan step at a millisecond scan speed. Instead of two synchronized ultrafast lasers in the traditional asynchronous sampling scheme, just one fiber laser is needed in our scheme, which could significantly simplify the system setup.

  12. Genetic differentiation and reduced genetic diversity at the northern range edge of two species with different dispersal modes.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Abigail E; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that genetic variation should be reduced at range margins, but empirical support is equivocal. Here, we used genotyping-by-sequencing technology to investigate genetic variation in central and marginal populations of two species in the marine gastropod genus Crepidula. These two species have different development and dispersal types and might therefore show different spatial patterns of genetic variation. Both allelic richness and the proportion of private alleles were highest in the most central populations of both species, and lower at the margin. The species with low dispersal, Crepidula convexa, showed high degrees of structure throughout the range that conform to the pattern found in previous studies using other molecular markers. The northernmost populations of the high-dispersing species, Crepidula fornicata, are distinct from more central populations, although this species has been previously observed to have little genetic structure over much of its range. Although genetic diversity was significantly lower at the range margin, the absolute reduction in diversity observed with these genomewide markers was slight, and it is not yet known whether there are functional consequences for the marginal populations. PMID:26615052

  13. Genetic differentiation and reduced genetic diversity at the northern range edge of two species with different dispersal modes.

    PubMed

    Cahill, Abigail E; Levinton, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Theory predicts that genetic variation should be reduced at range margins, but empirical support is equivocal. Here, we used genotyping-by-sequencing technology to investigate genetic variation in central and marginal populations of two species in the marine gastropod genus Crepidula. These two species have different development and dispersal types and might therefore show different spatial patterns of genetic variation. Both allelic richness and the proportion of private alleles were highest in the most central populations of both species, and lower at the margin. The species with low dispersal, Crepidula convexa, showed high degrees of structure throughout the range that conform to the pattern found in previous studies using other molecular markers. The northernmost populations of the high-dispersing species, Crepidula fornicata, are distinct from more central populations, although this species has been previously observed to have little genetic structure over much of its range. Although genetic diversity was significantly lower at the range margin, the absolute reduction in diversity observed with these genomewide markers was slight, and it is not yet known whether there are functional consequences for the marginal populations.

  14. Experimental Studies of Multi-Species Pure Ion Plasmas: Cyclotron Modes, Long-Range Collisional Drag, and Non-Linear Langmuir Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolter, Matthew

    Cyclotron modes are studied on rigid rotor, multi-species ion plasmas confined in a Penning-Malmberg trap. Collective effects and radial electric fields shift the cyclotron mode frequencies away from the ''bare'' cyclotron frequencies for each species s. These frequency shifts are measured on the distinct cyclotron modes (m = 0, 1, and 2) with sinusoidal azimuthal dependence. We find that the frequency shifts corroborate a simple theory expression in which collective effects enter only through the ExB rotation frequency and the species fraction, when the plasma is radially uniform. At ultra-low temperatures, these plasmas exhibit centrifugal separation by mass, and additional frequency shifts are observed in agreement with a more general theory. Additionally, quantitative measurements of the plasma heating from short resonant cyclotron bursts are found to be proportional to the species fraction. These cyclotron modes are used as a diagnostic tool to estimate the plasma composition, in order to investigate the damping of Langmuir waves due to inter-species collisions. Experiments and theory of this collisional inter-species drag damping are presented. This also provides the first experimental confirmation of recent theory predicting enhanced collisional slowing due to long-range collisions. Drag damping theory, proportional to the collisional slowing rate, is in quantitative agreement with the experimental results only when these long-range collisions are included, exceeding classical collision calculations by as much as an order of magnitude. At large wave amplitudes, Langmuir waves exhibit harmonic generation, non-linear frequency shifts, and a parametric decay instability, which are experimentally investigated. The parametric wave-wave coupling rates are in agreement with three-wave instability theory in the dispersion dominated oscillatory coupling regime, and in the phase-locked exponential decay regime. However, significant variations are observed near the

  15. 1.55-μm mode-locked quantum-dot lasers with 300 MHz frequency tuning range

    SciTech Connect

    Sadeev, T. Arsenijević, D.; Bimberg, D.; Franke, D.; Kreissl, J.; Künzel, H.

    2015-01-19

    Passive mode-locking of two-section quantum-dot mode-locked lasers grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy on InP is reported. 1250-μm long lasers exhibit a wide tuning range of 300 MHz around the fundamental mode-locking frequency of 33.48 GHz. The frequency tuning is achieved by varying the reverse bias of the saturable absorber from 0 to −2.2 V and the gain section current from 90 to 280 mA. 3 dB optical spectra width of 6–7 nm leads to ex-facet optical pulses with full-width half-maximum down to 3.7 ps. Single-section quantum-dot mode-locked lasers show 0.8 ps broad optical pulses after external fiber-based compression. Injection current tuning from 70 to 300 mA leads to 30 MHz frequency tuning.

  16. Extending the Constant Power Speed Range of the Brushless DC Motor through Dual Mode Inverter Control -- Part I: Theory and Simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Lawler, J.S.

    2001-10-29

    An inverter topology and control scheme has been developed that can drive low-inductance, surface-mounted permanent magnet motors over the wide constant power speed range required in electric vehicle applications. This new controller is called the dual-mode inverter control (DMIC) [1]. The DMIC can drive either the Permanent Magnet Synchronous Machine (PMSM) with sinusoidal back emf, or the brushless dc machine (BDCM) with trapezoidal emf in the motoring and regenerative braking modes. In this paper we concentrate on the BDCM under high-speed motoring conditions. Simulation results show that if all motor and inverter loss mechanisms are neglected, the constant power speed range of the DMIC is infinite. The simulation results are supported by closed form expressions for peak and rms motor current and average power derived from analytical solution to the differential equations governing the DMIC/BDCM drive for the lossless case. The analytical solution shows that the range of motor inductance that can be accommodated by the DMIC is more than an order of magnitude such that the DMIC is compatible with both low- and high-inductance BDCMs. Finally, method is given for integrating the classical hysteresis band current control, used for motor control below base speed, with the phase advance of DMIC that is applied above base speed. The power versus speed performance of the DMIC is then simulated across the entire speed range.

  17. Liquid-phase epitaxy grown PbSnTe distributed feedback laser diodes with broad continuous single-mode tuning range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsieh, H.-H.; Fonstad, C. G.

    1980-01-01

    Distributed feedback (DFB) pulsed laser operation has been demonstrated in stripe geometry Pb(1-x)Sn(x)Te double-heterostructures grown by liquid-phase epitaxy. The grating structure of 0.79 micron periodicity operates in first order near 12.8 microns and was fabricated prior to the liquid-phase epitaxial growth using holographic exposure techniques. These DFB lasers had moderate thresholds, 3.6 kA/sq cm, and the output power versus current curves exhibited a sharp turn-on free of kinks. Clean, single-mode emission spectra, continuously tunable over a range in excess of 20 per cm, centered about 780 per cm (12.8 microns), and at an average rate of 1.2 per cm-K from 9 to 26 K, were observed. While weaker modes could at times be seen in the spectrum, substantially single-mode operation was obtained over the entire operating range and to over 10 times threshold.

  18. Observation of ion cyclotron range of frequencies mode conversion plasma flow drive on Alcator C-Moda)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Y.; Rice, J. E.; Wukitch, S. J.; Greenwald, M. J.; Hubbard, A. E.; Ince-Cushman, A.; Lin, L.; Marmar, E. S.; Porkolab, M.; Reinke, M. L.; Tsujii, N.; Wright, J. C.; Alcator C-Mod Team

    2009-05-01

    At modest H3e levels (n3He/ne˜8%-12%), in relatively low density D(H3e) plasmas, n¯e≤1.3×1020 m-3, heated with 50 MHz rf power at Bt0˜5.1 T, strong (up to 90 km/s) toroidal rotation (Vϕ) in the cocurrent direction has been observed by high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy on Alcator C-Mod. The change in central Vϕ scales with the applied rf power (≤30 km s-1 MW-1), and is generally at least a factor of 2 higher than the empirically determined intrinsic plasma rotation scaling. The rotation in the inner plasma (r /a≤0.3) responds to the rf power more quickly than that of the outer region (r /a≥0.7), and the rotation profile is broadly peaked for r /a≤0.5. Localized poloidal rotation (0.3≤r/a≤0.6) in the ion diamagnetic drift direction (˜2 km/s at 3 MW) is also observed, and similarly increases with rf power. Changing the toroidal phase of the antenna does not affect the rotation direction, and it only weakly affects the rotation magnitude. The mode converted ion cyclotron wave (MC ICW) has been detected by a phase contrast imaging system and the MC process is confirmed by two-dimensional full wave TORIC simulations. The simulations also show that the MC ICW is strongly damped on H3e ions in the vicinity of the MC layer, approximately on the same flux surfaces where the rf driven flow is observed. The flow shear in our experiment is marginally sufficient for plasma confinement enhancement based on the comparison of the E ×B shearing rate and gyrokinetic linear stability analysis.

  19. Using tri-axial acceleration data to identify behavioral modes of free-ranging animals: general concepts and tools illustrated for griffon vultures.

    PubMed

    Nathan, Ran; Spiegel, Orr; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Harel, Roi; Wikelski, Martin; Getz, Wayne M

    2012-03-15

    Integrating biomechanics, behavior and ecology requires a mechanistic understanding of the processes producing the movement of animals. This calls for contemporaneous biomechanical, behavioral and environmental data along movement pathways. A recently formulated unifying movement ecology paradigm facilitates the integration of existing biomechanics, optimality, cognitive and random paradigms for studying movement. We focus on the use of tri-axial acceleration (ACC) data to identify behavioral modes of GPS-tracked free-ranging wild animals and demonstrate its application to study the movements of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus, Hablizl 1783). In particular, we explore a selection of nonlinear and decision tree methods that include support vector machines, classification and regression trees, random forest methods and artificial neural networks and compare them with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a baseline for classifying behavioral modes. Using a dataset of 1035 ground-truthed ACC segments, we found that all methods can accurately classify behavior (80-90%) and, as expected, all nonlinear methods outperformed LDA. We also illustrate how ACC-identified behavioral modes provide the means to examine how vulture flight is affected by environmental factors, hence facilitating the integration of behavioral, biomechanical and ecological data. Our analysis of just over three-quarters of a million GPS and ACC measurements obtained from 43 free-ranging vultures across 9783 vulture-days suggests that their annual breeding schedule might be selected primarily in response to seasonal conditions favoring rising-air columns (thermals) and that rare long-range forays of up to 1750 km from the home range are performed despite potentially heavy energetic costs and a low rate of food intake, presumably to explore new breeding, social and long-term resource location opportunities.

  20. Using tri-axial acceleration data to identify behavioral modes of free-ranging animals: general concepts and tools illustrated for griffon vultures

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, Ran; Spiegel, Orr; Fortmann-Roe, Scott; Harel, Roi; Wikelski, Martin; Getz, Wayne M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Integrating biomechanics, behavior and ecology requires a mechanistic understanding of the processes producing the movement of animals. This calls for contemporaneous biomechanical, behavioral and environmental data along movement pathways. A recently formulated unifying movement ecology paradigm facilitates the integration of existing biomechanics, optimality, cognitive and random paradigms for studying movement. We focus on the use of tri-axial acceleration (ACC) data to identify behavioral modes of GPS-tracked free-ranging wild animals and demonstrate its application to study the movements of griffon vultures (Gyps fulvus, Hablizl 1783). In particular, we explore a selection of nonlinear and decision tree methods that include support vector machines, classification and regression trees, random forest methods and artificial neural networks and compare them with linear discriminant analysis (LDA) as a baseline for classifying behavioral modes. Using a dataset of 1035 ground-truthed ACC segments, we found that all methods can accurately classify behavior (80–90%) and, as expected, all nonlinear methods outperformed LDA. We also illustrate how ACC-identified behavioral modes provide the means to examine how vulture flight is affected by environmental factors, hence facilitating the integration of behavioral, biomechanical and ecological data. Our analysis of just over three-quarters of a million GPS and ACC measurements obtained from 43 free-ranging vultures across 9783 vulture-days suggests that their annual breeding schedule might be selected primarily in response to seasonal conditions favoring rising-air columns (thermals) and that rare long-range forays of up to 1750 km from the home range are performed despite potentially heavy energetic costs and a low rate of food intake, presumably to explore new breeding, social and long-term resource location opportunities. PMID:22357592

  1. Range resolved mode mixing in a large volume for the mitigation of speckle and strategic target orientation requirements in active millimeter-wave imaging.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Mark A; Holt, Jennifer A; Joye, Colin D; De Lucia, Frank C

    2015-04-01

    In spite of many reports of active millimeter-wave imaging in the literature, speckle and requirements for cooperative target orientation significantly reduce its practical usefulness. Here we report a new technique, range resolved mode mixing (RRMM), which significantly mitigates both of these issues. It also provides a three-dimensional (3D) image. RRMM accomplishes this by combining multimode illumination (which eliminates the requirement for cooperative target orientation) with range resolution (which provides statistical independence of speckle patterns for averaging and the 3D image). The use of a 5W extended interaction klystron amplifier results in large signal margins in the 50 m scale atrium of the Physics Department at Ohio State University. It appears that there are a number of scenarios out to a range of 1 km for which this approach is useful to provide 3D images, with minimal speckle, and no requirement for cooperative target orientation.

  2. Low-power low-noise mixed-mode VLSI ASIC for infinite dynamic range imaging applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turchetta, Renato; Hu, Y.; Zinzius, Y.; Colledani, C.; Loge, A.

    1998-11-01

    Solid state solutions for imaging are mainly represented by CCDs and, more recently, by CMOS imagers. Both devices are based on the integration of the total charge generated by the impinging radiation, with no processing of the single photon information. The dynamic range of these devices is intrinsically limited by the finite value of noise. Here we present the design of an architecture which allows efficient, in-pixel, noise reduction to a practically zero level, thus allowing infinite dynamic range imaging. A detailed calculation of the dynamic range is worked out, showing that noise is efficiently suppressed. This architecture is based on the concept of single-photon counting. In each pixel, we integrate both the front-end, low-noise, low-power analog part and the digital part. The former consists of a charge preamplifier, an active filter for optimal noise bandwidth reduction, a buffer and a threshold comparator, and the latter is simply a counter, which can be programmed to act as a normal shift register for the readout of the counters' contents. Two different ASIC's based on this concept have been designed for different applications. The first one has been optimized for silicon edge-on microstrips detectors, used in a digital mammography R and D project. It is a 32-channel circuit, with a 16-bit binary static counter.It has been optimized for a relatively large detector capacitance of 5 pF. Noise has been measured to be equal to 100 + 7*Cd (pF) electron rms with the digital part, showing no degradation of the noise performances with respect to the design values. The power consumption is 3.8mW/channel for a peaking time of about 1 microsecond(s) . The second circuit is a prototype for pixel imaging. The total active area is about (250 micrometers )**2. The main differences of the electronic architecture with respect to the first prototype are: i) different optimization of the analog front-end part for low-capacitance detectors, ii) in- pixel 4-bit comparator

  3. Validation of full-wave simulations for mode conversion of waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies with phase contrast imaging in Alcator C-Mod

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujii, N.; Porkolab, M.; Bonoli, P. T.; Edlund, E. M.; Ennever, P. C.; Lin, Y.; Wright, J. C.; Wukitch, S. J.; Jaeger, E. F.; Green, D. L.; Harvey, R. W.

    2015-08-15

    Mode conversion of fast waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) is known to result in current drive and flow drive under optimised conditions, which may be utilized to control plasma profiles and improve fusion plasma performance. To describe these processes accurately in a realistic toroidal geometry, numerical simulations are essential. Quantitative comparison of these simulations and the actual experimental measurements is important to validate their predictions and to evaluate their limitations. The phase contrast imaging (PCI) diagnostic has been used to directly detect the ICRF waves in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The measurements have been compared with full-wave simulations through a synthetic diagnostic technique. Recently, the frequency response of the PCI detector array on Alcator C-Mod was recalibrated, which greatly improved the comparison between the measurements and the simulations. In this study, mode converted waves for D-{sup 3}He and D-H plasmas with various ion species compositions were re-analyzed with the new calibration. For the minority heating cases, self-consistent electric fields and a minority ion distribution function were simulated by iterating a full-wave code and a Fokker-Planck code. The simulated mode converted wave intensity was in quite reasonable agreement with the measurements close to the antenna, but discrepancies remain for comparison at larger distances.

  4. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  5. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  6. Accumulation of HMX (octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine) in indigenous and agricultural plants grown in HMX-contaminated anti-tank firing-range soil.

    PubMed

    Groom, Carl A; Halasz, Annamaria; Paquet, Louise; Morris, Neil; Olivier, Lucie; Dubois, Charles; Hawari, Jalal

    2002-01-01

    To investigate their potential for phytoremediation, selected agricultural and indigenous terrestrial plants were examined fortheir capacity to accumulate and degrade the explosive octahydro-1 ,3,5,7-tetra nitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine (HMX). Plant tissue and soil extracts were analyzed for the presence of HMX and possible degradative metabolites using high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array UV detection (HPLC-UV), micellar electrokinetic chromatography with diode-array UV detection (MEKC-UV), and HPLC with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LC-MS). The pattern of HMX accumulation for alfalfa (Medicago sativa), bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), canola (Brassica rapa), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and perennial ryegrass (Loliumperenne) grown in a controlled environment on contaminated soil from an anti-tank firing range was similar to that observed for plants (wild bergamot (Monarda fistulosa), western wheat grass (Agropyron smithii), brome grass (Bromus sitchensis), koeleria (Koeleria gracilis), goldenrod (Solidago sp.), blueberry (Vaccinium sp.), anemone (Anemone sp.), common thistle (Circium vulgare), wax-berry (Symphoricarpos albus), western sage (Artemisia gnaphalodes), and Drummond's milk vetch (Astragalus drummondii)) collected from the range. No direct evidence of plant-mediated HMX (bio)chemical transformation was provided by the available analytical methods. Traces of mononitroso-HMX were found in contaminated soil extracts and were also observed in leaf extracts. The dominant mechanism for HMX translocation and accumulation in foliar tissue was concluded to be aqueous transpirational flux and evaporation. The accumulation of HMX in the leaves of most of the selected species to levels significantly above soil concentration is relevant to the assessment of both phytoremediation potential and environmental risks.

  7. Switches in the mode of transmission select for or against a poorly aphid-transmissible strain of potato virus Y with reduced helper component and virus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Legavre, T; Maia, I G; Casse-Delbart, F; Bernardi, F; Robaglia, C

    1996-07-01

    A poorly aphid-transmissible potato virus Y (PVY-PAT) variant emerged after several cycles of mechanical transmission of an initially aphid-transmissible (AT) isolate. Sequence analysis of the N-terminal region of the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) gene revealed a Lys to Glu change at a position previously found to abolish the HC-Pro aphid transmission activity in several potyviruses. Two cycles of aphid transmission allowed the virus population to evolve towards an AT form (PVY-ATnew) where a Glu to Lys change was observed. PVY-PAT produced lower amounts of coat protein and the accumulation of its HC-Pro in infected plants decreased from 7 to 28 days post-inoculation, as compared to PVY-ATnew. RT-PCR and restriction analysis showed that the two virus populations co-existed in the PVY-AT isolate and that the AT form was counter-selected during mechanical transmission. These observations suggest that the Lys to Glu substitution leads to decreased stability of HC-Pro resulting in poor transmissions by aphids, and further strengthen the idea that HC-Pro is involved in the accumulation of potyvirus in infected plants.

  8. Pixel multiplexing technique for real-time three-dimensional-imaging laser detection and ranging system using four linear-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-03-01

    The avalanche-photodiode-array (APD-array) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system has been continually developed owing to its superiority of nonscanning, large field of view, high sensitivity, and high precision. However, how to achieve higher-efficient detection and better integration of the LADAR system for real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging continues to be a problem. In this study, a novel LADAR system using four linear mode APDs (LmAPDs) is developed for high-efficient detection by adopting a modulation and multiplexing technique. Furthermore, an automatic control system for the array LADAR system is proposed and designed by applying the virtual instrumentation technique. The control system aims to achieve four functions: synchronization of laser emission and rotating platform, multi-channel synchronous data acquisition, real-time Ethernet upper monitoring, and real-time signal processing and 3D visualization. The structure and principle of the complete system are described in the paper. The experimental results demonstrate that the LADAR system is capable of achieving real-time 3D imaging on an omnidirectional rotating platform under the control of the virtual instrumentation system. The automatic imaging LADAR system utilized only 4 LmAPDs to achieve 256-pixel-per-frame detection with by employing 64-bit demodulator. Moreover, the lateral resolution is ∼15 cm and range accuracy is ∼4 cm root-mean-square error at a distance of ∼40 m.

  9. Mechanical tuning of whispering gallery modes over a 0.5 THz tuning range with MHz resolution in a silica microsphere at cryogenic temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dinyari, Khodadad N; Barbour, Russell J; Golter, D Andrew; Wang, Hailin

    2011-09-12

    We experimentally demonstrate the mechanical tuning of whispering gallery modes in a 40 μm diameter silica microsphere at 10K, over a tuning range of 450 GHz and with a resolution less than 10 MHz. This is achieved by mechanically stretching the stems of a double-stemmed silica microsphere with a commercially available piezo-driven nano-positioner. The large tuning range is made possible by the millimeter long slip-stick motion of the nano-positioner. The ultrafine tuning resolution, corresponding to sub-picometer changes in the sphere diameter, is enabled by the use of relatively long and thin fiber stems, which reduces the effective Poisson ratio of the combined sphere-stem system to approximately 0.0005. The mechanical tuning demonstrated here removes a major obstacle for the use of ultrahigh Q-factor silica microspheres in cavity QED studies of solid state systems and, in particular, cavity QED studies of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond.

  10. Low threshold lasing of bubble-containing glass microspheres by non-whispering gallery mode excitation over a wide wavelength range

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, Tsutaru Kishi, Tetsuo; Yano, Tetsuji

    2015-03-21

    Bubble-containing Nd{sup 3+}-doped tellurite glass microspheres were fabricated by localized laser heating technique to investigate their optical properties for use as microresonators. Fluorescence and excitation spectra measurements were performed by pumping with a tunable CW-Ti:Sapphire laser. The excitation spectra manifested several sharp peaks due to the conventional whispering gallery mode (WGM) when the pumping laser was irradiated to the edge part of the microsphere. However, when the excitation light was irradiated on the bubble position inside the microsphere, “non-WGM excitation” was induced, giving rise to numerous peaks at a broad wavelength range in the excitation spectra. Thus, efficient excitation was achieved over a wide wavelength range. Lasing threshold excited at the bubble position was much lower than that for the excitation at the edges of the microsphere. The lowest value of the laser threshold was 34 μW for a 4 μm sphere containing a 0.5 μm bubble. Efficiency of the excitation at the bubble position with broadband light was calculated to be 5 times higher than that for the edge of the microsphere. The bubble-containing microsphere enables efficient utilization of broadband light excitation from light-emitting diodes and solar light.

  11. Pixel multiplexing technique for real-time three-dimensional-imaging laser detection and ranging system using four linear-mode avalanche photodiodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-03-01

    The avalanche-photodiode-array (APD-array) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system has been continually developed owing to its superiority of nonscanning, large field of view, high sensitivity, and high precision. However, how to achieve higher-efficient detection and better integration of the LADAR system for real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging continues to be a problem. In this study, a novel LADAR system using four linear mode APDs (LmAPDs) is developed for high-efficient detection by adopting a modulation and multiplexing technique. Furthermore, an automatic control system for the array LADAR system is proposed and designed by applying the virtual instrumentation technique. The control system aims to achieve four functions: synchronization of laser emission and rotating platform, multi-channel synchronous data acquisition, real-time Ethernet upper monitoring, and real-time signal processing and 3D visualization. The structure and principle of the complete system are described in the paper. The experimental results demonstrate that the LADAR system is capable of achieving real-time 3D imaging on an omnidirectional rotating platform under the control of the virtual instrumentation system. The automatic imaging LADAR system utilized only 4 LmAPDs to achieve 256-pixel-per-frame detection with by employing 64-bit demodulator. Moreover, the lateral resolution is ˜15 cm and range accuracy is ˜4 cm root-mean-square error at a distance of ˜40 m.

  12. Pixel multiplexing technique for real-time three-dimensional-imaging laser detection and ranging system using four linear-mode avalanche photodiodes.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-03-01

    The avalanche-photodiode-array (APD-array) laser detection and ranging (LADAR) system has been continually developed owing to its superiority of nonscanning, large field of view, high sensitivity, and high precision. However, how to achieve higher-efficient detection and better integration of the LADAR system for real-time three-dimensional (3D) imaging continues to be a problem. In this study, a novel LADAR system using four linear mode APDs (LmAPDs) is developed for high-efficient detection by adopting a modulation and multiplexing technique. Furthermore, an automatic control system for the array LADAR system is proposed and designed by applying the virtual instrumentation technique. The control system aims to achieve four functions: synchronization of laser emission and rotating platform, multi-channel synchronous data acquisition, real-time Ethernet upper monitoring, and real-time signal processing and 3D visualization. The structure and principle of the complete system are described in the paper. The experimental results demonstrate that the LADAR system is capable of achieving real-time 3D imaging on an omnidirectional rotating platform under the control of the virtual instrumentation system. The automatic imaging LADAR system utilized only 4 LmAPDs to achieve 256-pixel-per-frame detection with by employing 64-bit demodulator. Moreover, the lateral resolution is ∼15 cm and range accuracy is ∼4 cm root-mean-square error at a distance of ∼40 m. PMID:27036763

  13. Optical parametric oscillator of mid-IR, visible and UV ranges with synchronous pumping by a Q-switched mode-locked Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, M. D.; Yakovin, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The parametric generation in a nonlinear PPLN crystal synchronously pumped by a Q-switched mode-locked Nd : YAG laser with a pulse duration of 45 ps is studied. The output pump intensity in the nonlinear crystal reaches ~10 GW cm-2. At a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz, the average output power at the idler wavelength (~3.6 μm) is ~12 mW, the peak power is ~25 kW, and the conversion efficiency (with respect to the absorbed power) is ~10%. The radiation linewidth at the signal wavelength (~1.5 μm) is 13 cm-1. Along with the signal and idler waves, the output emission spectrum contains lines at wavelengths of 822, 754, 624, 532, 463, 442, 392 and 355 nm. The tunable radiation with wavelengths in the vicinity of 392, 463 and 822 nm is observed for the first time. The tuning ranges for the new lines are measured (5 – 10 nm) and their origin is explained.

  14. Operation of a New Half-Bridge Gate Driver for Enhancement - Mode GaN FETs, Type LM5113, Over a Wide Temperature Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2011-01-01

    A new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) gate driver designed to drive both the high-side and the low-side enhancement-mode GaN FETs, National Semiconductor's type LM5113, was evaluated for operation at temperatures beyond its recommended specified limits of -40 C to +125 C. The effects of limited thermal cycling under the extended test temperature, which ranged from -194 C to +150 C, on the operation of this chip as well as restart capability at the extreme cryogenic and hot temperatures were also investigated. The driver circuit was able to maintain good operation throughout the entire test regime between -194 C and +150 C without undergoing any major changes in its outputs signals and characteristics. The limited thermal cycling performed on the device also had no effect on its performance, and the driver chip was able to successfully restart at each of the extreme temperatures of -194 C and +150 C. The plastic packaging of this device was also not affected by either the short extreme temperature exposure or the limited thermal cycling. These preliminary results indicate that this new commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) halfbridge eGaN FET driver integrated circuit has the potential for use in space exploration missions under extreme temperature environments. Further testing is planned under long-term cycling to assess the reliability of these parts and to determine their suitability for extended use in the harsh environments of space.

  15. Optical parametric oscillator of mid-IR, visible and UV ranges with synchronous pumping by a Q-switched mode-locked Nd : YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donin, V. I.; Yakovin, M. D.; Yakovin, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The parametric generation in a nonlinear PPLN crystal synchronously pumped by a Q-switched mode-locked Nd : YAG laser with a pulse duration of 45 ps is studied. The output pump intensity in the nonlinear crystal reaches ~10 GW cm-2. At a pulse repetition rate of 1 kHz, the average output power at the idler wavelength (~3.6 μm) is ~12 mW, the peak power is ~25 kW, and the conversion efficiency (with respect to the absorbed power) is ~10%. The radiation linewidth at the signal wavelength (~1.5 μm) is 13 cm-1. Along with the signal and idler waves, the output emission spectrum contains lines at wavelengths of 822, 754, 624, 532, 463, 442, 392 and 355 nm. The tunable radiation with wavelengths in the vicinity of 392, 463 and 822 nm is observed for the first time. The tuning ranges for the new lines are measured (5 - 10 nm) and their origin is explained.

  16. Insect-Specific Flaviviruses: A Systematic Review of Their Discovery, Host Range, Mode of Transmission, Superinfection Exclusion Potential and Genomic Organization

    PubMed Central

    Blitvich, Bradley J.; Firth, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    There has been a dramatic increase in the number of insect-specific flaviviruses (ISFs) discovered in the last decade. Historically, these viruses have generated limited interest due to their inability to infect vertebrate cells. This viewpoint has changed in recent years because some ISFs have been shown to enhance or suppress the replication of medically important flaviviruses in co-infected mosquito cells. Additionally, comparative studies between ISFs and medically important flaviviruses can provide a unique perspective as to why some flaviviruses possess the ability to infect and cause devastating disease in humans while others do not. ISFs have been isolated exclusively from mosquitoes in nature but the detection of ISF-like sequences in sandflies and chironomids indicates that they may also infect other dipterans. ISFs can be divided into two distinct phylogenetic groups. The first group currently consists of approximately 12 viruses and includes cell fusing agent virus, Kamiti River virus and Culex flavivirus. These viruses are phylogenetically distinct from all other known flaviviruses. The second group, which is apparently not monophyletic, currently consists of nine viruses and includes Chaoyang virus, Nounané virus and Lammi virus. These viruses phylogenetically affiliate with mosquito/vertebrate flaviviruses despite their apparent insect-restricted phenotype. This article provides a review of the discovery, host range, mode of transmission, superinfection exclusion ability and genomic organization of ISFs. This article also attempts to clarify the ISF nomenclature because some of these viruses have been assigned more than one name due to their simultaneous discoveries by independent research groups. PMID:25866904

  17. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  18. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7-7.6 μm Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7-7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5-12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5-7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range. PMID:27089343

  19. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7–7.6 μm Spectral Range

    PubMed Central

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K.; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7–7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5–12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5–7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range. PMID:27089343

  20. Low-Loss Coupling of Quantum Cascade Lasers into Hollow-Core Waveguides with Single-Mode Output in the 3.7-7.6 μm Spectral Range.

    PubMed

    Patimisco, Pietro; Sampaolo, Angelo; Mihai, Laura; Giglio, Marilena; Kriesel, Jason; Sporea, Dan; Scamarcio, Gaetano; Tittel, Frank K; Spagnolo, Vincenzo

    2016-04-13

    We demonstrated low-loss and single-mode laser beam delivery through hollow-core waveguides (HCWs) operating in the 3.7-7.6 μm spectral range. The employed HCWs have a circular cross section with a bore diameter of 200 μm and metallic/dielectric internal coatings deposited inside a glass capillary tube. The internal coatings have been produced to enhance the spectral response of the HCWs in the range 3.5-12 µm. We demonstrated Gaussian-like outputs throughout the 4.5-7.6 µm spectral range. A quasi single-mode output beam with only small beam distortions was achieved when the wavelength was reduced to 3.7 μm. With a 15-cm-long HCW and optimized coupling conditions, we measured coupling efficiencies of >88% and transmission losses of <1 dB in the investigated infrared spectral range.

  1. Rotary balance data for a typical single-engine general aviation design for an angle-of-attack range of 20 to 90 deg. 3: Influence of control deflection on predicted model D spin modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ralston, J. N.; Barnhart, B. P.

    1984-01-01

    The influence of control deflections on the rotational flow aerodynamics and on predicted spin modes is discussed for a 1/6-scale general aviation airplane model. The model was tested for various control settings at both zero and ten degree sideslip angles. Data were measured, using a rotary balance, over an angle-of-attack range of 30 deg to 90 deg, and for clockwise and counter-clockwise rotations covering an omegab/2V range of 0 to 0.5.

  2. Experimental demonstration of change of dynamical properties of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to dual optical feedback by dual full delay-range tuning.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, O; Jaurigue, L; Drzewietzki, L; Lüdge, K; Breuer, S

    2016-06-27

    In this contribution we experimentally demonstrate the change and improvement of dynamical properties of a passively mode-locked semiconductor laser subject to optical feedback from two external cavities by coupling the feedback pulses back into the gain segment. Hereby, we tune the full delay-phase of the pulse-to-pulse period of both external cavities separately and demonstrate the change of the repetition rate, timing jitter, multi-pulse formation and side-band suppression for the first time for such a dual feedback configuration. In addition, we thereby confirm modeling predictions by achieving both a good qualitative and quantitative agreement of experimental and simulated results. Our findings suggest a path towards the realization of side-band free all-optical photonic oscillators based on mode-locked lasers. PMID:27410585

  3. Different Mode of Afferents Determines the Frequency Range of High Frequency Activities in the Human Brain: Direct Electrocorticographic Comparison between Peripheral Nerve and Direct Cortical Stimulation.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Katsuya; Matsumoto, Riki; Matsuhashi, Masao; Usami, Kiyohide; Shimotake, Akihiro; Kunieda, Takeharu; Kikuchi, Takayuki; Mikuni, Nobuhiro; Miyamoto, Susumu; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Ikeda, Akio

    2015-01-01

    Physiological high frequency activities (HFA) are related to various brain functions. Factors, however, regulating its frequency have not been well elucidated in humans. To validate the hypothesis that different propagation modes (thalamo-cortical vs. cortico-coritcal projections), or different terminal layers (layer IV vs. layer II/III) affect its frequency, we, in the primary somatosensory cortex (SI), compared HFAs induced by median nerve stimulation with those induced by electrical stimulation of the cortex connecting to SI. We employed 6 patients who underwent chronic subdural electrode implantation for presurgical evaluation. We evaluated the HFA power values in reference to the baseline overriding N20 (earliest cortical response) and N80 (late response) of somatosensory evoked potentials (HFA(SEP(N20)) and HFA(SEP(N80))) and compared those overriding N1 and N2 (first and second responses) of cortico-cortical evoked potentials (HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA(CCEP(N2))). HFA(SEP(N20)) showed the power peak in the frequency above 200 Hz, while HFA(CCEP(N1)) had its power peak in the frequency below 200 Hz. Different propagation modes and/or different terminal layers seemed to determine HFA frequency. Since HFA(CCEP(N1)) and HFA induced during various brain functions share a similar broadband profile of the power spectrum, cortico-coritcal horizontal propagation seems to represent common mode of neural transmission for processing these functions. PMID:26087042

  4. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  5. Coupling of Er light emissions to plasmon modes on In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Sn nanoparticle sheets in the near-infrared range

    SciTech Connect

    Matsui, Hiroaki Tabata, Hitoshi; Badalawa, Wasanthamala; Nomura, Wataru; Yatsui, Takashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Hasebe, Takayuki; Furuta, Shinya

    2014-07-28

    Near-infrared Er photoluminescence (PL) is markedly modified using a plasmonic In{sub 2}O{sub 3}: Sn nanoparticle (NP) sheet. Modeling and optical measurements reveal the presence of different electric fields (E-field) in the NP sheet. The local E-field excited at the interface between the NP sheet and Er-emitting layer of ZnO contributes significantly towards the spectral modifications of Er PL due to matching with the photon energy of Er PL. We also determine the critical temperature for Er PL modifications, which is related to the energy transfer efficiency between Er transition dipoles in ZnO and the plasmon modes on the NP sheet.

  6. Macroscopic Fourier transform infrared scanning in reflection mode (MA-rFTIR), a new tool for chemical imaging of cultural heritage artefacts in the mid-infrared range.

    PubMed

    Legrand, Stijn; Alfeld, Matthias; Vanmeert, Frederik; De Nolf, Wout; Janssens, Koen

    2014-05-21

    In this paper we demonstrate that by means of scanning reflection FTIR spectroscopy, it is possible to record highly specific distribution maps of organic and inorganic compounds from flat, macroscopic objects with cultural heritage value in a non-invasive manner. Our previous work involved the recording of macroscopic distributions of chemical elements or crystal phases from painted works of art based on respectively macroscopic X-ray fluorescence or X-ray powder diffraction analysis. The use of infrared radiation instead of X-rays has the advantage that more specific information about the nature and distribution of the chemical compounds present can be gathered. This higher imaging specificity represents a clear advantage for the characterization of painting and artist materials. It allows the distribution of metallo-organic compounds to be visualized and permits distinguishing between pigmented materials containing the same key metal. The prototype instrument allows the recording of hyperspectral datacubes by scanning the surface of the artefact in a contactless and sequential single-point measuring mode, while recording the spectrum of reflected infrared radiation. After the acquisition, spectral line intensities of individual bands and chemical distribution maps can be extracted from the datacube to identify the compounds present and/or to highlight their spatial distribution. Not only is information gained on the surface of the investigated artefacts, but also images of overpainted paint layers and, if present, the underdrawing may be revealed in this manner. A current major limitation is the long scanning times required to record these maps.

  7. 3D models automatic reconstruction of selected close range objects. (Polish Title: Automatyczna rekonstrukcja modeli 3D małych obiektów bliskiego zasiegu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaweiska, D.

    2013-12-01

    Reconstruction of three-dimensional, realistic models of objects from digital images has been the topic of research in many areas of science for many years. This development is stimulated by new technologies and tools, which appeared recently, such as digital photography, laser scanners, increase in the equipment efficiency and Internet. The objective of this paper is to present results of automatic modeling of selected close range objects, with the use of digital photographs acquired by the Hasselblad H4D50 camera. The author's software tool was utilized for calculations; it performs successive stages of the 3D model creation. The modeling process was presented as the complete process which starts from acquisition of images and which is completed by creation of a photorealistic 3D model in the same software environment. Experiments were performed for selected close range objects, with appropriately arranged image geometry, creating a ring around the measured object. The Area Base Matching (CC/LSM) method, the RANSAC algorithm, with the use of tensor calculus, were utilized form automatic matching of points detected with the SUSAN algorithm. Reconstruction of the surface of model generation is one of the important stages of 3D modeling. Reconstruction of precise surfaces, performed on the basis of a non-organized cloud of points, acquired from automatic processing of digital images, is a difficult task, which has not been finally solved. Creation of poly-angular models, which may meet high requirements concerning modeling and visualization is required in many applications. The polynomial method is usually the best way to precise representation of measurement results, and, at the same time, to achieving the optimum description of the surface. Three algorithm were tested: the volumetric method (VCG), the Poisson method and the Ball pivoting method. Those methods are mostly applied to modeling of uniform grids of points. Results of experiments proved that incorrect

  8. Comparison in gas media (absolute and gauge mode)in the range from 25 kPa TO 200 kPa (EURAMET.M.P-K8)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wuethrich, C.; Alisic, S.; Altintas, A.; van Andel, I.; C, In­Mook; Eltawil, A. A.; Farár, P.; Hetherington, P.; Koçaş, I.; Lefkopoulos, A.; Otal, P.; Prazak, D.; Sabuga, W.; Salustiano, R.; Sandu, I.; Sardi, M.; Saxholm, S.; Setina, J.; Spohr, I.; Steindl, D.; Testa, N.; Vámossy, C.; Grgec Bermanec, L.

    2016-01-01

    It was decided at the EURAMET TC-M meeting in Torino in 2006 to realize a comparison in gauge and absolute pressure up to 200 kPa as it would allow a link to the CCM.P-K6 and CCM.P-K2 comparisons to be established. This project interested a lot of laboratories from the beginning with 23 participants, 22 of which have submitted results. The circulation of the transfer standard began in July 2009 and lasted until January 2012. No major problems occurred during the transport. The measurand of the comparison is the effective area of a piston-cylinder determined in gauge and absolute pressure from 25 kPa to 200 kPa with pressure steps of 25 kPa. The transfer standard is a gas lubricated tungsten carbide piston-cylinder with an effective area of ~9.8 cm2, fabricated by DH Instruments and compatible with a PG-7601 pressure balance. Some participants used their own pressure balance while a pressure balance with a reference vacuum sensor has been circulated for the participants not equipped with this system. One participant (SMU, Slovakia) has never provided the measurement results and another participant (FORCE Technology, Denmark) submitted a revised set of measurement results after the pilot laboratory mentioned that the equivalence was not met. After the determination of the reference value, all the 22 participants who delivered the results in gauge pressure demonstrated equivalence respective to the reference value on most of the range. In absolute pressure the equivalence is demonstrated, for all nominal pressures, by all 17 participants who submitted results. The comparison is linked to the CCM.P-K6 for gauge pressure and to CCM.P-K2 for absolute pressure. The link does not strongly affect the equivalence of the results and an excellent degree of equivalence is achieved in gauge and absolute pressure. Main text To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb

  9. Multiperiodic irradiance changes caused by r-modes and g-modes. [of the sun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, Charles L.; Hickey, John R.

    1987-01-01

    More than 20 real periodicities ranging from 20 days to 2 years modulate the solar irradiance data accumulated since November 1978 by Nimbus 7. Many are quite strong during the first three years (solar maximum) and weak after that. There is a high correspondence between periods in irradiance and 28 periods predicted from the rotation and beating of global solar oscillations (r-modes and g-modes). Angular states l = 1, 2, and 3 are detected as well as some unresolved r-mode power at higher l. The prominence of beat periods implies a nonlinear system whose effective nonlinear power was measured to be about 2. This analysis constitutes a detection of r-modes in the sun, and determines from them a mean sidereal rotation rate for the convective envelope of 459 + or - 4 nHz which converts to a period of 25.2 days (27.1d, synodic).

  10. Multivariate optimization and simultaneous determination of hydride and non-hydride-forming elements in samples of a wide pH range using dual-mode sample introduction with plasma techniques: application on leachates from cement mortar material.

    PubMed

    Mulugeta, Mesay; Wibetoe, Grethe; Engelsen, Christian J; Asfaw, Alemayehu

    2009-02-01

    Analytical methods have been developed for the simultaneous determination of hydride-forming (As, Sb) and non-hydride-forming (Cr, Mo, V) elements in aqueous samples of a wide pH range (pH 3-13). The methods used dual-mode (DM) sample introduction with ICP-AES and ICP-MS instruments. The effect of selected experimental variables, i.e., sample pH and concentrations of HNO(3), thiourea, and NaBH(4), were studied in a multivariate way using face-centered central composite design (FC-CCD). Compromised optimum values of the experimental parameters were identified using a response optimizer. The statistically found optimum values were verified experimentally. The methods provided improved sensitivities for the hydride-forming elements compared with the respective conventional nebulization (Neb) systems by factors of 67 (As) and 64 (Sb) for ICP-AES and 36 (As) and 54 (Sb) for ICP-MS. Slight sensitivity improvements were also observed for the non-hydride-forming elements. The limits of detection (LOD) of As and Sb were lowered, respectively, to 0.8 and 0.9 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-AES system and to 0.01 and 0.02 microg L(-1) with the DM-ICP-MS system. The short-term stabilities of both methods were between 2.1 and 5.4%. The methods were applied for the analysis of leachates of a cement mortar material prepared in the pH range 3-13. The elemental concentration of the leachates determined by the two DM methods were statistically compared with the values obtained from Neb-ICP-MS analysis; the values showed good agreement at the 95% confidence level. Quantitative spike recoveries were obtained for the analytes from most of the leachates using both DM methods.

  11. Toward stand-off open-path measurements of NO and NO(2) in the sub-parts per million meter range using quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) in the intra-pulse absorption mode.

    PubMed

    Reidl-Leuthner, Christoph; Lendl, Bernhard

    2013-12-01

    Two thermoelectrically cooled mid-infrared distributed feedback quantum cascade lasers operated in pulsed mode have been used for the quasi-simultaneous determination of NO and NO2 in the sub-parts per million meter (sub-ppm-m) range. Using a beam splitter, the beams of the two lasers were combined and sent to a retro-reflector. The returned light was recorded with a thermoelectrically cooled mercury cadmium telluride detector with a rise time of 4 ns. Alternate operation of the lasers with pulse lengths of 300 ns and a repetition rate of 66 kHz allowed quasi-simultaneous measurements. During each pulse the laser temperature increased, causing a thermal chirp of the laser line of up to 1.3 cm(-1). These laser chirps were sufficient to scan rotational bands of NO centered at 1902 cm(-1) and NO2 located at 1632 cm(-1). In that way an absorption spectrum could be recorded from a single laser pulse. Currently achieved limits of detection are 600 parts per billion meter (ppb-m) for NO and 260 ppb-m for NO2 using signal averaging over 1 min. This work presents the first steps toward a portable stand-off, open-path instrument that uses thermoelectrically cooled detector and lasers.

  12. Experimental Study of Top Heat Mode Thermosyphon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirashima, Masao; Kimura, Kenichiro; Utsumi, Yoichi; Kimura, Kenichi; Negishi, Kanji

    The purpose of this study is to develop the top heat mode thermosyphon that is very attractive means, for example, to accumulate directly the summer solar energy into the underground soil for the winter season. In this case, it can exclude the complex piping and mechanical pump to circulate the hot water absorbed the solar energy through the piping system buried in the soil layer. The several ideas concerning the top heat thermosyphon had been proposed, however, there were few reports on the definite experiments. The authors have carried out the experimental study of the top heat mode thermosyphon, with a simple lifting pipe, which could draw the working liquid from the under condenser to the upper evaporator section. The improvement of the main construction parts such as evaporator, lifting pipe, liquid reservoir trap and vapour nozzle have been performed in the present experiment in order to obtain the optimum operation range.

  13. Dual-Mode Combustor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trefny, Charles J (Inventor); Dippold, Vance F (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new dual-mode ramjet combustor used for operation over a wide flight Mach number range is described. Subsonic combustion mode is usable to lower flight Mach numbers than current dual-mode scramjets. High speed mode is characterized by supersonic combustion in a free-jet that traverses the subsonic combustion chamber to a variable nozzle throat. Although a variable combustor exit aperture is required, the need for fuel staging to accommodate the combustion process is eliminated. Local heating from shock-boundary-layer interactions on combustor walls is also eliminated.

  14. Integrated mode converter for mode division multiplexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Galacho, Diego; Alonso-Ramos, Carlos Alberto; Marris-Morini, Delphine; Vakarin, Vladyslav; Le Roux, Xavier; Ortega-Moñux, Alejandro; Wangüemert-Perez, Juan Gonzalo; Vivien, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    The ever growing demands of bandwidth in optical communication systems are making traditional Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) based systems to reach its limit. In order to cope with future bandwidth demand is necessary to use new levels of orthogonality, such as the waveguide mode or the polarization state. Mode Division Multiplexing (MDM) has recently attracted attention as a possible solution to increase aggregate bandwidth. In this work we discuss the proposition a of mode converter that can cover the whole C-Band of optical communications. The Mode Converter is based on two Multimode Interference (MMI) couplers and a phase shifter. Insertion loss (IL) below 0.2 dB and Extinction ratio (ER) higher than 20 dB in a broad bandwidth range of 1.5 μm to 1.6 μm have been estimated. The total length of the device is less than 30 μm.

  15. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  16. Coupled perturbed modes and internal solitary waves.

    PubMed

    Higham, C J; Tindle, C T

    2003-05-01

    Coupled perturbed mode theory combines conventional coupled modes and perturbation theory. The theory is used to directly calculate mode coupling in a range-dependent shallow water problem involving propagation through continental shelf internal solitary waves. The solitary waves considered are thermocline depressions, separating well-mixed upper and lower layers. The method is fast and accurate. Results highlight mode coupling associated with internal solitary waves, and mode capture or loss to and from the discrete mode spectrum.

  17. Airborne Measurements of Coarse Mode Aerosol Composition and Abundance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Froyd, K. D.; Murphy, D. M.; Brock, C. A.; Ziemba, L. D.; Anderson, B. E.; Wilson, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    Coarse aerosol particles impact the earth's radiative balance by direct scattering and absorption of light and by promoting cloud formation. Modeling studies suggest that coarse mode mineral dust and sea salt aerosol are the dominant contributors to aerosol optical depth throughout much of the globe. Lab and field studies indicate that larger aerosol particles tend to be more efficient ice nuclei, and recent airborne measurements confirm the dominant role of mineral dust on cirrus cloud formation. However, our ability to simulate coarse mode particle abundance in large scale models is limited by a lack of validating measurements above the earth's surface. We present airborne measurements of coarse mode aerosol abundance and composition over several mid-latitude, sub-tropical, and tropical regions from the boundary layer to the stratosphere. In the free troposphere the coarse mode constitutes 10-50% of the total particulate mass over a wide range of environments. Above North America mineral dust typically dominates the coarse mode, but biomass burning particles and sea salt also contribute. In remote environments coarse mode aerosol mainly consists of internally mixed sulfate-organic particles. Both continental and marine convection can enhance coarse aerosol mass through direct lofting of primary particles and by secondary accumulation of aerosol material through cloud processing.

  18. Plasma Modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubin, D. H. E.

    This chapter explores several aspects of the linear electrostatic normal modes of oscillation for a single-species non-neutral plasma in a Penning trap. Linearized fluid equations of motion are developed, assuming the plasma is cold but collisionless, which allow derivation of the cold plasma dielectric tensor and the electrostatic wave equation. Upper hybrid and magnetized plasma waves in an infinite uniform plasma are described. The effect of the plasma surface in a bounded plasma system is considered, and the properties of surface plasma waves are characterized. The normal modes of a cylindrical plasma column are discussed, and finally, modes of spheroidal plasmas, and finite temperature effects on the modes, are briefly described.

  19. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  20. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  1. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  2. Comprehensive model of damage accumulation in silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Mok, K. R. C.; Benistant, F.; Jaraiz, M.; Rubio, J. E.; Castrillo, P.; Pinacho, R.; Srinivasan, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Ion implantation induced damage accumulation is crucial to the simulation of silicon processing. We present a physically based damage accumulation model, implemented in a nonlattice atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulator, that can simulate a diverse range of interesting experimental observations. The model is able to reproduce the ion-mass dependent silicon amorphous-crystalline transition temperature of a range of ions from C to Xe, the amorphous layer thickness for a range of amorphizing implants, the superlinear increase in damage accumulation with dose, and the two-layered damage distribution observed along the path of a high-energy ion. In addition, this model is able to distinguish between dynamic annealing and post-cryogenic implantation annealing, whereby dynamic annealing is more effective in removing damage than post-cryogenic implantation annealing at the same temperature.

  3. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites.

  4. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  5. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  6. Accumulator with preclosing preventer

    SciTech Connect

    Murthy, R.R.; Rice, B.J.

    1981-11-24

    A guided-float accumulator suitable for use with a hydraulic system for an oil well blowout preventer is provided with a wing shut-off valve. Radially inwardly directed outlet parts are aimed at the bottom of the valve wing to generate unbalanced reaction forces which oppose the bernoulli effect forces caused by rapid movement of fluid through the chamber of the shut-off valve, thus preventing premature closing of the valve.

  7. Scissors Mode in Gd Nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroll, J.; Baramsai, B.; Becker, J. A.; Bečvář, F.; Bredeweg, T. A.; Couture, A.; Chyzh, A.; Dashdorj, D.; Haight, R. C.; Jandel, M.; Krtička, M.; Mitchell, G. E.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Parker, W.; Rundberg, R. S.; Ullmann, J. L.; Vieira, G. J.; Walker, C. L.; Wilhelmy, J. B.; Wouters, J. M.; Wu, C. Y.

    2012-02-01

    Spectra of γ rays following neutron capture at isolated resonances of 6 stable Gd isotopes were measured with highly segmented BaF2 detector DANCE at the Los Alamos LANSCE spallation neutron source. The main emphasis was put on studying the γ-cascade decay of neutron resonances to get unique information on photon strength. An analysis of the accumulated γ-ray spectra within the extreme statistical model leads to an inescapable conclusion that scissors mode resonances are built not only on the ground-state, but also on excited levels in all product nuclei studied. The results on summed B(M1)↑ strength and energy of the scissors mode are compared with systematics of scissors mode parameters for the ground-state transitions deduced from nuclear resonance fluorescence measurements. A specific feature of our experiments is the investigation of scissors mode of odd nuclei, for which the nuclear resonance fluorescence provides only limited information.

  8. Quantum theory of IR spectroscopy of dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on the surface of a metal in the frequency range of the anomalous skin effect

    SciTech Connect

    Volokitin, A.I.; Persson, B.N.J.

    1995-09-01

    A completely quantum-mechanical calculation of the IR spectrum for the dipole-forbidden vibrational modes of adsorbed molecules on a metal surface is performed. IT is shown for broad-band metals with a simple band structure that the asymmetry of the line shape is determined by nonlocal effects, while the nonadiabaticity makes a small contribution. In the region of the limiting anomalous skin effect ({omega}/{omega}{sub 1}{much_lt} 1, where {omega} is the frequency of the IR radiation, {omega}{sub 1}={upsilon}{sub F}/{delta}, {upsilon}{sub F} is the Fermi velocity, {delta}=c/{omega}{sub p} is the depth of the skin layer, and {omega}{sub p} is the plasma frequency) the broad-band absorption spectrum caused by the adsorbed molecules has an asymptotic limit {omega}{sup O}. The theory is compared with new absolute measurements of the IR spectrum of the CO/Cu(100) system. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  9. What is Local Mode (LM)? Global Mode (GM)? Calibration Mode?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2014-12-08

    ... measurement in Global Mode (GM), Local Mode (LM), and Calibration. Global Mode is the normal acquisition with pole to pole coverage ... targets approximately 300 km in length Calibration Implemented bi-monthly Spectralon solar ...

  10. The effective degeneracy of protein normal modes.

    PubMed

    Na, Hyuntae; Song, Guang

    2016-01-01

    Normal modes are frequently computed and used to portray protein dynamics and interpret protein conformational changes. In this work, we investigate the nature of normal modes and find that the normal modes of proteins, especially those at the low frequency range (0-600 cm(-1)), are highly susceptible to degeneracy. Two or more modes are degenerate if they have the same frequency and consequently any orthogonal transformation of them also is a valid representation of the mode subspace. Thus, degenerate modes can no longer characterize unique directions of motions as regular modes do. Though the normal modes of proteins are usually of different frequencies, the difference in frequency between neighboring modes is so small that, under even slight structural uncertainty that unavoidably exists in structure determination, it can easily vanish and as a result, a mode becomes effectively degenerate with its neighboring modes. This can be easily observed in that some modes seem to disappear and their matching modes cannot be found when the structure used to compute the modes is modified only slightly. We term this degeneracy the effective degeneracy of normal modes. This work is built upon our recent discovery that the vibrational spectrum of globular proteins is universal. The high density of modes observed in the vibrational frequency spectra of proteins renders their normal modes highly susceptible to degeneracy, under even the smallest structural uncertainty. Indeed, we find the degree of degeneracy of modes is proportional to the density of modes in the vibrational spectrum. This means that for modes at the same frequency, degeneracy is more severe for larger proteins. Degeneracy exists also in the modes of coarse-grained models, but to a much lesser extent than those of all-atom models. In closing, we discuss the implications of the effective degeneracy of normal modes: how it may significantly affect the ways in which normal modes are used in various normal modes

  11. Heat exchanger-accumulator

    DOEpatents

    Ecker, Amir L.

    1980-01-01

    What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

  12. Volume accumulator design analysis computer codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, W. D.; Shimazaki, T. T.

    1973-01-01

    The computer codes, VANEP and VANES, were written and used to aid in the design and performance calculation of the volume accumulator units (VAU) for the 5-kwe reactor thermoelectric system. VANEP computes the VAU design which meets the primary coolant loop VAU volume and pressure performance requirements. VANES computes the performance of the VAU design, determined from the VANEP code, at the conditions of the secondary coolant loop. The codes can also compute the performance characteristics of the VAU's under conditions of possible modes of failure which still permit continued system operation.

  13. Modes of Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Partridge, Susan

    This literature review is divided into two parts. The first part is a survey of materials in the William S. Gray Collection at the University of Chicago that deal with modes of learning. The studies reviewed range from the 1930s to the 1960s. The second part of the paper extends the review to studies published during the 1970s. Each section of the…

  14. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  15. Acetate limitation and nitrite accumulation during denitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Oh, J.; Silverstein, J.

    1999-03-01

    Nitrite accumulated in denitrifying activated sludge mixed liquor when the carbon and electron source, acetate, was limited. If acetate was added to obtain a carbon-to-nitrogen (C:N) ratio in the range of 2:1 to 3:1, nitrate was completely consumed at the same rate with no nitrite accumulation, indicating that nitrate concentration controlled the respiration rate as long as sufficient substrate was present. However, when acetate was reduced to a C:N ratio of 1:1, while nitrate continued to be consumed, > 50% of the initial nitrate-nitrogen accumulated as nitrite and 29% persisted as nitrite throughout an endogenous denitrification period of 8--9 h. While nitrite accumulated during acetate-limited denitrification, the specific nitrate reduction rate increased significantly compared with the rate when excess acetate was provided as follows: 0.034 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h versus 0.023 mg-NO{sub 3}-N/mg-mixed liquid volatile suspended solids/h, respective. This may be explained by nitrate respiration out-competing nitrite respiration for limited acetate electrons. Complete restoration of balanced denitrification and elimination of nitrite accumulation during denitrification required several weeks after the C:N ratio was increased back to 2:1.

  16. The Operation Modes of Kharkov X-Ray Generator Based on Compton Scattering NESTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Bulyak, E.V.; Gladkikh, P.; Karnaukhov, I.M.; Mytsykov, A.; Shcherbakov, A.A.; Zelinsky, A.Y.; Tatchyn, R.; /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-05-09

    The results of theoretical and numerical considerations of linear Compton scattering are used to evaluate characteristics of X-rays produced by collision between a low emittance electron beam and intensive laser light in an X-ray generator NESTOR of NSC KIPT. Two main generation modes have been under consideration at preliminary NESTOR design. There are the operation mode for medicine 33.4 keV X-rays production using 43 Mev electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam and higher energy X-rays production mode providing X-rays with energy up to 900 keV with 225 MeV electron beam and Nd:YAG laser beam. It was supposed to use an optical cavity for laser beam accumulation of about 2.6 m long and an interaction angle of about 3{sup o} in both operation modes. A few more operation modes provide possibility to expand operation range of NESTOR. Using interaction angle 10{sup o} and 150{sup o} along with optical resonator of 42 cm long and the second mode of laser light it is possible to produce X-rays in energy range from a few keV till 1.5 MeV. The intensity and spectral brightness of the X-rays is expected to be {approx} 10{sup 13} phot/s and {approx}10{sup 13} phot/s/mm{sup 2}/mrad{sup 2}/0.1%BW respectively.

  17. Sugar Accumulation in Sugarcane

    PubMed Central

    Gayler, K. R.; Glasziou, K. T.

    1972-01-01

    The rate-limiting reaction for glucose uptake in storage tissue of sugarcane, Saccharum officinarum L., appears to be the movement of glucose across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartments. The mechanism for uptake of glucose across this boundary has been studied using 3-O-methyl glucose, an analogue of glucose which is not metabolized by sugar-cane tissue. This analogue is taken up by sugarcane storage tissue at a similar rate to glucose. Its rate of uptake follows Michaelis-Menten kinetics, Km = 1.9 mm, and it is competitively inhibited by glucose, Ki = 2 to 3 mm. Glucose uptake is similarly inhibited by 3-O-methyl glucose. Uptake of 3-O-methyl glucose is energy-dependent and does not appear to be the result of counterflow of glucose. It is concluded that glucose and 3-O-methyl glucose uptake across the boundary between the free space and the metabolic compartment in this tissue is mediated by an energy-dependent carrier system capable of accumulating the sugars against a concentration gradient. PMID:16658002

  18. TTX accumulation in pufferfish.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu; Takatani, Tomohiro

    2006-03-01

    Tetrodotoxin (TTX) has been detected in a variety of animals. The finding of TTX in the trumpet shell Charonia sauliae strongly suggested that its origin was its food, a TTX-bearing starfish Astropecten polyacanthus. Since then, the food chain has been consistently implicated as the principal means of TTX intoxication. To identify the primary producer of TTX, intestinal bacteria isolated from several TTX-bearers were investigated for their TTX production. The results demonstrated that some of them could produce TTX. Thus the primary TTX producers in the sea are concluded to be marine bacteria. Subsequently, detritus feeders and zooplankton can be intoxicated with TTX through the food chain, or in conjunction with parasitism or symbiosis. The process followed by small carnivores, omnivores or scavengers, and by organisms higher up the food chain would result in the accumulation of higher concentrations of TTX. Finally, pufferfish at the top of the food chain are intoxicated with TTX. This hypothesis is supported by the fact that net cage and land cultures produce non-toxic pufferfish that can be made toxic by feeding with a TTX-containing diet.

  19. Mode conversion in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaeger, E. F.; Berry, L. A.; Myra, J. R.

    2006-10-01

    Fast magnetosonic waves in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) can convert to much shorter wavelength modes such as ion Bernstein waves (IBW) and ion cyclotron waves (ICW) [1]. These modes are potentially useful for plasma control through the generation of localized currents and sheared flows. As part of the SciDAC Center for Simulation of Wave-Plasma Interactions project, the AORSA global-wave solver [2] has been ported to the new, dual-core Cray XT-3 (Jaguar) at ORNL where it demonstrates excellent scaling with the number of processors. Preliminary calculations using 4096 processors have allowed the first full-wave simulations of mode conversion in ITER. Mode conversion from the fast wave to the ICW is observed in mixtures of deuterium, tritium and helium3 at 53 MHz. The resulting flow velocity and electric field shear will be calculated. [1] F.W. Perkins, Nucl. Fusion 17, 1197 (1977). [2] E.F. Jaeger, L.A. Berry, J.R. Myra, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 195001-1 (2003).

  20. Rates and controls on N accumulation in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, T.; Wang, M.; Moore, T. R.; Loisel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Paleoecological studies on peat cores have focused mainly on carbon (C) accumulation rates, whereas nitrogen (N) accumulation rates and cycling have been largely overlooked. We use primary data from peat cores extracted from Mer Bleue bog, the Northwest Territories and eastern and western Canada to estimate long- and short-term N accumulation rates. Furthermore, we apply the mean C/N ratios from a wide range of peatland types in Ontario to estimate N accumulation rates where C accumulation rates are available. Rates of N accumulation range from 0.1 to 2.0 g m-2 yr-1. We examine the sources of N to peatlands and different peatland types (bogs, fens and swamps) depend on N from different sources. For example, ombrotrophic bogs depend on bulk atmospheric N deposition and biological N2 fixation as their only source of N. Oligo- and minerotrophic fens however receive additional N along with other nutrients from the surface and ground water. Prior to Industrial Revolution atmospheric N deposition in peatlands was minimal and likely constant (< 0.1 g m-2 yr-1). Although it is impossible to measure N2 fixation rates in the past, N accumulation rates represent an overall balance between N inputs and outputs in these ecosystems. In bogs, N outputs are small, thus N accumulation rates could be explained by N2 fixation rates that have been the main source of N for these ecosystems, and we compare N accumulation rates with current measurements of N2 fixation.

  1. Noise Reduction by Signal Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kraftmakher, Yaakov

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show how the noise reduction by signal accumulation can be accomplished with a data acquisition system. This topic can be used for student projects. In many cases, the noise reduction is an unavoidable part of experimentation. Several techniques are known for this purpose, and among them the signal accumulation is the…

  2. Organic carbon accumulation in Brazilian mangal sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanders, Christian J.; Smoak, Joseph M.; Sanders, Luciana M.; Sathy Naidu, A.; Patchineelam, Sambasiva R.

    2010-12-01

    This study reviews the organic carbon (OC) accumulation rates in mangrove forests, margins and intertidal mudflats in geographically distinct areas along the Brazilian coastline (Northeastern to Southern). Our initial results indicate that the mangrove forests in the Northeastern region of Brazil are accumulating more OC (353 g/m 2/y) than in the Southeastern areas (192 g/m 2/y) being that the sediment accumulation rates, 2.8 and 2.5 mm/y, and OC content ˜7.1% and ˜5.8% (dry sediment weight) were contributing factors to the discrepancies between the forests. The intertidal mudflats on the other hand showed substantially greater OC accumulation rates, sedimentation rates and content 1129 g/m 2/y and 234 g/m 2/y; 7.3 and 3.4 mm/y; 10.3% and ˜2.7% (OC of dry sediment weight content), respectively, in the Northeastern compared to the Southeastern region. Mangrove forests in the South-Southeastern regions of Brazil may be more susceptible to the rising sea level, as they are geographically constricted by the vast mountain ranges along the coastline.

  3. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-09-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  4. Accumulated damage process of thermal sprayed coating under rolling contact by acoustic emission technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jia; Zhou, Zhen-yu; Piao, Zhong-yu

    2016-07-01

    The accumulated damage process of rolling contact fatigue (RCF) of plasma-sprayed coatings was investigated. The influences of surface roughness, loading condition, and stress cycle frequency on the accumulated damage status of the coatings were discussed. A ball-ondisc machine was employed to conduct RCF experiments. Acoustic emission (AE) technique was introduced to monitor the RCF process of the coatings. AE signal characteristics were investigated to reveal the accumulated damage process. Result showed that the polished coating would resist the asperity contact and remit accumulated damage. The RCF lifetime would then extend. Heavy load would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce surface fracture. Wear became the main failure mode that reduced the RCF lifetime. Frequent stress cycle would aggravate the accumulated damage status and induce interface fracture. Fatigue then became the main failure mode that also reduced the RCF lifetime.

  5. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, M.K.

    1984-09-20

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  6. Wide-range radiation dose monitor

    DOEpatents

    Kopp, Manfred K.

    1986-01-01

    A radiation dose-rate monitor is provided which operates in a conventional linear mode for radiation in the 0 to 0.5 R/h range and utilizes a nonlinear mode of operation for sensing radiation from 0.5 R/h to over 500 R/h. The nonlinear mode is achieved by a feedback circuit which adjusts the high voltage bias of the proportional counter, and hence its gas gain, in accordance with the amount of radiation being monitored. This allows compression of readout onto a single scale over the range of 0 to greater than 500 R/h without scale switching operations.

  7. Gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGee, E.S.; Mossotti, V.G.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of gypsum on carbonate stone has been investigated through exposure of fresh samples of limestone and marble at monitored sites, through examination of alteration crusts from old buildings and through laboratory experiments. Several factors contribute to gypsum accumulation on carbonate stone. Marble or limestone that is sheltered from direct washing by rain in an urban environment with elevated pollution levels is likely to accumulate a gypsum crust. Crust development may be enhanced if the stone is porous or has an irregular surface area. Gypsum crusts are a surficial alteration feature; gypsum crystals form at the pore opening-air interface, where evaporation is greatest.

  8. Regulating Chemical Accumulation in the Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Timothy M.; Vighi, Marco

    1999-01-01

    The environment has been exposed to a range of damaging contaminants from a wide variety of sources. Regulation of and legislation against offending parties has frequently been hampered because of the difficulty with cooperation among disparate disciplines in the natural, social and political sciences. This volume forms the conclusion of five years' collaboration among toxicologists, economists and lawyers in the understanding and solution of the problem of accumulative chemicals. As well as being a case study of the accumulation of pesticides in groundwater in one particular region (the European Union), the book forms a general study of the value of interdisciplinary approaches in environmental policy making. The volume will be a valuable resource for a broad group of academics and researchers in the area of environmental science and environmental policy.

  9. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  10. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  11. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-11-03

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius.

  12. Long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic waveguide.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhonglai; Wang, Jian

    2014-01-01

    We design a novel long-range hybrid wedge plasmonic (LRHWP) waveguide composed of two identical dielectric nanowires symmetrically placed on two opposed wedges of a diamond shaped metal wire. With strong coupling between the dielectric nanowire mode and long-range surface plasmon polariton (SPP) mode, both deep subwavelength mode confinement and low propagation loss are achieved. On one hand, when compared to the previous long-range hybrid SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can achieve smaller mode size with similar propagation length; on the other hand, when compared to the previous hybrid wedge SPP waveguide, LRHWP waveguide can provide an order of magnitude longer propagation length with similar level of mode confinement. The designed LRHWP waveguide also features an overall advantage of one-order improvement of Figure of Merit. We further evaluate in detail the impacts of possible practical fabrication imperfections on the mode properties. The obtained results of mode properties show that the proposed LRHWP waveguide with an optimized wedge tip angle of 140 degree is fairly tolerant to practical fabrication errors in geometry parameters such as misalignment in the horizontal direction, asymmetry in the vertical direction, variation of wedge tip angle, tilt or rotation of metal wire, and variation of wedge tip curvature radius. PMID:25362900

  13. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data.

    PubMed Central

    Rohwer, J M; Botha, F C

    2001-01-01

    Sucrose accumulation in developing sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) is accompanied by a continuous synthesis and cleavage of sucrose in the storage tissues. Despite numerous studies, the factors affecting sucrose accumulation are still poorly understood, and no consistent pattern has emerged which pinpoints certain enzyme activities as important controlling steps. Here, we develop an approach based on pathway analysis and kinetic modelling to assess the biochemical control of sucrose accumulation and futile cycling in sugar cane. By using the concept of elementary flux modes, all possible routes of futile cycling of sucrose were enumerated in the metabolic system. The available kinetic data for the pathway enzymes were then collected and assembled in a kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugar cane culm tissue. Although no data were fitted, the model agreed well with independent experimental results: in no case was the difference between calculated and measured fluxes and concentrations greater than 2-fold. The model thus validated was then used to assess different enhancement strategies for increasing sucrose accumulation. First, the control coefficient of each enzyme in the system on futile cycling of sucrose was calculated. Secondly, the activities of those enzymes with the numerically largest control coefficients were varied over a 5-fold range to determine the effect on the degree of futile cycling, the conversion efficiency from hexoses into sucrose, and the net sucrose accumulation rate. In view of the modelling results, overexpression of the fructose or glucose transporter or the vacuolar sucrose import protein, as well as reduction of cytosolic neutral invertase levels, appear to be the most promising targets for genetic manipulation. This offers a more directed improvement strategy than cumbersome gene-by-gene manipulation. The kinetic model can be viewed and interrogated on the World Wide Web at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za. PMID:11513743

  14. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data.

    PubMed

    Rohwer, J M; Botha, F C

    2001-09-01

    Sucrose accumulation in developing sugar cane (Saccharum officinarum) is accompanied by a continuous synthesis and cleavage of sucrose in the storage tissues. Despite numerous studies, the factors affecting sucrose accumulation are still poorly understood, and no consistent pattern has emerged which pinpoints certain enzyme activities as important controlling steps. Here, we develop an approach based on pathway analysis and kinetic modelling to assess the biochemical control of sucrose accumulation and futile cycling in sugar cane. By using the concept of elementary flux modes, all possible routes of futile cycling of sucrose were enumerated in the metabolic system. The available kinetic data for the pathway enzymes were then collected and assembled in a kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in sugar cane culm tissue. Although no data were fitted, the model agreed well with independent experimental results: in no case was the difference between calculated and measured fluxes and concentrations greater than 2-fold. The model thus validated was then used to assess different enhancement strategies for increasing sucrose accumulation. First, the control coefficient of each enzyme in the system on futile cycling of sucrose was calculated. Secondly, the activities of those enzymes with the numerically largest control coefficients were varied over a 5-fold range to determine the effect on the degree of futile cycling, the conversion efficiency from hexoses into sucrose, and the net sucrose accumulation rate. In view of the modelling results, overexpression of the fructose or glucose transporter or the vacuolar sucrose import protein, as well as reduction of cytosolic neutral invertase levels, appear to be the most promising targets for genetic manipulation. This offers a more directed improvement strategy than cumbersome gene-by-gene manipulation. The kinetic model can be viewed and interrogated on the World Wide Web at http://jjj.biochem.sun.ac.za.

  15. Constant-Differential-Pressure Two-Fluid Accumulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piecuch, Benjamin; Dalton, Luke T.

    2010-01-01

    A two-fluid accumulator has been designed, built, and demonstrated to provide an acceptably close approximation to constant differential static pressure between two fluids over the full ranges of (1) accumulator stroke, (2) rates of flow of the fluids, and (3) common static pressure applied to the fluids. Prior differential- pressure two-fluid accumulators are generally not capable of maintaining acceptably close approximations to constant differential pressures. The inadequacies of a typical prior differential-pressure two-fluid accumulator can be summarized as follows: The static differential pressure is governed by the intrinsic spring rate (essentially, the stiffness) of an accumulator tank. The spring rate can be tailored through selection of the tank-wall thickness, selection of the number and/or shape of accumulator convolutions, and/or selection of accumulator material(s). Reliance on the intrinsic spring rate of the tank results in three severe limitations: (1) The spring rate and the expulsion efficiency tend to be inversely proportional to each other: that is to say, as the stiffness (and thus the differential pressure) is increased, the range of motion of the accumulator is reduced. (2) As the applied common static pressure increases, the differential pressure tends to decrease. An additional disadvantage, which may or may not be considered limiting, depending on the specific application, is that an increase in stiffness entails an increase in weight. (3) The additional weight required by a low expulsion efficiency accumulator eliminates the advantage given to such gas storage systems. The high expulsion efficiency provided by this two-fluid accumulator allows for a lightweight, tightly packaged system, which can be used in conjunction with a fuel cell-based system.

  16. Atmospheric mercury accumulation and washoff processes on impervious urban surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eckley, C.S.; Branfireun, B.; Diamond, M.; Van Metre, P.C.; Heitmuller, F.

    2008-01-01

    The deposition and transport of mercury (Hg) has been studied extensively in rural environments but is less understood in urbanized catchments, where elevated atmospheric Hg concentrations and impervious surfaces may efficiently deliver Hg to waterways in stormwater runoff. We determined the rate at which atmospheric Hg accumulates on windows, identified the importance of washoff in removing accumulated Hg, and measured atmospheric Hg concentrations to help understand the relationship between deposition and surface accumulation. The main study location was Toronto, Ontario. Similar samples were also collected from Austin, Texas for comparison of Hg accumulation between cities. Windows provided a good sampling surface because they are ubiquitous in urban environments and are easy to clean/blank allowing the assessment of contemporary Hg accumulation. Hg Accumulation rates were spatially variable ranging from 0.82 to 2.7 ng m-2 d-1 in Toronto and showed similar variability in Austin. The highest accumulation rate in Toronto was at the city center and was 5?? higher than the rural comparison site (0.58 ng m-2 d-1). The atmospheric total gaseous mercury (TGM) concentrations were less than 2?? higher between the rural and urban locations (1.7 ?? 0.3 and 2.7 ?? 1.1 ng m-3, respectively). The atmospheric particulate bound fraction (HgP), however, was more than 3?? higher between the rural and urban sites, which may have contributed to the higher urban Hg accumulation rates. Windows exposed to precipitation had 73 ?? 9% lower accumulation rates than windows sheltered from precipitation. Runoff collected from simulated rain events confirmed that most Hg accumulated on windows was easily removed and that most of the Hg in washoff was HgP. Our results indicate that the Hg flux from urban catchments will respond rapidly to changes in atmospheric concentrations due to the mobilization of the majority of the surface accumulated Hg during precipitation events. ?? 2008 Elsevier

  17. Deep Space Mission Emergency Mode Downlink

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    2008-01-01

    This paper investigates telecommunications between a deep space mission satellite and the ground station during an emergency mode. Once emergency is detected, spacecraft is put into a safe mode, i.e., antenna to be used for emergency mode communications is pointed towards the sun and use total available power to transmit. There are many parameters affecting communications in this mode and these should be properly balanced to produce desired results. This paper explores the effectiveness of spacecraft antenna gain pattern in the emergency mode with respect to positions of the spacecraft, earth, Sun Earth Probe (SEP) angle at the receiving antenna, and the range of the spacecraft with respect to the ground station. The paper also provides parabolic reflector antenna diameter that should be used for emergency mode as a function of the satellite to sun range in the solar system.

  18. Broadband radiation modes: Estimation and active control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.

    2002-03-01

    In this paper we give a formulation of the most efficiently radiating vibration patterns of a vibrating body, the radiation modes, in the time domain. The radiation modes can be used to arrive at efficient weighting schemes for an array of sensors in order to reduce the controller dimensionality. Because these particular radiation modes are optimum in a broadband sense, they are termed broadband radiation modes. Methods are given to obtain these modes from measured data. The broadband radiation modes are used for the design of an actuator array in a feedback control system to reduce the sound power radiated from a plate. Three methods for the design of the actuator are compared, taking into account the reduction of radiated sound power in the controlled frequency range, but also the possible increase of radiated sound power in the uncontrolled frequency range.

  19. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet Accumulation Rates from Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    An important component of NASA's Program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a mass balance investigation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The mass balance is calculated by taking the difference between the areally Integrated snow accumulation and the net ice discharge of the ice sheet. Uncertainties in this calculation Include the snow accumulation rate, which has traditionally been determined by interpolating data from ice core samples taken from isolated spots across the ice sheet. The sparse data associated with ice cores juxtaposed against the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by remote sensing , has motivated scientists to investigate relationships between accumulation rate and microwave observations as an option for obtaining spatially contiguous estimates. The objective of this PARCA continuation proposal was to complete an estimate of surface accumulation rate on the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from C-band radar backscatter data compiled in the ERS-1 SAR mosaic of data acquired during, September-November, 1992. An empirical equation, based on elevation and latitude, is used to determine the mean annual temperature. We examine the influence of accumulation rate, and mean annual temperature on C-band radar backscatter using a forward model, which incorporates snow metamorphosis and radar backscatter components. Our model is run over a range of accumulation and temperature conditions. Based on the model results, we generate a look-up table, which uniquely maps the measured radar backscatter, and mean annual temperature to accumulation rate. Our results compare favorably with in situ accumulation rate measurements falling within our study area.

  20. Anthocyanins facilitate tungsten accumulation in Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, K.L.

    2002-11-01

    Accumulation of molybdenum in Brassica was recently found to be correlated with anthocyanin content, involving the formation of a blue complex. Here the role of anthocyanins in tungsten sequestration was investigated using three species of Brassica: B. rapa (cv. Fast plants), B. juncea (Indian mustard) and B. oleracea (red cabbage). Seedlings of B. rapa and B. juncea turned blue when supplied with colourless tungstate. The blue compound co-localized with anthocyanins in the peripheral cell layers, and the degree of blueness was correlated with anthocyanin content. The direct involvement of anthocyanins in the blue coloration was evident when purified anthocyanins showed a colour change from pink to blue in vitro upon addition of tungstate, over a wide pH range. Anthocyanin production was upregulated 3-fold by W in B. juncea, possibly reflecting a function for anthocyanins in W tolerance or sequestration. The presence of anthocyanins facilitated W accumulation in B. rapa: anthocyanin-containing seedlings accumulated 3-fold more W than an anthocyaninless mutant. There was no correlation between anthocyanin content and W tolerance under these conditions. The nature of the interaction between anthocyanins and tungstate was investigated. X-ray absorption spectroscopy showed no change in the local chemical environment of Wupon uptake of tungstate by the plant; HPLC analysis of purified anthocyanin with or without tungstate showed no peak shift after metal treatment.

  1. Linear Deterministic Accumulator Models of Simple Choice

    PubMed Central

    Heathcote, Andrew; Love, Jonathon

    2012-01-01

    We examine theories of simple choice as a race among evidence accumulation processes. We focus on the class of deterministic race models, which assume that the effects of fluctuations in the parameters of the accumulation processes between-choice trials (between-choice noise) dominate the effects of fluctuations occurring while making a choice (within-choice noise) in behavioral data (i.e., response times and choices). The latter deterministic approximation, when combined with the assumption that accumulation is linear, leads to a class of models that can be readily applied to simple-choice behavior because they are computationally tractable. We develop a new and mathematically simple exemplar within the class of linear deterministic models, the Lognormal race (LNR). We then examine how the LNR, and another widely applied linear deterministic model, Brown and Heathcote’s (2008) LBA, account for a range of benchmark simple-choice effects in lexical-decision task data reported by Wagenmakers et al. (2008). Our results indicate that the LNR provides an accurate description of this data. Although the LBA model provides a slightly better account, both models support similar psychological conclusions. PMID:22936920

  2. How wealth accumulation can promote cooperation.

    PubMed

    Chadefaux, Thomas; Helbing, Dirk

    2010-01-01

    Explaining the emergence and stability of cooperation has been a central challenge in biology, economics and sociology. Unfortunately, the mechanisms known to promote it either require elaborate strategies or hold only under restrictive conditions. Here, we report the emergence, survival, and frequent domination of cooperation in a world characterized by selfishness and a strong temptation to defect, when individuals can accumulate wealth. In particular, we study games with local adaptation such as the prisoner's dilemma, to which we add heterogeneity in payoffs. In our model, agents accumulate wealth and invest some of it in their interactions. The larger the investment, the more can potentially be gained or lost, so that present gains affect future payoffs. We find that cooperation survives for a far wider range of parameters than without wealth accumulation and, even more strikingly, that it often dominates defection. This is in stark contrast to the traditional evolutionary prisoner's dilemma in particular, in which cooperation rarely survives and almost never thrives. With the inequality we introduce, on the contrary, cooperators do better than defectors, even without any strategic behavior or exogenously imposed strategies. These results have important consequences for our understanding of the type of social and economic arrangements that are optimal and efficient. PMID:21048947

  3. Global Alfven modes: Theory and experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Turnbull, A.D.; Strait, E.J.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Chu, M.S.; Duong, H.H.; Greene, J.M.; Lao, L.L.; Taylor, T.S.; Thompson, S.J. )

    1993-07-01

    It is shown that the theoretical predictions and experimental observations of toroidicity-induced Alfven eigenmodes (TAE's) are now in good agreement, with particularly detailed agreement in the mode frequencies. Calculations of the driving and damping rates predict the importance of continuum damping for low toroidal mode numbers and this is confirmed experimentally. However, theoretical calculations in finite-[beta], shaped discharges predict the existence of other global Alfven modes, in particular the ellipticity-induced Alfven eigenmode (EAE) and a new mode, the beta-induced Alfven eigenmode (BAE). The BAE mode is calculated to be in or below the same frequency range as the TAE mode and may contribute to the experimental observations at high [beta]. Experimental evidence and complementary analyses are presented confirming the presence of the EAE mode at higher frequencies.

  4. Multi-Mode Broadband Patch Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romanofsky, Robert R. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A multi-mode broad band patch antenna is provided that allows for the same aperture to be used at independent frequencies such as reception at 19 GHz and transmission at 29 GHz. Furthermore, the multi-mode broadband patch antenna provides a ferroelectric film that allows for tuning capability of the multi-mode broadband patch antenna over a relatively large tuning range. The alternative use of a semiconductor substrate permits reduced control voltages since the semiconductor functions as a counter electrode.

  5. List mode multichannel analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, S. John; Mauger, G. Joseph; Riot, Vincent J.; Knapp, David A.

    2007-08-07

    A digital list mode multichannel analyzer (MCA) built around a programmable FPGA device for onboard data analysis and on-the-fly modification of system detection/operating parameters, and capable of collecting and processing data in very small time bins (<1 millisecond) when used in histogramming mode, or in list mode as a list mode MCA.

  6. Maximum likelihood decoding analysis of Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    Repeat-Accumulate (RA) codes are the simplest turbo-like codes that achieve good performance. However, they cannot compete with Turbo codes or low-density parity check codes (LDPC) as far as performance is concerned. The Accumulate Repeat Accumulate (ARA) codes, as a subclass of LDPC codes, are obtained by adding a pre-coder in front of RA codes with puncturing where an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. These codes not only are very simple, but also achieve excellent performance with iterative decoding. In this paper, the performance of these codes with (ML) decoding are analyzed and compared to random codes by very tight bounds. The weight distribution of some simple ARA codes is obtained, and through existing tightest bounds we have shown the ML SNR threshold of ARA codes approaches very closely to the performance of random codes. We have shown that the use of precoder improves the SNR threshold but interleaving gain remains unchanged with respect to RA code with puncturing.

  7. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  8. Mode coupling in hybrid square-rectangular lasers for single mode operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Xiu-Wen; Huang, Yong-Zhen; Yang, Yue-De; Xiao, Jin-Long; Weng, Hai-Zhong; Xiao, Zhi-Xiong

    2016-08-01

    Mode coupling between a square microcavity and a Fabry-Pérot (FP) cavity is proposed and demonstrated for realizing single mode lasers. The modulations of the mode Q factor as simulation results are observed and single mode operation is obtained with a side mode suppression ratio of 46 dB and a single mode fiber coupling loss of 3.2 dB for an AlGaInAs/InP hybrid laser as a 300-μm-length and 1.5-μm-wide FP cavity connected to a vertex of a 10-μm-side square microcavity. Furthermore, tunable single mode operation is demonstrated with a continuous wavelength tuning range over 10 nm. The simple hybrid structure may shed light on practical applications of whispering-gallery mode microcavities in large-scale photonic integrated circuits and optical communication and interconnection.

  9. Pensions and Household Wealth Accumulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, Gary V.; Kumar, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Economists have long suggested that higher private pension benefits "crowd out" other sources of household wealth accumulation. We exploit detailed information on pensions and lifetime earnings for older workers in the 1992 wave of the Health and Retirement Study and employ an instrumental-variable (IV) identification strategy to estimate…

  10. Equatorial Energy Accumulation and Emanation Regions: Impacts of a Zonally Varying Basic State.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Peter J.; Chang, Hai-Ru

    1988-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the regions of mean anomalous perturbation kinetic energy which exist in the vicinity of the equatorial upper-tropospheric westerlies are the result of the propagation of extratropical synoptic and low frequency waves through the equatorial `westerly duet' where a subsequent wave energy convergence occurs. The proposition that these perturbed equatorial regions may arise from remote equatorial energy sources is investigated. It is shown that three criteria must be met. The first two, the existence of wave energy sources along the equator and a mechanism to transport that energy longitudinally, are accounted for relatively easily with existing theory of divergent, trapped equatorial modes. The third criterion, the requirement of a mechanism for an accumulation of transient energy in the equatorial stretch flow (i.e., nonzero x), is not immediately obvious and requires exploration to develop new concepts.Using simple WKBJ arguments it is shown that within a realistic parameter range, a combination of longitudinal stretch in the basic state along the equator and the characteristics of the equatorial trapped waves satisfy the third criterion. The equatorial waves must possess a divergent structure which insists on equatorial trapping. It is shown that purely barotropic modes, which cannot be equatorially trapped, do not represent the real atmospheric structure at low latitudes. Regions of negative longitudinal stretch along the equator (i.e., westerlies decreasing, or easterlies increasing, towards the cast) are shown to be wave energy accumulation regions. Regions with positive stretch, on the other hand, are wave energy depletion regions. A free-surface barotropic model with fully nonlinear basic states, containing both stretch and shear, confirm the results of the simpler model, i.e., regardless of the position of the energy source within the tropical atmosphere the wave energy accumulates in the same region; namely, on the

  11. Influencing factors on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Zhang; Bing, Chen; Gang, Liu; Baoxi, Wei; Xu, Xu

    2014-10-01

    An experimental investigation was performed to characterize the effects of fuel type, injector configuration, inflow total temperature and fuel injection distribution on the mode transition in a dual-mode scramjet combustor. High enthalpy vitiated air was heated to three total temperatures by the hydrogen-oxygen combustion, entering the isolator entrance at a Mach number of 2.0. Fuel was injected through a four-hole aero-ramp or transverse injector, and ignited by a gas-pilot flame. At an inflow stagnation condition of P0=0.85 MPa and T0=1200 K, three combustion modes, namely Pure Scram Mode, Dual-Mode Scram Mode and Dual-Mode Ram Mode, were classified through the wall pressure distributions, one-dimensional performance analysis, and optical visualization. Two critical fuel equivalence ratios were selected to divide three combustion modes. At the lower transition point, ERlc, the transition from Pure Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Scram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.23; while at the upper transition point, ERuc, the transition from Dual-Mode Scram Mode to Dual-Mode Ram Mode occurred corresponding to a normalized wall pressure at x/H=2.5 of 0.34. The transition width, ERw, was defined as the difference of two transition points. In this limited range, the combustor was operating in the Dual-Mode Scram Mode. The ERuc was estimated based on the Rayleigh flow relation, and the applicability of the analytic equation was testified through a series of experiments with different boundary conditions. The experimental results showed that two transition points in the ethylene case were higher in ER than in the hydrogen case, and the measured ERuc of two fuels were all 2.5 times larger than the predicted values. However, two fuels had little difference on the transition width. Due to the angled injection, two transition points in the aero-ramp case were higher in ER than in the transverse injector case; while the influence of injector

  12. Mixed-mode fracture of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The mixed-mode fracture behavior of ceramic materials is of importance for monolithic ceramics in order to predict the onset of fracture under generalized loading conditions and for ceramic composites to describe crack deflection toughening mechanisms. Experimental data on surface flaw mixed-mode fracture in various ceramics indicate that the flaw-plane normal stress at fracture decreases with increasing in-flaw-plane shear stress, although present data exhibit a fairly wide range in details of this sigma - tau relationship. Fracture from large cracks suggests that Mode II has a greater effect on Mode I fracture than Mode III. A comparison of surface flaw and large crack mixed-mode I-II fracture responses indicated that surface flaw behavior is influenced by shear resistance effects.

  13. Patterns of sediment accumulation in the tidal marshes of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, M.E.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    One year's measurements of surficial sedimentation rates (1986-1987) for 26 Maine marsh sites were made over marker horizons of brick dust. Observed sediment accumulation rates, from 0 to 13 mm yr-1, were compared with marsh morphology, local relative sea-level rise rate, mean tidal range, and ice rafting activity. Marshes with four different morphologies (back-barrier, fluvial, bluff-toe, and transitional) showed distinctly different sediment accumulation rates. In general, back-barrier marshes had the highest accumulation rates and blufftoe marshes had the lowest rates, with intermediate values for transitional and fluvial marshes. No causal relationship between modern marsh sediment accumulation rate and relative sea-level rise rate (from tide gauge records) was observed. Marsh accretionary balance (sediment accumulation rate minus relative sea-level rise rate) did not correlate with mean tidal range for this meso- to macro-tidal area. Estimates of ice-rafted debris on marsh sites ranged from 0% to >100% of measured surficial sedimentation rates, indicating that ice transport of sediment may make a significant contribution to surficial sedimentation on Maine salt marshes. ?? 1989 Estuarine Research Federation.

  14. Chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui

    2013-11-15

    Chromoplasts are special organelles that possess superior ability to synthesize and store massive amounts of carotenoids. They are responsible for the distinctive colors found in fruits, flowers, and roots. Chromoplasts exhibit various morphologies and are derived from either pre-existing chloroplasts or other non-photosynthetic plastids such as proplastids, leucoplasts or amyloplasts. While little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying chromoplast biogenesis, research progress along with proteomics study of chromoplast proteomes signifies various processes and factors important for chromoplast differentiation and development. Chromoplasts act as a metabolic sink that enables great biosynthesis and high storage capacity of carotenoids. The formation of chromoplasts enhances carotenoid metabolic sink strength and controls carotenoid accumulation in plants. The objective of this review is to provide an integrated view on our understanding of chromoplast biogenesis and carotenoid accumulation in plants.

  15. Himalayan Strain Accumulation 100 ka Timescales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, J. M.; Murphy, M. A.; Liu, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Crustal scale fault systems and tectonostratigraphic units in the Himalaya can be traced for 2500 km along strike. However regional studies have shown that there is variability in the location and rate of strain accumulation which appears to be driven by Main Himalayan Thrust (MHT) geometry and convergence obliquity. GPS illuminates the modern interseismic strain rate and the historical record of great earthquakes elucidates variations in strain accumulation over 103 years. To connect these patterns with the 106 year structural and thermochronometric geologic record we examine normalized river channel steepness (ksn), a proxy for rock uplift rate, which develops over 104 - 105 years. Here we present a ksn map of the Himalaya and compare it with bedrock geology, precipitation, the historic earthquake record, GPS, seismicity, and seismotectonic models. Our map shows significant along strike changes in the magnitude of channel steepness, the areal extent of swaths of high ksn channels, and their location with respect to the range front. Differences include the juxtaposition of two narrow (30 - 40 km) range parallel belts of high ksn in west Nepal and Bhutan coincident with MHT duplexes and belts of microseismcity, with a single broad (70 km) swath of high ksn and microseismicity in central and eastern Nepal. Separating west and central Nepal a band of low ksn crosses the range coincident with the West Nepal Fault (WNF) and the lowest rate of microseismicity in Nepal. To the west the orogen is obliquely convergent and has less high ksn channels, while the orthogonally convergent region to the east contains the highest concentration of oversteepened channels in the Himalaya supporting the idea that the WNF is a strain partitioning boundary. The syntaxes are characterized by locally high channel steepness surrounded by low to moderate ksn channels consistent with the hypothesis that rapid exhumation within the syntaxes is sustained by an influx of lower crust.

  16. Large mode radius resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, Michael R.

    1987-01-01

    Resonator configurations permitting operation with large mode radius while maintaining good transverse mode discrimination are considered. Stable resonators incorporating an intracavity telescope and unstable resonator geometries utilizing an output coupler with a Gaussian reflectivity profile are shown to enable large radius single mode laser operation. Results of heterodyne studies of pulsed CO2 lasers with large (11mm e sup-2 radius) fundamental mode sizes are presented demonstrating minimal frequency sweeping in accordance with the theory of laser-induced medium perturbations.

  17. Mechanisms of intrahepatic triglyceride accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Ress, Claudia; Kaser, Susanne

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis defined as lipid accumulation in hepatocytes is very frequently found in adults and obese adolescents in the Western World. Etiologically, obesity and associated insulin resistance or excess alcohol intake are the most frequent causes of hepatic steatosis. However, steatosis also often occurs with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and is also found in rare but potentially life-threatening liver diseases of pregnancy. Clinical significance and outcome of hepatic triglyceride accumulation are highly dependent on etiology and histological pattern of steatosis. This review summarizes current concepts of pathophysiology of common causes of hepatic steatosis, including non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), alcoholic fatty liver disease, chronic HCV infections, drug-induced forms of hepatic steatosis, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. Regarding the pathophysiology of NAFLD, this work focuses on the close correlation between insulin resistance and hepatic triglyceride accumulation, highlighting the potential harmful effects of systemic insulin resistance on hepatic metabolism of fatty acids on the one side and the role of lipid intermediates on insulin signalling on the other side. Current studies on lipid droplet morphogenesis have identified novel candidate proteins and enzymes in NAFLD. PMID:26819531

  18. Few-mode fibers for mode division multiplexing transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hirokazu; Morioka, Toshio

    2012-01-01

    A study is presented of the fiber properties needed to achieve 10-mode multiplexing transmission. A combination of MIMO processing with optical LP mode separation is proposed to prevent the need for massive MIMO computation. The impact of mode crosstalk, differential mode delay, and the mode dependent loss of the few-mode fibers on mode multiplexing are discussed.

  19. Controls on pathogen species richness in plants introduced and native ranges: roles of residence time, range size and host traits

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Introduction of hosts to new geographic regions allows them to escape many pathogens, raising two questions. How quickly do introduced hosts accumulate pathogens? Do the same factors control pathogen accumulation as in the native range? We analyzed fungal and viral pathogen species richness on 124 p...

  20. Hardware test program for evaluation of baseline range/range rate sensor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Hardware Test Program for evaluation of the baseline range/range rate sensor concept was initiated 11 September 1984. This ninth report covers the period 12 May through 11 June 1885. A contract amendment adding a second phase has extended the Hardware Test Program through 10 December 1985. The objective of the added program phase is to establish range and range measurement accuracy and radar signature characteristics for a typical spacecraft target. Phase I of the Hardware Test Program was designed to reduce the risks associated with the Range/Range Rate (R/R) Sensor baseline design approach. These risks are associated with achieving the sensor performance required for the two modes of operation, the Interrupted CW (ICW) mode for initial acquisition and tracking to close-in ranges, and the CW mode, providing coverage during the final docking maneuver. The risks associated with these modes of operation have to do with the realization of adequate sensitivity to operate to their individual maximum ranges.

  1. The KRAKEN normal mode program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, M. B.

    1992-05-01

    In the late 1970's, several normal-mode models existed which were widely used for predicting acoustic transmission-loss in the ocean; however, each had its own problems. Typical difficulties included numerical instabilities for certain types of sound-speed profiles and failures to compute a complete set of ocean modes. In short, there was a need for a model that was robust, accurate, and efficient. In order to resolve these problems, a new algorithm was developed forming the basis for the KRAKEN normal mode model. Over subsequent years, KRAKEN was greatly extended, with options for modeling ocean environments that are range-independent, range-dependent, or fully 3-dimensional. The current version offers the specialist a vast number of options for treating ocean-acoustics problems (or more generally acousto-elastic waveguides). On the other hand, it is easy for a less sophisticated user to learn the small subset of tools needed for the common problem of transmission-loss modeling in range-independent ocean environments. This report addresses the need for a more complete user's guide to supplement the on-line help files. The first chapters give a fairly technical description of the mathematical and numerical basis of the model. Additional chapters give a simpler description of its use and installation in a manner that is accessible to less scientifically-oriented readers.

  2. Mixed-mode fracture toughness of ceramic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Suresh, S.; Shih, C.F.; O'Dowd, N.P. . Div. of Engineering); Morrone, A. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1990-05-01

    An experimental technique whereby pure mode I, mode II, and combined mode I-mode II fracture toughness values of ceramic materials can be determined using four-point bend specimens containing sharp, through-thickness precracks is discussed. In this method, notched and fatigue-precracked specimens of brittle solids are subjected to combined mode I-mode II and pure mode II fracture under asymmetric four point bend loading and to pure mode I under symmetric bend loading. A detailed finite element analysis of the test specimen is performed to obtain stress intensity factor calibrations for a wide range of loading states. The effectiveness of this method to provide reproducible combined mode I- mode II fracture toughness values is demonstrated with experimental results obtained for a polycrystalline Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  3. Telemetry Ranging: Concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2015-11-01

    Telemetry ranging is a proposed alternative to conventional two-way ranging for determining the two-way time delay between a Deep Space Station (DSS) and a spacecraft. The advantage of telemetry ranging is that the ranging signal on the uplink is not echoed to the downlink, so that telemetry alone modulates the downlink carrier. The timing information needed on the downlink, in order to determine the two-way time delay, is obtained from telemetry frames. This article describes the phase and timing estimates required for telemetry ranging, and how two-way range is calculated from these estimates. It explains why the telemetry ranging architecture does not require the spacecraft transponder to have a high-frequency or high-quality oscillator, and it describes how a telemetry ranging system can be infused in the Deep Space Network.

  4. The accumulation of nickel in human lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Edelman, D.A.; Roggli, V.L. )

    1989-05-01

    Using data from published studies, lung concentrations of nickel were compare for persons with and without occupational exposure to nickel. As expected, the concentrations were much higher for persons with occupational exposure. To estimate the effects of nickel-containing tobacco smoke and nickel in the ambient air on the amount of nickel accumulated in lungs over time, a model was derived that took into account various variables related to the deposition of nickel in lungs. The model predicted nickel concentrations that were in the range of those of persons without known nickel exposure. Nickel is a suspected carcinogen and has been associated with an increased risk of respiratory tract cancer among nickel workers. However, before the nickel content of cigarettes can be implicated in the etiology of lung cancer, further studies are needed to evaluate the independent effects of smoking and exposure to nickel.

  5. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Nieset, R.T.

    1961-05-16

    A radio ranging device is described. It utilizes a super regenerative detector-oscillator in which echoes of transmitted pulses are received in proper phase to reduce noise energy at a selected range and also at multiples of the selected range.

  6. SAR ambiguous range suppression.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-09-01

    Pulsed Radar systems suffer range ambiguities, that is, echoes from pulses transmitted at different times arrive at the receiver simultaneously. Conventional mitigation techniques are not always adequate. However, pulse modulation schemes exist that allow separation of ambiguous ranges in Doppler space, allowing easy filtering of problematic ambiguous ranges.

  7. Bacterial Swimming and Accumulation at the Fluid Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay

    2012-02-01

    Micro-organisms often reside and thrive at the fluid boundaries. The tendency of accumulation is particularly strong for flagellated bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Vibro alginolyticus, and Caulobacter crescentus. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of Caulobacter crescentus near a solid surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on darkfield microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within micrometers from the surface, even though individual swimmers are not trapped long enough to display circular trajectories. We attributed this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with the rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed simulations based on this model, which reproduces the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. Our ongoing experimental effort also includes observation of similar phenomena at the interfaces of either water-oil or water-air, noting even stronger trapping of the swimming bacteria than near a solid surface. These studies reveal a rich range of fluid physics for further analysis.

  8. Fine mode aerosol chemistry over a rural atmosphere near the north-east coast of Bay of Bengal in India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adak, Anandamay; Chatterjee, Abhijit; Ghosh, Sanjay; Raha, Sibaji; Roy, Arindam

    2016-07-01

    A study was conducted on the chemical characterization of fine mode aerosol or PM2.5 over a rural atmosphere near the coast of Bay of Bengal in eastern India. Samples were collected and analyzed during March 2013 - February 2014. The concentration of PM2.5 was found span over a wide range from as low as 3 µg m-3 to as high as 180 µg m-3. The average concentration of PM2.5 was 62 µg m-3. Maximum accumulation of fine mode aerosol was observed during winter whereas minimum was observed during monsoon. Water soluble ionic species of fine mode aerosol were characterized over this rural atmosphere. In spite of being situated near the coast of Bay of Bengal, we observed significantly higher concentrations for anthropogenic species like ammonium and sulphate. The concentrations of these two species were much higher than the sea-salt aerosols. Ammonium and sulphate contributed around 30 % to the total fine mode aerosols. Even dust aerosol species like calcium also showed higher concentrations. Chloride to sodium ratio was found to be much less than that in standard sea-water indicating strong interaction between sea-salt and anthropogenic aerosols. Use of fertilizers in various crop fields and human and animal wastes significantly increased ammonium in fine mode aerosols. Dust aerosol species were accumulated in the atmosphere which could be due to transport of finer dust species from nearby metropolis or locally generated. Non-sea-sulphate and nitrate showed significant contributions in fine mode aerosols having both local and transported sources. Source apportionment shows prominent emission sources of anthropogenic aerosols from local anthropogenic activities and transported from nearby Kolkata metropolis as well.

  9. Copper accumulation by stickleback nests containing spiggin.

    PubMed

    Pinho, G L L; Martins, C M G; Barber, I

    2016-07-01

    The three-spined stickleback is a ubiquitous fish of marine, brackish and freshwater ecosystems across the Northern hemisphere that presents intermediate sensitivity to copper. Male sticklebacks display a range of elaborate reproductive behaviours that include nest construction. To build the nests, each male binds nesting material together using an endogenous glycoprotein nesting glue, known as 'spiggin'. Spiggin is a cysteine-rich protein and, therefore, potentially binds heavy metals present in the environment. The aim of this study was to investigate the capacity of stickleback nests to accumulate copper from environmental sources. Newly built nests, constructed by male fish from polyester threads in laboratory aquaria, were immersed in copper solutions ranging in concentration from 21.1-626.6 μg Cu L(-1). Bundles of polyester threads from aquaria without male fish were also immersed in the same copper solutions. After immersion, nests presented higher amounts of copper than the thread bundles, indicating a higher capacity of nests to bind this metal. A significant, positive correlation between the concentration of copper in the exposure solution and in the exposed nests was identified, but there was no such relationship for thread bundles. Since both spiggin synthesis and male courtship behaviour are under the control of circulating androgens, we predicted that males with high courtship scores would produce and secrete high levels of the spiggin protein. In the present study, nests built by high courtship score males accumulated more copper than those built by low courtship score males. Considering the potential of spiggin to bind metals, the positive relationship between fish courtship and spiggin secretion seems to explain the higher amount of copper on the nests from the fish showing high behaviour scores. Further work is now needed to determine the consequences of the copper binding potential of spiggin in stickleback nests for the health and survival of

  10. On some spurious mode issues in shallow-water models using a linear algebra approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Roux, D. Y.; Sène, A.; Rostand, V.; Hanert, E.

    Numerical methods that are usually employed in ocean modelling are typically finite-difference, finite and spectral-element techniques. For most of these methods the coupling between the momentum and continuity equations is a delicate problem and it usually leads to spurious solutions in the representation of inertia-gravity waves. The spurious modes have a wide range of characteristics and may take the form of pressure (surface-elevation), velocity and/or Coriolis modes. The modes usually cause aliasing and an accumulation of energy in the smallest-resolvable scale, leading to noisy solutions. The Fourier analysis has proven practical and beneficial to describe the spurious solutions of several classical schemes. However it is restricted to uniform meshes on which the variables are regularly distributed. In this paper, a linear algebra approach is proposed to study the existence and the behaviour of stationary spurious modes associated with zero frequency, for some popular finite-difference and finite-element grids. The present approach is performed on uniform meshes but it applies equally well to regular as well as unstructured meshes with irregular geometry for the finite-element schemes.

  11. Telemetry Ranging: Signal Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamkins, J.; Kinman, P.; Xie, H.; Vilnrotter, V.; Dolinar, S.

    2016-02-01

    This article describes the details of the signal processing used in a telemetry ranging system in which timing information is extracted from the downlink telemetry signal in order to compute spacecraft range. A previous article describes telemetry ranging concepts and architecture, which are a slight variation of a scheme published earlier. As in that earlier work, the telemetry ranging concept eliminates the need for a dedicated downlink ranging signal to communicate the necessary timing information. The present article describes the operation and performance of the major receiver functions on the spacecraft and the ground --- many of which are standard tracking loops already in use in JPL's flight and ground radios --- and how they can be used to provide the relevant information for making a range measurement. It also describes the implementation of these functions in software, and performance of an end-to-end software simulation of the telemetry ranging system.

  12. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  13. Observation of impurity accumulation and concurrent impurity influx in PBX

    SciTech Connect

    Sesnic, S.S.; Fonck, R.J.; Ida, K.; Bol, K.; Couture, P.; Gammel, G.; Kaita, R.; Kaye, S.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.

    1986-07-01

    Impurity studies in L- and H-mode discharges in PBX have shown that both types of discharges can evolve into either an impurity accumulative or nonaccumulative case. In a typical accumulative discharge, Zeff peaks in the center to values of about 5. The central metallic densities can be high, n/sub met//n/sub e/ approx. = 0.01, resulting in central radiated power densities in excess of 1 W/cm/sup 3/, consistent with bolometric estimates. The radial profiles of metals obtained independently from the line radiation in the soft x-ray and the VUV regions are very peaked. Concurrent with the peaking, an increase in the impurity influx coming from the edge of the plasma is observed. At the beginning of the accumulation phase the inward particle flux for titanium has values of 6 x 10/sup 10/ and 10 x 10/sup 10/ particles/cm/sup 2/s at minor radii of 6 and 17 cm. At the end of the accumulation phase, this particle flux is strongly increased to values of 3 x 10/sup 12/ and 1 x 10/sup 12/ particles/cm/sup 2/s. This increased flux is mainly due to influx from the edge of the plasma and to a lesser extent due to increased convective transport. Using the measured particle flux, an estimate of the diffusion coefficient D and the convective velocity v is obtained.

  14. Microstructural effects on fracture toughness of polycrystalline ceramics in combined mode I and mode II loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, D.; Shetty, D. K.

    1988-01-01

    Fracture toughness of polycrystalline alumina and ceria partially-stabilized tetragonal zirconia (CeO2-TZP) ceramics were assessed in combined mode I and mode II loading using precracked disk specimens in diametral compression. Stress states ranging from pure mode I, combined mode I and mode II, and pure mode II were obtained by aligning the center crack at specific angles relative to the loading diameter. The resulting mixed-mode fracture toughness envelope showed significant deviation to higher fracture toughness in mode II relative to the predictions of the linear elastic fracture mechanics theory. Critical comparison with corresponding results on soda-lime glass and fracture surface observations showed that crack surface resistance arising from grain interlocking and abrasion was the main source of the increased fracture toughness in mode II loading of the polycrystalline ceramics. The normalized fracture toughness for pure mode II loading, (KII/KIc), increased with increasing grain size for the CeO2-TZP ceramics. Quantitative fractography confirmed an increased percentage of transgranular fracture of the grains in mode II loading.

  15. Whispering gallery mode sensors

    PubMed Central

    Foreman, Matthew R.; Swaim, Jon D.; Vollmer, Frank

    2015-01-01

    We present a comprehensive overview of sensor technology exploiting optical whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonances. After a short introduction we begin by detailing the fundamental principles and theory of WGMs in optical microcavities and the transduction mechanisms frequently employed for sensing purposes. Key recent theoretical contributions to the modeling and analysis of WGM systems are highlighted. Subsequently we review the state of the art of WGM sensors by outlining efforts made to date to improve current detection limits. Proposals in this vein are numerous and range, for example, from plasmonic enhancements and active cavities to hybrid optomechanical sensors, which are already working in the shot noise limited regime. In parallel to furthering WGM sensitivity, efforts to improve the time resolution are beginning to emerge. We therefore summarize the techniques being pursued in this vein. Ultimately WGM sensors aim for real-world applications, such as measurements of force and temperature, or alternatively gas and biosensing. Each such application is thus reviewed in turn, and important achievements are discussed. Finally, we adopt a more forward-looking perspective and discuss the outlook of WGM sensors within both a physical and biological context and consider how they may yet push the detection envelope further. PMID:26973759

  16. Dynamically accumulated dose and 4D accumulated dose for moving tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Li Heng; Li Yupeng; Zhang Xiaodong; Li Xiaoqiang; Liu Wei; Gillin, Michael T.; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to investigate the relationship between dynamically accumulated dose (dynamic dose) and 4D accumulated dose (4D dose) for irradiation of moving tumors, and to quantify the dose uncertainty induced by tumor motion. Methods: The authors established that regardless of treatment modality and delivery properties, the dynamic dose will converge to the 4D dose, instead of the 3D static dose, after multiple deliveries. The bounds of dynamic dose, or the maximum estimation error using 4D or static dose, were established for the 4D and static doses, respectively. Numerical simulations were performed (1) to prove the principle that for each phase, after multiple deliveries, the average number of deliveries for any given time converges to the total number of fractions (K) over the number of phases (N); (2) to investigate the dose difference between the 4D and dynamic doses as a function of the number of deliveries for deliveries of a 'pulsed beam'; and (3) to investigate the dose difference between 4D dose and dynamic doses as a function of delivery time for deliveries of a 'continuous beam.' A Poisson model was developed to estimate the mean dose error as a function of number of deliveries or delivered time for both pulsed beam and continuous beam. Results: The numerical simulations confirmed that the number of deliveries for each phase converges to K/N, assuming a random starting phase. Simulations for the pulsed beam and continuous beam also suggested that the dose error is a strong function of the number of deliveries and/or total deliver time and could be a function of the breathing cycle, depending on the mode of delivery. The Poisson model agrees well with the simulation. Conclusions: Dynamically accumulated dose will converge to the 4D accumulated dose after multiple deliveries, regardless of treatment modality. Bounds of the dynamic dose could be determined using quantities derived from 4D doses, and the mean dose difference

  17. Micron Accurate Absolute Ranging System: Range Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smalley, Larry L.; Smith, Kely L.

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to investigate Fresnel diffraction as a means of obtaining absolute distance measurements with micron or greater accuracy. It is believed that such a system would prove useful to the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) as a non-intrusive, non-contact measuring system for use with secondary concentrator station-keeping systems. The present research attempts to validate past experiments and develop ways to apply the phenomena of Fresnel diffraction to micron accurate measurement. This report discusses past research on the phenomena, and the basis of the use Fresnel diffraction distance metrology. The apparatus used in the recent investigations, experimental procedures used, preliminary results are discussed in detail. Continued research and equipment requirements on the extension of the effective range of the Fresnel diffraction systems is also described.

  18. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/article/001225.htm Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (formerly known as Hallervorden-Spatz disease) is ...

  19. Revisiting Modes of energy generation in sulfate reducing bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Joachimiak, Marcin; Chakraborty, Romy; Zhou, Aifen; Fortney, Julian; Geller, Jil; Wall, Judy; Zhou, Jizhong; Arkin, Adam; Hazen, Terry; Keasling, Jay; Chhabra, Swapnil

    2010-05-17

    Sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) play an important role in global sulfur and carbon cycling through their ability to completely mineralize organic matter while respiring sulfate to hydrogen sulfide. They are ubiquitous in anaerobic environments and have the ability to reduce toxic metals like Cr(VI) and U(VI). While SRB have been studied for over three decades, bioenergetic modes of this group of microbes are poorly understood. Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough (DvH) has served as a model SRB over the last decade with the accumulation of transcriptomic, proteomic and metabolic data under a wide variety of stressors. To further investigate the three hypothesized modes of energy generation in this anaerobe we conducted a systematic study involving multiple electron donor and acceptor combinations for growth. DvH was grown at 37oC in a defined medium with (a) lactate + thiosulfate, (b) lactate + sulfite (c) lactate + sulfate, (d) pyruvate + sulfate, (e) H2 + acetate + sulfate, (f) formate + acetate + sulfate, g) formate + sulfate and (h) pyruvate fermentation. Cells were harvested at mid-log phase of growth for all conditions for transcriptomics, when the optical density at 600nm was in the range 0.42-0.5. Initial results indicate that cells grown on lactate do not appear to significantly differentiate their gene expression profiles when presented with different electron acceptors. These profiles however differ significantly from those observed during growth with other electron donors such as H2 and formate, as well as during fermentative growth. Together the gene expression changes in the presence of different electron donors provide insights into the ability of DvH to differentially reduce metals such as Cr(VI). Here we present revised modes of energy generation in DvH in light of this new transcriptomic evidence.

  20. Wave Forced Normal Modes on Fringing Reefs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pequignet, A. N.; Becker, J. M.; Merrifield, M. M.; Aucan, J.

    2008-12-01

    In an effort to assess wave-driven coastal inundation at the shoreline of fringing reefs, pressure and current observations were collected at reefs on Guam (Ipan) and Oahu, Hawaii (Mokuleia) as part of the PILOT (Pacific Island Land-Ocean Typhoon) experiment. Similar to dissipative sandy beaches, nearshore surface elevation at both reefs is dominated by energy in the infragravity frequency band. Coherent infragravity oscillations across the reef tend to occur at discrete frequencies and with standing wave cross-shore structures that are consistent with open basin resonant modes. The modes are forced by swell wave groups, similar to a time-dependent setup. The resonant modes are most apparent during energetic wave events, in part because wave setup over the reef increases the low mode resonant frequencies to a range that is conducive to wave group forcing. Evidence of the excitation of resonant modes during tropical storm Man-Yi at Ipan, Guam is presented.

  1. Automatic range selector

    DOEpatents

    McNeilly, Clyde E.

    1977-01-04

    A device is provided for automatically selecting from a plurality of ranges of a scale of values to which a meter may be made responsive, that range which encompasses the value of an unknown parameter. A meter relay indicates whether the unknown is of greater or lesser value than the range to which the meter is then responsive. The rotatable part of a stepping relay is rotated in one direction or the other in response to the indication from the meter relay. Various positions of the rotatable part are associated with particular scales. Switching means are sensitive to the position of the rotatable part to couple the associated range to the meter.

  2. Strain Accumulation in Montenegro Using GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatovic, B.; Vucic, L.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Anastasio, E.; Selvaggi, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of GPS measurements collected from continuous stations belonging to networks deployed for both sceintific and societal purposes. The area is particularly interesting in relationship with the large Mw 7.1 earthquake that affected the Montenegro coastal areas in 1979 and the large uncertainties associated with recurrence times of large events and the present-day rate of strain accumulation. The dataset from the MEPOS (Montenegro), MONTEPOS (Montenegro), AGROS (Serbia) and MAKPOS (Macedonia) networks, combined with data from the RING (http://ring.gm.ingv.it) and other continuous GPS networks in the Mediterranean, Eurasian and African regions, has been analyzed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software package and the precise point positioning method [Zumberge et al., 1997]. Carrier phase ambiguities have been successfully resolved across the entire network using an algorithm based on a fixed-point theorem that closely approximates a full-network resolution [Blewitt, 2008]. Satellite orbit and clock parameters, and daily coordinate transformation parameters into ITRF2005 were provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ITRF2005 positions were transformed into an Eurasia fixed reference frame by performing daily transformations into a frame that is defined by minimizing the horizontal velocities of 30 stations across the stable part of the Eurasian continent (away from areas affected by glacial isostatic adjustments). Common mode errors for this continental scale frame are further reduced by including an additional 60 stations as far away as Iceland, Eastern Eurasia, and Africa in a daily spatial (7 parameters) filter [D'Anastasio et al., 2008]. We estimate velocities from the continuous GPS time-series using the CATS software package [Williams, 2003] while accounting for annual and semi-annual constituents, simultaneously estimating rate uncertainties given the assumption that the error model is dominated by

  3. Long-Range Reactive Dynamics in Myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, J. Timothy; Durbin, Stephen M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Wharton, David C.; Champion, Paul M.; Hession, Philip; Sutter, John; Alp, E. Ercan

    2001-05-01

    We report the complete vibrational spectrum of the probe nucleus 57Fe at the oxygen-binding site of the protein myoglobin. The Fe-pyrrole nitrogen stretching modes of the heme group, identified here, probe asymmetric interactions with the protein environment. Collective oscillations of the polypeptide, rather than localized heme vibrations, dominate the low frequency region. We conclude that the heme 'doming' mode is significantly delocalized, so that distant sites respond to oxygen binding on vibrational time scales. This has ramifications for understanding long-range interactions in biomolecules, such as those that mediate cooperativity in allosteric proteins.

  4. Long-Range Reactive Dynamics in Myoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Sage, J. Timothy; Durbin, Stephen M.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Wharton, David C.; Champion, Paul M.; Hession, Philip; Sutter, John; Alp, E. Ercan

    2001-05-21

    We report the complete vibrational spectrum of the probe nucleus {sup 57}Fe at the oxygen-binding site of the protein myoglobin. The Fe-pyrrole nitrogen stretching modes of the heme group, identified here, probe asymmetric interactions with the protein environment. Collective oscillations of the polypeptide, rather than localized heme vibrations, dominate the low frequency region. We conclude that the heme ''doming'' mode is significantly delocalized, so that distant sites respond to oxygen binding on vibrational time scales. This has ramifications for understanding long-range interactions in biomolecules, such as those that mediate cooperativity in allosteric proteins.

  5. Model for the incorporation of plant detritus within clastic accumulating interdistributary bays

    SciTech Connect

    Gastaldo, R.A.; McCarroll, S.M.; Douglass, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    Plant-bearing clastic lithologies interpreted as interdistributary bay deposits are reported from rocks Devonian to Holocene in age. Often, these strata preserve accumulations of discrete, laterally continuous leaf beds or coaly horizons. Investigations within two modern inter-distributary bays in the lower delta plain of the Mobile Delta, Alabama have provided insight into the phytotaphonomic processes responsible for the generation of carbonaceous lithologies, coaly horizons and laterally continuous leaf beds. Delvan and Chacalooche Bays lie adjacent to the Tensaw River distributary channel and differ in the mode of clastic and plant detrital accumulation. Delvan Bay, lying west of the distributary channel, is accumulating detritus solely by overbank deposition. Chacaloochee Bay, lying east of the channel, presently is accumulating detritus by active crevasse-splay activity. Plant detritus is accumulating as transported assemblages in both bays, but the mode of preservation differs. In Delvan Bay, the organic component is highly degraded and incorporated within the clastic component resulting in a carbonaceous silt. Little identifiable plant detritus can be recovered. On the other hand, the organic component in Chacaloochee Bay is accumulating in locally restricted allochthonous peat deposits up to 2 m in thickness, and discrete leaf beds generated by flooding events. In addition, autochthonous plant accumulations occur on subaerially and aerially exposed portions of the crevasse. The resultant distribution of plant remains is a complicated array of transported and non-transported organics.

  6. Ectoine accumulation in Brevibacterium epidermis.

    PubMed

    Onraedt, Annelies; De Muynck, Cassandra; Walcarius, Bart; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2004-10-01

    As a halotolerant bacterial species, Brevibacterium epidermis DSM 20659 can grow at relatively high salinity, tolerating up to 2 M NaCl. It synthesizes ectoine and the intracellular content increases with the medium salinity, with a maximum of 0.14 g ectoine/g CDW at 1 M NaCl. Sugar-stressed cells do not synthesize ectoine. Ectoine synthesis is also affected by the presence of external osmolytes. Added betaine is taken up and completely replaced ectoine, while L-proline is only temporarily accumulated after which ectoine is synthesized. The strain can metabolize ectoine; L-glutamate is a better carbon source for ectoine synthesis than L-aspartate.

  7. 3-D Mixed Mode Delamination Fracture Criteria - An Experimentalist's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    2006-01-01

    Many delamination failure criteria based on fracture toughness have been suggested over the past few decades, but most only covered the region containing mode I and mode II components of loading because that is where toughness data existed. With new analysis tools, more 3D analyses are being conducted that capture a mode III component of loading. This has increased the need for a fracture criterion that incorporates mode III loading. The introduction of a pure mode III fracture toughness test has also produced data on which to base a full 3D fracture criterion. In this paper, a new framework for visualizing 3D fracture criteria is introduced. The common 2D power law fracture criterion was evaluated to produce unexpected predictions with the introduction of mode III and did not perform well in the critical high mode I region. Another 2D criterion that has been shown to model a wide range of materials well was used as the basis for a new 3D criterion. The new criterion is based on assumptions that the relationship between mode I and mode III toughness is similar to the relation between mode I and mode II and that a linear interpolation can be used between mode II and mode III. Until mixed-mode data exists with a mode III component of loading, 3D fracture criteria cannot be properly evaluated, but these assumptions seem reasonable.

  8. Failure modes in surface micromachined microelectromechanical actuators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, S.L.; Rodgers, M.S.; LaVigne, G.; Sniegowski, J.J.; Clews, P.; Tanner, D.M.; Peterson, K.A.

    1998-03-01

    In order for the rapidly emerging field of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS) to meet its extraordinary expectations regarding commercial impact, issues pertaining to how they fail must be understood. The authors identify failure modes common to a broad range of MEMS actuators, including adhesion (stiction) and friction induced failures caused by improper operational methods, mechanical instabilities, and electrical instabilities. Demonstrated methods to mitigate these failure modes include implementing optimized designs, model based operational methods, and chemical surface treatments.

  9. An improved light source for laser ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamal, Karel; Richardson, Martin

    1993-01-01

    The development of a new laser material, Cr-doped LiSAF, makes possible the development of a laser source for satellite ranging systems that is more superior in performance capabilities than current Nd:YAG-based laser sources. This new material offers the potential of shorter pulses and more preferable wavelengths (850 and 425 nm) than multiwavelength Nd:YAG systems, leading to superior ranging resolution and greater detection sensitivity. We are embarking on a feasibility study of a two-wavelength, mode-locked laser system based on Cr:LiSAF, providing shorter pulses for improved ranging resolution.

  10. Distribution of whistler mode bursts at Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scarf, F. L.; Jordan, K. F.; Russell, C. T.

    1987-01-01

    Several thousand impulsive whistler mode noise bursts were detected by the Pioneer Venus wave instrument during the first 10 seasons with nightside traversals at low altitudes. The altitude distribution for these events shows that essentially all of the bursts were detected when the orbiter was less than 2000 km above the planet, suggesting that the varying plasma conditions could not maintain coherent whistler mode field-aligned guidance over greater distances. Within the 2000-km range, the distribution of the number of events versus altitude shows that there are two distinct subregions. These results are interpreted in terms of two types of whistler mode propagation from sources below the ionosphere.

  11. Range Scheduling Aid (RSA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, J. R.; Pulvermacher, M. K.

    1991-01-01

    Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is presented in the form of the viewgraphs. The following subject areas are covered: satellite control network; current and new approaches to range scheduling; MITRE tasking; RSA features; RSA display; constraint based analytic capability; RSA architecture; and RSA benefits.

  12. The radio luminosity function and redshift evolution of radio-mode and quasar-mode AGN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pracy, Mike

    2016-08-01

    The properties of the AGN population indicate that there are two fundamentally different accretion modes operating. In the quasar-mode, material is accreted onto the supermassive black hole via a small, thin, optically luminous accretion disc. Accretion in this mode is recognisable by emission lines in the optical spectrum. However, there is a population of AGN observable only by their radio emission and without optical emission lines. These radio-mode AGN are likely powered by radiatively inefficient accretion from a hot gas halo. I will describe the cosmic evolution of these two populations via radio luminosity functions. The radio luminosity functions are constructed from a new survey of over 4000 radio galaxies out to z=1, all with confirmed redshifts and their accretion mode classified from their optical spectra. This is 20 times larger than the only other survey used to make such a measurement. The radio-mode AGN population displays no statistically significant evolution in space density out to redshift z=1. In contrast the quasar mode AGN exhibits rapid evolution in space density, increasing by a factor of 8 over the same redshift range. The characteristic break in the radio luminosity function occurs at a significantly higher power for the quasar-mode AGN in comparison to the radio-mode AGN and we demonstrate this is consistent with the two populations representing fundamentally different accretion modes. The radio luminosity function is used to estimate the total amount of mechanical energy available for radio mode feedback as a function of redshift, and is found to be in good agreement with cosmological models and previous measurements. Again, by separating by accretion mode, the previously estimated increase in available mechanical energy per unit volume out to z=1 (approximately a factor of 2) can be attributed to the rapid evolution of the quasar-mode AGN, while for the classical radio-mode AGN the total mechanical energy output remains roughly

  13. Home range and travels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stickel, L.F.; King, John A.

    1968-01-01

    The concept of home range was expressed by Seton (1909) in the term 'home region,' which Burr (1940, 1943) clarified with a definition of home range and exemplified in a definitive study of Peromyscus in the field. Burt pointed out the ever-changing characteristics of home-range area and the consequent absence of boundaries in the usual sense--a finding verified by investigators thereafter. In the studies summarized in this paper, sizes of home ranges of Peromyscus varied within two magnitudes, approximately from 0.1 acre to ten acres, in 34 studies conducted in a variety of habitats from the seaside dunes of Florida to the Alaskan forests. Variation in sizes of home ranges was correlated with both environmental and physiological factors; with habitat it was conspicuous, both in the same and different regions. Food supply also was related to size of home range, both seasonally and in relation to habitat. Home ranges generally were smallest in winter and largest in spring, at the onset of the breeding season. Activity and size also were affected by changes in weather. Activity was least when temperatures were low and nights were bright. Effects of rainfall were variable. Sizes varied according to sex and age; young mice remained in the parents' range until they approached maturity, when they began to travel more widely. Adult males commonly had larger home ranges than females, although there were a number of exceptions. An inverse relationship between population density and size of home range was shown in several studies and probably is the usual relationship. A basic need for activity and exploration also appeared to influence size of home range. Behavior within the home range was discussed in terms of travel patterns, travels in relation to home sites and refuges, territory, and stability of size of home range. Travels within the home range consisted of repeated use of well-worn trails to sites of food, shelter, and refuge, plus more random exploratory travels

  14. Damage accumulation in neon implanted silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Oliviero, E.; Peripolli, S.; Amaral, L.; Fichtner, P. F. P.; Beaufort, M. F.; Barbot, J. F.; Donnelly, S. E.

    2006-08-15

    Damage accumulation in neon-implanted silicon with fluences ranging from 5x10{sup 14} to 5x10{sup 16} Ne cm{sup -2} has been studied in detail. As-implanted and annealed samples were investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry under channeling conditions and by transmission electron microscopy in order to quantify and characterize the lattice damage. Wavelength dispersive spectrometry was used to obtain the relative neon content stored in the matrix. Implantation at room temperature leads to the amorphization of the silicon while a high density of nanosized bubbles is observed all along the ion distribution, forming a uniform and continuous layer for implantation temperatures higher than 250 deg.C. Clusters of interstitial defects are also present in the deeper part of the layer corresponding to the end of range of ions. After annealing, the samples implanted at temperatures below 250 deg.C present a polycrystalline structure with blisters at the surface while in the other samples coarsening of bubbles occurs and nanocavities are formed together with extended defects identified as (311) defects. The results are discussed in comparison to the case of helium-implanted silicon and in the light of radiation-enhanced diffusion.

  15. Guidelines for Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    The purpose of this document is to set conditions for establishing and maintaining areas for the accumulation of hazardous waste at LBL. Areas designed for accumulation of these wastes in quantities greater than 100 kg (220 lb) per month of solid waste or 55 gallons per month of liquid waste are called Waste Accumulation Areas (WAAs). Areas designed for accumulation of wastes in smaller amounts are called Satellite Accumulation Areas (SAAs). This document provides guidelines for employee and organizational responsibilities for WAAs; constructing a WAA; storing waste in a WAA; operating and maintaining a WAA, and responding to spills in a WAA. 4 figs.

  16. New Modes of Knowing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samples, Bob

    1979-01-01

    Recounts the experiences of an education expert who learned from his Navajo Indian students that there are many modes of learning. Identifies the dominant modes as symbolic/abstract, visual, kinesthetic/integrative, and auditory; argues for the value of each. (First part of a two-part article.) (FL)

  17. Tearing Modes in Tokamaks

    SciTech Connect

    White, R. B.

    2008-05-14

    This lecture gives a basic introduction to magnetic pound elds, magnetic surface destruction, toroidal equilibrium and tearing modes in a tokamak, including the linear and nonlinear development of these modes and their modi pound cation by current drive and bootstrap current, and sawtooth oscillations and disruptions.

  18. Mode decomposition evolution equations

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang; Wei, Guo-Wei; Yang, Siyang

    2011-01-01

    Partial differential equation (PDE) based methods have become some of the most powerful tools for exploring the fundamental problems in signal processing, image processing, computer vision, machine vision and artificial intelligence in the past two decades. The advantages of PDE based approaches are that they can be made fully automatic, robust for the analysis of images, videos and high dimensional data. A fundamental question is whether one can use PDEs to perform all the basic tasks in the image processing. If one can devise PDEs to perform full-scale mode decomposition for signals and images, the modes thus generated would be very useful for secondary processing to meet the needs in various types of signal and image processing. Despite of great progress in PDE based image analysis in the past two decades, the basic roles of PDEs in image/signal analysis are only limited to PDE based low-pass filters, and their applications to noise removal, edge detection, segmentation, etc. At present, it is not clear how to construct PDE based methods for full-scale mode decomposition. The above-mentioned limitation of most current PDE based image/signal processing methods is addressed in the proposed work, in which we introduce a family of mode decomposition evolution equations (MoDEEs) for a vast variety of applications. The MoDEEs are constructed as an extension of a PDE based high-pass filter (Europhys. Lett., 59(6): 814, 2002) by using arbitrarily high order PDE based low-pass filters introduced by Wei (IEEE Signal Process. Lett., 6(7): 165, 1999). The use of arbitrarily high order PDEs is essential to the frequency localization in the mode decomposition. Similar to the wavelet transform, the present MoDEEs have a controllable time-frequency localization and allow a perfect reconstruction of the original function. Therefore, the MoDEE operation is also called a PDE transform. However, modes generated from the present approach are in the spatial or time domain and can be

  19. Zero-mode waveguides

    DOEpatents

    Levene, Michael J.; Korlach, Jonas; Turner, Stephen W.; Craighead, Harold G.; Webb, Watt W.

    2007-02-20

    The present invention is directed to a method and an apparatus for analysis of an analyte. The method involves providing a zero-mode waveguide which includes a cladding surrounding a core where the cladding is configured to preclude propagation of electromagnetic energy of a frequency less than a cutoff frequency longitudinally through the core of the zero-mode waveguide. The analyte is positioned in the core of the zero-mode waveguide and is then subjected, in the core of the zero-mode waveguide, to activating electromagnetic radiation of a frequency less than the cut-off frequency under conditions effective to permit analysis of the analyte in an effective observation volume which is more compact than if the analysis were carried out in the absence of the zero-mode waveguide.

  20. Excursions through KK modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furuuchi, Kazuyuki

    2016-07-01

    In this article we study Kaluza-Klein (KK) dimensional reduction of massive Abelian gauge theories with charged matter fields on a circle. Since local gauge transformations change position dependence of the charged fields, the decomposition of the charged matter fields into KK modes is gauge dependent. While whole KK mass spectrum is independent of the gauge choice, the mode number depends on the gauge. The masses of the KK modes also depend on the field value of the zero-mode of the extra dimensional component of the gauge field. In particular, one of the KK modes in the KK tower of each massless 5D charged field becomes massless at particular values of the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field. When the extra-dimensional component of the gauge field is identified with the inflaton, this structure leads to recursive cosmological particle productions.

  1. Nutrient-contaminant (Pu) plant accumulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A model was developed which simulates the movement and daily accumulation of nutrients and contaminants in crop plants resulting from known physiological processes in the plant. In the model, the daily contaminant accumulation is governed by daily increase in plant biomass derived from photosynthesis and by the specified thermodynamic activity of the bioavailable contaminant species in soil or hydroponic solutin. Total accumulation and resulting concentration in the plant's root, stem and branch, leaf, and reproductive compartments can be simulated any time during the growing season. Parameters were estimated from data on plutonium accumulation in soybeans and the model was calibrated against this same data set. The plutonium distribution in the plant was found to be most sensitive to parameters related to leaf accumulation. Contamination at different times during the growing season resulted in a large change in predicted leaf accumulation but very little change in predicted accumulation in other plant parts except when contamination occurred very late in the growing season.

  2. Susceptibility of riparian wetland plants to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mudumbi, J B N; Ntwampe, S K O; Muganza, M; Okonkwo, J O

    2014-01-01

    As plants have been shown to accumulate organic compounds from contaminated sediments, there is a potential for long-lasting ecological impact as a result of contaminant accumulation in riparian areas of wetlands, particularly the accumulation of non-biodegradable contaminants such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). In this study, commonly found riparian wetland plants including reeds, i.e., Xanthium strumarium, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus corymbosus, Ruppia maritime; Populus canescens, Polygonum salicifolium, Cyperus congestus; Persicaria amphibian, Ficus carica, Artemisia schmidtiana, Eichhornia crassipes, were studied to determine their susceptibility to PFOA accumulation from PFOA contaminated riparian sediment with a known PFOA concentration, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated that the plants affinity to PFOA accumulation was; E. crassipes, > P. sali-cifolium, > C. congestus, > P. x canescens, > P. amphibian, > F. carica, > A. schmidtiana, > X. strumarium,> P. australis, > R. maritime, > S. corymbosus. The concentration of PFOA in the plants and/or reeds was in the range 11.7 to 38 ng/g, with a BCF range of 0.05 to 0.37. The highest BCF was observed in sediment for which its core water had a high salinity, total organic carbon and a pH which was near neutral. As the studied plants had a higher affinity for PFOA, the resultant effect is that riparian plants such as E. crassipes, X. strumarium, and P. salicifolium, typified by a fibrous rooting system, which grow closer to the water edge, exacerbate the accumulation of PFOA in riparian wetlands.

  3. Susceptibility of riparian wetland plants to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mudumbi, J B N; Ntwampe, S K O; Muganza, M; Okonkwo, J O

    2014-01-01

    As plants have been shown to accumulate organic compounds from contaminated sediments, there is a potential for long-lasting ecological impact as a result of contaminant accumulation in riparian areas of wetlands, particularly the accumulation of non-biodegradable contaminants such as perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). In this study, commonly found riparian wetland plants including reeds, i.e., Xanthium strumarium, Phragmites australis, Schoenoplectus corymbosus, Ruppia maritime; Populus canescens, Polygonum salicifolium, Cyperus congestus; Persicaria amphibian, Ficus carica, Artemisia schmidtiana, Eichhornia crassipes, were studied to determine their susceptibility to PFOA accumulation from PFOA contaminated riparian sediment with a known PFOA concentration, using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). The bioconcentration factor (BCF) indicated that the plants affinity to PFOA accumulation was; E. crassipes, > P. sali-cifolium, > C. congestus, > P. x canescens, > P. amphibian, > F. carica, > A. schmidtiana, > X. strumarium,> P. australis, > R. maritime, > S. corymbosus. The concentration of PFOA in the plants and/or reeds was in the range 11.7 to 38 ng/g, with a BCF range of 0.05 to 0.37. The highest BCF was observed in sediment for which its core water had a high salinity, total organic carbon and a pH which was near neutral. As the studied plants had a higher affinity for PFOA, the resultant effect is that riparian plants such as E. crassipes, X. strumarium, and P. salicifolium, typified by a fibrous rooting system, which grow closer to the water edge, exacerbate the accumulation of PFOA in riparian wetlands. PMID:24933893

  4. SNOWY RANGE WILDERNESS, WYOMING.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Houston, Robert S.; Bigsby, Philip R.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Snowy Range Wilderness in Wyoming was undertaken and was followed up with more detailed geologic and geochemical surveys, culminating in diamond drilling of one hole in the Snowy Range Wilderness. No mineral deposits were identified in the Snowy Range Wilderness, but inasmuch as low-grade uranium and associated gold resources were identified in rocks similar to those of the northern Snowy Range Wilderness in an area about 5 mi northeast of the wilderness boundary, the authors conclude that the northern half of the wilderness has a probable-resource potential for uranium and gold. Closely spaced drilling would be required to completely evaluate this mineral potential. The geologic terrane precludes the occurrence of fossil fuels.

  5. Mu-2 ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, W. L.; Zygielbaum, A. I.

    1977-01-01

    The Mu-II Dual-Channel Sequential Ranging System designed as a model for future Deep Space Network ranging equipment is described. A list of design objectives is followed by a theoretical explanation of the digital demodulation techniques first employed in this machine. Hardware and software implementation are discussed, together with the details relating to the construction of the device. Two appendixes are included relating to the programming and operation of this equipment to yield the maximum scientific data.

  6. LANDSAT Range Resource Information System. [a user evaluation of green forage and rainfall accumulation maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, W. E.; Harlan, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    A series of test products were developed from LANDSAT data sets for North Central Texas that paralleled the needs of ranchers, technical personnel, and the media. The products and evaluation questionnaires were mailed to approximately 150 ranchers who had reported an interest in evaluating the information systems. In addition to the rancher group, fourteen media people and a thirty-three member group in the agri business/technical community was also chosen to receive test products. The group responses are analyzed. Examples of the test products and associated questionnaires are included.

  7. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  8. Natural radionuclide accumulation by raindrops

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Martin, Inacio; Shkevov, Rumen; Alves, Mauro

    2016-07-01

    The laboratory of environmental radiation of ITA (São José dos Campos, 23°11'11″S, 45°52'43″W, 650 MAMSL) performs simultaneous monitoring of a natural radiation background and meteorological parameters. A time resolution of up to 1 minute allows a detailed comparison of changes in meteorological parameters with those of a concentration of ambient radon progenies in the atmosphere. Results of a study of variation of a fallout of radon progenies ^{214}Pb and ^{214}Bi concomitanting rainfalls are present. The radionuclide fallout rate is reconstructed from the observed gamma rate through a simulation of the first kind Volterra integral equation with difference kernel, determined by ratio of precipitating rates of 214Pb and 214Bi and their decay half times. An original straightforward step-by-step procedure was used for the numerical solution of the equation. The radionuclide concentration in the rainwater is calculated as a ratio of the reconstructed fallout to the measured rainfall. It was observed that the radionuclide fallout rate increases as the rainfall one in approximately power 0.6, i.e. the same as the mean raindrop volume. The concentration thereafter decreases as the rainfall rate in power 0.4. A numerical simulation of the process of accumulation of the radionuclides during diffusion and coalescence drop growth and aerosol scavenging during a passage from a cloud to the ground was performed. The results of the simulations agree with the experimental data.

  9. High Precision Ranging and Range-Rate Measurements over Free-Space-Laser Communication Link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Guangning; Lu, Wei; Krainak, Michael; Sun, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    We present a high-precision ranging and range-rate measurement system via an optical-ranging or combined ranging-communication link. A complete bench-top optical communication system was built. It included a ground terminal and a space terminal. Ranging and range rate tests were conducted in two configurations. In the communication configuration with 622 data rate, we achieved a two-way range-rate error of 2 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 9 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. Ranging and range-rate as a function of Bit Error Rate of the communication link is reported. They are not sensitive to the link error rate. In the single-frequency amplitude modulation mode, we report a two-way range rate error of 0.8 microns/s, or a modified Allan deviation of 2.6 x 10 (exp -15) with 10 second averaging time. We identified the major noise sources in the current system as the transmitter modulation injected noise and receiver electronics generated noise. A new improved system will be constructed to further improve the system performance for both operating modes.

  10. New methods of generation of ultrashort laser pulses for ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jelinkova, Helena; Hamal, Karel; Kubecek, V.; Prochazka, Ivan

    1993-01-01

    To reach the millimeter satellite laser ranging accuracy, the goal for nineties, new laser ranging techniques have to be applied. To increase the laser ranging precision, the application of the ultrashort laser pulses in connection with the new signal detection and processing techniques, is inevitable. The two wavelength laser ranging is one of the ways to measure the atmospheric dispersion to improve the existing atmospheric correction models and hence, to increase the overall system ranging accuracy to the desired value. We are presenting a review of several nonstandard techniques of ultrashort laser pulses generation, which may be utilized for laser ranging: compression of the nanosecond pulses using stimulated Brillouin and Raman backscattering; compression of the mode-locked pulses using Raman backscattering; passive mode-locking technique with nonlinear mirror; and passive mode-locking technique with the negative feedback.

  11. Laser Ranging Simulation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piazolla, Sabino; Hemmati, Hamid; Tratt, David

    2003-01-01

    Laser Ranging Simulation Program (LRSP) is a computer program that predicts selected aspects of the performances of a laser altimeter or other laser ranging or remote-sensing systems and is especially applicable to a laser-based system used to map terrain from a distance of several kilometers. Designed to run in a more recent version (5 or higher) of the MATLAB programming language, LRSP exploits the numerical and graphical capabilities of MATLAB. LRSP generates a graphical user interface that includes a pop-up menu that prompts the user for the input of data that determine the performance of a laser ranging system. Examples of input data include duration and energy of the laser pulse, the laser wavelength, the width of the laser beam, and several parameters that characterize the transmitting and receiving optics, the receiving electronic circuitry, and the optical properties of the atmosphere and the terrain. When the input data have been entered, LRSP computes the signal-to-noise ratio as a function of range, signal and noise currents, and ranging and pointing errors.

  12. Evaluation of size segregation of elemental carbon emission in Europe: influence on atmospheric long-range transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Cheng, Y. F.; Nordmann, S.; Birmili, W.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Ma, N.; Wolke, R.; Wehner, B.; Sun, J.; Spindler, G.; Mu, Q.; Pöschl, U.; Su, H.; Wiedensohler, A.

    2015-11-01

    Elemental Carbon (EC) has significant impact on human health and climate change. In order to evaluate the size segregation of EC emission and investigation of its influence on atmospheric transport processes in Europe, we used the fully coupled online Weather Research and Forecasting/Chemistry model (WRF-Chem) at a resolution of 2 km focusing on a region in Germany, in conjunction with a high-resolution EC emission inventory. The ground meteorology conditions, vertical structure and wind pattern were well reproduced by the model. The simulations of particle number/mass size distributions were evaluated by observations taken at the central European background site Melpitz. The fine mode aerosol was reasonably well simulated, but the coarse mode was substantially overestimated by the model. We found that it was mainly due to the nearby point source plume emitting a high amount of EC in the coarse mode. The comparisons between simulated EC and Multi-angle Absorption Photometers (MAAP) measurements at Melpitz, Leipzig-TROPOS and Bösel indicated that coarse mode EC (ECc) emission in the nearby point sources might be overestimated by a factor of 2-10. The emission fraction of EC in coarse mode was overestimated by about 10-30 % for Russian and 5-10 % for Eastern Europe (e.g.: Poland and Belarus), respectively. This overestimation in ECc emission fraction makes EC particles having less opportunity to accumulate in the atmosphere and participate to the long range transport, due to the shorter lifetime of coarse mode aerosol. The deposition concept model showed that the transported EC mass from Warsaw and Moskva to Melpitz may be reduced by 25-35 and 25-55 % respectively, due to the overestimation of ECc emission fraction. This may partly explain the underestimation of EC concentrations for Germany under eastern wind pattern in some other modelling research.

  13. Range resolved lidar for long distance ranging with sub-millimeter resolution.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Nguyen, Dat; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Yilmaz, Tolga; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Ozharar, Sarper; Delfyett, Peter J

    2010-03-29

    A lidar technique employing temporally stretched, frequency chirped pulses from a 20 MHz mode locked laser is presented. Sub-millimeter resolution at a target range of 10.1 km (in fiber) is observed. A pulse tagging scheme based on phase modulation is demonstrated for range resolved measurements. A carrier to noise ratio of 30 dB is observed at an unambiguous target distance of 30 meters in fiber.

  14. Critical configurations (determinantal loci) for range and range difference satellite networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsimis, E.

    1973-01-01

    The observational modes of Geometric Satellite Geodesy are discussed. The geometrical analysis of the problem yielded a regression model for the adjustment of the observations along with a suitable and convenient metric for the least-squares criterion. The determinantal loci (critical configurations) for range networks are analyzed. An attempt is made to apply elements of the theory of variants for this purpose. The use of continuously measured range differences for loci determination is proposed.

  15. Range resolved lidar for long distance ranging with sub-millimeter resolution.

    PubMed

    Piracha, Mohammad Umar; Nguyen, Dat; Mandridis, Dimitrios; Yilmaz, Tolga; Ozdur, Ibrahim; Ozharar, Sarper; Delfyett, Peter J

    2010-03-29

    A lidar technique employing temporally stretched, frequency chirped pulses from a 20 MHz mode locked laser is presented. Sub-millimeter resolution at a target range of 10.1 km (in fiber) is observed. A pulse tagging scheme based on phase modulation is demonstrated for range resolved measurements. A carrier to noise ratio of 30 dB is observed at an unambiguous target distance of 30 meters in fiber. PMID:20389739

  16. Holographic thermalization with initial long range correlation

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Shu

    2016-01-19

    Here, we studied the evolution of the Wightman correlator in a thermalizing state modeled by AdS3-Vaidya background. A prescription was given for calculating the Wightman correlator in coordinate space without using any approximation. For equal-time correlator , we obtained an enhancement factor v2 due to long range correlation present in the initial state. This was missed by previous studies based on geodesic approximation. Moreover, we found that the long range correlation in initial state does not lead to significant modification to thermalization time as compared to known results with generic initial state. We also studied the spatially integrated Wightman correlatormore » and showed evidence on the distinction between long distance and small momentum physics for an out-of-equilibrium state. We also calculated the radiation spectrum of particles weakly coupled to O and found that lower frequency mode approaches thermal spectrum faster than high frequency mode.« less

  17. Reconfigurable laser ranging instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneiter, John

    1994-03-01

    This paper describes the design and operation of a fast, flexible, non-contact, eye-safe laser ranging instrument useful in a variety of industrial metrology situations, such as in-process machining control and part inspection. The system has variable computer-controlled standoff and depth of field, and can obtain 3-D images of surfaces within a range of from 1.5 ft to almost 10 ft from the final optical element. The minimum depth of field is about 3.5 in. at 1.5 ft and about 26 in. at the far range. The largest depth of field for which useful data are available is about 41 in. Resolution, with appropriate averaging, is about one part in 4000 of the depth of field, which implies a best case resolution for this prototype of 0.00075 in. System flexibility is achieved by computer controlled relative positioning of optical components.

  18. The range scheduling aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbfinger, Eliezer M.; Smith, Barry D.

    1991-01-01

    The Air Force Space Command schedules telemetry, tracking and control activities across the Air Force Satellite Control network. The Range Scheduling Aid (RSA) is a rapid prototype combining a user-friendly, portable, graphical interface with a sophisticated object-oriented database. The RSA has been a rapid prototyping effort whose purpose is to elucidate and define suitable technology for enhancing the performance of the range schedulers. Designing a system to assist schedulers in their task and using their current techniques as well as enhancements enabled by an electronic environment, has created a continuously developing model that will serve as a standard for future range scheduling systems. The RSA system is easy to use, easily ported between platforms, fast, and provides a set of tools for the scheduler that substantially increases his productivity.

  19. The electron geodesic acoustic mode

    SciTech Connect

    Chakrabarti, N.; Kaw, P. K.

    2012-09-15

    In this report, a novel new mode, named the electron geodesic acoustic mode, is presented. This mode can occur in toroidal plasmas like the conventional geodesic acoustic mode (GAM). The frequency of this new mode is much larger than that of the conventional GAM by a factor equal to the square root of the ion to electron mass ratio.

  20. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. PMID:26560353

  1. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads. PMID:26560353

  2. No Accumulation of Transposable Elements in Asexual Arthropods.

    PubMed

    Bast, Jens; Schaefer, Ina; Schwander, Tanja; Maraun, Mark; Scheu, Stefan; Kraaijeveld, Ken

    2016-03-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) and other repetitive DNA can accumulate in the absence of recombination, a process contributing to the degeneration of Y-chromosomes and other nonrecombining genome portions. A similar accumulation of repetitive DNA is expected for asexually reproducing species, given their entire genome is effectively nonrecombining. We tested this expectation by comparing the whole-genome TE loads of five asexual arthropod lineages and their sexual relatives, including asexual and sexual lineages of crustaceans (Daphnia water fleas), insects (Leptopilina wasps), and mites (Oribatida). Surprisingly, there was no evidence for increased TE load in genomes of asexual as compared to sexual lineages, neither for all classes of repetitive elements combined nor for specific TE families. Our study therefore suggests that nonrecombining genomes do not accumulate TEs like nonrecombining genomic regions of sexual lineages. Even if a slight but undetected increase of TEs were caused by asexual reproduction, it appears to be negligible compared to variance between species caused by processes unrelated to reproductive mode. It remains to be determined if molecular mechanisms underlying genome regulation in asexuals hamper TE activity. Alternatively, the differences in TE dynamics between nonrecombining genomes in asexual lineages versus nonrecombining genome portions in sexual species might stem from selection for benign TEs in asexual lineages because of the lack of genetic conflict between TEs and their hosts and/or because asexual lineages may only arise from sexual ancestors with particularly low TE loads.

  3. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the work of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR). NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). Maps show the general location of the WATR area that is used for aeronautical testing and evaluation. The products, services and facilities of WATR are discussed,

  4. Himalayan Mountain Range, India

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Snow is present the year round in most of the high Himalaya Mountain Range (33.0N, 76.5E). In this view taken at the onset of winter, the continuous snow line can be seen for hundreds of miles along the south face of the range in the Indian states of Punjab and Kashmir. The snow line is at about 12,000 ft. altitude but the deep Cenab River gorge is easily delineated as a break along the south edge of the snow covered mountains. '

  5. Satellite Laser Ranging operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, Michael R.

    1994-01-01

    Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) is currently providing precision orbit determination for measurements of: 1) Ocean surface topography from satellite borne radar altimetry, 2) Spatial and temporal variations of the gravity field, 3) Earth and ocean tides, 4) Plate tectonic and regional deformation, 5) Post-glacial uplift and subsidence, 6) Variations in the Earth's center-of-mass, and 7) Variations in Earth rotation. SLR also supports specialized programs in time transfer and classical geodetic positioning, and will soon provide precision ranging to support experiments in relativity.

  6. Satellite laser ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osorio, J. P.

    1992-03-01

    Laser ranging to satellites is one of the most precise methods for positio ning on the surface of the Earth. Reference is made to the need for precise posi tioning and to the improvement brought by the use of space techniques. Satellite Laser Ranging system is then described and in view of the high precision of the results derived from its measurements comments are made to some of the more important applications: high precision networks tectonic plate motion polar motion and earth''s rotation. Finally plans for system improvement in the near future are also presented.

  7. Supersymmetric mode converters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Matthias; Miri, Mohammad-Ali; Stützer, Simon; Nolte, Stefan; Szameit, Alexander; Christodoulides, Demetrios N.

    2015-08-01

    In recent years, the ever-increasing demand for high-capacity transmission systems has driven remarkable advances in technologies that encode information on an optical signal. Mode-division multiplexing makes use of individual modes supported by an optical waveguide as mutually orthogonal channels. The key requirement in this approach is the capability to selectively populate and extract specific modes. Optical supersymmetry (SUSY) has recently been proposed as a particularly elegant way to resolve this design challenge in a manner that is inherently scalable, and at the same time maintains compatibility with existing multiplexing strategies. Supersymmetric partners of multimode waveguides are characterized by the fact that they share all of their effective indices with the original waveguide. The crucial exception is the fundamental mode, which is absent from the spectrum of the partner waveguide. Here, we demonstrate experimentally how this global phase-matching property can be exploited for efficient mode conversion. Multimode structures and their superpartners are experimentally realized in coupled networks of femtosecond laser-written waveguides, and the corresponding light dynamics are directly observed by means of fluorescence microscopy. We show that SUSY transformations can readily facilitate the removal of the fundamental mode from multimode optical structures. In turn, hierarchical sequences of such SUSY partners naturally implement the conversion between modes of adjacent order. Our experiments illustrate just one of the many possibilities of how SUSY may serve as a building block for integrated mode-division multiplexing arrangements. Supersymmetric notions may enrich and expand integrated photonics by versatile optical components and desirable, yet previously unattainable, functionalities.

  8. Mode Gaussian beam tracing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trofimov, M. Yu.; Zakharenko, A. D.; Kozitskiy, S. B.

    2016-10-01

    A mode parabolic equation in the ray centered coordinates for 3D underwater sound propagation is developed. The Gaussian beam tracing in this case is constructed. The test calculations are carried out for the ASA wedge benchmark and proved an excellent agreement with the source images method in the case of cross-slope propagation. But in the cases of wave propagation at some angles to the cross-slope direction an account of mode interaction becomes necessary.

  9. Range-balancing the Large Binocular Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakich, A.; Thompson, D.; Kuhn, O. P.

    2011-10-01

    The Large Binocular Telescope (LBT) consists of two 8.4 m telescopes mounted on a common alt-az gimbal. The telescope has various modes of operation, including prime-focus, bent- and direct-Gregorian modes. The telescopes can feed independent instruments or their light can be combined in one of two interferometric instruments, giving an interferometric baseline of over 22 m. With all large telescopes, including the LBT, collimation models or modeled values for hexapod positions, are required to maintain reasonable optical alignment over the working range of temperatures and telescope elevations. Unlike other telescopes, the LBT has a highly asymmetric mechanical structure, and as a result the collimation models are required to do a lot more "work", than on an equivalent aperture monocular telescope that are usually designed to incorporate a Serurrier truss arrangement. LBT has been phasing in science operations over the last 5 years, with first light on the prime-focus cameras in 2006, and first light in Gregorian mode in 2008. In this time the generation of collimation models for LBT has proven to be problematic, with large departures from a given model, and large changes in pointing, being the norm. A refined approach to generating collimation models, "range balancing", has greatly improved this situation. The range-balancing approach to generating collimation models has delivered reliable collimation and pointing in both prime focus and Gregorian modes which has led to greatly increased operational efficiency. The details of the range-balancing approach, involving the removal of pointing "contamination" from collimation data, are given in this paper.

  10. Slow Modes in Convecting Liquid Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurnou, J. M.; Ribeiro, A.; Calkins, M. A.; Julien, K. A.

    2015-12-01

    Slow, large-scale magnetostrophic wave modes are expected to develop in rapidly-rotating magnetohydrodynamic systems. These slow modes arise due to a leading order balance between Coriolis and Lorentz forces, with negligible effects of fluid inertia. Such slow modes have long been argued to be the primary cause of the long period (e.g., century-scale) variations in observations of the geomagnetic field. Yet, to date, such slow modes have yet to develop in global-scale numerical models of planetary dynamo action. Here we present the results of closely coupled laboratory-numerical simulations of rapidly rotating magnetoconvection in liquid gallium, in which we find strong evidence for slow modes developing near, as well as beyond, the onset of convection. Preliminary results from an associated survey of numerical simulations are allowing us to determine under what range of conditions slow convective modes exist. Thus far, it appears they develop only in low Prandtl number fluids, in which the thermal diffusivity significantly exceeds the viscous diffusivity, as occurs in liquid metals. Our findings suggest more metal-like fluid properties are necessary for the development of slow modes in convection-driven global-scale dynamo models.

  11. RADIO RANGING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Bogle, R.W.

    1960-11-22

    A description is given of a super-regenerative oscillator ranging device provided with radiating and receiving means and being capable of indicating the occurrence of that distance between itself and a reflecting object which so phases the received echo of energy of a preceding emitted oscillation that the intervals between oscillations become uniform.

  12. Agriculture, forest, and range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    The findings and recommendations of the panel for developing a satellite remote-sensing global information system in the next decade are reported. User requirements were identified in five categories: (1) cultivated crops, (2) land resources, (3)water resources, (4)forest management, and (5) range management. The benefits from the applications of satellite data are discussed.

  13. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crea, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    In the area of crop specie identification, it has been found that temporal data analysis, preliminary stratification, and unequal probability analysis were several of the factors that contributed to high identification accuracies. Single data set accuracies on fields of greater than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) are in the 70- to 90-percent range; however, with the use of temporal data, accuracies of 95 percent have been reported. Identification accuracy drops off significantly on areas of less than 80,000 sq m (20 acres) as does measurement accuracy. Forest stratification into coniferous and deciduous areas has been accomplished to a 90- to 95-percent accuracy level. Using multistage sampling techniques, the timber volume of a national forest district has been estimated to a confidence level and standard deviation acceptable to the Forest Service at a very favorable cost-benefit time ratio. Range specie/plant community vegetation mapping has been accomplished at various levels of success (69- to 90-percent accuracy). However, several investigators have obtained encouraging initial results in range biomass (forage production) estimation and range readiness predictions. Soil association map correction and soil association mapping in new area appear to have been proven feasible on large areas; however, testing in a complex soil area should be undertaken.

  14. Agriculture, forestry, range resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdonald, R. B.

    1974-01-01

    The necessary elements to perform global inventories of agriculture, forestry, and range resources are being brought together through the use of satellites, sensors, computers, mathematics, and phenomenology. Results of ERTS-1 applications in these areas, as well as soil mapping, are described.

  15. Institutional Long Range Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell Community Coll. and Technical Inst., Lenoir, NC.

    Long-range institutional planning has been in effect at Caldwell Community College and Technical Institute since 1973. The first step in the process was the identification of planning areas: administration, organization, educational programs, learning resources, student services, faculty, facilities, maintenance/operation, and finances. The major…

  16. STDN ranging equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. E.

    1975-01-01

    Final results of the Spaceflight Tracking and Data Network (STDN) Ranging Equipment program are summarized. Basic design concepts and final design approaches are described. Theoretical analyses which define requirements and support the design approaches are presented. Design verification criteria are delineated and verification test results are specified.

  17. Laser ranging data analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Center for Space Research efforts have focused on the near real-time analysis of Lageos laser ranging data and on the production of predictive ephemerides. The data are analyzed in terms of range bias, time bias, and internal precision, and estimates for the Earth orientation parameters X(sub p), Y(sub p) and UT1 are obtained. The results of these analyses are reported in a variety of formats. In addition several additional stations began sending not only quick-look observations but also normal points created on-site with new software. These normal points are transmitted in a new standard format different from either current quick-look or MERIT-II full-rate formats. Thus new preprocessing software was written and successfully tested on these data. Inspection of the Bendix produced Lageos full-rate normal points continued, with detailed analyses and filtering of all 1991 A and B release normal points for Lageos through the beginning of 1992. A summary of the combined full-rate and quick-look normal point data set created for 1991 is provided. New long-term ephemerides for Lageos satellite, as well as for Etalon-1 and Etalon-2 (the so-called high satellites used for laser ranging) were produced and distributed to the network stations in cooperation with the Crustal Dynamics Project and Eurolas. These predictions are used by essentially every laser ranging site obtaining regular returns from any of these three satellites.

  18. Front Range Branch Officers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Front Range Branch of AGU has installed officers for 1990: Ray Noble, National Center for Atmospheric Research, chair; Sherry Oaks, U.S. Geological Survey, chair-elect; Howard Garcia, NOAA, treasurer; Catharine Skokan, Colorado School of Mines, secretary. JoAnn Joselyn of NOAA is past chair. Members at large are Wallace Campbell, NOAA; William Neff, USGS; and Stephen Schneider, NCAR.

  19. Fact Sheet: Range Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornelson, C.; Fretter, E.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Ames has a long tradition in leadership with the use of ballistic ranges and shock tubes for the purpose of studying the physics and phenomena associated with hypervelocity flight. Cutting-edge areas of research run the gamut from aerodynamics, to impact physics, to flow-field structure and chemistry. This legacy of testing began in the NACA era of the 1940's with the Supersonic Free Flight Tunnel, and evolved dramatically up through the late 1950s with the pioneering work in the Ames Hypersonic Ballistic Range. The tradition continued in the mid-60s with the commissioning of the three newest facilities: the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) in 1964, the Hypervelocity Free Flight Facility (HFFF) in 1965 and the Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) in 1966. Today the Range Complex continues to provide unique and critical testing in support of the Nation's programs for planetary geology and geophysics; exobiology; solar system origins; earth atmospheric entry, planetary entry, and aerobraking vehicles; and various configurations for supersonic and hypersonic aircraft.

  20. Electric vehicles: Driving range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kempton, Willett

    2016-09-01

    For uptake of electric vehicles to increase, consumers' driving-range needs must be fulfilled. Analysis of the driving patterns of personal vehicles in the US now shows that today's electric vehicles can meet all travel needs on almost 90% of days from a single overnight charge.

  1. Mobile satellite ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silverberg, E. C.

    1978-01-01

    A brief review of the constraints which have limited satellite ranging hardware and an outline of the steps which are underway to improve the status of the equipment in this area are given. In addition, some suggestions are presented for the utilization of newer instruments and for possible future research and development work in this area.

  2. Observation of the palm tree mode, a new MHD mode excited by type-I ELMs on JET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koslowski, H. R.; Alper, B.; Borba, D. N.; Eich, T.; Sharapov, S. E.; Perez, C. P.; Westerhof, E.; contributors, JET-EFDA

    2005-03-01

    A new MHD mode has been discovered during type-I ELMy H-modes in the Joint European Torus (JET) tokamak. This mode is excited by the perturbation of the edge plasma due to the edge localized mode (ELM). It is radially and poloidally well localized and has the toroidal mode number n = 1 and the poloidal mode number m = 3. The mode appears in different plasma configurations and in a wide range of global plasma parameters as long as the rational q = 3 surface is located in the ELM perturbed region. A possible explanation for the new mode is as the remnant of a magnetic island created by edge ergodization during the ELM. Consequences for the understanding of the ELM process itself are discussed.

  3. Observation of pedestal turbulence in edge localized mode-free H-mode on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, X.; Zhang, T.; Zhang, S. B.; Wang, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Liu, Z. X.; Kong, D. F.; Qu, H.; Gao, X.

    2014-10-01

    Two different pedestal turbulence structures have been observed in edge localized mode-free phase of H-mode heated by lower hybrid wave and RF wave in ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. When the fraction of ICRF power PICRF/Ptotal exceeds 0.7, coherent mode is observed. The mode is identified as an electromagnetic mode, rotating in electron diamagnetic direction with a frequency around 50 kHz and toroidal mode number n = -3. Whereas when PICRF/Ptotal is less than 0.7, harmonic mode with frequency f = 40-300 kHz appears instead. The characteristics of these two modes are demonstrated preliminarily. The threshold value of heating power and also the plasma parameters are distinct.

  4. Observation of pedestal turbulence in edge localized mode-free H-mode on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Han, X. Zhang, T.; Zhang, S. B.; Wang, Y. M.; Shi, T. H.; Liu, Z. X.; Kong, D. F.; Qu, H.; Gao, X.

    2014-10-15

    Two different pedestal turbulence structures have been observed in edge localized mode-free phase of H-mode heated by lower hybrid wave and RF wave in ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) on experimental advanced superconducting tokamak. When the fraction of ICRF power P{sub ICRF}/P{sub total} exceeds 0.7, coherent mode is observed. The mode is identified as an electromagnetic mode, rotating in electron diamagnetic direction with a frequency around 50 kHz and toroidal mode number n = −3. Whereas when P{sub ICRF}/P{sub total} is less than 0.7, harmonic mode with frequency f = 40–300 kHz appears instead. The characteristics of these two modes are demonstrated preliminarily. The threshold value of heating power and also the plasma parameters are distinct.

  5. Radar detection of surface oil accumulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, J. E.; Oneill, P.; Wilson, M.

    1980-01-01

    The United States Coast Guard is developing AIREYE, an all weather, day/night airborne surveillance system, for installation aboard future medium range surveillance aircraft. As part of this program, a series of controlled tests were conducted off southern California to evaluate the oil slick detection capabilities of two Motorola developed, side looking radars. The systems, a real aperture AN/APS-94D and a synthetic aperture coherent on receive (COR) were flown over the Santa Barbara Channel on May 19, 1976. Targets imaged during the coincident overflights included natural oil seepage, simulated oil spills, oil production platforms, piers, mooring buoys, commercial boats and barges at other targets. Based on an analysis of imagery from the coincident radar runs, COR provides better detection of natural and man made oil slicks, whereas the AN/APS-94D consistently exhibited higher surface target detection results. This and other tests have shown that active microwave systems have considerable potential for aiding in the detection and analysis of surface oil accumulations.

  6. Assessment of gas accumulation and retention -- Tank 241-SY-101

    SciTech Connect

    Alleman, R.T.; Burke, T.M.; Reynolds, D.A.; Simpson, D.E.

    1993-03-01

    An approximate analysis has been carried out to assess and estimate the maximum quantity of gas that is likely to be accumulated within waste tank 241-SY-101, and the maximum quantity which is likely to be retained after gas release events (GRE). According to the phenomenological models used for this assessment, based on interpretation of current and recent operational data, the estimated gas generation rate in the tank is approximately 4 m{sup 3}/day (147 ft{sup 3}/day). About half of this gas is released as it is generated, which is (essentially) continuously. The remainder is accumulated within the slurry layer of settled solids at the bottom of the tank, and released episodically in GREs, known as ``burps,`` that are induced by unstable buoyant conditions which develop when sufficient gas accumulates in the slurry. Calculations based on gas volumes to cause neutral buoyancy in the slurry predict the following: the maximum gas accumulation (at 1 atm pressure) that can occur without triggering a GRE is in the range of 606 to 1,039 m{sup 3} (21,400 to 36,700 ft{sup 3}); and the maximum gas retention immediately after a GRE is equal to the maximum accumulation minus the gas released in the GRE. GREs do not necessarily involve all of the slurry. In the largest GREs, which are assumed to involve all of the slurry, the minimum gas release (at 1 atm pressure) is calculated to be in the range of 193 to 328 m{sup 3} (6,800 to 11,600 ft{sup 3}). The corresponding maximum gas retention would be 413 to 711 m{sup 3} (14,600 to 25,100 ft{sup 3}).

  7. Hardware test program for evaluation of baseline range-range rate sensor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The baseline range/range rate sensor concept was evaluated. The Interrupted CW (ICW) mode of operation continued with emphasis on establishing the sensitivity of the video portion of the receiver was 7 dB less than the theoretical value. This departs from test results of previous implementations in which achieved sensitivity was within 1.5 to 2 dB of the theoretical value. Several potential causes of this discrepancy in performance were identified and are scheduled for further investigation. Results indicate that a cost savings in both per unit and program costs are realizable by eliminating one of the modes of operation. An acquisition (total program) cost savings of approximately 10% is projected by eliminating the CW mode of operation. The modified R/R sensor would operate in the ICW mode only and would provide coverage from initial acquisition at 12 nmi to within a few hundred feet of the OMV. If the ICW mode only were selected, then an accompanying sensor would be required to provide coverage from a few hundred feet to docking.

  8. On the ordinary mode and whistler mode instabilities in the degenerate anisotropic plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iqbal, Z.; Hussain, A.; Murtaza, G.; Tsintsadze, N. L.

    2014-03-01

    Employing Vlasov-Maxwell set of equations, we have investigated the O-mode and whistler mode instability in a degenerate anisotropic magnetoplasma environment and compared the results to those reported for classical plasmas. We propose the excitation of a new banded type of instability for the O-mode case, which grows at some particular values of temperature anisotropy and external magnetic field. For the case of whistler wave, we observe instability saturation mechanism similar to the case of classical plasmas. The existence of both O-mode and whistler mode instability has been observed only for some specific range of unstable wavenumbers. The possible excitation of such instabilities in solid state plasma has been discussed, particularly for semiconductor and semimetal plasmas.

  9. Iron line variability of discoseismic corrugation modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsang, David; Butsky, Iryna

    2013-10-01

    Using a fast semi-analytic raytracing code, we study the variability of relativistically broadened Fe-Kα lines due to discoseismic oscillations concentrated in the innermost regions of accretion discs around black holes. The corrugation mode, or c-mode, is of particular interest as its natural frequency corresponds well to the ˜0.1-15 Hz range observed for low-frequency quasi-periodic oscillations (LFQPOs) for lower spins. Comparison of the oscillation phase dependent variability and quasi-periodic oscillation-phase stacked Fe-Kα line observations will allow such discoseismic models to be confirmed or ruled out as a source of particular LFQPOs. The spectral range and frequency of the variability of the Fe-Kα line due to c-modes can also potentially be used to constrain the black hole spin if observed with sufficient temporal and spectral resolution.

  10. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1998-06-16

    A ``laser tape measure`` for measuring distance is disclosed which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%. 7 figs.

  11. Light beam range finder

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1998-01-01

    A "laser tape measure" for measuring distance which includes a transmitter such as a laser diode which transmits a sequence of electromagnetic pulses in response to a transmit timing signal. A receiver samples reflections from objects within the field of the sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses with controlled timing, in response to a receive timing signal. The receiver generates a sample signal in response to the samples which indicates distance to the object causing the reflections. The timing circuit supplies the transmit timing signal to the transmitter and supplies the receive timing signal to the receiver. The receive timing signal causes the receiver to sample the reflection such that the time between transmission of pulses in the sequence in sampling by the receiver sweeps over a range of delays. The transmit timing signal causes the transmitter to transmit the sequence of electromagnetic pulses at a pulse repetition rate, and the received timing signal sweeps over the range of delays in a sweep cycle such that reflections are sampled at the pulse repetition rate and with different delays in the range of delays, such that the sample signal represents received reflections in equivalent time. The receiver according to one aspect of the invention includes an avalanche photodiode and a sampling gate coupled to the photodiode which is responsive to the received timing signal. The transmitter includes a laser diode which supplies a sequence of visible electromagnetic pulses. A bright spot projected on to the target clearly indicates the point that is being measured, and the user can read the range to that point with precision of better than 0.1%.

  12. Molecular analysis of polyphosphate accumulation in bacteria.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, A; Ohtake, H

    2000-03-01

    The dynamic behavior of inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), its accumulation and disappearance, is the most striking aspect of polyP metabolism in bacteria. Imbalance between polyP synthesis and degradation results in fluctuations of polyP by 100- to 1000-fold. We here review recent results with respect to this polyP metabolism in bacteria. PolyP accumulation in response to amino acid starvation, accompanied by increased levels of stringent factors, has been observed in Escherichia coli. Inhibition by stringent factors of polyphosphatase interrupts the dynamic balance between the synthesis and degradation of polyP, accounting for polyP accumulation. Polyphosphate kinase is required for activation of intracellular protein degradation, which is required for adaptation at the onset of amino acid starvation. The adaptation to amino acid starvation is mediated by the network of stringent response and polyP metabolism. PolyP accumulation independent of stringent response has also been observed. Novobiocin, an inhibitor for DNA gyrase, stimulated accumulation of polyP but not that of stringent factors. However, a temperature-sensitive DNA gyrase mutant did not exhibit polyP accumulation at the non-permissive temperature. Antagonistic relationship of polyP to nucleic acid synthesis, explored by Harold, appears to be more complicated. We discuss relationship of Pi regulation to polyP accumulation in E. coli and Klebsiella aerogenes. A function of polyP as an in vivo phosphagen affecting polyP accumulation is also discussed.

  13. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired pressure vessel in which energy is stored under high pressure in the form of a gas or a gas and hydraulic... result in contamination of the hydraulic fluid and loss of gas through absorption. (c) Each...

  14. 46 CFR 58.30-25 - Accumulators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... RELATED SYSTEMS Fluid Power and Control Systems § 58.30-25 Accumulators. (a) An accumulator is an unfired pressure vessel in which energy is stored under high pressure in the form of a gas or a gas and hydraulic... result in contamination of the hydraulic fluid and loss of gas through absorption. (c) Each...

  15. Fault core and damage zone fracture attributes vary along strike owing to interaction of fracture growth, quartz accumulation, and differing sandstone composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, S. E.; Eichhubl, P.; Hargrove, P.; Ellis, M. A.; Hooker, J. N.

    2014-11-01

    Small, meter-to decimeter-displacement oblique-slip faults cut latest Precambrian lithic arkose to feldspathic litharenite and Cambrian quartz arenite sandstones in NW Scotland. Despite common slip and thermal histories during faulting, the two sandstone units have different fault-core and damage-zone attributes, including fracture length and aperture distributions, and location of quartz deposits. Fault cores are narrow (less than 1 m), low-porosity cataclasite in lithic arkose/feldspathic litharenites. Damage zone-parallel opening-mode fractures are long (meters or more) with narrow ranges of lengths and apertures, are mostly isolated, have sparse quartz cement, and are open. In contrast, quartz arenites, despite abundant quartz cement, have fault cores that contain porous breccia and dense, striated slip zones. Damage-zone fractures have lengths ranging from meters to centimeters or less, but with distributions skewed to short fractures, and have power-law aperture distributions. Owing to extensive quartz cement, they tend to be sealed. These attributes reflect inhibited authigenic quartz accumulation on feldspar and lithic grains, which are unfavorable precipitation substrates, and favored accumulation on detrital quartz. In quartz breccia, macropores >0.04 mm wide persist where surrounded by slow-growing euhedral quartz. Differences in quartz occurrence and size distributions are compatible with the hypothesis that cement deposits modify the probability of fracture reactivation. Existing fractures readily reactivate in focused growth where quartz accumulation is low and porosity high. Only some existing, partly cemented fractures reactivate and some deformation is manifest in new fracture formation in partitioned growth where quartz accumulation is high. Consequences include along-strike differences in permeability and locus of fluid flow between cores and damage zones and fault strength.

  16. Accumulation and hyperaccumulation of copper in plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, V.; Trnkova, L.; Huska, D.; Babula, P.; Kizek, R.

    2009-04-01

    Copper is natural component of our environment. Flow of copper(II) ions in the environment depends on solubility of compounds containing this metal. Mobile ion coming from soil and rocks due to volcanic activity, rains and others are then distributed to water. Bio-availability of copper is substantially lower than its concentration in the aquatic environment. Copper present in the water reacts with other compounds and creates a complex, not available for organisms. The availability of copper varies depending on the environment, but moving around within the range from 5 to 25 % of total copper. Thus copper is stored in the sediments and the rest is transported to the seas and oceans. It is common knowledge that copper is essential element for most living organisms. For this reason this element is actively accumulated in the tissues. The total quantity of copper in soil ranges from 2 to 250 mg / kg, the average concentration is 30 mg / kg. Certain activities related to agriculture (the use of fungicides), possibly with the metallurgical industry and mining, tend to increase the total quantity of copper in the soil. This amount of copper in the soil is a problem particularly for agricultural production of food. The lack of copper causes a decrease in revenue and reduction in quality of production. In Europe, shows the low level of copper in total 18 million hectares of farmland. To remedy this adverse situation is the increasing use of copper fertilizers in agricultural soils. It is known that copper compounds are used in plant protection against various illnesses and pests. Mining of minerals is for the development of human society a key economic activity. An important site where the copper is mined in the Slovakia is nearby Smolníka. Due to long time mining in his area (more than 700 years) there are places with extremely high concentrations of various metals including copper. Besides copper, there are also detected iron, zinc and arsenic. Various plant species

  17. Accumulation of Zn, Cu and Cd by crabs and barnacles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rainbow, P. S.

    1985-11-01

    The crab Carcinus maenas (L.) and the barnacle Elminius modestus Darwin were exposed to a range of dissolved concentrations of Zn, Cu and Cd for 21 days in artificial seawater. Accumulation of Zn and Cu by crabs has been interpreted in terms of the presence of a regulation mechanism to maintain constant body concentrations (83·2 ± 19·4 μg Zn g -1 dry wt.; 39·8 ± 9·8 μg Cu g -1 dry wt.) under varying external dissolved metal levels, until a threshold dissolved metal concentration ( c. 400 μg Zn l -1; c. 170 μg Cu l -1) beyond which net accumulation of metal begins. Cadium appears to be accumulated by C. maenas at all exposures with no evidence for regulation of body cadmium concentrations. Exposure of E. modestus to Zn, Cu or Cd caused net accumulation of the respective metal in the bodies of the barnacles, with no evidence for regulation of body metal concentrations.

  18. Hydroponic screening of poplar for trace element tolerance and accumulation.

    PubMed

    Migeon, Aude; Richaud, Pierre; Guinet, Frédéric; Blaudez, Damien; Chalot, Michel

    2012-04-01

    Using the nutrient film technique, we screened 21 clones of poplar for growth in the presence of a mix of trace elements (TE) and for TE accumulation capacities. Poplar cuttings were exposed for four weeks to a multipollution solution consisting in 10 microM Cd, Cu, Ni, and Pb, and 200 microM Zn. Plant biomass and TE accumulation patterns in leaves varied greatly between clones. The highest Cd and Zn concentrations in leaves were detected in P. trichocarpa and P. trichocarpa hybrids, with the clone Skado (P. trichocarpa x P. maximowiczii) accumulating up to 108 mg Cd kg(-1) DW and 1510 mg Zn kg(-1) DW when exposed to a multipollution context. Our data also confirm the importance of pH and multipollution, as these factors greatly affect TE accumulation in above ground biomass. The NFT technique applied here to a large range of poplar clones also revealed the potential of the Rochester, AFO662 and AFO678 poplar clones for use in phytostabilization programs and bioenergy production, where production of less contaminated above ground biomass is suitable.

  19. Accumulation of heavy metals in the earthworm Eisenia foetida

    SciTech Connect

    Hartenstein, R.; Neuhauser, E.F.; Collier, J.

    1980-01-01

    Conversion of waste-activated sludge into egesta by the earthworm Eisenia foetida resulted in neither an increase nor decrease of 0.1 N HCl-extractable cadmium, copper, nickel, lead, or zinc. The addition of 2500 ppM copper as copper sulfate to activated sludge caused 100% mortality whthin 1 week, though feeding upon nonamended activated sludges with up to 1500 ppM copper over several months was innocuous. Amendment of sludge with 10, 50, and 100 ppM Cd as CdSO/sub 4/ resulted in 3.90-, 2.04-, and 1.44-fold concentrations in the earthworm over the quantities present in the sludge, with a range of 118 to 170 ppM being found on exposure to the highest level for periods of 1 to 5 weeks at 25/sup 0/C. In field trials with nonamended sludge, however, containing 12 to 27 ppM Cd, biweekly sampling for 28 weeks revealed accumulations in E. foetida ranging from 8 to 46 ppM; control earthworms not exposed to culture media with easily measurable Cd levels contained 0.3 to 2 ppM Cd. Upwards to about 50 ppM Ni, 325 ppM Pb, and 250 ppM Zn accumulated from sludges amended with ionic soluble forms of these metals. In the field, where these metals ranged from 2 to 46, 1 to 53, and 68 to 210 ppM, respectively, an upper concentration of about 50 ppM Ni, 55 ppM Pb, and 250 ppM Zn were found in the earthworm. Distinctions were made between accumulable and concentratable and a discussion is provided to show that each of the most problematic heavy metals, Cd, Zn, Ni, Pb, and Cu, may accumulate or concentrate in the earthworm.

  20. Limitations of Geiger-mode arrays for Flash LADAR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, George M., Jr.

    2010-04-01

    It is shown through physics-based Monte Carlo simulations of avalanche photodiode (APD) LADAR receivers that under typical operating scenarios, Geiger-mode APD (GmAPD) flash LADAR receivers may often be ineffective. These results are corroborated by analysis of the signal photon detection efficiency and signal-to-noise ratio metrics. Due to their ability to detect only one pulse per laser shot, the target detection efficiency of GmAPD receivers, as measured by target signal events detected compared to those present at the receiver's optical aperture, is shown to be highly particular and respond nonlinearly to the specific LADAR conditions including range, laser power, detector efficiency, and target occlusion, which causes the GmAPD target detection capabilities to vary unpredictably over standard mission conditions. In the detection of partially occluded targets, GmAPD LADAR receivers perform optimally within only a narrow operating window of range, detector efficiency, and laser power; outside this window performance degrades sharply. Operating at both short and long standoff ranges, GmAPD receivers most often cannot detect partially occluded targets, and with an increased number of detector dark noise events, e.g. resulting from exposure to ionizing radiation, the probability that a GmAPD device is armed and able to detect target signal returns approaches zero. Even when multiple pulses are accumulated or contrived operational scenarios are employed, and even in weak-signal scenarios, GmAPDs most often perform inefficiently in their detection of target signal events at the aperture. It is concluded that the inability of the GmAPD to detect target signal present at the receiver's aperture may lead to a loss of operational capability, may have undesired implications for the equivalent optical aperture, laser power, and/or system complexity, and may incur other costs deleterious to operational efficacy.

  1. Mode 2 fracture mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzard, Robert J.; Ghosn, Louis

    1988-01-01

    Current development of high-performance rolling element bearings for aircraft engines (up to 3 million DN, where DN is the product of shaft diameter in millimeters and speed in revolutions per minute) has aroused concern about fatigue crack growth in the inner bearing race that leads to catastrophic failure of the bearing and the engine. A failure sequence was postulated by Srawley, and an analytical program was undertaken to simulate fatigue crack propagation in the inner raceway of such a bearing. A fatigue specimen was developed at NASA by which fatigue data may be obtained relative to the cracking problems. The specimen may be used to obtain either mode 2 data alone or a combination of mixed-mode (1 and 2) data as well and was calibrated in this regard. Mixed-mode fracture data for M-50 bearing steel are presented, and a method for performing reversed-loading tests is described.

  2. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors. PMID:25618046

  3. Violin plate modes.

    PubMed

    Gough, Colin

    2015-01-01

    As the first step toward developing a generic model for the acoustically radiating vibrational modes of the violin and related instruments, the modes of both freely supported and edge-constrained top and back plates have been investigated as functions of shape, arching height, elastic anisotropy, the f-holes and associated island area, thickness graduations, and the additional boundary constraints of the ribs, soundpost, and bass-bar present in the assembled instrument. Comsol shell structure finite element software has been used as a quasi-experimental tool, with physical and geometric properties varied smoothly, often over several orders of magnitude, allowing the development of the plate modes to be followed continuously from those of an initially square plate to those of doubly-arched, guitar-shaped, orthotropic plates and their dependence on all the above factors.

  4. Whispering Bloch modes

    PubMed Central

    Craster, R. V.

    2016-01-01

    We investigate eigenvalue problems for the planar Helmholtz equation in open systems with a high order of rotational symmetry. The resulting solutions have similarities with the whispering gallery modes exploited in photonic micro-resonators and elsewhere, but unlike these do not necessarily require a surrounding material boundary, with confinement instead resulting from the geometry of a series of inclusions arranged in a ring. The corresponding fields exhibit angular quasi-periodicity reminiscent of Bloch waves, and hence we refer to them as whispering Bloch modes (WBMs). We show that if the geometry of the system is slightly perturbed such that the rotational symmetry is broken, modes with asymmetric field patterns can be observed, resulting in field enhancement and other potentially desirable effects. We investigate the WBMs of two specific geometries first using expansion methods and then by applying a two-scale asymptotic scheme. PMID:27493564

  5. Infernal Fishbone Mode

    SciTech Connect

    Ya.I. Kolesnichenko; V.S. Marchenko; R.B. White

    2003-02-11

    A new kind of fishbone instability associated with circulating energetic ions is predicted. The considered instability is essentially the energetic particle mode; it is characterized by m/n not equal to 1 (m and n are the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers, respectively). The mode is localized inside the flux surface where the safety factor (q) is q* = m/n, its amplitude being maximum near q*. The instability arises in plasmas with small shear inside the q* surface and q(0) > 1. A possibility to explain recent experimental observations of the m = 2 fishbone oscillations accompanied by strong changes of the neutron emission during tangential neutral-beam injection in the National Spherical Torus Experiment [M. Ono, et al., Nucl. Fusion 40 (2000) 557] is shown.

  6. Accumulation of isochorismate-derived 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic 3-O-beta-D-xyloside in arabidopsis resistance to pathogens and ageing of leaves.

    PubMed

    Bartsch, Michael; Bednarek, Paweł; Vivancos, Pedro D; Schneider, Bernd; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Foyer, Christine H; Kombrink, Erich; Scheel, Dierk; Parker, Jane E

    2010-08-13

    An intricate network of hormone signals regulates plant development and responses to biotic and abiotic stress. Salicylic acid (SA), derived from the shikimate/isochorismate pathway, is a key hormone in resistance to biotrophic pathogens. Several SA derivatives and associated modifying enzymes have been identified and implicated in the storage and channeling of benzoic acid intermediates or as bioactive molecules. However, the range and modes of action of SA-related metabolites remain elusive. In Arabidopsis, Enhanced Disease Susceptibility 1 (EDS1) promotes SA-dependent and SA-independent responses in resistance against pathogens. Here, we used metabolite profiling of Arabidopsis wild type and eds1 mutant leaf extracts to identify molecules, other than SA, whose accumulation requires EDS1 signaling. Nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry of isolated and purified compounds revealed 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid (2,3-DHBA) as an isochorismate-derived secondary metabolite whose accumulation depends on EDS1 in resistance responses and during ageing of plants. 2,3-DHBA exists predominantly as a xylose-conjugated form (2-hydroxy-3-beta-O-D-xylopyranosyloxy benzoic acid) that is structurally distinct from known SA-glucose conjugates. Analysis of DHBA accumulation profiles in various Arabidopsis mutants suggests an enzymatic route to 2,3-DHBA synthesis that is under the control of EDS1. We propose that components of the EDS1 pathway direct the generation or stabilization of 2,3-DHBA, which as a potentially bioactive molecule is sequestered as a xylose conjugate.

  7. Gas cooking range

    SciTech Connect

    Narang, R.K.; Narang, K.

    1984-02-14

    An energy-efficient gas cooking range features an oven section with improved heat circulation and air preheat, a compact oven/broiler burner, a smoke-free drip pan, an efficient piloted ignition, flame-containing rangetop burner rings, and a small, portable oven that can be supported on the burner rings. Panels spaced away from the oven walls and circulation fans provide very effective air flow within the oven. A gas shutoff valve automatically controls the discharge of heated gases from the oven so that they are discharged only when combustion is occurring.

  8. Verification of International Space Station Component Leak Rates by Helium Accumulation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D.; Smith, Sherry L.

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of leakage on several International Space Station U.S. Laboratory Module ammonia system quick disconnects (QDs) led to the need for a process to quantify total leakage without removing the QDs from the system. An innovative solution was proposed allowing quantitative leak rate measurement at ambient external pressure without QD removal. The method utilizes a helium mass spectrometer configured in the detector probe mode to determine helium leak rates inside a containment hood installed on the test component. The method was validated through extensive developmental testing. Test results showed the method was viable, accurate and repeatable for a wide range of leak rates. The accumulation method has been accepted by NASA and is currently being used by Boeing Huntsville, Boeing Kennedy Space Center and Boeing Johnson Space Center to test welds and valves and will be used by Alenia to test the Cupola. The method has been used in place of more expensive vacuum chamber testing which requires removing the test component from the system.

  9. Should Radial Modes Always Be Regarded as p-Modes?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takata, M.

    2013-12-01

    As standard textbooks of stellar oscillations say, the only restoring force of radial modes in spherically symmetric stars is the pressure gradient, whereas the buoyancy force does not operate because no horizontal inhomogeneity is generated by radial oscillations. This is the physical reason why all radial modes should be classified as p-modes. In this presentation, however, we numerically demonstrate that unstable (adiabatic) radial modes should not be regraded as p-modes, because they are closely related to f-modes or g-modes of nonradial oscillations.

  10. Tunable single-mode slot waveguide quantum cascade lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Bo; Tao, Jin; Quan Zeng, Yong; Wu, Sheng; Jie Wang, Qi

    2014-05-19

    We report experimental demonstration of tunable, monolithic, single-mode quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) at ∼10 μm with a two-section etched slot structure. A single-mode tuning range of 77 cm{sup −1} (785 nm), corresponding to ∼7.8% of the relative tuning range, was realized with a ∼20 dB side mode suppression ratio within the whole tuning range. Compared with integrated distributed feedback QCLs, our devices have the advantages of easy fabrication and a broader tuning range. Further theoretical analyses and numerical simulations show that it is possible to achieve a broad continuous tuning range by optimizing the slot structures. The proposed slot-waveguide design could provide an alternative but simple approach to the existing tuning schemes for realizing broadly continuous tunable single-mode QCLs.

  11. Multi-mode horn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neilson, Jeffrey M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A horn has an input aperture and an output aperture, and comprises a conductive inner surface formed by rotating a curve about a central axis. The curve comprises a first arc having an input aperture end and a transition end, and a second arc having a transition end and an output aperture end. When rotated about the central axis, the first arc input aperture end forms an input aperture, and the second arc output aperture end forms an output aperture. The curve is then optimized to provide a mode conversion which maximizes the power transfer of input energy to the Gaussian mode at the output aperture.

  12. Laser range profiling for small target recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinvall, Ove; Tulldahl, Michael

    2016-05-01

    The detection and classification of small surface and airborne targets at long ranges is a growing need for naval security. Long range ID or ID at closer range of small targets has its limitations in imaging due to the demand on very high transverse sensor resolution. It is therefore motivated to look for 1D laser techniques for target ID. These include vibrometry, and laser range profiling. Vibrometry can give good results but is also sensitive to certain vibrating parts on the target being in the field of view. Laser range profiling is attractive because the maximum range can be substantial, especially for a small laser beam width. A range profiler can also be used in a scanning mode to detect targets within a certain sector. The same laser can also be used for active imaging when the target comes closer and is angular resolved. The present paper will show both experimental and simulated results for laser range profiling of small boats out to 6-7 km range and a UAV mockup at close range (1.3 km). We obtained good results with the profiling system both for target detection and recognition. Comparison of experimental and simulated range waveforms based on CAD models of the target support the idea of having a profiling system as a first recognition sensor and thus narrowing the search space for the automatic target recognition based on imaging at close ranges. The naval experiments took place in the Baltic Sea with many other active and passive EO sensors beside the profiling system. Discussion of data fusion between laser profiling and imaging systems will be given. The UAV experiments were made from the rooftop laboratory at FOI.

  13. Western Aeronautical Test Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakahara, Robert D.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) is a network of facilities used to support aeronautical research, science missions, exploration system concepts, and space operations. The WATR resides at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center located at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The WATR is a part of NASA's Corporate Management of Aeronautical Facilities and funded by the Strategic Capability Asset Program (SCAP). It is managed by the Aeronautics Test Program (ATP) of the Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) to provide the right facility at the right time. NASA is a tenant on Edwards Air Force Base and has an agreement with the Air Force Flight Test Center to use the land and airspace controlled by the Department of Defense (DoD). The topics include: 1) The WATR supports a variety of vehicles; 2) Dryden shares airspace with the AFFTC; 3) Restricted airspace, corridors, and special use areas are available for experimental aircraft; 4) WATR Products and Services; 5) WATR Support Configuration; 6) Telemetry Tracking; 7) Time Space Positioning; 8) Video; 9) Voice Communication; 10) Mobile Operations Facilities; 11) Data Processing; 12) Mission Control Center; 13) Real-Time Data Analysis; and 14) Range Safety.

  14. Monocular visual ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witus, Gary; Hunt, Shawn

    2008-04-01

    The vision system of a mobile robot for checkpoint and perimeter security inspection performs multiple functions: providing surveillance video, providing high resolution still images, and providing video for semi-autonomous visual navigation. Mid-priced commercial digital cameras support the primary inspection functions. Semi-autonomous visual navigation is a tertiary function whose purpose is to reduce the burden of teleoperation and free the security personnel for their primary functions. Approaches to robot visual navigation require some form of depth perception for speed control to prevent the robot from colliding with objects. In this paper present the initial results of an exploration of the capabilities and limitations of using a single monocular commercial digital camera for depth perception. Our approach combines complementary methods in alternating stationary and moving behaviors. When the platform is stationary, it computes a range image from differential blur in the image stack collected at multiple focus settings. When the robot is moving, it extracts an estimate of range from the camera auto-focus function, and combines this with an estimate derived from angular expansion of a constellation of visual tracking points.

  15. Range Process Simulation Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dave; Haas, William; Barth, Tim; Benjamin, Perakath; Graul, Michael; Bagatourova, Olga

    2005-01-01

    Range Process Simulation Tool (RPST) is a computer program that assists managers in rapidly predicting and quantitatively assessing the operational effects of proposed technological additions to, and/or upgrades of, complex facilities and engineering systems such as the Eastern Test Range. Originally designed for application to space transportation systems, RPST is also suitable for assessing effects of proposed changes in industrial facilities and large organizations. RPST follows a model-based approach that includes finite-capacity schedule analysis and discrete-event process simulation. A component-based, scalable, open architecture makes RPST easily and rapidly tailorable for diverse applications. Specific RPST functions include: (1) definition of analysis objectives and performance metrics; (2) selection of process templates from a processtemplate library; (3) configuration of process models for detailed simulation and schedule analysis; (4) design of operations- analysis experiments; (5) schedule and simulation-based process analysis; and (6) optimization of performance by use of genetic algorithms and simulated annealing. The main benefits afforded by RPST are provision of information that can be used to reduce costs of operation and maintenance, and the capability for affordable, accurate, and reliable prediction and exploration of the consequences of many alternative proposed decisions.

  16. Dynamic modeling of structures from measured complex modes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, s. R.

    1982-01-01

    A technique is presented to use a set of identified complex modes together with an analytical mathematical model of a structure under test to compute improved mass, stiffness and damping matrices. A set of identified normal modes, computed from the measured complex modes, is used in the mass orthogonality equation to compute an improved mass matrix. This eliminates possible errors that may result from using approximated complex modes as normal modes. The improved mass matrix, the measured complex modes and the higher analytical modes are then used to compute the improved stiffness and damping matrices. The number of degrees-of-freedom of the improved model is limited to equal the number of elements in the measured modal vectors. A simulated experiment shows considerable improvements, in the system's analytical dynamic model, over the frequency range of the given measured modal information.

  17. The Middeck 0-gravity Dynamics Experiment (MODE)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crawley, Edward F.; Deluis, Javier

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on the middeck 0-gravity dynamics experiment (MODE) are presented. Topics covered include: MODE flight hardware elements; MODE science objectives; MODE team; flight operations; and summary.

  18. TEA -- Temperature and energy accumulated

    SciTech Connect

    Borresen, B.A.; Marken, A.V.

    1999-07-01

    Energy quality relates to energy supply temperatures. Instead of the exergy term, a TEA curve was introduced for evaluating the planned 100 GWh district heating system of Fornebu, outside Oslo. The questions that were raised when analyzing the energy system were: (1) how could one make a design that improves the use of low temperature energy? (2) is a design with low flow rate, i.e., low pipeline costs, compatible with the use of low temperature energy? (3) can one visualize the quality of the energy used through the distributed temperatures and the corresponding quantity of energy? A spreadsheet analysis tool for the TEA curve was implemented, and used for the heating plant design and optimization at Fornebu. The paper presents the TEA curve and shows how evaluations may be done. Different design temperatures ranging from 60 C/50 C to 110 C/40 C are included in the discussion. The main findings are: The TEA curve demonstrates clearly the use of energy quality; Avoid shunting, utilize the available high temperatures when possible; and A 75 C/40 C design improves the level of energy use compared to a 60 C/50 C design.

  19. Gene limiting cadmium accumulation in rice.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Daisei; Yamaji, Naoki; Kono, Izumi; Huang, Chao Feng; Ando, Tsuyu; Yano, Masahiro; Ma, Jian Feng

    2010-09-21

    Intake of toxic cadmium (Cd) from rice caused Itai-itai disease in the past and it is still a threat for human health. Therefore, control of the accumulation of Cd from soil is an important food-safety issue, but the molecular mechanism for the control is unknown. Herein, we report a gene (OsHMA3) responsible for low Cd accumulation in rice that was isolated from a mapping population derived from a cross between a high and low Cd-accumulating cultivar. The gene encodes a transporter belonging to the P(1B)-type ATPase family, but shares low similarity with other members. Heterologous expression in yeast showed that the transporter from the low-Cd cultivar is functional, but the transporter from the high-Cd cultivar had lost its function, probably because of the single amino acid mutation. The transporter is mainly expressed in the tonoplast of root cells at a similar level in both the low and high Cd-accumulating cultivars. Overexpression of the functional gene from the low Cd-accumulating cultivar selectively decreased accumulation of Cd, but not other micronutrients in the grain. Our results indicated that OsHMA3 from the low Cd-accumulating cultivar limits translocation of Cd from the roots to the above-ground tissues by selectively sequestrating Cd into the root vacuoles.

  20. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, M.W.

    1990-06-19

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typically sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream. 2 figs.

  1. Range imaging laser radar

    DOEpatents

    Scott, Marion W.

    1990-01-01

    A laser source is operated continuously and modulated periodically (typicy sinusoidally). A receiver imposes another periodic modulation on the received optical signal, the modulated signal being detected by an array of detectors of the integrating type. Range to the target determined by measuring the phase shift of the intensity modulation on the received optical beam relative to a reference. The receiver comprises a photoemitter for converting the reflected, periodically modulated, return beam to an accordingly modulated electron stream. The electron stream is modulated by a local demodulation signal source and subsequently converted back to a photon stream by a detector. A charge coupled device (CCD) array then averages and samples the photon stream to provide an electrical signal in accordance with the photon stream.

  2. Long-range connectomics.

    PubMed

    Jbabdi, Saad; Behrens, Timothy E

    2013-12-01

    Decoding neural algorithms is one of the major goals of neuroscience. It is generally accepted that brain computations rely on the orchestration of neural activity at local scales, as well as across the brain through long-range connections. Understanding the relationship between brain activity and connectivity is therefore a prerequisite to cracking the neural code. In the past few decades, tremendous technological advances have been achieved in connectivity measurement techniques. We now possess a battery of tools to measure brain activity and connections at all available scales. A great source of excitement are the new in vivo tools that allow us to measure structural and functional connections noninvasively. Here, we discuss how these new technologies may contribute to deciphering the neural code.

  3. Thermodynamics of Radiation Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pina, Eduardo; de la Selva, Sara Maria Teresa

    2010-01-01

    We study the equilibrium thermodynamics of the electromagnetic radiation in a cavity of a given volume and temperature. We found three levels of description, the thermodynamics of one mode, the thermodynamics of the distribution of frequencies in a band by summing over the frequencies in it and the global thermodynamics by summing over all the…

  4. Synthesize Modes and Correlate

    2005-10-01

    SMAC is an automated experimental modal parameter extraction package which determines the natural frequencies of vibration, viscous damping ratios and mode shapes from experimental accelerance frequency response functions (FRFs). It is written in the MATLAB interpretive matrix language and has a graphical user interface.

  5. Study Mode Negotiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasan, Mani Le; Sargunan, Rajeswary

    This paper outlines a model of study mode negotiation between clients and English Language Training providers that has been developed at the University of Malaya, specifically related to English language writing skills as taught to corporate clients. Negotiation is used to reach decisions concerning the goals and methodology of learning to ensure…

  6. Modes of Communication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewatripont, Mathias; Tirole, Jean

    2005-01-01

    The paper develops a theory of costly communication in which the sender's and receiver's motivations and abilities endogenously determine the communication mode and the transfer of knowledge. Communication is modeled as a problem of moral hazard in teams, in which the sender and receiver select persuasion and message elaboration efforts. The model…

  7. Theories and Modes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apsche, Jack A.

    2005-01-01

    In his work on the Theory of Modes, Beck (1996) suggested that there were flaws with his cognitive theory. He suggested that though there are shortcomings to his cognitive theory, there were not similar shortcomings to the practice of Cognitive Therapy. The author suggests that if there are shortcomings to cognitive theory the same shortcomings…

  8. Microbial accumulation of uranium, radium, and cesium

    SciTech Connect

    Strandberg, G.W.; Shumate, S.E. II; Parrott, J.R. Jr.; North, S.E.

    1981-05-01

    Diverse microbial species varied considerably in their ability to accumulate uranium, cesium, and radium. Mechanistic differences in uranium uptake by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were indicated. S. serevisiae exhibited a slow (hours) surface accumulation of uranium which was subject to environmental factors, while P. aeruginosa accumulated uranium rapidly (minutes) as dense intracellular deposits and did not appear to be affected by environmental parameters. Metabolism was not required for uranium uptake by either organism. Cesium and radium were concentrated to a considerably lesser extent than uranium by the several species tested.

  9. Metal accumulation in wild-caught opossum.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, J Mitchell; Siddiqui, Samreen; Loughry, W J; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2016-06-01

    The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is widespread in the USA, ranging south through Latin America. The ecology of opossums is such that they are in frequent contact with soils, suggesting that they may function as a valuable bioindicator for chemical contamination in terrestrial environments. Surprisingly, there have been virtually no toxicology studies on opossums. Here, we provide the first analysis of metal contaminants in opossum liver tissues. Liver samples were obtained from 471 opossums, collected from 2003 to 2006, at four sites in North Florida and South Georgia, USA, and concentrations of copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and zinc were measured. We found little evidence of age differences in the concentration of any of the metals. However, there were at least some significant differences between years, males and females, and between sites for each metal, although the pattern of these differences was not always consistent across metals. Concentrations of metals in liver tissue were positively correlated with one another, primarily of each metal (except Pb) with zinc. Reference levels of metal contaminants are not available for opossums, but concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in our samples were for the most part significantly higher than those reported from liver tissues of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) collected at the same sites and in the same years. Data from other small mammals studied elsewhere further indicate that metal concentrations in opossums were high, but at this time, it is not possible to determine if these elevated levels generated toxicity. The substantial temporal and spatial variation we found in metal concentrations suggests that determination of baseline levels for opossums may not be straightforward. Nonetheless, this is the first study quantifying metal accumulation in the livers of Didelphis virginiana and, as such, provides an important starting point for future research. PMID:27138002

  10. Metal accumulation in wild-caught opossum.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, J Mitchell; Siddiqui, Samreen; Loughry, W J; Bielmyer-Fraser, Gretchen K

    2016-06-01

    The Virginia opossum (Didelphis virginiana) is widespread in the USA, ranging south through Latin America. The ecology of opossums is such that they are in frequent contact with soils, suggesting that they may function as a valuable bioindicator for chemical contamination in terrestrial environments. Surprisingly, there have been virtually no toxicology studies on opossums. Here, we provide the first analysis of metal contaminants in opossum liver tissues. Liver samples were obtained from 471 opossums, collected from 2003 to 2006, at four sites in North Florida and South Georgia, USA, and concentrations of copper, lead, nickel, selenium, and zinc were measured. We found little evidence of age differences in the concentration of any of the metals. However, there were at least some significant differences between years, males and females, and between sites for each metal, although the pattern of these differences was not always consistent across metals. Concentrations of metals in liver tissue were positively correlated with one another, primarily of each metal (except Pb) with zinc. Reference levels of metal contaminants are not available for opossums, but concentrations of Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn in our samples were for the most part significantly higher than those reported from liver tissues of nine-banded armadillos (Dasypus novemcinctus) collected at the same sites and in the same years. Data from other small mammals studied elsewhere further indicate that metal concentrations in opossums were high, but at this time, it is not possible to determine if these elevated levels generated toxicity. The substantial temporal and spatial variation we found in metal concentrations suggests that determination of baseline levels for opossums may not be straightforward. Nonetheless, this is the first study quantifying metal accumulation in the livers of Didelphis virginiana and, as such, provides an important starting point for future research.

  11. Long-range surface plasmons in electrode structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stegeman, G. I.; Burke, J. J.

    1983-01-01

    Surface polaritons guided by symmetric double metal film structures are analyzed, with particular attention given to the attenuation of the two long-range modes that occur. It is found that long-range surface plasmon polariton modes do exist for double electrode structures over a limited range of material parameters. Guided by thin metal electrodes, surface plasmon polaritons can achieve millimeter plus propagation distances in the near infrared. It is pointed out that if the slab is electrooptic, then very low voltages will be needed to manipulate the waves. The fact that long-range modes exist simultaneously with junction tunnel plasmons may be of use in providing directional radiation from light-emitting junctions or the inverse process of light to electrical energy conversion.

  12. An evaluation of mixed-mode delamination failure criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed mode data exist that are consistent over the full mode I opening to mode II shear load range. The mixed mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state of the art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria which have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was analyzed. A new bilinear failure criterion was developed based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed mode failure response, mixed mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. A critical evaluation is provided of the mixed mode failure criteria and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  13. Spin-wave modes of ferromagnetic films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arias, R. E.

    2016-10-01

    The spin-wave modes of ferromagnetic films have been studied for a long time experimentally as well as theoretically, either in the magnetostatic approximation or also considering the exchange interaction. A theoretical method is presented that allows one to determine with ease the exact frequency dispersion relations of dipole-exchange modes under general conditions: an obliquely applied magnetic field, and surface boundary conditions that allow for partial pinning, which may be of different origins. The method is a generalization of Green's theorem to the problem of solving the linear dynamics of ferromagnetic spin-wave modes. Convolution integral equations for the magnetization and the magnetostatic potential of the modes are derived on the surfaces of the film. For the translation-invariant film these become simple local algebraic equations at each in-plane wave vector. Eigenfrequencies result from imposing a 6 ×6 determinant to be null, and spin-wave modes follow everywhere through solving linear 6 ×6 inhomogeneous systems. An interpretation of the results is that the Green's functions represent six independent plane-wave solutions to the equations of motion, with six associated complex perpendicular wave vectors: volume modes correspond to the cases in which two of these are purely real at a given frequency. Furthermore, the convolution extinction equations enforce the boundary conditions: this is possible at specific eigenfrequencies for a given in-plane wave vector. Magnetostatic modes may also be obtained in detail. At low frequencies and for some obliquely applied magnetic fields, magnetostatic and dipole-exchange volume modes may have forward or backward character depending on the frequency range.

  14. SERIES - Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdoran, P. F.; Spitzmesser, D. J.; Buennagel, L. A.

    1983-01-01

    The Satellite Emission Range Inferred Earth Surveying (SERIES) concept is based on the utilization of NAVSTAR Global Positioning System (GPS) radio transmissions without any satellite modifications and in a totally passive mode. The SERIES stations are equipped with lightweight 1.5 m diameter dish antennas mounted on trailers. A series baseline measurement accuracy demonstration is considered, taking into account a 100 meter baseline estimation from approximately one hour of differential Doppler data. It is planned to conduct the next phase of experiments on a 150 m baseline. Attention is given to details regarding future baseline measurement accuracy demonstrations, aspects of ionospheric calibration in connection with subdecimeter baseline accuracy requirements of geodesy, and advantages related to the use of the differential Doppler or pseudoranging mode.

  15. Transient-mode multipactor discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, T. P.; Spektor, R.; Stout, P.; Axley, A.

    2009-08-01

    Multipactor discharge is a resonant condition in which electrons impact material surfaces in phase with an alternating rf or microwave electric field. A growing and/or sustained discharge requires the electrode secondary electron coefficient, δ(Ee), to be greater than unity at the impacting electron energy (Ee). E1, the minimum energy for δ =1, is highly dependent on electrode surface preparation and conditioning, and contaminated surfaces will generally experience a lower E1 than the same clean or "conditioned" surface. A transient mode of multipactor discharge can exist when the multipactor electron energy distribution occurs near E1. The transient nature of such a discharge is shown to result from dynamic changes in E1 due to multipactor conditioning and surface contamination. Experimental data depict transient-mode multipactor (TMM) discharges at a range of rf voltages and chamber pressures for both copper and aluminum electrodes. TMM was detected using a biased current probe, and these events were undetectable by third harmonic diagnostics at chamber pressures below 1×10-3 torr. Discharge parameters such as charge density, period, and duty cycle are shown to be related to both the rf voltage and the chamber pressure. Monte Carlo simulation results support the experimental findings, showing an exponential decrease in the resonant electron population with increasing E1.

  16. Whispering Gallery Mode Optomechanical Resonator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aveline, David C.; Strekalov, Dmitry V.; Yu, Nan; Yee, Karl Y.

    2012-01-01

    Great progress has been made in both micromechanical resonators and micro-optical resonators over the past decade, and a new field has recently emerged combining these mechanical and optical systems. In such optomechanical systems, the two resonators are strongly coupled with one influencing the other, and their interaction can yield detectable optical signals that are highly sensitive to the mechanical motion. A particularly high-Q optical system is the whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonator, which has many applications ranging from stable oscillators to inertial sensor devices. There is, however, limited coupling between the optical mode and the resonator s external environment. In order to overcome this limitation, a novel type of optomechanical sensor has been developed, offering great potential for measurements of displacement, acceleration, and mass sensitivity. The proposed hybrid device combines the advantages of all-solid optical WGM resonators with high-quality micro-machined cantilevers. For direct access to the WGM inside the resonator, the idea is to radially cut precise gaps into the perimeter, fabricating a mechanical resonator within the WGM. Also, a strategy to reduce losses has been developed with optimized design of the cantilever geometry and positions of gap surfaces.

  17. Comparison of fatigue crack propagation in Modes I and III

    SciTech Connect

    Ritchie, R.O.

    1985-06-01

    The propagation behavior of fatigue cracks in Mode III (anti-plane shear), measured under cyclic torsion, is described and compared with more commonly encountered behavior under Mode I (tensile opening) loads. It is shown that a unique, global characterization of Mode III growth rates, akin to the Paris ''law'' in Mode I, is only possible if characterizating parameters appropriate to large-scale yielding are employed and allowance is made for crack tip shielding from sliding crack surface interference (i.e., friction and abrasion) between mating fracture surfaces. Based on the crack tip stress and deformation fields for Mode III stationary cracks, the cyclic crack tip displacement, (..delta..CTD/sub III/, and plastic strain intensity range ..delta..GAMMA/sub III/, have been proposed and are found to provide an adequate description of behavior in a range of steels, provided crack surface interference is minimized. The magnitude of this interference, which is somewhat analogous to crack closure in Mode I, is further examined in the light of the complex fractography of torsional fatigue failures and the question of a ''fatigue threshold'' for Mode III crack growth. Finally, micro-mechanical models for cyclic crack extension in anti-plane shear are briefly described, and the contrasting behavior between Mode III and Mode I cracks subjected to simple variable amplitude spectra is examined in terms of the differing role of crack tip blunting and closure in influencing shear, as opposed to tensile opening, modes of crack growth.

  18. Adenovirus type 2 nuclear RNA accumulating during productive infection.

    PubMed Central

    Bachenheimer, S L

    1977-01-01

    The viral-specific nuclear RNA which accumulates early and late during productive infection of HeLa cells by adenovirus-type 2 (Ad2) has been characterized with respect to its size and stability after denaturation by Me2SO. Early nuclear transcripts, under nondenaturing conditions, sediment in the range 28 to 45S, but treatment with Me2SO prior to sedimentation results in a shift to about 20S. Later nuclear RNA accumulates as a composite of two populations of molecules: one with a broad size distribution centering on 45S under nondenaturing conditions and less than 32S after denaturation and a second having a narrow size distribution around 35S which is quite stable to Me2SO. Analysis of late RNA by hybridization to Sma fragments of Ad2 DNA suggests that the 35S RNA species is derived from a limited portion of the left half of the viral genome. PMID:864839

  19. Financial Management of Distance Learning in Dual-Mode Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rumble, Greville

    2012-01-01

    Dual-mode universities operating in a tough economic environment need to be able to answer a range of questions concerning their use of different teaching modes accurately and with confidence. Only an activity-based costing approach will provide them with this tool. Cost studies of other distance learning projects may provide benchmarks against…

  20. High dynamic range infrared radiometry and imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coon, Darryl D.; Karunasiri, R. P. G.; Bandara, K. M. S. V.

    1988-01-01

    The use is described of cryogenically cooled, extrinsic silicon infrared detectors in an unconventional mode of operation which offers an unusually large dynamic range. The system performs intensity-to-frequency conversion at the focal plane via simple circuits with very low power consumption. The incident IR intensity controls the repetition rate of short duration output pulses over a pulse rate dynamic range of about 10(6). Theory indicates the possibility of monotonic and approx. linear response over the full dynamic range. A comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results shows that the model provides a reasonably good description of experimental data. Some measurements of survivability with a very intense IR source were made on these devices and found to be very encouraging. Evidence continues to indicate that some variations in interpulse time intervals are deterministic rather than probabilistic.

  1. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures (˜140 °C) the discharge transitions from "ring mode" to "red mode," which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from "good emission" for optical pumping to "poor emission." Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  2. Radio frequency-power and the ring-mode to red-mode transition in an inductively coupled plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Coffer, J. G.; Camparo, J. C.

    2012-04-15

    The optical output of an alkali-metal inductively coupled plasma (alkali-ICP) plays an important role in both atomic magnetometers and atomic clocks, producing these devices' atomic signals through optical pumping. Unfortunately, though the alkali-ICP's optical pumping efficiency grows exponentially with temperature, at relatively high temperatures ({approx}140 deg. C) the discharge transitions from ''ring mode'' to ''red mode'', which is a spectral change in the plasma's output that corresponds broadly to a transition from ''good emission'' for optical pumping to ''poor emission.'' Recently, evidence has accumulated pointing to radiation trapping as the mechanism driving the ring-mode to red-mode transition, suggesting that the phenomenon is primarily linked to the alkali vapor's temperature. However, observations of the transition made in the 1960 s, demonstrating that the ICP temperature associated with the transition depended on rf-power, would appear to cast doubt on this mechanism. Here, we carefully investigate the influence of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition, finding that rf-power only affects the transition through discharge heating. Thus, the present work shows that the primary effect of rf-power on the ring-mode to red-mode transition can be understood in terms of the radiation trapping mechanism.

  3. Front-end simulation of injector for terawatt accumulator.

    PubMed

    Kropachev, G N; Balabin, A I; Kolomiets, A A; Kulevoy, T V; Pershin, V I; Shumshurov, A V

    2008-02-01

    A terawatt accumulator (TWAC) accelerator/storage ring complex with the laser ion source is in progress at ITEP. The new injector I4 based on the radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and interdigital H-mode (IH) linear accelerator is under construction. The front end of the new TWAC injector consists of a laser ion source, an extraction system, and a low energy beam transport (LEBT). The KOBRA3-INP was used for the simulation and optimization of the ion source extraction system. The optimization parameter is the maximum brightness of the beam generated by the laser ion source. Also the KOBRA3-INP code was used for LEBT investigation. The LEBT based on electrostatic grid lenses is chosen for injector I4. The results of the extraction system and LEBT investigations for ion beam matching with RFQ are presented.

  4. Neutron range spectrometer

    DOEpatents

    Manglos, Stephen H.

    1989-06-06

    A neutron range spectrometer and method for determining the neutron energy spectrum of a neutron emitting source are disclosed. Neutrons from the source are collimnated along a collimation axis and a position sensitive neutron counter is disposed in the path of the collimated neutron beam. The counter determines positions along the collimation axis of interactions between the neutrons in the neutron beam and a neutron-absorbing material in the counter. From the interaction positions, a computer analyzes the data and determines the neutron energy spectrum of the neutron beam. The counter is preferably shielded and a suitable neutron-absorbing material is He-3. The computer solves the following equation in the analysis: ##EQU1## where: N(x).DELTA.x=the number of neutron interactions measured between a position x and x+.DELTA.x, A.sub.i (E.sub.i).DELTA.E.sub.i =the number of incident neutrons with energy between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i, and C=C(E.sub.i)=N .sigma.(E.sub.i) where N=the number density of absorbing atoms in the position sensitive counter means and .sigma. (E.sub.i)=the average cross section of the absorbing interaction between E.sub.i and E.sub.i +.DELTA.E.sub.i.

  5. Waste tank ventilation system waste material accumulations

    SciTech Connect

    Van Vleet, R.J., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-06

    This paper calculates the amount of material that accumulates in the ventilation systems of various Tank Waste Remediation System facilities and estimates the amount of material that could be released due to a rapid pressurization.

  6. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  7. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  8. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  9. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  10. 19 CFR 10.534 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Singapore Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.534 Accumulation. (a) Originating materials of Singapore or the United States...

  11. Accumulation of nickel in transgenic tobacco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidik, Nik Marzuki; Othman, Noor Farhan

    2013-11-01

    The accumulation of heavy metal Ni in the roots and leaves of four T1 transgenic lines of tobacco (T(1)20E, T(1)24C, T(1)18B1 and T(1)20B) expressing eiMT1 from E.indica was assessed. The aim of the study was to investigate the level of Ni accumulation in the leaves and roots of each transgenic lines and to evaluate the eligibility of the plants to be classified as a phytoremediation agent. All of the transgenic lines showed different ability in accumulating different metals and has translocation factor (TF) less than 1 (TF<1) at all levels of metal treatment. Among the 4 transgenic lines, transgenic line T(1)24C showed the highest accumulation of Ni (251.9 ± 0.014 mg/kg) and the lowest TF value (TFT(1)24C=0.0875) at 60 ppm Ni.

  12. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  13. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  14. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ....3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM... investment contained in Account 2001, Telecommunications Plant in Service. (b) This account shall be credited... plant in service. (Note also Account 3300, Accumulated depreciation—nonoperating.) (c) At the time...

  15. Metal accumulation by wood-decaying fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, G.

    1982-01-01

    Metal concentrations (Na, K, Rb, Mg, Ca, Sr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Cd, Al, and Pb) in the sporophores of ten wood-decaying macromycete species were related to concentrations in the wood substrates. Manganese, Sr, Ca, and Pb were usually excluded by the fungi; K, Rb, and to a lower degree, Cd, Fe, Zn, Cu, Mg and Na were accumulated. Accumulation ratios are compared with similar ratios for soil and litter inhabiting species previously studied.

  16. Impact of new aircraft observations Mode-S MRAR in a mesoscale NWP model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strajnar, B.; Žagar, N.; Berre, L.

    2015-05-01

    The impact of recently available high-resolution Mode-S Meteorological Routine Air Report (MRAR) wind and temperature observations is evaluated in the mesoscale numerical weather prediction (NWP) model Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement InterNational (ALADIN). Data available from the airspace communicating with the Ljubljana Airport in Slovenia are assimilated by using the three-dimensional variational assimilation procedure on top of all other observations assimilated operationally. A data selection method based on aircraft type was shown to be important for the first application of the new observations in ALADIN. The evaluation of Mode-S MRAR impact included both winter and summer periods. In both seasons a clear improvement of wind and temperature forecasts was found for in the short forecast range, 1-3 h. The impact in the 24 h forecast range depends on season, with a consistent positive improvement of the boundary layer temperature forecasts obtained for the stable anticyclonic winter situations. In summer, the impact was mixed and it was found to be sensitive to the multivariate aspects of the moisture analysis. Overall presented results suggest that the new aircraft-derived observations Mode-S MRAR have a significant potential for mesoscale NWP and improved data assimilation modeling.

  17. Acoustic mode coupling induced by nonlinear internal waves: evaluation of the mode coupling matrices and applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, T C

    2014-02-01

    This paper applies the mode coupling equation to calculate the mode-coupling matrix for nonlinear internal waves appearing as a train of solitons. The calculation is applied to an individual soliton up to second order expansion in sound speed perturbation in the Dyson series. The expansion is valid so long as the fractional sound speed change due to a single soliton, integrated over range and depth, times the wavenumber is smaller than unity. Scattering between the solitons are included by coupling the mode coupling matrices between the solitons. Acoustic fields calculated using this mode-coupling matrix formulation are compared with that obtained using a parabolic equation (PE) code. The results agree very well in terms of the depth integrated acoustic energy at the receivers for moving solitary internal waves. The advantages of using the proposed approach are: (1) The effects of mode coupling can be studied as a function of range and time as the solitons travel along the propagation path, and (2) it allows speedy calculations of sound propagation through a packet or packets of solitons saving orders of magnitude computations compared with the PE code. The mode coupling theory is applied to at-sea data to illustrate the underlying physics.

  18. Sucrose induces vesicle accumulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Hiroko

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the treatment of mammalian cells with sucrose leads to vacuole accumulation associated with lysosomes and upregulation of lysosomal enzyme expression and activity. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostatic process by which cells deliver cytoplasmic material for degradation into lysosomes, thus it is probable that sucrose affects the autophagic activity. The role of sucrose in autophagy is unknown; however, another disaccharide, trehalose has been shown to induce autophagy. In the current study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate whether sucrose induces autophagy and whether vesicle formation is associated with autophagy. The results showed that sucrose induces autophagy while being accumulated within the endosomes/lysosomes. These vesicles were swollen and packed within the cytoplasm. Furthermore, trehalose and the trisaccharide raffinose, which are not hydrolyzed in mammalian cells, increased the rate of vesicles accumulation and LC3-II level (a protein marker of autophagy). However, fructose and maltose did not show the same effects. The correlation between the two processes, vesicle accumulation and autophagy induction, was confirmed by treatment of cells with sucrose plus invertase, or maltose plus acarbose-the α-glucosidase inhibitor-and by sucrose deprivation. Results also showed that vesicle accumulation was not affected by autophagy inhibition. Therefore, the data suggest that sucrose-induced autophagy through accumulation of sucrose-containing vesicles is caused by the absence of hydrolysis enzymes.

  19. Sodium accumulation in Atriplex. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, J.A.; Caldwell, M.M.; Richardson, S.G.

    1984-09-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the ecological significance and the significance to arid land reclamation of sodium accumulation and nonaccumulation in Atriplex. There was a continuum in the genetic tendency of Atriplex canescens to accumulate sodium, from populations which accumulated almost no sodium to populations which accumulated up to 7% in the leaves. There were also substantial differences in sodium uptake between populations of A. tridentata, A. falcata and A. gardneri, with some populations having less than 0.1% leaf sodium and other populations having up to 5 or 6%. In three experiments (a field study, a greenhouse pot study and a hydroponics study) there were no significant differences in salinity tolerance between sodium accumulating and nonaccumulating A. canescens: both genotypes were highly salt tolerant. There was a significant buildup of sodium in the soil beneath sodium accumulating Atriplex plants, both in natural populations and on revegetated oil shale study plots. The sodium buildup was not sufficient to be detrimental to the growth or establishment of most herbaceous species, but with older Atriplex plants or with more saline soil, the buildup could potentially be detrimental. 14 references, 42 figures, 3 tables.

  20. Sucrose induces vesicle accumulation and autophagy.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Takahiro; Nishikawa, Jun; Inoue, Hiroko

    2015-04-01

    It has been shown that the treatment of mammalian cells with sucrose leads to vacuole accumulation associated with lysosomes and upregulation of lysosomal enzyme expression and activity. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved homeostatic process by which cells deliver cytoplasmic material for degradation into lysosomes, thus it is probable that sucrose affects the autophagic activity. The role of sucrose in autophagy is unknown; however, another disaccharide, trehalose has been shown to induce autophagy. In the current study, we used mouse embryonic fibroblasts to investigate whether sucrose induces autophagy and whether vesicle formation is associated with autophagy. The results showed that sucrose induces autophagy while being accumulated within the endosomes/lysosomes. These vesicles were swollen and packed within the cytoplasm. Furthermore, trehalose and the trisaccharide raffinose, which are not hydrolyzed in mammalian cells, increased the rate of vesicles accumulation and LC3-II level (a protein marker of autophagy). However, fructose and maltose did not show the same effects. The correlation between the two processes, vesicle accumulation and autophagy induction, was confirmed by treatment of cells with sucrose plus invertase, or maltose plus acarbose-the α-glucosidase inhibitor-and by sucrose deprivation. Results also showed that vesicle accumulation was not affected by autophagy inhibition. Therefore, the data suggest that sucrose-induced autophagy through accumulation of sucrose-containing vesicles is caused by the absence of hydrolysis enzymes. PMID:25389129

  1. Variation in copper and zinc tolerance and accumulation in 12 willow clones: implications for phytoextraction*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Wei-dong; Wang, Yu-yan; Zhao, Feng-liang; Ding, Zhe-li; Zhang, Xin-cheng; Zhu, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2014-01-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) have shown high potential for the phytoextraction of heavy metals. This study compares variations in copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) tolerance and accumulation potential among 12 willow clones grown in a nutrient solution treated with 50 μmol/L of Cu or Zn, respectively. The results showed differences in the tolerance and accumulation of Cu and Zn with respect to different species/clones. The biomass variation among clones in response to Cu or Zn exposure ranged from the stimulation of growth to inhibition, and all of the clones tested showed higher tolerance to Cu than to Zn. The clones exhibited less variation in Cu accumulation but larger variation in Zn accumulation. Based on translocation factors, it was found that most of the Cu was retained in the roots and that Zn was more mobile than Cu for all clones. It is concluded that most willow clones are good accumulators of Zn and Cu. PMID:25183033

  2. Variation in copper and zinc tolerance and accumulation in 12 willow clones: implications for phytoextraction.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei-dong; Wang, Yu-yan; Zhao, Feng-liang; Ding, Zhe-li; Zhang, Xin-cheng; Zhu, Zhi-qiang; Yang, Xiao-e

    2014-09-01

    Willows (Salix spp.) have shown high potential for the phytoextraction of heavy metals. This study compares variations in copper (Cu) and zinc (Zn) tolerance and accumulation potential among 12 willow clones grown in a nutrient solution treated with 50 μmol/L of Cu or Zn, respectively. The results showed differences in the tolerance and accumulation of Cu and Zn with respect to different species/clones. The biomass variation among clones in response to Cu or Zn exposure ranged from the stimulation of growth to inhibition, and all of the clones tested showed higher tolerance to Cu than to Zn. The clones exhibited less variation in Cu accumulation but larger variation in Zn accumulation. Based on translocation factors, it was found that most of the Cu was retained in the roots and that Zn was more mobile than Cu for all clones. It is concluded that most willow clones are good accumulators of Zn and Cu. PMID:25183033

  3. Geometric adjustment of simultaneous Doppler-derived range differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, C.; Mueller, I. I.

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical model for the use of simultaneous Doppler derived correlated ranges in the geometric mode is presented. The model was tested with data taken during the EDOC-2 campaign with different integration intervals. The results of this adjustment are compared with the EDOC-2 adopted solution and those from an uncorrelated model used earlier to provide more economical calculations. It is shown that the correlated mode is superior to the uncorrelated one when the optimum integration interval of 23 seconds is used.

  4. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion. PMID:24078269

  5. Geometric design of microfluidic chambers: platelet adhesion versus accumulation.

    PubMed

    Casa, Lauren D C; Ku, David N

    2014-02-01

    Arterial, platelet-rich thrombosis depends on shear rates and integrin binding to either a collagen surface or to the growing thrombus, which are mechanistically different. In general, small microfluidic test sections may favor platelet-surface adhesion without testing for the primary mode of intra-arterial thrombosis, i.e. platelet-platelet bonding and accumulation. In the present report, the ratio of platelet-platelet to platelet-surface interactions, R, and the percentage of platelet-platelet interactions, P, are estimated using an analytical approach for circular and rectangular test sections. Results show that the test section geometry strongly affects both R and P, with test section height in low-aspect ratio channels or diameter greater than 90 μm dominated by platelet-platelet interactions (R >10). Increasing rectangular test section aspect ratio decreases the required height. R increases linearly while P approaches 100 % asymptotically with increasing channel dimension. Analysis of platelet shape shows that the assumption of spherical platelets has a small effect on R compared to discoid platelets adhering flat against test section wall. However, an increase in average platelet volume resulted in a large decrease in R. Nonetheless, Monte Carlo simulations of a typical distribution of human platelet sizes show intrasubject variation in platelet size has only a 10 % net effect on R. Finally, experiments of thrombus formation show that platelet-surface lag times and platelet-platelet accumulation are similar for rectangular microfluidic test sections and round test sections when R >10. The findings show that the size of a microfluidic test section should be carefully considered in studies of cell-cell accumulation versus cell-surface adhesion.

  6. Dual mode laser velocimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gunter, William D., Jr. (Inventor); Donaldson, Ralph W. (Inventor); Anderson, Alma G., Jr. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    Described is a laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV) which is capable of operating with a small focus diameter for analyzing fluid flows at low velocity with high spatial resolution, or with a larger focus diameter to measure fluid flows at higher velocities accurately. More particularly, this is an LDV in which a simple reversal of a lens pair will allow it to operate in the two focus diameter modes.

  7. Translating 'Asian' Modes of Healing and Biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Sleeboom-Faulkner, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    This review article discusses the 'translation of Asian modes of healing and medicine' in six recently published books by raising seven questions. They serve both to review the volumes and to ask how we have moved from understanding systems of healing in terms of tradition and modernity, science and nonscience, globalization and locality, innovation and cultural heritage, to translating them in terms of assemblages, products, modes of resistance, social (dis-)harmony, and ecological balance. The questions span subjects ranging from the meaning of 'Asian' in Asian modes of healing, the object of healing and classifications of systems of healing to their relation with 'biomedicine,' modernization and the state, the extents to which communities share healing tradition, and their existential meaning in context.

  8. The whistler mode in a Vlasov plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tokar, R. L.; Gary, S. P.

    1985-01-01

    In this study, properties of small-amplitude parallel and oblique whistler-mode waves are investigated for a wide range of plasma parameters by numerically solving the full electromagnetic Vlasov-dispersion equation. To investigate the cold-plasma and electrostatic approximations for the whistler mode, the results are compared with results obtained using these descriptions. For large wavelengths, the cold-plasma description is often accurate, while for short wavelengths and sufficiently oblique propagation, the electrostatic description is often accurate. The study demonstrates that in a Vlasov plasma the whistler mode near resonance has a group velocity more nearly parallel to the magnetic field than that predicted by cold-plasma theory.

  9. Dual Mode Transmission Designs for Motorcycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheu, Kuen-Bao; Yan, Hong-Sen

    This paper presents two types of the dual mode transmission for use in a motorcycle. A motorcycle transmission typically using the discrete speed ratio transmission that works by alternating the gear drive, and the continuously variable transmission (CVT) that transmits power by using the rubber V-belt. The dual mode transmission described in this paper, utilizing a V-belt drive, a fixed ratio mechanism, and a planetary gear train, can provide two operation regimes over the full speed ratio range by means engaged clutches. One is the fixed gear ratio and differential transmission system; the other is the differential and continuously variable transmission system. The kinematics, power flow, and mechanical efficiency of each transmission system are analyzed. An example is employed to illustrate the design procedure. Furthermore, several available design concepts of the dual mode transmissions for motorcycle applications are proposed.

  10. The g-modes of white dwarfs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sobouti, Y.; Khajehpour, M. R. H.; Dixit, V. V.

    1980-01-01

    The neutral g-modes of a degenerate fluid at zero temperature are analyzed. The g-modes of a degenerate fluid at finite but small temperatures are then expanded in terms of those of the zero temperature fluid. For nonrelativistic degenerate fluids it is found that (1) the g-eigenvalues are proportional to T mu(6)sub e mu(-1)sub i, where T is the internal temperature of the fluid, mu sub e and mu sub i are the mean molecular weights of electrons and ions, respectively; (2) the ion pressure is solely responsible for driving the g-modes. For white dwarfs of about a solar mass, the periods of the g-oscillations are in the range of a few hundredths of seconds.

  11. Reconfigurable long-range phonon dynamics in optomechanical arrays.

    PubMed

    Xuereb, André; Genes, Claudiu; Pupillo, Guido; Paternostro, Mauro; Dantan, Aurélien

    2014-04-01

    We investigate periodic optomechanical arrays as reconfigurable platforms for engineering the coupling between multiple mechanical and electromagnetic modes and for exploring many-body phonon dynamics. Exploiting structural resonances in the coupling between light fields and collective motional modes of the array, we show that tunable effective long-range interactions between mechanical modes can be achieved. This paves the way towards the implementation of controlled phononic walks and heat transfer on densely connected graphs as well as the coherent transfer of excitations between distant elements of optomechanical arrays. PMID:24745417

  12. Did BICEP2 see vector modes? First B-mode constraints on cosmic defects.

    PubMed

    Moss, Adam; Pogosian, Levon

    2014-05-01

    Scaling networks of cosmic defects, such as strings and textures, actively generate scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations throughout the history of the Universe. In particular, vector modes sourced by defects are an efficient source of the cosmic microwave background B-mode polarization. We use the recently released BICEP2 and POLARBEAR B-mode polarization spectra to constrain properties of a wide range of different types of cosmic strings networks. We find that in order for strings to provide a satisfactory fit on their own, the effective interstring distance needs to be extremely large--spectra that fit the data best are more representative of global strings and textures. When a local string contribution is considered together with the inflationary B-mode spectrum, the fit is improved. We discuss implications of these results for theories that predict cosmic defects. PMID:24836232

  13. Probing plasmonic breathing modes optically

    SciTech Connect

    Krug, Markus K. Reisecker, Michael; Hohenau, Andreas; Ditlbacher, Harald; Trügler, Andreas; Hohenester, Ulrich; Krenn, Joachim R.

    2014-10-27

    The confinement of surface plasmon modes in flat nanoparticles gives rise to plasmonic breathing modes. With a vanishing net dipole moment, breathing modes do not radiate, i.e., they are optically dark. Having thus escaped optical detection, breathing modes were only recently revealed in silver nanodisks with electron energy loss spectroscopy in an electron microscope. We show that for disk diameters >200 nm, retardation induced by oblique optical illumination relaxes the optically dark character. This makes breathing modes and thus the full plasmonic mode spectrum accessible to optical spectroscopy. The experimental spectroscopy data are in excellent agreement with numerical simulations.

  14. Pulsation modes of long-period variables in the period-luminosity plane

    SciTech Connect

    Soszyński, I.; Udalski, A.; Wood, P. R. E-mail: udalski@astrouw.edu.pl

    2013-12-20

    We present a phenomenological analysis of long-period variables (LPVs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud with the aim of detecting pulsation modes associated with different period-luminosity (PL) relations. Among brighter LPVs, we discover a group of triple-mode semi-regular variables with the fundamental, first-overtone, and second-overtone modes simultaneously excited, which fall on PL sequences C, C', and B, respectively. The mode identification in the fainter red giants is more complicated. We demonstrate that the fundamental-mode pulsators partly overlap with the first-overtone modes. We show a possible range of fundamental mode and first overtone periods in the PL diagram.

  15. Constraining primordial vector mode from B-mode polarization

    SciTech Connect

    Saga, Shohei; Ichiki, Kiyotomo; Shiraishi, Maresuke E-mail: maresuke.shiraishi@pd.infn.it

    2014-10-01

    The B-mode polarization spectrum of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) may be the smoking gun of not only the primordial tensor mode but also of the primordial vector mode. If there exist nonzero vector-mode metric perturbations in the early Universe, they are known to be supported by anisotropic stress fluctuations of free-streaming particles such as neutrinos, and to create characteristic signatures on both the CMB temperature, E-mode, and B-mode polarization anisotropies. We place constraints on the properties of the primordial vector mode characterized by the vector-to-scalar ratio r{sub v} and the spectral index n{sub v} of the vector-shear power spectrum, from the Planck and BICEP2 B-mode data. We find that, for scale-invariant initial spectra, the ΛCDM model including the vector mode fits the data better than the model including the tensor mode. The difference in χ{sup 2} between the vector and tensor models is Δχ{sup 2} = 3.294, because, on large scales the vector mode generates smaller temperature fluctuations than the tensor mode, which is preferred for the data. In contrast, the tensor mode can fit the data set equally well if we allow a significantly blue-tilted spectrum. We find that the best-fitting tensor mode has a large blue tilt and leads to an indistinct reionization bump on larger angular scales. The slightly red-tilted vector mode supported by the current data set can also create O(10{sup -22})-Gauss magnetic fields at cosmological recombination. Our constraints should motivate research that considers models of the early Universe that involve the vector mode.

  16. Hippocampal pyramidal neurons switch from a multipolar migration mode to a novel "climbing" migration mode during development.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Ayako; Kubo, Ken-ichiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Matsunaga, Yuki; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2014-01-22

    The hippocampus plays important roles in brain functions. Despite the importance of hippocampal functions, recent analyses of neuronal migration have mainly been performed on the cerebral neocortex, and the cellular mechanisms responsible for the formation of the hippocampus are not yet completely understood. Moreover, why a prolonged time is required for hippocampal neurons to complete their migration has been unexplainable for several decades. We analyzed the migratory profile of neurons in the developing mouse hippocampal CA1 region and found that the hippocampal pyramidal neurons generated near the ventricle became postmitotic multipolar cells and accumulated in the multipolar cell accumulation zone (MAZ) in the late stage of development. The hippocampal neurons passed through the pyramidal layer by a unique mode of migration. Their leading processes were highly branched and made contact with many radial fibers. Time-lapse imaging revealed that the migrating cells changed their scaffolds from the original radial fibers to other radial fibers, and as a result they proceed in a zigzag manner, with long intervals. The migrating cells in the hippocampus reminded us of "rock climbers" that instead of using their hands to pull up their bodies were using their leading processes to pull up their cell bodies. Because this mode of migration had never been described, we called it the "climbing" mode. The change from the "climbing" mode in the hippocampus to the "locomotion" mode in the neocortex may have contributed to the brain expansion during evolution.

  17. Slow EIT waves as gravity modes

    SciTech Connect

    Vranjes, J.

    2011-06-15

    The EIT waves [named after the extreme-ultraviolet imaging telescope (EIT) onboard the solar and heliospheric observatory (SOHO)] are in the literature usually described as fast magneto-acoustic (FMA) modes. However, observations show that a large percentage of these events propagate with very slow speeds that may be as low as 20 km/s. This is far below the FMA wave speed which cannot be below the sound speed, the latter being typically larger than 10{sup 2} km/s in the corona. In the present study, it is shown that, to account for such low propagation speed, a different wave model should be used, based on the theory of gravity waves, both internal (IG) and surface (SG) ones. The gravity modes are physically completely different from the FMA mode, as they are essentially dispersive and in addition the IG wave is a transverse mode. Both the IG and the SG mode separately can provide proper propagation velocities in the whole low speed range.

  18. Structure-property relationship for cellular accumulation of macrolones in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs).

    PubMed

    Munić Kos, Vesna; Koštrun, Sanja; Fajdetić, Andrea; Bosnar, Martina; Kelnerić, Željko; Stepanić, Višnja; Eraković Haber, Vesna

    2013-05-13

    Macrolones are a new class of antimicrobial compounds consisting of a macrolide scaffold linked to a 4-quinolone-3-carboxylic acid moiety via C(4″) position of a macrolide. As macrolides are known to possess favorable pharmacokinetic properties by accumulating in inflammatory cells, in this study we determined the intensity of accumulation in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) of 57 compounds of the macrolone class and analyzed the relationship between the molecular structure and this cellular pharmacokinetic property. Accumulation of macrolones ranged from 0 to 5.5-fold higher than the standard macrolide azithromycin. Distinct structural features in all three considered molecule parts: the macrolide scaffold, quinolone moiety and the linker, affect cellular accumulation. Interestingly, while the parent macrolide, azithromycin, accumulates approximately 3-fold more than clarithromycin, among macrolones all clarithromycin derivatives accumulated in PMNs significantly more than their azithromycin counterparts. Modeling cellular accumulation of macrolones with simple molecular descriptors, as well as with the measured octanol-water distribution coefficient, revealed that the number of hydrogen bond donors and secondary amide groups negatively contribute to macrolone accumulation, while lipophilicity makes a positive contribution.

  19. Cadmium uptake and accumulation by the decapod crustacean Penaeus indicus.

    PubMed

    Nuñez-Nogueira, Gabriel; Rainbow, Philip S

    2005-09-01

    Juveniles of the dendrobranchiate decapod Penaeus indicus take up radiolabelled cadmium from solution over the exposure concentration range of 1.8-31.5 microg L(-1), with an uptake rate constant of 0.090 L g(-1)d(-1) at 15 salinity and 25 degrees C. New cadmium taken up is added to the existing cadmium content of the prawn with no significant excretion, and the rate of accumulation of radiolabelled cadmium is a measure of the absolute cadmium uptake rate from solution. Moulting had no significant effect on the accumulation of cadmium. Newly accumulated cadmium is distributed to all organs with the highest proportions of body content being found in the hepatopancreas, exoskeleton, gills and remaining soft tissues, the hepatopancreas and gills containing the highest labelled cadmium concentrations. Like other crustaceans, penaeid prawns inhabiting anthropogenically contaminated coastal waters with raised cadmium bioavailabilities can be expected to contain raised body concentrations of cadmium. Cadmium concentrations of most field-collected adult penaeids are relatively low, as a probable consequence of the growth dilution of their cadmium contents as a result of the rapid growth rates of penaeid prawns. PMID:15769503

  20. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    DOE PAGES

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify themore » particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.« less

  1. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. But, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. Moreover, a charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. Our study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  2. Surface charge accumulation of particles containing radionuclides in open air.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yong-ha; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Tsouris, Costas

    2015-05-01

    Radioactivity can induce charge accumulation on radioactive particles. However, electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are typically neglected in transport modeling of radioactive plumes because it is assumed that ionizing radiation leads to charge neutralization. The assumption that electrostatic interactions caused by radioactivity are negligible is evaluated here by examining charge accumulation and neutralization on particles containing radionuclides in open air. A charge-balance model is employed to predict charge accumulation on radioactive particles. It is shown that particles containing short-lived radionuclides can be charged with multiple elementary charges through radioactive decay. The presence of radioactive particles can significantly modify the particle charge distribution in open air and yield an asymmetric bimodal charge distribution, suggesting that strong electrostatic particle interactions may occur during short- and long-range transport of radioactive particles. Possible effects of transported radioactive particles on electrical properties of the local atmosphere are reported. The study offers insight into transport characteristics of airborne radionuclides. Results are useful in atmospheric transport modeling of radioactive plumes.

  3. Bacterial accumulation mediated by flow compression-expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miño, Gastón L.; Altshuler, Ernesto; Lindner, Anke; Stocker, Roman; Condat, Carlos A.; Banchio, Adolfo J.; Marconi, Veronica I.; Clément, Eric

    2014-11-01

    Swimming bacteria can be concentrated using a suitable microfluidic device. The combination of flow rate and surface shape can have significant impact on the microorganisms' behavior. In those processes rheotaxis, accumulation caused by ratchets and even attachment to surfaces leading biofilm formation can be observed. Under these conditions, the transport of the active suspension is deeply modified, and differs significantly from passive suspensions. In this work, we present experimental evidence of Escherichia coli suspension flowing in a straight channel with a funnel-like constriction in the middle. This constriction is characterized by the aperture (wf) and its angle (Θf). We explore how the modification of wf and Θf affects the accumulation of bacteria in the channel. Concentrations of bacteria passing the constriction were observed for all the cases. However, the range of the flow rate that produced such accumulation varied with the geometry. In order to obtain a better understanding of this phenomenon, experiments are compared with a simple phenomenological model.

  4. Accumulation rates of airborne heavy metals in wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Souch, C.J.; Filippelli, G.M.; Dollar, N.; Perkins, S.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Accumulation rates of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) retained in wetland sediments in northwest Indiana-downwind of the Chicago-Gary-Hammond industrial area-are quantified to assess anthropogenic influences on atmospheric fluxes. Metal concentrations for 22 sediment cores are determined by ICP-AES after ashing and strong acid extraction. Relations between organic content and metal concentrations at depth are used to separate natural and anthropogenic sources. Accumulation rates over the lifetime of the wetlands (???4500 years) have averaged 0.2 (Cd), 1.4 (Cu), 1.7 (Cr), 13.4 (Mn), 4.8 (Pb), and 18.7 (Zn) mg m-2 y-1. Rates for the last 100 years have increased on average by factors of 6 (Cd), 8 (Cu), 10 (Mn), 15 (Pb), and 30 (Zn), remaining effectively constant for Cr. Where the wetlands have been drained, metals have been lost from the sediments, owing to changes in organic content and local hydrochemistry (exposure to acidic rainfall). Sediment-based accumulation rates at the undrained sites are higher, though generally consistent, with measured and modeled atmospheric fluxes documented by short-term studies conducted over the last three decades. The fraction of the total metals in the wetlands estimated to be of anthropogenic origin ranges from approximately 3% for Cr, up to approximately 35% for Pb, and 70% for Zn. This historic legacy of contamination must be considered in land management decisions, particularly when wetlands are drained.

  5. Gyrokinetic Stability Studies of the Microtearing Mode in the National Spherical Torus Experiment H-mode

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertel, J. A.; Redi, M. H.; Budny, R. V.; Rewoldt, G.; Dorland, W.

    2005-10-19

    Insight into plasma microturbulence and transport is being sought using linear simulations of drift waves on the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX), following a study of drift wave modes on the Alcator C-Mod Tokamak. Microturbulence is likely generated by instabilities of drift waves, which cause transport of heat and particles. Understanding this transport is important because the containment of heat and particles is required for the achievement of practical nuclear fusion. Microtearing modes may cause high heat transport through high electron thermal conductivity. It is hoped that microtearing will be stable along with good electron transport in the proposed low collisionality International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). Stability of the microtearing mode is investigated for conditions at mid-radius in a high density NSTX high performance (H-mode) plasma, which is compared to the proposed ITER plasmas. The microtearing mode is driven by the electron temperature gradient, and believed to be mediated by ion collisions and magnetic shear. Calculations are based on input files produced by TRXPL following TRANSP (a time-dependent transport analysis code) analysis. The variability of unstable mode growth rates is examined as a function of ion and electron collisionalities using the parallel gyrokinetic computational code GS2. Results show the microtearing mode stability dependence for a range of plasma collisionalities. Computation verifies analytic predictions that higher collisionalities than in the NSTX experiment increase microtearing instability growth rates, but that the modes are stabilized at the highest values. There is a transition of the dominant mode in the collisionality scan to ion temperature gradient character at both high and low collisionalities. The calculations suggest that plasma electron thermal confinement may be greatly improved in the low-collisionality ITER.

  6. Accumulation of swimming bacteria near an interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jay; Li, Guanglai

    2012-11-01

    Microbes inhabit planet earth over billions of years and have adapted to diverse physical environment of water, soil, and particularly at or near interfaces. We focused our attention on the locomotion of Caulobacter crescentus, a singly flagellated bacterium, at the interface of water/solid or water/air. We measured the distribution of a forward swimming strain of C. crescentus near a surface using a three-dimensional tracking technique based on dark field microscopy and found that the swimming bacteria accumulate heavily within a micrometer from the surface. We attribute this accumulation to frequent collisions of the swimming cells with the surface, causing them to align parallel to the surface as they continually move forward. The extent of accumulation at the steady state is accounted for by balancing alignment caused by these collisions with rotational Brownian motion of the micrometer-sized bacteria. We performed a simulation based on this model, which reproduced the measured results. Additional simulations demonstrate the dependence of accumulation on swimming speed and cell size, showing that longer and faster cells accumulate more near a surface than shorter and slower ones do. The overarching goal of our study is to describe interfacial microbial behavior through detailed analysis of their motion. We acknowledge support by NSF PHY 1058375.

  7. Geomorphic control of landscape carbon accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenbloom, N.A.; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Schimel, D.S.

    2006-01-01

    We use the CREEP process-response model to simulate soil organic carbon accumulation in an undisturbed prairie site in Iowa. Our primary objectives are to identify spatial patterns of carbon accumulation, and explore the effect of erosion on basin-scale C accumulation. Our results point to two general findings. First, redistribution of soil carbon by erosion results in a net increase in basin-wide carbon storage relative to a noneroding environment. Landscape-average mean residence times are increased in an eroding landscape owing to the burial/preservation of otherwise labile C. Second, field observations taken along a slope transect may overlook significant intraslope variations in carbon accumulation. Spatial patterns of modeled deep C accumulation are complex. While surface carbon with its relatively short equilibration time is predictable from surface properties, deep carbon is strongly influenced by the landscape's geomorphic and climatic history, resulting in wide spatial variability. Convergence and divergence associated with upland swales and interfluves result in bimodal carbon distributions in upper and mid slopes; variability in carbon storage within modeled mid slopes was as high as simulated differences between erosional shoulders and depositional valley bottoms. The bimodality of mid-slope C variability in the model suggests that a three-dimensional sampling strategy is preferable over the traditional two-dimensional analog or "catena" approach. Copyright 2006 by the American Geophysical Union.

  8. Three-port mode-(de)interleaver in silicon waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Weiwei; Wang, Pengjun; Yang, Jianyi

    2016-06-01

    We propose a three-port silicon mode-(de)interleaver (TSMIL) using an asymmetric multi-arm Y-junction to flexibly address optical modes and efficiently increase the ports with less cascaded stages in mode-division multiplexing transmission. The design criteria developed for multi-port mode-(de)interleaving is presented. The qualitative functionality of the device is mainly determined by the widths of the arms. The example of a six-mode TSMIL is designed and analyzed in detail. Numerical simulations show that a low excess loss (<1 dB) and a low mode crosstalk (<-17 dB) over a 60 nm wavelength range can be obtained.

  9. Stability of TAE modes in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect

    Strait, E.J.; Chu, M.S.; Lao, L.L.; Turnbull, A.D.; Heidbrink, W.W.; Duong, H.H.

    1992-09-01

    TAE modes driven by neutral beam injection have been observed in DIII-D. The measured frequency agrees very well with theoretical predictions for DIII-D discharges. At large amplitude these instabilities can lead to loss of over 50% of the beam power, as well as large loss of non-resonant MeV fusion products. The threshold value of fast ion beta for destabilization and the observed range of unstable mode numbers are in reasonable agreement with predictions for the mode growth rate. Continuum damping dominates at low mode numbers, while damping by electron kinetic effects dominates at high mode numbers. Preliminary experiments suggest that TAB modes can be stabilized by current profile control.

  10. Mode Tracker for Mode-Hop-Free Operation of a Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Gerard; Tittel, Frank K.; Curl, Robert F.

    2010-01-01

    A mode-tracking system that includes a mode-controlling subsystem has been incorporated into an external-cavity (EC) quantum cascade laser that operates in a mid-infrared wavelength range. The mode-tracking system makes it possible to perform mode-hop-free wavelength scans, as needed for high-resolution spectroscopy and detection of trace gases. The laser includes a gain chip, a beam-collimating lens, and a diffraction grating. The grating is mounted on a platform, the position of which can be varied to effect independent control of the EC length and the grating angle. The position actuators include a piezoelectric stage for translation control and a motorized stage for coarse rotation control equipped with a piezoelectric actuator for fine rotation control. Together, these actuators enable control of the EC length over a range of about 90 m with a resolution of 0.9 nm, and control of the grating angle over a coarse-tuning range of +/-6.3deg and a fine-tuning range of +/-520 microrad with a resolution of 10 nrad. A mirror mounted on the platform with the grating assures always the same direction of the output laser beam.

  11. Attenuation of free spheroidal oscillations of the Earth after the M = 9 Earthquake in Sumatra and the super-deep Earthquake in the Sea of Okhotsk: I. the Admissible Q-factor range for the fundamental mode and overtones of the free spheroidal oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodenskii, S. M.; Molodenskaya, M. S.

    2015-11-01

    The problem of reconstructing the depth distribution of density and the depth and frequency dependences of the mechanical Q-factor in the Earth's mantle from the entire set of the present-day seismic and astrometric data on the travel times and periods of seismic waves and the amplitudes and phases of forced nutations is considered. The solution of the problem is refined by including the new data about the attenuation of the free oscillations of the Earth excited by the Sumatra earthquake ( M = 9) and super-deep earthquake in the Sea of Okhotsk. The actual accuracy of the Q-factor is studied in the first part of the paper. To this end, we analyze (1) the convergence of the Q-factor estimated from the time series of different length shifted along the time axis and (2) the convergence of the results based on the different data. Since the accuracy of identifying all the periods and attenuation factors for the free oscillations from the Sumatra earthquake is significantly higher than for the earthquake with M = 9 in Japan, the data are only compared for the Sumatra and Okhotsk events. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is analyzed based on the records from different Global Seismographic Network (GSN) stations including the station in Obninsk, the Kurchatov station in Kazakhstan, and the main ERM and MAJO stations in Japan. It is found that the highest SNR was observed in Obninsk. The inverse problem of reconstructing the density and Q-factor is solved for the frequency dependent real parts of the shear moduli with allowance for the most accurate data about the attenuation factors for the fundamental spheroidal modes of the free oscillations of the Earth.

  12. A bilinear failure criterion for mixed-mode delamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeder, James R.

    1993-01-01

    Many different failure criteria have been suggested for mixed-mode delamination toughness, but few sets of mixed-mode data exist that are consistent over the full range of Mode 1 opening load to Mode 2 shear load range. The mixed-mode bending (MMB) test was used to measure the delamination toughness of a brittle epoxy composite, a state-of-the-art toughened epoxy composite, and a tough thermoplastic composite over the full mixed-mode range. To gain insight into the different failure responses of the different materials, the delamination fracture surfaces were also examined. An evaluation of several failure criteria that have been reported in the literature was performed, and the range of responses modeled by each criterion was analyzed. A bilinear failure criterion was introduced based on a change in the failure mechanism observed from the delamination surfaces. The different criteria were compared to the failure response of the three materials tested. The responses of the two epoxies were best modeled with the new bilinear failure criterion. The failure response of the tough thermoplastic composite could be modeled well with the bilinear criterion but could also be modeled with the more simple linear failure criterion. Since the materials differed in their mixed-mode failure response, mixed-mode delamination testing will be needed to characterize a composite material. This paper presents consistent sets of mixed-mode data, provides a critical evaluation of the mixed-mode failure criteria, and should provide general guidance for selecting an appropriate criterion for other materials.

  13. Damage mechanics - failure modes

    SciTech Connect

    Krajcinovic, D.; Vujosevic, M.

    1996-12-31

    The present study summarizes the results of the DOE sponsored research program focused on the brittle failure of solids with disordered microstructure. The failure is related to the stochastic processes on the microstructural scale; namely, the nucleation and growth of microcracks. The intrinsic failure modes, such as the percolation, localization and creep rupture, are studied by emphasizing the effect of the micro-structural disorder. A rich spectrum of physical phenomena and new concepts that emerges from this research demonstrates the reasons behind the limitations of traditional, deterministic, and local continuum models.

  14. Localized acoustic surface modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Mohamed; Chen, Pai-Yen; Bağcı, Hakan

    2016-04-01

    We introduce the concept of localized acoustic surface modes. We demonstrate that they are induced on a two-dimensional cylindrical rigid surface with subwavelength corrugations under excitation by an incident acoustic plane wave. Our results show that the corrugated rigid surface is acoustically equivalent to a cylindrical scatterer with uniform mass density that can be represented using a Drude-like model. This, indeed, suggests that plasmonic-like acoustic materials can be engineered with potential applications in various areas including sensing, imaging, and cloaking.

  15. Secondary sympatry caused by range expansion informs on the dynamics of microendemism in a biodiversity hotspot.

    PubMed

    Nattier, Romain; Grandcolas, Philippe; Elias, Marianne; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Jourdan, Hervé; Couloux, Arnaud; Robillard, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Islands are bounded areas where high endemism is explained either by allopatric speciation through the fragmentation of the limited amount of space available, or by sympatric speciation and accumulation of daughter species. Most empirical evidence point out the dominant action of allopatric speciation. We evaluate this general view by looking at a case study where sympatric speciation is suspected. We analyse the mode, tempo and geography of speciation in Agnotecous, a cricket genus endemic to New Caledonia showing a generalized pattern of sympatry between species making sympatric speciation plausible. We obtained five mitochondrial and five nuclear markers (6.8 kb) from 37 taxa corresponding to 17 of the 21 known extant species of Agnotecous, and including several localities per species, and we conducted phylogenetic and dating analyses. Our results suggest that the diversification of Agnotecous occurred mostly through allopatric speciation in the last 10 Myr. Highly microendemic species are the most recent ones (<2 Myr) and current sympatry is due to secondary range expansion after allopatric speciation. Species distribution should then be viewed as a highly dynamic process and extreme microendemism only as a temporary situation. We discuss these results considering the influence of climatic changes combined with intricate soil diversity and mountain topography. A complex interplay between these factors could have permitted repeated speciation events and range expansion. PMID:23139758

  16. Secondary Sympatry Caused by Range Expansion Informs on the Dynamics of Microendemism in a Biodiversity Hotspot

    PubMed Central

    Nattier, Romain; Grandcolas, Philippe; Elias, Marianne; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure; Jourdan, Hervé; Couloux, Arnaud; Robillard, Tony

    2012-01-01

    Islands are bounded areas where high endemism is explained either by allopatric speciation through the fragmentation of the limited amount of space available, or by sympatric speciation and accumulation of daughter species. Most empirical evidence point out the dominant action of allopatric speciation. We evaluate this general view by looking at a case study where sympatric speciation is suspected. We analyse the mode, tempo and geography of speciation in Agnotecous, a cricket genus endemic to New Caledonia showing a generalized pattern of sympatry between species making sympatric speciation plausible. We obtained five mitochondrial and five nuclear markers (6.8 kb) from 37 taxa corresponding to 17 of the 21 known extant species of Agnotecous, and including several localities per species, and we conducted phylogenetic and dating analyses. Our results suggest that the diversification of Agnotecous occurred mostly through allopatric speciation in the last 10 Myr. Highly microendemic species are the most recent ones (<2 Myr) and current sympatry is due to secondary range expansion after allopatric speciation. Species distribution should then be viewed as a highly dynamic process and extreme microendemism only as a temporary situation. We discuss these results considering the influence of climatic changes combined with intricate soil diversity and mountain topography. A complex interplay between these factors could have permitted repeated speciation events and range expansion. PMID:23139758

  17. Inhibition of Fat Accumulation by Hesperidin in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Peng, Huimin; Wei, Zhaohan; Luo, Hujie; Yang, Yiting; Wu, Zhengxing; Gan, Lu; Yang, Xiangliang

    2016-06-29

    Hesperidin, abundant in citrus fruits, has a wide range of pharmacological effects, including anticarcinogenic, anti-inflammatory, antioxidative, radioprotective, and antiviral activities. However, relatively few studies on the effects of hesperidin on lipid metabolism have been reported. Here, using Caenorhaditis elegans as a model animal, we found that 100 μM hesperidin significantly decreased fat accumulation in both high-fat worms cultured in nematode growth medium containing 10 mM glucose (83.5 ± 1.2% versus control by Sudan Black B staining and 87.6 ± 2.0% versus control by Oil Red O staining; p < 0.001) and daf-2 mutant worms (87.8 ± 1.4% versus control by Oil Red O staining; p < 0.001). Furthermore, 50 μM hesperidin decreased the ratio of oleic acid/stearic acid (C18:1Δ9/C18:0) (p < 0.05), and supplementation of oleic acid could restore the inhibitory effect of hesperidin on fat accumulation. Hesperidin significantly downregulated the expression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase, fat-6, and fat-7 (p < 0.05), and mutation of fat-6 and fat-7 reversed fat accumulation inhibited by hesperidin. In addition, hesperidin decreased the expression of other genes involved in lipid metabolism, including pod-2, mdt-15, acs-2, and kat-1 (p < 0.05). These results suggested that hesperidin reduced fat accumulation by affecting several lipid metabolism pathways, such as fat-6 and fat-7. This study provided new insights into elucidating the mechanism underlying the regulation of lipid metabolism by hesperidin. PMID:27267939

  18. Mode characteristics and directional emission for square microcavity lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yue-De; Huang, Yong-Zhen

    2016-06-01

    Square microcavities with high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes have a series of novel optical properties and can be employed as compact-size laser resonators. In this paper, the mode characteristics of square optical microcavities and the lasing properties of directional-emission square semiconductor microlasers are reviewed for the realization of potential light sources in the photonic integrated circuits and optical interconnects. A quasi-analytical model is introduced to describe the confined modes in square microcavities, and high quality factor whispering-gallery-like modes are predicted by the mode-coupling theory and confirmed by the numerical simulation. An output waveguide directly coupled to the position with weak mode field is used to achieve directional emission and control the lasing mode. Electrically-pumped InP-based directional-emission square microlasers are realized at room temperature, and the lasing spectra agree well with the mode analysis. Different kinds of square microcavity lasers, including dual-mode laser with a tunable interval, single-mode laser with a wide tunable wavelength range, and high-speed direct-modulated laser are also demonstrated experimentally.

  19. Slichter modes of Mercury: period and possible observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coyette, A.; Van Hoolst, T.; Dehant, V.

    2012-04-01

    We study the period of the Slichter mode (vibrational mode of the inner core of a planet) of Mercury in relation to its interior structure and assess the possibility to observe this mode with the probes MESSENGER and BepiColombo. Grinfeld and Wisdom (2005) have developed a methodology for the determination of the period of the polar Slichter modes of a planetary interior consisting of three homogeneous layers. We generalized this approach to models with an arbitrary but finite number of layers. Slichter mode periods are calculated for a large set of interior structure models of Mercury. Periods obtained ranges from a few hours to more than hundred hours depending mainly on the size of the inner core. The Slichter mode of Mercury could be excited to a level observable by BepiColombo by an impact by a meteoroid with a radius of at least 100 m (assuming that the Slichter mode is the only excited mode). However, observation of the Slichter mode of Mercury by BepiColombo would require a fortunate recent impact since the estimated magnetic damping time of the mode is well below the average time between impacts of at least this size.

  20. Cohabitation history, marriage, and wealth accumulation.

    PubMed

    Vespa, Jonathan; Painter, Matthew A

    2011-08-01

    This study extends research on the relationship between wealth accumulation and union experiences, such as marriage and cohabitation. Using data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1979, we explore the wealth trajectories of married individuals in light of their premarital cohabitation histories. Over time, marriage positively correlates with wealth accumulation. Most married persons with a premarital cohabitation history have wealth trajectories that are indistinguishable from those without cohabitation experience, with one exception: individuals who marry their one and only cohabiting partner experience a wealth premium that is twice as large as that for married individuals who never cohabited prior to marrying. Results remain robust over time despite cohabiters' selection out of marriage, yet vary by race/ethnicity. We conclude that relationship history may shape long-term wealth accumulation, and contrary to existing literature, individuals who marry their only cohabiting partners experience a beneficial marital outcome. It is therefore important to understand the diversity of cohabitation experiences among the married.

  1. ACCA College English Teaching Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ding, Renlun

    2008-01-01

    This paper elucidates a new college English teaching mode--"ACCA" (Autonomous Cooperative Class-teaching All-round College English Teaching Mode). Integrated theories such as autonomous learning and cooperative learning into one teaching mode, "ACCA", which is being developed and advanced in practice as well, is the achievement…

  2. Standardization of Keyword Search Mode

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Su, Di

    2010-01-01

    In spite of its popularity, keyword search mode has not been standardized. Though information professionals are quick to adapt to various presentations of keyword search mode, novice end-users may find keyword search confusing. This article compares keyword search mode in some major reference databases and calls for standardization. (Contains 3…

  3. Comparative analysis of planetary laser ranging concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dirkx, D.; Bauer, S.; Noomen, R.; Vermeersen, B. L. A.; Visser, P. N.

    2014-12-01

    Laser ranging is an emerging technology for tracking interplanetary missions, offering improved range accuracy and precision (mm-cm), compared to existing DSN tracking. The ground segment uses existing Satellite Laser Ranging (SLR) technology, whereas the space segment is modified with an active system. In a one-way system, such as that currently being used on the LRO spacecraft (Zuber et al., 2010), only an active detector is required on the spacecraft. For a two-way system, such as that tested by using the laser altimeter system on the MESSENGER spacecraft en route to Mercury (Smith et al., 2006), a laser transmitter system is additionally placed on the space segment, which will asynchronously fire laser pulses towards the ground stations. Although the one-way system requires less hardware, clock errors on both the space and ground segments will accumulate over time, polluting the range measurements. For a two-way system, the range measurements are only sensitive to clock errors integrated over the the two-way light time.We investigate the performance of both one- and two-way laser range systems by simulating their operation. We generate realizations of clock error time histories from Allan variance profiles, and use them to create range measurement error profiles. We subsequently perform the orbit determination process from this data to quanitfy the system's performance. For our simulations, we use two test cases: a lunar orbiter similar to LRO and a Phobos lander similar to the Phobos Laser Ranging concept (Turyshev et al., 2010). For the lunar orbiter, we include an empirical model for unmodelled non-gravitational accelerations in our truth model to include errors ihe dynamics. We include the estimation of clock parameters over a number of arc lengths for our simulations of the one-way range system and use a variety of state arc durations for the lunar orbiter simulations.We perform Monte Carlo simulations and generate true error distributions for both

  4. Landscape Evolution and Carbon Accumulation: Uniformitarianism Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenbloom, N. A.; Harden, J. W.; Neff, J. C.; Schimel, D. S.

    2003-12-01

    What is the role of hillslope transport in long-term carbon accumulation in soils? How do parent material, climate, and landform interact to produce the landscapes we observe today and to what extent can we use present day conditions to infer the dominant processes of the past? We use the CREEP [Rosenbloom, N.A. et al., 2001] process-response model to ask these questions, exploring the time-evolution of landscape form, soil distribution, and carbon accumulation in an undisturbed prairie site in western Iowa [Harden, J.W. et al., 2002]. The CREEP model simulates differential transport of soil particles, blanket deposition of atmospheric 10Be with eolian dust, and passive advection of soil carbon and 10Be, enabling the preferential enrichment and burial of rapidly moving soil constituents. By comparing landscape-wide average accumulations of 10Be to borehole observations at three hillslope positions, we conclude that the distribution of clay-adsorbed 10Be cannot be explained by co-transport with clay particles alone. Rather, 10Be appears to behave as a more complex tracer than originally assumed, requiring an explicit, independent parameterization of wet deposition and transport. By comparison, model carbon accumulation strongly reflects patterns of clay redistribution indicating that in situ carbon turnover is faster than redistribution. Observed vertical distributions of soil properties, including 10Be, could only be explained by assuming variations in deposition and erosion rates, specifically periods of accumulation, followed by periods of transport. This effect might not be apparent if only landform shape, geometry, and soil depth were considered and vertical distributions of soil properties were not explicitly simulated. The current landscape reflects a history of strong shifts in erosion and accumulation rates that cannot be simulated using a uniform parameterization of long-term landscape-evolution processes.

  5. Nonlinear excitation of long-wavelength modes in Hall plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhin, V. P.; Ilgisonis, V. I.; Smolyakov, A. I.; Sorokina, E. A.

    2016-10-01

    Hall plasmas with magnetized electrons and unmagnetized ions exhibit a wide range of small scale fluctuations in the lower-hybrid frequency range as well as low-frequency large scale modes. Modulational instability of lower-hybrid frequency modes is investigated in this work for typical conditions in Hall plasma devices such as magnetrons and Hall thrusters. In these conditions, the dispersion of the waves in the lower-hybrid frequency range propagating perpendicular to the external magnetic field is due to the gradients of the magnetic field and the plasma density. It is shown that such lower-hybrid modes are unstable with respect to the secondary instability of the large scale quasimode perturbations. It is suggested that the large scale slow coherent modes observed in a number of Hall plasma devices may be explained as a result of such secondary instabilities.

  6. Single-Mode VISAR

    SciTech Connect

    Krauter, Kerry

    2007-11-28

    High energy-density physics (HEDP) experiments examine the properties of materials under extreme conditions. These experiments rely on the measurement of one or two velocities. These velocities are used to obtain Hugoniot relationships and thermodynamic equations of state. This methodology is referred to as 'velocimetry' and an instrument used to measure the shock wave is called a 'velocimeter' or a '(velocity) diagnostic'. The two most-widely used existing velocity diagnostics are; photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and velocity interferometer system for any reflector (VISAR). PDV's advantages are a fast rise-time and ease of implementation but PDV has an upper velocity limit. Traditional implementations of VISAR have a rise time 10 times slower than PDV and are not easily implemented but are capable of measuring any velocity produced during HEDP experiments. This thesis describes a novel method of combining the positive attributes of PDV and VISAR into a more cost effective diagnostic called a Single-Mode VISAR (SMV). The new diagnostic will consist of PDV parts in a VISAR configuration. This configuration will enable the measurement of any velocity produced during shock physics experiments while the components used to build the diagnostic will give the diagnostic a fast rise time and make it easy to use. This thesis describes the process of building and testing the first single-mode VISAR. The tests include verifying the performance of the components and the diagnostic as a whole.

  7. Modes of fossil preservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schopf, J.M.

    1975-01-01

    The processes of geologic preservation are important for understanding the organisms represented by fossils. Some fossil differences are due to basic differences in organization of animals and plants, but the interpretation of fossils has also tended to be influenced by modes of preservation. Four modes of preservation generally can be distinguished: (1) Cellular permineralization ("petrifaction") preserves anatomical detail, and, occasionally, even cytologic structures. (2) Coalified compression, best illustrated by structures from coal but characteristic of many plant fossils in shale, preserves anatomical details in distorted form and produces surface replicas (impressions) on enclosing matrix. (3) Authigenic preservation replicates surface form or outline (molds and casts) prior to distortion by compression and, depending on cementation and timing, may intergrade with fossils that have been subject to compression. (4) Duripartic (hard part) preservation is characteristic of fossil skeletal remains, predominantly animal. Molds, pseudomorphs, or casts may form as bulk replacements following dissolution of the original fossil material, usually by leaching. Classification of the kinds of preservation in fossils will aid in identifying the processes responsible for modifying the fossil remains of both animals and plants. ?? 1975.

  8. SAMPEX Spin Stabilized Mode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsai, Dean C.; Markley, F. Landis; Watson, Todd P.

    2008-01-01

    The Solar, Anomalous, and Magnetospheric Particle Explorer (SAMPEX), the first of the Small Explorer series of spacecraft, was launched on July 3, 1992 into an 82' inclination orbit with an apogee of 670 km and a perigee of 520 km and a mission lifetime goal of 3 years. After more than 15 years of continuous operation, the reaction wheel began to fail on August 18,2007. With a set of three magnetic torquer bars being the only remaining attitude actuator, the SAMPEX recovery team decided to deviate from its original attitude control system design and put the spacecraft into a spin stabilized mode. The necessary operations had not been used for many years, which posed a challenge. However, on September 25, 2007, the spacecraft was successfully spun up to 1.0 rpm about its pitch axis, which points at the sun. This paper describes the diagnosis of the anomaly, the analysis of flight data, the simulation of the spacecraft dynamics, and the procedures used to recover the spacecraft to spin stabilized mode.

  9. Fuzzy logic mode switching in helicopters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherman, Porter D.; Warburton, Frank W.

    1993-01-01

    The application of fuzzy logic to a wide range of control problems has been gaining momentum internationally, fueled by a concentrated Japanese effort. Advanced Research & Development within the Engineering Department at Sikorsky Aircraft undertook a fuzzy logic research effort designed to evaluate how effective fuzzy logic control might be in relation to helicopter operations. The mode switching module in the advanced flight control portion of Sikorsky's motion based simulator was identified as a good candidate problem because it was simple to understand and contained imprecise (fuzzy) decision criteria. The purpose of the switching module is to aid a helicopter pilot in entering and leaving coordinated turns while in flight. The criteria that determine the transitions between modes are imprecise and depend on the varied ranges of three flight conditions (i.e., simulated parameters): Commanded Rate, Duration, and Roll Attitude. The parameters were given fuzzy ranges and used as input variables to a fuzzy rulebase containing the knowledge of mode switching. The fuzzy control program was integrated into a real time interactive helicopter simulation tool. Optimization of the heading hold and turn coordination was accomplished by interactive pilot simulation testing of the handling quality performance of the helicopter dynamic model. The fuzzy logic code satisfied all the requirements of this candidate control problem.

  10. Improved feedback control of wall stabilized kink modes with different plasma-wall couplings and mode rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Q.; Levesque, J. P.; Stoafer, C. C.; Bialek, J.; Byrne, P.; Hughes, P. E.; Mauel, M. E.; Navratil, G. A.; Rhodes, D. J.

    2016-04-01

    A new algorithm for feedback control of rotating, wall-stabilized kink modes in the High Beta Tokamak-Extended Pulse (HBT-EP) device maintains an accurate phase shift between the perturbation and the measured rotating mode through current control, with control power emphasizing fast rotation and phase jumps over fast amplitude changes. In HBT-EP, wall-stabilized kink modes become unstable above the ideal wall stability limit, and feedback suppression is aimed at delaying the onset of discharge disruption through reduction of the kink mode amplitude. Performance of the new feedback algorithm is tested under different experimental conditions, including variation of the plasma-wall coupling, insertion of a ferritic wall, changing mode rotation frequency over the range of 4-8 kHz using an internal biased electrode, and adjusting the feedback phase-angle to accelerate, amplify, or suppress the mode. We find the previously reported excitation of the slowly rotating mode at high feedback gain in HBT-EP is mitigated by the current control scheme. We also find good agreement between the observed and predicted changes to the mode rotation frequency and amplitude. When ferritic material is introduced, or the plasma-wall coupling becomes weaker as the walls are retracted from plasma, the feedback gain needs to be increased to achieve the same level of suppression. When mode rotation is slowed by a biased electrode, the feedback system still achieves mode suppression, and demonstrates wide bandwidth effectiveness.

  11. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS) study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety [global positioning system (GPS) metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay] and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California, USA) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit (RSU) provided real-time video for three days during the historic Global Flyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California, USA) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This paper discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  12. Space-Based Range Safety and Future Space Range Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whiteman, Donald E.; Valencia, Lisa M.; Simpson, James C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety study is a multiphase project to demonstrate the performance, flexibility and cost savings that can be realized by using space-based assets for the Range Safety (global positioning system metric tracking data, flight termination command and range safety data relay) and Range User (telemetry) functions during vehicle launches and landings. Phase 1 included flight testing S-band Range Safety and Range User hardware in 2003 onboard a high-dynamic aircraft platform at Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) using the NASA Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System as the communications link. The current effort, Phase 2, includes hardware and packaging upgrades to the S-band Range Safety system and development of a high data rate Ku-band Range User system. The enhanced Phase 2 Range Safety Unit provided real-time video for three days during the historic GlobalFlyer (Scaled Composites, Mojave, California) flight in March, 2005. Additional Phase 2 testing will include a sounding rocket test of the Range Safety system and aircraft flight testing of both systems. Future testing will include a flight test on a launch vehicle platform. This report discusses both Range Safety and Range User developments and testing with emphasis on the Range Safety system. The operational concept of a future space-based range is also discussed.

  13. Electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, K. H.; Omura, Y.; Lee, L. C.

    2013-11-15

    We carried out a series of particle simulations to study electron acceleration by Z-mode and whistler-mode waves generated by an electron ring distribution. The electron ring distribution leads to excitations of X-mode waves mainly in the perpendicular direction, Z-mode waves in the perpendicular and parallel directions, and whistler-mode waves mainly in the parallel direction. The parallel Z- and whistler-mode waves can lead to an effective acceleration of ring electrons. The electron acceleration is mainly determined by the wave amplitude and phase velocity, which in turn is affected by the ratio of electron plasma to cyclotron frequencies. For the initial kinetic energy ranging from 100 to 500 keV, the peak energy of the accelerated electrons is found to reach 2–8 times the initial kinetic energy. We further study the acceleration process by test-particle calculations in which electrons interact with one, two, or four waves. The electron trajectories in the one-wave case are simple diffusion curves. In the multi-wave cases, electrons are accelerated simultaneously by counter-propagating waves and can have a higher final energy.

  14. Inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars in Cowling approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Kastaun, Wolfgang

    2008-06-15

    In this article, we investigate inertial modes of rigidly rotating neutron stars, i.e. modes for which the Coriolis force is dominant. This is done using the assumption of a fixed spacetime (Cowling approximation). We present frequencies and eigenfunctions for a sequence of stars with a polytropic equation of state, covering a broad range of rotation rates. The modes were obtained with a nonlinear general relativistic hydrodynamic evolution code. We further show that the eigenequations for the oscillation modes can be written in a particularly simple form for the case of arbitrary fast but rigid rotation. Using these equations, we investigate some general characteristics of inertial modes, which are then compared to the numerically obtained eigenfunctions. In particular, we derive a rough analytical estimate for the frequency as a function of the number of nodes of the eigenfunction, and find that a similar empirical relation matches the numerical results with unexpected accuracy. We investigate the slow rotation limit of the eigenequations, obtaining two different sets of equations describing pressure and inertial modes. For the numerical computations we only considered axisymmetric modes, while the analytic part also covers nonaxisymmetric modes. The eigenfunctions suggest that the classification of inertial modes by the quantum numbers of the leading term of a spherical harmonic decomposition is artificial in the sense that the largest term is not strongly dominant, even in the slow rotation limit. The reason for the different structure of pressure and inertial modes is that the Coriolis force remains important in the slow rotation limit only for inertial modes. Accordingly, the scalar eigenequation we obtain in that limit is spherically symmetric for pressure modes, but not for inertial modes.

  15. Asian summer monsoon rainfall predictability: a predictable mode analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Lee, June-Yi; Xiang, Baoqiang

    2015-01-01

    To what extent the Asian summer monsoon (ASM) rainfall is predictable has been an important but long-standing issue in climate science. Here we introduce a predictable mode analysis (PMA) method to estimate predictability of the ASM rainfall. The PMA is an integral approach combining empirical analysis, physical interpretation and retrospective prediction. The empirical analysis detects most important modes of variability; the interpretation establishes the physical basis of prediction of the modes; and the retrospective predictions with dynamical models and physics-based empirical (P-E) model are used to identify the "predictable" modes. Potential predictability can then be estimated by the fractional variance accounted for by the "predictable" modes. For the ASM rainfall during June-July-August, we identify four major modes of variability in the domain (20°S-40°N, 40°E-160°E) during 1979-2010: (1) El Niño-La Nina developing mode in central Pacific, (2) Indo-western Pacific monsoon-ocean coupled mode sustained by a positive thermodynamic feedback with the aid of background mean circulation, (3) Indian Ocean dipole mode, and (4) a warming trend mode. We show that these modes can be predicted reasonably well by a set of P-E prediction models as well as coupled models' multi-model ensemble. The P-E and dynamical models have comparable skills and complementary strengths in predicting ASM rainfall. Thus, the four modes may be regarded as "predictable" modes, and about half of the ASM rainfall variability may be predictable. This work not only provides a useful approach for assessing seasonal predictability but also provides P-E prediction tools and a spatial-pattern-bias correction method to improve dynamical predictions. The proposed PMA method can be applied to a broad range of climate predictability and prediction problems.

  16. A Wide Dynamic Range Tapped Linear Array Image Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Washkurak, William D.; Chamberlain, Savvas G.; Prince, N. Daryl

    1988-08-01

    Detectors for acousto-optic signal processing applications require fast transient response as well as wide dynamic range. There are two major choices of detectors: conductive or integration mode. Conductive mode detectors have an initial transient period before they reach then' i equilibrium state. The duration of 1 his period is dependent on light level as well as detector capacitance. At low light levels a conductive mode detector is very slow; response time is typically on the order of milliseconds. Generally. to obtain fast transient response an integrating mode detector is preferred. With integrating mode detectors. the dynamic range is determined by the charge storage capability of the tran-sport shift registers and the noise level of the image sensor. The conventional net hod used to improve dynamic range is to increase the shift register charge storage capability. To achieve a dynamic range of fifty thousand assuming two hundred noise equivalent electrons, a charge storage capability of ten million electrons would be required. In order to accommodate this amount of charge. unrealistic shift registers widths would be required. Therefore, with an integrating mode detector it is difficult to achieve a dynamic range of over four orders of magnitude of input light intensity. Another alternative is to solve the problem at the photodetector aml not the shift, register. DALSA's wide dynamic range detector utilizes an optimized, ion implant doped, profiled MOSFET photodetector specifically designed for wide dynamic range. When this new detector operates at high speed and at low light levels the photons are collected and stored in an integrating fashion. However. at bright light levels where transient periods are short, the detector switches into a conductive mode. The light intensity is logarithmically compressed into small charge packets, easily carried by the CCD shift register. As a result of the logarithmic conversion, dynamic ranges of over six orders of

  17. Accumulation of contaminants in fish from wastewater treatment wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber, L.B.; Keefe, S.H.; Antweiler, R.C.; Taylor, H.E.; Wass, R.D.

    2006-01-01

    Increasing demands on water resources in arid environments make reclamation and reuse of municipal wastewater an important component of the water budget. Treatment wetlands can be an integral part of the water-reuse cycle providing both water-quality enhancement and habitat functions. When used for habitat, the bioaccumulation potential of contaminants in the wastewater is a critical consideration. Water and fish samples collected from the Tres Rios Demonstration Constructed Wetlands near Phoenix, Arizona, which uses secondary-treated wastewater to maintain an aquatic ecosystem in a desert environment, were analyzed for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOC) and trace elements. Semipermeable membrane devices (SPMD) were deployed to investigate uptake of HOC. The wetlands effectively removed HOC, and concentrations of herbicides, pesticides, and organic wastewater contaminants decreased 40-99% between inlet and outlet. Analysis of Tilapia mossambica and Gambusia affinis indicated accumulation of HOC, including p,p???-DDE and trans-nonachlor. The SPMD accumulated the HOC detected in the fish tissue as well as additional compounds. Trace-element concentrations in whole-fish tissue were highly variable, but were similar between the two species. Concentrations of HOC and trace elements varied in different fish tissue compartments, and concentrations in Tilapia liver tissue were greater than those in the whole organism or filet tissue. Bioconcentration factors for the trace elements ranged from 5 to 58 000 and for the HOC ranged from 530 to 150 000. ?? 2006 American Chemical Society.

  18. 19 CFR 10.772 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.772 Section 10.772 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade...

  19. 19 CFR 10.772 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.772 Section 10.772 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade...

  20. 19 CFR 10.772 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.772 Section 10.772 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade...

  1. 19 CFR 10.772 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.772 Section 10.772 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade...

  2. 19 CFR 10.772 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.772 Section 10.772 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Morocco Free Trade...

  3. 19 CFR 10.597 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.597 Section 10.597 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central...

  4. 19 CFR 10.597 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.597 Section 10.597 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central...

  5. 19 CFR 10.597 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.597 Section 10.597 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central...

  6. 19 CFR 10.597 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.597 Section 10.597 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central...

  7. 19 CFR 10.597 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.597 Section 10.597 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Dominican Republic-Central...

  8. RF SYSTEM FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    BLASKIEWICZ, M.; BRENNAN, J.M.; BRODOWSKI, J.; DELONG, J.; METH, M.; SMITH, K.; ZALTSMAN, A.

    2001-06-18

    During accumulation the RF beam current in the spallation neutron source ring rises from 0 to 50 amperes. A clean, 250 nanosecond gap is needed for the extraction kicker risetime. Large momentum spread and small peak current are needed to prevent instabilities and stopband related losses. A robust RF system meeting these requirements has been designed.

  9. Copper accumulation in the crayfish (Orconectes rusticus)

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.L.

    1980-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not the crayfish, O. rusticus could fulfill Nehring's (1976) criteria for a good biological monitor of heavy metal pollution. Since there is some evidence that the cupric ion is the most toxic form of aqueous copper, crayfish-accumulated copper was compared to both total and cupric copper in the culture water.

  10. Hippocampal Networks Habituate as Novelty Accumulates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murty, Vishnu P.; Ballard, Ian C.; Macduffie, Katherine E.; Krebs, Ruth M.; Adcock, R. Alison

    2013-01-01

    Novelty detection, a critical computation within the medial temporal lobe (MTL) memory system, necessarily depends on prior experience. The current study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) in humans to investigate dynamic changes in MTL activation and functional connectivity as experience with novelty accumulates. fMRI data were…

  11. 19 CFR 10.458 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Chile Free Trade Agreement Rules of Origin § 10.458 Accumulation. (a) Originating goods or materials of Chile or the United States... of Chile, the United States, or both, by one or more producers, will be considered as an...

  12. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Accumulated depreciation. 32.3100 Section 32.3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts §...

  13. 47 CFR 32.3100 - Accumulated depreciation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accumulated depreciation. 32.3100 Section 32.3100 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES UNIFORM SYSTEM OF ACCOUNTS FOR TELECOMMUNICATIONS COMPANIES Instructions for Balance Sheet Accounts §...

  14. Plastic accumulation in the Mediterranean sea.

    PubMed

    Cózar, Andrés; Sanz-Martín, Marina; Martí, Elisa; González-Gordillo, J Ignacio; Ubeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Á; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of floating plastic were measured throughout the Mediterranean Sea to assess whether this basin can be regarded as a great accumulation region of plastic debris. We found that the average density of plastic (1 item per 4 m2), as well as its frequency of occurrence (100% of the sites sampled), are comparable to the accumulation zones described for the five subtropical ocean gyres. Plastic debris in the Mediterranean surface waters was dominated by millimeter-sized fragments, but showed a higher proportion of large plastic objects than that present in oceanic gyres, reflecting the closer connection with pollution sources. The accumulation of floating plastic in the Mediterranean Sea (between 1,000 and 3,000 tons) is likely related to the high human pressure together with the hydrodynamics of this semi-enclosed basin, with outflow mainly occurring through a deep water layer. Given the biological richness and concentration of economic activities in the Mediterranean Sea, the affects of plastic pollution on marine and human life are expected to be particularly frequent in this plastic accumulation region.

  15. Plastic Accumulation in the Mediterranean Sea

    PubMed Central

    Cózar, Andrés; Sanz-Martín, Marina; Martí, Elisa; González-Gordillo, J. Ignacio; Ubeda, Bárbara; Gálvez, José Á.; Irigoien, Xabier; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2015-01-01

    Concentrations of floating plastic were measured throughout the Mediterranean Sea to assess whether this basin can be regarded as a great accumulation region of plastic debris. We found that the average density of plastic (1 item per 4 m2), as well as its frequency of occurrence (100% of the sites sampled), are comparable to the accumulation zones described for the five subtropical ocean gyres. Plastic debris in the Mediterranean surface waters was dominated by millimeter-sized fragments, but showed a higher proportion of large plastic objects than that present in oceanic gyres, reflecting the closer connection with pollution sources. The accumulation of floating plastic in the Mediterranean Sea (between 1,000 and 3,000 tons) is likely related to the high human pressure together with the hydrodynamics of this semi-enclosed basin, with outflow mainly occurring through a deep water layer. Given the biological richness and concentration of economic activities in the Mediterranean Sea, the affects of plastic pollution on marine and human life are expected to be particularly frequent in this plastic accumulation region. PMID:25831129

  16. 19 CFR 10.917 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.917 Section 10.917 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Peru Trade Promotion...

  17. 19 CFR 10.917 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.917 Section 10.917 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Peru Trade Promotion...

  18. 19 CFR 10.917 - Accumulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Accumulation. 10.917 Section 10.917 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. United States-Peru Trade Promotion...

  19. Expanded mode lasers for telecommunications applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lealman, Ian F.

    This thesis describes the development of a long wavelength (1.55 μm) expanded mode semiconductor laser. The increased spot size of the laser improves both the coupling efficiency to cleaved fibre and fibre alignment tolerances and reduces packaging cost. In this type of device the strength of the waveguide is gradually reduced towards the front facet allowing the mode to adiabatically expand so that the laser mode is better matched in size to that of a cleaved fibre. This can be achieved by either reducing the refractive index of the guide or reducing the amount of material in the core. The structure chosen was a buried heterostructure laser that utilised a twin guide consisting of an upper higher refractive index guide (the active region of the laser) above a weak passive guide. The width of the active region was reduced along part of the device allowing the mode to expand into the weak underlying guide. The guide structure was optimised using a variable grid finite difference mode solver, and the taper length calculated by an approximation to Love's method. Detailed results are presented for the measured light-current characteristic, farfield and coupling loss to cleaved fibre. These coupling losses were compared to the calculated data thus allowing the waveguide design to be optimised. Several iterations in the design of the device were undertaken, with the aim of reducing the coupling loss to cleaved single mode fibre without significantly compromising the laser performance. The final device design had extremely low coupling losses as low as 1.2 dB to cleaved fibre. Finally, the positive impact this device had on passive alignment using a silicon motherboard is examined, and the application this technology to a range of other optoelectronic components is discussed.

  20. Analysis of multi-mode to single-mode conversion at 635 nm and 1550 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora, Vanessa; Bogatzki, Angelina; Arndt-Staufenbiel, Norbert; Hofmann, Jens; Schröder, Henning

    2016-03-01

    We propose two low-cost and robust optical fiber systems based on the photonic lantern (PL) technology for operating at 635 nm and 1550 nm. The PL is an emerging technology that couples light from a multi-mode (MM) fiber to several single-mode (SM) fibers via a low-loss adiabatic transition. This bundle of SM fibers is observed as a MM fiber system whose spatial modes are the degenerate supermodes of the bundle. The adiabatic transition allows that those supermodes evolve into the modes of the MM fiber. Simulations of the MM fiber end structure and its taper transition have been performed via functional mode solver tools in order to understand the modal evolution in PLs. The modelled design consists of 7 SM fibers inserted into a low-index capillary. The material and geometry of the PLs are chosen such that the supermodes match to the spatial modes of the desired step-index MM fiber in a moderate loss transmission. The dispersion of materials is also considered. These parameters are studied in two PL systems in order to reach a spectral transmission from 450 nm to 1600 nm. Additionally, an analysis of the geometry and losses due to the mismatching of modes is presented. PLs are typically used in the fields of astrophotonics and space photonics. Recently, they are demonstrated as mode converters in telecommunications, especially focusing on spatial division multiplexing. In this study, we show the use of PLs as a promising interconnecting tool for the development of miniaturized spectrometers operating in a broad wavelength range.

  1. Vlasov equation for long-range interactions on a lattice.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, R; Dauxois, T; De Ninno, G; Ruffo, S; Staniscia, F

    2011-06-01

    We show that, in the continuum limit, the dynamics of Hamiltonian systems defined on a lattice with long-range couplings is well described by the Vlasov equation. This equation can be linearized around the homogeneous state, and a dispersion relation, which depends explicitly on the Fourier modes of the lattice, can be derived. This allows one to compute the stability thresholds of the homogeneous state, which turns out to depend on the mode number. When this state is unstable, the growth rates are also functions of the mode number. Explicit calculations are performed for the α-Hamiltonian mean field model with 0≤α<1, for which the mean-field mode is always found to dominate the exponential growth. The theoretical predictions are successfully compared with numerical simulations performed on a finite lattice.

  2. Role of taurine accumulation in keratinocyte hydration.

    PubMed

    Janeke, Guido; Siefken, Wilfried; Carstensen, Stefanie; Springmann, Gunja; Bleck, Oliver; Steinhart, Hans; Höger, Peter; Wittern, Klaus-Peter; Wenck, Horst; Stäb, Franz; Sauermann, Gerhard; Schreiner, Volker; Doering, Thomas

    2003-08-01

    Epidermal keratinocytes are exposed to a low water concentration at the stratum corneum-stratum granulosum interface. When epithelial tissues are osmotically perturbed, cellular protection and cell volume regulation is mediated by accumulation of organic osmolytes such as taurine. Previous studies reported the presence of taurine in the epidermis of several animal species. Therefore, we analyzed human skin for the presence of the taurine transporter (TAUT) and studied the accumulation of taurine as one potential mechanism protecting epidermal keratinocytes from dehydration. According to our results, TAUT is expressed as a 69 kDa protein in human epidermis but not in the dermis. For the epidermis a gradient was evident with maximal levels of TAUT in the outermost granular keratinocyte layer and lower levels in the stratum spinosum. No TAUT was found in the basal layer or in the stratum corneum. Keratinocyte accumulation of taurine was induced by experimental induction of skin dryness via application of silica gel to human skin. Cultured human keratinocytes accumulated taurine in a concentration- and osmolarity-dependent manner. TAUT mRNA levels were increased after exposure of human keratinocytes to hyperosmotic culture medium, indicating osmosensitive TAUT mRNA expression as part of the adaptation of keratinocytes to hyperosmotic stress. Keratinocyte uptake of taurine was inhibited by beta-alanine but not by other osmolytes such as betaine, inositol, or sorbitol. Accumulation of taurine protected cultured human keratinocytes from both osmotically induced and ultraviolet-induced apoptosis. Our data indicate that taurine is an important epidermal osmolyte required to maintain keratinocyte hydration in a dry environment. PMID:12880428

  3. Tear film MMP accumulation and corneal disease

    PubMed Central

    Smith, V; Rishmawi, H; Hussein, H; Easty, D

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) accumulate in the tears of patients with active peripheral ulcerative keratitis (PUK) but it is unknown whether these enzymes have a central role in disease progression. The aims of the present investigation were to determine the source of these enzymes and to ascertain whether their accumulation in tears is a phenomenon specific to PUK or a general feature of other anterior segment diseases.
METHODS—The experimental samples were obtained from the culture media of conjunctival and corneal epithelial cells, from fractionated blood plasma and leucocytes of healthy subjects and patients with rheumatoid arthritis, and from the tears of healthy subjects and patients with a variety of anterior segment diseases. The MMPs of all samples were visualised by zymography and tear samples were assayed using nitrophenol acetate and an MMP-9 susceptible quenched fluorescent peptide as substrate.
RESULTS—The major MMPs that accumulate in the tears of patients with rheumatoid arthritis with active ocular disease are MMP-9 and a species of Mr 116 000. By comparing the zymographic activity profiles of the gelatinases present in the samples obtained, it was deduced that the main source of these MMPs was granulocytes. Their accumulation in tears was not unique to patients with PUK; detectable amounts of the enzymes also occurred in the tears of patients with keratoconus with associated atopic disease, patients undergoing treatment for herpetic eye disease, and patients with systemic and non-systemic dry eye disease.
CONCLUSION—The MMPs that accumulate in tears are mainly derived from granulocytes. This may be effected by autoimmune diseases that involve ocular tissue or by ocular diseases that induce an inflammatory response.

 PMID:11159476

  4. Dual-Mode Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goyne, Christopher P.; McDaniel, James C.

    2002-01-01

    The Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at the University of Virginia has conducted an investigation of the mixing and combustion processes in a hydrogen fueled dual-mode scramjet combustor. The experiment essentially consisted of the "direct connect" continuous operation of a Mach 2 rectangular combustor with a single unswept ramp fuel injector. The stagnation enthalpy of the test flow simulated a flight Mach number of 5. Measurements were obtained using conventional wall instrumentation and laser based diagnostics. These diagnostics included, pressure and wall temperature measurements, Fuel Plume Imaging (FPI) and Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). A schematic of the combustor configuration and a summary of the measurements obtained are presented. The experimental work at UVa was parallel by Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) work at NASA Langley. The numerical and experiment results are compared in this document.

  5. Mixed Mode Matrix Multiplication

    SciTech Connect

    Meng-Shiou Wu; Srinivas Aluru; Ricky A. Kendall

    2004-09-30

    In modern clustering environments where the memory hierarchy has many layers (distributed memory, shared memory layer, cache,...), an important question is how to fully utilize all available resources and identify the most dominant layer in certain computations. When combining algorithms on all layers together, what would be the best method to get the best performance out of all the resources we have? Mixed mode programming model that uses thread programming on the shared memory layer and message passing programming on the distributed memory layer is a method that many researchers are using to utilize the memory resources. In this paper, they take an algorithmic approach that uses matrix multiplication as a tool to show how cache algorithms affect the performance of both shared memory and distributed memory algorithms. They show that with good underlying cache algorithm, overall performance is stable. When underlying cache algorithm is bad, superlinear speedup may occur, and an increasing number of threads may also improve performance.

  6. Geometric Effects on the Amplification of First Mode Instability Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirk, Lindsay C.; Candler, Graham V.

    2013-01-01

    The effects of geometric changes on the amplification of first mode instability waves in an external supersonic boundary layer were investigated using numerical techniques. Boundary layer stability was analyzed at Mach 6 conditions similar to freestream conditions obtained in quiet ground test facilities so that results obtained in this study may be applied to future test article design to measure first mode instability waves. The DAKOTA optimization software package was used to optimize an axisymmetric geometry to maximize the amplification of the waves at first mode frequencies as computed by the 2D STABL hypersonic boundary layer stability analysis tool. First, geometric parameters such as nose radius, cone half angle, vehicle length, and surface curvature were examined separately to determine the individual effects on the first mode amplification. Finally, all geometric parameters were allowed to vary to produce a shape optimized to maximize the amplification of first mode instability waves while minimizing the amplification of second mode instability waves. Since first mode waves are known to be most unstable in the form of oblique wave, the geometries were optimized using a broad range of wave frequencies as well as a wide range of oblique wave angles to determine the geometry that most amplifies the first mode waves. Since first mode waves are seen most often in flows with low Mach numbers at the edge of the boundary layer, the edge Mach number for each geometry was recorded to determine any relationship between edge Mach number and the stability of first mode waves. Results indicate that an axisymmetric cone with a sharp nose and a slight flare at the aft end under the Mach 6 freestream conditions used here will lower the Mach number at the edge of the boundary layer to less than 4, and the corresponding stability analysis showed maximum first mode N factors of 3.

  7. The Integrated Mode Management Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hutchins, Edwin

    1996-01-01

    Mode management is the processes of understanding the character and consequences of autoflight modes, planning and selecting the engagement, disengagement and transitions between modes, and anticipating automatic mode transitions made by the autoflight system itself. The state of the art is represented by the latest designs produced by each of the major airframe manufacturers, the Boeing 747-400, the Boeing 777, the McDonnell Douglas MD-11, and the Airbus A320/A340 family of airplanes. In these airplanes autoflight modes are selected by manipulating switches on the control panel. The state of the autoflight system is displayed on the flight mode annunciators. The integrated mode management interface (IMMI) is a graphical interface to autoflight mode management systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The interface consists of a vertical mode manager and a lateral mode manager. Autoflight modes are depicted by icons on a graphical display. Mode selection is accomplished by touching (or mousing) the appropriate icon. The IMMI provides flight crews with an integrated interface to autoflight systems for aircraft equipped with flight management computer systems (FMCS). The current version is modeled on the Boeing glass-cockpit airplanes (747-400, 757/767). It runs on the SGI Indigo workstation. A working prototype of this graphics-based crew interface to the autoflight mode management tasks of glass cockpit airplanes has been installed in the Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator of the CSSRF of NASA Ames Research Center. This IMMI replaces the devices in FMCS equipped airplanes currently known as mode control panel (Boeing), flight guidance control panel (McDonnell Douglas), and flight control unit (Airbus). It also augments the functions of the flight mode annunciators. All glass cockpit airplanes are sufficiently similar that the IMMI could be tailored to the mode management system of any modern cockpit. The IMMI does not replace the

  8. Optimization of few-mode-fiber based mode converter for mode division multiplexing transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yiwei; Fu, Songnian; Zhang, Minming; Tang, M.; Shum, P.; Liu, Deming

    2013-10-01

    Few-mode-fiber (FMF) based mode division multiplexing (MDM) is a promising technique to further increase the transmission capacity of single mode fibers. We propose and numerically investigate a fiber-optical mode converter (MC) using long period gratings (LPGs) fabricated on the FMF by point-by-point CO2 laser inscription technique. In order to precisely excite three modes (LP01, LP11, and LP02), both untilted LPG and tilted LPG are comprehensively optimized through the length, index modulation depth, and tilt angle of the LPG in order to achieve a mode contrast ratio (MCR) of more than 20 dB with less wavelength dependence. It is found that the proposed MCs have obvious advantages of high MCR, low mode crosstalk, easy fabrication and maintenance, and compact size.

  9. Long-term accumulation and transport of anthropogenic phosphorus in world river basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powers, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Global food production crucially depends on phosphorus (P). In agricultural and urban landscapes, much P is anthropogenic, entering via trade, and then can be transported by a combination of fluvial and human processes. To date there have been few long-term, large-scale analyses combining both fluvial and human modes of P transport. Here we present reconstructed historical records of anthropogenic P entering and leaving soils and aquatic systems via a combination of trade, infrastructure, food waste, and fluvial fluxes. We then report the net annual P inputs, and the mass of P that has accumulated over the long-term, for entire river basins. Our analyses reveal rapid historical P accumulation for two mixed agricultural-urban landscapes (Thames Basin, UK, Yangtze Basin, China), and one rural agricultural landscape (Maumee Basin, USA). We also show that the human P fluxes massively dominate over the fluvial fluxes in these large basins. For Thames and Maumee Basins, recently there has been modest P depletion/drawdown of the massive P pool accumulated in prior decades, whereas the Yangtze Basin has consistently and rapidly accumulated P since 1980. These first estimates of the magnitude of historical P accumulation in contrasting settings illustrate the scope of management challenges surrounding the storage, fate, exploitation, and reactivation of legacy P that is currently present in the Earth's critical zone.

  10. Giant enhancement of spin pumping in the out-of-phase precession mode

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, S.

    2014-02-03

    We theoretically study the spin pumping from the two ferromagnetic layers embedded in a normal metal and investigate the spin current and spin accumulation generated by the precessing magnetizations, focusing on their dependence on the relative precessional motion and the layer separation. We demonstrate a giant enhancement of spin pumping induced in the out-of-phase precession mode of the magnetizations in which the pumped spin current and spin accumulation are greatly enhanced compared to those in the in-phase precession mode. The giant enhancement of spin pumping is discussed in relation to an enhanced Gilbert damping.

  11. Automatic determination of important mode-mode correlations in many-mode vibrational wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Carolin; Christiansen, Ove

    2015-04-01

    We introduce new automatic procedures for parameterizing vibrational coupled cluster (VCC) and vibrational configuration interaction wave functions. Importance measures for individual mode combinations in the wave function are derived based on upper bounds to Hamiltonian matrix elements and/or the size of perturbative corrections derived in the framework of VCC. With a threshold, this enables an automatic, system-adapted way of choosing which mode-mode correlations are explicitly parameterized in the many-mode wave function. The effect of different importance measures and thresholds is investigated for zero-point energies and infrared spectra for formaldehyde and furan. Furthermore, the direct link between important mode-mode correlations and coordinates is illustrated employing water clusters as examples: Using optimized coordinates, a larger number of mode combinations can be neglected in the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function than with normal coordinates for the same accuracy. Moreover, the fraction of important mode-mode correlations compared to the total number of correlations decreases with system size. This underlines the potential gain in efficiency when using optimized coordinates in combination with a flexible scheme for choosing the mode-mode correlations included in the parameterization of the correlated many-mode vibrational wave function. All in all, it is found that the introduced schemes for parameterizing correlated many-mode vibrational wave functions lead to at least as systematic and accurate calculations as those using more standard and straightforward excitation level definitions. This new way of defining approximate calculations offers potential for future calculations on larger systems.

  12. Evaluating user interfaces for stack mode viewing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkins, M. Stella; Kirkpatrick, Arthur E.; Knight, Adelle; Forster, Bruce

    2007-03-01

    The goal of this research was to evaluate two different stack mode layouts for 3D medical images - a regular stack mode layout where just the topmost image was visible, and a new stack mode layout, which included the images just before and after the main image. We developed stripped down user interfaces to test the techniques, and designed a look-alike radiology task using 3D artificial target stimuli implanted in the slices of medical image volumes. The task required searching for targets and identifying the range of slices containing the targets. Eight naive students participated, using a within-subjects design. We measured the response time and accuracy of subjects using the two layouts and tracked the eyegaze of several subjects while they performed the task. Eyegaze data was divided into fixations and saccades Subjects were 19% slower with the new stack layout than the standard stack layout, but 5 of the 8 subjects preferred the new layout. Analysis of the eyegaze data showed that in the new technique, the context images on both sides were fixated once the target was found in the topmost image. We believe that the extra time was caused by the difficulty in controlling the rate of scrolling, causing overshooting. We surmise that providing some contextual detail such as adjacent slices in the new stack mode layout is helpful to reduce cognitive load for this radiology look-alike task.

  13. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet. PMID:12656403

  14. Wall compliance and violin cavity modes.

    PubMed

    Bissinger, George

    2003-03-01

    Violin corpus wall compliance, which has a substantial effect on cavity mode frequencies, was added to Shaw's two-degree-of-freedom (2DOF) network model for A0 ("main air") and A1 (lowest length mode included in "main wood") cavity modes. The 2DOF model predicts a V(-0.25) volume dependence for A0 for rigid violin-shaped cavities, to which a semiempirical compliance correction term, V(-x(c)) (optimization parameter x(c)) consistent with cavity acoustical compliance and violin-based scaling was added. Optimizing x(c) over A0 and A1 frequencies measured for a Hutchins-Schelleng violin octet yielded x(c) approximately 0.08. This markedly improved A0 and A1 frequency predictions to within approximately +/- 10% of experiment over a range of about 4.5:1 in length, 10:1 in f-hole area, 3:1 in top plate thickness, and 128:1 in volume. Compliance is a plausible explanation for A1 falling close to the "main wood" resonance, not increasingly higher for the larger instruments, which were scaled successively shorter compared to the violin for ergonomic and practical reasons. Similarly incorporating compliance for A2 and A4 (lowest lower-/upper-bout modes, respectively) improves frequency predictions within +/-20% over the octet.

  15. Two chiroptical modes of silver nanospirals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Fan; Deng, Junhong; Yang, Mengsu; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-03-01

    As an emerging three-dimensional chiral metamaterial, plasmonic nanospirals (NSs) possess inherent chiroptical activity that has attracted increasing attention for developing potential photonic applications. However, the study of chiroptical activity of plasmonic NSs is still in its infancy, especially for NSs made of silver, which is a typical plasmonic material with high plasmonic quality. Herein, we present a systematic study of circular dichroism (CD) of silver NSs (AgNSs) that are fabricated and engineered in helical lengths by glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) and dispersed in ethanol. The CD spectrum is composed of a bisignated mode of two peaks, one in the UV regime and the other in the visible. The UV mode has a resonance wavelength saturating at ∼375 nm and a linewidth decoupled from the helical elongation, while the visible mode tends to have a redshift and its linewidth broadens linearly with the elongation of AgNS. Helical elongation generally amplifies the chiroptical activity of both modes. Finite-element simulation shows good agreement with the experimental CD results, and accounts for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction in terms of the resonance wavelength. This work contributes to understanding the bisignated chiroptical responses of plasmonic nanospirals, and introduces a simple method to tailor the visible chiroptical activity that is strongly desired to explore a wide range of chirality-related bio-applications.

  16. Two chiroptical modes of silver nanospirals.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fan; Deng, Junhong; Yang, Mengsu; Fu, Junxue; Ng, Jack; Huang, Zhifeng

    2016-03-18

    As an emerging three-dimensional chiral metamaterial, plasmonic nanospirals (NSs) possess inherent chiroptical activity that has attracted increasing attention for developing potential photonic applications. However, the study of chiroptical activity of plasmonic NSs is still in its infancy, especially for NSs made of silver, which is a typical plasmonic material with high plasmonic quality. Herein, we present a systematic study of circular dichroism (CD) of silver NSs (AgNSs) that are fabricated and engineered in helical lengths by glancing-angle deposition (GLAD) and dispersed in ethanol. The CD spectrum is composed of a bisignated mode of two peaks, one in the UV regime and the other in the visible. The UV mode has a resonance wavelength saturating at ∼375 nm and a linewidth decoupled from the helical elongation, while the visible mode tends to have a redshift and its linewidth broadens linearly with the elongation of AgNS. Helical elongation generally amplifies the chiroptical activity of both modes. Finite-element simulation shows good agreement with the experimental CD results, and accounts for the wavelength-related chiroptical distinction in terms of the resonance wavelength. This work contributes to understanding the bisignated chiroptical responses of plasmonic nanospirals, and introduces a simple method to tailor the visible chiroptical activity that is strongly desired to explore a wide range of chirality-related bio-applications. PMID:26876361

  17. Added versus accumulated sugars on color development and acrylamide formation in french-fried potato strips.

    PubMed

    Higley, Jeremy; Kim, Jong-Yea; Huber, Kerry C; Smith, Gordon

    2012-09-01

    Added (glucose addition) versus accumulated (in situ sugar development via cold-temperature storage) sugar treatments were investigated in relation to acrylamide formation within fried potato strips at standardized levels of finish-fried color (Agtron color scores ranged from 36 to 84). The added sugar treatment exhibited a relatively reduced rate of acrylamide formation and generally possessed a lower and less variable acrylamide content (61-1290 ng/g) than the accumulated sugar scheme (61-2191 ng/g). In a subsequent experiment, added fructose applied to strip surfaces via dipping prior to frying favored acrylamide formation over color development relative to added glucose, for which the reverse trend was observed. Thus, where acrylamide differences were noted between added and accumulated sugar treatments (given equivalent Agtron color scores), this result was likely aided by the relative higher fructose content in strips of the accumulated sugar scheme rather than simply a greater relative concentration of total reducing sugars. PMID:22881236

  18. Accumulation of radionuclides by plants as a monitor system.

    PubMed Central

    Koranda, J J; Robison, W L

    1978-01-01

    The accumulation of radionuclides by plants acting as a monitoring system in the environment may occur by two modes; foliar absorption by the leaves and shoot of the plant, or by root uptake from the soil. Data on plant accumulation of radionuclides may be obtained from studies of fission product radionuclides deposited as worldwide fallout, and from tracer studies of plant physiology. The epidermal features of plant foliage may exert an effect upon particle retention by leaves, and subsequent uptake of radionuclides from the surface. The transport of radionuclides across the cuticle and epidermis of plant leaves is determined in part by the anatomy of the leaf, and by physiological factors. The foliar uptake of fallout radionuclides, 99Sr, 131I, and 137Cs, is described with examples from the scientific literature. The environmental half-life of 131I, for example, is considerably shorter than its physical half-life because of physical and biological factors which may produce a half-life as short as 0.23/day. 99Sr and 137Cs are readily taken up by the leaf, but 137Cs undergoes more translocation into fruit and seeds than 99Sr which tends to remain in the plant part in which it was initially absorbed. Soil-root uptake is conditioned primarily by soil chemical and physical factors which may selectively retain a radionuclide, such as 137Cs. The presence of organic matter, inorganic colloids (clay), and competing elements will strongly affect the uptake of 99Sr and 137Cs by plants from the soil. The role of plants as monitors of radionuclides is twofold: as monitors of recent atmospheric releases of radionuclides; and as indicators of the long-term behavior of aged deposits of radionuclides in the soil. PMID:367767

  19. Modes of glutamate receptor gating

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Gabriela K

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The time course of excitatory synaptic currents, the major means of fast communication between neurons of the central nervous system, is encoded in the dynamic behaviour of post-synaptic glutamate-activated channels. First-pass attempts to explain the glutamate-elicited currents with mathematical models produced reaction mechanisms that included only the most basic functionally defined states: resting vs. liganded, closed vs. open, responsive vs. desensitized. In contrast, single-molecule observations afforded by the patch-clamp technique revealed an unanticipated kinetic multiplicity of transitions: from microseconds-lasting flickers to minutes-long modes. How these kinetically defined events impact the shape of the synaptic response, how they relate to rearrangements in receptor structure, and whether and how they are physiologically controlled represent currently active research directions. Modal gating, which refers to the slowest, least frequently observed ion-channel transitions, has been demonstrated for representatives of all ion channel families. However, reaction schemes have been largely confined to the short- and medium-range time scales. For glutamate receptors as well, modal gating has only recently come under rigorous scrutiny. This article reviews the evidence for modal gating of glutamate receptors and the still developing hypotheses about the mechanism(s) by which modal shifts occur and the ways in which they may impact the time course of synaptic transmission. PMID:22106181

  20. 26 CFR 1.535-3 - Accumulated earnings credit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Accumulated earnings credit. 1.535-3 Section 1... Accumulated earnings credit. (a) In general. As provided in section 535(a) and § 1.535-1, the accumulated earnings credit, provided by section 535(c), reduces taxable income in computing accumulated taxable...

  1. Selenoprotein P Inhibits Radiation-Induced Late Reactive Oxygen Species Accumulation and Normal Cell Injury

    SciTech Connect

    Eckers, Jaimee C.; Kalen, Amanda L.; Xiao, Wusheng; Sarsour, Ehab H.; Goswami, Prabhat C.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: Radiation is a common mode of cancer therapy whose outcome is often limited because of normal tissue toxicity. We have shown previously that the accumulation of radiation-induced late reactive oxygen species (ROS) precedes cell death, suggesting that metabolic oxidative stress could regulate cellular radiation response. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether selenoprotein P (SEPP1), a major supplier of selenium to tissues and an antioxidant, regulates late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated normal human fibroblasts (NHFs). Methods and Materials: Flow cytometry analysis of cell viability, cell cycle phase distribution, and dihydroethidium oxidation, along with clonogenic assays, were used to measure oxidative stress and toxicity. Human antioxidant mechanisms array and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were used to measure gene expression during late ROS accumulation in irradiated NHFs. Sodium selenite addition and SEPP1 overexpression were used to determine the causality of SEPP1 regulating late ROS accumulation and toxicity in irradiated NHFs. Results: Irradiated NHFs showed late ROS accumulation (4.5-fold increase from control; P<.05) that occurs after activation of the cell cycle checkpoint pathways and precedes cell death. The mRNA levels of CuZn- and Mn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxiredoxin 3, and thioredoxin reductase 1 increased approximately 2- to 3-fold, whereas mRNA levels of cold shock domain containing E1 and SEPP1 increased more than 6-fold (P<.05). The addition of sodium selenite before the radiation treatment suppressed toxicity (45%; P<.05). SEPP1 overexpression suppressed radiation-induced late ROS accumulation (35%; P<.05) and protected NHFs from radiation-induced toxicity (58%; P<.05). Conclusion: SEPP1 mitigates radiation-induced late ROS accumulation and normal cell injury.

  2. Multiple modes in the vibration of cantilevered shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindle, W. L.; Torvik, P. J.

    1987-06-01

    The term multiple modes describes pairs of modes which are similar in shape but occur at different frequencies. This phenomenon has been observed in holographic vibration test results for a turbine blade. Pairs of modes were found, such as two modes which both resembled first torsional modes. In this investigation holographic interferometry was used to verify the earlier results for the turbine blade and to investigate three shell segments simulating blades. The shells ranged in size from moderately to very thick with length to thickness ratios of 16, 8 and 5·6. The blade geometry is characterized by a circumferential angle of 142° and a ratio of length to inner radii arc length near 1·0. In addition, a NASTRAN finite element analysis was performed on these simulated blades. Both mode shapes and frequencies were found to be in good agreement with the results from the experiment. The multiple mode phenomenon was found to be an artifact of the holographic experiment. Pairs of modes were found in the NASTRAN results for the simulated blades in which the out-of-plane displacements (those seen in the hologram) were very similar, but for which the displacements in the plane of the hologram differed significantly. Thus, the two modes which appeared in the experimental results as first torsional modes were seen to include quite different in-plane displacements. The two modes are therefore quite different and do not contradict the normal result, which may be justified from such elementary considerations as a Rayleigh quotient, that similar modes must produce similar frequencies.

  3. Nonlinear optics in the LP(02) higher-order mode of a fiber.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y; Chen, Z; Wadsworth, W J; Birks, T A

    2013-07-29

    The distinct disperion properties of higher-order modes in optical fibers permit the nonlinear generation of radiation deeper into the ultraviolet than is possible with the fundamental mode. This is exploited using adiabatic, broadband mode convertors to couple light efficiently from an input fundamental mode and also to return the generated light to an output fundamental mode over a broad spectral range. For example, we generate visible and UV supercontinuum light in the LP(02) mode of a photonic crystal fiber from sub-ns pulses with a wavelength of 532 nm.

  4. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Guided modes in a rectangular waveguide with semiconductor metamaterial

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tingting, Tang; Fushen, Chen; Bao, Sun

    2010-05-01

    The dispersion equations of bulk modes and surface modes in a rectangular waveguide of semiconductor metamaterial are derived by a modified “Marcatili's method". The cutoff frequencies of the lowest TM bulk mode are discussed, and the Brillouin diagrams of different bulk modes are drawn. They demonstrate that different heights correspond to different guidance frequency ranges which have no superposition with each other and a waveguide with a larger height possesses a wider passband of light. In addition, tendencies of degeneracy for different modes are observed. Finally, the existence of surface modes is verified by a graphical method.

  5. Waveguides having patterned, flattened modes

    SciTech Connect

    Messerly, Michael J.; Pax, Paul H.; Dawson, Jay W.

    2015-10-27

    Field-flattening strands may be added to and arbitrarily positioned within a field-flattening shell to create a waveguide that supports a patterned, flattened mode. Patterning does not alter the effective index or flattened nature of the mode, but does alter the characteristics of other modes. Compared to a telecom fiber, a hexagonal pattern of strands allows for a three-fold increase in the flattened mode's area without reducing the separation between its effective index and that of its bend-coupled mode. Hexagonal strand and shell elements prove to be a reasonable approximation, and, thus, to be of practical benefit vis-a-vis fabrication, to those of circular cross section. Patterned flattened modes offer a new and valuable path to power scaling.

  6. Linear stability of tearing modes

    SciTech Connect

    Cowley, S.C.; Kulsrud, R.M.; Hahm, T.S.

    1986-05-01

    This paper examines the stability of tearing modes in a sheared slab when the width of the tearing layer is much smaller than the ion Larmor radius. The ion response is nonlocal, and the quasineutrality retains its full integal form. An expansion procedure is introduced to solve the quasineutrality equation in powers of the width of the tearing layer over the ion Larmor radius. The expansion procedure is applied to the collisionless and semi-collisional tearing modes. The first order terms in the expansion we find to be strongly stabilizing. The physics of the mode and of the stabilization is discussed. Tearing modes are observed in experiments even though the slab theory predicts stability. It is proposed that these modes grow from an equilibrium with islands at the rational surfaces. If the equilibrium islands are wider than the ion Larmor radius, the mode is unstable when ..delta..' is positive.

  7. Surface Structure and Growth Mode of Pd Deposited on Mo(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehara, Y.; Kawanowa, H.; Gotoh, Y.

    The surface structure and growth mode of Pd/Mo(110) have been studied using reflection high energy electron diffraction (RHEED). The surface diagram of Pd on the Mo(110) substrate for deposition thickness versus substrate temperature was obtained. Four kinds of surface structures, namely α1, α2, β and γ, were observed. At less than 1 ML, α2 appeared in temperatures ranging from 400 to 1050°C and α1 appeared from RT to 400°C. α2 has a structure intermediate between those of Pd(111) and Mo(110), in which the dense direction of the layer is parallel to the [111]Mo orientation and their atomic row distances are coincident, resulting in formation of a long-period structure with a Mo surface, namely a coincident site lattice. The α1 structure is similar to the 1 × 1 structure. At more than 1.0 ML, β and γ structures appeared simultaneously in the temperature region from 500 to 950°C. However, at a high temperature region from 950 to 1050°C, the α2 structure was observed. β shows a one-dimensional ordered structure, in which Pd atoms line along [111]Mo. γ exhibits a 3 × 1 structure with the same atomic arrangement as the Mo(110) plane rotated at 70.5°. At greater than 2.0 ML, the Pd film grows in the Frank van der Merwe growth mode at a low temperature with accumulation of a Pd(111) layer, and in the Stranski Krastanov growth mode at a high temperature with two-dimensional growth of the γ structure followed by formation of flat crystallites.

  8. Predictions of H-mode performance in ITER

    SciTech Connect

    Budny, R. V.; Andre, R.; Bateman, G.; Halpern, F.; Kessel, C. E.; Kritz, A.; McCune, D.

    2008-03-03

    Time-dependent integrated predictive modeling is carried out using the PTRANSP code to predict fusion power and parameters such as alpha particle density and pressure in ITER H-mode plasmas. Auxiliary heating by negative ion neutral beam injection and ion cyclotron heating of He3 minority ions are modeled, and the GLF23 transport model is used in the prediction of the evolution of plasma temperature profiles. Effects of beam steering, beam torque, plasma rotation, beam current drive, pedestal temperatures, sawtooth oscillations, magnetic diffusion, and accumulation of He ash are treated self-consistently. Variations in assumptions associated with physics uncertainties for standard base-line DT H-mode plasmas (with Ip=15 MA, BTF=5.3 T, and Greenwald fraction=0.86) lead to a range of predictions for DT fusion power PDT and quasi-steady state fusion QDT (≡ PDT/Paux). Typical predictions assuming Paux = 50-53 MW yield PDT = 250- 720 MW and QDT = 5 - 14. In some cases where Paux is ramped down or shut off after initial flat-top conditions, quasi-steady QDT can be considerably higher, even infinite. Adverse physics assumptions such as existence of an inward pinch of the helium ash and an ash recycling coefficient approaching unity lead to very low values for PDT. Alternative scenarios with different heating and reduced performance regimes are also considered including plasmas with only H or D isotopes, DT plasmas with toroidal field reduced 10 or 20%, and discharges with reduced beam voltage. In full-performance D-only discharges, tritium burn-up is predicted to generate central tritium densities up to 1016/m3 and DT neutron rates up to 5×1016/s, compared with the DD neutron rates of 6×1017/s. Predictions with the toroidal field reduced 10 or 20% below the planned 5.3 T and keeping the same q98, Greenwald fraction, and Βη indicate that the fusion yield PDT and QDT will be lower by about a factor of two (scaling as B3.5).

  9. Zinc Accumulation and Behavior in Tuyere Coke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Kejiang; Zhang, Jianliang; Liu, Zhengjian; Wang, Tianqiu; Ning, Xiaojun; Zhong, Jianbo; Xu, Runsheng; Wang, Guangwei; Ren, Shan; Yang, Tianjun

    2014-10-01

    A case study of zinc oxide, which represents the first report on the occurrence, crystalline features, formation mechanism, and influence of this mineral in tuyere coke, was conducted in this study. A number of zinc oxides, some of which were in hexagonal wurtzite habit, were observed to distribute mainly in coke pores, cracks, surfaces, and around coke minerals. The accumulation of zinc in tuyere coke may enhance the degradation of coke and increase the generation and accumulation of coke fine in a blast furnace, which would cause bad effect on blast furnace operation. Investigations into zinc behavior in tuyere coke can be important for further interpretations of coke degradation in the high temperature zone of a blast furnace.

  10. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels.

    This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  11. Heat accumulation during pulsed laser materials processing.

    PubMed

    Weber, Rudolf; Graf, Thomas; Berger, Peter; Onuseit, Volkher; Wiedenmann, Margit; Freitag, Christian; Feuer, Anne

    2014-05-01

    Laser materials processing with ultra-short pulses allows very precise and high quality results with a minimum extent of the thermally affected zone. However, with increasing average laser power and repetition rates the so-called heat accumulation effect becomes a considerable issue. The following discussion presents a comprehensive analytical treatment of multi-pulse processing and reveals the basic mechanisms of heat accumulation and its consequence for the resulting processing quality. The theoretical findings can explain the experimental results achieved when drilling microholes in CrNi-steel and for cutting of CFRP. As a consequence of the presented considerations, an estimate for the maximum applicable average power for ultra-shorts pulsed laser materials processing for a given pulse repetition rate is derived.

  12. Accumulative Tritium Transfer from Water into Biosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Baumgaertner, Franz

    2005-07-15

    The energy balance of hydrogen isotopes in H bonds of water and biomolecules results in accumulative tritium transfer from water into biomolecules. Tests of DNA dissolved in tritiated water and of maize or barley hydroponically grown in tritiated water confirm the increase. The primary hydration shell of DNA shows an accumulation factor of {approx}1.4, and the exchangeable hydrogens inside DNA show {approx}2. Logistic growth analyses of maize and barley reveal the intrinsic growth rates of tritium 1.3 and 1.2 times larger than that of hydrogen. The higher rate of tritium than hydrogen incorporation in solid biomatter is caused by the hydration shells, which constitute an intrinsic component of biomolecules.

  13. [Radionuclide accumulation in fruit bodies of macromycetes].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V N; Eliashevich, N V

    2000-01-01

    Coefficients of 137Cs accumulation and 90Sr were determined in macromycetes of different trophic groups (137Cs in 43 species and 90Sr in 19 species) in the conditions of droughty year (1992). Their variability in forest formations was determined in the period from 1992 to 1998. In the year with increased atmospheric humidity (1998), two-fold rise of 137Cs accumulation in fruit bodies was registered on average. The pollution of Boletus edulis correlates with photosynthetically active part of Betula pendula and Pinus silvestris closer than with soil pollution. This shows the possibility to indicate the pollution of short-living fruit bodies of fungi by the pollution of plants-symbiotrophs. PMID:11155341

  14. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Frederick L; Krahnke, Jason S; Kim, Victor

    2014-01-01

    Airway mucus is part of the lung’s native immune function that traps particulates and microorganisms, enabling their clearance from the lung by ciliary transport and cough. Mucus hypersecretion and chronic productive cough are the features of the chronic bronchitis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Overproduction and hypersecretion by goblet cells and the decreased elimination of mucus are the primary mechanisms responsible for excessive mucus in chronic bronchitis. Mucus accumulation in COPD patients affects several important outcomes such as lung function, health-related quality of life, COPD exacerbations, hospitalizations, and mortality. Nonpharmacologic options for the treatment of mucus accumulation in COPD are smoking cessation and physical measures used to promote mucus clearance. Pharmacologic therapies include expectorants, mucolytics, methylxanthines, beta-adrenergic receptor agonists, anticholinergics, glucocorticoids, phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitors, antioxidants, and antibiotics. PMID:24493923

  15. [Radionuclide accumulation in fruit bodies of macromycetes].

    PubMed

    Fedorov, V N; Eliashevich, N V

    2000-01-01

    Coefficients of 137Cs accumulation and 90Sr were determined in macromycetes of different trophic groups (137Cs in 43 species and 90Sr in 19 species) in the conditions of droughty year (1992). Their variability in forest formations was determined in the period from 1992 to 1998. In the year with increased atmospheric humidity (1998), two-fold rise of 137Cs accumulation in fruit bodies was registered on average. The pollution of Boletus edulis correlates with photosynthetically active part of Betula pendula and Pinus silvestris closer than with soil pollution. This shows the possibility to indicate the pollution of short-living fruit bodies of fungi by the pollution of plants-symbiotrophs.

  16. High power and single mode quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Bismuto, Alfredo; Bidaux, Yves; Blaser, Stéphane; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Rochat, Michel; Muller, Antoine; Bonzon, Christopher; Faist, Jerome

    2016-05-16

    We present a single mode quantum cascade laser with nearly 1 W optical power. A buried distributed feedback reflector is used on the back section for wavelength selection. The laser is 6 mm long, 3.5 μm wide, mounted episide-up and the laser facets are left uncoated. Laser emission is centered at 4.68 μm. Single-mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of more than 30 dB is obtained in whole range of operation. Farfield measurements prove a symmetric, single transverse-mode emission in TM00-mode with typical divergences of 41° and 33° in the vertical and horizontal direction respectively. This work shows the potential for simple fabrication of high power lasers compatible with standard DFB processing. PMID:27409890

  17. Harmonic gyrotrons operating in high-order symmetric modes

    SciTech Connect

    Nusinovich, Gregory S.; Kashyn, Dmytro G.; Antonsen, T. M.

    2015-01-05

    It is shown that gyrotrons operating at cyclotron harmonics can be designed for operation in symmetric TE{sub 0,p}-modes. Such operation in fundamental harmonic gyrotrons is possible only at small radial indices (p≤3) because of the severe mode competition with TE{sub 2,p}-modes, which are equally coupled to annular beams as the symmetric modes. At cyclotron harmonics, however, this “degeneracy” of coupling is absent, and there is a region in the parameter space where harmonic gyrotrons can steadily operate in symmetric modes. This fact is especially important for sub-THz and THz-range gyrotrons where ohmic losses limit the power achievable in continuous-wave and high duty cycle regimes.

  18. High power and single mode quantum cascade lasers.

    PubMed

    Bismuto, Alfredo; Bidaux, Yves; Blaser, Stéphane; Terazzi, Romain; Gresch, Tobias; Rochat, Michel; Muller, Antoine; Bonzon, Christopher; Faist, Jerome

    2016-05-16

    We present a single mode quantum cascade laser with nearly 1 W optical power. A buried distributed feedback reflector is used on the back section for wavelength selection. The laser is 6 mm long, 3.5 μm wide, mounted episide-up and the laser facets are left uncoated. Laser emission is centered at 4.68 μm. Single-mode operation with a side mode suppression ratio of more than 30 dB is obtained in whole range of operation. Farfield measurements prove a symmetric, single transverse-mode emission in TM00-mode with typical divergences of 41° and 33° in the vertical and horizontal direction respectively. This work shows the potential for simple fabrication of high power lasers compatible with standard DFB processing.

  19. Topology-optimized silicon photonic wire mode (de)multiplexer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frellsen, Louise F.; Frandsen, Lars H.; Ding, Yunhong; Elesin, Yuriy; Sigmund, Ole; Yvind, Kresten

    2015-02-01

    We have designed and for the first time experimentally verified a topology optimized mode (de)multiplexer, which demultiplexes the fundamental and the first order mode of a double mode photonic wire to two separate single mode waveguides (and multiplexes vice versa). The device has a footprint of ~4.4 μm x ~2.8 μm and was fabricated for different design resolutions and design threshold values to verify the robustness of the structure to fabrication tolerances. The multiplexing functionality was confirmed by recording mode profiles using an infrared camera and vertical grating couplers. All structures were experimentally found to maintain functionality throughout a 100 nm wavelength range limited by available laser sources and insertion losses were generally lower than 1.3 dB. The cross talk was around -12 dB and the extinction ratio was measured to be better than 8 dB.

  20. Optical cavity modes of a single crystalline zinc oxide microsphere.

    PubMed

    Moirangthem, Rakesh Singh; Cheng, Pi-Ju; Chien, Paul Ching-Hang; Ngo, Buu Trong Huynh; Chang, Shu-Wei; Tien, Chung-Hao; Chang, Yia-Chung

    2013-02-11

    A detailed study on the optical cavity modes of zinc oxide microspheres under the optical excitation is presented. The zinc oxide microspheres with diameters ranging from 1.5 to 3.0 µm are prepared using hydrothermal growth technique. The photoluminescence measurement of a single microsphere shows prominent resonances of whispering gallery modes at room temperature. The experimentally observed whispering gallery modes in the photoluminescence spectrum are compared with theoretical calculations using analytical and finite element methods in order to clarify resonance properties of these modes. The comparison between theoretical analysis and experiment suggests that the dielectric constant of the ZnO microsphere is somewhat different from that for bulk ZnO. The sharp resonances of whispering gallery modes in zinc oxide microspheres cover the entire visible window. They may be utilized in realizations of optical resonators, light emitting devices, and lasers for future chip integrations with micro/nano optoelectronic circuits, and developments of optical biosensors. PMID:23481759