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Sample records for accumulation myeloperoxidase activity

  1. Myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C; Vissers, M C; Kettle, A J

    2000-01-01

    This review covers recent advances in the biology of myeloperoxidase. Mechanisms of posttranslational processing and how these fail in some of the common deficiency mutants are discussed. We also review the enzymology that points to myeloperoxidase having a number of physiologic substrates in addition to chloride and the evidence that it produces hypochlorous acid in the neutrophil phagosome in sufficient quantities to be bactericidal. Evidence is accumulating that myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants modify biologic macromolecules and cell-regulatory pathways and that they play a role in atherosclerosis. Investigation of disease incidence in relation to a polymorphism in the promoter region of the gene has produced interesting associations. These links with inflammatory diseases can now be pursued further using specific biomarkers of myeloperoxidase activity. PMID:10608505

  2. Pulmonary Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Ozment, Tammy Regena

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are considered one of the first responders of the innate immune response. Their primary activities are to migrate to sites of infection by chemotaxis and trans-migration across the endothelium (Gaines et al., 2005). Once at the site of infection, they phagocytize microbes and kill them. Critical to the neutrophil's ability to kill microbes are the multiple degradative enzymes contained within granules. The activity of these enzymes is non-specific, and therefore, neutrophils also contribute to tissue damage at the site of infection (Gaines and Berliner, 2005). Measurement of neutrophil infiltration into tissues is one way to gauge the severity of infection, inflammation, and tissue damage (Ayala et al., 2002). Myeloperoxidase is found in the primary granules of neutrophils and is an effective measure of neutrophil infiltration into tissues (Gaines and Berliner, 2005).

  3. Myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, S J

    1999-01-01

    Phagocytes respond to stimulation with a burst of oxygen consumption, and much, if not all, of the extra oxygen consumed in the respiratory burst is converted first to the superoxide anion and then to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Myeloperoxidase (MPO), which is released from cytoplasmic granules of neutrophils and monocytes by a degranulation process, reacts with the H2O2 formed by the respiratory burst to form a complex that can oxidize a large variety of substances. Among the latter is chloride, which is oxidized initially to hypochlorous acid, with the subsequent formation of chlorine and chloramines. These products of the MPO-H2O2-chloride system are powerful oxidants that can have profound biological effects. The primary function of neutrophils is the phagocytosis and destruction of microorganisms, and the release of MPO and H2O2 into the phagosome containing the ingested microorganism generally leads to a rapid microbicidal effect. Neutrophils from patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) have a microbicidal defect that is associated with the absence of a respiratory burst and, thus, H2O2 production. Neutrophils from patients with a hereditary MPO deficiency, who lack MPO, also have a microbicidal defect, although it is not as severe as that seen in CGD. MPO and H2O2 also can be released to the outside of the cell where a reaction with chloride can induce damage to adjacent tissue and, thus, contribute to the pathogenesis of disease. It has been suggested that pulmonary injury, renal glomerular damage, and the initiation of atherosclerotic lesions may be caused by the MPO system. PMID:10519157

  4. Methods for measuring myeloperoxidase activity toward assessing inhibitor efficacy in living systems.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Milton, Amber; Arnold, Robert D; Huang, Hui; Smith, Forrest; Panizzi, Jennifer R; Panizzi, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Myeloperoxidase aids in clearance of microbes by generation of peroxidase-mediated oxidants that kill leukocyte-engulfed pathogens. In this review, we will examine 1) strategies for in vitro evaluation of myeloperoxidase function and its inhibition, 2) ways to monitor generation of certain oxidant species during inflammation, and 3) how these methods can be used to approximate the total polymorphonuclear neutrophil chemotaxis following insult. Several optical imaging probes are designed to target reactive oxygen and nitrogen species during polymorphonuclear neutrophil inflammatory burst following injury. Here, we review the following 1) the broad effect of myeloperoxidase on normal physiology, 2) the difference between myeloperoxidase and other peroxidases, 3) the current optical probes available for use as surrogates for direct measures of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants, and 4) the range of preclinical options for imaging myeloperoxidase accumulation at sites of inflammation in mice. We also stress the advantages and drawbacks of each of these methods, the pharmacokinetic considerations that may limit probe use to strictly cell cultures for some reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, rather than in vivo utility as indicators of myeloperoxidase function. Taken together, our review should shed light on the fundamental rational behind these techniques for measuring myeloperoxidase activity and polymorphonuclear neutrophil response after injury toward developing safe myeloperoxidase inhibitors as potential therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:26884610

  5. Peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities of isolated human myeloperoxidases.

    PubMed Central

    Svensson, B E; Domeij, K; Lindvall, S; Rydell, G

    1987-01-01

    Isolated neutrophils from healthy donors were used for the isolation of four highly purified forms of myeloperoxidase as determined by spectral (A430/A280 ratio 0.80-0.87) and enzyme-activity measurements. Although the myeloperoxidases exhibited different elution profiles on cation-exchange chromatography, gel filtration indicated similar relative molecular masses. When these forms were assayed for peroxidase and peroxidase-oxidase activities with several substrates, they all exhibited virtually the same specific activities. These results suggest that possible functional differences between the enzymes may be related to differences in their sites of action rather than to differences in enzyme activity. Myeloperoxidase from a patient with chronic myeloid leukaemia also revealed a similar heterogeneity on cation-exchange chromatography. However, this myeloperoxidase contained in addition one form with a lower and one form with a higher relative molecular mass, as indicated by gel-filtration chromatography. PMID:3036098

  6. Myeloperoxidase-mediated activation of xenobiotics by human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Hofstra, A H; Uetrecht, J P

    1993-10-01

    Peripheral blood leukocytes contain a variety of enzymes that are capable of metabolising xenobiotics. The enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) appears to be the most important for drug metabolism. MPO is a peroxidase/oxidase and generates the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid. MPO- or MPO-generated oxidants are capable of oxidizing a wide variety of compounds and a broad range of functional groups, especially those that contain nitrogen and sulfur. Leukocytes have a role in immune response; therefore, reactive intermediates generated by leukocyte metabolism of xenobiotics may have a role in idiosyncratic drug reactions, particularly those that are immune-mediated such as drug-induced lupus or agranulocytosis. PMID:8236277

  7. Myeloperoxidase activity and the oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Muravlyova, Larissa; Molotov-Luchanskiy, Vilen; Bakirova, Ryszhan; Klyuyev, Dmitriy; Demidchik, Ludmila; Kolesnikova, Yevgeniya

    2014-10-01

    The main purpose of our investigation was to study myeloperoxidase activity and concentration of oxidized proteins in blood neutrophils of patients with ambulant pneumonia and secondary pneumonia which has arisen on a background of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Patients were divided into 2 groups. 17 patients with ambulant pneumonia moderate severity and respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 1-st group. 20 COPD patients with secondary pneumonia moderate severity and with respiratory insufficiency of grade 2 were included in the 2-nd group. The control group consisted of 15 healthy subjects. The reactive protein carbonyl derivates, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP) and myeloperoxidase activity were detected in neutrophils. In neutrophils of 1-st group patients the augmentation of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the slight decrease of reactive protein carbonyl derivates was observed in comparison with healthy ones (by 17%). In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients the significant increasing AOPP in comparison with healthy ones (p <0.01) and 1 group patients (p <0.05) was fixed. Myeloperoxidase activity was higher in neutrophils of 1-th group patients in comparison with healthy ones. In neutrophils of 2-nd group patients myeloperoxidase activity was higher in comparison with the same of 1 group patients (by 67%, p <0.05). Our results showed the different direction of oxidized proteins formation neutrophils of patients with primary and secondary pneumonia. Besides that the varied degree of myeloperoxidase activity was fixed. Our results require more detailed understanding because they can reflect peculiar mechanisms of pneumonia development and determine the characteristics of their progression. PMID:26461373

  8. Myeloperoxidase deficiency induces MIP-2 production via ERK activation in zymosan-stimulated mouse neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Tateno, N; Matsumoto, N; Motowaki, T; Suzuki, K; Aratani, Y

    2013-05-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a major constituent of neutrophils, catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride anion. We have previously reported that MPO-deficient (MPO(-/-)) neutrophils produce greater amount of macrophage inflammatory protein-2 (MIP-2) in vitro than do wild type when stimulated with zymosan. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms governing the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in the mutant neutrophils. Interestingly, we found that zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 was blocked by pre-treatment with U0126, an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK), and with BAY11-7082, an inhibitor of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Western blot analysis indicated that U0126 also inhibited the phosphorylation of p65 subunit of NF-κB (p65), indicating that MIP-2 was produced via the ERK/NF-κB pathway. Intriguingly, we found that ERK1/2, p65, and alpha subunit of inhibitor of κB (IκBα) in the MPO(-/-) neutrophils were phosphorylated more strongly than in the wild type when stimulated with zymosan. Exogenous H2O2 treatment in addition to zymosan stimulation enhanced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 without affecting the zymosan-induced MIP-2 production. In contrast, exogenous HOCl inhibited the production of MIP-2 as well as IκBα phosphorylation without affecting ERK activity. The zymosan-induced production of MIP-2 in the wild-type neutrophils was enhanced by pre-treatment of the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. Collectively, these results strongly suggest that both lack of HOCl and accumulation of H2O2 due to MPO deficiency contribute to the up-regulation of MIP-2 production in mouse neutrophils stimulated with zymosan. PMID:23438680

  9. Assessment of Myeloperoxidase Activity by the Conversion of Hydroethidine to 2-Chloroethidium*

    PubMed Central

    Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Cergol, Katie M.; Shengule, Sudhir R.; Suarna, Cacang; Newington, Darren; Kettle, Anthony J.; Payne, Richard J.; Stocker, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Oxidants derived from myeloperoxidase (MPO) contribute to inflammatory diseases. In vivo MPO activity is commonly assessed by the accumulation of 3-chlorotyrosine (3-Cl-Tyr), although 3-Cl-Tyr is formed at low yield and is subject to metabolism. Here we show that MPO activity can be assessed using hydroethidine (HE), a probe commonly employed for the detection of superoxide. Using LC/MS/MS, 1H NMR, and two-dimensional NOESY, we identified 2-chloroethidium (2-Cl-E+) as a specific product when HE was exposed to hypochlorous acid (HOCl), chloramines, MPO/H2O2/chloride, and activated human neutrophils. The rate constant for HOCl-mediated conversion of HE to 2-Cl-E+ was estimated to be 1.5 × 105 m−1s−1. To investigate the utility of 2-Cl-E+ to assess MPO activity in vivo, HE was injected into wild-type and MPO-deficient (Mpo−/−) mice with established peritonitis or localized arterial inflammation, and tissue levels of 2-Cl-E+ and 3-Cl-Tyr were then determined by LC/MS/MS. In wild-type mice, 2-Cl-E+ and 3-Cl-Tyr were detected readily in the peritonitis model, whereas in the arterial inflammation model 2-Cl-E+ was present at comparatively lower concentrations (17 versus 0.3 pmol/mg of protein), and 3-Cl-Tyr could not be detected. Similar to the situation with 3-Cl-Tyr, tissue levels of 2-Cl-E+ were decreased substantially in Mpo−/− mice, indicative of the specificity of the assay. In the arterial inflammation model, 2-Cl-E+ was absent from non-inflamed arteries and blood, suggesting that HE oxidation occurred locally in the inflamed artery. Our data suggest that the conversion of exogenous HE to 2-Cl-E+ may be a useful selective and sensitive marker for MPO activity in addition to 3-Cl-Tyr. PMID:24436331

  10. Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Sokolov, A V; Kostevich, V A; Vasilyev, V B; Cherenkevich, S N; Panasenko, O M

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation. PMID:27597056

  11. Influence of organophosphorus pesticides on peroxidase and chlorination activity of human myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Lazarević-Pašti, Tamara; Momić, Tatjana; Radojević, Miloš M; Vasić, Vesna

    2013-09-01

    Inhibitory effects of five organophosphorus pesticides (diazinon, malathion, chlorpyrifos, azinphos-methyl and phorate) and their oxo-analogs on human myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were investigated. While inspecting separately peroxidase and chlorination activity, it was observed that investigated OPs affect peroxidase activity, but not chlorination activity. Among investigated pesticides, malathion and malaoxon have showed the highest power to inhibit MPO peroxidase activity with IC50 values of the order of 3×10(-7) and 5×10(-9) M, respectively. It was proposed that inhibition trend is rendered by molecular structure which invokes steric hindrance for OPs interaction with MPO active center responsible for peroxidase activity. In addition, it was concluded that physiological function of MPO is not affected by any of the investigated OPs. PMID:25149236

  12. Characterization and Antioxidant Properties of Six Algerian Propolis Extracts: Ethyl Acetate Extracts Inhibit Myeloperoxidase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 μM. PMID:24514562

  13. Characterization and antioxidant properties of six Algerian propolis extracts: ethyl acetate extracts inhibit myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Boufadi, Yasmina Mokhtaria; Soubhye, Jalal; Riazi, Ali; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Nève, Jean; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Because propolis contains many types of antioxidant compounds such as polyphenols and flavonoids, it can be useful in preventing oxidative damages. Ethyl acetate extracts of propolis from several Algerian regions show high activity by scavenging free radicals, preventing lipid peroxidation and inhibiting myeloperoxidase (MPO). By fractioning and assaying ethyl acetate extracts, it was observed that both polyphenols and flavonoids contribute to these activities. A correlation was observed between the polyphenol content and the MPO inhibition. However, it seems that kaempferol, a flavonoid, contributes mainly to the MPO inhibition. This molecule is in a high amount in the ethyl acetate extract and demonstrates the best efficiency towards the enzyme with an inhibiting concentration at 50% of 4 ± 2 µM. PMID:24514562

  14. [Myeloperoxidase activity in blood plasma as a criterion of therapy for patients with cardiovascular disease].

    PubMed

    Grigorieva, D V; Gorudko, I V; Kostevich, V A; Sokolov, A V; Buko, I V; Vasilyev, V B; Polonetsky, L Z; Panasenko, O M; Cherenkevich, S N

    2016-03-01

    A significant increase in the myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity has been found in plasma of patients with stable angina and with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in comparison with the control group. MPO concentration was significantly increased in plasma of ACS patients. Reduced MPO activity in the treated ACS patients correlated with a favorable outcome of the disease. Generally, changes in plasma MPO concentration coincided with changes in lactoferrin concentration thus confirming the role of neutrophil degranulation in the increase of plasma concentrations of these proteins. The increase in MPO activity was obviously determined by modification of the MPO protein caused by reactive oxygen species and halogen in the molar ratio of 1 : 25 and 1 : 50. The decrease in plasma MPO activity may be associated with increased plasma concentrations of the physiological inhibitor of its activity, ceruloplasmin, and also with modification of the MPO protein with reactive oxygen species and halogen at their molar ratio of 1 : 100 and higher. Thus, MPO activity may be used for evaluation of effectiveness of the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27420626

  15. A rapid bioluminescence assay for measuring myeloperoxidase activity in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Goiffon, Reece J.; Martinez, Sara C.; Piwnica-Worms, David

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a circulating cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarker used to estimate clinical risk and patient prognosis. Current enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for MPO concentration are costly and time-intensive. Here we report a novel bioluminescence assay, designated MPO activity on a polymer surface (MAPS), for measuring MPO activity in human plasma samples using the bioluminescent substrate L-012. The method delivers a result in under an hour and is resistant to confounding effects from endogenous MPO inhibitors. In a pilot clinical study, we compared MAPS and two clinical ELISAs using 72 plasma samples from cardiac catheterization patients. Results from parallel MAPS and ELISAs were concordant within 2±11 μg l−1 MPO with similar uncertainty and reproducibility. Results between parallel MAPS and ELISA were in better agreement than those between independent ELISAs. MAPS may provide an inexpensive and rapid assay for determining MPO activity in plasma samples from patients with CVD or potentially other immune and inflammatory disorders. PMID:25666092

  16. Peroxidatic activity distinct from myeloperoxidase in human monocytes cultured in vitro and in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Breton-Gorius, J; Vildé, J L; Guichard, J; Vainchenker, W; Basset, F

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes develop a peroxidatic activity (PA) in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) after adherence or after culture in semi-solid medium. This enzyme activity disappears after three days of culture in the majority of macrophages derived from adult monocytes but persists for one week in macrophages derived from neonatal monocytes. The PA is due to an enzyme distinct from myeloperoxidase (MPO), since monocytes from a patient with MPO deficiency develop the same PA as that of normal monocytes after adherence. By its localization and other characteristics, PA of adherent monocytes resembles that of rodent macrophages. We therefore investigated whether human alveolar macrophages exhibit PA, using a sensitive cytochemical method which prevents inhibition by aldehyde in adherent monocytes. In various pathological cases, four types of macrophages could be identified: the majority were peroxidase-negative, a small percentage was of exudate type exhibiting a PA in granules as blood monocytes, while few macrophages were intermediate, possessing only PA in RER i.e. of type resident and a smaller proportion had PA in RER and in granules i.e. exudate-resident macrophages. These findings demonstrate that human macrophages and adherent monocytes may exhibit PA in RER as has been reported for rodent macrophages. The true nature and function of the enzyme responsible for this PA, which is distinct from MPO, remains unknown, but some arguments seem to suggest its role in prostaglandin synthesis. PMID:6283838

  17. Alkalinity of neutrophil phagocytic vacuoles is modulated by HVCN1 and has consequences for myeloperoxidase activity.

    PubMed

    Levine, Adam P; Duchen, Michael R; de Villiers, Simon; Rich, Peter R; Segal, Anthony W

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase of neutrophils, essential for innate immunity, passes electrons across the phagocytic membrane to form superoxide in the phagocytic vacuole. Activity of the oxidase requires that charge movements across the vacuolar membrane are balanced. Using the pH indicator SNARF, we measured changes in pH in the phagocytic vacuole and cytosol of neutrophils. In human cells, the vacuolar pH rose to ~9, and the cytosol acidified slightly. By contrast, in Hvcn1 knock out mouse neutrophils, the vacuolar pH rose above 11, vacuoles swelled, and the cytosol acidified excessively, demonstrating that ordinarily this channel plays an important role in charge compensation. Proton extrusion was not diminished in Hvcn1-/- mouse neutrophils arguing against its role in maintaining pH homeostasis across the plasma membrane. Conditions in the vacuole are optimal for bacterial killing by the neutral proteases, cathepsin G and elastase, and not by myeloperoxidase, activity of which was unphysiologically low at alkaline pH. PMID:25885273

  18. Diffused Intra-Oocyte Hydrogen Peroxide Activates Myeloperoxidase and Deteriorates Oocyte Quality

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sana N.; Shaeib, Faten; Najafi, Tohid; Kavdia, Mahendra; Gonik, Bernard; Saed, Ghassan M.; Goud, Pravin T.; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2015-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) is a relatively long-lived signaling molecule that plays an essential role in oocyte maturation, implantation, as well as early embryonic development. Exposure to relatively high levels of H2O2 functions efficiently to accelerate oocyte aging and deteriorate oocyte quality. However, little precise information exists regarding intra-oocyte H2O2 concentrations, and its diffusion to the oocyte milieu. In this work, we utilized an L-shaped amperometric integrated H2O2-selective probe to directly and quantitatively measure the real-time intra-oocyte H2O2 concentration. This investigation provides an exact measurement of H2O2 in situ by reducing the possible loss of H2O2 caused by diffusion or reactivity with other biological systems. This experiment suggests that the intra-oocyte H2O2 levels of oocytes obtained from young animals are reasonably high and remained constant during the procedure measurements. However, the intra-oocyte H2O2 concentration dropped significantly (40-50% reduction) in response to catalase pre-incubation, suggesting that the measurements are truly H2O2 based. To further confirm the extracellular diffusion of H2O2, oocytes were incubated with myeloperoxidase (MPO), and the diffused H2O2 triggered MPO chlorinating activity. Our results show that the generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) facilitated the deterioration in oocyte quality, a process that could be prevented by pre-incubating the oocytes with melatonin, which was experimentally proven to be oxidized utilizing HPLC methods. This study is the first to demonstrate direct quantitative measurement of intracellular H2O2, and its extracellular diffusion and activation of MPO as well as its impact on oocyte quality. These results may help in designing more accurate treatment plans in assisted reproduction under inflammatory conditions. PMID:26197395

  19. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality.

    PubMed

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  20. The Impact of Myeloperoxidase and Activated Macrophages on Metaphase II Mouse Oocyte Quality

    PubMed Central

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Thakur, Mili; Kohan-Ghadr, Hamid-Reza; Drewlo, Sascha; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme-containing enzyme present in neutrophils, monocytes, and macrophages, is produced in high levels during inflammation, and associated with poor reproductive outcomes. MPO is known to generate hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a damaging reactive oxygen species (ROS) utilizing hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and chloride (Cl-). Here we investigate the effect of activated immune cells and MPO on oocyte quality. Mouse metaphase II oocytes were divided into the following groups: 1) Incubation with a catalytic amount of MPO (40 nM) for different incubation periods in the presence of 100 mM Cl- with and without H2O2 and with and without melatonin (100 μM), at 37°C (n = 648/648 total number of oocytes in each group for oocytes with and without cumulus cells); 2) Co-cultured with activated mouse peritoneal macrophage and neutrophils cells (1.0 x 106 cells/ml) in the absence and presence of melatonin (200 μM), an MPO inhibitor/ROS scavenger, for different incubation periods in HTF media, at 37°C (n = 200/200); 3) Untreated oocytes incubated for 4 hrs as controls (n = 73/64). Oocytes were then fixed, stained and scored based on the microtubule morphology and chromosomal alignment. All treatments were found to negatively affect oocyte quality in a time dependent fashion as compared to controls. In all cases the presence of cumulus cells offered no protection; however significant protection was offered by melatonin. Similar results were obtained with oocytes treated with neutrophils. This work provides a direct link between MPO and decreased oocyte quality. Therefore, strategies to decrease MPO mediated inflammation may influence reproductive outcomes. PMID:26982351

  1. MR Imaging of Myeloperoxidase Activity in a Model of the Inflamed Aneurysm Wall

    PubMed Central

    Gounis, M.J.; van der Bom, I.M.J.; Wakhloo, A.K.; Zheng, S.; Chueh, J.-Y.; Kühn, A.L.; Bogdanov, A.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Although myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in vivo can be visualized using non-invasive imaging, successful clinical translation requires further optimization of the imaging approach. We report a motion-sensitized-driven-equilibrium (MSDE) for the detection of an MPO activity-specific gadolinium (Gd)-containing imaging agent (IA) in experimental aneurysm models that compensates for irregular blood flow enabling vascular wall imaging in the aneurysm. Materials and Methods We deployed a phantom model to optimize a MSDE MR sequence that suppresses complex flow patterns within the aneurysm for detection of an MPO-specific Gd-chelate. The phantom was built from rotational angiography of a rabbit elastase aneurysm model and connected to a cardiac pulse duplicator mimicking rabbit-specific flow conditions. Thereafter, we further refined the MSDE sequence and applied it in vivo to rabbit aneurysm models with and without inflammation in the aneurysmal wall. Under each condition, the aneurysms were imaged before and after intravenous administration of the IA. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of each MR slice through the aneurysm was calculated. Results The MSDE sequence was optimized to reduce flow signal enabling detection of the MPO-IA in the phantom. The optimized imaging protocol in the rabbit model of saccular aneurysms revealed a significant increase in the change of SNR pre- to postcontrast MR signal intensities in the inflamed aneurysms as compared to naïve aneurysms and the adjacent carotid artery (p<0.0001). Conclusion A diagnostic MR protocol was optimized for molecular imaging of an MPO-specific molecular imaging agent in an animal model of brain aneurysms. PMID:25273534

  2. Plasma myeloperoxidase level and polymorphonuclear leukocyte activation in horses suffering from large intestinal obstruction requiring surgery: preliminary results.

    PubMed Central

    Grulke, S; Benbarek, H; Caudron, I; Deby-Dupont, G; Mathy-Hartert, M; Farnir, F; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1999-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a specific enzyme of neutrophil azurophilic granules with a strong oxidative activity. Thanks to a radioimmunoassay of equine myeloperoxidase, the authors have observed a significantly higher plasma level of MPO in horses operated for strangulation obstruction of the large intestine (n = 6) than in horses suffering from a non-strangulating displacement of the large intestine (n = 9). For the 2 groups, 3 phases were distinguished: reception (P1), intensive care (P2) and terminal phase (P3). The mean peak values of MPO for these phases were 121.6 ng/mL (P1), 168.6 ng/mL (P2), and 107.0 ng/mL (P3) for the non-strangulating group, and 242.6 ng/mL (P1); 426.0 ng/mL (P2), and 379.5 ng/mL (P3) for the strangulation group. The variations of the mean peak values of plasma MPO were significantly different between the 2 groups and between the different phases. A significant increase of the least square means of MPO was observed between P1 and P2. A significant decrease of the least square means of the number of circulating leukocytes was observed between P1 and P3. Polymorphonuclear neutrophil activation could play a major role in the pathogenesis of acute abdominal disease and endotoxic shock. PMID:10369573

  3. Effect of Hemodialysis on Plasma Myeloperoxidase Activity in End Stage Renal Disease Patients.

    PubMed

    Rao, A Madhusudhana; Apoorva, R; Anand, Usha; Anand, C V; Venu, G

    2012-07-01

    End stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis (HD) have an increased oxidative stress, with a high risk of atherosclerosis and other co-morbid conditions. Recent studies have suggested that myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidative stress may play a role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular complications in dialysis patients. Furthermore, dialysis treatment 'per se' can aggravate oxidative stress. Hence this study was designed to determine whether HD leads to an alteration in the plasma levels of MPO and malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of oxidative stress in ESRD patients on maintenance HD. To study the effect of HD, plasma MPO and MDA were determined before and after HD in forty ESRD patients (24 men and 16 women, age between 8 and 71 years, median being 40.5 years) on maintenance HD. Plasma MPO and MDA were assayed by spectrophotometric methods. Haematological and other biochemical parameters were obtained from patients' case records. Plasma MPO and MDA levels were significantly higher after HD when compared with pre-dialysis levels (p < 0.05). There was no correlation between MPO and MDA (r = 0.184, p = 0.10) and other biochemical parameters (p > 0.05). However, there was a significant correlation between MPO and MDA with haemodialysis vintage (p < 0.05). In univariate regression analysis duration of HD (β = 1.470, p = 0.045, β = 0.388, p = 0.013), was independently associated with MPO and MDA. Although HD is indispensable for survival of patients with ESRD, it is fraught with undesirable side-effects, such as an increase in the plasma MPO and MDA levels. The elevated levels of MPO contribute to the increased oxidative stress as free radicals are produced by the reaction catalyzed by it. PMID:26405383

  4. Evaluation of the serum catalase and myeloperoxidase activities in chronic arsenic-exposed individuals and concomitant cytogenetic damage

    SciTech Connect

    Banerjee, Mayukh; Banerjee, Nilanjana; Ghosh, Pritha; Das, Jayanta K.; Basu, Santanu; Sarkar, Ajoy K.; States, J. Christopher; Giri, Ashok K.

    2010-11-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure through contaminated drinking water is a major environmental health issue. Chronic arsenic exposure is known to exert its toxic effects by a variety of mechanisms, of which generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is one of the most important. A high level of ROS, in turn, leads to DNA damage that might ultimately culminate in cancer. In order to keep the level of ROS in balance, an array of enzymes is present, of which catalase (CAT) and myeloperoxidase (MPO) are important members. Hence, in this study, we determined the activities of these two enzymes in the sera and chromosomal aberrations (CA) in peripheral blood lymphocytes in individuals exposed and unexposed to arsenic in drinking water. Arsenic in drinking water and in urine was used as a measure of exposure. Our results show that individuals chronically exposed to arsenic have significantly higher CAT and MPO activities and higher incidence of CA. We found moderate positive correlations between CAT and MPO activities, induction of CA and arsenic in urine and water. These results indicate that chronic arsenic exposure causes higher CAT and MPO activities in serum that correlates with induction of genetic damage. We conclude that the serum levels of these enzymes might be used as biomarkers of early arsenic exposure induced disease much before the classical dermatological symptoms of arsenicosis begin to appear.

  5. Smart imaging of acute lung injury: exploration of myeloperoxidase activity using in vivo endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Chagnon, Frédéric; Bourgouin, Alexandra; Lebel, Réjean; Bonin, Marc-André; Marsault, Eric; Lepage, Martin; Lesur, Olivier

    2015-09-15

    The pathophysiology of acute lung injury (ALI) is well characterized, but its real-time assessment at bedside remains a challenge. When patients do not improve after 1 wk despite supportive therapies, physicians have to consider open lung biopsy (OLB) to identify the process(es) at play. Sustained inflammation and inadequate repair are often observed in this context. OLB is neither easy to perform in a critical setting nor exempt from complications. Herein, we explore intravital endoscopic confocal fluorescence microscopy (ECFM) of the lung in vivo combined with the use of fluorescent smart probe(s) activated by myeloperoxidase (MPO). MPO is a granular enzyme expressed by polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), catalyzing the synthesis of hypoclorous acid, a by-product of hydrogen peroxide. Activation of these probes was first validated in vitro in relevant cells (i.e., AMs and PMNs) and on MPO-non-expressing cells (as negative controls) and then tested in vivo using three rat models of ALI and real-time intravital imaging with ECFM. Semiquantitative image analyses revealed that in vivo probe-related cellular/background fluorescence was associated with corresponding enhanced lung enzymatic activity and was partly prevented by specific MPO inhibition. Additional ex vivo phenotyping was performed, confirming that fluorescent cells were neutrophil elastase(+) (PMNs) or CD68(+) (AMs). This work is a first step toward "virtual biopsy" of ALI without OLB. PMID:26232301

  6. Comparative reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants with mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Rayner, Benjamin S; Love, Dominic T; Hawkins, Clare L

    2014-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an important heme enzyme released by activated leukocytes that catalyzes the reaction of hydrogen peroxide with halide and pseudo-halide ions to form various hypohalous acids. Hypohalous acids are chemical oxidants that have potent antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties and, as such, play key roles in the human immune system. However, increasing evidence supports an alternative role for myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants in the development of disease. Excessive production of hypohalous acids, particularly during chronic inflammation, leads to the initiation and accumulation of cellular damage that has been implicated in many human pathologies including atherosclerosis, neurodegenerative disease, lung disease, arthritis, inflammatory cancers, and kidney disease. This has sparked a significant interest in developing a greater understanding of the mechanisms involved in myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant-induced mammalian cell damage. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the cellular reactivity of hypochlorous acid, hypobromous acid, and hypothiocyanous acid, the major oxidants produced by myeloperoxidase under physiological conditions. PMID:24632382

  7. Impact of myeloperoxidase-LDL interactions on enzyme activity and subsequent posttranslational oxidative modifications of apoB-100

    PubMed Central

    Delporte, Cédric; Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Noyon, Caroline; Furtmüller, Paul G.; Nuyens, Vincent; Slomianny, Marie-Christine; Madhoun, Philippe; Desmet, Jean-Marc; Raynal, Pierre; Dufour, Damien; Koyani, Chintan N.; Reyé, Florence; Rousseau, Alexandre; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Ducobu, Jean; Michalski, Jean-Claude; Nève, Jean; Vanhamme, Luc; Obinger, Christian; Malle, Ernst; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Oxidation of LDL by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-chloride system is a key event in the development of atherosclerosis. The present study aimed at investigating the interaction of MPO with native and modified LDL and at revealing posttranslational modifications on apoB-100 (the unique apolipoprotein of LDL) in vitro and in vivo. Using amperometry, we demonstrate that MPO activity increases up to 90% when it is adsorbed at the surface of LDL. This phenomenon is apparently reflected by local structural changes in MPO observed by circular dichroism. Using MS, we further analyzed in vitro modifications of apoB-100 by hypochlorous acid (HOCl) generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system or added as a reagent. A total of 97 peptides containing modified residues could be identified. Furthermore, differences were observed between LDL oxidized by reagent HOCl or HOCl generated by the MPO-H2O2-chloride system. Finally, LDL was isolated from patients with high cardiovascular risk to confirm that our in vitro findings are also relevant in vivo. We show that several HOCl-mediated modifications of apoB-100 identified in vitro were also present on LDL isolated from patients who have increased levels of plasma MPO and MPO-modified LDL. In conclusion, these data emphasize the specificity of MPO to oxidize LDL. PMID:24534704

  8. Design, synthesis, and structure-activity relationship studies of novel 3-alkylindole derivatives as selective and highly potent myeloperoxidase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Soubhye, Jalal; Aldib, Iyas; Elfving, Betina; Gelbcke, Michel; Furtmüller, Paul G; Podrecca, Manuel; Conotte, Raphaël; Colet, Jean-Marie; Rousseau, Alexandre; Reye, Florence; Sarakbi, Ahmad; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Kauffmann, Jean-Michel; Obinger, Christian; Nève, Jean; Prévost, Martine; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim; Dufrasne, Francois; Van Antwerpen, Pierre

    2013-05-23

    Due to its production of potent antimicrobial oxidants including hypochlorous acid, human myeloperoxidase (MPO) plays a critical role in innate immunity and inflammatory diseases. Thus MPO is an attractive target in drug design. (Aminoalkyl)fluoroindole derivatives were detected to be very potent MPO inhibitors; however, they also promote inhibition of the serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) at the same concentration range. Via structure-based drug design, a new series of MPO inhibitors derived from 3-alkylindole were synthesized and their effects were assessed on MPO-mediated taurine chlorination and low-density lipoprotein oxidation as well as on inhibition of SERT. The fluoroindole compound with three carbons in the side chain and one amide group exhibited a selectivity index of 35 (Ki/IC50) with high inhibition of MPO activity (IC50 = 18 nM), whereas its effect on SERT was in the micromolar range. Structure-function relationships, mechanism of action, and safety of the molecule are discussed. PMID:23581551

  9. Myeloperoxidase: friend and foe.

    PubMed

    Klebanoff, Seymour J

    2005-05-01

    Neutrophilic polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are highly specialized for their primary function, the phagocytosis and destruction of microorganisms. When coated with opsonins (generally complement and/or antibody), microorganisms bind to specific receptors on the surface of the phagocyte and invagination of the cell membrane occurs with the incorporation of the microorganism into an intracellular phagosome. There follows a burst of oxygen consumption, and much, if not all, of the extra oxygen consumed is converted to highly reactive oxygen species. In addition, the cytoplasmic granules discharge their contents into the phagosome, and death of the ingested microorganism soon follows. Among the antimicrobial systems formed in the phagosome is one consisting of myeloperoxidase (MPO), released into the phagosome during the degranulation process, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), formed by the respiratory burst and a halide, particularly chloride. The initial product of the MPO-H2O2-chloride system is hypochlorous acid, and subsequent formation of chlorine, chloramines, hydroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, and ozone has been proposed. These same toxic agents can be released to the outside of the cell, where they may attack normal tissue and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of disease. This review will consider the potential sources of H2O2 for the MPO-H2O2-halide system; the toxic products of the MPO system; the evidence for MPO involvement in the microbicidal activity of neutrophils; the involvement of MPO-independent antimicrobial systems; and the role of the MPO system in tissue injury. It is concluded that the MPO system plays an important role in the microbicidal activity of phagocytes. PMID:15689384

  10. Myeloperoxidase in kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Buch, Thomas; Grone, Hermann-Josef

    2003-12-01

    In glomerular and tubulointerstitial disease, polymorphonuclear- and monocyte-derived reactive oxygen species may contribute to oxidative modification of proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. In part, the processes instigated by reactive oxygen species parallel events that lead to the development of atherosclerosis. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein and catalyst for (lipo)protein oxidation is present in these mononuclear cells. The ability of MPO to generate hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite (HOCl/OCl-) from hydrogen peroxide in the presence of chloride ions is a unique and defining activity for this enzyme. The MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system leads to a variety of chlorinated protein and lipid adducts that in turn may cause dysfunction of cells in different compartments of the kidney. The aim of this article is to cover and interpret some experimental and clinical aspects in glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases in which the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system has been considered an important pathophysiologic factor in the progression but also the attenuation of experimental renal disease. The colocalization of MPO and HOCl-modified proteins in glomerular peripheral basement membranes and podocytes in human membranous glomerulonephritis, the presence of HOCl-modified proteins in mononuclear cells of the interstitium and in damaged human tubular epithelia, the inflammation induced and exacerbated by MPO antibody complexes in necrotizing glomerulonephritis, and the presence of HOCl-modified epitopes in urine following hyperlipidemia-induced renal damage in rodents suggest that MPO is an important pathogenic factor in glomerular and tubulointerstitial diseases. Specifically, the interaction of MPO with nitric oxide metabolism adds to the complexity of actions of oxidants and may help to explain bimodal partly detrimental partly beneficial effects of the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system in redox-modulated renal diseases. PMID:14633118

  11. Channel catfish, Ictalurus punctatus, myeloperoxidase cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myeloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), a heme-containing lysosomal glycoprotein, is found in azurophilic granules of neutrophils and monocytes. Upon activation, neutrophiles produce hydrogen peroxide and release myeloperoxidase from the granules that the latter catalyzes the former in the presence of vario...

  12. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase by synovial fluid and serum.

    PubMed Central

    Dularay, B; Yea, C M; Elson, C J

    1991-01-01

    An inhibitor of myeloperoxidase has been identified in the synovial fluids and sera from patients with rheumatoid arthritis and sera from normal subjects. Initially, these fluids were found to inhibit stimulus induced degranulation of polymorphonuclear leucocytes independently of the stimulating agent. Subsequently, the fluids were shown to inhibit the released enzyme rather than the degranulation response of polymorphonuclear leucocytes. Both rheumatoid and normal serum samples contained high concentrations of the inhibitor but the concentrations were lower in rheumatoid synovial fluids. The inhibitory activity seemed to be specific for peroxidase as the fluids did not inhibit beta-glucuronidase activity. A protein of relative molecular mass (Mr) 150 kd was purified from synovial fluid by affinity chromatography on myeloperoxidase-Sepharose. It is concluded that serum and synovial fluid contain a novel myeloperoxidase inhibitor, which acts by binding to myeloperoxidase and thereby prevents myeloperoxidase releasing oxidative products in serum. Images PMID:1647755

  13. Deconstruction of activity-dependent covalent modification of heme in human neutrophil myeloperoxidase by multistage mass spectrometry (MS(4)).

    PubMed

    Geoghegan, Kieran F; Varghese, Alison H; Feng, Xidong; Bessire, Andrew J; Conboy, James J; Ruggeri, Roger B; Ahn, Kay; Spath, Samantha N; Filippov, Sergey V; Conrad, Steven J; Carpino, Philip A; Guimarães, Cristiano R W; Vajdos, Felix F

    2012-03-13

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is known to be inactivated and covalently modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide and agents similar to 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (1), a 254.08 Da derivative of 2-thioxanthine. Peptide mapping by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detected modification by 1 in a labile peptide-heme-peptide fragment of the enzyme, accompanied by a mass increase of 252.08 Da. The loss of two hydrogen atoms was consistent with mechanism-based oxidative coupling. Multistage mass spectrometry (MS(4)) of the modified fragment in an ion trap/Orbitrap spectrometer demonstrated that 1 was coupled directly to heme. Use of a 10 amu window delivered the full isotopic envelope of each precursor ion to collision-induced dissociation, preserving definitive isotopic profiles for iron-containing fragments through successive steps of multistage mass spectrometry. Iron isotope signatures and accurate mass measurements supported the structural assignments. Crystallographic analysis confirmed linkage between the methyl substituent of the heme pyrrole D ring and the sulfur atom of 1. The final orientation of 1 perpendicular to the plane of the heme ring suggested a mechanism consisting of two consecutive one-electron oxidations of 1 by MPO. Multistage mass spectrometry using stage-specific collision energies permits stepwise deconstruction of modifications of heme enzymes containing covalent links between the heme group and the polypeptide chain. PMID:22352991

  14. Detailed protocol to assess in vivo and ex vivo myeloperoxidase activity in mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease using hydroethidine.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Cheng, David; Stocker, Roland

    2016-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity contributes to arterial inflammation, vascular dysfunction and disease, including atherosclerosis. Current assessment of MPO activity in biological systems in vivo utilizes 3-chlorotyrosine (3-Cl-Tyr) as a biomarker of hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and other chlorinating species. However, 3-Cl-Tyr is formed in low yield and is subject to further metabolism. Recently, we reported a method to selectively assess MPO-activity in vivo by measuring the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-chloroethidium (2-Cl-E(+)) by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) (J. Biol. Chem., 289, 2014, pp. 5580-5595). The hydroethidine-based method has greater sensitivity for MPO activity than measurement of 3-Cl-Tyr. The current methods paper provides a detailed protocol to determine in vivo and ex vivo MPO activity in arteries from mouse models of vascular inflammation and disease by utilizing the conversion of hydroethidine to 2-Cl-E(+). Procedures for the synthesis of standards, preparation of tissue homogenates and the generation of 2-Cl-E(+) are also provided in detail, as are the conditions for LC-MS/MS detection of 2-Cl-E(+). PMID:27184954

  15. Nimesulide as a downregulator of the activity of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase pathway. Focus on the histoprotective potential of the drug during inflammatory processes.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Pastorino, G; Montagnani, G; Gatti, F; Guidi, G; Dallegri, F

    1993-01-01

    Neutrophils, recruited to tissue sites of inflammation, release a variety of oxidants and enzymes, which are responsible for tissue damage. Among the oxidants released are potent chlorinated compounds, such as hypochlorous acid and chloramines, which induce tissue cell damage and inactivate protease inhibitors, particularly alpha 1-antitrypsin, the specific inhibitor of neutrophil elastase. In studying a rational approach to the pharmacological control of neutrophil-mediated tissue injury, we investigated the activity of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide. This agent reduced the function of the myeloperoxidase pathway (which generates hypochlorous acid), by exerting a cell-directed inhibitory activity, as shown by measurement of superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide production. Nimesulide also inactivated hypochlorous acid directly and protected alpha 1-antitrypsin from the neutrophil-mediated oxidation. Thus, neutrophil elastolytic activity may be attenuated by nimesulide-spared alpha 1-antitrypsin. The prevention of oxidative inactivation of alpha 1-antitrypsin by nimesulide strictly correlates with the drug's ability to suppress the extracellular availability of hypochlorous acid. Taken together, these data suggest that nimesulide may prevent tissue injury at sites of inflammation by maintaining natural host protective systems. PMID:7506191

  16. Effect of bacterial extract, IRS-19, on the concentration of hydrogen peroxide and myeloperoxidase activity in nasal washings of patients with chronic bronchitis.

    PubMed

    Nowak, D; Prozyński, M; Pietras, T; Stolarek, R; Mazerant, P; Leder, M

    1997-01-01

    Twenty eight adult patients of both sexes with chronic bronchitis participated in an open study to determine the effect of intranasal treatment with IRS-19, an immunomodulating agent, on the number of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL), H2O2 concentration and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in nasal washings. The number of PMNL recovered from nasal spaces increased from 4460 +/- 3960 to 10,490 +/- 10,950 cells/ml (p < 0.02) after two month administration of IRS-19. It was accompanied by 2.6- and 1.4-fold increase (p < 0.001) in MPO activity and H2O2 concentration, respectively. However, no correlation was found between increments in these three variables. Since PMNL and MPO-H2O2-Cl- system are involved in the first line of defense against invading pathogens it is suggested that above mentioned changes may represent one among mechanisms leading to enhancement of antibacterial defence in the airways in response to treatment with IRS-19. PMID:9090443

  17. A1M/α1-microglobulin is proteolytically activated by myeloperoxidase, binds its heme group and inhibits low density lipoprotein oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Cederlund, Martin; Deronic, Adnan; Pallon, Jan; Sørensen, Ole E.; Åkerström, Bo

    2015-01-01

    α1-microglobulin (A1M) is a 26 kDa plasma and tissue protein with reductase activity and radical- and heme-binding anti-oxidative functions. In addition, exposure of A1M to hemoglobin has been shown to induce proteolytic elimination of a C-terminal tetrapeptide yielding a heme-degrading form, truncated A1M (t-A1M). Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme-containing enzyme that catalyzes the production of free radicals and hypochlorite, is released by neutrophils during the inflammatory response to bacterial infections. MPO-induced low density lipoprotein (LDL)-oxidation in blood has been suggested as a causative factor in atherosclerosis. In this study we have hypothesized that A1M interacts with MPO in a similar mode as with hemoglobin, and is a regulator of its activity. The results show that A1M is proteolytically cleaved, with formation of t-A1M, after exposure to MPO, and that t-A1M contains iron and heme-degradation products. The reaction is dependent of pH, time and concentration of substrates and a pH-value around 7 is shown to be optimal for cleavage. Furthermore, A1M inhibits MPO- and hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidation of LDL. The results suggest that A1M may have a role as an inhibitor of the damaging effects of the neutrophil respiratory burst on bystander tissue components. PMID:25698971

  18. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecule 3 inhibits myeloperoxidase (MPO) and protects against MPO-induced vascular endothelial cell activation/dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Eric K; Fraser, Douglas D; Capretta, Alfredo; Potter, Richard F; Cepinskas, Gediminas

    2014-05-01

    Polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN)-derived myeloperoxidase (MPO) contributes to the pathophysiology of numerous systemic inflammatory disorders through: (1) direct peroxidation of targets and (2) production of strong oxidizing compounds, e.g., hypohalous acids, particularly hypochlorous acid, which furthers oxidant damage and contributes to the propagation of inflammation and tissue injury/dysfunction. Carbon monoxide-releasing molecules (CORMs) offer potent anti-inflammatory effects; however, the mechanism(s) of action is not fully understood. This study assessed the potential of MPO activity inhibition by a water-soluble CORM, CORM-3. To this end, we used in vitro assays to study CORM-3-dependent modulation of MPO activity with respect to: (1) the inhibition of MPO's catalytic activity generally and (2) the specific inhibition of MPO's peroxidation and halogenation (i.e., production of hypochlorous acid) reactions. Further, we employed primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) to investigate MPO-dependent cellular activation and dysfunction by measuring intracellular oxidant stress (DHR-123 oxidation) and HUVEC permeability (flux of Texas red-dextran), respectively. The results indicate that CORM-3 significantly inhibits MPO activity as well as MPO's peroxidation and hypohalous acid cycles specifically (p<0.05 vs uninhibited MPO). In addition, CORM-3 significantly decreases PMN homogenate- or rhMPO-induced intracellular DHR-123 oxidation in HUVECs and rhMPO-induced HUVEC monolayer permeability (p<0.05 vs untreated). In all assays the inactivated CORM-3 was significantly less effective than CORM-3 (p<0.05). Taken together our findings indicate that CORM-3 is a novel MPO inhibitor and mitigates inflammatory damage at least in part through a mechanism involving the inhibition of neutrophilic MPO activity. PMID:24583458

  19. Superoxide-dependent oxidation of melatonin by myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Ximenes, Valdecir F; Silva, Sueli de O; Rodrigues, Maria R; Catalani, Luiz H; Maghzal, Ghassan J; Kettle, Anthony J; Campa, Ana

    2005-11-18

    Myeloperoxidase uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize numerous substrates to hypohalous acids or reactive free radicals. Here we show that neutrophils oxidize melatonin to N(1)-acetyl-N(2)-formyl-5-methoxykynuramine (AFMK) in a reaction that is catalyzed by myeloperoxidase. Production of AFMK was highly dependent on superoxide but not hydrogen peroxide. It did not require hypochlorous acid, singlet oxygen, or hydroxyl radical. Purified myeloperoxidase and a superoxide-generating system oxidized melatonin to AFMK and a dimer. The dimer would result from coupling of melatonin radicals. Oxidation of melatonin was partially inhibited by catalase or superoxide dismutase. Formation of AFMK was almost completely eliminated by superoxide dismutase but weakly inhibited by catalase. In contrast, production of melatonin dimer was enhanced by superoxide dismutase and blocked by catalase. We propose that myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to oxidize melatonin by two distinct pathways. One pathway involves the classical peroxidation mechanism in which hydrogen peroxide is used to oxidize melatonin to radicals. Superoxide adds to these radicals to form an unstable peroxide that decays to AFMK. In the other pathway, myeloperoxidase uses superoxide to insert dioxygen into melatonin to form AFMK. This novel activity expands the types of oxidative reactions myeloperoxidase can catalyze. It should be relevant to the way neutrophils use superoxide to kill bacteria and how they metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:16148002

  20. Myeloperoxidase deficiency preserves vasomotor function in humans

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Tanja K.; Wipper, Sabine; Reiter, Beate; Rudolph, Volker; Coym, Anja; Detter, Christian; Lau, Denise; Klinke, Anna; Friedrichs, Kai; Rau, Thomas; Pekarova, Michaela; Russ, Detlef; Knöll, Kay; Kolk, Mandy; Schroeder, Bernd; Wegscheider, Karl; Andresen, Hilke; Schwedhelm, Edzard; Boeger, Rainer; Ehmke, Heimo; Baldus, Stephan

    2012-01-01

    Aims Observational studies have suggested a mechanistic link between the leucocyte-derived enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) and vasomotor function. Here, we tested whether MPO is systemically affecting vascular tone in humans. Methods and results A total of 12 135 patients were screened for leucocyte peroxidase activity. We identified 15 individuals with low MPO expression and activity (MPOlow), who were matched with 30 participants exhibiting normal MPO protein content and activity (control). Nicotine-dependent activation of leucocytes caused attenuation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability in the control group (P < 0.01), but not in MPOlow individuals (P = 0.12); here the MPO burden of leucocytes correlated with the degree of vasomotor dysfunction (P = 0.008). To directly test the vasoactive properties of free circulating MPO, the enzyme was injected into the left atrium of anaesthetized, open-chest pigs. Myeloperoxidase plasma levels peaked within minutes and rapidly declined thereafter, reflecting vascular binding of MPO. Blood flow in the left anterior descending artery and the internal mammary artery (IMA) as well as myocardial perfusion decreased following MPO injection when compared with albumin-treated animals (P < 0.001). Isolated IMA-rings from animals subjected to MPO revealed markedly diminished relaxation in response to acetylcholine (P < 0.01) and nitroglycerine as opposed to controls (P < 0.001). Conclusion Myeloperoxidase elicits profound effects on vascular tone of conductance and resistance vessels in vivo. These findings not only call for revisiting the biological functions of leucocytes as systemic and mobile effectors of vascular tone, but also identify MPO as a critical systemic regulator of vasomotion in humans and thus a potential therapeutic target. PMID:21724624

  1. Myeloperoxidase, a catalyst for lipoprotein oxidation, is expressed in human atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, A; Dunn, J L; Rateri, D L; Heinecke, J W

    1994-01-01

    Oxidatively modified lipoproteins have been implicated in atherogenesis, but the mechanisms that promote oxidation in vivo have not been identified. Myeloperoxidase, a heme protein secreted by activated macrophages, generates reactive intermediates that oxidize lipoproteins in vitro. To explore the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the development of atherosclerosis, we determined whether the enzyme was present in surgically excised human vascular tissue. In detergent extracts of atherosclerotic arteries subjected to Western blotting, a rabbit polyclonal antibody monospecific for myeloperoxidase detected a 56-kD protein, the predicted molecular mass of the heavy subunit. Both the immunoreactive protein and authentic myeloperoxidase bound to a lectin-affinity column; after elution with methyl mannoside their apparent molecular masses were indistinguishable by nondenaturing size-exclusion chromatography. Peroxidase activity in detergent extracts of atherosclerotic lesions likewise bound to a lectin column and eluted with methyl mannoside. Moreover, eluted peroxidase generated the cytotoxic oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), indicating that enzymatically active myeloperoxidase was present in lesions. Patterns of immunostaining of arterial tissue with antihuman myeloperoxidase antibodies were similar to those produced by an antimacrophage antibody, and were especially prominent in the shoulder region of transitional lesions. Intense foci of myeloperoxidase immunostaining also appeared adjacent to cholesterol clefts in lipid-rich regions of advanced atherosclerotic lesions. These findings identify myeloperoxidase as a component of human vascular lesions. Because this heme protein can generate reactive species that damage lipids and proteins, myeloperoxidase may contribute to atherogenesis by catalyzing oxidative reactions in the vascular wall. Images PMID:8040285

  2. A Phytochemical-rich Multivitamin-multimineral Supplement Is Bioavailable and Reduces Serum Oxidized Low-density Lipoprotein, Myeloperoxidase, and Plasminogen Activator Inhibitor-1 in a Four-week Pilot trial of Healthy Individuals

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Anuradha; Lamb, Joseph J.; Chang, Jyh-Lurn; Darland, Gary; Konda, Veera R.

    2014-01-01

    Background: A multivitamin-multimineral supplement combined with a diverse blend of bioactive phytochemicals may provide additional antioxidant capacity and anti-inflammatory property for overall health. This convenient feature may be useful for individuals who want to increase their intake of phytochemicals. Methods: We conducted a pilot study in 15 healthy individuals (8 women and 7 men, mean age 41.7±14.9 years, mean body mass index 28.0±5.6) to investigate the effects of this novel formulation on biomarkers associated with oxidative stress and inflammation. After a 2-week diet that limited intake of fruits and vegetables to 2 servings/day, participants continued with the same restricted diet but began consuming 2 tablets of the study product for the subsequent 4 weeks. Fasting blood samples collected at Week 2 and Week 6 were analyzed and compared using paired t-tests for levels of carotenoids, folate, vitamin B12, homocysteine, oxidized low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (oxLDL), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP), F2-isoprostane, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), and myeloperoxidase. Noninvasive peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT) was also measured. Results: After 4 weeks of supplementation, plasma levels of carotenoids, folate, and vitamin B12, but not homocysteine, were significantly increased (P<.05). Serum levels of oxLDL, PAI-1 and myeloperoxidase were significantly reduced (P<.05), but F2-isoprostane, hs-CRP, and EndoPAT measures were unchanged compared with baseline. The study product was well tolerated. Conclusions: This nutritional supplement is bioavailable as indicated by the significant increase in plasma carotenoids, vitamin B12, and folate levels and may provide health benefits by significantly reducing serum levels of oxLDL, myeloperoxidase, and PAI-1 in healthy individuals. PMID:24808980

  3. Ceruloplasmin Is an Endogenous Inhibitor of Myeloperoxidase*

    PubMed Central

    Chapman, Anna L. P.; Mocatta, Tessa J.; Shiva, Sruti; Seidel, Antonia; Chen, Brian; Khalilova, Irada; Paumann-Page, Martina E.; Jameson, Guy N. L.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Kettle, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is a neutrophil enzyme that promotes oxidative stress in numerous inflammatory pathologies. It uses hydrogen peroxide to catalyze the production of strong oxidants including chlorine bleach and free radicals. A physiological defense against the inappropriate action of this enzyme has yet to be identified. We found that myeloperoxidase oxidized 75% of the ascorbate in plasma from ceruloplasmin knock-out mice, but there was no significant loss in plasma from wild type animals. When myeloperoxidase was added to human plasma it became bound to other proteins and was reversibly inhibited. Ceruloplasmin was the predominant protein associated with myeloperoxidase. When the purified proteins were mixed, they became strongly but reversibly associated. Ceruloplasmin was a potent inhibitor of purified myeloperoxidase, inhibiting production of hypochlorous acid by 50% at 25 nm. Ceruloplasmin rapidly reduced Compound I, the FeV redox intermediate of myeloperoxidase, to Compound II, which has FeIV in its heme prosthetic groups. It also prevented the fast reduction of Compound II by tyrosine. In the presence of chloride and hydrogen peroxide, ceruloplasmin converted myeloperoxidase to Compound II and slowed its conversion back to the ferric enzyme. Collectively, our results indicate that ceruloplasmin inhibits myeloperoxidase by reducing Compound I and then trapping the enzyme as inactive Compound II. We propose that ceruloplasmin should provide a protective shield against inadvertent oxidant production by myeloperoxidase during inflammation. PMID:23306200

  4. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase destruction by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanker, J.; Giammara, B.; Strauss, G.

    1988-01-01

    The peroxidase activity of enriched leukocyte preparations on coverslips was determined cytochemically with a newly developed method. The techniques utilizes diaminobenzidine medium and cupric nitrate intensification and is suitable for analysis with light microscopy, SEM, and TEM. Blood specimens from control individuals were studied with and without in vitro UV irradiation and compared with those from psoriasis patients exposed therapeutically to various types of UV in phototherapy. All UV irradiated samples showed diminished neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MP) activity although that of the principal eosinophil peroxidase was unaffected. The SEMs supported the contention that decreased neutrophil MP activity might be related to UV induced degranulation. It is believed to be possible, eventually, to equate the observed MP degranulation effect after UV irradiation with diminished ability to fight bacterial infections.

  5. Neutrophil-derived microparticles induce myeloperoxidase-mediated damage of vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Upon activation neutrophil releases microparticles - small plasma membrane vesicles that contain cell surface proteins and cytoplasmic matter, with biological activities. In this study we investigated the potential role of myeloperoxidase in the endothelial cell injury caused by neutrophil-derived microparticles. Results Microparticles were produced by activating human neutrophils with a calcium ionophore and characterized by flow cytometry and transmission and scanning electron microscopy. Myeloperoxidase activity was measured by luminol-dependent chemiluminescence. Neutrophil microparticles-induced injuries and morphological alterations in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were evaluated by microscopy and flow cytometry. Neutrophil microparticles were characterized as structures bounded by lipid bilayers and were less than 1 μm in diameter. The microparticles also expressed CD66b, CD62L and myeloperoxidase, which are all commonly expressed on the surface of neutrophils, as well as exposition of phosphatidylserine. The activity of the myeloperoxidase present on the microparticles was confirmed by hypochlorous acid detection. This compound is only catalyzed by myeloperoxidase in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. The addition of sodium azide or taurine inhibited and reduced enzymatic activity, respectively. Exposure of HUVEC to neutrophil microparticles induced a loss of cell membrane integrity and morphological changes. The addition of sodium azide or myeloperoxidase-specific inhibitor-I consistently reduced the injury to the endothelial cells. Taurine addition reduced HUVEC morphological changes. Conclusions We have demonstrated the presence of active myeloperoxidase in neutrophil microparticles and that the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase cause injury to endothelial cells. Hence, the microparticle-associated myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system may contribute to widespread endothelial cell damage

  6. Deconstruction of Activity-Dependent Covalent Modification of Heme in Human Neutrophil Myeloperoxidase by Multistage Mass Spectrometry (MS[superscript 4])

    SciTech Connect

    Geoghegan, Kieran F.; Varghese, Alison H.; Feng, Xidong; Bessire, Andrew J.; Conboy, James J.; Ruggeri, Roger B.; Ahn, Kay; Spath, Samantha N.; Filippov, Sergey V.; Conrad, Steven J.; Carpino, Philip A.; Guimarães, Cristiano R.W.; Vajdos, Felix F.

    2013-03-07

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is known to be inactivated and covalently modified by treatment with hydrogen peroxide and agents similar to 3-(2-ethoxypropyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydro-1H-purin-6(9H)-one (1), a 254.08 Da derivative of 2-thioxanthine. Peptide mapping by liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry detected modification by 1 in a labile peptide-heme-peptide fragment of the enzyme, accompanied by a mass increase of 252.08 Da. The loss of two hydrogen atoms was consistent with mechanism-based oxidative coupling. Multistage mass spectrometry (MS{sup 4}) of the modified fragment in an ion trap/Orbitrap spectrometer demonstrated that 1 was coupled directly to heme. Use of a 10 amu window delivered the full isotopic envelope of each precursor ion to collision-induced dissociation, preserving definitive isotopic profiles for iron-containing fragments through successive steps of multistage mass spectrometry. Iron isotope signatures and accurate mass measurements supported the structural assignments. Crystallographic analysis confirmed linkage between the methyl substituent of the heme pyrrole D ring and the sulfur atom of 1. The final orientation of 1 perpendicular to the plane of the heme ring suggested a mechanism consisting of two consecutive one-electron oxidations of 1 by MPO. Multistage mass spectrometry using stage-specific collision energies permits stepwise deconstruction of modifications of heme enzymes containing covalent links between the heme group and the polypeptide chain.

  7. A nuclear Overhauser effect study of the active site of myeloperoxidase. Structural similarity of the prosthetic group to that on lactoperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Dugad, L B; La Mar, G N; Lee, H C; Ikeda-Saito, M; Booth, K S; Caughey, W S

    1990-05-01

    The low-spin, cyanide-ligated ferric complex of the intact bovine granulocyte myeloperoxidase (MPO-CN) has been studied by proton nuclear magnetic resonance utilizing the nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE). This is the largest globular protein (approximately 1.5 x 10(5) for the intact alpha 2 beta 2 tetrameric species) for which successful NOEs have been observed without serious interference of spin diffusion, and demonstrably confirms the utility of such studies on large paramagnetic as compared to diamagnetic proteins. The 1H NMR spectrum of MPO-CN is found to have a remarkable similarity in the number, resonance pattern, and metal ion-induced relaxation properties of the resolved, hyperfine-shifted resonances to those reported earlier for the analogous complex of bovine lactoperoxidase (LPO-CN); moreover, the interproton connectivities between pairs of hyperfine-shifted proton sets, as reflected by the NOEs, are also essentially the same (Thanabal, V., and La Mar, G. N. (1989) Biochemistry 28, 7038-7044). Since the extracted prosthetic group of lactoperoxidase is a porphyrin with proposed functionalization of the 8-methylene group (Nichol, A. W., Angel, L. A., Moon, T., and Clezy, P. S. (1987) Biochem. J. 247, 147-150), we interpret the resultant similarity in 1H NMR spectral parameters for LPO-CN and MPO-CN as indicating that the prosthetic groups in MPO and LPO are very similar, and hence likely both porphyrins with a similarly functionalized periphery that allows covalent linkage to the protein matrix. The hyperfine shift pattern of the broadest resolved lines lead to their assignment to the axial histidyl imidazole side chain. Two pairs of resonances are found to have similar relaxation properties and/or dipolar as similarly shifted resonances that arise from a distal His and Arg in horseradish peroxidase (as also found in LPO-CN), and suggest that MPO also possesses these catalytically functional residues in the distal heme pocket. PMID:2158989

  8. Hypertrophic pachymeningitis: significance of myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody.

    PubMed

    Yokoseki, Akiko; Saji, Etsuji; Arakawa, Musashi; Kosaka, Takayuki; Hokari, Mariko; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Okamoto, Kouichirou; Takeda, Shigeki; Sanpei, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Hirotoshi; Hirohata, Shunsei; Akazawa, Kouhei; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Nishizawa, Masatoyo; Kawachi, Izumi

    2014-02-01

    The aim of this study was to elucidate the characteristics, pathogenesis and treatment strategy of hypertrophic pachymeningitis that is associated with myeloperoxidase anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA). We retrospectively investigated clinical, radiological, immunological and pathological profiles of 36 patients with immune-mediated or idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis, including 17 patients with myeloperoxidase-ANCA, four patients with proteinase 3-ANCA, six patients with other immune-mediated disorders, and nine patients with 'idiopathic' variety. Myeloperoxidase-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis was characterized by: (i) an elderly female predominance; (ii) 82% of patients diagnosed with granulomatosis with polyangiitis (previously known as Wegener's granulomatosis) according to Watts' algorithm; (iii) a high frequency of patients with lesions limited to the dura mater and upper airways, developing headaches, chronic sinusitis, otitis media or mastoiditis; (iv) a low frequency of patients with the 'classical or generalized form' of granulomatosis with polyangiitis involving the entire upper and lower airways and kidney, or progressing to generalized disease, in contrast to proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (v) less severe neurological damage according to the modified Rankin Scale and low disease activity according to the Birmingham Vasculitis Activity Score compared with proteinase 3-ANCA-positive hypertrophic pachymeningitis; (vi) increased levels of CXCL10, CXCL8 and interleukin 6 in cerebrospinal fluids, and increased numbers of T cells, neutrophils, eosinophils, plasma cells and monocytes/macrophages in autopsied or biopsied dura mater with pachymeningitis, suggesting TH1-predominant granulomatous lesions in hypertrophic pachymeningitis, as previously reported in pulmonary or renal lesions of granulomatosis with polyangiitis; and (vii) greater efficacy of combination therapy with prednisolone and

  9. Inhibition of myeloperoxidase-mediated hypochlorous acid production by nitroxides

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; Bottle, Steven E.; Fairfull-Smith, Kathryn E.; Malle, Ernst; Whitelock, John M.; Davies, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Tissue damage resulting from the extracellular production of HOCl (hypochlorous acid) by the MPO (myeloperoxidase)-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system of activated phagocytes is implicated as a key event in the progression of a number of human inflammatory diseases. Consequently, there is considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Nitroxides are well established antioxidant compounds of low toxicity that can attenuate oxidative damage in animal models of inflammatory disease. They are believed to exert protective effects principally by acting as superoxide dismutase mimetics or radical scavengers. However, we show here that nitroxides can also potently inhibit MPO-mediated HOCl production, with the nitroxide 4-aminoTEMPO inhibiting HOCl production by MPO and by neutrophils with IC50 values of approx. 1 and 6 μM respectively. Structure–activity relationships were determined for a range of aliphatic and aromatic nitroxides, and inhibition of oxidative damage to two biologically-important protein targets (albumin and perlecan) are demonstrated. Inhibition was shown to involve one-electron oxidation of the nitroxides by the compound I form of MPO and accumulation of compound II. Haem destruction was also observed with some nitroxides. Inhibition of neutrophil HOCl production by nitroxides was antagonized by neutrophil-derived superoxide, with this attributed to superoxide-mediated reduction of compound II. This effect was marginal with 4-aminoTEMPO, probably due to the efficient superoxide dismutase-mimetic activity of this nitroxide. Overall, these data indicate that nitroxides have considerable promise as therapeutic agents for the inhibition of MPO-mediated damage in inflammatory diseases. PMID:19379130

  10. Thioxo-dihydroquinazolin-one Compounds as Novel Inhibitors of Myeloperoxidase.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Ganesh, Thota; Diebold, Becky A; Zhu, Yerun; McCoy, James W; Smith, Susan M E; Sun, Aiming; Lambeth, J David

    2015-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a key antimicrobial enzyme, playing a normal role in host defense, but also contributing to inflammatory conditions including neuroinflammatory diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's. We synthesized and characterized more than 50 quinazolin-4(1H)-one derivatives and showed that this class of compounds inhibits MPO with IC50 values as low as 100 nM. Representative compounds showed partially reversible inhibition that was competitive with respect to Amplex Red substrate and did not result in the accumulation of MPO Compound II. Members of this group show promise for therapeutic development for the treatment of diseases in which inflammation plays a pathogenic role. PMID:26487910

  11. Myeloperoxidase in human neutrophil host defence.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, William M

    2014-08-01

    Human neutrophils represent the predominant leucocyte in circulation and the first responder to infection. Concurrent with ingestion of microorganisms, neutrophils activate and assemble the NADPH oxidase at the phagosome, thereby generating superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Concomitantly, granules release their contents into the phagosome, where the antimicrobial proteins and enzymes synergize with oxidants to create an environment toxic to the captured microbe. The most rapid and complete antimicrobial action by human neutrophils against many organisms relies on the combined efforts of the azurophilic granule protein myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide from the NADPH oxidase to oxidize chloride, thereby generating hypochlorous acid and a host of downstream reaction products. Although individual components of the neutrophil antimicrobial response exhibit specific activities in isolation, the situation in the environment of the phagosome is far more complicated, a consequence of multiple and complex interactions among oxidants, proteins and their by-products. In most cases, the cooperative interactions among the phagosomal contents, both from the host and the microbe, culminate in loss of viability of the ingested organism. PMID:24844117

  12. Immunomodulation by neutrophil myeloperoxidase and hydrogen peroxide: differential susceptibility of human lymphocyte functions.

    PubMed

    el-Hag, A; Lipsky, P E; Bennett, M; Clark, R A

    1986-05-01

    The coexistence of activated polymorphonuclear leukocytes and lymphocytes in tumor masses and inflammatory tissues suggests the possibility of interaction between secreted neutrophil products and nearby lymphocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined the effects of neutrophil myeloperoxidase and H2O2 on lymphocytes. Human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes were exposed to myeloperoxidase, an H2O2-generating system (glucose + glucose oxidase), and a halide, and were then tested for functional activities. Natural killer activity against K562 cells, lymphocyte proliferation in response to mitogens, and generation of immunoglobulin-secreting cells were all susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The degree as well as the mechanism of suppression was dependent on the glucose oxidase concentration (i.e., the rate of H2O2 delivery). At low H2O2 flux, myeloperoxidase was essential for induction of lymphocyte suppression; as the rate of H2O2 generation increased, suppression became myeloperoxidase-independent and was mediated by H2O2 alone. Various lymphocyte functions were differentially susceptible to oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The proliferative response to poke-weed mitogen was the least sensitive, whereas antibody formation was the most sensitive. Proliferative responses to concanavalin A and phytohemagglutinin as well as natural killer activity displayed intermediate degrees of susceptibility. In all assays, lymphocyte viability was greater than 90%. Removal of monocytes from mononuclear leukocytes by adherence to glass increased susceptibility of lymphocytes to oxidative injury. Monocytes in proportions within the range present in peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes protected lymphocyte functions against oxidative injury by myeloperoxidase and H2O2. This study demonstrates a differential susceptibility of various immune functions to oxidative injury by the neutrophil products myeloperoxidase and H2O2, and shows, in

  13. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  14. INACTIVATION OF MYELOPEROXIDASE BY BENZOIC ACID HYDRAZIDE*

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jiansheng; Smith, Forrest; Panizzi, Jennifer R.; Goodwin, Douglas C.; Panizzi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is expressed by myeloid cells for the purpose of catalyzing the formation of hypochlorous acid, from chloride ions and reaction with a hydrogen peroxide-charged heme covalently bound to the enzyme. Most peroxidase enzymes both plant and mammalian are inhibited by benzoic acid hydrazide (BAH)-containing compounds, but the mechanism underlying MPO inhibition by BAH compounds is largely unknown. Recently, we reported MPO inhibition by BAH and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-BAH was due to hydrolysis of the ester bond between MPO heavy chain glutamate 242 (Glu242) residue and the heme pyrrole A ring, freeing the heme linked light chain MPO subunit from the larger remaining heavy chain portion. Here we probed the structure and function relationship behind this ester bond cleavage using a panel of BAH analogs to gain insight into the constraints imposed by the MPO active site and channel leading to the buried protoporphyrin IX ring. In addition, we show evidence that destruction of the heme ring does not occur by tracking the heme prosthetic group and provide evidence that the mechanism of hydrolysis follows a potential attack of the Glu242 carbonyl leading to a rearrangement causing the release of the vinyl-sulfonium linkage between HC-Met243 and the pyrrole A ring. PMID:25688920

  15. Myeloperoxidase-generated oxidants and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Podrez, E A; Abu-Soud, H M; Hazen, S L

    2000-06-15

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory process where oxidative damage within the artery wall is implicated in the pathogenesis of the disease. Mononuclear phagocytes, an inflammatory cell capable of generating a variety of oxidizing species, are early components of arterial lesions. Their normal functions include host defense and surveillance through regulated generation of diffusible radical species, reactive oxygen or nitrogen species, and HOCl (hypochlorous acid). However, under certain circumstances an excess of these oxidizing species can overwhelm local antioxidant defenses and lead to oxidant stress and oxidative tissue injury, processes implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. This review focuses on oxidation reactions catalyzed by myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant heme protein secreted from activated phagocytes which is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. Over the past several years, significant evidence has accrued demonstrating that MPO is one pathway for protein and lipoprotein oxidation during the evolution of cardiovascular disease. Multiple distinct products of MPO are enriched in human atherosclerotic lesions and LDL recovered from human atheroma. However, the biological consequences of these MPO-catalyzed reactions in vivo are still unclear. Here we discuss evidence for the occurrence of MPO-catalyzed oxidation reactions in vivo and the potential role MPO plays in both normal host defenses and inflammatory diseases like atherosclerosis. PMID:10946213

  16. Inactivation of myeloperoxidase by benzoic acid hydrazide.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiansheng; Smith, Forrest; Panizzi, Jennifer R; Goodwin, Douglas C; Panizzi, Peter

    2015-03-15

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is expressed by myeloid cells for the purpose of catalyzing the formation of hypochlorous acid, from chloride ions and reaction with a hydrogen peroxide-charged heme covalently bound to the enzyme. Most peroxidase enzymes both plant and mammalian are inhibited by benzoic acid hydrazide (BAH)-containing compounds, but the mechanism underlying MPO inhibition by BAH compounds is largely unknown. Recently, we reported MPO inhibition by BAH and 4-(trifluoromethyl)-BAH was due to hydrolysis of the ester bond between MPO heavy chain glutamate 242 ((HC)Glu(242)) residue and the heme pyrrole A ring, freeing the heme linked light chain MPO subunit from the larger remaining heavy chain portion. Here we probed the structure and function relationship behind this ester bond cleavage using a panel of BAH analogs to gain insight into the constraints imposed by the MPO active site and channel leading to the buried protoporphyrin IX ring. In addition, we show evidence that destruction of the heme ring does not occur by tracking the heme prosthetic group and provide evidence that the mechanism of hydrolysis follows a potential attack of the (HC)Glu(242) carbonyl leading to a rearrangement causing the release of the vinyl-sulfonium linkage between (HC)Met(243) and the pyrrole A ring. PMID:25688920

  17. Myeloperoxidase: a target for new drug development?

    PubMed Central

    Malle, E; Furtmüller, P G; Sattler, W; Obinger, C

    2007-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a member of the haem peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes and certain type of macrophages. MPO participates in innate immune defence mechanism through formation of microbicidal reactive oxidants and diffusible radical species. A unique activity of MPO is its ability to use chloride as a cosubstrate with hydrogen peroxide to generate chlorinating oxidants such as hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. However, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and the initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. The fact that circulating levels of MPO have been shown to predict risks for major adverse cardiac events and that levels of MPO-derived chlorinated compounds are specific biomarkers for disease progression, has attracted considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Today, detailed information on the structure of ferric MPO and its complexes with low- and high-spin ligands is available. This, together with a thorough understanding of reaction mechanisms including redox properties of intermediates, enables a rationale attempt in developing specific MPO inhibitors that still maintain MPO activity during host defence and bacterial killing but interfere with pathophysiologically persistent activation of MPO. The various approaches to inhibit enzyme activity of MPO and to ameliorate adverse effects of MPO-derived oxidants will be discussed. Emphasis will be put on mechanism-based inhibitors and high-throughput screening of compounds as well as the discussion of physiologically useful HOCl scavengers. PMID:17592500

  18. Myeloperoxidase: a target for new drug development?

    PubMed

    Malle, E; Furtmüller, P G; Sattler, W; Obinger, C

    2007-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a member of the haem peroxidase-cyclooxygenase superfamily, is abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes and certain type of macrophages. MPO participates in innate immune defence mechanism through formation of microbicidal reactive oxidants and diffusible radical species. A unique activity of MPO is its ability to use chloride as a cosubstrate with hydrogen peroxide to generate chlorinating oxidants such as hypochlorous acid, a potent antimicrobial agent. However, evidence has emerged that MPO-derived oxidants contribute to tissue damage and the initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. The fact that circulating levels of MPO have been shown to predict risks for major adverse cardiac events and that levels of MPO-derived chlorinated compounds are specific biomarkers for disease progression, has attracted considerable interest in the development of therapeutically useful MPO inhibitors. Today, detailed information on the structure of ferric MPO and its complexes with low- and high-spin ligands is available. This, together with a thorough understanding of reaction mechanisms including redox properties of intermediates, enables a rationale attempt in developing specific MPO inhibitors that still maintain MPO activity during host defence and bacterial killing but interfere with pathophysiologically persistent activation of MPO. The various approaches to inhibit enzyme activity of MPO and to ameliorate adverse effects of MPO-derived oxidants will be discussed. Emphasis will be put on mechanism-based inhibitors and high-throughput screening of compounds as well as the discussion of physiologically useful HOCl scavengers. PMID:17592500

  19. Biomarkers of myeloperoxidase-derived hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, C C; Kettle, A J

    2000-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid is the major strong oxidant generated by neutrophils. The heme enzyme myeloperoxidase catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid from hydrogen peroxide and chloride. Although myeloperoxidase has been implicated in the tissue damage that occurs in numerous diseases that involve inflammatory cells, it has proven difficult to categorically demonstrate that it plays a crucial role in any pathology. This situation should soon be rectified with the advent of sensitive biomarkers for hypochlorous acid. In this review, we outline the advantages and limitations of chlorinated tyrosines, chlorohydrins, 5-chlorocytosine, protein carbonyls, antibodies that recognize HOCl-treated proteins, and glutathione sulfonamide as potential biomarkers of hypochlorous acid. Levels of 3-chlorotyrosine and 3,5-dichlorotyrosine are increased in proteins after exposure to low concentrations of hypochlorous acid and we conclude that their analysis by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry is currently the best method available for probing the involvement of oxidation by myeloperoxidase in the pathology of particular diseases. The appropriate use of other biomarkers should provide complementary information.Keywords-Free radicals, Myeloperoxidase, Neutrophil oxidant, Hypochlorous acid, Chlorotyrosine, Chlorohydrin, Oxidant biomarker PMID:11020661

  20. Purification of myeloperoxidase from equine polymorphonuclear leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Mathy-Hartert, M; Bourgeois, E; Grülke, S; Deby-Dupont, G; Caudron, I; Deby, C; Lamy, M; Serteyn, D

    1998-01-01

    Increases of plasma concentrations of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) can be used as markers of polymorphonuclear leucocytes (PMN) activation in pathological situations (sepsis, acute lung injury, acute inflammation). To develop an assay for measurement of plasma MPO in horses during the above-mentioned infectious and inflammatory conditions, MPO was purified from equine PMN isolated from blood anticoagulated with citrate. PMN were extracted in a saline milieu (0.2 M Na acetate, 1 M NaCl, pH 4.7) to eliminate most of cellular proteins. Pellets were then extracted in the same buffer containing cationic detergent (1% cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide). The supernatant was further purified by ion exchange chromatography (Hiload S Sepharose HP column 0.5 x 26 cm, equilibrated with 25 mM Na acetate, 0.2 M NaCl, pH 4.7) with a NaCl gradient (until 1 M). Most of the peroxidase activity of MPO (spectrophotometrically measured by the oxidation of orthodianisidine by hydrogen peroxide) was eluted at 0.65 M NaCl. MPO was further purified by gel filtration chromatography (Sephacryl S 200 column 2.6 x 42 cm with 25 mM Na acetate, 0.2 M NaCl, pH 4.7). MPO (specific activity: 74.3 U/mg) was obtained with a yield of 30% from the detergent extraction supernatant. Electrophoresis (non-reducing conditions) showed 3 bands identified, by comparison with human MPO, (i) the mature tetrameric enzyme (150 kDa) with 2 light and 2 heavy subunits, (ii) the precursor form (88 kDa) and (iii) a form of the heavy subunit without the prosthetic heme group (40 kDa). The mature enzyme and its precursor were glycosylated and possessed peroxidase activity. Equine MPO showed strong similarities with human and bovine MPO, with an absorption peak at 430 nm (Soret peak) characteristic of ferrimyeloperoxidase. Enzymatic activity was pH dependent (optimal value at pH 5.5). Images Figure 1. PMID:9553712

  1. The role of myeloperoxidase in the pathogenesis of systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Rutgers, A; Heeringa, P; Tervaert, J W

    2003-01-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis, Churg-Strauss syndrome and idiopathic pauci-immune necrotizing crescentic glomerulonephritis are strongly associated with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA). These ANCA-associated vasculitides can serologically be separated into myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA and proteinase 3 (PR3)-ANCA positive patients. The unique properties of the antigen targeted by the anti-MPO antibodies could help to explain the specific characteristics of MPO-ANCA associated disease. Recently, an animal model has been developed that proves that anti-mouse MPO immunoglobulins alone are capable of causing disease similar to that in humans. Also, the in vitro pathologic effects of binding of MPO-ANCA to MPO are better understood. MPO-ANCA can activate (primed) neutrophils directly causing extensive reactive oxygen species formation and degranulation of neutrophil constituents, including MPO, resulting in a destructive inflammatory response towards the vessel wall. MPO-ANCA can prevent the clearing and inactivation of MPO by ceruloplasmin as well, resulting in increased myeloperoxidase activity. Myeloperoxidase produces not only the strong oxidant bleach (hypochlorous acid) out of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ions but also oxidizes LDL into a macrophage high-uptake form, inactivates protease inhibitors, and consumes nitric oxide. These may contribute to endothelial dysfunction and add to the chronic renal lesions observed in patients with MPO-ANCA. MPO levels are influenced by genetic factors including two, MPO463 and MPO129, single nucleotide polymorphisms. The MPO 463 polymorphism has been associated with an increased risk of development of MPO-ANCA associated disease. PMID:14740428

  2. Active transport and accumulation of bicarbonate by a unicellular cyanobacterium.

    PubMed

    Miller, A G; Colman, B

    1980-09-01

    The rates of inorganic carbon accumulation and carbon fixation in light by the unicellular cyanobacterim Coccohloris peniocystis have been determined. Cells incubated in the light in medium containing H14CO3- were rapidly separated from the medium by centrifugation through silicone oil into a strongly basic terminating solution. Samples of these inactivated cells were assayed to determine total 14C accumulation, and acid-treated samples were assayed to determine 14C fixation. The rate of transport of inorganic into illuminated cells was faster than the rate of CO2 production in the medium from HCO3- dehydration. This evidence for HCO3- transport in these cells is in agreement with our previous results based upon measurements of photosynthetic O2 evolution. A substantial pool of inorganic carbon was bulit up within the cells presumably as HCO3- before the onset of the maximum rate of photosynthesis. Large accumulation ratios were observed, greater than 1,000 times the external HCO3- concentration. Accumulation did not occur in the dark and was greatly suppressed by the photosynthesis inhibitors 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethyl urea and 3-chloro-carbonylcyanide phenylhydrazone. These results indicate that the accumulation of inorganic carbon in these cells involves a light-dependent active transport process. PMID:6773925

  3. Low-Density Lipoprotein Modified by Myeloperoxidase in Inflammatory Pathways and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Vanhamme, Luc; Roumeguère, Thierry; Zouaoui Boudjeltia, Karim

    2013-01-01

    Oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) has a key role in atherogenesis. Among the different models of oxidation that have been studied, the one using myeloperoxidase (MPO) is thought to be more physiopathologically relevant. Apolipoprotein B-100 is the unique protein of LDL and is the major target of MPO. Furthermore, MPO rapidly adsorbs at the surface of LDL, promoting oxidation of amino acid residues and formation of oxidized lipoproteins that are commonly named Mox-LDL. The latter is not recognized by the LDL receptor and is accumulated by macrophages. In the context of atherogenesis, Mox-LDL accumulates in macrophages leading to foam cell formation. Furthermore, Mox-LDL seems to have specific effects and triggers inflammation. Indeed, those oxidized lipoproteins activate endothelial cells and monocytes/macrophages and induce proinflammatory molecules such as TNFα and IL-8. Mox-LDL may also inhibit fibrinolysis mediated via endothelial cells and consecutively increase the risk of thrombus formation. Finally, Mox-LDL has been involved in the physiopathology of several diseases linked to atherosclerosis such as kidney failure and consequent hemodialysis therapy, erectile dysfunction, and sleep restriction. All these issues show that the investigations of MPO-dependent LDL oxidation are of importance to better understand the inflammatory context of atherosclerosis. PMID:23983406

  4. PARP activation promotes nuclear AID accumulation in lymphoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Böttcher, Katrin; Schmidt, Angelika; Davari, Kathrin; Müller, Peter; Kremmer, Elisabeth; Hemmerich, Peter; Pfeil, Ines; Jungnickel, Berit

    2016-01-01

    Activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) initiates immunoglobulin diversification in germinal center B cells by targeted introduction of DNA damage. As aberrant nuclear AID action contributes to the generation of B cell lymphoma, the protein's activity is tightly regulated, e.g. by nuclear/cytoplasmic shuttling and nuclear degradation. In the present study, we asked whether DNA damage may affect regulation of the AID protein. We show that exogenous DNA damage that mainly activates base excision repair leads to prevention of proteasomal degradation of AID and hence its nuclear accumulation. Inhibitor as well as knockout studies indicate that activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) by DNA damaging agents promotes both phenomena. These findings suggest that PARP inhibitors influence DNA damage dependent AID regulation, with interesting implications for the regulation of AID function and chemotherapy of lymphoma. PMID:26921193

  5. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants selectively disrupt the protein core of the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan

    PubMed Central

    Rees, Martin D.; Whitelock, John M.; Malle, Ernst; Chuang, Christine Y.; Iozzo, Renato V.; Nilasaroya, Anastasia; Davies, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    The potent oxidants hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypobromous acid (HOBr) are produced extracellularly by myeloperoxidase, following release of this enzyme from activated leukocytes. The subendothelial extracellular matrix is a key site for deposition of myeloperoxidase and damage by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants, with this damage implicated in the impairment of vascular cell function during acute inflammatory responses and chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis. The heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan, a key component of the subendothelial extracellular matrix, regulates important cellular processes and is a potential target for HOCl and HOBr. It is shown here that perlecan binds myeloperoxidase via its heparan sulfate side chains and that this enhances oxidative damage by myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl and HOBr. This damage involved selective degradation of the perlecan protein core without detectable alteration of its heparan sulfate side chains, despite the presence of reactive GlcNH2 resides within this glycosaminoglycan. Modification of the protein core by HOCl and HOBr (measured by loss of immunological recognition of native protein epitopes and the appearance of oxidatively-modified protein epitopes) was associated with an impairment of its ability to support endothelial cell adhesion, with this observed at a pathologically-achievable oxidant dose of 425 nmol oxidant/mg protein. In contrast, the heparan sulfate chains of HOCl/HOBr-modified perlecan retained their ability to bind FGF-2 and collagen V and were able to promote FGF-2-dependent cellular proliferation. Collectively, these data highlight the potential role of perlecan oxidation, and consequent deregulation of cell function, in vascular injuries by myeloperoxidase-derived HOCl and HOBr. PMID:19788922

  6. Active inference, evidence accumulation and the urn task

    PubMed Central

    FitzGerald, Thomas HB; Schwartenbeck, Philipp; Moutoussis, Michael; Dolan, Raymond J; Friston, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Deciding how much evidence to accumulate before making a decision is a problem we and other animals often face, but one which is not completely understood. This issue is particularly important because a tendency to sample less information (often known as reflection impulsivity) is a feature in several psychopathologies, such as psychosis. A formal understanding information sampling may therefore clarify the computational anatomy of psychopathology. In this theoretical paper, we consider evidence accumulation in terms of active (Bayesian) inference using a generic model of Markov decision processes. Here, agents are equipped with beliefs about their own behaviour – in this case, that they will make informed decisions. Normative decision-making is then modelled using variational Bayes to minimise surprise about choice outcomes. Under this scheme, different facets of belief updating map naturally onto the functional anatomy of the brain (at least at a heuristic level). Of particular interest is the key role played by the expected precision of beliefs about control, which we have previously suggested may be encoded by dopaminergic neurons in the midbrain. We show that manipulating expected precision strongly affects how much information an agent characteristically samples, and thus provides a possible link between impulsivity and dopaminergic dysfunction. Our study therefore represents a step towards understanding evidence accumulation in terms of neurobiologically plausible Bayesian inference, and may cast light on why this process is disordered in psychopathology. PMID:25514108

  7. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  8. Spin trapping evidence for myeloperoxidase-dependent hydroxyl radical formation by human neutrophils and monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ramos, C.L.; Pou, S.; Britigan, B.E.; Cohen, M.S.; Rosen, G.M. )

    1992-04-25

    Using the electron spin resonance/spin trapping system, 4-pyridyl 1-oxide N-tert-butylnitrone (4-POBN)/ethanol, hydroxyl radical was detected as the alpha-hydroxyethyl spin trapped adduct of 4-POBN, 4-POBN-CH(CH3)OH, from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated human neutrophils and monocytes without the addition of supplemental iron. 4-POBN-CH(CH3)OH was stable in the presence of a neutrophil-derived superoxide flux. Hydroxyl radical formation was inhibited by treatment with superoxide dismutase, catalase, and azide. Treatment with a series of transition metal chelators did not appreciably alter 4-POBN-CH(CH3)OH, which suggested that hydroxyl radical generation was mediated by a mechanism independent of the transition metal-catalyzed Haber-Weiss reaction. Kinetic differences between transition metal-dependent and -independent mechanisms of hydroxyl radical generation by stimulated neutrophils were demonstrated by a greater rate of 4-POBN-CH(CH3)-OH accumulation in the presence of supplemental iron. Detection of hydroxyl radical from stimulated monocyte-derived macrophages, which lack myeloperoxidase, required the addition of supplemental iron. The addition of purified myeloperoxidase to an enzymatic superoxide generating system resulted in the detection of hydroxyl radical that was dependent upon the presence of chloride and was inhibited by superoxide dismutase, catalase, and azide. These findings implicated the reaction of hypochlorous acid and superoxide to produce hydroxyl radical. 4-POBN-CH(CH3)OH was not observed upon stimulation of myeloperoxidase-deficient neutrophils, whereas addition of myeloperoxidase to the reaction mixture resulted in the detection of hydroxyl radical. These results support the ability of human neutrophils and monocytes to generate hydroxyl radical through a myeloperoxidase-dependent mechanism.

  9. Myeloperoxidase-produced Genomic DNA-centered Radicals and Protection by Resveratrol

    EPA Science Inventory

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by activated neutrophils, production of hypochlorous acid (HOCI) and oxidation of the genomic DNA in epithelial cells is thought to initiate and promote carcinogenesis. In this study we applied the 5,5-dimethyl-l-pyrroline N-oxide (DMPO)-based i;nmu...

  10. Renal participation of myeloperoxidase in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody (ANCA)-associated glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    O'Sullivan, Kim M; Lo, Camden Y; Summers, Shaun A; Elgass, Kirstin D; McMillan, Paul J; Longano, Anthony; Ford, Sharon L; Gan, Poh-Yi; Kerr, Peter G; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2015-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important neutrophil lysosomal enzyme, a major autoantigen, and a potential mediator of tissue injury in MPO-ANCA-associated vasculitis (MPO-AAV) and glomerulonephritis. Here we examined MPO deposition in kidney biopsies from 47 patients with MPO-AAV. Leukocyte accumulation and fibrin deposition consistent with cell-mediated immunity was a major feature. Tubulointerstitial macrophage, CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell, and neutrophil numbers correlated with low presenting eGFR. MPO was not detected in kidneys from patients with minimal change or thin basement membrane disease, but was prominent in glomerular, periglomerular, and tubulointerstitial regions in MPO-AAV. Extracellular MPO released from leukocytes was pronounced in all MPO-AAV patients. Similar numbers of neutrophils and macrophages expressed MPO in the kidneys, but colocalization studies identified neutrophils as the major source of extracellular MPO. Extraleukocyte MPO was prominent in neutrophil extracellular traps in the majority of patients; most of which had traps in half or more glomeruli. These traps were associated with more neutrophils and more MPO within glomeruli. Glomerular MPO-containing macrophages generated extracellular trap-like structures. MPO also localized to endothelial cells and podocytes. The presence of the most active glomerular lesions (both segmental necrosis and cellular crescents) correlated with intraglomerular CD4+ cells and MPO+ macrophages. Thus, cellular and extracellular MPO may cause glomerular and interstitial injury. PMID:26176828

  11. Ascorbate in aqueous humor protects against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation.

    PubMed Central

    Rosenbaum, J. T.; Howes, E. L.; English, D.

    1985-01-01

    Chemotactic factors can cause polymorphonuclear leukocytes to release the contents of azurophilic granules, including the enzymes beta-glucuronidase and myeloperoxidase. In the presence of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the rabbit eye, the supernatant from stimulated leukocytes contains beta-glucuronidase, but myeloperoxidase is not detectable. Studies with aqueous humor and partially purified human myeloperoxidase suggest that this phenomenon is not due to a failure of enzyme release. The factor responsible for the inability to detect MPO in the assay system is heat-labile, dialyzable, and reversed by ascorbate oxidase. Comparable assay inhibition is produced by ascorbic acid at a concentration present in either human or rabbit aqueous humor. The ability of aqueous humor to protect against myeloperoxidase-induced oxidation may contribute to several diverse phenomena, including the susceptibility of the eye to Candida infection and a prolonged half-life for several inflammatory mediators in the anterior chamber. PMID:2992283

  12. Myeloperoxidase, paraoxonase-1, and HDL form a functional ternary complex.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Zhiping; Riwanto, Meliana; Gao, Shengqiang; Levison, Bruce S; Gu, Xiaodong; Fu, Xiaoming; Wagner, Matthew A; Besler, Christian; Gerstenecker, Gary; Zhang, Renliang; Li, Xin-Min; DiDonato, Anthony J; Gogonea, Valentin; Tang, W H Wilson; Smith, Jonathan D; Plow, Edward F; Fox, Paul L; Shih, Diana M; Lusis, Aldons J; Fisher, Edward A; DiDonato, Joseph A; Landmesser, Ulf; Hazen, Stanley L

    2013-09-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) and paraoxonase 1 (PON1) are high-density lipoprotein-associated (HDL-associated) proteins mechanistically linked to inflammation, oxidant stress, and atherosclerosis. MPO is a source of ROS during inflammation and can oxidize apolipoprotein A1 (APOA1) of HDL, impairing its atheroprotective functions. In contrast, PON1 fosters systemic antioxidant effects and promotes some of the atheroprotective properties attributed to HDL. Here, we demonstrate that MPO, PON1, and HDL bind to one another, forming a ternary complex, wherein PON1 partially inhibits MPO activity, while MPO inactivates PON1. MPO oxidizes PON1 on tyrosine 71 (Tyr71), a modified residue found in human atheroma that is critical for HDL binding and PON1 function. Acute inflammation model studies with transgenic and knockout mice for either PON1 or MPO confirmed that MPO and PON1 reciprocally modulate each other's function in vivo. Further structure and function studies identified critical contact sites between APOA1 within HDL, PON1, and MPO, and proteomics studies of HDL recovered from acute coronary syndrome (ACS) subjects revealed enhanced chlorotyrosine content, site-specific PON1 methionine oxidation, and reduced PON1 activity. HDL thus serves as a scaffold upon which MPO and PON1 interact during inflammation, whereupon PON1 binding partially inhibits MPO activity, and MPO promotes site-specific oxidative modification and impairment of PON1 and APOA1 function. PMID:23908111

  13. Myeloperoxidase promoter region polymorphism and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xifeng; Schabath, Matthew B; Spitz, Margaret R

    2003-01-01

    Historically, myeloperoxidase activity and subsequent production of hypochlorous acid has been associated with the killing of host-invading microorganisms (bacteria, viruses, and fungi). Currently, there is a wealth of evidence that the MPO polymorphism and enzyme activity is associated with a wide range of pathological and biological processes, including lung cancer carcinogenesis. Although the molecular epidemiology reports reviewed in this chapter are not in complete agreement on all aspects of their findings, it is evident that the MPO polymorphism contributes to the modulation of overall lung cancer risk. Four of the five molecular epidemiologic studies reviewed in this chapter utilized similar case-control study designs with quite different sources of populations. These studies all demonstrate that the MPO variant genotype modulates overall lung cancer risk. However, these studies are not in agreement regarding age and gender effects, and gene-environmental interactions. The nested case control study designed utilized by Misra et al. (35) is a valid and sound approach, but their results found no evidence of an association. Certainly, heterogeneity in study populations can contribute to the variability between these studies. Additionally, epidemiologic issues such as case-control matching and sources of control populations may contribute to the conflicting findings. Thus, the publication of inconsistent or null studies as well as other positive findings is certainly encouraged to elucidate the range of effects associated with the MPO polymorphism and lung cancer risk. PMID:12407737

  14. Growing significance of myeloperoxidase in non-infectious diseases.

    PubMed

    Hoy, Aline; Leininger-Muller, Brigitte; Kutter, Dolphe; Siest, Gérard; Visvikis, Sophie

    2002-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a glycoprotein released by activated polymorphonuclear neutrophils, which takes part in the defense of the organism through production of hypochlorous acid (HOCl), a potent oxidant. Since the discovery of MPO deficiency, initially regarded as rare and restricted to patients suffering from severe infections, MPO has attracted clinical attention. The development of new technologies allowing screening for this defect has permitted new advances in the comprehension of underlying mechanisms. Apart from its implications for host defense, the expression of MPO restricted to myeloid precursors makes MPO mRNA a good marker of acute myeloid leukemia. In addition, during the last few years, involvement of MPO has been described in numerous diseases such as atherosclerosis, lung cancer, Alzheimer's disease and multiple sclerosis. Both strong oxidative activity and MPO genetic polymorphism have been involved. This review summarizes the broad range of diseases involving MPO and points out the possible use of this protein as a new clinical marker and a future therapeutic target. PMID:11916266

  15. Natural and disease associated anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO) autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Guilpain, Philippe; Servettaz, Amélie; Batteux, Frédéric; Guillevin, Loïc; Mouthon, Luc

    2008-06-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a cationic protein present in primary azurophilic granules of neutrophils and monocytes. MPO produces a highly deleterious reactive oxygen species, the hypochlorous acid (HOCl), using hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) and chloride ions as substrate. Anti-MPO antibodies (Abs) are present in 70% of the cases in patients with microscopic polyangiitis (MPA), a small-sized vessel vasculitis. Anti-MPO Abs from patients with MPA can trigger the release of MPO by neutrophils and monocytes. Anti-MPO Abs can activate MPO to generate an oxidative stress deleterious for the endothelium. Thus, we recently demonstrated that MPA sera with anti-MPO Abs activated MPO in vitro, and generated hypochlorous acid, whereas sera from MPA patients with no anti-MPO Abs or healthy individuals did not. Both hypochlorous acid production and endothelial lysis were abrogated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), an antioxidant molecule. Thus, anti-MPO Abs could play a pathogenic role in vivo by triggering an oxidative burst leading to severe endothelial damages. PMID:18558355

  16. Myeloperoxidase acts as a profibrotic mediator of atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Volker; Andrié, René P; Rudolph, Tanja K; Friedrichs, Kai; Klinke, Anna; Hirsch-Hoffmann, Birgit; Schwoerer, Alexander P; Lau, Denise; Fu, XiaoMing; Klingel, Karin; Sydow, Karsten; Didié, Michael; Seniuk, Anika; von Leitner, Eike-Christin; Szoecs, Katalin; Schrickel, Jan W; Treede, Hendrik; Wenzel, Ulrich; Lewalter, Thorsten; Nickenig, Georg; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus; Meinertz, Thomas; Böger, Rainer H; Reichenspurner, Hermann; Freeman, Bruce A; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ehmke, Heimo; Hazen, Stanley L; Willems, Stephan; Baldus, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Observational clinical and ex vivo studies have established a strong association between atrial fibrillation and inflammation1. However, whether inflammation is the cause or the consequence of atrial fibrillation and which specific inflammatory mediators may increase the atria's susceptibility to fibrillation remain elusive. Here we provide experimental and clinical evidence for the mechanistic involvement of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme enzyme abundantly expressed by neutrophils, in the pathophysiology of atrial fibrillation. MPO-deficient mice pretreated with angiotensin II (AngII) to provoke leukocyte activation showed lower atrial tissue abundance of the MPO product 3-chlorotyrosine, reduced activity of matrix metalloproteinases and blunted atrial fibrosis as compared to wild-type mice. Upon right atrial electrophysiological stimulation, MPO-deficient mice were protected from atrial fibrillation, which was reversed when MPO was restored. Humans with atrial fibrillation had higher plasma concentrations of MPO and a larger MPO burden in right atrial tissue as compared to individuals devoid of atrial fibrillation. In the atria, MPO colocalized with markedly increased formation of 3-chlorotyrosine. Our data demonstrate that MPO is a crucial prerequisite for structural remodeling of the myocardium, leading to an increased vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. PMID:20305660

  17. Payload Drug vs. Nanocarrier Biodegradation by Myeloperoxidase- and Peroxynitrite-Mediated Oxidations: Pharmacokinetic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Wanji; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Shurin, Galina V.; Shurin, Michael R.; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2015-01-01

    With the advancement of nanocarriers for drug delivery into biomedical practice, assessments of drug susceptibility to oxidative degradation by enzymatic mechanisms of inflammatory cells become important. Here, we investigate oxidative degradation of a carbon nanotube-based drug carrier loaded with Doxorubicin. We employed myeloperoxidase-catalysed and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative conditions to mimic the respiratory burst of neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. In addition, we revealed that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of free Doxorubicin, but not nanotube-carried drug, on melanoma and lung carcinoma cell lines were abolished in the presence of tumor-activated myeloid regulatory cells that create unique myeloperoxidase- and peroxynitrite-induced oxidative conditions. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that the nanocarrier protects the drug against oxidative biodegradation. PMID:25902750

  18. Payload drug vs. nanocarrier biodegradation by myeloperoxidase- and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidations: pharmacokinetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Wanji; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Shurin, Galina V.; Shurin, Michael R.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2015-05-01

    With the advancement of nanocarriers for drug delivery into biomedical practice, assessments of drug susceptibility to oxidative degradation by enzymatic mechanisms of inflammatory cells become important. Here, we investigate oxidative degradation of a carbon nanotube-based drug carrier loaded with Doxorubicin. We employed myeloperoxidase-catalysed and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative conditions to mimic the respiratory burst of neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. In addition, we revealed that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of free Doxorubicin, but not nanotube-carried drug, on melanoma and lung carcinoma cell lines were abolished in the presence of tumor-activated myeloid regulatory cells that create unique myeloperoxidase- and peroxynitrite-induced oxidative conditions. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that the nanocarrier protects the drug against oxidative biodegradation.With the advancement of nanocarriers for drug delivery into biomedical practice, assessments of drug susceptibility to oxidative degradation by enzymatic mechanisms of inflammatory cells become important. Here, we investigate oxidative degradation of a carbon nanotube-based drug carrier loaded with Doxorubicin. We employed myeloperoxidase-catalysed and peroxynitrite-mediated oxidative conditions to mimic the respiratory burst of neutrophils and macrophages, respectively. In addition, we revealed that the cytostatic and cytotoxic effects of free Doxorubicin, but not nanotube-carried drug, on melanoma and lung carcinoma cell lines were abolished in the presence of tumor-activated myeloid regulatory cells that create unique myeloperoxidase- and peroxynitrite-induced oxidative conditions. Both ex vivo and in vitro studies demonstrate that the nanocarrier protects the drug against oxidative biodegradation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and data from characterization of materials synthesis and degradation studies. See DOI: 10

  19. Myeloperoxidase and coronary arterial disease: from research to clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Roman, Raquel Melchior; Wendland, Andrea Elisabet; Polanczyk, Carisi Anne

    2008-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme derived of leukocytes that catalyze formation of numerous reactive oxidant species. Besides members of the innate host defense, evidences have been proving the contribution of these oxidants to tissue injury during inflammation. MPO participates in proatherogenic biological activities related to the evolution of cardiovascular disease, including initiation, propagation and acute complications of atherosclerotic process. Thereby, MPO and its inflammatory cascade represents an attractive target for prognostical investigation and therapeutics in atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. In this review, we present the state of the art in the understanding of biological actions to clinical evidences of the relationship between MPO and coronary arterial disease. Several studies point to the independent effect of MPO levels in the evolution of disease and incidence of events in patients with acute coronary syndrome. However, the additional predictive value of MPO levels in the cardiovascular risk assessment, to incorporate it to the clinical practice as marker of plaque vulnerability, is still not consistent. Additional studies are necessary to confirm its role in the different forms of presentation of ischemic disease, besides the standardization of the assay, fundamental point for transition of this marker from research atmosphere to use in clinical routine: : from laboratory to clinical practice. PMID:18660935

  20. Mast Cell Stabilization Ameliorates Autoimmune Anti-Myeloperoxidase Glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Gan, Poh-Yi; O'Sullivan, Kim M; Ooi, Joshua D; Alikhan, Maliha A; Odobasic, Dragana; Summers, Shaun A; Kitching, A Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R

    2016-05-01

    Observations in experimental murine myeloperoxidase (MPO)-ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV) show mast cells degranulate, thus enhancing injury as well as producing immunomodulatory IL-10. Here we report that, compared with biopsy specimens from control patients, renal biopsy specimens from 44 patients with acute AAV had more mast cells in the interstitium, which correlated with the severity of tubulointerstitial injury. Furthermore, most of the mast cells were degranulated and spindle-shaped in patients with acute AAV, indicating an activated phenotype. We hypothesized that the mast cell stabilizer disodium cromoglycate would attenuate mast cell degranulation without affecting IL-10 production. We induced anti-MPO GN by immunizing mice with MPO and a low dose of anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody. When administered before or after induction of MPO autoimmunity in these mice, disodium cromoglycate attenuated mast cell degranulation, development of autoimmunity, and development of GN, without diminishing IL-10 production. In contrast, administration of disodium cromoglycate to mast cell-deficient mice had no effect on the development of MPO autoimmunity or GN. MPO-specific CD4(+) effector T cell proliferation was enhanced by co-culture with mast cells, but in the presence of disodium cromoglycate, proliferation was inhibited and IL-10 production was enhanced. These results indicate that disodium cromoglycate blocks injurious mast cell degranulation specifically without affecting the immunomodulatory role of these cells. Thus as a therapeutic, disodium cromoglycate may substantially enhance the regulatory role of mast cells in MPO-AAV. PMID:26374606

  1. Myeloperoxidase: the yin and yang in tumour progression.

    PubMed

    Mika, Denish; Guruvayoorappan, C

    2011-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme- containing enzyme abundantly expressed in neutrophils. It catalyzes the reaction between chloride and hydrogen peroxide to generate a potent oxidant, hypochlorous acid (HOCl). It plays an important role in innate immune defense mechanism. However, excessive generation of MPO-derived oxidants has been linked to tissue damage and in the initiation and progression of diseases such as cancer which arise from chronic inflammation. The oxidant activity of MPO is believed to promote the metabolism of chemical carcinogens, cause DNA damage and compromise the repair process. It is also considered as important mediators of gastric ulcers caused by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) through its ability to catalyze the generation of reactive oxidants. A G-463 a polymorphism located in the promoter of the MPO gene plays an important role in its transcription. Moreover the reactive oxidants produced by neutrophilic enzyme have the potential to interact with tumour cells and contribute to their metastasis. There has been a considerable interest in the screening of plant extracts and compounds isolated from them for their potential use as HOCl scavengers. This review will discuss the role of MPO in tumour progression and provide an overview of its part in tumour metastasis and ulcer. PMID:21699016

  2. [Role of myeloperoxidase in the host defense against fungal infection].

    PubMed

    Aratani, Yasuaki

    2006-01-01

    Neutrophils are believed to be the first line of defense against invading microorganisms, but in vivo roles of reactive oxygens produced by neutrophils are not well known. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyzes reaction of hydrogen peroxide with chloride ion to produce hypochlorous acid that is used for microbial killing by phagocytic cells. To define the in vivo role of MPO, we generated mice having no peroxidase activity in their neutrophils or monocytes. MPO-deficient (MPO-KO) mice showed severely reduced cytotoxicity to Candida albicans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Cryptococcus neoformans, and other microorganisms, demonstrating that an MPO-dependent oxidative system is important for host defense against fungi. However, the significance of MPO compared to the NADPH-oxidase is still unclear because individuals with MPO deficiency are usually healthy in contrast to patients with chronic granulomatous disease (CGD) who present clinical symptoms early in life. To better understand the contributions of MPO and NADPH-oxidase to antifungal defense mechanisms, we compared the susceptibility of MPO-KO mice and CGD mice to infections by C. albicans. Interestingly, at the highest dose, the mortality of MPO-KO mice was comparable to CGD mice, but was the same as normal mice at the lowest dose. These results suggest that MPO and NADPH-oxidase are equally important for early host defense against a large inocula of Candida. Our present results suggest that MPO-deficient individuals could exhibit similar problems as CGD patients if exposed to a large number of microorganisms. PMID:16940954

  3. Myeloperoxidase-induced genomic DNA-centered radicals.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E; Zhai, Zili; Gimenez, Maria S; Ashby, Michael T; Chilakapati, Jaya; Kitchin, Kirk; Mason, Ronald P; Ramirez, Dario C

    2010-06-25

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by activated neutrophils can initiate and promote carcinogenesis. MPO produces hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that oxidizes the genomic DNA in inflammatory cells as well as in surrounding epithelial cells. DNA-centered radicals are early intermediates formed during DNA oxidation. Once formed, DNA-centered radicals decay by mechanisms that are not completely understood, producing a number of oxidation products that are studied as markers of DNA oxidation. In this study we employed the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide-based immuno-spin trapping technique to investigate the MPO-triggered formation of DNA-centered radicals in inflammatory and epithelial cells and to test whether resveratrol blocks HOCl-induced DNA-centered radical formation in these cells. We found that HOCl added exogenously or generated intracellularly by MPO that has been taken up by the cell or by MPO newly synthesized produces DNA-centered radicals inside cells. We also found that resveratrol passed across cell membranes and scavenged HOCl before it reacted with the genomic DNA, thus blocking DNA-centered radical formation. Taken together our results indicate that the formation of DNA-centered radicals by intracellular MPO may be a useful point of therapeutic intervention in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:20406811

  4. Myeloperoxidase-induced Genomic DNA-centered Radicals*

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Mejiba, Sandra E.; Zhai, Zili; Gimenez, Maria S.; Ashby, Michael T.; Chilakapati, Jaya; Kitchin, Kirk; Mason, Ronald P.; Ramirez, Dario C.

    2010-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by activated neutrophils can initiate and promote carcinogenesis. MPO produces hypochlorous acid (HOCl) that oxidizes the genomic DNA in inflammatory cells as well as in surrounding epithelial cells. DNA-centered radicals are early intermediates formed during DNA oxidation. Once formed, DNA-centered radicals decay by mechanisms that are not completely understood, producing a number of oxidation products that are studied as markers of DNA oxidation. In this study we employed the 5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide-based immuno-spin trapping technique to investigate the MPO-triggered formation of DNA-centered radicals in inflammatory and epithelial cells and to test whether resveratrol blocks HOCl-induced DNA-centered radical formation in these cells. We found that HOCl added exogenously or generated intracellularly by MPO that has been taken up by the cell or by MPO newly synthesized produces DNA-centered radicals inside cells. We also found that resveratrol passed across cell membranes and scavenged HOCl before it reacted with the genomic DNA, thus blocking DNA-centered radical formation. Taken together our results indicate that the formation of DNA-centered radicals by intracellular MPO may be a useful point of therapeutic intervention in inflammation-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:20406811

  5. EFFECT OF VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR OPERATION ON BIOMASS ACCUMULATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND ACTIVITY. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess biomass accumulation and activity loss in vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) can lead to unreliable long-term operation. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in biomass accumulation, distribution and activity in VPBs treating toluene-contaminated air were monitored o...

  6. The molecular mechanism for interaction of ceruloplasmin and myeloperoxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhautdin, Bakytzhan; Bakhautdin, Esen Göksöy

    2016-04-01

    Ceruloplasmin (Cp) is a copper-containing ferroxidase with potent antioxidant activity. Cp is expressed by hepatocytes and activated macrophages and has been known as physiologic inhibitor of myeloperoxidase (MPO). Enzymatic activity of MPO produces anti-microbial agents and strong prooxidants such as hypochlorous acid and has a potential to damage host tissue at the sites of inflammation and infection. Thus Cp-MPO interaction and inhibition of MPO has previously been suggested as an important control mechanism of excessive MPO activity. Our aim in this study was to identify minimal Cp domain or peptide that interacts with MPO. We first confirmed Cp-MPO interaction by ELISA and surface plasmon resonance (SPR). SPR analysis of the interaction yielded 30 nM affinity between Cp and MPO. We then designed and synthesized 87 overlapping peptides spanning the entire amino acid sequence of Cp. Each of the peptides was tested whether it binds to MPO by direct binding ELISA. Two of the 87 peptides, P18 and P76 strongly interacted with MPO. Amino acid sequence analysis of identified peptides revealed high sequence and structural homology between them. Further structural analysis of Cp's crystal structure by PyMOL software unfolded that both peptides represent surface-exposed sites of Cp and face nearly the same direction. To confirm our finding we raised anti-P18 antisera in rabbit and demonstrated that this antisera disrupts Cp-MPO binding and rescues MPO activity. Collectively, our results confirm Cp-MPO interaction and identify two nearly identical sites on Cp that specifically bind MPO. We propose that inhibition of MPO by Cp requires two nearly identical sites on Cp to bind homodimeric MPO simultaneously and at an angle of at least 120 degrees, which, in turn, exerts tension on MPO and results in conformational change.

  7. Sequence analysis, characterization and tissue distribution of channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus Rafinesque, 1818) myeloperoxidase cDNA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Myeloperoxidase (EC 1.11.1.7), a heme-containing lysosomal glycoprotein, is found predominantly in azurophilic granules of neutrophils. This enzyme upon activation catalyzes hydrogen peroxide in the presence of various halide ions to form hypohalous acids. Subsequently, these reagents are able to ...

  8. Evaluation of Antiradical and Anti-Inflammatory Activities of Ethyl Acetate and Butanolic Subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius (DC.) Polhill & Wiens (Loranthaceae) Using Equine Myeloperoxidase and Both PMA-Activated Neutrophils and HL-60 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boly, Rainatou; Franck, Thierry; Kohnen, Stephan; Lompo, Marius; Guissou, Innocent Pierre; Dubois, Jacques; Serteyn, Didier; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange

    2015-01-01

    The ethyl acetate and n-butanolic subfractions of Agelanthus dodoneifolius were investigated for their antioxidant and antimyeloperoxidase (MPO) activities. The reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was assessed by lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence (CL) and dichlorofluorescein- (DCF-) induced fluorescence techniques from phorbol myristate acetate- (PMA-) stimulated equine neutrophils and human myeloid cell line HL-60, respectively. In parallel, the effects of the tested subfractions were evaluated on the total MPO release by stimulated neutrophils and on the specific MPO activity by means of immunological assays. The results showed the potent activity of the butanolic subfraction, at least in respect of the chemiluminescence test (IC50 = 0.3 ± 0.1 µg/mL) and the ELISA and SIEFED assays (IC50 = 2.8 ± 1.2 µg/mL and 1.3 ± 1.0 µg/mL), respectively. However, the ethyl acetate subfraction was found to be the most potent in the DCF assay as at the highest concentration, DCF fluorescence intensity decreases of about 50%. Moreover, we demonstrated that the ethyl acetate subfraction was rich in catechin (16.51%) while it was not easy to identify the main compounds in the butanolic subfraction using the UPLC-MS/MS technique. Nevertheless, taken together, our results provide evidence that Agelanthus dodoneifolius subfractions may represent potential sources of natural antioxidants and of antimyeloperoxidase compounds. PMID:25821497

  9. Comparative Ni tolerance and accumulation potentials between Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (halophyte) and Brassica juncea: Metal accumulation, nutrient status and photosynthetic activity.

    PubMed

    Amari, Taoufik; Ghnaya, Tahar; Debez, Ahmed; Taamali, Manel; Ben Youssef, Nabil; Lucchini, Giorgio; Sacchi, Gian Attilio; Abdelly, Chedly

    2014-11-01

    Saline soils often constitute sites of accumulation of industrial and urban wastes contaminated by heavy metals. Halophytes, i.e. native salt-tolerant species, could be more suitable for heavy metal phytoextraction from saline areas than glycophytes, most frequently used so far. In the framework of this approach, we assess here the Ni phytoextraction potential in the halophyte Mesembryanthemum crystallinum compared with the model species Brassica juncea. Plants were hydroponically maintained for 21 days at 0, 25, 50, and 100μM NiCl2. Nickel addition significantly restricted the growth activity of both species, and to a higher extent in M. crystallinum, which did not, however, show Ni-related toxicity symptoms on leaves. Interestingly, photosynthesis activity, chlorophyll content and photosystem II integrity assessed by chlorophyll fluorescence were less impacted in Ni-treated M. crystallinum as compared to B. juncea. The plant mineral nutrition was differently affected by NiCl2 exposure depending on the element, the species investigated and even the organ. In both species, roots were the preferential sites of Ni(2+) accumulation, but the fraction translocated to shoots was higher in B. juncea than in M. crystallinum. The relatively good tolerance of M. crystallinum to Ni suggests that this halophyte species could be used in the phytoextraction of moderately polluted saline soils. PMID:25171515

  10. Exposure of aconitase to smoking-related oxidants results in iron loss and increased iron response protein-1 activity: potential mechanisms for iron accumulation in human arterial cells.

    PubMed

    Talib, Jihan; Davies, Michael J

    2016-06-01

    Smokers have an elevated risk of cardiovascular disease, but the origin(s) of this increased risk are incompletely defined. Evidence supports an accumulation of the oxidant-generating enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) in the inflamed artery wall, and smokers have high levels of SCN(-), a preferred MPO substrate, with this resulting in HOSCN formation. We hypothesised that HOSCN, a thiol-specific oxidant may target the iron-sulphur cluster of aconitase (both isolated, and within primary human coronary artery endothelial cells; HCAEC) resulting in enzyme dysfunction, release of iron, and conversion of the cytosolic isoform to iron response protein-1, which regulates intracellular iron levels. We show that exposure of isolated aconitase to increasing concentrations of HOSCN releases iron from the aconitase [Fe-S]4 cluster, and decreases enzyme activity. This is associated with protein thiol loss and modification of specific Cys residues in, and around, the [Fe-S]4 cluster. Exposure of HCAEC to HOSCN resulted in increased intracellular levels of chelatable iron, loss of aconitase activity and increased iron response protein-1 (IRP-1) activity. These data indicate HOSCN, an oxidant associated with oxidative stress in smokers, can induce aconitase dysfunction in human endothelial cells via Cys oxidation, damage to the [Fe-S]4 cluster, iron release and generation of IRP-1 activity, which modulates ferritin protein levels and results in dysregulation of iron metabolism. These data may rationalise, in part, the presence of increased levels of iron in human atherosclerotic lesions and contribute to increased oxidative damage and endothelial cell dysfunction in smokers. Similar reactions may occur at other sites of inflammation. PMID:26837749

  11. Melatonin prevents myeloperoxidase heme destruction and the generation of free iron mediated by self-generated hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N; Ali, Iyad; Najafi, Tohid; Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Saed, Ghassan M; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formed during catalysis is able to destroy the MPO heme moiety through a feedback mechanism, resulting in the accumulation of free iron. Here we show that the presence of melatonin (MLT) can prevent HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction using a combination of UV-visible photometry, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific electrode, and ferrozine assay techniques. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that MPO heme protection was at the expense of MLT oxidation. The full protection of the MPO heme requires the presence of a 1:2 MLT to H2O2 ratio. Melatonin prevents HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction through multiple pathways. These include competition with chloride, the natural co-substrate; switching the MPO activity from a two electron oxidation to a one electron pathway causing the buildup of the inactive Compound II, and its subsequent decay to MPO-Fe(III) instead of generating HOCl; binding to MPO above the heme iron, thereby preventing the access of H2O2 to the catalytic site of the enzyme; and direct scavenging of HOCl. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and MPO inhibitor, MLT can exert its protective effect by preventing the release of free iron mediated by self-generated HOCl. Our work may establish a direct mechanistic link by which MLT exerts its antioxidant protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases with MPO elevation. PMID:25835505

  12. Melatonin Prevents Myeloperoxidase Heme Destruction and the Generation of Free Iron Mediated by Self-Generated Hypochlorous Acid

    PubMed Central

    Shaeib, Faten; Khan, Sana N.; Ali, Iyad; Najafi, Tohid; Maitra, Dhiman; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Saed, Ghassan M.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2015-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) generated hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formed during catalysis is able to destroy the MPO heme moiety through a feedback mechanism, resulting in the accumulation of free iron. Here we show that the presence of melatonin (MLT) can prevent HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction using a combination of UV-visible photometry, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-specific electrode, and ferrozine assay techniques. High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis showed that MPO heme protection was at the expense of MLT oxidation. The full protection of the MPO heme requires the presence of a 1:2 MLT to H2O2 ratio. Melatonin prevents HOCl–mediated MPO heme destruction through multiple pathways. These include competition with chloride, the natural co-substrate; switching the MPO activity from a two electron oxidation to a one electron pathway causing the buildup of the inactive Compound II, and its subsequent decay to MPO-Fe(III) instead of generating HOCl; binding to MPO above the heme iron, thereby preventing the access of H2O2 to the catalytic site of the enzyme; and direct scavenging of HOCl. Collectively, in addition to acting as an antioxidant and MPO inhibitor, MLT can exert its protective effect by preventing the release of free iron mediated by self-generated HOCl. Our work may establish a direct mechanistic link by which MLT exerts its antioxidant protective effect in chronic inflammatory diseases with MPO elevation. PMID:25835505

  13. Progesterone regulates the accumulation and the activation of Eg2 kinase in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Frank-Vaillant, M; Haccard, O; Thibier, C; Ozon, R; Arlot-Bonnemains, Y; Prigent, C; Jessus, C

    2000-04-01

    Xenopus prophase oocytes reenter meiotic division in response to progesterone. The signaling pathway leading to Cdc2 activation depends on neosynthesized proteins and a decrease in PKA activity. We demonstrate that Eg2 protein, a Xenopus member of the Aurora/Ipl1 family of protein kinases, accumulates in response to progesterone and is degraded after parthenogenetic activation. The polyadenylation and cap ribose methylation of Eg2 mRNA are not needed for the protein accumulation. Eg2 protein accumulation is induced by progesterone through a decrease in PKA activity, upstream of Cdc2 activation. Eg2 kinase activity is undetectable in prophase and is raised in parallel with Cdc2 activation. In contrast to Eg2 protein accumulation, Eg2 kinase activation is under Cdc2 control. Furthermore, by using an anti-sense strategy, we show that Eg2 accumulation is not required in the transduction pathway leading to Cdc2 activation. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that Eg2 is not necessary for Cdc2 activation, though it could participate in the organization of the meiotic spindles, in agreement with the well-conserved roles of the members of the Aurora family, from yeast to man. PMID:10704364

  14. Cadmium accumulation, activities of antioxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in Pistia stratiotes L.

    PubMed

    Li, Yong; Zhang, Shanshan; Jiang, Wusheng; Liu, Donghua

    2013-02-01

    The aquatic plant Pistia stratiotes L. (water lettuce) was studied due to its capability of absorption of contaminants in water and its subsequent use in wetlands constructed for wastewater treatment. The effects of Cd on root growth, accumulation of Cd, antioxidant enzymes, and malondialdehyde (MDA) content in P. stratiotes were investigated. The results indicated that P. stratiotes has considerable ability to accumulate Cd. Cadmium induced higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) and peroxidase (POD) activities than catalase activity, suggesting that SOD and POD provided a better defense mechanism against Cd-induced oxidative damage. The accumulation of Cd promoted MDA production. PMID:22791349

  15. An aqueous pomegranate peel extract inhibits neutrophil myeloperoxidase in vitro and attenuates lung inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bachoual, Rafik; Talmoudi, Wifak; Boussetta, Tarek; Braut, Françoise; El-Benna, Jamel

    2011-06-01

    Punica granatum peel aqueous extract (PGE) is widely used to treat disorders such as inflammation, ulcers and infections, but its pharmacological target is not known. In this study we investigated the effect of PGE on human neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in vitro and on LPS-induced lung inflammation in vivo in mice. Neutrophils were isolated and ROS generation was measured by luminol-amplified chemiluminescence. Superoxide anion generation was detected by the cytochrome c reduction assay. H(2)O(2) was detected by DCFH fluorescence assay. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity was measured by the tetramethyl benzidine oxidation method. Lung inflammation was induced in mice by LPS instillation. PGE inhibited luminol-amplified chemiluminescence of resting neutrophils and N-formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLF)- or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated neutrophils, in a concentration-dependent manner. PGE had no effect on superoxide anion generation, suggesting that it does not directly inhibit NADPH oxidase activity or activation pathways, or scavenge superoxide anions. PGE did not scavenge H(2)O(2) but directly inhibited myeloperoxidase activity in vitro. In vivo studies showed that PGE also attenuated LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. So this study reveals that PGE inhibits neutrophil MPO activity and attenuates LPS-induced lung inflammation in mice. Inhibition of MPO activity by PGE could explain its anti-inflammatory action. PMID:21376769

  16. Gold enrichment in active geothermal systems by accumulating colloidal suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hannington, Mark; Harðardóttir, Vigdis; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter; Brown, Kevin L.

    2016-04-01

    The origins of high-grade hydrothermal ore deposits are debated, but active geothermal systems provide important clues to their formation. The highest concentrations of gold are found in geothermal systems with direct links to island arc magmatism. Yet, similar concentrations have also been found in the absence of any input from arc magmas, for example, in the Reykjanes geothermal field, Iceland. Here we analyse brine samples taken from deep wells at Reykjanes and find that gold concentrations in the reservoir zone have increased over the past seven years from an average of 3 ppb to 14 ppb. The metal concentrations greatly exceed the maximum solubility of gold in the reservoir under saturated conditions and are now nearly two orders of magnitude higher than in mid-ocean ridge black smoker fluids--the direct analogues of Reykjanes deep liquids. We suggest that ongoing extraction of brine, the resulting pressure drop, and increased boiling have caused gold to drop out of solution and become trapped in the reservoir as a colloidal suspension. This process may explain how the stock of metal in the reservoirs of fossil geothermal systems could have increased over time and thus become available for the formation of gold-rich ore deposits.

  17. Molecular chlorine generated by the myeloperoxidase-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system of phagocytes converts low density lipoprotein cholesterol into a family of chlorinated sterols.

    PubMed

    Hazen, S L; Hsu, F F; Duffin, K; Heinecke, J W

    1996-09-20

    Oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) may be of critical importance in triggering the pathological events of atherosclerosis. Myeloperoxidase, a heme protein secreted by phagocytes, is a potent catalyst for LDL oxidation in vitro, and active enzyme is present in human atherosclerotic lesions. We have explored the possibility that reactive intermediates generated by myeloperoxidase target LDL cholesterol for oxidation. LDL exposed to the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl- system at acidic pH yielded a family of chlorinated sterols. The products were identified by mass spectrometry as a novel dichlorinated sterol, cholesterol alpha-chlorohydrin (6beta-chlorocholestane-(3beta,5alpha)-diol), cholesterol beta-chlorohydrin (5alpha-chlorocholestane-(3beta, 6beta)-diol), and a structurally related cholesterol chlorohydrin. Oxidation of LDL cholesterol by myeloperoxidase required H2O2 and Cl-, suggesting that hypochlorous acid (HOCl) was an intermediate in the reaction. However, HOCl failed to generate chlorinated sterols under chloride-free conditions. Since HOCl is in equilibrium with molecular chlorine (Cl2) through a reaction which requires Cl- and H+, this raised the possibility that Cl2 was the actual chlorinating intermediate. Consonant with this hypothesis, HOCl oxidized LDL cholesterol in the presence of Cl- and at acidic pH. Moreover, in the absence of Cl- and at neutral pH, Cl2 generated the same family of chlorinated sterols as the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-Cl- system. Finally, direct addition of Cl2 to the double bond of cholesterol accounts for dichlorinated sterol formation by myeloperoxidase. Collectively, these results indicate that Cl2 derived from HOCl is the chlorinating intermediate in the oxidation of cholesterol by myeloperoxidase. Our observations suggest that Cl2 generation in acidic compartments may constitute one pathway for oxidation of LDL cholesterol in the artery wall. PMID:8798498

  18. NEUTOPHIL MYELOPEROXIDASE DESTRUCTION BY ULTRAVIOLET IRRADIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The peroxidase activity of enriched leukocyte preparations on coverslips was determined cytochemically with our newly developed methods. his technique utilizes diaminobenzidine medium and cupric nitrate intensification and is suitable for analysis with light microscopy, SEM, and ...

  19. Myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation promotes the oxidative modification of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P; Magon, Nicholas J; Harwood, D Tim; Kettle, Anthony J; Vissers, Margreet C; Winterbourn, Christine C; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-04-10

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  20. Myeloperoxidase-dependent Lipid Peroxidation Promotes the Oxidative Modification of Cytosolic Proteins in Phagocytic Neutrophils*

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie-Grantham, Rachel P.; Magon, Nicholas J.; Harwood, D. Tim; Kettle, Anthony J.; Vissers, Margreet C.; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Hampton, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytic neutrophils generate reactive oxygen species to kill microbes. Oxidant generation occurs within an intracellular phagosome, but diffusible species can react with the neutrophil and surrounding tissue. To investigate the extent of oxidative modification, we assessed the carbonylation of cytosolic proteins in phagocytic neutrophils. A 4-fold increase in protein carbonylation was measured within 15 min of initiating phagocytosis. Carbonylation was dependent on NADPH oxidase and myeloperoxidase activity and was inhibited by butylated hydroxytoluene and Trolox, indicating a role for myeloperoxidase-dependent lipid peroxidation. Proteomic analysis of target proteins revealed significant carbonylation of the S100A9 subunit of calprotectin, a truncated form of Hsp70, actin, and hemoglobin from contaminating erythrocytes. The addition of the reactive aldehyde 4-hydroxynonenal (HNE) caused carbonylation, and HNE-glutathione adducts were detected in the cytosol of phagocytic neutrophils. The post-translational modification of neutrophil proteins will influence the functioning and fate of these immune cells in the period following phagocytic activation, and provides a marker of neutrophil activation during infection and inflammation. PMID:25697357

  1. Characterization of cDNA clones for human myeloperoxidase: predicted amino acid sequence and evidence for multiple mRNA species.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, K R; Nauseef, W M; Care, A; Wheelock, M J; Shane, S; Hudson, S; Koeffler, H P; Selsted, M; Miller, C; Rovera, G

    1987-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is a component of the microbicidal network of polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The enzyme is a tetramer consisting of two heavy and two light subunits. A large proportion of humans demonstrate genetic deficiencies in the production of myeloperoxidase. As a first step in analyzing these deficiencies in more detail, we have isolated cDNA clones for myeloperoxidase from an expression library of the HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell line. Two overlapping plasmids (pMP02 and pMP062) were identified as myeloperoxidase cDNA clones based on the detection with myeloperoxidase antiserum of 70 kDa protein expressed in pMP02-containing bacteria and a 75 kDa polypeptide produced by hybridization selection and translation using pMP062 and HL-60 RNA. Formal identification of the clones was made by matching the predicted amino acid sequences with the amino terminal sequences of the heavy and light subunits. Both subunits are encoded by one mRNA in the following order: pre-pro-sequences--light subunit--heavy subunit. The molecular weight of the predicted primary translation product is 83.7 kDa. Northern blots reveal two size classes of hybridizing RNAs (approximately 3.0-3.3 and 3.5-4.0 kilobases) whose expression is restricted to cells of the granulocytic lineage and parallels the changes in enzymatic activity observed during differentiation. Images PMID:3031585

  2. Relationships Between Photosynthetic Activity and Silica Accumulation with Ages of Leaf in Sasa veitchii (Poaceae, Bambusoideae)

    PubMed Central

    Motomura, Hiroyuki; Hikosaka, Kouki; Suzuki, Mitsuo

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims Bamboos have long-lived, evergreen leaves that continue to accumulate silica throughout their life. Silica accumulation has been suggested to suppress their photosynthetic activity. However, nitrogen content per unit leaf area (Narea), an important determinant of maximum photosynthetic capacity per unit leaf area (Pmax), decreases as leaves age and senescence. In many species, Pmax decreases in parallel with the leaf nitrogen content. It is hypothesized that if silica accumulation affects photosynthesis, then Pmax would decrease faster than Narea, leading to a decrease in photosynthetic rate per unit leaf nitrogen (photosynthetic nitrogen use efficiency, PNUE) with increasing silica content in leaves. Methods The hypothesis was tested in leaves of Sasa veitchii, which have a life span of 2 years and accumulate silica up to 41 % of dry mass. Seasonal changes in Pmax, stomatal conductance, Narea and silica content were measured for leaves of different ages. Key Results Although Pmax and PNUE were negatively related with silica content across leaves of different ages, the relationship between PNUE and silica differed depending on leaf age. In second-year leaves, PNUE was almost constant although there was a large increase in silica content, suggesting that leaf nitrogen was a primary factor determining the variation in Pmax and that silica accumulation did not affect photosynthesis. PNUE was strongly and negatively correlated with silica content in third-year leaves, suggesting that silica accumulation affected photosynthesis of older leaves. Conclusions Silica accumulation in long-lived leaves of bamboo did not affect photosynthesis when the silica concentration of a leaf was less than 25 % of dry mass. Silica may be actively transported to epidermal cells rather than chlorenchyma cells, avoiding inhibition of CO2 diffusion from the intercellular space to chloroplasts. However, in older leaves with a larger silica content, silica was also

  3. Pharmacologically active drug metabolites: therapeutic and toxic activities, plasma and urine data in man, accumulation in renal failure.

    PubMed

    Drayer, D E

    1976-01-01

    Drugs that are administered to man may be biotransformed to yield metabolites that are pharmacologically active. The therapeutic and toxic activities of drug metabolites and the species in which this activity was demonstrated are compiled for the metabolites of 58 drugs. The metabolite to parent drug ratio in the plasma of non-uraemic man and the percentage urinary excretion of the metabolite in non-uraemic man are also tabulated. Those active metabolites with significant pharmacological activity and high plasma levels, both relative to that of the parent drug, will probably contribute substantially to the pharmacological effect ascribed to the parent drug. Active metabolites may accumulate in patients with end stage renal disease if renal excretion is a major elimination pathway for the metabolite. This is true even if the active metabolite is a minor metabolite of the parent drug, as long as the minor metabolite is not further biotransformed and is mainly excreted in the urine. Minor metabolite accumulation may also occur if it is further biotransformed by a pathway inhibited in uraemia. Some clinical examples of the accumulation of active drug metabolites in patients with renal failure are: (a) The abolition of premature ventricular contractions and prevention of paroxysmal atrial tachycardia in some cardiac patients with poor renal function treated with procainamide are associated with high levels of N-acetylprocainamide. (b) The severe irritability and twitching seen in a uraemic patient treated with pethidine (meperidine) are associated with high levels of norpethidine. (c) The severe muscle weakness and tenderness seen in patients with renal failure receiving clofibrate are associated with excessive accumulation of the free acid metabolite of clofibrate. (d) Patients with severe renal insufficiency taking allopurinol appear to experience a higher incidence of side reactions, possibly due to the accumulation of oxipurinol. (e) Accumulation of free and

  4. Serum myeloperoxidase: a novel biomarker for evaluation of patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gururajan, P; Gurumurthy, P; Nayar, P; Babu, S; Sarasabharati, A; Victor, D; Cherian, K M

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Myeloperoxidase, an abundant leucocyte enzyme, is elevated in culprit lesions that have ruptured in patients with sudden cardiac injury. Multiple lines of evidence suggest an association between myeloperoxidase and inflammation and acute coronary syndrome. Myeloperoxidase has been proposed as a potent risk marker and diagnostic tool in acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Recent studies have reported the potential use of myeloperoxidase in acute coronary syndrome, but limited reports are available on its utility in different groups of ACS in the emergency department. Therefore the circulating levels of serum myeloperoxidase in patients with acute coronary syndrome and control subjects were studied. Design and setting The levels of serum myeloperoxidase were measured by ELISA in 485 patients admitted to emergency care unit, of which 89 patients were diagnosed as non-cardiac chest pain (NCCP). The levels of myeloperoxidase were significantly increased in patients with ACS when compared with controls and NCCP. From the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis, the optimum value above which myeloperoxidase can be considered positive was found to be 48.02 U/ml. The area under the curve was found to be 0.956 with 95% CI (0.934 to 0.973) (p<0.0001). A combination analysis of ROC curves of troponin, creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) and myeloperoxidase showed myeloperoxidase to be highly significant. Multivariate analysis revealed myeloperoxidase to be an independent diagnostic marker for early diagnosis of ACS. Conclusion Myeloperoxidase, in contrast to troponin and CK-MB, identified patients at risk of ischaemic events, even in the absence of myocardial necrosis, thus highlighting its potent usefulness for risk stratification among patients presenting with chest pain.

  5. ANTIMICROBIAL ACTIVITY OF COPPER AND ZINC ACCUMULATED BY EASTERN OYSTER AMEBOCYTES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fisher, William S. Submitted. Antimicrobial Activity of Copper and Zinc Accumulated by Eastern Oyster Amebocytes. J. Shellfish Res. 54 p. (ERL,GB 1196).

    The distribution of eastern oysters Crassostrea virginica near terrestrial watersheds has led to a general impression t...

  6. Biochemical and Immunologic Analysis of Hereditary Myeloperoxidase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nauseef, William M.; Root, Richard K.; Malech, Harry L.

    1983-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme enzyme present in the azurophilic granules of human polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), is important in the oxygen-dependent microbicidal activity of PMN. MPO deficiency, defined as the lack of PMN peroxidative activity, is a common genetic defect of human PMN. The purpose of our study was to characterize the structural basis for this loss of enzymatic activity, using protein biochemical and immunochemical techniques to examine PMN from three subjects with partial MPO deficiency and from five subjects with complete MPO deficiency. We purified MPO from normal PMN and defined its electrophoretic mobility after two-dimensional electrophoretic separation, using nondenaturing acidic polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) followed by sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) denaturation and SDS-PAGE separation of MPO subunit peptides. In agreement with previous studies, we found that normal MPO had subunits of 59,000 and 13,500 mol wt when subjected to SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions. Granule protein extracts of normal PMN, partially MPO-deficient PMN, and completely MPO-deficient PMN were analyzed with two-dimensional PAGE. Partially MPO-deficient PMN granules contained electrophoretically normal MPO in less than normal amounts, whereas completely MPO-deficient PMN granules contain no protein with the electrophoretic mobility of normal MPO. Using rabbit antiserum against purified MPO, we used immunoautoradiographic analysis to examine whole PMN for peptides immunochemically related to MPO. PMN from normal, partially MPO-deficient, and completely MPO-deficient subjects were solubilized in SDS and component peptides separated by SDS-PAGE. The peptides were electroblotted onto nitrocellulose paper that was exposed sequentially to rabbit anti-MPO and 125I-protein A before autoradiography. Radiolabeled bands were identical when partially purified MPO or normal PMN were compared except that whole PMN contained a small amount of an immunologically

  7. Epicuticular Wax Accumulation and Fatty Acid Elongation Activities Are Induced during Leaf Development of Leeks1

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, Yoon; Hlousek-Radojcic, Alenka; Ponsamuel, Jayakumar; Liu, Dehua; Post-Beittenmiller, Dusty

    1998-01-01

    Epicuticular wax production was evaluated along the length of expanding leek (Allium porrum L.) leaves to gain insight into the regulation of wax production. Leaf segments from the bottom to the top were analyzed for (a) wax composition and load; (b) microsomal fatty acid elongase, plastidial fatty acid synthase, and acyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) thioesterase activities; and (c) tissue and cellular morphological changes. The level of total wax, which was low at the bottom, increased 23-fold along the length of the leaf, whereas accumulation of the hentriacontan-16-one increased more than 1000-fold. The onset of wax accumulation was not linked to cell elongation but, rather, occurred several centimeters above the leaf base. Peak microsomal fatty acid elongation activity preceded the onset of wax accumulation, and the maximum fatty acid synthase activity was coincident with the onset. The C16:0- and C18:0-ACP-hydrolyzing activities changed relatively little along the leaf, whereas C18:1-ACP-hydrolyzing activity increased slightly prior to the peak elongase activity. Electron micrographic analyses revealed that wax crystal formation was asynchronous among cells in the initial stages of wax deposition, and morphological changes in the cuticle and cell wall preceded the appearance of wax crystals. These studies demonstrated that wax production and microsomal fatty acid elongation activities were induced within a defined and identifiable region of the expanding leek leaf and provide the foundation for future molecular studies. PMID:9501123

  8. Effects of mechanical wounding on Carica papaya cysteine endopeptidases accumulation and activity.

    PubMed

    Azarkan, Mohamed; Dibiani, Rachid; Baulard, Céline; Baeyens-Volant, Danielle

    2006-05-30

    The mechanical wounding impact on the Carica papaya latex protein pattern was investigated by analyzing three latexes. A first one commercially available, a second harvested from unripe but fully grown fruits, both obtained from regularly tapped fruits. A third one was collected from similar fruits but wounded for the first time. The results demonstrated both quantitative and qualitative changes in the protein content and in the enzymatic activity. Repeated wounding results in either, accumulation or activation (or both of them) of papain, chymopapain and caricain. Furthermore, new cysteine protease activity was found to transiently accumulate in the latex collected from newly wounded fruits. The possible implication of this enzymatic material in the papaya cysteine endopeptidases pro-forms activation is discussed. PMID:16580724

  9. Triggering of inflammatory response by myeloperoxidase-oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Boudjeltia, Karim Zouaoui; Legssyer, Ilham; Van Antwerpen, Pierre; Kisoka, Roger Lema; Babar, Sajida; Moguilevsky, Nicole; Delree, Paul; Ducobu, Jean; Remacle, Claude; Vanhaeverbeek, Michel; Brohee, Dany

    2006-10-01

    The oxidation theory proposes that LDL oxidation is an early event in atherosclerosis and that oxidized LDL contributes to atherogenesis in triggering inflammation. In contrast to the copper-modified LDL, there are few studies using myeloperoxidase-modified LDL (Mox-LDL) as an inflammation inducer. Our aim is to test whether Mox-LDL could constitute a specific inducer of the inflammatory response. Albumin, which is the most abundant protein in plasma and which is present to an identical concentration of LDL in the intima, was used for comparison. The secretion of IL-8 by endothelial cells (Ea.hy926) and TNF-alpha by monocytes (THP-1) was measured in the cell medium after exposure of these cells to native LDL, native albumin, Mox-LDL, or Mox-albumin. We observed that Mox-LDL induced a 1.5- and 2-fold increase (ANOVA; P < 0.001) in IL-8 production at 100 microg/mL and 200 microg/mL, respectively. The incubation of THP-1 cells with Mox-LDL (100 microg/mL) increased the production of TNF-alpha 2-fold over the control. Native LDL, albumin, and Mox-albumin showed no effect in either cellular types. The myeloperoxidase-modified LDL increase in cytokine release by endothelial and monocyte cells and by firing both local and systemic inflammation could induce atherogenesis and its development. PMID:17167545

  10. Phospho-dependent Accumulation of GABABRs at Presynaptic Terminals after NMDAR Activation.

    PubMed

    Hannan, Saad; Gerrow, Kim; Triller, Antoine; Smart, Trevor G

    2016-08-16

    Here, we uncover a mechanism for regulating the number of active presynaptic GABAB receptors (GABABRs) at nerve terminals, an important determinant of neurotransmitter release. We find that GABABRs gain access to axon terminals by lateral diffusion in the membrane. Their relative accumulation is dependent upon agonist activation and the presence of the two distinct sushi domains that are found only in alternatively spliced GABABR1a subunits. Following brief activation of NMDA receptors (NMDARs) using glutamate, GABABR diffusion is reduced, causing accumulation at presynaptic terminals in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner that involves phosphorylation of GABABR2 subunits at Ser783. This signaling cascade indicates how synaptically released glutamate can initiate, via a feedback mechanism, increased levels of presynaptic GABABRs that limit further glutamate release and excitotoxicity. PMID:27498877

  11. Tissue accumulation kinetics of ciclesonide-active metabolite and budesonide in mice.

    PubMed

    Mårs, Ulla; d'Argy, Roland; Hallbeck, Karin; Miller-Larsson, Anna; Edsbäcker, Staffan

    2013-06-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are mainstay treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, highly lipophilic ICS accumulate in systemic tissues, which may lead to adverse systemic effects. The accumulation of a new, highly lipophilic ICS, ciclesonide and its active metabolite (des-CIC) has not yet been reported. Here, we have compared tissue accumulation of des-CIC and an ICS of a moderate lipophilicity, budesonide (BUD), after 14 days of once-daily treatment in mice. Single, three or 14 daily doses of [(3) H]-des-CIC or [(3) H]-BUD were administered subcutaneously to male CD1 albino mice, which were killed at 4 hr, 24 hr or 5 days after the last dose. Distribution of tissue concentration of radioactivity was studied by quantitative whole-body autoradiography. Pattern of radioactivity distribution across most tissues was similar for both corticosteroids after a single as well as after repeated dosing. However, tissue concentration of radioactivity differed between des-CIC and BUD. After a single dose, concentrations of radioactivity for both corticosteroids were low for most tissues but increased over 14 days of daily dosing. The tissue radioactivity of des-CIC at 24 hr and 5 days after the 14th dose was 2-3 times higher than that of BUD in majority of tissues. Tissue accumulation, assessed as concentration of tissue radioactivity 5 days after the 14th versus 3rd dose, showed an average ratio of 5.2 for des-CIC and 2.7 for BUD (p < 0.0001). In conclusion, des-CIC accumulated significantly more than BUD. Systemic accumulation may lead to increased risk of adverse systemic side effects during long-term therapy. PMID:23256845

  12. Relationships among antibacterial activity, inhibition of DNA gyrase, and intracellular accumulation of 11 fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Bazile, S; Moreau, N; Bouzard, D; Essiz, M

    1992-01-01

    A series of 11 fluoroquinolone antibacterial agents, including 8 newly synthesized molecules and 3 reference compounds (pefloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and sparfloxacin), were tested for their MICs against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The intracellular accumulation of fluoroquinolones by these microorganisms was measured by centrifugation through silicone oil and a fluorescence assay. The minimal effective dose (MED) was determined for all agents in a supercoiling assay with E. coli DNA gyrase. The hydrophobicities of the quinolones were determined and expressed as the logarithm of the coefficient of distribution (log D) between 1-octanol and phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). No correlation was found between MICs and cell accumulation for the quinolones studied. A correlation was found between log D and accumulation by S. aureus (r = 0.71, n = 11), and an inverse correlation was found between log D and accumulation by E. coli (r = 0.73, n = 11) and P. aeruginosa (r = 0.64, n = 10). The correlation coefficients between MICs and MED for E. coli, which were 0.60, 0.64, and 0.74 (n = 11) for E. coli, P. aeruginosa, and S. aureus, respectively, rose to 0.85, 0.74, and 0.74 (n = 11) for the same microorganisms, respectively, when the accumulation of the drug by the cell was taken into account. It was concluded that the inhibitory activity against DNA gyrase remains the most important parameter for quinolone potency, but that intracellular accumulation must be taken into account, since, for a given organism, both parameters are under the control of the physicochemical properties of the quinolones. PMID:1336340

  13. Activation of AMPKα2 Is Not Required for Mitochondrial FAT/CD36 Accumulation during Exercise.

    PubMed

    Monaco, Cynthia; Whitfield, Jamie; Jain, Swati S; Spriet, Lawrence L; Bonen, Arend; Holloway, Graham P

    2015-01-01

    Exercise has been shown to induce the translocation of fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36), a fatty acid transport protein, to both plasma and mitochondrial membranes. While previous studies have examined signals involved in the induction of FAT/CD36 translocation to sarcolemmal membranes, to date the signaling events responsible for FAT/CD36 accumulation on mitochondrial membranes have not been investigated. In the current study muscle contraction rapidly increased FAT/CD36 on plasma membranes (7.5 minutes), while in contrast, FAT/CD36 only increased on mitochondrial membranes after 22.5 minutes of muscle contraction, a response that was exercise-intensity dependent. Considering that previous research has shown that AMP activated protein kinase (AMPK) α2 is not required for FAT/CD36 translocation to the plasma membrane, we investigated whether AMPK α2 signaling is necessary for mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. Administration of 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) induced AMPK phosphorylation, and resulted in FAT/CD36 accumulation on SS mitochondria, suggesting AMPK signaling may mediate this response. However, SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 increased following acute treadmill running in both wild-type (WT) and AMPKα 2 kinase dead (KD) mice. These data suggest that AMPK signaling is not required for SS mitochondrial FAT/CD36 accumulation. The current data also implicates alternative signaling pathways that are exercise-intensity dependent, as IMF mitochondrial FAT/CD36 content only occurred at a higher power output. Taken altogether the current data suggests that activation of AMPK signaling is sufficient but not required for exercise-induced accumulation in mitochondrial FAT/CD36. PMID:25965390

  14. Cellular Accumulation, Localization, and Activity of a Synthetic Cyclopeptamine in Fungi

    PubMed Central

    Capobianco, John O.; Zakula, Dorothy; Frost, David J.; Goldman, Robert C.; Li, Leping; Klein, Larry L.; Lartey, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A novel synthetic cyclopeptamine, A172013, rapidly accumulated by passive diffusion into Candida albicans CCH442. Drug influx could not be totally facilitated by the membrane-bound target, β-(1,3)-glucan synthase, since accumulation was unsaturable at drug concentrations up to 10 μg/ml (about 1.6 × 10−7 molecules/cell), or 25× MIC. About 55 and 23% of the cell-incorporated drug was associated with the cell wall and protoplasts, respectively. Isolated microsomes contained 95% of the protoplast-associated drug, which was fully active against glucan synthesis in vitro. Drug (0.1 μg/ml) accumulation was rapid and complete after 5 min in several fungi tested, including a lipopeptide/cyclopeptamine-resistant strain of C. albicans (LP3-1). The compound penetrated to comparable levels in both yeast and hyphal forms of C. albicans, and accumulation in Aspergillus niger was 20% that in C. albicans. These data indicated that drug-cell interactions were driven by the amphiphilic nature of the compound and that the cell wall served as a major drug reservoir. PMID:9527791

  15. Inhibition of Myeloperoxidase: Evaluation of 2H-Indazoles and 1H-Indazolones

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Aaron; Ott, Sean; Farber, Kelli M.; Palazzo, Teresa A.; Conrad, Wayne E.; Haddadin, Makhluf J.; Tantillo, Dean J.; Cross, Carroll E.; Eiserich, Jason P.; Kurth, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) produces hypohalous acids as a key component of the innate immune response; however, release of these acids extracellularly results in inflammatory cell and tissue damage. The two-step, one-pot Davis-Beirut reaction was used to synthesize a library of 2H-indazoles and 1H-indazolones as putative inhibitors of MPO. A structure-activity relationship study was undertaken wherein compounds were evaluated utilizing taurine-chloramine and MPO-mediated H2O2 consumption assays. Docking studies as well as toxicophore and Lipinski analyses were performed. Fourteen compounds were found to be potent inhibitors with IC50 values <1 μM, suggesting these compounds could be considered as potential modulators of pro-oxidative tissue injury pertubated by the inflammatory MPO:H2O2:HOCl/HOBr system. PMID:25438766

  16. Reactions of superoxide with myeloperoxidase and its products.

    PubMed

    Winterbourn, Christine C; Kettle, Anthony J

    2004-10-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) uses hydrogen peroxide to oxidize chloride to hypochlorous acid. It also converts numerous substrates to reactive free radicals. When released by neutrophils, the enzyme operates in the presence of a flux of superoxide. We show that superoxide has a profound influence on oxidative reactions catalysed by MPO. It reacts directly with the enzyme to modulate production of hypochlorous acid. Within neutrophil phagosomes, where MPO functions to kill micro-organisms, it may be the preferred substrate for the enzyme. Superoxide also reacts rapidly with radicals generated by MPO, e.g. from tyrosine and tyrosyl peptides. Initial products are organic peroxides. These species are likely to be toxic and contribute to the pathophysiological actions of MPO. PMID:15507767

  17. Myeloperoxidase and its contributory role in inflammatory vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lau, Denise; Baldus, Stephan

    2006-07-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein abundantly expressed in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMN), has long been viewed to function primarily as a bactericidal enzyme centrally linked to innate host defense. Recent observations now extend this perspective and suggest that MPO is profoundly involved in the regulation of cellular homeostasis and may play a central role in initiation and propagation of acute and chronic vascular inflammatory disease. For example, low levels of MPO-derived hypochlorous acid (HOCl) interfere with intracellular signaling events, MPO-dependent oxidation of lipoproteins modulates their affinity to macrophages and the vessel wall, MPO-mediated depletion of endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) impairs endothelium-dependent vasodilatation, and nitrotyrosine (NO(2)Tyr) formation by MPO sequestered into the vessel wall may affect matrix protein structure and function. Future studies are needed to further elucidate the significance of MPO in the development of acute and chronic vascular disease and to evaluate MPO as a potential target for treatment. PMID:16476484

  18. Role of Myeloperoxidase in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kisic, Bojana; Miric, Dijana; Dragojevic, Ilija; Rasic, Julijana; Popovic, Ljiljana

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a worldwide public health problem. Patients with CKD have a number of disorders in the organism, and the presence of oxidative stress and systemic inflammation in these patients is the subject of numerous studies. Chronic inflammation joined with oxidative stress contributes to the development of numerous complications: accelerated atherosclerosis process and cardiovascular disease, emergence of Type 2 diabetes mellitus, development of malnutrition, anaemia, hyperparathyroidism, and so forth, affecting the prognosis and quality of life of patients with CKD. In this review we presented the potential role of the myeloperoxidase enzyme in the production of reactive/chlorinating intermediates and their role in oxidative damage to biomolecules in the body of patients with chronic kidney disease and end-stage renal disease. In addition, we discussed the role of modified lipoprotein particles under the influence of prooxidant MPO intermediates in the development of endothelial changes and cardiovascular complications in renal failure. PMID:27127544

  19. Distinctive role of activated tumor-associated macrophages in photosensitizer accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-05-01

    Cells dissociated from tumors (carcinomas and sarcomas) growing subcutaneously in mice that have been administered Photofrin or other photosensitizers were analyzed by flow cytometry. Monoclonal antibodies were used for identification of major cellular populations contained in these tumors. The results demonstrate that a subpopulation of tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) is unique among tumor cell populations in that it excels in the accumulation of very high levels of photosensitizers. These macrophages showed an increased expression of interleukin 2 receptor, which is indicative of their activated state. since macrophages were reported to concentrate in the periphery of human neoplasms, it is suggested that activates TAMs are the determinants of tumor-localized photosensitizer fluorescence.

  20. Qushi Huayu Decoction Inhibits Hepatic Lipid Accumulation by Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qin; Gou, Xiao-jun; Meng, Sheng-xi; Huang, Cheng; Zhang, Yu-quan; Tang, Ya-jun; Wang, Wen-jing; Xu, Lin; Peng, Jing-hua; Hu, Yi-yang

    2013-01-01

    Qushi Huayu Decoction (QHD), a Chinese herbal formula, has been proven effective on alleviating nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in human and rats. The present study was conducted to investigate whether QHD could inhibit hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in vivo and in vitro. Nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) model was duplicated with high-fat diet in rats and with free fatty acid (FFA) in L02 cells. In in vivo experimental condition, QHD significantly decreased the accumulation of fatty droplets in livers, lowered low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c), alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) levels in serum. Moreover, QHD supplementation reversed the HFD-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) and decreased hepatic nuclear protein expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) and carbohydrate-responsive element-binding protein (ChREBP) in the liver. In in vitro, QHD-containing serum decreased the cellular TG content and alleviated the accumulation of fatty droplets in L02 cells. QHD supplementation reversed the FFA-induced decrease in the phosphorylation levels of AMPK and ACC and decreased the hepatic nuclear protein expression of SREBP-1 and ChREBP. Overall results suggest that QHD has significant effect on inhibiting hepatic lipid accumulation via AMPK pathway in vivo and in vitro. PMID:23573117

  1. Effect of acetic acid on lipid accumulation by glucose-fed activated sludge cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Mondala, Andro; Hernandez, Rafael; French, Todd; McFarland, Linda; Sparks, Darrell; Holmes, William; Haque, Monica

    2012-01-01

    The effect of acetic acid, a lignocellulose hydrolysis by-product, on lipid accumulation by activated sludge cultures grown on glucose was investigated. This was done to assess the possible application of lignocellulose as low-cost and renewable fermentation substrates for biofuel feedstock production. Results: Biomass yield was reduced by around 54% at a 2 g L -1 acetic acid dosage but was increased by around 18% at 10 g L -1 acetic acid dosage relative to the control run. The final gravimetric lipid contents at 2 and 10 g L -1 acetic acid levels were 12.5 + 0.7% and 8.8 + 3.2% w/w, respectively, which were lower than the control (17.8 + 2.8% w/w). However, biodiesel yields from activated sludge grown with acetic acid (5.6 + 0.6% w/w for 2 g L -1 acetic acid and 4.2 + 3.0% w/w for 10 g L -1 acetic acid) were higher than in raw activated sludge (1-2% w/w). The fatty acid profiles of the accumulated lipids were similar with conventional plant oil biodiesel feedstocks. Conclusions: Acetic acid enhanced biomass production by activated sludge at high levels but reduced lipid production. Further studies are needed to enhance acetic acid utilization by activated sludge microorganisms for lipid biosynthesis.

  2. Plasma membrane overgrowth causes fibrotic collagen accumulation and immune activation in Drosophila adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zang, Yiran; Wan, Ming; Liu, Min; Ke, Hongmei; Ma, Shuangchun; Liu, Lu-Ping; Ni, Jian-Quan; Pastor-Pareja, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Many chronic diseases are associated with fibrotic deposition of Collagen and other matrix proteins. Little is known about the factors that determine preferential onset of fibrosis in particular tissues. Here we show that plasma membrane (PM) overgrowth causes pericellular Collagen accumulation in Drosophila adipocytes. We found that loss of Dynamin and other endocytic components causes pericellular trapping of outgoing Collagen IV due to dramatic cortex expansion when endocytic removal of PM is prevented. Deposits also form in the absence of negative Toll immune regulator Cactus, excess PM being caused in this case by increased secretion. Finally, we show that trimeric Collagen accumulation, downstream of Toll or endocytic defects, activates a tissue damage response. Our work indicates that traffic imbalances and PM topology may contribute to fibrosis. It also places fibrotic deposits both downstream and upstream of immune signaling, consistent with the chronic character of fibrotic diseases. PMID:26090908

  3. Myeloperoxidase evokes substantial vasomotor responses in isolated skeletal muscle arterioles of the rat

    PubMed Central

    Csató, V; Pető, A; Fülöp, G Á; Rutkai, I; Pásztor, E T; Fagyas, M; Kalász, J; Édes, I; Tóth, A; Papp, Z

    2015-01-01

    Aims Myeloperoxidase (MPO) catalyses the formation of a wide variety of oxidants, including hypochlorous acid (HOCl), and contributes to cardiovascular disease progression. We hypothesized that during its action MPO evokes substantial vasomotor responses. Methods Following exposure to MPO (1.92 mU mL−1) in the presence of increasing concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), changes in arteriolar diameter of isolated gracilis skeletal muscle arterioles (SMAs) and coronary arterioles (CAs) and in the isometric force in basilar arteries (BAs) of the rat were monitored. Results Myeloperoxidase increased vascular tone to different degrees in CAs, SMAs and BAs. The mechanism of increased vasoconstriction was studied in detail in SMAs. MPO-evoked vasoconstrictions were prevented by the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzhydrazide (50 μm), by endothelium removal in the SMAs. Surprisingly, the HOCl scavenger L-methionine (100 μm), the thromboxane A2 (TXA2) antagonist SQ-29548 (1 μm) or the non-specific cyclooxygenase (COX) antagonist indomethacin (1 μm) converted the MPO-evoked vasoconstrictions to pronounced vasodilations in SMAs, not seen in the presence of H2O2. In contrast to noradrenaline-induced vasoconstrictions, the MPO-evoked vasoconstrictions were not accompanied by significant increases in arteriolar [Ca2+] levels in SMAs. Conclusion These data showed that H2O2-derived HOCl to be a potent vasoconstrictor upon MPO application. HOCl activated the COX pathway, causing the synthesis and release of a TXA2-like substance to increase the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus in vascular smooth muscle cells and thereby to augment H2O2-evoked vasoconstrictions. Nevertheless, inhibition of the HOCl–COX–TXA2 pathway unmasked the effects of additional MPO-derived radicals with a marked vasodilatory potential in SMAs. PMID:25760778

  4. RIM Promotes Calcium Channel Accumulation at Active Zones of the Drosophila Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Graf, Ethan R.; Valakh, Vera; Wright, Christina M.; Wu, Chunlai; Liu, Zhihua; Zhang, Yong Q.; DiAntonio, Aaron

    2012-01-01

    Summary Synaptic communication requires the controlled release of synaptic vesicles from presynaptic axon terminals. Release efficacy is regulated by the many proteins that comprise the presynaptic release apparatus, including Ca2+ channels and proteins that influence Ca2+ channel accumulation at release sites. Here we identify Drosophila RIM and demonstrate that it localizes to active zones at the larval neuromuscular junction. In Drosophila RIM mutants, there is a large decrease in evoked synaptic transmission, due to a significant reduction in both the clustering of Ca2+ channels and the size of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles at active zones. Hence, RIM plays an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating synaptic calcium channel localization and readily releasable pool size. Since RIM has traditionally been studied as an effector of Rab3 function, we investigate whether RIM is involved in the newly identified function of Rab3 in the distribution of presynaptic release machinery components across release sites. Bruchpilot (Brp), an essential component of the active zone cytomatrix T bar, is unaffected by RIM disruption, indicating that Brp localization and distribution across active zones does not require wild type RIM. In addition, larvae containing mutations in both RIM and rab3 have reduced Ca2+ channel levels and a Brp distribution that is very similar to that of the rab3 single mutant, indicating that RIM functions to regulate Ca2+ channel accumulation but is not a Rab3 effector for release machinery distribution across release sites. PMID:23175814

  5. Potassium activation of [3H]-choline accumulation by isolated sympathetic ganglia of the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Higgins, A. J.; Neal, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    1 The effect of K-depolarization on the uptake of low and high concentrations of [3H]-choline by isolated superior sympathetic ganglia of the rat has been studied. 2 In unstimulated ganglia, the uptake of [3H]-choline (0.1 microM) ('high affinity uptake') was unaffected by denervation or by hemicholinium-3 (HC-3), suggesting uptake by structures other than cholinergic nerve terminals. 3 K-depolarization of the ganglia increased [3H]-choline accumulation by the high affinity uptake process but in contrast the 'low affinity' accumulation of [3H]-choline (100 microM) was decreased. 4 The K-activated, 'high affinity' component of choline uptake was highly sodium-dependent, inhibited by HC-3, and was abolished by denervation. 5 In incubation conditions designed to prevent transmitter release (Ca-free medium and high-Mg medium), the K-activated uptake of [3H]-choline was abolished. 6 It is concluded that in unstimulated ganglia, there is little choline uptake by nerve terminals. However, when the terminals are depolarized, choline uptake is increased by the activation of a sodium-dependent, HC-3-sensitive transport process. The activation of this uptake process is apparently associated with the release of acetylcholine from the terminals, or by changes in ionic fluxes, and not by the depolarization per se. PMID:7150866

  6. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H+-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha. However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H+-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H+-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H+-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H+-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  7. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kremserova, Silvie; Perecko, Tomas; Soucek, Karel; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P; Kubala, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site. PMID:26998194

  8. Lung Neutrophilia in Myeloperoxidase Deficient Mice during the Course of Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kremserova, Silvie; Perecko, Tomas; Soucek, Karel; Klinke, Anna; Baldus, Stephan; Eiserich, Jason P.; Kubala, Lukas

    2016-01-01

    Systemic inflammation accompanying diseases such as sepsis affects primarily lungs and induces their failure. This remains the most common cause of sepsis induced mortality. While neutrophils play a key role in pulmonary failure, the mechanisms remain incompletely characterized. We report that myeloperoxidase (MPO), abundant enzyme in neutrophil granules, modulates the course of acute pulmonary inflammatory responses induced by intranasal application of lipopolysaccharide. MPO deficient mice had significantly increased numbers of airway infiltrated neutrophils compared to wild-type mice during the whole course of lung inflammation. This was accompanied by higher levels of RANTES in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the MPO deficient mice. Other markers of lung injury and inflammation, which contribute to recruitment of neutrophils into the inflamed lungs, including total protein and other selected proinflammatory cytokines did not significantly differ in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from the wild-type and the MPO deficient mice. Interestingly, MPO deficient neutrophils revealed a decreased rate of cell death characterized by phosphatidylserine surface expression. Collectively, the importance of MPO in regulation of pulmonary inflammation, independent of its putative microbicidal functions, can be potentially linked to MPO ability to modulate the life span of neutrophils and to affect accumulation of chemotactic factors at the inflammatory site. PMID:26998194

  9. Endogenous nitric oxide accumulation is involved in the antifungal activity of Shikonin against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Liao, Zebin; Yan, Yu; Dong, Huaihuai; Zhu, Zhenyu; Jiang, Yuanying; Cao, Yingying

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of nitric oxide (NO) in the antifungal activity of Shikonin (SK) against Candida albicans (C. albicans) and to clarify the underlying mechanism. The results showed that the NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) and L-arginine could enhance the antifungal activity of SK, whereas the NO production inhibitor Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) attenuated antifungal action. Using the fluorescent dye 3-amino,4-aminomethyl-2', 7-difluorescein, diacetate (DAF-FM DA), we found that the accumulation of NO in C. albicans was increased markedly by SK in a time- and dose-dependent manner. In addition, the results of real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) demonstrated that the transcription level of YHB1 in C. albicans was greatly increased upon incubation of SK. Consistently, the YHB1-null mutant (yhb1Δ/Δ) exhibited a higher susceptibility to SK than wild-type cells. In addition, although the transcription level of CTA4 in C. albicans was not significantly changed when exposed to SK, the CTA4-null mutant (cta4Δ/Δ) was more susceptible to SK. Collectively, SK is the agent found to execute its antifungal activity directly via endogenous NO accumulation, and NO-mediated damage is related to the suppression of YHB1 and the function of CTA4. PMID:27530748

  10. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. 13C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using 3H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  11. Intracellular Accumulation of Glycine in Polyphosphate-Accumulating Organisms in Activated Sludge, a Novel Storage Mechanism under Dynamic Anaerobic-Aerobic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hien Thi Thu; Kristiansen, Rikke; Vestergaard, Mette; Wimmer, Reinhard; Nielsen, Per Halkjær

    2015-07-01

    Dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions are applied to wastewater treatment plants to select polyphosphate-accumulating organisms to carry out enhanced biological phosphorus removal. Acetate is a well-known substrate to stimulate this process, and here we show that different amino acids also are suitable substrates, with glycine as the most promising. (13)C-labeled glycine and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were applied to investigate uptake and potential storage products when activated sludge was fed with glycine under anaerobic conditions. Glycine was consumed by the biomass, and the majority was stored intracellularly as free glycine and fermentation products. Subsequently, in the aerobic phase without addition of external substrate, the stored glycine was consumed. The uptake of glycine and oxidation of intracellular metabolites took place along with a release and uptake of orthophosphate, respectively. Fluorescence in situ hybridization combined with microautoradiography using (3)H-labeled glycine revealed uncultured actinobacterial Tetrasphaera as a dominant glycine consumer. Experiments with Tetrasphaera elongata as representative of uncultured Tetrasphaera showed that under anaerobic conditions it was able to take up labeled glycine and accumulate this and other labeled metabolites to an intracellular concentration of approximately 4 mM. All components were consumed under subsequent aerobic conditions. Intracellular accumulation of amino acids seems to be a novel storage strategy for polyphosphate-accumulating bacteria under dynamic anaerobic-aerobic feast-famine conditions. PMID:25956769

  12. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation and diamine oxidase activity in pea root nodules under aluminum stress.

    PubMed

    Sujkowska-Rybkowska, Marzena; Borucki, Wojciech

    2014-02-01

    Aluminum (Al) is one of the environmental stressors that induces formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants. Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and H2O2-generated apoplast diamine oxidase (DAO) activity were detected cytochemically via transmission electron microscopy (TEM), in pea (Pisum sativum L.) root nodules exposed to high (50 μM AlCl3, for 2 and 24h) Al stress. The nodules were shown to respond to Al stress by disturbances in infection thread (IT) growth, bacteria endocytosis, premature degeneration of bacteroidal tissue and generation of H2O2 in nodule apoplast. Large amounts of peroxide were found at the same sites as high DAO activity under Al stress, suggesting that DAO is a major source of Al-induced peroxide accumulation in the nodules. Peroxide distribution and DAO activity in the nodules of both control plants and Al-treated ones were typically found in the plant cell walls, intercellular spaces and infection threads. However, 2 h Al treatment increased DAO activity and peroxide accumulation in the nodule apoplast and bacteria within threads. A prolonged Al treatment (24 h) increased the H2O2 content and DAO activity in the nodule apoplast, especially in the thread walls, matrix and bacteria within infection threads. In addition to ITs, prematurely degenerated bacteroids, which occurred in response to Al, were associated with intense staining for H2O2 and DAO activity. These results suggest the involvement of DAO in the production of a large amount of H2O2 in the nodule apoplast under Al stress. The role of reactive oxygen species in pea-Rhizobium symbiosis under Al stress is discussed. PMID:24246127

  13. Structure-activity relationships of oligo-beta-glucoside elicitors of phytoalexin accumulation in soybean.

    PubMed Central

    Cheong, J J; Birberg, W; Fügedi, P; Pilotti, A; Garegg, P J; Hong, N; Ogawa, T; Hahn, M G

    1991-01-01

    The abilities of a family of chemically synthesized oligo-beta-glucosides, ranging in size from hexamer to decamer, to induce phytoalexin accumulation in soybean cotyledons were investigated to determine which structural elements of the oligoglucosides are important for their biological activity. The results of the biological assays established that the following structural motif is necessary for the oligo-beta-glucosides to have high elicitor activity: [formula; see text] The branched trisaccharide at the nonreducing end of the oligoglucosides was found to be essential for maximum elicitor activity. Substitution of either the nonreducing terminal backbone glucosyl residue or the side-chain glucosyl residue closest to the nonreducing end with glucosaminyl or N-acetylglucosaminyl residues reduced the elicitor activity of the oligoglucosides between 10-fold and 10,000-fold. Elicitor activity was also reduced 1000-fold if the two side-chain glucosyl residues were attached to adjacent backbone glucosyl residues rather than to glucosyl residues separated by an unbranched residue. In contrast, modifications of the reducing terminal glucosyl residue of an elicitor-active hepta-beta-glucoside by conjugation with tyramine and subsequent iodination had no significant effect on the elicitor activity of the hepta-beta-glucoside. These results demonstrate that oligo-beta-glucosides must have a specific structure to trigger the signal transduction pathway, which ultimately leads to the de novo synthesis of phytoalexins in soybean. PMID:1840904

  14. Effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the neutrophil myeloperoxidase system of horses.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Grégory; Franck, Thierry; Joris, Jean; Ceusters, Justine; Mouithys-Mickalad, Ange; Serteyn, Didier; Sandersen, Charlotte

    2015-05-15

    Volatile anaesthestics have shown to modulate the oxidative response of polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs). We investigated the effects of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the degranulation of total and active myeloperoxidase (MPO) from horse PMNs and their direct interaction with MPO activity. Whole blood from horse was incubated in 1 and 2 minimal alveolar concentrations (MAC) of isoflurane or sevoflurane for 1h and PMNs were stimulated with cytochalasin B (CB) plus N-formyl-méthionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (fMLP). After stimulation, the plasma was collected to measure total and active MPO by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and specific immunological extraction followed by enzymatic detection (SIEFED) respectively. The effects of 1 and 2 MAC of isoflurane and sevoflurane on the peroxidase and chlorination activity of pure MPO were assessed by fluorescence using Amplex red and 3'-(p-aminophenyl) fluorescein (APF) respectively and in parallel with a SIEFED assay to estimate the potential interaction of the anaesthetics with the enzyme. Although isoflurane and sevoflurane had inconsistent effects on total MPO release, both volatile agents reduced active MPO release and showed a direct inhibition on the peroxidase and the chlorination activity of the enzyme. A persistent interaction between MPO and anaesthetics was evidenced with isoflurane but not with sevoflurane. PMID:25796094

  15. Elucidating further phylogenetic diversity among the Defluviicoccus-related glycogen-accumulating organisms in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    McIlroy, Simon; Seviour, Robert J

    2009-12-01

    Glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAO) are thought to out-compete the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAO) in activated sludge communities removing phosphate (P). Two GAO groups are currently recognized, the gammaproteobacterial Candidatus'Competibacter phosphatis', and the alphaproteobacterial Defluviicoccus vanus-related tetrad forming organisms (TFOs). Both are phylogenetically diverse based on their 16S rRNA sequences, with the latter currently considered to contain members falling into three distinct clusters. This paper identifies members of an additional fourth Defluviicoccus cluster from 16S rRNA gene clone library data obtained from a laboratory-scale activated sludge plant community removing P, and details FISH probes designed against them. Probe DF181A was designed to target a single sequence and DF181B designed against the remaining sequences in the cluster. Cells hybridizing with these probes in the biomass samples tested always appeared as either TFOs or in large clusters of small cocci. Members of the Defluviicoccus-related organisms were commonly found in full-scale wastewater treatments plants, sometimes as a dominant population. PMID:23765935

  16. Manganese accumulation in yeast cells. Electron-spin-resonance characterization and superoxide dismutase activity.

    PubMed

    Galiazzo, F; Pedersen, J Z; Civitareale, P; Schiesser, A; Rotilio, G

    1989-01-01

    Manganese accumulation was studied by room-temperature electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in the presence of increasing amounts of MnSO4. Mn2+ retention was nearly linear in intact cells for fractions related to both low-molecular-mass and macromolecular complexes ('free' and 'bound' Mn2+, respectively). A deviation from linearity was observed in cell extracts between the control value and 0.1 mM Mn2+, indicating more efficient accumulation at low Mn2+ concentrations. The difference in slopes between the two straight lines describing Mn2+ retention at concentrations lower and higher than 0.1 mM, respectively, was quite large for the free Mn2+ fraction. Furthermore it was unaffected by subsequent dialyses of the extracts, showing stable retention in the form of low-molecular-mass complexes. In contrast, the slope of the line describing retention of 'bound' Mn2+ at concentrations higher than 0.1 mM became less steep after subsequent dialyses of the cell extracts. This result indicates that the macromolecule-bound Mn2+ was essentially associated with particulate structures. In contrast to Cu2+, Mn2+ had no effect on the major enzyme activities involved in oxygen metabolism except for a slight increase of cyanide-resistant Mn-superoxide dismutase activity, due to dialyzable Mn2+ complexes. PMID:2562042

  17. Myeloperoxidase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Production and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sabrina Sayori; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; de Araújo, Tomaz Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Campa, Ana; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important enzyme in the front-line protection against microorganisms. In peripheral blood, it is accepted that MPO is only produced by myeloid-lineage cells. Thus, MPO presence is unexpected in lymphocytes. We showed recently that B1-lymphocytes from mice have MPO. Here, we showed that subsets of human peripheral B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes express MPO. The content of MPO in lymphocytes was very low compared to neutrophils/monocytes with a preferential distribution in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Also, we performed a MPO mRNA expression analysis from human blood cells derived from microarray raw data publicly available, showing that MPO is modulated in infectious disease. MPO was increased in CD4(+) T lymphocytes from HIV chronic infection and in CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HCV-positive patients. Our study points out MPO as a multifunctional protein due to its subcellular localization and expression modulation in lymphocytes indicating alternative unknown functions for MPO in lymphocytes. PMID:26632272

  18. Rapid Changes on Sediment Accumulation Rates within Submarine Canyons Caused By Bottom Trawling Activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Masque, P.; Martin, J.; Paradis, S.; Juan, X.; Toro, M.; Palanques, A.

    2014-12-01

    The physical disturbance of the marine sedimentary environments by commercial bottom trawling is a matter of concern. The direct physical effects of this fishing technique include scraping and ploughing of the seabed and increases of the near-bottom water turbidity by sediment resuspension. However, the quantification of the sediment that has been resuspended by this anthropogenic activity over years and has been ultimately exported across the margin remains largely unaddressed. The analysis of sediment accumulation rates from sediment cores collected along the axes of several submarine canyons in the Catalan margin (northwestern Mediterranean) has allowed to estimate the contribution of this anthropogenic activity to the present-day sediment dynamics. 210Pb chronologies, occasionally supported by 137Cs dating, indicate a rapid increase of sediment accumulation rates since the 1970s, in coincidence with a strong impulse in the industrialization of the trawling fleets of this region. Such increase has been associated to the enhanced delivery of sediment resuspended by trawlers from the shelves and upper slope regions towards the canyon's interior, and to the rapid technical development at that time, in terms of engine power and gear size. This change has been observed in La Fonera (or Palamós) Canyon at depths greater than 1700 m, while in other canyons it is restricted to shallower regions (~1000 m in depth) closer to fishing grounds. Two sampling sites from La Fonera and Foix submarine canyons that exhibited high sediment accumulation rates (0.6-0.7 cm/y) were reoccupied several years after the first chronological analyses. These two new cores reveal a second and more rapid increase of sediment accumulation rates in both canyons occurring circa 2002 and accounting for about 2 cm/y. This second change at the beginning of the XXI century has been attributed to a preferential displacement of the trawling fleet towards slope fishing grounds surrounding submarine

  19. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3'-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects.

    PubMed

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3'-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community. PMID:27274868

  20. Dual Functionality of Myeloperoxidase in Rotenone-Exposed Brain-Resident Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chi Young; Song, Mi Jeon; Jeon, Sae-Bom; Yoon, Hee Jung; Lee, Dae Kee; Kim, In-Hoo; Suk, Kyungho; Choi, Dong-Kug; Park, Eun Jung

    2011-01-01

    Rotenone exposure has emerged as an environmental risk factor for inflammation-associated neurodegenerative diseases. However, the underlying mechanisms responsible for the harmful effects of rotenone in the brain remain poorly understood. Herein, we report that myeloperoxidase (MPO) may have a potential regulatory role in rotenone-exposed brain-resident immune cells. We show that microglia, unlike neurons, do not undergo death; instead, they exhibit distinctive activated properties under rotenone-exposed conditions. Once activated by rotenone, microglia show increased production of reactive oxygen species, particularly HOCl. Notably, MPO, an HOCl-producing enzyme that is undetectable under normal conditions, is significantly increased after exposure to rotenone. MPO-exposed glial cells also display characteristics of activated cells, producing proinflammatory cytokines and increasing their phagocytic activity. Interestingly, our studies with MPO inhibitors and MPO-knockout mice reveal that MPO deficiency potentiates, rather than inhibits, the rotenone-induced activated state of glia and promotes glial cell death. Furthermore, rotenone-triggered neuronal injury was more apparent in co-cultures with glial cells from Mpo−/− mice than in those from wild-type mice. Collectively, our data provide evidence that MPO has dual functionality under rotenone-exposed conditions, playing a critical regulatory role in modulating pathological and protective events in the brain. PMID:21704008

  1. Failure of Neuroprotection Despite Microglial Suppression by Delayed-Start Myeloperoxidase Inhibition in a Model of Advanced Multiple System Atrophy: Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Kaindlstorfer, Christine; Sommer, Patrick; Georgievska, Biljana; Mather, Robert J; Kugler, Alan R; Poewe, Werner; Wenning, Gregor K; Stefanova, Nadia

    2015-10-01

    Multiple system atrophy (MSA) is a rapidly progressive neurodegenerative disease. Post-mortem hallmarks of MSA neuropathology include oligodendroglial α-synuclein (αSYN) inclusions, striatonigral degeneration, olivopontocerebellar atrophy, and increased microglial activation that accompanies the wide spread neurodegeneration. Recently, we demonstrated upregulation of myeloperoxidase (MPO) in activated microglia and provided evidence for the role of microglial MPO in the mediation of MSA-like neurodegeneration (Stefanova et al. Neurotox Res 21:393-404, 2015). The aim of the current study was to assess the therapeutic potency of MPO inhibition (MPOi) in a model of advanced MSA. We replicated the advanced pathology of MSA by intoxicating transgenic PLP-α-synuclein transgenic mice with 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP). After onset of the full-blown pathology, MSA mice received either MPOi or vehicle over 3 weeks. Motor phenotype and neuropathology were analyzed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of MPOi compared to vehicle treatment in MSA mice. MPOi therapy initiated after the onset of severe MSA-like neuropathology in mice failed to attenuate motor impairments and neuronal loss within the striatum, substantia nigra pars compacta, inferior olives, pontine nuclei, and cerebellar cortex. However, we observed a significant reduction of microglial activation in degenerating brain areas. Further, nitrated αSYN accumulation was reduced in the striatonigral region. In summary, delayed-start MPOi treatment reduced microglial activation and levels of nitrated αSYN in a mouse model of advanced MSA. These effects failed to impact on motor impairments and neuronal loss in contrast to previously reported disease modifying efficacy of early-start therapy with MPOi in MSA. PMID:26194617

  2. Pulmonary fibrosis—an uncommon manifestation of anti-myeloperoxidase-positive systemic vasculitis?

    PubMed Central

    Bhanji, Amir; Karim, Mahzuz

    2010-01-01

    Small vessel vasculitides such as microscopic polyangiitis and Wegener’s granulomatosis commonly involve the kidney and lung, with alveolar haemorrhage being the commonest manifestation of pulmonary involvement. Here we describe a patient who developed acute renal failure and pulmonary haemorrhage with positive autoantibodies against myeloperoxidase 1 year after a diagnosis of usual interstitial pneumonia had been made and we discuss the uncommon association of pulmonary fibrosis and anti-myeloperoxidase positive vasculitis. PMID:20640181

  3. Reactive oxidants and myeloperoxidase and their involvement in neutrophil extracellular traps.

    PubMed

    Parker, Heather; Winterbourn, Christine C

    2012-01-01

    Neutrophils release extracellular traps (NETs) in response to a variety of inflammatory stimuli. These structures are composed of a network of chromatin strands associated with a variety of neutrophil-derived proteins including the enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO). Studies into the mechanisms leading to the formation of NETs indicate a complex process that differs according to the stimulus. With some stimuli an active nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase is required. However, assigning specific reactive oxygen species involved downstream of the oxidase is a difficult task and definitive proof for any single oxidant is still lacking. Pharmacological inhibition of MPO and the use of MPO-deficient neutrophils indicate active MPO is required with phorbol myristate acetate as a stimulus but not necessarily with bacteria. Reactive oxidants and MPO may also play a role in NET-mediated microbial killing. MPO is present on NETs and maintains activity at this site. Therefore, MPO has the potential to generate reactive oxidants in close proximity to trapped microorganisms and thus effect microbial killing. This brief review discusses current evidence for the involvement of reactive oxidants and MPO in NET formation and their potential contribution to NET antimicrobial activity. PMID:23346086

  4. Myeloperoxidase Deletion Prevents High-Fat Diet–Induced Obesity and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qilong; Xie, Zhonglin; Zhang, Wencheng; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Yue; Zhang, Miao; Zhu, Huaiping

    2014-01-01

    Activation of myeloperoxidase (MPO), a heme protein primarily expressed in granules of neutrophils, is associated with the development of obesity. However, whether MPO mediates high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance remains to be determined. Here, we found that consumption of an HFD resulted in neutrophil infiltration and enhanced MPO expression and activity in epididymal white adipose tissue, with an increase in body weight gain and impaired insulin signaling. MPO knockout (MPO−/−) mice were protected from HFD-enhanced body weight gain and insulin resistance. The MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide reduced peroxidase activity of neutrophils and prevented HFD-enhanced insulin resistance. MPO deficiency caused high body temperature via upregulation of uncoupling protein-1 and mitochondrial oxygen consumption in brown adipose tissue. Lack of MPO also attenuated HFD-induced macrophage infiltration and expression of proinflammatory cytokines. We conclude that activation of MPO in adipose tissue contributes to the development of obesity and obesity-associated insulin resistance. Inhibition of MPO may be a potential strategy for prevention and treatment of obesity and insulin resistance. PMID:25024373

  5. Functional UQCRC1 polymorphisms affect promoter activity and body lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kunej, Tanja; Wang, Zeping; Michal, Jennifer J; Daniels, Tyler F; Magnuson, Nancy S; Jiang, Zhihua

    2007-12-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes constitute leading public health problems worldwide. Studies have shown that insulin resistance affiliated with these conditions is associated with skeletal muscle lipid accumulation, while the latter is associated with mitochondrial dysfunctions. However, the initiation and regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis rely heavily on approximately 1000 nuclear-encoded mitochondrial regulatory proteins. In this study, we targeted the ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein I gene, a nuclear-encoded component of mitochondrial complex III, for its association with subcutaneous fat depth (SFD) and skeletal muscle lipid accumulation (SMLA) using cattle as a model. Four promoter polymorphisms were identified and genotyped on approximately 250 Wagyu x Limousin F2 progeny. Statistical analysis revealed that two completely linked polymorphic sites, g.13487C>T and g.13709G>C (r2 = 1), were significantly associated with both SFD (p < 0.01) and SMLA (p < 0.0001). The difference between TTCC and CCGG haplotypes was 0.178 cm for SFD and 0.624 scores for SMLA. Interestingly, the former haplotype produced higher promoter activities than the latter by 43% to 49% in three cell lines (p < 0.05). In addition to Rett syndrome and breast/ovarian cancer observed in other studies, we report evidence for the first time, to our knowledge, that overexpression of ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase core protein I might affect mitochondrial morphology and/or physiology and lead to development of obesity and related conditions. PMID:18198295

  6. Why do movements drift in the dark? Passive versus active mechanisms of error accumulation.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Brendan D; de la Malla, Cristina; López-Moliner, Joan

    2015-07-01

    When vision of the hand is unavailable, movements drift systematically away from their targets. It is unclear, however, why this drift occurs. We investigated whether drift is an active process, in which people deliberately modify their movements based on biased position estimates, causing the real hand to move away from the real target location, or a passive process, in which execution error accumulates because people have diminished sensory feedback and fail to adequately compensate for the execution error. In our study participants reached back and forth between two targets when vision of the hand, targets, or both the hand and targets was occluded. We observed the most drift when hand vision and target vision were occluded and equivalent amounts of drift when either hand vision or target vision was occluded. In a second experiment, we observed movement drift even when no visual target was ever present, providing evidence that drift is not driven by a visual-proprioceptive discrepancy. The observed drift in both experiments was consistent with a model of passive error accumulation in which the amount of drift is determined by the precision of the sensory estimate of movement error. PMID:25925317

  7. A review on soil carbon accumulation due to the management change of major Brazilian agricultural activities.

    PubMed

    La Scala jr, N; De Figueiredo, E B; Panosso, A R

    2012-08-01

    Agricultural areas deal with enormous CO2 intake fluxes offering an opportunity for greenhouse effect mitigation. In this work we studied the potential of soil carbon sequestration due to the management conversion in major agricultural activities in Brazil. Data from several studies indicate that in soybean/maize, and related rotation systems, a significant soil carbon sequestration was observed over the year of conversion from conventional to no-till practices, with a mean rate of 0.41 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1). The same effect was observed in sugarcane fields, but with a much higher accumulation of carbon in soil stocks, when sugarcane fields are converted from burned to mechanised based harvest, where large amounts of sugarcane residues remain on the soil surface (1.8 Mg C ha(-1) year(-1)). The higher sequestration potential of sugarcane crops, when compared to the others, has a direct relation to the primary production of this crop. Nevertheless, much of this mitigation potential of soil carbon accumulation in sugarcane fields is lost once areas are reformed, or intensive tillage is applied. Pasture lands have shown soil carbon depletion once natural areas are converted to livestock use, while integration of those areas with agriculture use has shown an improvement in soil carbon stocks. Those works have shown that the main crop systems of Brazil have a huge mitigation potential, especially in soil carbon form, being an opportunity for future mitigation strategies. PMID:23011303

  8. Hypericin-based photodynamic therapy: antitumor activity, accumulation potential, and induced cell death pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luksiene, Zivile; Vaitkuviene, Aurelija

    2004-09-01

    In this study the main interest was focused on the to investigation the photodynamic efficacy of hypericin, three other photosensitizers and 5 aminolevulinic acid-induced protopofirin IX in their ability to block the growth of rather aggressive tumor - Ehrlich ascite carcinoma in mice as well as Reh cells in humans (B-leukemia). Hypericin was found to exhibit the highest phototoxicity and antitumor activity in treating Ehrlich ascite carcinoma. The different photosensitizers were ranked as follows: Hypericin > hematoporphyrin dimethyl ether > Photofrin II > meso-tetra (para-sulfophenyl)porphin > 5-aminolevulinic acid. The most important is that just after Hyp-based photodynamic therapy 75% of mice survived a 4 month-period, and no recurrence of tumor within this period was detected in 25% of the treated mice. The clear cut correlation observed between intracellular dye concentration in the tumor cells and efficiency of photodynamic therapy, supports the idea that the intracellular accumulation of the photosensitizer is one of the most important factors in determining the benefit of photodynamic therapy. Hence, the accumulation of the photosensitizer in the tumor cells should be considered as one of the prognostic factors for the determination of the therapeutic outcome. Eventually, one of the most significant result is that hypericin is effective photosensitizer for human B-leukemia cells and induces apoptosis after photosensitization.

  9. WIN1, a transcriptional activator of epidermal wax accumulation in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Broun, Pierre; Poindexter, Patricia; Osborne, Erin; Jiang, Cai-Zhong; Riechmann, José Luis

    2004-01-01

    Epicuticular wax forms a layer of hydrophobic material on plant aerial organs, which constitutes a protective barrier between the plant and its environment. We report here the identification of WIN1, an Arabidopsis thaliana ethylene response factor-type transcription factor, which can activate wax deposition in overexpressing plants. We constitutively expressed WIN1 in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, and found that leaf epidermal wax accumulation was up to 4.5-fold higher in these plants than in control plants. A significant increase was also found in stems. Interestingly, ≈50% of the additional wax could only be released by complete lipid extractions, suggesting that not all of the wax is superficial. Gene expression analysis indicated that a number of genes, such as CER1, KCS1, and CER2, which are known to be involved in wax biosynthesis, were induced in WIN1 overexpressors. This observation indicates that induction of wax accumulation in transgenic plants is probably mediated through an increase in the expression of genes encoding enzymes of the wax biosynthesis pathway. PMID:15070782

  10. Accumulation of Exogenous Activated TGF-β in the Superficial Zone of Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    Albro, Michael B.; Nims, Robert J.; Cigan, Alexander D.; Yeroushalmi, Kevin J.; Alliston, Tamara; Hung, Clark T.; Ateshian, Gerard A.

    2013-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that mechanical shearing of synovial fluid (SF), induced during joint motion, rapidly activates latent transforming growth factor β (TGF-β). This discovery raised the possibility of a physiological process consisting of latent TGF-β supply to SF, activation via shearing, and transport of TGF-β into the cartilage matrix. Therefore, the two primary objectives of this investigation were to characterize the secretion rate of latent TGF-β into SF, and the transport of active TGF-β across the articular surface and into the cartilage layer. Experiments on tissue explants demonstrate that high levels of latent TGF-β1 are secreted from both the synovium and all three articular cartilage zones (superficial, middle, and deep), suggesting that these tissues are capable of continuously replenishing latent TGF-β to SF. Furthermore, upon exposure of cartilage to active TGF-β1, the peptide accumulates in the superficial zone (SZ) due to the presence of an overwhelming concentration of nonspecific TGF-β binding sites in the extracellular matrix. Although this response leads to high levels of active TGF-β in the SZ, the active peptide is unable to penetrate deeper into the middle and deep zones of cartilage. These results provide strong evidence for a sequential physiologic mechanism through which SZ chondrocytes gain access to active TGF-β: the synovium and articular cartilage secrete latent TGF-β into the SF and, upon activation, TGF-β transports back into the cartilage layer, binding exclusively to the SZ. PMID:23601326

  11. Myeloperoxidase modulation by LDL apheresis in Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a marker of plaque vulnerability and a mechanistic bridge between inflammation and cardiovascular disease, and thus is a suitable target for therapeutic strategy against cardiovascular disease. Methods Since hypercholesterolemia is associated with atherosclerosis and inflammation, we tested whether MPO serum levels were up-regulated in Familial Hypercholesterolemia (FH) and whether acute reduction of total cholesterol (TC) would also reduce MPO concentration. FH subjects undergoing LDL-apheresis (LDL-A) treatment are a paradigmatic clinical model where TC rapidly plunges from extremely high to extremely low levels after selective LDL removal, and then spontaneously rebounds to baseline conditions. This clinical setting allows multiple intra-patient observations at different plasma TC concentrations. We measured MPO levels in serum by ELISA tests, and in peripheral leukocytes by immunofluorescence, to learn whether they were affected by the changes in TC levels. Serum MPO was measured before and serially up to the 14th day following LDL-A. Results In both serum and peripheral leukocytes, MPO concentrations were i) higher than in sex- and age-matched healthy controls (p < 0.01); ii) decreased with TC reduction; iii) parallel with TC time course; iv) correlated with plasma TC. At regression analysis, plasma TC was the only variable considered that influenced MPO serum levels (β 0.022 ± 0.010, p < 0.0001). Conclusions In FH the MPO serum levels were modulated through changes in the TC concentrations carried out by LDL-A. Further study is needed to determine whether reduced MPO levels obtained by LDL-A could have any therapeutic impact. PMID:22014237

  12. Bioactivation of myelotoxic xenobiotics by human neutrophil myeloperoxidase

    SciTech Connect

    Roy, R.R.

    1989-01-01

    Many environmental pollutants and drugs are toxic to the bone marrow. Some of these xenobiotics may initiate toxicity after undergoing bioactivation to free radicals and/or other reactive electrophiles. Peroxidases are a group of enzymes that catalyze the one-electron oxidative bioactivation of a variety of xenobiotics in vitro. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a peroxidative enzyme found in very high concentration in the neutrophils of human bone marrow. In this study, human MPO was evaluated to determine its ability to catalyze the in vitro bioactivation of known bone marrow toxicants that contain the aromatic hydroxyl (Ar-OH), aromatic amine (Ar-N-R{sub 2}), or heterocyclic tertiary amine ({double bond}N-R) moieties. The formation of free radical metabolites during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of hydroquinone and catechol (benzene metabolites), mitoxantrone and ametantrone (antitumor drugs), and chlorpromazine and promazine (antipsychotic drugs) was demonstrated by EPR spectroscopy. The reactivity of the products formed during the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of ({sup 14}C)hydroquinone and ({sup 14}C)catechol was shown by their covalent binding to protein and DNA in vitro. The covalently binding metabolite in each case is postulated to be the quinone form of the xenobiotic. In addition, both GSH and NADH were oxidized by the reactive intermediate(s) formed during the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of many of the bone marrow toxicants tested. It was also shown that p,p-biphenol stimulated the MPO catalyzed bioactivation of both hydroquinone and catechol, while p-cresol stimulated the MPO-catalyzed bioactivation of catechol.

  13. Myeloperoxidase propagates damage and is a potential therapeutic target for subacute stroke

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Reza; Kim, Hyeon Ju; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R; Bure, Lionel; Wu, Yue; Hayase, Makoto; Wei, Ying; Zheng, Yi; Moskowitz, Michael A; Chen, John W

    2015-01-01

    Few effective treatment options exist for stroke beyond the hyperacute period. Radical generation and myeloperoxidase (MPO) have been implicated in stroke. We investigated whether pharmacologic reduction or gene deletion of this highly oxidative enzyme reduces infarct propagation and improves outcome in the transient middle cerebral artery occlusion mouse model (MCAO). Mice were treated with 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH), a specific irreversible MPO inhibitor. Three treatment regimens were used: (1) daily throughout the 21-day observational period, (2) during the acute stage (first 24 hours), or (3) during the subacute stage (daily starting on day 2). We found elevated MPO activity in ipsilateral brain 3 to 21 days after ischemia. 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide reduced enzyme activity by 30% to 40% and final lesion volume by 60% (P<0.01). The MPO-knockout (KO) mice subjected to MCAO also showed a similar reduction in the final lesion volume (P<0.01). The ABAH treatment or MPO-KO mice also improved neurobehavioral outcome (P<0.001) and survival (P=0.01), but ABAH had no additional beneficial effects in MPO-KO mice, confirming specificity of ABAH. Interestingly, inhibiting MPO activity during the subacute stage recapitulated most of the therapeutic benefit of continuous MPO inhibition, suggesting that MPO-targeted therapies could be useful when given after 24 hours of stroke onset. PMID:25515211

  14. Myeloperoxidase: molecular mechanisms of action and their relevance to human health and disease.

    PubMed

    van der Veen, Betty S; de Winther, Menno P J; Heeringa, Peter

    2009-11-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme-containing peroxidase abundantly expressed in neutrophils and to a lesser extent in monocytes. Enzymatically active MPO, together with hydrogen peroxide and chloride, produces the powerful oxidant hypochlorous acid and is a key contributor to the oxygen-dependent microbicidal activity of phagocytes. In addition, excessive generation of MPO-derived oxidants has been linked to tissue damage in many diseases, especially those characterized by acute or chronic inflammation. It has become increasingly clear that MPO exerts effects that are beyond its oxidative properties. These properties of MPO are, in many cases, independent of its catalytic activity and affect various processes involved in cell signaling and cell-cell interactions and are, as such, capable of modulating inflammatory responses. Given these diverse effects, an increased interest has emerged in the role of MPO and its downstream products in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. In this article, our knowledge pertaining to the biologic role of MPO and its downstream effects and mechanisms of action in health and disease is reviewed and discussed. PMID:19622015

  15. Accumulated source imaging of brain activity with both low and high-frequency neuromagnetic signals

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Jing; Luo, Qian; Kotecha, Rupesh; Korman, Abraham; Zhang, Fawen; Luo, Huan; Fujiwara, Hisako; Hemasilpin, Nat; Rose, Douglas F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed the importance of high-frequency brain signals (>70 Hz). One challenge of high-frequency signal analysis is that the size of time-frequency representation of high-frequency brain signals could be larger than 1 terabytes (TB), which is beyond the upper limits of a typical computer workstation's memory (<196 GB). The aim of the present study is to develop a new method to provide greater sensitivity in detecting high-frequency magnetoencephalography (MEG) signals in a single automated and versatile interface, rather than the more traditional, time-intensive visual inspection methods, which may take up to several days. To address the aim, we developed a new method, accumulated source imaging, defined as the volumetric summation of source activity over a period of time. This method analyzes signals in both low- (1~70 Hz) and high-frequency (70~200 Hz) ranges at source levels. To extract meaningful information from MEG signals at sensor space, the signals were decomposed to channel-cross-channel matrix (CxC) representing the spatiotemporal patterns of every possible sensor-pair. A new algorithm was developed and tested by calculating the optimal CxC and source location-orientation weights for volumetric source imaging, thereby minimizing multi-source interference and reducing computational cost. The new method was implemented in C/C++ and tested with MEG data recorded from clinical epilepsy patients. The results of experimental data demonstrated that accumulated source imaging could effectively summarize and visualize MEG recordings within 12.7 h by using approximately 10 GB of computer memory. In contrast to the conventional method of visually identifying multi-frequency epileptic activities that traditionally took 2–3 days and used 1–2 TB storage, the new approach can quantify epileptic abnormalities in both low- and high-frequency ranges at source levels, using much less time and computer memory. PMID:24904402

  16. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Ōmura, Satoshi

    2004-01-01

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC50 values of 0.78 and 0.41 μM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC50 values of 6.0 and 5.5 μM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  17. Antiatherogenic activity of fungal beauveriolides, inhibitors of lipid droplet accumulation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Namatame, Ichiji; Tomoda, Hiroshi; Ishibashi, Shun; Omura, Satoshi

    2004-01-20

    Beauveriolides I and III, isolated from the culture broth of fungal Beauveria sp. FO-6979, showed potent inhibitory activity of lipid droplet accumulation in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages. The cellular molecular target of this inhibitory activity was studied in macrophages. Beauveriolides I and III strongly inhibited the cholesteryl ester (CE) synthesis with IC(50) values of 0.78 and 0.41 microM, respectively, without showing significant effects on the triacylglycerol and phospholipid synthesis. Furthermore, lysosomal cholesterol metabolism to CE in macrophages was inhibited by the compounds, indicating that the inhibition site lies within steps between cholesterol departure from the lysosome and CE synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum. Therefore, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse macrophages was studied, resulting in a dose-dependent inhibition by beauveriolides I and III with IC(50) values of 6.0 and 5.5 microM, respectively. Thus, we showed that the beauveriolides inhibit macrophage ACAT activity specifically, resulting in blockage of the CE synthesis, leading to a reduction of lipid droplets in macrophages. ACAT activity in the membrane fractions prepared from mouse liver and Caco-2 cells was also inhibited, indicating that the beauveriolides block both ACAT-1 and -2. Moreover, beauveriolides I and III exert antiatherogenic activity in both low-density lipoprotein receptor- and apolipoprotein E-knockout mice without any side effects such as diarrhea or cytotoxicity to adrenal tissues as observed for many synthetic ACAT inhibitors. Beauveriolides I and III are the first microbial cyclodepsipeptides having an in vivo antiatherosclerotic effect and show promise as potential lead compounds for antiatherosclerotic agents. PMID:14718664

  18. Quantification of Interictal Neuromagnetic Activity in Absence Epilepsy with Accumulated Source Imaging.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Jing; Tenney, Jeffrey R; Korman, Abraham M; Leiken, Kimberly; Rose, Douglas F; Harris, Elana; Yuan, Weihong; Horn, Paul S; Holland, Katherine; Loring, David W; Glauser, Tracy A

    2015-11-01

    Aberrant brain activity in childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) during seizures has been well recognized as synchronous 3 Hz spike-and-wave discharges on electroencephalography. However, brain activity from low- to very high-frequency ranges in subjects with CAE between seizures (interictal) has rarely been studied. Using a high-sampling rate magnetoencephalography (MEG) system, we studied ten subjects with clinically diagnosed but untreated CAE in comparison with age- and gender-matched controls. MEG data were recorded from all subjects during the resting state. MEG sources were assessed with accumulated source imaging, a new method optimized for localizing and quantifying spontaneous brain activity. MEG data were analyzed in nine frequency bands: delta (1-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (12-30 Hz), low-gamma (30-55 Hz), high-gamma (65-90 Hz), ripple (90-200 Hz), high-frequency oscillation (HFO, 200-1,000 Hz), and very high-frequency oscillation (VHFO, 1,000-2,000 Hz). MEG source imaging revealed that subjects with CAE had higher odds of interictal brain activity in 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz in the parieto-occipito-temporal junction and the medial frontal cortices as compared with controls. The strength of the interictal brain activity in these regions was significantly elevated in the frequency bands of 90-200, 200-1,000 and 1,000-2,000 Hz for subjects with CAE as compared with controls. The results indicate that CAE has significantly aberrant brain activity between seizures that can be noninvasively detected. The measurements of high-frequency neuromagnetic oscillations may open a new window for investigating the cerebral mechanisms of interictal abnormalities in CAE. PMID:25359158

  19. Experimental evaluation of decrease in the activities of polyphosphate/glycogen-accumulating organisms due to cell death and activity decay in activated sludge.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xiaodi; Wang, Qilin; Cao, Yali; van Loosdrecht, Mark C M

    2010-06-15

    Decrease in bacterial activity (biomass decay) in activated sludge can result from cell death (reduction in the amount of active bacteria) and activity decay (reduction in the specific activity of active bacteria). The goal of this study was to experimentally differentiate between cell death and activity decay as the cause of decrease in bacterial activity. By means of measuring maximal anaerobic phosphate release rates, verifying membrane integrity by live/dead staining and verifying presence of 16S rRNA with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), the decay rates and death rates of polyphosphate-accumulating organisms (PAOs) in a biological nutrient removal (BNR) system and a laboratory phosphate removing sequencing batch reactor (SBR) system were determined, respectively, under famine conditions. In addition, the decay rate and death rate of glycogen-accumulating organisms (GAOs) in a SBR system with an enrichment culture of GAOs were also measured under famine conditions. Hereto the maximal anaerobic volatile fatty acid uptake rates, live/dead staining, and FISH were used. The experiments revealed that in the BNR and enriched PAO-SBR systems, activity decay contributed 58% and 80% to the decreased activities of PAOs, and that cell death was responsible for 42% and 20% of decreases in their respective activities. In the enriched GAOs system, activity decay constituted a proportion of 74% of the decreased activity of GAOs, and cell death only accounted for 26% of the decrease of their activity. PMID:20178124

  20. Excess beta-catenin promotes accumulation of transcriptionally active p53.

    PubMed Central

    Damalas, A; Ben-Ze'ev, A; Simcha, I; Shtutman, M; Leal, J F; Zhurinsky, J; Geiger, B; Oren, M

    1999-01-01

    beta-catenin is a multifunctional protein, acting both as a structural component of the cell adhesion machinery and as a transducer of extracellular signals. Deregulated beta-catenin protein expression, due to mutations in the beta-catenin gene itself or in its upstream regulator, the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, is prevalent in colorectal cancer and in several other tumor types, and attests to the potential oncogenic activity of this protein. Increased expression of beta-catenin is an early event in colorectal carcinogenesis, and is usually followed by a later mutational inactivation of the p53 tumor suppressor. To examine whether these two key steps in carcinogenesis are interrelated, we studied the effect of excess beta-catenin on p53. We report here that overexpression of beta-catenin results in accumulation of p53, apparently through interference with its proteolytic degradation. This effect involves both Mdm2-dependent and -independent p53 degradation pathways, and is accompanied by augmented transcriptional activity of p53 in the affected cells. Increased p53 activity may provide a safeguard against oncogenic deregulation of beta-catenin, and thus impose a pressure for mutational inactivation of p53 during the later stages of tumor progression. PMID:10357817

  1. Utilizing G2/M retention effect to enhance tumor accumulation of active targeting nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Guanlian; Cun, Xingli; Ruan, Shaobo; Shi, Kairong; Wang, Yang; Kuang, Qifang; Hu, Chuan; Xiao, Wei; He, Qin; Gao, Huile

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, active targeting strategies by ligand modification have emerged to enhance tumor accumulation of NP, but their clinical application was strictly restricted due to the complex preparation procedures, poor stability and serious toxicity. An effective and clinical translational strategy is required to satisfy the current problems. Interestingly, the internalization of NP is intimately related with cell cycle and the expression of receptors is not only related with cancer types but also cell cycle progression. So the cellular uptake of ligand modified NP may be related with cell cycle. However, few investigations were reported about the relationship between cell cycle and the internalization of ligand modified NP. Herein, cellular uptake of folic acid (FA) modified NP after utilizing chemotherapeutic to retain the tumor cells in G2/M phase was studied and a novel strategy was designed to enhance the active targeting effect. In our study, docetaxel (DTX) notably synchronized cells in G2/M phase and pretreatment with DTX highly improved in vitro and in vivo tumor cell targeting effect of FA decorated NP (FANP). Since FA was a most common used tumor active targeting ligand, we believe that this strategy possesses broader prospects in clinical application for its simplicity and effectiveness. PMID:27273770

  2. Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate Inhibition of Myeloperoxidase and Its Counter-Regulation by Dietary Iron and Lipocalin 2 in Murine Model of Gut Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Beng San; Aguilera Olvera, Rodrigo; Singh, Vishal; Xiao, Xia; Kennett, Mary J; Joe, Bina; Lambert, Joshua D; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-04-01

    Green tea-derived polyphenol (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) has been extensively studied for its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties in models of inflammatory bowel disease, yet the underlying molecular mechanism is not completely understood. Herein, we demonstrate that EGCG can potently inhibit the proinflammatory enzyme myeloperoxidase in vitro in a dose-dependent manner over a range of physiologic temperatures and pH values. The ability of EGCG to mediate its inhibitory activity is counter-regulated by the presence of iron and lipocalin 2. Spectral analysis indicated that EGCG prevents the peroxidase-catalyzed reaction by reverting the reactive peroxidase heme (compound I:oxoiron) back to its native inactive ferric state, possibly via the exchange of electrons. Further, administration of EGCG to dextran sodium sulfate-induced colitic mice significantly reduced the colonic myeloperoxidase activity and alleviated proinflammatory mediators associated with gut inflammation. However, the efficacy of EGCG against gut inflammation is diminished when orally coadministered with iron. These findings indicate that the ability of EGCG to inhibit myeloperoxidase activity is one of the mechanisms by which it exerts mucoprotective effects and that counter-regulatory factors such as dietary iron and luminal lipocalin 2 should be taken into consideration for optimizing clinical management strategies for inflammatory bowel disease with the use of EGCG treatment. PMID:26968114

  3. Myeloperoxidase scavenges peroxynitrite: A novel anti-inflammatory action of the heme enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Koyani, Chintan N.; Flemmig, Joerg; Malle, Ernst; Arnhold, Juergen

    2015-01-01

    Peroxynitrite, a potent pro-inflammatory and cytotoxic species, interacts with a variety of heme containing proteins. We addressed the question whether (i) the interaction of myeloperoxidase (MPO, an enzyme generating hypochlorous acid from hydrogen peroxide and chloride ions) with peroxynitrite affects the clearance of peroxynitrite, and (ii) if peroxynitrite could modulate the chlorinating activity of MPO. Our results show that this interaction promotes the decomposition of the highly reactive pro-inflammatory oxidant, whereby MPO Compound II (but not Compound I) is formed. The efficiency of MPO to remove peroxynitrite was enhanced by l-tyrosine, nitrite and (−)-epicatechin, substances known to reduce Compound II with high reaction rate. Next, peroxynitrite (added as reagent) diminished the chlorinating activity of MPO in the presence of hydrogen peroxide. Alternatively, SIN-1, a peroxynitrite donor, reduced hypochlorous acid formation by MPO, as measured by aminophenyl fluorescein oxidation (time kinetics) and taurine chloramine formation (end point measurement). At inflammatory loci, scavenging of peroxynitrite by MPO may overcome the uncontrolled peroxynitrite decomposition and formation of reactive species, which lead to cell/tissue damage. PMID:25731855

  4. The myeloperoxidase product hypochlorous acid generates irreversible high-density lipoprotein receptor inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Binder, Veronika; Ljubojevic, Senka; Haybaeck, Johannes; Holzer, Michael; El-Gamal, Dalia; Schicho, Rudolf; Pieske, Burkert; Heinemann, Akos; Marsche, Gunther

    2014-01-01

    Objective Elevated levels of advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs) have been described in several chronic inflammatory diseases, like chronic renal insufficiency, rheumatoid arthritis and atherosclerosis. Recent findings revealed that AOPPs are inhibitors of the major high-density lipoprotein (HDL) receptor, scavenger receptor class B, type 1 (SR-BI). Here we investigated what oxidation induced structural alterations convert plasma albumin into an HDL-receptor inhibitor. Approach and Results Exposure of albumin to the physiological oxidant, hypochlorous acid, generated high affinity SR-BI ligands. Protection of albumin lysine-residues prior exposure to hypochlorous acid as well as regeneration of N-chloramines after oxidation of albumin completely prevented binding of oxidized albumin to SR-BI, indicating that modification of albumin lysine-residues is required to generate SR-BI ligands. Of particular interest, N-chloramines within oxidized albumin promoted irreversible binding to SR-BI, resulting in permanent receptor blockade. We observed that the SR-BI inhibitory activity of albumin isolated from chronic kidney disease patients correlated with the content of the myeloperoxidase-specific oxidation product 3-chlorotyrosine and was associated with alterations in the composition of HDL. Conclusion Given that several potential atheroprotective activities of HDL are mediated by SR-BI, the present results raise the possibility that oxidized plasma albumin, through permanent SR-BI blockade, contributes to the pathophysiology of cardiovascular disease. PMID:23493288

  5. [DIACYLGLYCEROL ACCUMULATION IMPAIRS SHORT-TERM ACTIVATION OF PHOSPHOLIPASE D BY THYROXINE IN THE LIVER CELLS].

    PubMed

    Hassouneh, Loay Kh M

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid hormones (TG) are known modulators of signal transduction. Phospholipase D (PLD) is one of the targets of TG in the stimulated cells. Response of cells to the short-term TG action significantly reduces at old age. Taking into account that diacylglycerol (DAG) accumulation induces the resistance of cells to some of regulatory factors in the target cells the aim of the present study was to determine if DAG content increase in hepatocytes impairs the L-thyroxine (L-T4) short-term action. The experiments were performed in either the [14C]palmitic acid- labeled hepatocytes or [14C]oleic acid-pre-labeled liver cells of 3- and 24-month-old rats. To study the short-term L-T4 action on cells the PLD activation was determined. The DAG production and content in hepatocytes significantly increased at old age and in the young cells pre-treated with palmitic acid. The reduction of DAG level in cells by means of DAG-kinase activator, alfa-tocoferol acetate, or long-term L-T4 treatment improved the short-term hormone action. The above data have indicated that DAG play important role in the L-T4 PLD regulation. The cross-talk between classic and non-genomic pathways of TG regulation of lipid metabolism has been determined. PMID:26387163

  6. Interferon gamma regulates accumulation of the proteasome activator PA28 and immunoproteasomes at nuclear PML bodies.

    PubMed

    Fabunmi, R P; Wigley, W C; Thomas, P J; DeMartino, G N

    2001-01-01

    PA28 is an interferon (gamma) (IFN(gamma)) inducible proteasome activator required for presentation of certain major histocompatibility (MHC) class I antigens. Under basal conditions in HeLa and Hep2 cells, a portion of nuclear PA28 is concentrated at promyelocytic leukemia oncoprotein (PML)-containing bodies also commonly known as PODs or ND10. IFN(gamma) treatment greatly increased the number and size of the PA28- and PML-containing bodies, and the effect was further enhanced in serum-deprived cells. PML bodies are disrupted in response to certain viral infections and in diseases such as acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Like PML, PA28 was delocalized from PML bodies by expression of the cytomegalovirus protein, IE1, and in NB4 cells, an APL model line. Moreover, retinoic acid treatment, which causes remission of APL in patients and reformation of PML-containing bodies in NB4 cells, relocalized PA28 to this site. In contrast, the proteasome, the functional target of PA28, was not detected at PML bodies under basal conditions in HeLa and Hep2 cells, but IFN(gamma) promoted accumulation of 'immunoproteasomes' at this site. These results establish PA28 as a novel component of nuclear PML bodies, and suggest that PA28 may assemble or activate immunoproteasomes at this site as part of its role in proteasome-dependent MHC class I antigen presentation. PMID:11112687

  7. Demystifying "free will": the role of contextual information and evidence accumulation for predictive brain activity.

    PubMed

    Bode, Stefan; Murawski, Carsten; Soon, Chun Siong; Bode, Philipp; Stahl, Jutta; Smith, Philip L

    2014-11-01

    Novel multivariate pattern classification analyses have enabled the prediction of decision outcomes from brain activity prior to decision-makers' reported awareness. These findings are often discussed in relation to the philosophical concept of "free will". We argue that these studies demonstrate the role of unconscious processes in simple free choices, but they do not inform the philosophical debate. Moreover, these findings are difficult to relate to cognitive decision-making models, due to misleading assumptions about random choices. We review evidence suggesting that sequential-sampling models, which assume accumulation of evidence towards a decision threshold, can also be applied to free decisions. If external evidence is eliminated by the task instructions, decision-makers might use alternative, subtle contextual information as evidence, such as their choice history, that is not consciously monitored and usually concealed by the experimental design. We conclude that the investigation of neural activity patterns associated with free decisions should aim to investigate how decisions are jointly a function of internal and external contexts, rather than to resolve the philosophical "free will" debate. PMID:25452111

  8. Particulate activity accumulated on a moving filter and RCS leak detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wu-Hung

    2012-08-01

    Analytical equations for calculating the particulate activity accumulated on a moving filter of a containment air particulate radiation monitor due to a reactor coolant system leak in the containment, including the noble gas decay products, were presented. The particulate airborne concentration in the containment was treated by assumptions of a constant reactor coolant leak rate at a constant concentration, a given aerosolizing fraction, a constant removal coefficient to account for the loss due to diffusion, settling, diffusiophoresis, and containment air recirculation operation. The ratio of moving-to-fixed filter activity was presented for radionuclide of various half-lives and for different filter moving speeds. The monitor response at one hour after the initiation of a 1-gallon per minute leak at measured reactor coolant concentrations was compared to the standard deviation of the background count rate for an operating pressurized water reactor. The detectability of a 1-gallon per minute leak in an hour can be demonstrated if the aerosolization percentage of the radionuclide in the leaked coolant is at least a few percent. PMID:22739972

  9. Empagliflozin Protects against Diet-Induced NLRP-3 Inflammasome Activation and Lipid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Elisa; Mastrocola, Raffaella; Vitarelli, Giovanna; Cutrin, Juan Carlos; Nigro, Debora; Chiazza, Fausto; Mayoux, Eric; Collino, Massimo; Fantozzi, Roberto

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of chronic treatment with empagliflozin, a potent and selective sodium glucose cotransporter-2 inhibitor, in a murine model of diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, focusing on drug effects on body weight reduction and nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing protein (NLRP)-3 inflammasome activation, which have never been investigated to date. Male C57BL/6 mice were fed control or a high fat-high sugar (HFHS) diet for 4 months. Over the last 2 months, subsets of animals were treated with empagliflozin (1-10 mg/kg) added to the diet. Empagliflozin evoked body weight reduction (P < 0.001 for the highest dose) and positive effects on fasting glycemia and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. In addition, the drug was able to reduce renal tubular damage and liver triglycerides level in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, empagliflozin also decreased cardiac lipid accumulation. Moreover, diet-induced activation of NLRP-3 in kidney and liver (not observed in the heart) was dose-dependently attenuated by empagliflozin. Our results clearly demonstrate the ability of empagliflozin to counteract the deleterious effects evoked by chronic exposure to HFHS diet. Most notably, empagliflozin treatment was associated with NLRP-3 inflammasome signaling modulation, suggesting that this inhibition may contribute to the drug therapeutic effects. PMID:27440421

  10. Transportation and Accumulation of Redox Active Species at the Buried Interfaces of Plasticized Membrane Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sohail, Manzar; De Marco, Roland; Jarolímová, Zdeňka; Pawlak, Marcin; Bakker, Eric; He, Ning; Latonen, Rose-Marie; Lindfors, Tom; Bobacka, Johan

    2015-09-29

    The transportation and accumulation of redox active species at the buried interface between glassy carbon electrodes and plasticized polymeric membranes have been studied using synchrotron radiation X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (SR-XPS), near edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS), in situ electrochemical Fourier transform infrared-attenuated total reflectance (FTIR-ATR) spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronoamperometry (CA), and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Ferrocene tagged poly(vinyl chloride) [FcPVC], ferrocene (Fc), and its derivatives together with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ) doped plasticized polymeric membrane electrodes have been investigated, so as to extend the study of the mechanism of this reaction chemistry to different time scales (both small and large molecules with variable diffusion coefficients) using a range of complementary electrochemical and surface analysis techniques. This study also provides direct spectroscopic evidence for the transportation and electrochemical reactivity of redox active species, regardless of the size of the electrochemically reactive molecule, at the buried interface of the substrate electrode. With all redox dopants, when CA electrolysis was performed, redox active species were undetectable (<1 wt % of signature elements or below the detection limit of SR-XPS and NEXAFS) in the outermost surface layers of the membrane, while a high concentration of redox species was located at the electrode substrate as a consequence of the deposition of the reaction product (Fc(+)-anion complex) at the buried interface between the electrode and the membrane. This reaction chemistry for redox active species within plasticized polymeric membranes may be useful in the fashioning of multilayered polymeric devices (e.g., chemical sensors, organic electronic devices, protective laminates, etc.) based on an electrochemical tunable deposition of redox molecules at the buried substrate electrode beneath

  11. Caffeine attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Quan, Hai Yan; Kim, Do Yeon; Chung, Sung Hyun

    2013-04-01

    The main purpose of this study is to examine the effect of caffeine on lipid accumulation in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. Significant decreases in the accumulation of hepatic lipids, such as triglyceride (TG), and cholesterol were observed when HepG2 cells were treated with caffeine as indicated. Caffeine decreased the mRNA level of lipogenesis-associated genes (SREBP1c, SREBP2, FAS, SCD1, HMGR and LDLR). In contrast, mRNA level of CD36, which is responsible for lipid uptake and catabolism, was increased. Next, the effect of caffeine on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling pathway was examined. Phosphorylation of AMPK and acetyl-CoA carboxylase were evidently increased when the cells were treated with caffeine as indicated for 24 h. These effects were all reversed in the presence of compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. In summary, these data indicate that caffeine effectively depleted TG and cholesterol levels by inhibition of lipogenesis and stimulation of lipolysis through modulating AMPK-SREBP signaling pathways. PMID:23615262

  12. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase and its substrates: formation of specific markers and reactive compounds during inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoji

    2016-03-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory enzyme that generates reactive hypochlorous acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. However, this enzyme also uses bromide ion or thiocyanate as a substrate to form hypobromous or hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These species play important roles in host defense against the invasion of microorganisms. In contrast, these enzyme products modify biomolecules in hosts during excess inflammation, indicating that the action of myeloperoxidase is both beneficial and harmful. Myeloperoxidase uses other endogenous compounds, such as serotonin, urate, and l-tyrosine, as substrates. This broad-range specificity may have some biological implications. Target molecules of this enzyme and its products vary, including low-molecular weight thiols, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The modified products represent biomarkers of myeloperoxidase action. Moderate inhibition of this enzyme might be critical for the prevention/modulation of excess, uncontrolled inflammatory events. Some phytochemicals inhibit myeloperoxidase, which might explain the reductive effect caused by the intake of vegetables and fruits on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27013775

  13. Neutrophil myeloperoxidase and its substrates: formation of specific markers and reactive compounds during inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Yoji

    2016-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase is an inflammatory enzyme that generates reactive hypochlorous acid in the presence of hydrogen peroxide and chloride ion. However, this enzyme also uses bromide ion or thiocyanate as a substrate to form hypobromous or hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These species play important roles in host defense against the invasion of microorganisms. In contrast, these enzyme products modify biomolecules in hosts during excess inflammation, indicating that the action of myeloperoxidase is both beneficial and harmful. Myeloperoxidase uses other endogenous compounds, such as serotonin, urate, and l-tyrosine, as substrates. This broad-range specificity may have some biological implications. Target molecules of this enzyme and its products vary, including low-molecular weight thiols, proteins, nucleic acids, and lipids. The modified products represent biomarkers of myeloperoxidase action. Moderate inhibition of this enzyme might be critical for the prevention/modulation of excess, uncontrolled inflammatory events. Some phytochemicals inhibit myeloperoxidase, which might explain the reductive effect caused by the intake of vegetables and fruits on cardiovascular diseases. PMID:27013775

  14. The myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant hypothiocyanous acid inhibits protein tyrosine phosphatases via oxidation of key cysteine residues.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Moeke, Cassidy H; Fantoni, Luca I; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Phosphorylation of protein tyrosine residues is critical to cellular processes, and is regulated by kinases and phosphatases (PTPs). PTPs contain a redox-sensitive active site Cys residue, which is readily oxidized. Myeloperoxidase, released from activated leukocytes, catalyzes thiocyanate ion (SCN(-)) oxidation by H2O2 to form hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), an oxidant that targets Cys residues. Dysregulated phosphorylation and elevated MPO levels have been associated with chronic inflammatory diseases where HOSCN can be generated. Previous studies have shown that HOSCN inhibits isolated PTP1B and induces cellular dysfunction in cultured macrophage-like cells. The present study extends this previous work and shows that physiologically-relevant concentrations of HOSCN alter the activity and structure of other members of the wider PTP family (including leukocyte antigen-related PTP, PTP-LAR; T-cell PTP, TC-PTP; CD45 and Src homology phosphatase-1, Shp-1) by targeting Cys residues. Isolated PTP activity, and activity in lysates of human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM) was inhibited by 0-100 µM HOSCN with this being accompanied by reversible oxidation of Cys residues, formation of sulfenic acids or sulfenyl-thiocyanates (detected by Western blotting, and LC-MS as dimedone adducts), and structural changes. LC-MS/MS peptide mass-mapping has provided data on the modified Cys residues in PTP-LAR. This study indicates that inflammation-induced oxidants, and particularly myeloperoxidase-derived species, can modulate the activity of multiple members of the PTP superfamily via oxidation of Cys residues to sulfenic acids. This alteration of the balance of PTP/kinase activity may perturb protein phosphorylation and disrupt cell signaling with subsequent induction of apoptosis at sites of inflammation. PMID:26616646

  15. Induction of Mast Cell Accumulation by Tryptase via a Protease Activated Receptor-2 and ICAM-1 Dependent Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Wang, Junling; Zhang, Huiyun; Zhan, Mengmeng; Chen, Hanqiu; Fang, Zeman; Xu, Chiyan; Chen, Huifang; He, Shaoheng

    2016-01-01

    Mast cells are primary effector cells of allergy, and recruitment of mast cells in involved tissue is one of the key events in allergic inflammation. Tryptase is the most abundant secretory product of mast cells, but little is known of its influence on mast cell accumulation. Using mouse peritoneal model, cell migration assay, and flow cytometry analysis, we investigated role of tryptase in recruiting mast cells. The results showed that tryptase induced up to 6.7-fold increase in mast cell numbers in mouse peritoneum following injection. Inhibitors of tryptase, an antagonist of PAR-2 FSLLRY-NH2, and pretreatment of mice with anti-ICAM-1, anti-CD11a, and anti-CD18 antibodies dramatically diminished tryptase induced mast cell accumulation. On the other hand, PAR-2 agonist peptides SLIGRL-NH2 and tc-LIGRLO-NH2 provoked mast cell accumulation following injection. These implicate that tryptase induced mast cell accumulation is dependent on its enzymatic activity, activation of PAR-2, and interaction between ICAM-1 and LFA-1. Moreover, induction of trans-endothelium migration of mast cells in vitro indicates that tryptase acts as a chemoattractant. In conclusion, provocation of mast cell accumulation by mast cell tryptase suggests a novel self-amplification mechanism of mast cell accumulation. Mast cell stabilizers as well as PAR-2 antagonist agents may be useful for treatment of allergic reactions. PMID:27378825

  16. Lactoferrin, myeloperoxidase, and ceruloplasmin: complementary gearwheels cranking physiological and pathological processes.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Alexey V; Zakharova, Elena T; Zakahrova, Elena T; Kostevich, Valeria A; Samygina, Valeria R; Vasilyev, Vadim B

    2014-10-01

    Copper-containing plasma protein ceruloplasmin (Cp) forms a complex with lactoferrin (Lf), an iron-binding protein, and with the heme-containing myeloperoxidase (Mpo). In case of inflammation, Lf and Mpo are secreted from neutrophil granules. Among the plasma proteins, Cp seems to be the preferential partner of Lf and Mpo. After an intraperitoneal injection of Lf to rodents, the "Cp-Lf" complex has been shown to appear in their bloodstream. Cp prevents the interaction of Lf with protoplasts of Micrococcus luteus. Upon immunoprecipitation of Cp, the blood plasma becomes depleted of Lf and in a dose-dependent manner loses the capacity to inhibit the peroxidase activity of Mpo, but not the Mpo-catalyzed oxidation of thiocyanate in the (pseudo)halogenating cycle. Antimicrobial effect against E. coli displayed by a synergistic system that includes Lf and Mpo-H2O2-chloride, but not thiocyanate, as the substrate for Mpo is abrogated when Cp is added. Hence, Cp can be regarded as an anti-inflammatory factor that restrains the halogenating cycle and redirects the synergistic system Mpo-H2O2-chloride/thiocyanate to production of hypothiocyanate, which is relatively harmless for the human organism. Structure and functions of the "2Cp-2Lf-Mpo" complex and binary complexes Cp-Lf and 2Cp-Mpo in inflammation are discussed. PMID:24966132

  17. Reactions and reactivity of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants: differential biological effects of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acids.

    PubMed

    Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2012-08-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is recognised to play important roles both in the immune system and during the development of numerous human pathologies. MPO is released by activated neutrophils, monocytes and some tissue macrophages, where it catalyses the conversion of hydrogen peroxide to hypohalous acids (HOX; X = Cl, Br, SCN) in the presence of halide and pseudo-halide ions. The major reactive species produced by MPO under physiological conditions are hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN), with the ratio of these oxidants critically dependent on the concentration of thiocyanate ions (SCN⁻). The reactivity and selectivity of HOCl and HOSCN for biological targets are markedly different, indicating that SCN⁻ ions have the potential to modulate both the extent and nature of oxidative damage in vivo. This article reviews recent developments in our understanding of the role of SCN⁻ in modulating the formation of MPO-derived oxidants, particularly in respect to the differences in reaction kinetics and targets of HOCl compared to HOSCN and the ability of these two oxidants to induce damage in biological systems. PMID:22348603

  18. Contributions of myeloperoxidase to proinflammatory events: more than an antimicrobial system.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, W M

    2001-08-01

    Optimal oxygen-dependent antimicrobial activity of circulating polymorphonuclear leukocytes reflects the synergistic effects of the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-hydrogen peroxide-halide system. Delivered from its storage compartment to the phagolysosome during fusion of the azurophilic granules, MPO catalyzes the oxidation of chloride in the presence of H2O2, chemistry unique to MPO, and thereby generates an array of highly reactive oxidants. Recent investigations of a wide range of inflammatory disorders have identified biochemical markers of MPO-dependent reactions, thus indirectly implicating MPO in their pathogenesis, progression, or perpetuation. The implied involvement of MPO-dependent events in diseases such as atherosclerosis forces reexamination of several fundamental tenets about MPO that are derived from studies of myeloid cells, most notably factors important in the regulated expression of MPO gene transcription. The evidence supporting a role for MPO in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, demyelinating diseases of the central nervous system, and specific cancers is reviewed and some of the new questions raised by these studies are discussed. Lastly, an appreciation for the existence of a broad family of proteins structurally related to MPO and the functional diversity implied by the corresponding structures may provide insights into novel ways in which MPO can function as more than an important antimicrobial component. PMID:11594511

  19. Effect of Inoculation with Glomus versiforme on Cadmium Accumulation, Antioxidant Activities and Phytochelatins of Solanum photeinocarpum

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Shi-Yun; Jiang, Qiu-Yun; Zhuo, Feng; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yu-Tao; Li, Shao-Shan; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Jing, Yuan-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The plant growth, phosphate acquisition, Cd translocation, phytochelatins (PCs) production and antioxidant parameters [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione (GSH), ascorbate (ASA) and malonaldehyde (MDA)] were investigated in Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum photeinocarpum inoculated with Glomus versiforme BGC GD01C (Gv) in Cd-added soils (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg Cd kg-1 soil). Mycorrhizal colonization rates were generally high (from 77% to 94%), and hardly affected by Cd. Gv colonization significantly enhanced P acquisition, growth and total Cd uptakes in both shoots and roots of S. photeinocarpum at all Cd levels. Meanwhile, Gv symbiosis significantly increased Cd concentration in the roots, and decreased Cd concentration in the shoots at all Cd levels, which indicates that Gv could promote phytostabilization by enhancing Cd accumulation in the roots to inhibit its translocation to shoots and the “dilution effects” linked to an increase in plant dry matter yield and a reduced Cd partitioning to shoots. Moreover, the improvement of CAT, POD and APX activities in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants infers that Gv symbiosis helped S. photeinocarpum to relieve oxidative damage to biomolecules in Cd-contaminated soil. The evident decline of MDA content in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants indicates that Gv symbiosis evidently improved antioxidant activities, and the enhancement of PCs production in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants suggests that Gv-inoculated plant may be more efficient to relieve Cd phytotoxicity. Therefore, the possible mechanisms of Cd phytotoxicity alleviation by Gv can be concluded as the decline of Cd concentration in the shoots and the improvement of P acquisition, PCs production and activities of CAT, POD, APX in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:26176959

  20. Effect of Inoculation with Glomus versiforme on Cadmium Accumulation, Antioxidant Activities and Phytochelatins of Solanum photeinocarpum.

    PubMed

    Tan, Shi-Yun; Jiang, Qiu-Yun; Zhuo, Feng; Liu, Hui; Wang, Yu-Tao; Li, Shao-Shan; Ye, Zhi-Hong; Jing, Yuan-Xiao

    2015-01-01

    The plant growth, phosphate acquisition, Cd translocation, phytochelatins (PCs) production and antioxidant parameters [superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (POD), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione (GSH), ascorbate (ASA) and malonaldehyde (MDA)] were investigated in Cd-hyperaccumulator Solanum photeinocarpum inoculated with Glomus versiforme BGC GD01C (Gv) in Cd-added soils (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 mg Cd kg-1 soil). Mycorrhizal colonization rates were generally high (from 77% to 94%), and hardly affected by Cd. Gv colonization significantly enhanced P acquisition, growth and total Cd uptakes in both shoots and roots of S. photeinocarpum at all Cd levels. Meanwhile, Gv symbiosis significantly increased Cd concentration in the roots, and decreased Cd concentration in the shoots at all Cd levels, which indicates that Gv could promote phytostabilization by enhancing Cd accumulation in the roots to inhibit its translocation to shoots and the "dilution effects" linked to an increase in plant dry matter yield and a reduced Cd partitioning to shoots. Moreover, the improvement of CAT, POD and APX activities in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants infers that Gv symbiosis helped S. photeinocarpum to relieve oxidative damage to biomolecules in Cd-contaminated soil. The evident decline of MDA content in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants indicates that Gv symbiosis evidently improved antioxidant activities, and the enhancement of PCs production in the leaves of mycorrhizal plants suggests that Gv-inoculated plant may be more efficient to relieve Cd phytotoxicity. Therefore, the possible mechanisms of Cd phytotoxicity alleviation by Gv can be concluded as the decline of Cd concentration in the shoots and the improvement of P acquisition, PCs production and activities of CAT, POD, APX in mycorrhizal plants. PMID:26176959

  1. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  2. Myeloperoxidase-Derived Oxidants Induce Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Üllen, Andreas; Singewald, Evelin; Konya, Viktoria; Fauler, Günter; Reicher, Helga; Nusshold, Christoph; Hammer, Astrid; Kratky, Dagmar; Heinemann, Akos; Holzer, Peter; Malle, Ernst; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral leukocytes can exacerbate brain damage by release of cytotoxic mediators that disrupt blood-brain barrier (BBB) function. One of the oxidants released by activated leukocytes is hypochlorous acid (HOCl) formed via the myeloperoxidase (MPO)-H2O2-Cl− system. In the present study we examined the role of leukocyte activation, leukocyte-derived MPO and MPO-generated oxidants on BBB function in vitro and in vivo. In a mouse model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced systemic inflammation, neutrophils that had become adherent released MPO into the cerebrovasculature. In vivo, LPS-induced BBB dysfunction was significantly lower in MPO-deficient mice as compared to wild-type littermates. Both, fMLP-activated leukocytes and the MPO-H2O2-Cl− system inflicted barrier dysfunction of primary brain microvascular endothelial cells (BMVEC) that was partially rescued with the MPO inhibitor 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide. BMVEC treatment with the MPO-H2O2-Cl− system or activated neutrophils resulted in the formation of plasmalogen-derived chlorinated fatty aldehydes. 2-chlorohexadecanal (2-ClHDA) severely compromised BMVEC barrier function and induced morphological alterations in tight and adherens junctions. In situ perfusion of rat brain with 2-ClHDA increased BBB permeability in vivo. 2-ClHDA potently activated the MAPK cascade at physiological concentrations. An ERK1/2 and JNK antagonist (PD098059 and SP600125, respectively) protected against 2-ClHDA-induced barrier dysfunction in vitro. The current data provide evidence that interference with the MPO pathway could protect against BBB dysfunction under (neuro)inflammatory conditions. PMID:23691142

  3. Impact of simultaneous stimulation of 5-lipoxygenase and myeloperoxidase in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Zschaler, Josefin; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Human neutrophil 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxidizes arachidonic acid (AA) to 5S-hydro(pero)xy-6E,8Z,11Z, 14Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-H(p)ETE) and leukotriene (LT)A4, which is further converted to the chemoattractant LTB4. These cells contain also the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) producing several potent oxidants such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl). Previously, it was shown that MPO-metabolites influence 5-LOX product formation. Here, we addressed the question, whether a simultaneous activation of MPO and 5-LOX in neutrophils results in comparable changes of 5-LOX activity. Human neutrophils were stimulated with H2O2 or phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) for MPO activation and subsequently treated with calcium ionophore A23187 inducing 5-LOX product formation on endogenous AA. Special attention was drawn to neutrophil vitality, formation of MPO-derived metabolites and redox status. The pre-stimulation with H2O2 resulted in a concentration-dependent increase in the ratio of 5-HETE to the sum of LTB4+6-trans-LTB4 in consequence of MPO activation. Thereby no impairment of cell vitality and only a slightly reduction of total glutathione level was observed. An influence of MPO on 5-LOX product formation could be suggested using an MPO inhibitor. In contrast, the pre-stimulation with PMA resulted in different changes of 5-LOX product formation leading to a reduced amount of 5-HETE unaffected by MPO inhibition. Furthermore, impaired cell vitality and diminished redox status was detected after PMA stimulation. Nevertheless, a MPO-induced diminution of LTB4 was obvious. Further work is necessary to define the type of 5-LOX modification and investigate the effect of physiological MPO activators. PMID:27033421

  4. Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robbins, E.I.

    1983-01-01

    A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

  5. Paclitaxel loading in PLGA nanospheres affected the in vitro drug cell accumulation and antiproliferative activity

    PubMed Central

    Vicari, Luisa; Musumeci, Teresa; Giannone, Ignazio; Adamo, Luana; Conticello, Concetta; De Maria, Ruggero; Pignatello, Rosario; Puglisi, Giovanni; Gulisano, Massimo

    2008-01-01

    Background PTX is one of the most widely used drug in oncology due to its high efficacy against solid tumors and several hematological cancers. PTX is administered in a formulation containing 1:1 Cremophor® EL (polyethoxylated castor oil) and ethanol, often responsible for toxic effects. Its encapsulation in colloidal delivery systems would gain an improved targeting to cancer cells, reducing the dose and frequency of administration. Methods In this paper PTX was loaded in PLGA NS. The activity of PTX-NS was assessed in vitro against thyroid, breast and bladder cancer cell lines in cultures. Cell growth was evaluated by MTS assay, intracellular NS uptake was performed using coumarin-6 labelled NS and the amount of intracellular PTX was measured by HPLC. Results NS loaded with 3% PTX (w/w) had a mean size < 250 nm and a polydispersity index of 0.4 after freeze-drying with 0.5% HP-Cyd as cryoprotector. PTX encapsulation efficiency was 30% and NS showed a prolonged drug release in vitro. An increase of the cytotoxic effect of PTX-NS was observed with respect to free PTX in all cell lines tested. Conclusion These findings suggest that the greater biological effect of PTX-NS could be due to higher uptake of the drug inside the cells as shown by intracellular NS uptake and cell accumulation studies. PMID:18657273

  6. Measurement of 224Ra uptake in a fern actively accumulating radium.

    PubMed

    Chao, J H; Lee, H P; Chiu, C Y

    2006-03-01

    A method is proposed for determining the level of 224Ra in plant samples by measuring its descendant nuclide 212Pb at 239 keV by gamma-ray spectrometry. Variations of 224Ra and 212Pb over time during sample preparation and counting were delineated prior to gamma-ray measurement. The 224Ra concentrations in plant samples were measured by their direct uptake from soil, which could be determined and distinguished from that resulting from decay of 228Th inside the plants. We propose that a field-growing Dicranopteris linearis, which actively accumulates radium, can be used as an indicator of the nutritional transportation and metabolic rate of radium and other alkaline earth elements. We investigated the influence of rainfall on 224Ra concentrations in fronds of D. linearis and the corresponding uptake rates. 224Ra could serve as a natural tracer of growth in plants over a several days. Its presence and content in plants implies a temporal mineral metabolic rate, which can provide useful information for plant physiological and environmental investigations. PMID:16087212

  7. Auxin efflux carrier activity and auxin accumulation regulate cell division and polarity in tobacco cells.

    PubMed

    Petrásek, Jan; Elckner, Miroslav; Morris, David A; Zazímalová, Eva

    2002-12-01

    Division and growth of most types of in vitro-cultured plant cells require an external source of auxin. In such cultures, the ratio of external to internal auxin concentration is crucial for the regulation of the phases of the standard growth cycle. In this report the internal concentration of auxin in suspension-cultured cells of Nicotiana tabacum L., strain VBI-0, was manipulated either (i) by increasing 10-fold the normal concentration of 1-naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid in the external medium; or (ii) by addition 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid (NPA; an inhibitor of auxin efflux and of auxin efflux carrier traffic). Both treatments delayed the onset of cell division for 6-7 days without loss of cell viability. In both cases, cell division activity subsequently resumed coincident with a reduction in the ability of cells to accumulate [(3)H]NAA from an external medium. Following renewed cell division, a significant proportion of the NPA-treated cells but not those grown at high auxin concentration, exhibited changes in the orientation of new cell divisions and loss of polarity. We conclude that cell division, but not cell elongation, is prevented when the internal auxin concentration rises above a critical threshold value and that the directed traffic of auxin efflux carriers to the plasma membrane may regulate the orientation of cell divisions. PMID:12447544

  8. Mercury modulates selenium activity via altering its accumulation and speciation in garlic (Allium sativum).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiating; Hu, Yi; Gao, Yuxi; Li, Yufeng; Li, Bai; Dong, Yuanxing; Chai, Zhifang

    2013-06-01

    Combined pollution of selenium (Se) and mercury (Hg) has been known in Wanshan district (Guizhou Province, China). A better understanding of how Se and Hg interact in plants and the phytotoxicity thereof will provide clues about how to avoid or mitigate adverse effects of Se/Hg on local agriculture. In this study, the biological activity of Se has been investigated in garlic with or without Hg exposure. Se alone can promote garlic growth at low levels (<0.1 mg L(-1)), whereas it inhibits garlic growth at high levels (>1 mg L(-1)). The promotive effect of Se in garlic can be enhanced by low Hg exposure (<0.1 mg L(-1)). When both Se and Hg are at high levels, there is a general antagonistic effect between these two elements in terms of phytotoxicity. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) data suggest that Se is mainly concentrated in garlic roots, compared to the leaves and the bulbs. Se uptake by garlic in low Se medium (<0.1 mg L(-1)) can be significantly enhanced as Hg exposure levels increase (P < 0.05), while it can be inhibited by Hg when Se exposure levels exceed 1 mg L(-1). The synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence (SRXRF) mapping further shows that Se is mainly concentrated in the stele of the roots, bulbs and the veins of the leaves, and Se accumulation in garlic can be reduced by Hg. The X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) study indicates that Se is mainly formed in C-Se-C form in garlic. Hg can decrease the content of inorganic Se mainly in SeO3(2-) form in garlic while increasing the content of organic Se mainly in C-Se-C form (MeSeCys and its derivatives). Hg-mediated changes in Se species along with reduced Se accumulation in garlic may account for the protective effect of Hg against Se phytotoxicity. PMID:23765168

  9. Virucidal efficacy of treatment with photodynamically activated curcumin on murine norovirus bio-accumulated in oysters.

    PubMed

    Wu, Juan; Hou, Wei; Cao, Binbin; Zuo, Tao; Xue, Changhu; Leung, Albert Wingnang; Xu, Chuanshan; Tang, Qing-Juan

    2015-09-01

    Norovirus (NoV) is one of the most important seafood- and water-borne viruses, and is a major cause of acute gastroenteritis outbreaks. In the present study we investigated the effect of curcumin as a sensitizer to photodynamic treatment both in buffer and in oysters against murine norovirus 1 (MNV-1), a surrogate of NoV. MNV-1 cultured in buffer and MNV-1 bio-accumulated in oysters were irradiated with a novel LED light source with a wavelength of 470nm and an energy of 3.6J/cm(2). Inactivation of MNV-1 was investigated by plaque assays. After virus was extracted from the gut of oysters treated over a range of curcumin concentrations, the ultrastructural morphology of the virus was observed using electron microscopy, and the integrity of viral nucleic acids and stability of viral capsid proteins were also determined. Results showed that the infectivity of MNV-1 was significantly inhibited by 1-3logPFU/ml, with significant damage to viral nucleic acids in a curcumin dose-dependent manner after photodynamic activation. Virus morphology was altered after the photodynamic treatment with curcumin, presumably due to the change of the viral capsid protein structures. The data suggest that treatment of oysters with photodynamic activation of curcumin is a potentially efficacious and cost-effective method to inactivate food-borne NoV. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the toxicology of this approach in detail and perform sensory evaluation of the treated product. PMID:26117199

  10. Trichothecenes induce accumulation of glucosylceramide in neural cells by interfering with lactosylceramide synthase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kralj, Ana; Gurgui, Mihaela; Koenig, Gabriele M.; Echten-Deckert, Gerhild van

    2007-11-15

    Trichothecenes are sesquiterpenoid metabolites produced by several fungal strains that impair human and animal health. Since sphingolipids were connected with fungal toxicity the aim of the present study was to test the influence of fungal metabolites on sphingolipid metabolism in neural cells. The crude extract of fungal strain Spicellum roseum induced accumulation of glucosylceramide (GlcCer), and simultaneous reduction of the formation of lactosylceramide (LacCer) and complex gangliosides in primary cultured neurons. Following a bioassay-guided fractionation of the respective fungal extract we could demonstrate that the two isolated trichothecene derivatives, 8-deoxy-trichothecin (8-dT) and trichodermol (Td-ol) were responsible for this effect. Thus, incubation of primary cultured neurons as well as of neuroblastoma B104 cells for 24 h with 30 {mu}M of either of the two fungal metabolites resulted in uncoupling of sphingolipid biosynthesis at the level of LacCer. For the observed reduction of LacCer synthase activity by about 90% cell integrity was crucial in both cell types. In neuroblastoma cells the amount of LacCer synthase mRNA was reduced in the presence of trichothecenes, whereas in primary cultured neurons this was not the case, suggesting a post-transcriptional mechanism of action in the latter cell type. The data also show that the compounds did not interfere with the translocation of GlcCer in neuroblastoma cells. Collectively, our results demonstrate that trichodermol and 8-deoxy-trichothecin inhibit LacCer synthase activity in a cell-type-specific manner.

  11. Cytotoxicity towards human endothelial cells, induced by neutrophil myeloperoxidase: protection by ceftazidime

    PubMed Central

    Deby-Dupont, G.; Deby, C.; Jadoul, L.; Vandenberghe, A.; Lamy, M.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the antibiotic ceftazidime (CAZ) on the cytolytic action of the neutrophil myeloperoxidase–hydrogen peroxide–chloride anion system (MPO/H2O2/Cl−). In this system, myeloperoxidase catalyses the conversion of H2O2 and CI− to the cytotoxic agent HOCl. Stimulated neutrophils can release MPO into the extracellular environment and then may cause tissue injury through direct endothelial cells lysis. We showed that human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were capable of taking up active MPO. In presence of H2O2 (10−4 M), this uptake was accompanied by cell lysis. The cytolysis was estimated by the release of 51Cr from HUVEC and expressed as an index of cytotoxicity (IC). Dose dependent protection was obtained for CAZ concentrations ranging from 10−5 to 10−3 M;this can be attributed to inactivation of HOCl by the drug. This protection is comparable to that obtained with methionine and histidine, both of which are known to neutralize HOCl. This protection by CAZ could also be attributed to inactivation of H2O2, but when cytolysis was achieved with H2O2 or O2- generating enzymatic systems, no protection by CAZ was observed. Moreover, the peroxidation activity of MPO (action on H2O2) was not affected by CAZ, while CAZ prevented the chlorination activity of MPO (chlorination of monochlorodimedon). So, we concluded that CAZ acts via HOCl inactivation. These antioxidant properties of CAZ may be clinically useful in pathological situations where excessive activation of neutrophils occurs, such as in sepsis. PMID:18475677

  12. Myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants rapidly oxidize and disrupt zinc-cysteine/histidine clusters in proteins.

    PubMed

    Cook, Naomi L; Pattison, David I; Davies, Michael J

    2012-12-01

    Zinc is an abundant cellular transition metal ion, which binds avidly to protein cysteine (Cys) and histidine (His) residues to form zinc-Cys/His clusters; these play a key role in the function of many proteins (e.g., DNA binding and repair enzymes, transcription factors, nitric oxide synthase). Leukocyte-derived myeloperoxidase generates powerful oxidants including hypochlorous (HOCl), hypobromous (HOBr), and hypothiocyanous (HOSCN) acids from H(2)O(2) and (pseudo)halide ions. Excessive or misplaced formation of these species is associated with cellular dysfunction, apoptosis and necrosis, and multiple inflammatory diseases. HOCl and HOBr react rapidly with sulfur-containing compounds, and HOSCN reacts specifically with thiols. Consequently, we hypothesized that zinc-Cys/His clusters would be targets for these oxidants, and the activity of such enzymes would be perturbed. This hypothesis has been tested using yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH), which contains a well-characterized Zn(1)Cys(2)His(1) cluster. Incubation of YADH with pathologically relevant concentrations of HOSCN, HOCl, and HOBr resulted in rapid oxidation of the protein (rate constants, determined by competition kinetics, for reaction of HOCl and HOSCN with YADH being (3.3±0.9)×10(8) and (2.9±0.4)×10(4) M(-1) s(-1) per YADH monomer, respectively), loss of enzyme activity, Zn(2+) release, changes in protein structure (particularly formation of disulfide cross-links), and oxidation of Cys residues. The loss of enzyme activity correlated with Zn(2+) release, loss of thiols, and changes in protein structure. We conclude that exposure of zinc-Cys/His clusters to inflammatory oxidants can result in impaired protein activity, thiol oxidation, and Zn(2+) release. These reactions may contribute to inflammation-induced tissue damage. PMID:23032100

  13. Effects of Antioxidant Therapy on Leukocyte Myeloperoxidase and Cu/Zn-Superoxide Dismutase and Plasma Malondialdehyde Levels in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Cetinkaya, Ali; Bulbuloglu, Ertan; Kantarceken, Bulent

    2005-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effects of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and L-carnitine (LCAR) supplementations on polymorphonuclear leukocytes myeloperoxidase (MPO) and Cu/Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu/Zn-SOD) and plasma malondialdehyde (MDA) in acetic acid (AA)-induced ulcerative colitis model. The mean polymorphonuclear leukocyte MPO and Cu/Zn-SOD activity was significantly higher in the colitis group than in the control group. Both NAC and LCAR pretreatment markedly decreased MPO and Cu/Zn-SOD activity compared to colitis group. AA administration significantly increased the levels of plasma MDA in comparison with controls. However, NAC and LCAR administration to the AA-treated rats significantly reduced the MDA levels compared to colitis group. In conclusion NAC and LCAR could be beneficial agents in restoring the circulating proinflammatory mediators. PMID:16489261

  14. Ammonia activates pacC and patulin accumulation in an acidic environment during apple colonization by Penicillium expansum.

    PubMed

    Barad, Shiri; Espeso, Eduardo A; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2016-06-01

    Penicillium expansum, the causal agent of blue mould rot, causes severe post-harvest fruit maceration simultaneously with the secretion of d-gluconic acid (GLA) and the mycotoxin patulin in colonized tissue. The factor(s) inducing patulin biosynthesis during colonization of the host acidic environment is unclear. During the colonization of apple fruit in vivo and growth in culture, P. expansum secretes pH-modulating GLA and ammonia. Although patulin and its possible opportunistic precursor GLA accumulate together during fungal development, ammonia is detected on the colonized tissue's leading edge and after extended culture, close to patulin accumulation. Here, we demonstrate ammonia-induced transcript activation of the global pH modulator PacC and patulin accumulation in the presence of GLA by: (i) direct exogenous treatment of P. expansum growing on solid medium; (ii) direct exogenous treatment on colonized apple tissue; (iii) growth under self-ammonia production conditions with limited carbon; and (iv) analysis of the transcriptional response to ammonia of the patulin biosynthesis cluster. Ammonia induced patulin accumulation concurrently with the transcript activation of pacC and patulin biosynthesis cluster genes, indicating the regulatory effect of ammonia on pacC transcript expression under acidic conditions. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays using P. expansum PacC and antibodies to the different cleaved proteins showed that PacC is not protected against proteolytic signalling at pH 4.5 relative to pH 7.0, but NH4 addition did not further enhance its proteolytic cleavage. Ammonia enhanced the activation of palF transcript in the Pal pathway under acidic conditions. Ammonia accumulation in the host environment by the pathogen under acidic pH may be a regulatory cue for pacC activation, towards the accumulation of secondary metabolites, such as patulin. PMID:26420024

  15. Accumulation of human full-length tau induces degradation of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 via activating calpain-2

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Yaling; Wang, Yali; Gao, Di; Ye, Jinwang; Wang, Xin; Fang, Lin; Wu, Dongqin; Pi, Guilin; Lu, Chengbiao; Zhou, Xin-Wen; Yang, Ying; Wang, Jian-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Cholinergic impairments and tau accumulation are hallmark pathologies in sporadic Alzheimer’s disease (AD), however, the intrinsic link between tau accumulation and cholinergic deficits is missing. Here, we found that overexpression of human wild-type full-length tau (termed hTau) induced a significant reduction of α4 subunit of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) with an increased cleavage of the receptor producing a ~55kDa fragment in primary hippocampal neurons and in the rat brains, meanwhile, the α4 nAChR currents decreased. Further studies demonstrated that calpains, including calpain-1 and calpain-2, were remarkably activated with no change of caspase-3, while simultaneous suppression of calpain-2 by selective calpain-2 inhibitor but not calpain-1 attenuated the hTau-induced degradation of α4 nAChR. Finally, we demonstrated that hTau accumulation increased the basal intracellular calcium level in primary hippocampal neurons. We conclude that the hTau accumulation inhibits nAChRs α4 by activating calpain-2. To our best knowledge, this is the first evidence showing that the intracellular accumulation of tau causes cholinergic impairments. PMID:27277673

  16. Active Hydrocarbon Biosynthesis and Accumulation in a Green Alga, Botryococcus braunii (Race A)

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Mana; Mukaida, Fukiko; Okada, Sigeru

    2013-01-01

    Among oleaginous microalgae, the colonial green alga Botryococcus braunii accumulates especially large quantities of hydrocarbons. This accumulation may be achieved more by storage of lipids in the extracellular space rather than in the cytoplasm, as is the case for all other examined oleaginous microalgae. The stage of hydrocarbon synthesis during the cell cycle was determined by autoradiography. The cell cycle of B. braunii race A was synchronized by aminouracil treatment, and cells were taken at various stages in the cell cycle and cultured in a medium containing [14C]acetate. Incorporation of 14C into hydrocarbons was detected. The highest labeling occurred just after septum formation, when it was about 2.6 times the rate during interphase. Fluorescent and electron microscopy revealed that new lipid accumulation on the cell surface occurred during at least two different growth stages and sites of cells. Lipid bodies in the cytoplasm were not prominent in interphase cells. These lipid bodies then increased in number, size, and inclusions, reaching maximum values just before the first lipid accumulation on the cell surface at the cell apex. Most of them disappeared from the cytoplasm concomitant with the second new accumulation at the basolateral region, where extracellular lipids continuously accumulated. The rough endoplasmic reticulum near the plasma membrane is prominent in B. braunii, and the endoplasmic reticulum was often in contact with both a chloroplast and lipid bodies in cells with increasing numbers of lipid bodies. We discuss the transport pathway of precursors of extracellular hydrocarbons in race A. PMID:23794509

  17. Myeloperoxidase-mediated oxidation of high-density lipoproteins: fingerprints of newly recognized potential proatherogenic lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Marsche, Gunther; Panzenboeck, Ute; Sattler, Wolfgang

    2006-01-15

    Substantial evidence supports the notion that oxidative processes participate in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic heart disease. Major evidence for myeloperoxidase (MPO) as enzymatic catalyst for oxidative modification of lipoproteins in the artery wall has been suggested in numerous studies performed with low-density lipoprotein. In contrast to low-density lipoprotein, plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and apoAI, the major apolipoprotein of HDL, inversely correlate with the risk of developing coronary artery disease. These antiatherosclerotic effects are attributed mainly to HDL's capacity to transport excess cholesterol from arterial wall cells to the liver during 'reverse cholesterol transport'. There is now strong evidence that HDL is a selective in vivo target for MPO-catalyzed oxidation impairing the cardioprotective and antiinflammatory capacity of this antiatherogenic lipoprotein. MPO is enzymatically active in human lesion material and was found to be associated with HDL extracted from human atheroma. MPO-catalyzed oxidation products are highly enriched in circulating HDL from individuals with cardiovascular disease where MPO concentrations are also increased. The oxidative potential of MPO involves an array of intermediate-generated reactive oxygen and reactive nitrogen species and the ability of MPO to generate chlorinating oxidants-in particular hypochlorous acid/hypochlorite-under physiological conditions is a unique and defining activity for this enzyme. All these MPO-generated reactive products may affect structure and function of HDL as well as the activity of HDL-associated enzymes involved in conversion and remodeling of the lipoprotein particle, and represent clinically useful markers for atherosclerosis. PMID:16171772

  18. The immunodominant myeloperoxidase T-cell epitope induces local cell-mediated injury in antimyeloperoxidase glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Joshua D; Chang, Janet; Hickey, Michael J; Borza, Dorin-Bogdan; Fugger, Lars; Holdsworth, Stephen R; Kitching, A Richard

    2012-09-25

    Microscopic polyangiitis is an autoimmune small-vessel vasculitis that often manifests as focal and necrotizing glomerulonephritis and renal failure. Antineutrophil cytoplasmic Abs (ANCAs) specific for myeloperoxidase (MPO) play a role in this disease, but the role of autoreactive MPO-specific CD4(+) T cells is uncertain. By screening overlapping peptides of 20 amino acids spanning the MPO molecule, we identified an immunodominant MPO CD4(+) T-cell epitope (MPO(409-428)). Immunizing C57BL/6 mice with MPO(409-428) induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis similar to that seen after whole MPO immunization, when MPO was deposited in glomeruli. Transfer of an MPO(409-428)-specific CD4(+) T-cell clone to Rag1(-/-) mice induced focal necrotizing glomerulonephritis when glomerular MPO deposition was induced either by passive transfer of MPO-ANCA and LPS or by planting MPO(409-428) conjugated to a murine antiglomerular basement membrane mAb. MPO(409-428) also induced biologically active anti-MPO Abs in mice. The MPO(409-428) epitope has a minimum immunogenic core region of 11 amino acids, MPO(415-426), with several critical residues. ANCA-activated neutrophils not only induce injury but lodged the autoantigen MPO in glomeruli, allowing autoreactive anti-MPO CD4(+) cells to induce delayed type hypersensitivity-like necrotizing glomerular lesions. These studies identify an immunodominant MPO T-cell epitope and redefine how effector responses can induce injury in MPO-ANCA-associated microscopic polyangiitis. PMID:22955884

  19. Quality control in the endoplasmic reticulum: lessons from hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Nauseef, W M

    1999-09-01

    The optimal level of oxygen-dependent microbicidal activity in human neutrophils depends on the generation of highly toxic products, including hypochlorous acid, by hydrogen peroxide in the presence of chloride anion and the neutrophil granule protein myeloperoxidase (MPO). The biosynthesis of MPO is normally restricted to the promyelocytic stage of myeloid development and includes N-linked glycosylation, heme insertion, proteolytic processing, subunit dimerization, and eventual targeting to the azurophilic granule. In the endoplasmic reticulum, MPO precursors interact transiently with calreticulin and calnexin, presumably in their capacity as molecular chaperones. In light of the important role of the MPO-H2O2-chloride system in human host defense, the relatively high prevalence of inherited MPO deficiency was an unanticipated insight provided by the widespread use of automated flow cytometry for the enumeration of leukocytes in clinical specimens. In many cases of inherited MPO deficiency, affected neutrophils have immunochemical evidence of precursor protein but lack the subunits of mature MPO, peroxidase activity, or the ability to chlorinate target proteins. To date, four genotypes have been reported to cause inherited MPO deficiency, each of which results in missense mutations. In the genotype Y173C, the mutant precursor is retained in the endoplasmic reticulum by virtue of its prolonged interaction with calnexin, and it eventually undergoes degradation in the 20S proteasome. In this way, the quality control system operating in the endoplasmic reticulum retrieves malfolded MPO precursors from the biosynthetic pathway and creates the biochemical phenotype of MPO deficiency. Thus MPO deficiency caused by Y173C joins the ranks of cystic fibrosis, protein C deficiency, and other genetic disorders that reflect abnormalities in protein folding. PMID:10482305

  20. Infection-induced type I interferons activate CD11b on B-1 cells for subsequent lymph node accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Waffarn, Elizabeth E.; Hastey, Christine J.; Dixit, Neha; Choi, Youn Soo; Cherry, Simon; Kalinke, Ulrich; Simon, Scott I.; Baumgarth, Nicole

    2016-01-01

    Innate-like B-1a lymphocytes rapidly redistribute to regional mediastinal lymph nodes (MedLN) during influenza infection to generate protective IgM. Here we demonstrate that influenza infection-induced type I interferons directly stimulate body cavity B-1 cells and are a necessary signal required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Vascular mimetic flow chamber studies show that type I interferons increase ligand-mediated B-1 cell adhesion under shear stress by inducing high-affinity conformation shifts of surface-expressed integrins. In vivo trafficking experiments identify CD11b as the non-redundant, interferon-activated integrin required for B-1 cell accumulation in MedLN. Thus CD11b on B-1 cells senses infection-induced innate signals and facilitates their rapid sequester into secondary lymphoid tissues, thereby regulating the accumulation of polyreactive IgM producers at sites of infection. PMID:26612263

  1. Prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions induce impaired Oct-1 activity and autophagy in prematurely aged human mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Infante, Arantza; Gago, Andrea; de Eguino, Garbiñe Ruiz; Calvo-Fernández, Teresa; Gómez-Vallejo, Vanessa; Llop, Jordi; Schlangen, Karin; Fullaondo, Ane; Aransay, Ana M; Martín, Abraham; Rodríguez, Clara I

    2014-04-01

    Aging, a time-dependent functional decline of biological processes, is the primary risk factor in developing diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular or degenerative diseases. There is a real need to understand the human aging process in order to increase the length of disease-free life, also known as "health span". Accumulation of progerin and prelamin A are the hallmark of a group of premature aging diseases but have also been found during normal cellular aging strongly suggesting similar mechanisms between healthy aging and LMNA-linked progeroid syndromes. How this toxic accumulation contributes to aging (physiological or pathological) remains unclear. Since affected tissues in age-associated disorders and in pathological aging are mainly of mesenchymal origin we propose a model of human aging based on mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) which accumulate prelamin A. We demonstrate that prelamin A-accumulating hMSCs have a premature aging phenotype which affects their functional competence in vivo. The combination of prelamin A accumulation and stress conditions enhance the aging phenotype by dysregulating the activity of the octamer binding protein Oct-1This experimental model has been fundamental to identify a new role for Oct-1 in hMSCs aging. PMID:24753226

  2. Dietary Fructose Feeding Increases Adipose Methylglyoxal Accumulation in Rats in Association with Low Expression and Activity of Glyoxalase-2

    PubMed Central

    Masterjohn, Christopher; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung; Noh, Sang K.; Koo, Sung I.; Bruno, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a precursor to advanced glycation endproducts that may contribute to diabetes and its cardiovascular-related complications. Methylglyoxal is successively catabolized to d-lactate by glyoxalase-1 and glyoxalase-2. The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary fructose and green tea extract (GTE) differentially regulate methylglyoxal accumulation in liver and adipose, mediated by tissue-specific differences in the glyoxalase system. We fed six week old male Sprague-Dawley rats a low-fructose diet (10% w/w) or a high-fructose diet (60% w/w) containing no GTE or GTE at 0.5% or 1.0% for nine weeks. Fructose-fed rats had higher (P < 0.05) adipose methylglyoxal, but GTE had no effect. Plasma and hepatic methylglyoxal were unaffected by fructose and GTE. Fructose and GTE also had no effect on the expression or activity of glyoxalase-1 and glyoxalase-2 at liver or adipose. Regardless of diet, adipose glyoxalase-2 activity was 10.8-times lower (P < 0.05) than adipose glyoxalase-1 activity and 5.9-times lower than liver glyoxalase-2 activity. Adipose glyoxalase-2 activity was also inversely related to adipose methylglyoxal (r = −0.61; P < 0.05). These findings suggest that fructose-mediated adipose methylglyoxal accumulation is independent of GTE supplementation and that its preferential accumulation in adipose compared to liver is due to low constitutive expression of glyoxalase-2. PMID:23966111

  3. Dietary fructose feeding increases adipose methylglyoxal accumulation in rats in association with low expression and activity of glyoxalase-2.

    PubMed

    Masterjohn, Christopher; Park, Youngki; Lee, Jiyoung; Noh, Sang K; Koo, Sung I; Bruno, Richard S

    2013-08-01

    Methylglyoxal is a precursor to advanced glycation endproducts that may contribute to diabetes and its cardiovascular-related complications. Methylglyoxal is successively catabolized to D-lactate by glyoxalase-1 and glyoxalase-2. The objective of this study was to determine whether dietary fructose and green tea extract (GTE) differentially regulate methylglyoxal accumulation in liver and adipose, mediated by tissue-specific differences in the glyoxalase system. We fed six week old male Sprague-Dawley rats a low-fructose diet (10% w/w) or a high-fructose diet (60% w/w) containing no GTE or GTE at 0.5% or 1.0% for nine weeks. Fructose-fed rats had higher (P < 0.05) adipose methylglyoxal, but GTE had no effect. Plasma and hepatic methylglyoxal were unaffected by fructose and GTE. Fructose and GTE also had no effect on the expression or activity of glyoxalase-1 and glyoxalase-2 at liver or adipose. Regardless of diet, adipose glyoxalase-2 activity was 10.8-times lower (P < 0.05) than adipose glyoxalase-1 activity and 5.9-times lower than liver glyoxalase-2 activity. Adipose glyoxalase-2 activity was also inversely related to adipose methylglyoxal (r = -0.61; P < 0.05). These findings suggest that fructose-mediated adipose methylglyoxal accumulation is independent of GTE supplementation and that its preferential accumulation in adipose compared to liver is due to low constitutive expression of glyoxalase-2. PMID:23966111

  4. Intracellular Zn2+ accumulation enhances suppression of synaptic activity following spreading depolarization.

    PubMed

    Carter, Russell E; Seidel, Jessica L; Lindquist, Britta E; Sheline, Christian T; Shuttleworth, C William

    2013-06-01

    Spreading depolarization (SD) is a feed-forward wave that propagates slowly throughout brain tissue and recovery from SD involves substantial metabolic demand. Presynaptic Zn(2+) release and intracellular accumulation occurs with SD, and elevated intracellular Zn(2+) ([Zn(2+) ]i ) can impair cellular metabolism through multiple pathways. We tested here whether increased [Zn(2+) ]i could exacerbate the metabolic challenge of SD, induced by KCl, and delay recovery in acute murine hippocampal slices. [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD, by transient ZnCl2 application with the Zn(2+) ionophore pyrithione (Zn/Pyr), delayed recovery of field excitatory post-synaptic potentials (fEPSPs) in a concentration-dependent manner, prolonged DC shifts, and significantly increased extracellular adenosine accumulation. These effects could be due to metabolic inhibition, occurring downstream of pyruvate utilization. Prolonged [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation prior to SD was required for effects on fEPSP recovery and consistent with this, endogenous synaptic Zn(2+) release during SD propagation did not delay recovery from SD. The effects of exogenous [Zn(2+) ]i loading were also lost in slices preconditioned with repetitive SDs, implying a rapid adaptation. Together, these results suggest that [Zn(2+) ]i loading prior to SD can provide significant additional challenge to brain tissue, and could contribute to deleterious effects of [Zn(2+) ]i accumulation in a range of brain injury models. PMID:23495967

  5. Activity-dependent synaptic GRIP1 accumulation drives synaptic scaling up in response to action potential blockade

    PubMed Central

    Gainey, Melanie A.; Tatavarty, Vedakumar; Nahmani, Marc; Lin, Heather; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic scaling is a form of homeostatic plasticity that stabilizes neuronal firing in response to changes in synapse number and strength. Scaling up in response to action-potential blockade is accomplished through increased synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPA receptors (AMPAR), but the receptor trafficking steps that drive this process remain largely obscure. Here, we show that the AMPAR-binding protein glutamate receptor-interacting protein-1 (GRIP1) is essential for regulated synaptic AMPAR accumulation during scaling up. Synaptic abundance of GRIP1 was enhanced by activity deprivation, directly increasing synaptic GRIP1 abundance through overexpression increased the amplitude of AMPA miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs), and shRNA-mediated GRIP1 knockdown prevented scaling up of AMPA mEPSCs. Furthermore, knockdown and replace experiments targeting either GRIP1 or GluA2 revealed that scaling up requires the interaction between GRIP1 and GluA2. Finally, GRIP1 synaptic accumulation during scaling up did not require GluA2 binding. Taken together, our data support a model in which activity-dependent trafficking of GRIP1 to synaptic sites drives the forward trafficking and enhanced synaptic accumulation of GluA2-containing AMPAR during synaptic scaling up. PMID:26109571

  6. Expression of cadR Enhances its Specific Activity for Cd Detoxification and Accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingrui; Wei, Xuezhi; Yu, Pengli; Deng, Xin; Xu, Wenxiu; Ma, Mi; Zhang, Haiyan

    2016-08-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a transition metal that is highly toxic in biological systems. Anthropogenic emissions of Cd have increased biogeochemical cycling and the amount of Cd in the biosphere. Here we studied the utility of a bacterial Cd-binding protein, CadR, for the remediation of Cd contamination. CadR was successfully targeted to chloroplasts using a constitutive Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoter or a shoot-specific Chl a/b-binding protein 2 gene (CAB2) promoter and an RbcS (small subunit of the Rubisco complex) transit peptide. Under short-term (2 d) exposure to Cd, the cadR transgenic plants showed up to a 2.9-fold Cd accumulation in roots compared with untransformed plants. Under medium term (7 d) exposure to Cd, the concentrations of Cd in leaves began to increase but there were no differences between the wild type and the cadR transgenic plants. Under long-term (16 d) exposure to Cd, the cadR transgenic plants accumulated greater amounts of Cd in leaves than the untransformed plants. Total Cd accumulation (µg per plant) in shoots and roots of the plants expressing cadR were significantly higher (up to 3.5-fold in shoots and 5.2-fold in roots) than those of the untransformed plants. We also found that targeting CadR to chloroplasts facilitated chloroplastic metal homeostasis and Chl b accumulation. Our results demonstrate that manipulating chelating capacity in chloroplasts or in the cytoplasm may be effective in modifying both the accumulation of and resistance to Cd. PMID:27382127

  7. Myeloperoxidase-mediated Methionine Oxidation Promotes an Amyloidogenic Outcome for Apolipoprotein A-I*

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Gary K. L.; Witkowski, Andrzej; Gantz, Donald L.; Zhang, Tianqi O.; Zanni, Martin T.; Jayaraman, Shobini; Cavigiolio, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    High plasma levels of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) correlate with cardiovascular health, whereas dysfunctional apoA-I is a cause of atherosclerosis. In the atherosclerotic plaques, amyloid deposition increases with aging. Notably, apoA-I is the main component of these amyloids. Recent studies identified high levels of oxidized lipid-free apoA-I in atherosclerotic plaques. Likely, myeloperoxidase (MPO) secreted by activated macrophages in atherosclerotic lesions is the promoter of such apoA-I oxidation. We hypothesized that apoA-I oxidation by MPO levels similar to those present in the artery walls in atherosclerosis can promote apoA-I structural changes and amyloid fibril formation. ApoA-I was exposed to exhaustive chemical (H2O2) oxidation or physiological levels of enzymatic (MPO) oxidation and incubated at 37 °C and pH 6.0 to induce fibril formation. Both chemically and enzymatically oxidized apoA-I produced fibrillar amyloids after a few hours of incubation. The amyloid fibrils were composed of full-length apoA-I with differential oxidation of the three methionines. Met to Leu apoA-I variants were used to establish the predominant role of oxidation of Met-86 and Met-148 in the fibril formation process. Importantly, a small amount of preformed apoA-I fibrils was able to seed amyloid formation in oxidized apoA-I at pH 7.0. In contrast to hereditary amyloidosis, wherein specific mutations of apoA-I cause protein destabilization and amyloid deposition, oxidative conditions similar to those promoted by local inflammation in atherosclerosis are sufficient to transform full-length wild-type apoA-I into an amyloidogenic protein. Thus, MPO-mediated oxidation may be implicated in the mechanism that leads to amyloid deposition in the atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. PMID:25759391

  8. Homozygous calreticulin mutations in patients with myelofibrosis lead to acquired myeloperoxidase deficiency.

    PubMed

    Theocharides, Alexandre P A; Lundberg, Pontus; Lakkaraju, Asvin K K; Lysenko, Veronika; Myburgh, Renier; Aguzzi, Adriano; Skoda, Radek C; Manz, Markus G

    2016-06-23

    The pathogenesis of acquired myeloperoxidase (MPO) deficiency, a rare phenomenon observed in patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), is unknown. MPO is a glycoprotein (GP) chaperoned by calreticulin (CALR) in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in CALR are frequently found in patients with myelofibrosis (MF) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) with nonmutated Janus kinase 2 (JAK2). We hypothesized that acquired MPO deficiency in MPN could be associated with the presence of CALR mutations. A cohort of 317 patients with MPN (142 polycythemia vera [PV], 94 ET, and 81 MF) was screened for MPO deficiency. MPO deficiency was observed in 6/81 MF patients (7.4%), but not in PV or ET patients. Susceptibility to infections had been documented in 2/6 (33%) MPO-deficient patients. Five out of 6 patients with MPO deficiency carried a homozygous CALR mutation and were also deficient in eosinophilic peroxidase (EPX). In contrast, 1 patient with MF, a JAK2-V617F mutation, and MPO deficiency, carried 2 previously reported MPO mutations and showed normal EPX activity. Patients with homozygous CALR mutations had reduced MPO protein, but normal MPO messenger RNA (mRNA) levels supporting a posttranscriptional defect in MPO production. Finally, we demonstrate in vitro that in the absence of CALR, immature MPO protein precursors are degraded in the proteasome. Therefore, 4 decades after the first description of acquired MPO deficiency in MPN, we provide the molecular correlate associated with this phenomenon and evidence that CALR mutations can affect the biosynthesis of GPs. PMID:27013444

  9. Variable inflammation and intramuscular STAT3 phosphorylation and myeloperoxidase levels after downhill running.

    PubMed

    van de Vyver, M; Myburgh, K H

    2014-10-01

    Individual responses in creatine kinase (CK) release after eccentric exercise are divergent. This study aimed to identify whether this could be related to selected humoral or intramuscular inflammatory factors. Twenty-three subjects were divided into non-exercising (n = 5) and downhill run (DHR; n = 18) groups (12 × 5 min, 10% decline at 15 km/h). Blood samples were analyzed for white blood cell differential count, CK, myoglobin, tumor necrosis factor-α, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and IL-10. Muscle biopsies were analyzed for signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3), IκBα, and myeloperoxidase (MPO). DHR participants clustered as early (DHR1) recovery, biphasic response (DHR2), or classic delayed exaggerated CK response (DHR3), with a delayed CK peak (4784 ± 1496 U/L) on day 4. For DHR1 and DHR2, CK peaked on day 1 (DHR1: 1198 ± 837 U/L) or on day 1 and day 4 (DHR2: 1583 ± 448 U/L; 1878 ± 427 U/L), respectively. Immediately post-DHR, IL-6 increased in DHR2 and DHR3 whereas IL-10 increased in all DHR groups. STAT3 signaling increased for DHR1 and DHR2 at 4 h, but MPO at day 2 only in DHR2. Objective cluster analysis uncovered a group of subjects with a characteristic biphasic CK release after DHR. The second elevation was related to their early cytokine response. The results provide evidence that early responses following eccentric exercise are indicative of later variation. PMID:24383415

  10. Niemann-Pick Type C2 Protein Mediates Hepatic Stellate Cells Activation by Regulating Free Cholesterol Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Twu, Yuh-Ching; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Lin, Yun-Lian; Hsu, Shih-Ming; Wang, Yuan-Hsi; Liao, Chia-Yu; Wang, Chung-Kwe; Liang, Yu-Chih; Liao, Yi-Jen

    2016-01-01

    In chronic liver diseases, regardless of their etiology, the development of fibrosis is the first step toward the progression to cirrhosis, portal hypertension, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) are the main profibrogenic cells that promote the pathogenesis of liver fibrosis, and so it is important to identify the molecules that regulate HSCs activation and liver fibrosis. Niemann-Pick type C2 (NPC2) protein plays an important role in the regulation of intracellular cholesterol homeostasis by directly binding with free cholesterol. However, the roles of NPC2 in HSCs activation and liver fibrosis have not been explored in detail. Since a high-cholesterol diet exacerbates liver fibrosis progression in both rodents and humans, we propose that the expression of NPC2 affects free cholesterol metabolism and regulates HSCs activation. In this study, we found that NPC2 is decreased in both thioacetamide- and carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis tissues. In addition, NPC2 is expressed in quiescent HSCs, but its activation status is down-regulated. Knockdown of NPC2 in HSC-T6 cells resulted in marked increases in transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-induced collagen type 1 α1 (Col1a1), α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) expression, and Smad2 phosphorylation. In contrast, NPC2 overexpression decreased TGF-β1-induced HSCs activation. We further demonstrated that NPC2 deficiency significantly increased the accumulation of free cholesterol in HSCs, increasing Col1a1 and α-SMA expression and activating Smad2, and leading to sensitization of HSCs to TGF-β1 activation. In contrast, overexpression of NPC2 decreased U18666A-induced free cholesterol accumulation and inhibited the subsequent HSCs activation. In conclusion, our study has demonstrated that NPC2 plays an important role in HSCs activation by regulating the accumulation of free cholesterol. NPC2 overexpression may thus represent a new treatment strategy for liver fibrosis. PMID:27420058

  11. Liver-specific loss of lipin-1-mediated phosphatidic acid phosphatase activity does not mitigate intrahepatic TG accumulation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Schweitzer, George G.; Chen, Zhouji; Gan, Connie; McCommis, Kyle S.; Soufi, Nisreen; Chrast, Roman; Mitra, Mayurranjan S.; Yang, Kui; Gross, Richard W.; Finck, Brian N.

    2015-01-01

    Lipin proteins (lipin 1, 2, and 3) regulate glycerolipid homeostasis by acting as phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase (PAP) enzymes in the TG synthesis pathway and by regulating DNA-bound transcription factors to control gene transcription. Hepatic PAP activity could contribute to hepatic fat accumulation in response to physiological and pathophysiological stimuli. To examine the role of lipin 1 in regulating hepatic lipid metabolism, we generated mice that are deficient in lipin-1-encoded PAP activity in a liver-specific manner (Alb-Lpin1−/− mice). This allele of lipin 1 was still able to transcriptionally regulate the expression of its target genes encoding fatty acid oxidation enzymes, and the expression of these genes was not affected in Alb-Lpin1−/− mouse liver. Hepatic PAP activity was significantly reduced in mice with liver-specific lipin 1 deficiency. However, hepatocytes from Alb-Lpin1−/− mice had normal rates of TG synthesis, and steady-state hepatic TG levels were unaffected under fed and fasted conditions. Furthermore, Alb-Lpin1−/− mice were not protected from intrahepatic accumulation of diacylglyerol and TG after chronic feeding of a diet rich in fat and fructose. Collectively, these data demonstrate that marked deficits in hepatic PAP activity do not impair TG synthesis and accumulation under acute or chronic conditions of lipid overload. PMID:25722343

  12. Accumulation of fatty acids in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoAcarboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense [corrected].

    PubMed

    Leyva, Luis A; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae. PMID:25129521

  13. Accumulation fatty acids of in Chlorella vulgaris under heterotrophic conditions in relation to activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase, temperature, and co-immobilization with Azospirillum brasilense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leyva, Luis A.; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E.

    2014-10-01

    The relation between fatty acid accumulation, activity of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), and consequently lipid accumulation was studied in the microalgae Chlorella vulgaris co-immobilized with the plant growth-promoting bacterium Azospirillum brasilense under dark heterotrophic conditions with Na acetate as a carbon source. In C. vulgaris immobilized alone, cultivation experiments for 6 days showed that ACC activity is directly related to fatty acid accumulation, especially in the last 3 days. In co-immobilization experiments, A. brasilense exerted a significant positive effect over ACC activity, increased the quantity in all nine main fatty acids, increased total lipid accumulation in C. vulgaris, and mitigated negative effects of nonoptimal temperature for growth. No correlation between ACC activity and lipid accumulation in the cells was established for three different temperatures. This study demonstrated that the interaction between A. brasilense and C. vulgaris has a significant effect on fatty acid and lipid accumulation in the microalgae.

  14. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE-/- mice and activate platelets via TLR2.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P; Byzova, Tatiana V; Salomon, Robert G; Podrez, Eugene A

    2016-05-26

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE(-/-) mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  15. Novel phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives accumulate in circulation in hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice and activate platelets via TLR2

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Sudipta; Xin, Liang; Panigrahi, Soumya; Zimman, Alejandro; Wang, Hua; Yakubenko, Valentin P.; Byzova, Tatiana V.; Salomon, Robert G.

    2016-01-01

    A prothrombotic state and increased platelet reactivity are common in dyslipidemia and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation, a major consequence of oxidative stress, generates highly reactive products, including hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids that modify autologous proteins generating biologically active derivatives. Phosphatidylethanolamine, the second most abundant eukaryotic phospholipid, can also be modified by hydroxy-ω-oxoalkenoic acids. However, the conditions leading to accumulation of such derivatives in circulation and their biological activities remain poorly understood. We now show that carboxyalkylpyrrole-phosphatidylethanolamine derivatives (CAP-PEs) are present in the plasma of hyperlipidemic ApoE−/− mice. CAP-PEs directly bind to TLR2 and induces platelet integrin αIIbβ3 activation and P-selectin expression in a Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-dependent manner. Platelet activation by CAP-PEs includes assembly of TLR2/TLR1 receptor complex, induction of downstream signaling via MyD88/TIRAP, phosphorylation of IRAK4, and subsequent activation of tumor necrosis factor receptor–associated factor 6. This in turn activates the Src family kinases, spleen tyrosine kinase and PLCγ2, and platelet integrins. Murine intravital thrombosis studies demonstrated that CAP-PEs accelerate thrombosis in TLR2-dependent manner and that TLR2 contributes to accelerate thrombosis in mice in the settings of hyperlipidemia. Our study identified the novel end-products of lipid peroxidation, accumulating in circulation in hyperlipidemia and inducing platelet activation by promoting cross-talk between innate immunity and integrin activation signaling pathways. PMID:27015965

  16. Proteasome inhibitors induce peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor transactivation through RXR accumulation and a protein kinase C-dependent pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Tsao, W.-C.; Wu, H.-M.; Chi, K.-H.; Chang, Y.-H.; Lin, W.-W. . E-mail: wwl@ha.mc.ntu.edu.tw

    2005-03-10

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma}), a member of nuclear hormone receptors, forms a heterodimeric DNA binding complex with retinoid X receptor (RXR) and serves as a transcriptional regulator of gene expression. In this study, using luciferase assay of a reporter gene containing PPAR response element (PPRE), we found PPRE transactivity was additively induced by PPAR{gamma} activator (15dPGJ{sub 2}) and RXR activator (9-cis retinoic acid, 9-cis RA). Proteasome inhibitors MG132 and MG262 also stimulate PPRE transactivity in a concentration-dependent manner, and this effect is synergistic to 15dPGJ{sub 2} and 9-cis RA. PKC activation by 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and ingenol 3,20-dibenzoate (IDB) also led to an increased PPRE activation, and this action was additive to PPAR{gamma} activators and 9-cis RA, but not to proteasome inhibitors. Results indicate that the PPAR{gamma} enhancing effect of proteasome inhibitors was attributed to redox-sensitive PKC activation. Western blot analysis showed that the protein level of RXR{alpha}, but not PPAR{gamma}, RXR{beta}, or PKC isoforms, was accumulated in the presence of proteasome inhibitors. Taken together, we conclude that proteasome inhibitors can upregulate PPRE activity through RXR{alpha} accumulation and a PKC-dependent pathway. The former is due to inhibition of RXR{alpha} degradation through ubiquitin-dependent proteasome system, while the latter is mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) production.

  17. The Early Activation Marker CD69 Regulates the Expression of Chemokines and CD4 T Cell Accumulation in Intestine

    PubMed Central

    Radulovic, Katarina; Rossini, Valerio; Manta, Calin; Holzmann, Karlheinz; Kestler, Hans A.; Niess, Jan Hendrik

    2013-01-01

    Migration of naïve and activated lymphocytes is regulated by the expression of various molecules such as chemokine receptors and ligands. CD69, the early activation marker of C-type lectin domain family, is also shown to regulate the lymphocyte migration by affecting their egress from the thymus and secondary lymphoid organs. Here, we aimed to investigate the role of CD69 in accumulation of CD4 T cells in intestine using murine models of inflammatory bowel disease. We found that genetic deletion of CD69 in mice increases the expression of the chemokines CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 in CD4+ T cells and/or CD4− cells. Efficient in vitro migration of CD69-deficient CD4 T cells toward the chemokine stimuli was the result of increased expression and/or affinity of chemokine receptors. In vivo CD69−/− CD4 T cells accumulate in the intestine in higher numbers than B6 CD4 T cells as observed in competitive homing assay, dextran sodium sulphate (DSS)-induced colitis and antigen-specific transfer colitis. In DSS colitis CD69−/− CD4 T cell accumulation in colonic lamina propria (cLP) was associated with increased expression of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 genes. Furthermore, treatment of DSS-administrated CD69−/− mice with the mixture of CCL-1, CXCL-10 and CCL-19 neutralizing Abs significantly decreased the histopathological signs of colitis. Transfer of OT-II×CD69−/− CD45RBhigh CD4 T cells into RAG−/− hosts induced CD4 T cell accumulation in cLP. This study showed CD69 as negative regulator of inflammatory responses in intestine as it decreases the expression of chemotactic receptors and ligands and reduces the accumulation of CD4 T cells in cLP during colitis. PMID:23776480

  18. Enrichment of denitrifying glycogen-accumulating organisms in anaerobic/anoxic activated sludge system.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Raymond J; Yuan, Zhiguo; Keller, Jürg

    2003-02-20

    Denitrifying glycogen-accumulating organisms (DGAO) were successfully enriched in a lab-scale sequencing batch reactor (SBR) running with anaerobic/anoxic cycles and acetate feeding during the anaerobic period. Acetate was completely taken up anaerobically, which was accompanied by the consumption of glycogen and the production of poly-beta-hydroxy-alkanoates (PHA). In the subsequent anoxic stage, nitrate or nitrite was utilized as electron acceptor for the oxidation of PHA, resulting in glycogen replenishment and cell growth. The above phenotype showed by the enrichment culture demonstrates the existence of DGAO. Further, it was found that the anaerobic behavior of DGAO could be predicted well by the anaerobic GAO model of Filipe et al. (2001) and Zeng et al. (2002a). The final product of denitrification during anoxic stage was mainly nitrous oxide (N(2)O) rather than N(2). The data strongly suggests that N(2)O production may be caused by the inhibition of nitrous oxide reductase by an elevated level of nitrite accumulated during denitrification. The existence of these organisms is a concern in biological nutrient removal systems that typically have an anaerobic/anoxic/aerobic reactor sequence since they are potential competitors to the polyphosphate-accumulating organisms. PMID:12491525

  19. Relationship between in vitro binding activity and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Sakahara, H.; Endo, K.; Koizumi, M.; Nakashima, T.; Kunimatsu, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Kawamura, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Tanaka, H.; Kotoura, Y.

    1988-02-01

    The relationship between in vitro cell binding and in vivo tumor accumulation of radiolabeled antibodies was studied using /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled monoclonal antibodies to human osteosarcoma, and a human osteosarcoma xenograft (KT005) in nude mice. Three monoclonal antibodies--OST6, OST7, and OST15--raised against human osteosarcoma recognize the same antigen molecule. Although the binding of both /sup 125/I- and /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 to KT005 cells was higher than that of radiolabeled OST7 in vitro, /sup 125/I-labeled OST6 showed a faster clearance from the circulation and a lower accumulation in the transplanted tumor than /sup 125/I-labeled OST7. In contrast to the radioiodinated antibodies, the in vivo tumor accumulation of /sup 111/In-labeled OST6 was higher, although not significantly, than that of /sup 111/In-labeled OST7. OST15 showed the lowest binding in vitro, and its in vivo tumor localization was also lower than the others. The discrepancy in tumor uptake between OST6 and OST7 labeled with either /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In may have been a result of differing blood clearance. These results suggest that binding studies can be used to exclude from in vivo use those antibodies which show very poor binding in vitro, while in vivo serum clearance may be a better test for choosing antibodies with similar binding.

  20. Eucommia ulmoides Oliver Extract, Aucubin, and Geniposide Enhance Lysosomal Activity to Regulate ER Stress and Hepatic Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hwa-Young; Lee, Geum-Hwa; Lee, Mi-Rin; Kim, Hye-Kyung; Kim, Nan-young; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Lee, Yong-Chul; Kim, Hyung-Ryong; Chae, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Eucommia ulmoides Oliver is a natural product widely used as a dietary supplement and medicinal plant. Here, we examined the potential regulatory effects of Eucommia ulmoides Oliver extracts (EUE) on hepatic dyslipidemia and its related mechanisms by in vitro and in vivo studies. EUE and its two active constituents, aucubin and geniposide, inhibited palmitate-induced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, reducing hepatic lipid accumulation through secretion of apolipoprotein B and associated triglycerides and cholesterol in human HepG2 hepatocytes. To determine how EUE diminishes the ER stress response, lysosomal and proteasomal protein degradation activities were analyzed. Although proteasomal activity was not affected, lysosomal enzyme activities including V-ATPase were significantly increased by EUE as well as aucubin and geniposide in HepG2 cells. Treatment with the V-ATPase inhibitor, bafilomycin, reversed the inhibition of ER stress, secretion of apolipoprotein B, and hepatic lipid accumulation induced by EUE or its component, aucubin or geniposide. In addition, EUE was determined to regulate hepatic dyslipidemia by enhancing lysosomal activity and to regulate ER stress in rats fed a high-fat diet. Together, these results suggest that EUE and its active components enhance lysosomal activity, resulting in decreased ER stress and hepatic dyslipidemia. PMID:24349058

  1. CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, accumulates at the postsynaptic density in an activity-dependent manner

    SciTech Connect

    Dosemeci, Ayse; Thein, Soe; Yang, Yijung; Reese, Thomas S.; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD is a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Presence of CYLD in PSDs is established by biochemistry and immunoEM. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CYLD accumulates on PSDs upon depolarization of neurons. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Accumulation of CYLD at PSDs may regulate trafficking/degradation of synaptic proteins. -- Abstract: Polyubiquitin chains on proteins flag them for distinct fates depending on the type of polyubiquitin linkage. While lysine48-linked polyubiquitination directs proteins to proteasomal degradation, lysine63-linked polyubiquitination promotes different protein trafficking and is involved in autophagy. Here we show that postsynaptic density (PSD) fractions from adult rat brain contain deubiquitinase activity that targets both lysine48 and lysine63-linked polyubiquitins. Comparison of PSD fractions with parent subcellular fractions by Western immunoblotting reveals that CYLD, a deubiquitinase specific for lysine63-linked polyubiquitins, is highly enriched in the PSD fraction. Electron microscopic examination of hippocampal neurons in culture under basal conditions shows immunogold label for CYLD at the PSD complex in approximately one in four synapses. Following depolarization by exposure to high K+, the proportion of CYLD-labeled PSDs as well as the labeling intensity of CYLD at the PSD increased by more than eighty percent, indicating that neuronal activity promotes accumulation of CYLD at the PSD. An increase in postsynaptic CYLD following activity would promote removal of lysine63-polyubiquitins from PSD proteins and thus could regulate their trafficking and prevent their autophagic degradation.

  2. Galactinol synthase enzyme activity influences raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) accumulation in developing chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seeds.

    PubMed

    Gangola, Manu P; Jaiswal, Sarita; Kannan, Udhaya; Gaur, Pooran M; Båga, Monica; Chibbar, Ravindra N

    2016-05-01

    To understand raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFO) metabolism in chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) seeds, RFO accumulation and corresponding biosynthetic enzymes activities were determined during seed development of chickpea genotypes with contrasting RFO concentrations. RFO concentration in mature seeds was found as a facilitator rather than a regulating step of seed germination. In mature seeds, raffinose concentrations ranged from 0.38 to 0.68 and 0.75 to 0.99 g/100 g, whereas stachyose concentrations varied from 0.79 to 1.26 and 1.70 to 1.87 g/100 g indicating significant differences between low and high RFO genotypes, respectively. Chickpea genotypes with high RFO concentration accumulated higher concentrations of myo-inositol and sucrose during early seed developmental stages suggesting that initial substrate concentrations may influence RFO concentration in mature seeds. High RFO genotypes showed about two to three-fold higher activity for all RFO biosynthetic enzymes compared to those with low RFO concentrations. RFO biosynthetic enzymes activities correspond with accumulation of individual RFO during seed development. PMID:26953100

  3. Accumulation of uroporphyrin does not provoke further inhibition of liver uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase activity in hexachlorobenzene-induced porphyria.

    PubMed

    Adjarov, D G; Elder, G H

    1986-01-01

    The inhibition of uroporphyrinogen decarboxylase (Uro-D) is the basic pathogenetic mechanism in porphyria caused by hexachlorobenzene (HCB). This study aimed to establish whether hepatic accumulation of uroporphyrin in this porphyria could provoke a further decrease of Uro-D activity. Male C57Bl/6 mice were treated for 8 weeks with a diet containing 0.02% HCB. In some of them the deposition of liver porphyrins was additionally increased by intraperitoneal application of delta-aminolaevulinic acid (ALA). Uro-D activity was determined by measuring unconverted substrate uroporphyrinogen after its oxidation to uroporphyrin by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography. The value of endogenously formed uroporphyrin was also obtained from the sample by subtraction, using a blank assay. HCB treatment resulted in reduced activity of hepatic Uro-D, but this activity was not significantly less in animals loaded with ALA than in non-loaded mice. Uroporphyrin deposition tended to decrease 6 weeks after withdrawal of HCB, but the activity of Uro-D was still markedly inhibited. There was no evidence that the accumulation of uroporphyrin promoted a supplementary decrease of Uro-D activity in HCB porphyria. PMID:3596742

  4. Present-day Block Motions and Strain Accumulation on Active Faults in the Caribbean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Symithe, S. J.; Calais, E.; Freed, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    The quasi-frontal subduction of the north and south American plates under the Lesser Antilles and the left and right lateral strike-slip along the northern and southern margins of the Caribbean plate offer the opportunity to study the transition from subduction to strike-slip between major plates. In addition, the segmentation and degree of interplate coupling at the Lesser Antilles subduction is key to our understanding of the earthquake potential of a subduction whose length is similar to the rupture area of the Mw9.0, 2011, Tohoku earthquake in Japan. We used the block modeling approach described in Meade and Loveless (2009) to test the optimal block geometry for the northern, eastern and southern boundaries of the Caribbean plate. We solved for angular velocities for each block/plate and strain accumulation rates for all major faults in the region. Then we calculated the variations in interplate coupling along the subduction plate boundaries using the accumulated strain rates. We tested 11 different block geometries; they are all based on geological evidences unless they are suggested by discrepancies within the GPS and seismological data or by previously published results. We confirm the existence of the micro Gonave plate. The boundary between the Micro-Gonave plate and the Hispaniola crustal block is better suited along the Haitian-Thrust-Belt instead of the Neiba-Matheux fault. The interseismic GPS velocities do not show evidence for a distinct North Lesser Antilles block. We found a totally uncoupled section of the subduction starting from the Puerto-Rico trench to the end of the Lesser Antilles section. All the relative motion of the Caribbean block is lost aseismically along the boundary of that portion of the subduction. While we found strong coupling along the northern Hispaniola section, most of the deformation on this region is being accumulated along intrablock faults with very low strain (~2mm/yr) along the intraplate subduction interface. We also

  5. Inhibition of Morganella morganii Histidine Decarboxylase Activity and Histamine Accumulation in Mackerel Muscle Derived from Filipendula ulumaria Extracts.

    PubMed

    Nitta, Yoko; Yasukata, Fumiko; Kitamoto, Noritoshi; Ito, Mikiko; Sakaue, Motoyoshi; Kikuzaki, Hiroe; Ueno, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    Filipendula ulmaria, also known as meadowsweet, is an herb; its extract was examined for the prevention of histamine production, primarily that caused by contaminated fish. The efficacy of meadowsweet was assessed using two parameters: inhibition of Morganella morganii histidine decarboxylase (HDC) and inhibition of histamine accumulation in mackerel. Ellagitannins from F. ulmaria (rugosin D, rugosin A methyl ester, tellimagrandin II, and rugosin A) were previously shown to be potent inhibitors of human HDC; and in the present work, these compounds inhibited M. morganii HDC, with half maximal inhibitory concentration values of 1.5, 4.4, 6.1, and 6.8 μM, respectively. Application of the extracts (at 2 wt%) to mackerel meat yielded significantly decreased histamine accumulation compared with treatment with phosphate-buffered saline as a control. Hence, F. ulmaria exhibits inhibitory activity against bacterial HDC and might be effective for preventing food poisoning caused by histamine. PMID:26939657

  6. Effects of waste activated sludge and surfactant addition on primary sludge hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhouying; Chen, Guanlan; Chen, Yinguang

    2010-05-01

    This paper focused on the effects of waste activated sludge (WAS) and surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) addition on primary sludge (PS) hydrolysis and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) accumulation in fermentation. The results showed that sludge hydrolysis, SCFA accumulation, NH(4)(+)-N and PO(4)(3-)-P release, and volatile suspended solids (VSS) reduction were increased by WAS addition to PS, which were further increased by the addition of SDBS to the mixture of PS and WAS. Acetic, propionic and valeric acids were the top three SCFA in all experiments. Also, the fermentation liquids of PS, PS+WAS, and PS+WAS+SDBS were added, respectively, to municipal wastewater to examine their effects on biological municipal wastewater treatment, and the enhancement of both wastewater nitrogen and phosphorus removals was observed compared with no fermentation liquid addition. PMID:20096564

  7. A Fuzzy Logic Prompting Mechanism Based on Pattern Recognition and Accumulated Activity Effective Index Using a Smartphone Embedded Sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chung-Tse; Chan, Chia-Tai

    2016-01-01

    Sufficient physical activity can reduce many adverse conditions and contribute to a healthy life. Nevertheless, inactivity is prevalent on an international scale. Improving physical activity is an essential concern for public health. Reminders that help people change their health behaviors are widely applied in health care services. However, timed-based reminders deliver periodic prompts suffer from flexibility and dependency issues which may decrease prompt effectiveness. We propose a fuzzy logic prompting mechanism, Accumulated Activity Effective Index Reminder (AAEIReminder), based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis to manage physical activity. AAEIReminder recognizes activity levels using a smartphone-embedded sensor for pattern recognition and analyzing the amount of physical activity in activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder can infer activity situations such as the amount of physical activity and days spent exercising through fuzzy logic, and decides whether a prompt should be delivered to a user. This prompting system was implemented in smartphones and was used in a short-term real-world trial by seventeenth participants for validation. The results demonstrated that the AAEIReminder is feasible. The fuzzy logic prompting mechanism can deliver prompts automatically based on pattern recognition and activity effective analysis. AAEIReminder provides flexibility which may increase the prompts' efficiency. PMID:27548184

  8. Myeloperoxidase and Crystalline Bodies in the Granules of DMBA-Induced Rat Chloroma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ioachim, Harry L.; Keller, Steven; Sabbath, Marlene; Andersson, Barbro; Dorsett, Brent; Essner, Edward

    1972-01-01

    Chloroma (chloroleukemia) was induced in a splenectomized rat by repeatedly administering dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) and was serially transplanted thereafter. Composed of immature myeloid cells, the tumor imparted a green discoloration to the tissues that it infiltrated extensively. Chloroma cells fluoresced red in ultraviolet light, produced a characteristic curve in spectrophotometry, and contained large amounts of myeloperoxidase. They included numerous intracytoplasmic granules of both types A and B, which contained occasional crystalline bars. Permanent lines of chloroma cells were established in tissue culture. These cells, while maintaining their initial morphology, ceased producing myeloperoxidase and subsequently induced white tumors when they were isotransplanted. ImagesFig 12Fig 13Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 8Fig 9Fig 10Fig 11Fig 1Fig 2Fig 3 PMID:4333120

  9. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  10. Salivary Myeloperoxidase, Assessed by 3,3′-Diaminobenzidine Colorimetry, Can Differentiate Periodontal Patients from Nonperiodontal Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Klangprapan, Supaporn; Chaiyarit, Ponlatham; Hormdee, Doosadee; Kampichai, Amonrujee; Khampitak, Tueanjit; Daduang, Jureerut; Tavichakorntrakool, Ratree; Panijpan, Bhinyo; Boonsiri, Patcharee

    2016-01-01

    Periodontal diseases, which result from inflammation of tooth supporting tissues, are highly prevalent worldwide. Myeloperoxidase (MPO), from certain white blood cells in saliva, is a biomarker for inflammation. We report our study on the salivary MPO activity and its association with severity of periodontal diseases among Thai patients. Periodontally healthy subjects (n = 11) and gingivitis (n = 32) and periodontitis patients (n = 19) were enrolled. Assessments of clinically periodontal parameters were reported as percentages for gingival bleeding index (GI) and bleeding on probing (BOP), whereas pocket depth (PD) and clinical attachment loss (CAL) were measured in millimeters and then made to index scores. Salivary MPO activity was measured by colorimetry using 3,3′-diaminobenzidine as substrate. The results showed that salivary MPO activity in periodontitis patients was significantly higher than in healthy subjects (p = 0.003) and higher than in gingivitis patients (p = 0.059). No difference was found between gingivitis and healthy groups (p = 0.181). Significant correlations were observed (p < 0.01) between salivary MPO activity and GI (r = 0.632, p < 0.001), BOP (r = 0.599, p < 0.001), PD (r = 0.179, p = 0.164), and CAL (r = 0.357, p = 0.004) index scores. Sensitivity (94.12%), specificity (54.55%), and positive (90.57%) and negative (66.67%) predictive values indicate that salivary MPO activity has potential use as a screening marker for oral health of the Thai community. PMID:27274868

  11. Impact of myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants on the product profile of human 5-lipoxygenase.

    PubMed

    Zschaler, Josefin; Dorow, Juliane; Schöpe, Louisa; Ceglarek, Uta; Arnhold, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Human 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX) oxidizes arachidonic acid to 5S-hydroperoxy-6 E,8 Z,11 Z,14 Z-eicosatetraenoic acid (5-HpETE) and leukotriene (LT) A4. In neutrophils, LTA4 is further converted to the potent chemoattractant LTB4. These cells also contain the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO), which produces several potent oxidants such as hypochlorous acid (HOCl), which are involved in pathogen defense and immune regulation. Here, we addressed the question whether MPO-derived oxidants are able to affect the activity of 5-LOX and the product profile of this enzyme. Human 5-LOX was incubated with increasing amounts of HOCl or HOBr. Afterward, arachidonic acid metabolites of 5-LOX were analyzed by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography as well as by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry. The incubation of 5-LOX with the MPO-derived oxidants significantly changed the product profile of 5-LOX. Thereby, HOCl and HOBr increased the ratio of 5-H(p)ETE to 6-trans-LTB4 in a concentration-dependent manner. At low oxidant concentrations, there was a strong decrease in the yield of 6-trans-LTB4, whereas 5-HpETE did not change or increased. Additionally, the formation of 8-HpETE and 12-HpETE by 5-LOX rose slightly with increasing HOCl and HOBr. Comparable results were obtained with the MPO-H2O2-Cl(-) system when glucose oxidase and glucose were applied as a source of H2O2. This was necessary because of a strong impairment of 5-LOX activity by H2O2. In summary, MPO-derived oxidants showed a considerable impact on 5-LOX, impairing the epoxidation of 5-HpETE, whereas the hydroperoxidation of arachidonic acid was unaffected. Apparently, this was caused by an oxidative modification of critical amino acid residues of 5-LOX. Further work is necessary to assess the specific type and position of oxidation in the substrate-binding cavity of 5-LOX and to specify whether this interaction between 5-LOX and MPO-derived oxidants also takes place in

  12. Oxidation of LDL by myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species: reaction pathways and antioxidant protection.

    PubMed

    Carr, A C; McCall, M R; Frei, B

    2000-07-01

    Oxidative modification of low density lipoprotein (LDL) appears to play an important role in atherogenesis. Although the precise mechanisms of LDL oxidation in vivo are unknown, several lines of evidence implicate myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species, in addition to ceruloplasmin and 15-lipoxygenase. Myeloperoxidase generates a number of reactive species, including hypochlorous acid, chloramines, tyrosyl radicals, and nitrogen dioxide. These reactive species oxidize the protein, lipid, and antioxidant components of LDL. Modification of apolipoprotein B results in enhanced uptake of LDL by macrophages with subsequent formation of lipid-laden foam cells. Nitric oxide synthases produce nitric oxide and, under certain conditions, superoxide radicals. Numerous other sources of superoxide radicals have been identified in the arterial wall, including NAD(P)H oxidases and xanthine oxidase. Nitric oxide and superoxide readily combine to form peroxynitrite, a reactive nitrogen species capable of modifying LDL. In this review, we examine the reaction pathways involved in LDL oxidation by myeloperoxidase and reactive nitrogen species and the potential protective effects of the antioxidant vitamins C and E. PMID:10894808

  13. High concentrations of myeloperoxidase in the equine uterus as an indicator of endometritis.

    PubMed

    Parrilla-Hernandez, Sonia; Ponthier, Jérôme; Franck, Thierry Y; Serteyn, Didier D; Deleuze, Stéfan C

    2014-04-15

    Intraluminal fluid and excessive abnormal hyperedema are regularly used for the diagnosis of endometritis in the mare, which is routinely confirmed by the presence of neutrophils on endometrial smears. Studies show a relation between neutrophils and myeloperoxidase (MPO), an enzyme contained in and released by neutrophils during degranulation or after cell lysis. This enzyme has been found in many fluids and tissues, and associated with different inflammatory pathologies in the horse. The aims of this study were to assess the presence and concentration of MPO in the equine uterus, and to investigate its relation with neutrophils, and other clinical signs of endometritis. Mares (n = 51) were evaluated for the presence of intraluminal fluid and excessive endometrial edema before breeding, and a small volume lavage and cytology samples were obtained. From 69 cycles, supernatant of the uterine flushes was analyzed with a specific equine MPO ELISA assay to measure MPO concentration. Cytology samples were used for the diagnosis of endometritis. Myeloperoxidase was present in the uterus of all estrus mares in highly variable concentrations. Myeloperoxidase concentrations were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in samples with positive cytologies and in the presence of intraluminal fluid. Occasionally, some samples with negative cytologies showed high MPO concentration, but the opposite was never observed. Cycles presenting hyperedema weren't associated with high concentration of MPO, intraluminal fluid, or positive cytology, making it a poor diagnostic tool of endometritis. PMID:24565475

  14. Erosion-accumulative activity of the bottom currents on the continental rise of Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisov, D. G.; Murdmaa, I. O.; Ivanova, E. V.; Roslyakov, A. G.; Anan'ev, R. A.

    2013-09-01

    Several high-resolution "SES 2000 deep" seismic profiles and a core of bottom sediments were obtained in cruises 33, 35, and 37 of the R/V Akademik Ioffe in the area of the Columbia channel (continental rise of Brazil, South America). The analysis of seismic facies and direct correlation of acoustic and lithological data indicates that sedimentation in this area is mostly controlled by the contour current of the Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW). The gravity flows from seamounts and continental slope only episodically contributed coarser material to the deposition of the muddy contourites. The mixed gravitite-contourite systems consisting of accumulative bodies (drifts) and erosion channels are the results of interaction of these sedimentation processes.

  15. Spt5 accumulation at variable genes distinguishes somatic hypermutation in germinal center B cells from ex vivo–activated cells

    PubMed Central

    Maul, Robert W.; Cao, Zheng; Venkataraman, Lakshmi; Giorgetti, Carol A.; Press, Joan L.; Denizot, Yves; Du, Hansen; Sen, Ranjan

    2014-01-01

    Variable (V) genes of immunoglobulins undergo somatic hypermutation by activation-induced deaminase (AID) to generate amino acid substitutions that encode antibodies with increased affinity for antigen. Hypermutation is restricted to germinal center B cells and cannot be recapitulated in ex vivo–activated splenic cells, even though the latter express high levels of AID. This suggests that there is a specific feature of antigen activation in germinal centers that recruits AID to V genes which is absent in mitogen-activated cultured cells. Using two Igh knock-in mouse models, we found that RNA polymerase II accumulates in V regions in B cells after both types of stimulation for an extended distance of 1.2 kb from the TATA box. The paused polymerases generate abundant single-strand DNA targets for AID. However, there is a distinct accumulation of the initiating form of polymerase, along with the transcription cofactor Spt5 and AID, in the V region from germinal center cells, which is totally absent in cultured cells. These data support a model where mutations are prevalent in germinal center cells, but not in ex vivo cells, because the initiating form of polymerase is retained, which affects Spt5 and AID recruitment. PMID:25288395

  16. The inner nuclear membrane protein Emerin regulates β-catenin activity by restricting its accumulation in the nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Markiewicz, Ewa; Tilgner, Katarzyna; Barker, Nick; van de Wetering, Mark; Clevers, Hans; Dorobek, Margareth; Hausmanowa-Petrusewicz, Irena; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Broers, Jos L V; Blankesteijn, W Matthijs; Salpingidou, Georgia; Wilson, Robert G; Ellis, Juliet A; Hutchison, Christopher J

    2006-01-01

    Emerin is a type II inner nuclear membrane (INM) protein of unknown function. Emerin function is likely to be important because, when it is mutated, emerin promotes both skeletal muscle and heart defects. Here we show that one function of Emerin is to regulate the flux of β-catenin, an important transcription coactivator, into the nucleus. Emerin interacts with β-catenin through a conserved adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)-like domain. When GFP-emerin is expressed in HEK293 cells, β-catenin is restricted to the cytoplasm and β-catenin activity is inhibited. In contrast, expression of an emerin mutant, lacking its APC-like domain (GFP-emerinΔ), dominantly stimulates β-catenin activity and increases nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. Human fibroblasts that are null for emerin have an autostimulatory growth phenotype. This unusual growth phenotype arises through enhanced nuclear accumulation and activity of β-catenin and can be replicated in wild-type fibroblasts by transfection with constitutively active β-catenin. Our results support recent findings that suggest that INM proteins can influence signalling pathways by restricting access of transcription coactivators to the nucleus. PMID:16858403

  17. A Low‐Frequency Variant in MAPK14 Provides Mechanistic Evidence of a Link With Myeloperoxidase: A Prognostic Cardiovascular Risk Marker

    PubMed Central

    Waterworth, Dawn M.; Li, Li; Scott, Robert; Warren, Liling; Gillson, Christopher; Aponte, Jennifer; Sarov‐Blat, Lea; Sprecher, Dennis; Dupuis, Josée; Reiner, Alex; Psaty, Bruce M.; Tracy, Russell P.; Lin, Honghuang; McPherson, Ruth; Chissoe, Stephanie; Wareham, Nick; Ehm, Margaret G.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetics can be used to predict drug effects and generate hypotheses around alternative indications. To support Losmapimod, a p38 mitogen‐activated protein kinase inhibitor in development for acute coronary syndrome, we characterized gene variation in MAPK11/14 genes by exome sequencing and follow‐up genotyping or imputation in participants well‐phenotyped for cardiovascular and metabolic traits. Methods and Results Investigation of genetic variation in MAPK11 and MAPK14 genes using additive genetic models in linear or logistic regression with cardiovascular, metabolic, and biomarker phenotypes highlighted an association of RS2859144 in MAPK14 with myeloperoxidase in a dyslipidemic population (Genetic Epidemiology of Metabolic Syndrome Study), P=2.3×10−6). This variant (or proxy) was consistently associated with myeloperoxidase in the Framingham Heart Study and Cardiovascular Health Study studies (replication meta‐P=0.003), leading to a meta‐P value of 9.96×10−7 in the 3 dyslipidemic groups. The variant or its proxy was then profiled in additional population‐based cohorts (up to a total of 58 930 subjects) including Cohorte Lausannoise, Ely, Fenland, European Prospective Investigation of Cancer, London Life Sciences Prospective Population Study, and the Genetics of Obesity Associations study obesity case–control for up to 40 cardiovascular and metabolic traits. Overall analysis identified the same single nucleotide polymorphisms to be nominally associated consistently with glomerular filtration rate (P=0.002) and risk of obesity (body mass index ≥30 kg/m2, P=0.004). Conclusions As myeloperoxidase is a prognostic marker of coronary events, the MAPK14 variant may provide a mechanistic link between p38 map kinase and these events, providing information consistent with current indication of Losmapimod for acute coronary syndrome. If replicated, the association with glomerular filtration rate, along with previous biological findings

  18. Myeloperoxidase: a front-line defender against phagocytosed microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Seymour J.; Kettle, Anthony J.; Rosen, Henry; Winterbourn, Christine C.; Nauseef, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Successful immune defense requires integration of multiple effector systems to match the diverse virulence properties that members of the microbial world might express as they initiate and promote infection. Human neutrophils—the first cellular responders to invading microbes—exert most of their antimicrobial activity in phagosomes, specialized membrane-bound intracellular compartments formed by ingestion of microorganisms. The toxins generated de novo by the phagocyte NADPH oxidase and delivered by fusion of neutrophil granules with nascent phagosomes create conditions that kill and degrade ingested microbes. Antimicrobial activity reflects multiple and complex synergies among the phagosomal contents, and optimal action relies on oxidants generated in the presence of MPO. The absence of life-threatening infectious complications in individuals with MPO deficiency is frequently offered as evidence that the MPO oxidant system is ancillary rather than essential for neutrophil-mediated antimicrobial activity. However, that argument fails to consider observations from humans and KO mice that demonstrate that microbial killing by MPO-deficient cells is less efficient than that of normal neutrophils. We present evidence in support of MPO as a major arm of oxidative killing by neutrophils and propose that the essential contribution of MPO to normal innate host defense is manifest only when exposure to pathogens overwhelms the capacity of other host defense mechanisms. PMID:23066164

  19. [Pigment accumulation and functional activity of chloroplasts in common Pisum sativum L. mutants with low chlorophyll level (chlorotica)].

    PubMed

    Ladygin, V G

    2003-01-01

    Pea mutants chlorotica 2004 and 2014 with a low content of chlorophyll were studied. The mutant 2004 has light green leaves and stem, and the mutant 2014 has yellow green leaves and stem. They accumulate approximately 80 and 50% chlorophylls of the parent form of pea Torsdag cv. The content of carotene in carotenoids of the mutant 2004 was much lower, and the accumulation of lutein and violaxanthine was increased. The accumulation of all carotenoids in the mutant 2014 decreased almost proportionally to a decrease in the chlorophyll content. The rate of CO2 evolution in mutant chlorotica 2004 and 2014 was established to be lower. The quantum efficiency of photosynthesis in the mutants was 29-30% lower as compared to the control, and in hybrid plants it was 1.5-2-fold higher. It is assumed that the increase in the activity of the night-time respiration in gas exchange of chlorotica mutants and the drop of photosynthesis lead to a decrease in biomass increment. The results obtained allow us to conclude that the mutation of chlorotica 2004 and 2014 affects the genes controlling the formation and functioning of different components of the photosynthetic apparatus. PMID:12723346

  20. Effect of TCDD on ACARAT activity and vitamin A accumulation in the kidney of male Sprague-Dawley rats

    SciTech Connect

    Jurek, M.A.; Powers, R.H.; Gilbert, L.C.; Aust, S.D.

    1987-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that rats treated with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exhibit symptoms of vitamin A deficiency, including hypophagia, failure of normal growth, loss of hepatic vitamin A and accumulation of vitamin A in the kidney. They observed that male Sprague-Dawley rats treated with a single dose of TCDD gained less weight than control rats over a 12 day period. Treated rats showed a progressive loss of hepatic retinyl esters to levels 55% that of control rats. Treated rats accumulated renal vitamin A, with retinyl palmitate levels reaching 5.2x that of control animals, while retinol levels were elevated to 1.5x that of control rats. The ratio of retinyl palmitate to retinol was significantly greater in treated rats than in the control rats. Acyl CoA:Retinol Acyl Transferase (ACARART) activity was 2x greater in kidneys from treated rats, and positively correlated with retinyl palmitate concentrations. They suggest that accumulation of retinyl esters in the kidney occurs as a result of retinol esterification, in response to the TCDD-induced vitamin A deficiency.

  1. Accumulation of glucosaminyl(acyl)phosphatidylinositol in an S3 HeLa subline expressing normal dolicholphosphomannose synthase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Sevlever, D; Schiemann, D; Guidubaldi, J; Medof, M E; Rosenberry, T L

    1997-01-01

    Glucosaminyl(acyl)phosphatidylinositol [GlcN(acyl)PI], the third intermediate in the mammalian glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor pathway, is undetectable in most cells. This intermediate was previously shown to accumulate, however, in murine lymphoma mutant E and in yeast mutant dpm1, both of which lack dolicholphosphomannose synthase activity. Here we report that a mammalian HeLa S3 subline, denoted D, produces large amounts of GlcN(acyl)PI. The level of GlcN(acyl)PI in this subline is twice that in the murine lymphoma mutant E and 4 times that in the parental S3 line. This HeLa D subline differs from the previously reported mutants that accumulate GlcN(acyl)PI because no defects in the synthesis or utilization of dolicholphosphomannose were found. Kinetic analysis indicated that in this HeLa subline there is an increased rate of synthesis of GlcN(acyl)PI, whereas the rate of metabolism for this GPI is comparable to that in wild-type cells. Furthermore, HeLa D cells accumulate GlcN(acyl)PI without a block in the synthesis of the downstream mannosylated GPI anchor precursors and GPI-anchored proteins. These findings might be relevant for understanding the regulation of the GPI pathway. PMID:9032473

  2. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  3. Myeloperoxidase-mediated protein oxidation: its possible biological functions.

    PubMed

    Naskalski, Jerzy W; Marcinkiewicz, Janusz; Drozdz, Ryszard

    2002-05-01

    Oxidation of proteins occurs both as a side-effect of aerobic energy metabolism and as an effect of specific metabolism of phagocytic polymorphonuclear granulocytes producing O2- and H2O2. In contrast to other cells, which control their H2O2 level by degrading it to O2 and H2O, polymorphonuclear neutrophilic leukocytes (PMN) use H2O2 as a substrate for oxidizing chloride ions to HOCl which rapidly react with all neighboring thiol, disulfide and amino residues. Chloramines, which are the most abundant HOCl reaction products, react with proteins, modifying only certain exposed methionine and cysteine residues. This may account for selective inactivation of a number of enzymes, carrier proteins and peptide mediators, including the alpha1-proteinase inhibitor, alpha2-macroglobulin and plasminogen activator inhibitor. Inactivaton of plasma proteinase inhibitors protects PMN elastase, collagenase, cathepsin G and other serine proteases in the inflammatory foci. This promotes proteolytic degradation of damaged tissue, removal of bacterial debris and wound healing, as well as tissue remodeling related to the inflammatory processes. Oxidative control of protease-anti-protease balance affects the development of the inflammatory processes. Moreover, inactivation of plasma proteinase inhibitors facilitates primary antigen processing, upregulates lymphocyte proliferative response and activates the local immune response. Oxidation produces a specific protein tagging which attracts and stimulates immune active cells. Therefore, humoral response against oxidatively modified proteins occurs more effectively than that of the native proteins. The effect is dose-dependent with respect to the amount of oxidant employed. Glycol aldehyde, which is the serine chloramine spontaneous decay product, in mice immunized with glycol aldehyde-modified egg-white albumin, yields specific IgG production manifold higher than that in mice immunized with native albumin. Immunopotentiation is produced

  4. A new hexacyclic triterpene acid from the roots of Euscaphis japonica and its inhibitory activity on triglyceride accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan-Ci; Tian, Ke; Sun, Li-Juan; Long, Hui; Li, Lu-Jun; Wu, Zheng-Zhi

    2016-03-01

    A new taraxerene-type hexacyclic triterpene acid named (12R,13S)-3-methoxy-12,13-cyclo-taraxerene-2,14-diene-1-one-28-oic acid (1), together with a known compound 3,7-dihydroxy-5-octanolide (2), was isolated from the roots of Euscaphis japonica. The structure of new compound 1 was elucidated on the basis of NMR, HR-ESIMS and X-ray diffraction analysis. It showed promising inhibitory activity on oleic acid induced triglyceride accumulation on HepG2 cells. PMID:26828452

  5. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines.

    PubMed

    López-Cruz, Roberto I; Crocker, Daniel E; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A; Real-Valle, Roberto A; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  6. Piperlongumine selectively kills glioblastoma multiforme cells via reactive oxygen species accumulation dependent JNK and p38 activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ju Mei; Pan, Feng; Li, Li; Liu, Qian Rong; Chen, Yong; Xiong, Xin Xin; Cheng, Kejun; Yu, Shang Bin; Shi, Zhi; Yu, Albert Cheung-Hoi; Chen, Xiao Qian

    2013-07-19

    Piperlongumine (PL), a natural alkaloid isolated from the long pepper, may have anti-cancer properties. It selectively targets and kills cancer cells but leaves normal cells intact. Here, we reported that PL selectively killed glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cells via accumulating reactive oxygen species (ROS) to activate JNK and p38. PL at 20μM could induce severe cell death in three GBM cell lines (LN229, U87 and 8MG) but not astrocytes in cultures. PL elevated ROS prominently and reduced glutathione levels in LN229 and U87 cells. Antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) completely reversed PL-induced ROS accumulation and prevented cell death in LN229 and U87 cells. In LN229 and U87 cells, PL-treatment activated JNK and p38 but not Erk and Akt, in a dosage-dependent manner. These activations could be blocked by NAC pre-treatment. JNK and p38 specific inhibitors, SB203580 and SP600125 respectively, significantly blocked the cytotoxic effects of PL in LN229 and U87 cells. Our data first suggests that PL may have therapeutic potential for one of the most malignant and refractory tumors GBM. PMID:23796709

  7. GPR40 agonist ameliorates liver X receptor-induced lipid accumulation in liver by activating AMPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Meng, Xiangyu; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Hongxia; Li, Guoping; Wang, Shu; Man, Yong; Tang, Weiqing; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. GPR40 is a G protein-coupled receptor mediating free fatty acid-induced insulin secretion and thus plays a beneficial role in the improvement of diabetes. However, the impact of GPR40 agonist on hepatic steatosis still remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we found that activation of GPR40 by its agonist GW9508 attenuated Liver X receptor (LXR)-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of LXR in the livers of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-cholesterol diet and in HepG2 cells stimulated by chemical agonist caused increased expression of its target lipogenic genes and subsequent lipid accumulation. All these effects of LXR were dramatically downregulated after GW9508 supplementation. Moreover, GPR40 activation was accompanied by upregulation of AMPK pathway, whereas the inhibitive effect of GPR40 on the lipogenic gene expression was largely abrogated by AMPK knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GW9508 exerts a beneficial effect to ameliorate LXR-induced hepatic steatosis through regulation of AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:27121981

  8. GPR40 agonist ameliorates liver X receptor-induced lipid accumulation in liver by activating AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Meng; Meng, Xiangyu; Xu, Jie; Huang, Xiuqing; Li, Hongxia; Li, Guoping; Wang, Shu; Man, Yong; Tang, Weiqing; Li, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Hepatic steatosis is strongly linked to insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. GPR40 is a G protein-coupled receptor mediating free fatty acid-induced insulin secretion and thus plays a beneficial role in the improvement of diabetes. However, the impact of GPR40 agonist on hepatic steatosis still remains to be elucidated. In the present study, we found that activation of GPR40 by its agonist GW9508 attenuated Liver X receptor (LXR)-induced hepatic lipid accumulation. Activation of LXR in the livers of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-cholesterol diet and in HepG2 cells stimulated by chemical agonist caused increased expression of its target lipogenic genes and subsequent lipid accumulation. All these effects of LXR were dramatically downregulated after GW9508 supplementation. Moreover, GPR40 activation was accompanied by upregulation of AMPK pathway, whereas the inhibitive effect of GPR40 on the lipogenic gene expression was largely abrogated by AMPK knockdown. Taken together, our results demonstrated that GW9508 exerts a beneficial effect to ameliorate LXR-induced hepatic steatosis through regulation of AMPK signaling pathway. PMID:27121981

  9. Plasma Hypoxanthine-Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Activity in Bottlenose Dolphins Contributes to Avoiding Accumulation of Non-recyclable Purines

    PubMed Central

    López-Cruz, Roberto I.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Gaxiola-Robles, Ramón; Bernal, Jaime A.; Real-Valle, Roberto A.; Lugo-Lugo, Orlando; Zenteno-Savín, Tania

    2016-01-01

    Marine mammals are exposed to ischemia/reperfusion and hypoxia/reoxygenation during diving. During oxygen deprivation, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) breakdown implies purine metabolite accumulation, which in humans is associated with pathological conditions. Purine recycling in seals increases in response to prolonged fasting and ischemia. Concentrations of metabolites and activities of key enzymes in purine metabolism were examined in plasma and red blood cells from bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) and humans. Hypoxanthine and inosine monophosphate concentrations were higher in plasma from dolphins than humans. Plasma hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase (HGPRT) activity in dolphins suggests an elevated purine recycling rate, and a mechanism for avoiding accumulation of non-recyclable purines (xanthine and uric acid). Red blood cell concentrations of hypoxanthine, adenosine diphosphate, ATP and guanosine triphosphate were lower in dolphins than in humans; adenosine monophosphate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide concentrations were higher in dolphins. HGPRT activity in red blood cells was higher in humans than in dolphins. The lower concentrations of purine catabolism and recycling by-products in plasma from dolphins could be beneficial in providing substrates for recovery of ATP depleted during diving or vigorous swimming. These results suggest that purine salvage in dolphins could be a mechanism for delivering nucleotide precursors to tissues with high ATP and guanosine triphosphate requirements. PMID:27375492

  10. Insulin Resistance in PCOS Patients Enhances Oxidative Stress and Leukocyte Adhesion: Role of Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Victor, Victor M.; Rovira-Llopis, Susana; Bañuls, Celia; Diaz-Morales, Noelia; Martinez de Marañon, Arantxa; Rios-Navarro, Cesar; Alvarez, Angeles; Gomez, Marcelino; Rocha, Milagros; Hernández-Mijares, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases and oxidative stress are related to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and insulin resistance (IR). We have evaluated the relationship between myeloperoxidase (MPO) and leukocyte activation in PCOS patients according to homeostatic model assessment of IR (HOMA-IR), and have explored a possible correlation between these factors and endocrine and inflammatory parameters. This was a prospective controlled study conducted in an academic medical center. The study population consisted of 101 PCOS subjects and 105 control subjects. We divided PCOS subjects into PCOS non-IR (HOMA-IR<2.5) and PCOS IR (HOMA-IR>2.5). Metabolic and anthropometric parameters, total and mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, MPO levels, interactions between human umbilical vein endothelial cells and leukocytes, adhesion molecules (E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-6 and TNF-α) were evaluated. Oxidative stress was observed in PCOS patients, in whom there was an increase in total and mitochondrial ROS production and MPO levels. Enhanced rolling flux and adhesion, and a decrease in polymorphonuclear cell rolling velocity were also detected in PCOS subjects. Increases in IL-6 and TNF-α and adhesion molecules (E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1) were also observed, particularly in the PCOS IR group, providing evidence that inflammation and oxidative stress are related in PCOS patients. HOMA-IR was positively correlated with hsCRP (p<0.001, r = 0.304), ROS production (p<0.01, r = 0.593), leukocyte rolling flux (p<0.05, r = 0.446), E-selectin (p<0.01, r = 0.436) and IL-6 (p<0.001, r = 0.443). The results show an increase in the rate of ROS and MPO levels in PCOS patients in general, and particularly in those with IR. Inflammation in PCOS induces leukocyte-endothelium interactions and a simultaneous increase in IL-6, TNF-α, E-selectin, ICAM-1 and VCAM-1. These conditions are aggravated by the presence of IR. PMID:27007571

  11. Design and synthesis of a series of piperazine-1-carboxamidine derivatives with antifungal activity resulting from accumulation of endogenous reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    François, Isabelle E; Thevissen, Karin; Pellens, Klaartje; Meert, Els M; Heeres, Jan; Freyne, Eddy; Coesemans, Erwin; Viellevoye, Marcel; Deroose, Frederik; Martinez Gonzalez, Sonia; Pastor, Joaquin; Corens, David; Meerpoel, Lieven; Borgers, Marcel; Ausma, Jannie; Dispersyn, Gerrit D; Cammue, Bruno P

    2009-10-01

    In this study, we screened a library of 500 compounds for fungicidal activity via induction of endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. Structure-activity relationship studies showed that piperazine-1-carboxamidine analogues with large atoms or large side chains substituted on the phenyl group at the R(3) and R(5) positions are characterized by a high ROS accumulation capacity in Candida albicans and a high fungicidal activity. Moreover, we could link the fungicidal mode of action of the piperazine-1-carboxamidine derivatives to the accumulation of endogenous ROS. PMID:19705386

  12. Activity-dependent accumulation of calcium in Purkinje cell dendritic spines

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, S.B.; Leapman, R.D.; Landis, D.M.; Reese, T.S.

    1988-03-01

    The calcium content of synapses of parallel fibers on Purkinje cell dendritic spines was determined by electron probe x-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried cryosections from directly frozen slices of mouse cerebellar cortex. In fresh slices frozen within 20-30 sec of excision, calcium concentrations ranging from 0.8 to 18.6 mmol/kg of dry weight were measured in cisterns of smooth endoplasmic reticulum within Purkinje cell dendritic spines. The average calcium content of spine cisterns in rapidly excised slices (6.7 +/- 0.6 mmol/kg of dry weight +/- SEM) was higher than the average calcium content of spine cisterns in brain slices incubated without stimulation for 1-2 hr before direct freezing (2.5 +/- 0.4 mmol/kg of dry weight). Depolarization of incubated cerebellar slices by isotonic 55 mM KCl resulted in the accumulation within spine cisterns of very high amounts of calcium or isotonically substituted strontium, both derived from the extracellular fluid. These results suggest that one function of spine cisterns is to sequester free calcium that enters the spine through ligand-gated or voltage-gated channels during synaptic transmission.

  13. Activation of accumulated nitrite reduction by immobilized Pseudomonas stutzeri T13 during aerobic denitrification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Fang; Sun, Yilu; Li, Ang; Zhang, Xuening; Yang, Jixian

    2015-01-01

    The excellent removal efficiency of nitrate by the aerobic denitrifier, Pseudomonas stutzeri T13, was achieved in free cells system. However, poor nitrite reduction prevents efficient aerobic denitrification because of the nitrite accumulation. This problem could be conquered by immobilizing the cells on supports. In this study, strain T13 was immobilized by mycelial pellets (MPs), polyurethane foam cubes (PFCs) and sodium alginate beads (SABs). Higher removal percentages of TN in MP (43.78%), PFC (42.31%) and SAB (57.25%) systems were achieved compared with the free cell system (29.7%). Furthermore, the optimal condition for immobilized cell systems was as follows: 30°C, 100rpm shaking speed and pH 7. The shock-resistance of SAB system was relatively poor, which could collapse under either alkaline (pH=9) or high rotating (200rpm) conditions. The recycling experiments demonstrated that the high steady TN removal rate could be maintained for seven cycles in both MP and PFC systems. PMID:25827250

  14. Chibby drives β catenin cytoplasmic accumulation leading to activation of the unfolded protein response in BCR-ABL1+ cells.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Manuela; Leo, Elisa; Takemaru, Ken-Ichi; Campi, Virginia; Borsi, Enrica; Castagnetti, Fausto; Gugliotta, Gabriele; Santucci, Maria Alessandra; Martinelli, Giovanni

    2013-09-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disease caused by the constitutive tyrosine kinase (TK) activity of the BCR-ABL fusion protein. However, the phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC) is sustained by β catenin rather than by the BCR-ABL TK. β catenin activity in CML is contingent upon its stabilization proceeding from the BCR-ABL-induced phosphorylation at critical residues for interaction with the Adenomatous polyposis coli (APC)/Axin/glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) destruction complex or GSK3 inactivating mutations. Here we studied the impact of β catenin antagonist Chibby (CBY) on β catenin signaling in BCR-ABL1+ cells. CBY is a small conserved protein which interacts with β catenin and impairs β catenin-mediated transcriptional activation through two distinct molecular mechanisms: 1) competition with T cell factor (TCF) or lymphoid enhancer factor (LEF) for β catenin binding; and 2) nuclear export of β catenin via interaction with 14-3-3. We found that its enforced expression in K562 cell line promoted β catenin cytoplasmic translocation resulting in inhibition of target gene transcription. Moreover, cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin activated the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress-associated pathway known as unfolded protein response (UPR). CBY-driven cytoplasmic accumulation of β catenin is also a component of BCR-ABL1+ cell response to the TK inhibitor Imatinib (IM). It evoked the UPR activation leading to the induction of BCL2-interacting mediator of cell death (BIM) by UPR sensors. BIM, in turn, contributed to the execution phase of apoptosis in the activation of ER resident caspase 12 and mobilization of Ca(2+) stores. PMID:23707389

  15. CARBON AND NITROGEN ACCUMULATION AND MICROBIAL ACTIVITY IN MOUNT ST. HELENS PYROCLASTIC SUBSTRATES AFTER 25 YEARS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lupines are important ecosystem engineers, linking above and belowground recovery of Mount St. Helens pyroclastic substrates by increasing soil organic matter and microbial activity and by influencing other biotic processes. Various soil properties were measured in samples collected from locations ...

  16. An extraovarian protein accumulated in mosquito oocytes is a carboxypeptidase activated in embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Wenlong Cho; Deitsch, K.W.; Raikhel, A.S. )

    1991-12-01

    The authors report a phenomenon previously unknown for oviparous animals; in Aedes aegypti mosquitoes a serine carboxypeptidase is synthesized extraovarially and then internalized by oocytes. The cDNA encoding mosquito vitellogenic carboxypeptidase (VCP) was cloned and sequenced. The VCP cDNA hybridizes to a 1.5-kilobase mRNA present only in the fat body of vitellogenic females. The deduced amino acid sequence of VCP shares significant homology with members of the serine carboxypeptidase family. Binding assays using a serine protease inhibitor, ({sup 3}H)diisopropyl fluorophosphate, showed that VCP is activated in eggs at the onset of embryonic development. Activation of VCP is associated with the reduction in its size from 53 kDa (inactive proenzyme) to 48 kDa (active enzyme). The active, 48-kDa, form of VCP is maximally present at the middle of embryonic development and disappears by the end.

  17. Deficient activity of dephosphophosphorylase kinase and accumulation of glycogen in the liver

    PubMed Central

    Hug, George; Schubert, William K.; Chuck, Gail

    1969-01-01

    Low activity of phosphorylase and increased concentration of glycogen were found in liver tissue from five children with asymptomatic hepatomegaly. In vitro activation of liver phosphorylase in these patients occurred at the rate of 10% or less of normal. Elimination of the defect by the addition of kinase that activates phosphorylase demonstrated the integrity of the phosphorylase enzyme and the deficient activity of dephophophosphorylase kinase. On the average, 60% of the phosphorylase enzyme of normal human liver was in the active form. Phosphorylase kinase of rabbit muscle activated phosphorylase of normal human liver to a final value that was significantly higher than the one obtained in the absence of muscle phosphorylase kinase. The ultrastructural examination of hepatic tissue from the five patients revealed increased amounts of glycogen. There was scarcity of endoplasmic reticulum. There was intercellular glycogen in continuity with the glycogen of the hepatocytes through breaks in their circumference. Lipid droplets with lucid areas in the form of needles and plates contained aggregates of glycogen. There were numerous lysosomes, some containing glycogen. Large vacuoles filled with glycogen and surrounded by a membrane were seen occasionally. The vacuoles might reflect the lysosomal pathway of glycogen degradation, since there was apparent fusion of such autophagic vacuoles with small vesicles resembling primary lysosomes. Images PMID:5774108

  18. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is rendered enzymatically inactive by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants but retains its immunomodulatory function.

    PubMed

    Dickerhof, Nina; Schindler, Lisa; Bernhagen, Jürgen; Kettle, Anthony J; Hampton, Mark B

    2015-12-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is an important player in the regulation of the inflammatory response. Elevated plasma MIF is found in sepsis, arthritis, cystic fibrosis and atherosclerosis. Immunomodulatory activities of MIF include the ability to promote survival and recruitment of inflammatory cells and to amplify pro-inflammatory cytokine production. MIF has an unusual nucleophilic N-terminal proline with catalytic tautomerase activity. It remains unclear whether tautomerase activity is required for MIF function, but small molecules that inhibit tautomerase activity also inhibit the pro-inflammatory activities of MIF. A prominent feature of the acute inflammatory response is neutrophil activation and production of reactive oxygen species, including myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid. We hypothesized that MPO-derived oxidants would oxidize the N-terminal proline of MIF and alter its biological activity. MIF was exposed to hypochlorous acid and hypothiocyanous acid and the oxidative modifications on MIF were examined by LC-MS/MS. Imine formation and carbamylation was observed on the N-terminal proline in response to MPO-dependent generation of hypochlorous and hypothiocyanous acid, respectively. These modifications led to a complete loss of tautomerase activity. However, modified MIF still increased CXCL-8/IL-8 production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and blocked neutrophil apoptosis, indicating that tautomerase activity is not essential for these biological functions. Pre-treatment of MIF with hypochlorous acid protected the protein from covalent modification by the MIF inhibitor 4-iodo-6-phenylpyrimidine (4-IPP). Therefore, oxidant generation at inflammatory sites may protect MIF from inactivation by more disruptive electrophiles, including drugs designed to target the tautomerase activity of MIF. PMID:26453918

  19. [Combined effects of copper and simulated acid rain on copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa].

    PubMed

    He, Shan-Ying; Gao, Yong-Jie; Shentu, Jia-Li; Chen, Kun-Bai

    2011-02-01

    A pot experiment was conducted to study the combined effects of Cu (0-1500 mg x kg(-1)) and simulated acid rain (pH 2.5-5.6) on the copper accumulation, growth, and antioxidant enzyme activities of Rumex acetosa. With the increasing concentration of soil Cu, the Cu accumulation in R. acetosa increased, being higher in root than in stem and leaf. The exposure to low pH acid rain promoted the Cu uptake by R. acetosa. With the increase of soil Cu concentration and/or of acid rain acidity, the biomass of R. acetosa decreased, leaf and root MDA contents increased and had good correlation with soil Cu concentration, and the SOD and POD activities in leaf and root displayed a decreasing trend after an initial increase. This study showed that R. acetosa had a strong adaptive ability to Cu and acid rain stress, exhibiting a high application potential in the remediation of Cu-contaminated soil in acid rain areas. PMID:21608265

  20. Ethylene-Induced Vinblastine Accumulation Is Related to Activated Expression of Downstream TIA Pathway Genes in Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xi; Pan, Ya-Jie; Chang, Bo-Wen; Hu, Yan-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    We selected different concentrations of ethephon, to stress C. roseus. We used qRT-PCR and HPLC followed by PCA to obtain comprehensive profiling of the vinblastine biosynthesis in response to ethephon. Based on our findings, the results showed that the high concentration of ethephon had a positive effect at both transcriptional and metabolite level. Meanwhile, there was a remarkable decrease of hydrogen peroxide content and a promoted peroxidase activity in leaves. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis suggested that CrPrx1 could be regarded as a positive regulator and interacts with ethylene response factor (ERF) to play a key role in vinblastine content and peroxidase (POD) activity. This study provides the foundation for a better understanding of the regulation and accumulation of vinblastine in response to ethephon. PMID:27314017

  1. Ethylene-Induced Vinblastine Accumulation Is Related to Activated Expression of Downstream TIA Pathway Genes in Catharanthus roseus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi; Pan, Ya-Jie; Chang, Bo-Wen; Hu, Yan-Bo; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2016-01-01

    We selected different concentrations of ethephon, to stress C. roseus. We used qRT-PCR and HPLC followed by PCA to obtain comprehensive profiling of the vinblastine biosynthesis in response to ethephon. Based on our findings, the results showed that the high concentration of ethephon had a positive effect at both transcriptional and metabolite level. Meanwhile, there was a remarkable decrease of hydrogen peroxide content and a promoted peroxidase activity in leaves. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis suggested that CrPrx1 could be regarded as a positive regulator and interacts with ethylene response factor (ERF) to play a key role in vinblastine content and peroxidase (POD) activity. This study provides the foundation for a better understanding of the regulation and accumulation of vinblastine in response to ethephon. PMID:27314017

  2. HCV core protein induces hepatic lipid accumulation by activating SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Kook Hwan; Hong, Sung Pyo; Kim, KyeongJin; Park, Min Jung; Kim, Kwang Jin; Cheong, JaeHun . E-mail: molecule85@pusan.ac.kr

    2007-04-20

    Hepatic steatosis is a common feature in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. HCV core protein plays an important role in the development of hepatic steatosis in HCV infection. Because SREBP1 (sterol regulatory element binding protein 1) and PPAR{gamma} (peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor {gamma}) are involved in the regulation of lipid metabolism of hepatocyte, we sought to determine whether HCV core protein may impair the expression and activity of SREBP1 and PPAR{gamma}. In this study, it was demonstrated that HCV core protein increases the gene expression of SREBP1 not only in Chang liver, Huh7, and HepG2 cells transiently transfected with HCV core protein expression plasmid, but also in Chang liver-core stable cells. Furthermore, HCV core protein enhanced the transcriptional activity of SREBP1. In addition, HCV core protein elevated PPAR{gamma} transcriptional activity. However, HCV core protein had no effect on PPAR{gamma} gene expression. Finally, we showed that HCV core protein stimulates the genes expression of lipogenic enzyme and fatty acid uptake associated protein. Therefore, our finding provides a new insight into the mechanism of hepatic steatosis by HCV infection.

  3. Effects of Age and Experience on Physical Activity Accumulation during Kin-Ball

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hastie, Peter A.; Langevin, Francois; Wadsworth, Danielle

    2011-01-01

    With a specific agenda of creating a fun activity that emphasized teamwork, cooperation, and sportsmanship, Mario Demers, a Canadian physical education professor, created Kin-Ball in the mid 1980s. The game involves three teams of four players each in which a large ball (4 feet diameter and 2.2 pounds weight (1.22 m and 1 kg, respectively) is sent…

  4. Protection by Nitric Oxide Donors of Isolated Rat Hearts Is Associated with Activation of Redox Metabolism and Ferritin Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Grievink, Hilbert; Zeltcer, Galina; Drenger, Benjamin; Berenshtein, Eduard; Chevion, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Preconditioning (PC) procedures (ischemic or pharmacological) are powerful procedures used for attaining protection against prolonged ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a variety of organs, including the heart. The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the protection by PC are however, complex and only partially understood. Recently, an ‘iron-based mechanism’ (IBM), that includes de novo ferritin synthesis and accumulation, was proposed to explain the specific steps in cardioprotection generated by IPC. The current study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO), generated by exogenous NO-donors, could play a role in the observed IBM of cardioprotection by IPC. Therefore, three distinct NO-donors were investigated at different concentrations (1–10 μM): sodium nitroprusside (SNP), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Isolated rat hearts were retrogradely perfused using the Langendorff configuration and subjected to prolonged ischemia and reperfusion with or without pretreatment by NO-donors. Hemodynamic parameters, infarct sizes and proteins of the methionine-centered redox cycle (MCRC) were analyzed, as well as cytosolic aconitase (CA) activity and ferritin protein levels. All NO-donors had significant effects on proteins involved in the MCRC system. Nonetheless, pretreatment with 10 μM SNAP was found to evoke the strongest effects on Msr activity, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase protein levels. These effects were accompanied with a significant reduction in infarct size, increased CA activity, and ferritin accumulation. Conversely, pretreatment with 2 μM SIN-1 increased infarct size and was associated with slightly lower ferritin protein levels. In conclusion, the abovementioned findings indicate that NO, depending on its bio-active redox form, can regulate iron metabolism and plays a role in the IBM of cardioprotection against reperfusion injury. PMID:27447933

  5. Protection by Nitric Oxide Donors of Isolated Rat Hearts Is Associated with Activation of Redox Metabolism and Ferritin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Grievink, Hilbert; Zeltcer, Galina; Drenger, Benjamin; Berenshtein, Eduard; Chevion, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Preconditioning (PC) procedures (ischemic or pharmacological) are powerful procedures used for attaining protection against prolonged ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) injury, in a variety of organs, including the heart. The detailed molecular mechanisms underlying the protection by PC are however, complex and only partially understood. Recently, an 'iron-based mechanism' (IBM), that includes de novo ferritin synthesis and accumulation, was proposed to explain the specific steps in cardioprotection generated by IPC. The current study investigated whether nitric oxide (NO), generated by exogenous NO-donors, could play a role in the observed IBM of cardioprotection by IPC. Therefore, three distinct NO-donors were investigated at different concentrations (1-10 μM): sodium nitroprusside (SNP), 3-morpholinosydnonimine (SIN-1) and S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine (SNAP). Isolated rat hearts were retrogradely perfused using the Langendorff configuration and subjected to prolonged ischemia and reperfusion with or without pretreatment by NO-donors. Hemodynamic parameters, infarct sizes and proteins of the methionine-centered redox cycle (MCRC) were analyzed, as well as cytosolic aconitase (CA) activity and ferritin protein levels. All NO-donors had significant effects on proteins involved in the MCRC system. Nonetheless, pretreatment with 10 μM SNAP was found to evoke the strongest effects on Msr activity, thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase protein levels. These effects were accompanied with a significant reduction in infarct size, increased CA activity, and ferritin accumulation. Conversely, pretreatment with 2 μM SIN-1 increased infarct size and was associated with slightly lower ferritin protein levels. In conclusion, the abovementioned findings indicate that NO, depending on its bio-active redox form, can regulate iron metabolism and plays a role in the IBM of cardioprotection against reperfusion injury. PMID:27447933

  6. Internalization of Proteinase 3 Is Concomitant with Endothelial Cell Apoptosis and Internalization of Myeloperoxidase with Generation of Intracellular Oxidants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jia Jin; Preston, Gloria A.; Pendergraft, William F.; Segelmark, Mårten; Heeringa, Peter; Hogan, Susan L.; Jennette, J. Charles; Falk, Ronald J.

    2001-01-01

    The important issue addressed by the studies presented here is the mechanism of neutrophil-mediated damage to endothelial and epithelial cells during inflammation. Binding of neutrophil-released granule proteins to endothelial cells may be involved in vascular damage in patients with inflammatory vascular diseases. We have determined whether granule proteins proteinase 3(PR3) and/or myeloperoxidase (MPO) are internalized into endothelial cells, as examined by UV light, confocal, and electron microscopy. Coincident induction of apoptosis and/or the generation of intracellular oxidants were monitored. The results indicate that human endothelial cells (human umbilical vein endothelial cells, human umbilical arterial endothelial cells, human lung microvascular endothelial cells) internalize both PR3 and MPO, which are detected on the cell surface, in the cytoplasm, and possibly nuclear. Epithelial cells (small airway epithelial cells) internalized MPO but not PR3, implying that the mechanism of PR3 internalization may be cell-type specific and different from that of MPO. Internalization of PR3, but not MPO, correlated with activation of apoptosis. Internalization of MPO correlated with an increase in intracellular oxidant radicals. The requirement for the proteolytic activity of PR3 for the induction of apoptosis was examined by generating PR3-truncated fragments that did not contain the components of the catalytic triad. An apoptotic function was localized to the C-terminal portion of PR3. These studies reveal novel mechanisms by which the neutrophil granule proteins PR3 and MPO contribute to tissue injury at sites of inflammation. PMID:11159195

  7. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADHo Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity

    PubMed Central

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH− redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals. PMID:27446119

  8. Kinetic Modeling of the Arabidopsis Cryptochrome Photocycle: FADH(o) Accumulation Correlates with Biological Activity.

    PubMed

    Procopio, Maria; Link, Justin; Engle, Dorothy; Witczak, Jacques; Ritz, Thorsten; Ahmad, Margaret

    2016-01-01

    Cryptochromes are flavoprotein photoreceptors with multiple signaling roles during plant de-etiolation and development. Arabidopsis cryptochromes (cry1 and cry2) absorb light through an oxidized flavin (FADox) cofactor which undergoes reduction to both FADH° and FADH(-) redox states. Since the FADH° redox state has been linked to biological activity, it is important to estimate its concentration formed upon illumination in vivo. Here we model the photocycle of isolated cry1 and cry2 proteins with a three-state kinetic model. Our model fits the experimental data for flavin photoconversion in vitro for both cry1 and cry2, providing calculated quantum yields which are significantly lower in cry1 than for cry2. The model was applied to the cryptochrome photocycle in vivo using biological activity in plants as a readout for FADH° concentration. The fit to the in vivo data provided quantum yields for cry1 and cry2 flavin reduction similar to those obtained in vitro, with decreased cry1 quantum yield as compared to cry2. These results validate our assumption that FADH° concentration correlates with biological activity. This is the first reported attempt at kinetic modeling of the cryptochrome photocycle in relation to macroscopic signaling events in vivo, and thereby provides a theoretical framework to the components of the photocycle that are necessary for cryptochrome response to environmental signals. PMID:27446119

  9. Effect of self-alkalization on nitrite accumulation in a high-rate denitrification system: Performance, microflora and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Li, Chen-Xu; Cai, Chao-Yang; Abbas, Ghulam; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The self-alkalization of denitrifying automatic circulation (DAC) reactor resulted in a large increase of pH up to 9.20 and caused a tremendous accumulation of nitrite up to 451.1 ± 49.0 mgN L(-1) at nitrate loading rate (NLR) from 35 kgN m(-3) d(-1) to 55 kgN m(-3) d(-1). The nitrite accumulation was greatly relieved even at the same NLR once the pH was maintained at 7.6 ± 0.2 in the system. Enzymatic assays indicated that the long-term bacterial exposure to high pH significantly inhibited the activity of copper type nitrite reductase (NirK) rather than the cytochrome cd1 type nitrite reductase (NirS). The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the dominant denitrifying bacteria shifted from the NirS-containing Thauear sp. 27 to the NirK-containing Hyphomicrobium nitrativorans strain NL23 during the self-alkalization. The significant nitrite accumulation in the high-rate denitrification system could be therefore, due to the inhibition of Cu-containing NirK by high pH from the self-alkalization. The results suggest that the NirK-containing H. nitrativorans strain NL23 could be an ideal functional bacterium for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, i.e. denitritation, which could be combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) to develop a new process for nitrogen removal from wastewater. PMID:26595097

  10. Comparative reactivity of the myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants HOCl and HOSCN with low-density lipoprotein (LDL): Implications for foam cell formation in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Ismael, Fahd O; Proudfoot, Julie M; Brown, Bronwyn E; van Reyk, David M; Croft, Kevin D; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2015-05-01

    Atherosclerosis is characterised by the accumulation of lipids within macrophages in the artery wall. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the source of this lipid, owing to the uptake of oxidised LDL by scavenger receptors. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) released by leukocytes during inflammation produces oxidants that are implicated in atherosclerosis. Modification of LDL by the MPO oxidant hypochlorous acid (HOCl), results in extensive lipid accumulation by macrophages. However, the reactivity of the other major MPO oxidant, hypothiocyanous acid (HOSCN) with LDL is poorly characterised, which is significant given that thiocyanate is the favoured substrate for MPO. In this study, we comprehensively compare the reactivity of HOCl and HOSCN with LDL, and show key differences in the profile of oxidative damage observed. HOSCN selectively modifies Cys residues on apolipoprotein B100, and oxidises cholesteryl esters resulting in formation of lipid hydroperoxides, 9-hydroxy-10,12-octadecadienoic acid (9-HODE) and F2-isoprostanes. The modification of LDL by HOSCN results macrophage lipid accumulation, though generally to a lesser extent than HOCl-modified LDL. This suggests that a change in the ratio of HOSCN:HOCl formation by MPO from variations in plasma thiocyanate levels, will influence the nature of LDL oxidation in vivo, and has implications for the progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25795019

  11. Palmitic Acid Reduces Circulating Bone Formation Markers in Obese Animals and Impairs Osteoblast Activity via C16-Ceramide Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Alsahli, Ahmad; Kiefhaber, Kathryn; Gold, Tziporah; Muluke, Munira; Jiang, Hongfeng; Cremers, Serge; Schulze-Späte, Ulrike

    2016-05-01

    Obesity and impaired lipid metabolism increase circulating and local fatty acid (FA) levels. Our previous studies showed that a high high-saturated -fat diet induced greater bone loss in mice than a high high-unsaturated-fat diet due to increased osteoclast numbers and activity. The impact of elevated FA levels on osteoblasts is not yet clear. We induced obesity in 4 week old male mice using a palmitic acid (PA)- or oleic acid (OA)-enriched high fat high-fat diet (HFD) (20 % of calories from FA), and compared them to mice on a normal (R) caloric diet (10 % of calories from FA). We collected serum to determine FA and bone metabolism marker levels. Primary osteoblasts were isolated; cultured in PA, OA, or control (C) medium; and assessed for mineralization activity, gene expression, and ceramide levels. Obese animals in the PA and OA groups had significantly lower serum levels of bone formation markers P1NP and OC compared to normal weight animals (*p < 0.001), with the lowest marker levels in animals on an PA-enriched HFD (*p < 0.001). Accordingly, elevated levels of PA significantly reduced osteoblast mineralization activity in vitro (*p < 0.05). Elevated PA intake significantly increased C16 ceramide accumulation. This accumulation was preventable through inhibition of SPT2 (serine palmitoyl transferase 2) using myriocin. Elevated levels of PA reduce osteoblast function in vitro and bone formation markers in vivo. Our findings suggest that saturated PA can compromise bone health by affecting osteoblasts, and identify a potential mechanism through which obesity promotes bone loss. PMID:26758875

  12. Double-Edge Sword of Sustained ROCK Activation in Prion Diseases through Neuritogenesis Defects and Prion Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Alleaume-Butaux, Aurélie; Nicot, Simon; Pietri, Mathéa; Baudry, Anne; Dakowski, Caroline; Tixador, Philippe; Ardila-Osorio, Hector; Haeberlé, Anne-Marie; Bailly, Yannick; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Launay, Jean-Marie; Kellermann, Odile; Schneider, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    In prion diseases, synapse dysfunction, axon retraction and loss of neuronal polarity precede neuronal death. The mechanisms driving such polarization defects, however, remain unclear. Here, we examined the contribution of RhoA-associated coiled-coil containing kinases (ROCK), key players in neuritogenesis, to prion diseases. We found that overactivation of ROCK signaling occurred in neuronal stem cells infected by pathogenic prions (PrPSc) and impaired the sprouting of neurites. In reconstructed networks of mature neurons, PrPSc-induced ROCK overactivation provoked synapse disconnection and dendrite/axon degeneration. This overactivation of ROCK also disturbed overall neurotransmitter-associated functions. Importantly, we demonstrated that beyond its impact on neuronal polarity ROCK overactivity favored the production of PrPSc through a ROCK-dependent control of 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase 1 (PDK1) activity. In non-infectious conditions, ROCK and PDK1 associated within a complex and ROCK phosphorylated PDK1, conferring basal activity to PDK1. In prion-infected neurons, exacerbated ROCK activity increased the pool of PDK1 molecules physically interacting with and phosphorylated by ROCK. ROCK-induced PDK1 overstimulation then canceled the neuroprotective α-cleavage of normal cellular prion protein PrPC by TACE α-secretase, which physiologically precludes PrPSc production. In prion-infected cells, inhibition of ROCK rescued neurite sprouting, preserved neuronal architecture, restored neuronal functions and reduced the amount of PrPSc. In mice challenged with prions, inhibition of ROCK also lowered brain PrPSc accumulation, reduced motor impairment and extended survival. We conclude that ROCK overactivation exerts a double detrimental effect in prion diseases by altering neuronal polarity and triggering PrPSc accumulation. Eventually ROCK emerges as therapeutic target to combat prion diseases. PMID:26241960

  13. Smoke Exposure Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Lipid Accumulation in Retinal Pigment Epithelium through Oxidative Stress and Complement Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Kunchithapautham, Kannan; Atkinson, Carl; Rohrer, Bärbel

    2014-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a complex disease caused by genetic and environmental factors, including genetic variants in complement components and smoking. Smoke exposure leads to oxidative stress, complement activation, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and lipid dysregulation, which have all been proposed to be associated with AMD pathogenesis. Here we examine the effects of smoke exposure on the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke or filtered air for 6 months. RPE cells grown as stable monolayers were exposed to 5% cigarette smoke extract (CSE). Effects of smoke were determined by biochemical, molecular, and histological measures. Effects of the alternative pathway (AP) of complement and complement C3a anaphylatoxin receptor signaling were analyzed using knock-out mice or specific inhibitors. ER stress markers were elevated after smoke exposure in RPE of intact mice, which was eliminated in AP-deficient mice. To examine this relationship further, RPE monolayers were exposed to CSE. Short term smoke exposure resulted in production and release of complement C3, the generation of C3a, oxidative stress, complement activation on the cell membrane, and ER stress. Long term exposure to CSE resulted in lipid accumulation, and secretion. All measures were reversed by blocking C3a complement receptor (C3aR), alternative complement pathway signaling, and antioxidant therapy. Taken together, our results provide clear evidence that smoke exposure results in oxidative stress and complement activation via the AP, resulting in ER stress-mediated lipid accumulation, and further suggesting that oxidative stress and complement act synergistically in the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:24711457

  14. Regulatory T cells with multiple suppressive and potentially pro-tumor activities accumulate in human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Timperi, Eleonora; Pacella, Ilenia; Schinzari, Valeria; Focaccetti, Chiara; Sacco, Luca; Farelli, Francesco; Caronna, Roberto; Del Bene, Gabriella; Longo, Flavia; Ciardi, Antonio; Morelli, Sergio; Vestri, Anna Rita; Chirletti, Piero; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Piconese, Silvia

    2016-07-01

    Tregs can contribute to tumor progression by suppressing antitumor immunity. Exceptionally, in human colorectal cancer (CRC), Tregs are thought to exert beneficial roles in controlling pro-tumor chronic inflammation. The goal of our study was to characterize CRC-infiltrating Tregs at multiple levels, by phenotypical, molecular and functional evaluation of Tregs from the tumor site, compared to non-tumoral mucosa and peripheral blood of CRC patients. The frequency of Tregs was higher in mucosa than in blood, and further significantly increased in tumor. Ex vivo, those Tregs suppressed the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. A differential compartmentalization was detected between Helios(high) and Helios(low) Treg subsets (thymus-derived versus peripherally induced): while Helios(low) Tregs were enriched in both sites, only Helios(high) Tregs accumulated significantly and specifically in tumors, displayed a highly demethylated TSDR region and contained high proportions of cells expressing CD39 and OX40, markers of activation and suppression. Besides the suppression of T cells, Tregs may contribute to CRC progression also through releasing IL-17, or differentiating into Tfr cells that potentially antagonize a protective Tfh response, events that were both detected in tumor-associated Tregs. Overall, our data indicate that Treg accumulation may contribute through multiple mechanisms to CRC establishment and progression. PMID:27622025

  15. Ultraviolet Radiation-Elicited Enhancement of Isoflavonoid Accumulation, Biosynthetic Gene Expression, and Antioxidant Activity in Astragalus membranaceus Hairy Root Cultures.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jiao; Gai, Qing-Yan; Wang, Wei; Luo, Meng; Gu, Cheng-Bo; Fu, Yu-Jie; Ma, Wei

    2015-09-23

    In this work, Astragalus membranaceus hairy root cultures (AMHRCs) were exposed to ultraviolet radiation (UV-A, UV-B, and UV-C) for promoting isoflavonoid accumulation. The optimum enhancement for isoflavonoid production was achieved in 34-day-old AMHRCs elicited by 86.4 kJ/m(2) of UV-B. The resulting isoflavonoid yield was 533.54 ± 13.61 μg/g dry weight (DW), which was 2.29-fold higher relative to control (232.93 ± 3.08 μg/g DW). UV-B up-regulated the transcriptional expressions of all investigated genes involved in isoflavonoid biosynthetic pathway. PAL and C4H were found to be two potential key genes that controlled isoflavonoid biosynthesis. Moreover, a significant increase was noted in antioxidant activity of extracts from UV-B-elicited AMHRCs (IC50 values = 0.85 and 1.08 mg/mL) in comparison with control (1.38 and 1.71 mg/mL). Overall, this study offered a feasible elicitation strategy to enhance isoflavonoid accumulation in AMHRCs and also provided a basis for metabolic engineering of isoflavonoid biosynthesis in the future. PMID:26370303

  16. Adsorption and Catalytic Activity of Glucose Oxidase Accumulated on OTCE upon the Application of External Potential

    PubMed Central

    Benavidez, Tomás E.; Torrente, Daniel; Marucho, Marcelo; Garcia, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the adsorption of glucose oxidase (GOx) onto optically transparent carbon electrodes (OTCE) under the effect of applied potential and the analysis of the enzymatic activity of the resulting GOx/OTCE substrates. In order to avoid electrochemical interferences with the enzyme redox center, control electrochemical experiments were performed using flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and GOx/OTCE substrates. Then, the enzyme adsorption experiments were carried out as a function of the potential applied (ranged from the open circuit potential to +950 mV), the pH solution, the concentration of enzyme, and the ionic strength on the environment. The experimental results demonstrated that an increase in the adsorbed amount of GOx on the OTCE can be achieved when the potential was applied. Although the increase in the adsorbed amount was examined as a function of the potential, a maximum enzymatic activity was observed in the GOx/OTCE substrate achieved at +800 mV. These experiments suggest that although an increase in the amount of enzyme adsorbed can be obtained by the application of an external potential to the electrode, the magnitude of such potential can produce detrimental effects in the conformation of the adsorbed protein and should be carefully considered. As such, the article describes a simple and rational approach to increase the amount of enzyme adsorbed on a surface and can be applied to improve the sensitivity of a variety of biosensors. PMID:25261840

  17. Rapid accumulation of Akt in mitochondria following phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Bijur, Gautam N; Jope, Richard S

    2003-12-01

    We describe here a new component of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt signaling pathway that directly impacts mitochondria. Akt (protein kinase B) was shown for the first time to be localized in mitochondria, where it was found to reside in the matrix and the inner and outer membranes, and the level of mitochondrial Akt was very dynamically regulated. Stimulation of a variety of cell types with insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin, or stress (induced by heat shock), induced translocation of Akt to the mitochondria within only several minutes of stimulation, causing increases of nearly eight- to 12-fold, and the mitochondrial Akt was in its phosphorylated, active state. Two mitochondrial proteins were identified to be phosphorylated following stimulation of mitochondrial Akt, the beta-subunit of ATP synthase and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. The finding that mitochondrial glycogen synthase kinase-3beta was rapidly and substantially modified by Ser9 phosphorylation, which inhibits its activity, following translocation of Akt to the mitochondria is the first evidence for a regulatory mechanism affecting mitochondrial glycogen synthase kinase-3beta. These results demonstrate that signals emanating from plasma membrane receptors or generated by stress rapidly modulate Akt and glycogen synthase kinase-3beta in mitochondria. PMID:14713298

  18. Hesperetin Induces Apoptosis in Breast Carcinoma by Triggering Accumulation of ROS and Activation of ASK1/JNK Pathway.

    PubMed

    Palit, Shreyasi; Kar, Susanta; Sharma, Gunjan; Das, Pijush K

    2015-08-01

    Hesperetin, a flavanone glycoside predominantly found in citrus fruits, exhibits a wide array of biological properties. In the present study hesperetin exhibited a significant cytotoxic effect in human breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner without affecting normal (HMEC) as well as immortalized normal mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A). The cytotoxic effect of hesperetin was due to the induction of apoptosis as evident from the phosphatidyl-serine externalization, DNA fragmentation, caspase-7 activation, and PARP cleavage. Apoptosis was associated with caspase-9 activation, mitochondrial membrane potential loss, release of cytochrome c, and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. Pre-treatment with caspase-9 specific inhibitor (Z-LEHD-fmk) markedly attenuated apoptosis suggesting an involvement of intrinsic mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. Further, DCFDA flow-cytometric analysis revealed triggering of ROS in a time-dependent manner. Pre-treatment with ROS scavenger N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and glutathione markedly abrogated hesperetin-mediated apoptosis whereas carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) pretreatment along with DHR123-based flow-cytometry indicated the generation of cytosolic ROS. Profiling of MAPKs revealed activation of JNK upon hesperetin treatment which was abrogated upon NAC pre-treatment. Additionally, inhibition of JNK by SP600125 significantly reversed hesperetin-mediated apoptosis. The activation of JNK was associated with the activation of ASK1. Silencing of ASK1 resulted in significant attenuation of JNK activation as well as reversed the hesperetin-mediated apoptosis suggesting that hesperetin-mediated apoptosis of MCF-7 cells involves accumulation of ROS and activation of ASK1/JNK pathway. In addition, hesperetin also induced apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells via intrinsic pathway via activation of caspase -9 and -3 and increase in Bax:Bcl-2 ratio. PMID:25204891

  19. Neutrophil-Mediated Regulation of Innate and Adaptive Immunity: The Role of Myeloperoxidase

    PubMed Central

    Odobasic, Dragana; Kitching, A. Richard; Holdsworth, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are no longer seen as leukocytes with a sole function of being the essential first responders in the removal of pathogens at sites of infection. Being armed with numerous pro- and anti-inflammatory mediators, these phagocytes can also contribute to the development of various autoimmune diseases and can positively or negatively regulate the generation of adaptive immune responses. In this review, we will discuss how myeloperoxidase, the most abundant neutrophil granule protein, plays a key role in the various functions of neutrophils in innate and adaptive immunity. PMID:26904693

  20. Accumulation of phenanthrene by roots of intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L.) seedlings: passive or active uptake?

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are of particular concern due to their hydrophobic, recalcitrant, persistent, potentially carcinogenic, mutagenic and toxic properties, and their ubiquitous occurrence in the environment. Most of the PAHs in the environment are present in surface soil. Plants grown in PAH-contaminated soils or water can become contaminated with PAHs because of their uptake. Therefore, they may threaten human and animal health. However, the mechanism for PAHs uptake by crop roots is little understood. It is important to understand exactly how PAHs are transported into the plant root system and into the human food chain, since it is beneficial in governing crop contamination by PAHs, remedying soils or waters polluted by PAHs with plants, and modeling potential uptake for risk assessment. Results The possibility that plant roots may take up phenanthrene (PHE), a representative of PAHs, via active process was investigated using intact wheat (Triticum acstivnm L.) seedlings in a series of hydroponic experiments. The time course for PHE uptake into wheat roots grown in Hoagland solution containing 5.62 μM PHE for 36 h could be separated into two periods: a fast uptake process during the initial 2 h and a slow uptake component thereafter. Concentration-dependent PHE uptake was characterized by a smooth, saturable curve with an apparent Km of 23.7 μM and a Vmax of 208 nmol g-1 fresh weight h-1, suggesting a carrier-mediated uptake system. Competition between PHE and naphthalene for their uptake by the roots further supported the carrier-mediated uptake system. Low temperature and 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP) could inhibit PHE uptake equally, indicating that metabolism plays a role in PHE uptake. The inhibitions by low temperature and DNP were strengthened with increasing concentration of PHE in external solution within PHE water solubility (7.3 μM). The contribution of active uptake to total absorption was almost 40% within PHE water

  1. Damage to Candida albicans Hyphae and Pseudohyphae by the Myeloperoxidase System and Oxidative Products of Neutrophil Metabolism In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Diamond, Richard D.; Clark, Robert A.; Haudenschild, Christian C.

    1980-01-01

    In previous studies, we noted that Candida hyphae and pseudohyphae could be damaged and probably killed by neutrophils, primarily by oxygen-dependent nonphagocytic mechanisms. In extending these studies, amount of damage to hyphae again was measured by inhibition of [14C]cytosine uptake. Neutrophils from only one of four patients with chronic granulomatous disease damaged hyphae at all, and neutrophils from this single patient damaged hyphae far less efficiently than simultaneously tested neutrophils from normal control subjects. Neutrophils from neither of two subjects with hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency damaged the hyphae. This confirmed the importance of oxidative mechanisms in general and myeloperoxidase-mediated systems in particular in damaging Candida hyphae. Several potentially fungicidal oxidative intermediates are produced by metabolic pathways of normal neutrophils, but their relative toxicity for Candida hyphae was previously unknown. To help determine this, cell-free in vitro systems were used to generate these potentially microbicidal products. Myeloperoxidase with hydrogen peroxide, iodide, and chloride resulted in 91.2% damage to hyphal inocula in 11 experiments. There was less damage when either chloride or iodide was omitted, and no damage when myeloperoxidase was omitted or inactivated by heating. Azide, cyanide, and catalase (but not heated catalase) inhibited the damage. Systems for generation of hydrogen peroxide could replace reagent hydrogen peroxide in the myeloperoxidase system. These included glucose oxidase, in the presence of glucose, and xanthine oxidase, in the presence of either hypoxanthine or acetaldehyde. In the presence of myeloperoxidase and a halide, the toxicity of the xanthine oxidase system was not inhibited by superoxide dismutase and, under some conditions, was marginally increased by this enzyme. This suggested that superoxide radical did not damage hyphae directly but served primarily as an intermediate in the

  2. Lumbricus terrestris L. activity increases the availability of metals and their accumulation in maize and barley.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, E; Alonso-Azcárate, J; Rodríguez, L

    2011-03-01

    The effect of the earthworm Lumbricus terrestris L. on metal availability in two mining soils was assessed by means of chemical extraction methods and a pot experiment using crop plants. Results from single and sequential extractions showed that L. terrestris had a slight effect on metal fractionation in the studied soils: only metals bound to the soil organic matter were significantly increased in some cases. However, we found that L. terrestris significantly increased root, shoot and total Pb and Zn concentrations in maize and barley for the soil with the highest concentrations of total and available metals. Specifically, shoot Pb concentration was increased by a factor of 7.5 and 3.9 for maize and barley, respectively, while shoot Zn concentration was increased by a factor of 3.7 and 1.7 for maize and barley, respectively. Our results demonstrated that earthworm activity increases the bioavailability of metals in soils. PMID:21190761

  3. Exploring Effective Strategies for Increasing the Amount of Moderate-to-Vigorous Physical Activity Children Accumulate during Recess: A Quasi-Experimental Intervention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Efrat, Merav W.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Less than half of elementary children meet the physical activity recommendations of 30 to 60 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) on a daily basis. Recess provides the single biggest opportunity for children to accumulate MVPA. This study explored whether a teacher's social prompting to be active during recess…

  4. Degradation of endothelial cell matrix heparan sulfate proteoglycan by elastase and the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system.

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, S. J.; Kinsella, M. G.; Wight, T. N.

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans of subendothelial matrix by neutrophil elastase and the myeloperoxidase-H2O2-chloride system added separately, sequentially, or together at pH 4.5 to 7.5 was determined by the release of lower molecular weight 35S-labeled material. Elastase alone and the myeloperoxidase system alone caused degradation, and when 4-hour exposure to elastase was followed by 15 minutes of exposure to the myeloperoxidase system, the effect was greater than additive. A greater than additive effect was not observed when elastase followed the myeloperoxidase system or the two were added together. Chloride (or sulfate) alone increased the release of 35S-labeled material from elastase-treated matrix, although the effect of 0.1 M chloride was not as great as that observed when an equivalent concentration of chloride was combined with myeloperoxidase and H2O2. The release of these systems at sites of adherence of neutrophils to glomerular basement membrane may contribute to neutrophil-associated proteinuria. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 5 Figure 7 PMID:8395774

  5. Effect of cyanide on nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation, cyclic GMP accumulation and guanylate cyclase activation in rat aorta.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, R M; Murad, F

    1984-09-01

    The effects of sodium cyanide on relaxation, increases in cyclic GMP accumulation and guanylate cyclase activation induced by sodium nitroprusside and other nitrovasodilators were examined in rat thoracic aorta. Cyanide abolished nitroprusside-induced relaxation and the associated increase in cyclic GMP levels. Basal levels of cyclic GMP and cyclic AMP were also depressed. Reversal of nitroprusside-induced relaxation by cyanide was independent of the tissue level of cyclic GMP prior to addition of cyanide. Incubation of nitroprusside with cyanide prior to addition to aortic strips did not alter the relaxant effect of nitroprusside. Sodium azide-, hydroxylamine-, N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanide-, nitroglycerin- and acetylcholine-induced relaxations and increased levels of cyclic GMP were also inhibited by cyanide. Relaxations induced by nitric oxide were also inhibited by cyanide, although the relaxation with the low concentration of nitric oxide employed was not accompanied by detectable increases in cyclic GMP. Relaxation to 8-bromo-cyclic GMP was essentially unaltered by cyanide; however, isoproterenol-induced relaxation was inhibited. Guanylate cyclase in soluble and particulate fractions of aorta homogenates was activated by nitroprusside and the activation was prevented by cyanide. The present results suggest that cyanide inhibits nitrovasodilator-induced relaxation through inhibition of guanylate cyclase activation; however, cyanide may also have nonspecific effects which inhibit relaxation. PMID:6149944

  6. Yam (Dioscorea batatas) Root and Bark Extracts Stimulate Osteoblast Mineralization by Increasing Ca and P Accumulation and Alkaline Phosphatase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suji; Shin, Mee-Young; Son, Kun-Ho; Sohn, Ho-Yong; Lim, Jae-Hwan; Lee, Jong-Hwa; Kwun, In-Sook

    2014-01-01

    Yam (Dioscorea batatas) is widely consumed as functional food for health promotion mainly in East Asia countries. We assessed whether yam root (tuber) or bark (peel) extracts stimulated the activity of osteoblasts for osteogenesis. MC3T3-E1 cells (mouse osteoblasts) were treated with yam root extracts (water or methanol) (study I) or bark extracts (water or hexane) (study II) within 0~10 μg/mL during the periods of osteoblast proliferation (5~10 day), matrix maturation (11~15 day) and mineralization (16~20 day) as appropriate. In study I, both yam root water and methanol extracts increased cell proliferation as concentration-dependent manner. Cellular collagen synthesis and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, both the indicators of bone matrix protein and inorganic phosphate production for calcification respectively, were also increased by yam root water and methanol extract. Osteoblast calcification as cell matrix Ca and P accumulation was also increased by the addition of yam root extracts. In study II, yam bark extracts (water and hexane) increased osteoblast proliferation and differentiation, as collagen synthesis and ALP activity and osteoblast matrix Ca and P deposition. The study results suggested that both yam root and bark extracts stimulate osteogenic function in osteoblasts by stimulating bone matrix maturation by increasing collagen synthesis, ALP activity, and matrix mineralization. PMID:25320717

  7. Accumulation of health promoting phytochemicals in wild relatives of tomato and their contribution to in vitro antioxidant activity.

    PubMed

    Meléndez-Martínez, Antonio J; Fraser, Paul D; Bramley, Peter M

    2010-07-01

    Harnessing natural variation is an important aspect of modern marker assisted breeding. Traditionally breeding programmes have focused on increased yield and resistance to biotic and abiotic pressures. However, consumer demands for improved quality have lead to increased effort into the breeding of nutritional quality traits in crop plants. In the present study, health-related phytochemicals (carotenoids, tocopherols and phenolics) present in green, yellow and red wild relatives of tomato have been analyzed during fruit development and ripening. This study shows that the differences in the final colour of the fruits were due to a distinct accumulation of carotenoids mainly related to the expression of the phytoene synthase-1 gene (Psy-1). In ripe red-fruited tomatoes, the different deposition of pigments gave rise in some cases to colour differences visually discernible by the consumer. Important quantitative differences between and across taxa were noticed for the in vitro antioxidant activity (AA) of the samples. PMID:20457456

  8. HIV-2 genomic RNA accumulates in stress granules in the absence of active translation

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Rifo, Ricardo; Valiente-Echeverria, Fernando; Rubilar, Paulina S.; Garcia-de-Gracia, Francisco; Ricci, Emiliano P.; Limousin, Taran; Décimo, Didier; Mouland, Andrew J.; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2014-01-01

    During the post-transcriptional events of the HIV-2 replication cycle, the full-length unspliced genomic RNA (gRNA) is first used as an mRNA to synthesize Gag and Gag-Pol proteins and then packaged into progeny virions. However, the mechanisms responsible for the coordinate usage of the gRNA during these two mutually exclusive events are poorly understood. Here, we present evidence showing that HIV-2 expression induces stress granule assembly in cultured cells. This contrasts with HIV-1, which interferes with stress granules assembly even upon induced cellular stress. Moreover, we observed that the RNA-binding protein and stress granules assembly factor TIAR associates with the gRNA to form a TIAR-HIV-2 ribonucleoprotein (TH2RNP) complex localizing diffuse in the cytoplasm or aggregated in stress granules. Although the assembly of TH2RNP in stress granules did not require the binding of the Gag protein to the gRNA, we observed that increased levels of Gag promoted both translational arrest and stress granule assembly. Moreover, HIV-2 Gag also localizes to stress granules in the absence of a ‘packageable’ gRNA. Our results indicate that the HIV-2 gRNA is compartmentalized in stress granules in the absence of active translation prior to being selected for packaging by the Gag polyprotein. PMID:25352557

  9. Relationship between Nitrite Reduction and Active Phosphate Uptake in the Phosphate-Accumulating Denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. Strain JR 12

    PubMed Central

    Barak, Yoram; van Rijn, Jaap

    2000-01-01

    Phosphate uptake by the phosphate-accumulating denitrifier Pseudomonas sp. JR12 was examined with different combinations of electron and carbon donors and electron acceptors. Phosphate uptake in acetate-supplemented cells took place with either oxygen or nitrate but did not take place when nitrite served as the final electron acceptor. Furthermore, nitrite reduction rates by this denitrifier were shown to be significantly reduced in the presence of phosphate. Phosphate uptake assays in the presence of the H+-ATPase inhibitor N,N′-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), in the presence of the uncoupler carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP), or with osmotic shock-treated cells indicated that phosphate transport over the cytoplasmic membrane of this bacterium was mediated by primary and secondary transport systems. By examining the redox transitions of whole cells at 553 nm we found that phosphate addition caused a significant oxidation of a c-type cytochrome. Based on these findings, we propose that this c-type cytochrome serves as an intermediate in the electron transfer to both nitrite reductase and the site responsible for active phosphate transport. In previous studies with this bacterium we found that the oxidation state of this c-type cytochrome was significantly higher in acetate-supplemented, nitrite-respiring cells (incapable of phosphate uptake) than in phosphate-accumulating cells incubated with different combinations of electron donors and acceptors. Based on the latter finding and results obtained in the present study it is suggested that phosphate uptake in this bacterium is subjected to a redox control of the active phosphate transport site. By means of this mechanism an explanation is provided for the observed absence of phosphate uptake in the presence of nitrite and inhibition of nitrite reduction by phosphate in this organism. The implications of these findings regarding denitrifying, phosphate removal wastewater plants is discussed. PMID

  10. Honokiol activates the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway and attenuates the lipid accumulation in hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Min Suk; Kim, Jung Hwan; Kim, Hye Jung; Chang, Ki Churl; Park, Sang Won

    2015-04-15

    Honokiol is a bioactive neolignan compound isolated from the species of Magnolia. This study was designed to elucidate the cellular mechanism by which honokiol alleviates the development of non-alcoholic steatosis. HepG2 cells were treated with honokiol for 1 h, and then exposed to 1 mM free fatty acid (FFA) for 24 h to simulate non-alcoholic steatosis in vitro. C57BL/6 mice were fed with a high-fat diet for 28 days, and honokiol (10 mg/kg/day) was daily treated. Honokiol concentration-dependently attenuated intracellular fat overloading and triglyceride (TG) accumulation in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. These effects were blocked by pretreatment with an AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibitor. Honokiol significantly inhibited sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) maturation and the induction of lipogenic proteins, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD-1) and fatty acid synthase (FAS) in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells, but these effects were blocked by pretreatment of an AMPK inhibitor. Honokiol induced AMPK phosphorylation and subsequent acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) phosphorylation, which were inhibited by genetic deletion of liver kinase B1 (LKB1). Honokiol stimulated LKB1 phosphorylation, and genetic deletion of LKB1 blocked the effect of honokiol on SREBP-1c maturation and the induction of SCD-1 and FAS proteins in FFA-exposed HepG2 cells. Honokiol attenuated the increases in hepatic TG and lipogenic protein levels and fat accumulation in the mice fed with high-fat diet, while significantly induced LKB1 and AMPK phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that honokiol has an anti-lipogenic effect in hepatocytes, and this effect may be mediated by the LKB1–AMPK signaling pathway, which induces ACC phosphorylation and inhibits SREBP-1c maturation in hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Honokiol attenuates lipid accumulation induced by free fatty acid in hepatocyte. • Honokiol inhibits the increase in lipogenic enzyme levels induced by free fatty

  11. {delta}-ALAD activity variations in red blood cells in response to lead accumulation in rock doves (Columba livia)

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, M.; Tejedor, M.C.

    1992-10-01

    The enzyme {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ({delta}-ALAD, E.C. 4.2.1.24), catalyses the second step of the haeme biosynthetic pathway and is required to maintain the haemoglobin and cytochrome content in red cells. {delta}-ALAD is not only found in bone marrow cells, the major site of haeme synthesis, but also in circulating erythrocytes and other tissues. An inverse correlation was found between {delta}-ALAD activity in red blood cells and lead concentration in the blood. The degree of {delta}-ALAD inhibition in erythrocytes has been widely accepted as a standard bioassay to detect acute and chronic lead exposure in humans and in avians. The value of this parameter as an indicator for environmental lead has been often reported in doves and Scanlon. In lead-treated rats, an increase in {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and in blood samples was shown by radioimmunoassay at 5 and 9 days after the treatment. Similarly, the amount of {delta}-ALAD seems to be more sensitive to lead in avian species than in mammals, the usefulness of blood {delta}-ALAD activity as an index of lead exposure has already been questioned by Hutton in the pigeon and by Jaffe et al. in humans. The present investigation studied the toxic effects of lead on rock dove red blood cell {delta}-ALAD activity in two situations: in doves treated with lead acetate in the laboratory and in doves exposed to the environment of Alcala de Henares. The final lead blood concentrations were lower in the environmental than in the laboratory doves. {delta}-ALAD activity in bone marrow cells and the relationships between lead accumulation and enzyme activity in red cells, are examined. 20 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-09-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  13. A Caleosin-Like Protein with Peroxygenase Activity Mediates Aspergillus flavus Development, Aflatoxin Accumulation, and Seed Infection

    PubMed Central

    Almousally, Ibrahem; Shaban, Mouhnad; Blee, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Caleosins are a small family of calcium-binding proteins endowed with peroxygenase activity in plants. Caleosin-like genes are present in fungi; however, their functions have not been reported yet. In this work, we identify a plant caleosin-like protein in Aspergillus flavus that is highly expressed during the early stages of spore germination. A recombinant purified 32-kDa caleosin-like protein supported peroxygenase activities, including co-oxidation reactions and reduction of polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides. Deletion of the caleosin gene prevented fungal development. Alternatively, silencing of the gene led to the increased accumulation of endogenous polyunsaturated fatty acid hydroperoxides and antioxidant activities but to a reduction of fungal growth and conidium formation. Two key genes of the aflatoxin biosynthesis pathway, aflR and aflD, were downregulated in the strains in which A. flavus PXG (AfPXG) was silenced, leading to reduced aflatoxin B1 production in vitro. Application of caleosin/peroxygenase-derived oxylipins restored the wild-type phenotype in the strains in which AfPXG was silenced. PXG-deficient A. flavus strains were severely compromised in their capacity to infect maize seeds and to produce aflatoxin. Our results uncover a new branch of the fungal oxylipin pathway and may lead to the development of novel targets for controlling fungal disease. PMID:26116672

  14. Mutagenesis of conserved active site residues of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase enhances the accumulation of α-ketoglutarate in Yarrowia lipolytica.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongwei; Madzak, Catherine; Du, Guocheng; Zhou, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    α-Ketoglutarate (α-KG) is an important intermediate in the tricarboxylic acid cycle and has broad applications. The mitochondrial ketoglutarate dehydrogenase (KGDH) complex catalyzes the oxidation of α-KG to succinyl-CoA. Disruption of KGDH, which may enhance the accumulation of α-KG theoretically, was found to be lethal to obligate aerobic cells. In this study, individual overexpression of dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase (DLST), which serves as the inner core of KGDH, decreased overall activity of the enzyme complex. Furthermore, two conserved active site residues of DLST, His419, and Asp423 were identified. In order to determine whether these residues are engaged in enzyme reaction or not, these two conserved residues were individually mutated. Analysis of the kinetic parameters of the enzyme variants provided evidence that the catalytic reaction of DLST depended on residues His419 and Asp423. Overexpression of mutated DLST not only impaired balanced assembly of KGDH, but also disrupted the catalytic integrity of the enzyme complex. Replacement of the Asp423 residue by glutamate increased extracellular α-KG by 40 % to 50 g L(-1) in mutant strain. These observations uncovered catalytic roles of two conserved active site residues of DLST and provided clues for effective metabolic strategies for rational carbon flux control for the enhanced production of α-KG and related bioproducts. PMID:26428234

  15. Transgenic tobacco plants expressing siRNA targeted against the Mungbean yellow mosaic virus transcriptional activator protein gene efficiently block the viral DNA accumulation.

    PubMed

    Shanmugapriya, Gnanasekaran; Das, Sudhanshu Sekhar; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-06-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) is a bipartite begomovirus that infects many pulse crops such as blackgram, mungbean, mothbean, Frenchbean, and soybean. We tested the efficacy of the transgenically expressed intron-spliced hairpin RNA gene of the transcriptional activator protein (hpTrAP) in reducing MYMV DNA accumulation. Tobacco plants transformed with the MYMV hpTrAP gene accumulated 21-22 nt siRNA. Leaf discs of the transgenic plants, agroinoculated with the partial dimers of MYMV, displayed pronounced reduction in MYMV DNA accumulation. Thus, silencing of the TrAP gene, a suppressor of gene silencing, emerged as an effective strategy to control MYMV. PMID:26436122

  16. Value of monoclonal anti-myeloperoxidase (MPO7) for diagnosing acute leukaemia.

    PubMed Central

    Storr, J; Dolan, G; Coustan-Smith, E; Barnett, D; Reilly, J T

    1990-01-01

    The expression of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was studied in 100 cases of acute leukaemia (83 with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and 17 acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) by both a conventional cytochemical method and the immunocytochemical antiperoxidase (APAAP) technique using the monoclonal antibody MPO7. In each case the staining was evaluated by light microscopical examination (percentage of positive cells). Of the 83 cases of AML, 78 (93.9%) were positive for MPO7 compared with 70 (84.3%) by cytochemistry. Antibodies against the myeloid markers CD13 and CD33 were positive in 71 (85.5%) and 70 (84.3%) cases, respectively. Importantly, all cases of ALL were negative for both MPO7 and cytochemical MPO staining even when they were positive for CD13 and CD33. These results indicate that the anti-myeloperoxidase antibody MPO7 is the most sensitive and specific reagent for the diagnosis of AML and should therefore be included in routine immunophenotyping panels. Images PMID:1977771

  17. Modification of low-density lipoprotein by myeloperoxidase-derived oxidants and reagent hypochlorous acid.

    PubMed

    Malle, Ernst; Marsche, Gunther; Arnhold, Jürgen; Davies, Michael J

    2006-04-01

    Substantial evidence supports the notion that oxidative processes contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. The nature of the oxidants that give rise to the elevated levels of oxidised lipids and proteins, and decreased levels of antioxidants, detected in human atherosclerotic lesions are, however, unclear, with multiple species having been invoked. Over the last few years, considerable data have been obtained in support of the hypothesis that oxidants generated by the heme enzyme myeloperoxidase play a key role in oxidation reactions in the artery wall. In this article, the evidence for a role of myeloperoxidase, and oxidants generated therefrom, in the modification of low-density lipoprotein, the major source of lipids in atherosclerotic lesions, is reviewed. Particular emphasis is placed on the reactions of the reactive species generated by this enzyme, the mechanisms and sites of damage, the role of modification of the different components of low-density lipoprotein, and the biological consequences of such oxidation on cell types present in the artery wall and in the circulation, respectively. PMID:16698314

  18. Western Mediterranean coastal waters--monitoring PCBs and pesticides accumulation in Mytilus galloprovincialis by active mussel watching: the Mytilos project.

    PubMed

    Scarpato, Alfonso; Romanelli, Giulia; Galgani, Francois; Andral, Bruno; Amici, Marina; Giordano, Pierpaolo; Caixach, Josep; Calvo, Monica; Campillo, Juan Antonio; Albadalejo, José Benedicto; Cento, Alessandro; BenBrahim, Samir; Sammari, Cherif; Deudero, Salud; Boulahdid, Mostefa; Giovanardi, Franco

    2010-04-01

    In order to evaluate the contamination levels in the Western Mediterranean basin, the active mussel watch methodology has been applied. This methodology consists of mussel transplantation (Mytilus galloprovincialis) from non impacted areas to selected coastal areas, characterised by potential impact from the continent due to contaminating sources. The areas of interest were selected along the entire coastal development of the Western Mediterranean sea, 122 sites in total. The time of mussel caging exposure was 12 weeks. The project was co-financed in the frame of the Interreg IIIB Meddoc Programme, aimed at determining the overall chemical quality of the Mediterranean sea, consistent with the Water Framework Directive 2000/60. Several partners representative of the coastal Mediterranean Countries were involved in the Project, with the purpose of building up a common surveillance network, adopting shared methodologies. In this paper we present the results of three yearly monitoring campaigns (2004, 2005, 2006) carried out along the coasts of Italy, France, Spain, Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia, including the coastal environment of Baleares, Sicily, Sardinia and Corsica. The contamination levels of Pesticides (DDT and its metabolites, Hexachlorocyclohexane isomers alpha and gamma) and Polychlorinated biphenyls, are reported and discussed. Statistical elaborations performed on the original data set were mainly aimed at validating the raw sample distributions, by means of the Johnson method. Both DD and PCB species frequency distributions have been approximated to appropriate theoretical distributions, belonging to the Log-normal and Bounded families. By integrating the related Probability Density Functions (p.d.f.), different accumulation values for DDT, DDD and DDE and PCB species have been estimated, corresponding to fixed percentage points of the area under the respective curves. By choosing appropriate probability level boundaries (33rd and 66th percentile

  19. PHO13 deletion-induced transcriptional activation prevents sedoheptulose accumulation during xylose metabolism in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Xu, Haiqing; Kim, Sooah; Sorek, Hagit; Lee, Youngsuk; Jeong, Deokyeol; Kim, Jungyeon; Oh, Eun Joong; Yun, Eun Ju; Wemmer, David E; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-03-01

    The deletion of PHO13 (pho13Δ) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, encoding a phosphatase enzyme of unknown specificity, results in the transcriptional activation of genes related to the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as TAL1 encoding transaldolase. It has been also reported that the pho13Δ mutant of S. cerevisiae expressing a heterologous xylose pathway can metabolize xylose efficiently compared to its parental strain. However, the interaction between the pho13Δ-induced transcriptional changes and the phenotypes of xylose fermentation was not understood. Thus we investigated the global metabolic changes in response to pho13Δ when cells were exponentially growing on xylose. Among the 134 intracellular metabolites that we identified, the 98% reduction of sedoheptulose was found to be the most significant change in the pho13Δ mutant as compared to its parental strain. Because sedoheptulose-7-phosphate (S7P), a substrate of transaldolase, reduced significantly in the pho13Δ mutant as well, we hypothesized that limited transaldolase activity in the parental strain might cause dephosphorylation of S7P, leading to carbon loss and inefficient xylose metabolism. Mutants overexpressing TAL1 at different degrees were constructed, and their TAL1 expression levels and xylose consumption rates were positively correlated. Moreover, as TAL1 expression levels increased, intracellular sedoheptulose concentration dropped significantly. Therefore, we concluded that TAL1 upregulation, preventing the accumulation of sedoheptulose, is the most critical mechanism for the improved xylose metabolism by the pho13Δ mutant of engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26724864

  20. Activity in Inferior Parietal and Medial Prefrontal Cortex Signals the Accumulation of Evidence in a Probability Learning Task

    PubMed Central

    d'Acremont, Mathieu; Fornari, Eleonora; Bossaerts, Peter

    2013-01-01

    In an uncertain environment, probabilities are key to predicting future events and making adaptive choices. However, little is known about how humans learn such probabilities and where and how they are encoded in the brain, especially when they concern more than two outcomes. During functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), young adults learned the probabilities of uncertain stimuli through repetitive sampling. Stimuli represented payoffs and participants had to predict their occurrence to maximize their earnings. Choices indicated loss and risk aversion but unbiased estimation of probabilities. BOLD response in medial prefrontal cortex and angular gyri increased linearly with the probability of the currently observed stimulus, untainted by its value. Connectivity analyses during rest and task revealed that these regions belonged to the default mode network. The activation of past outcomes in memory is evoked as a possible mechanism to explain the engagement of the default mode network in probability learning. A BOLD response relating to value was detected only at decision time, mainly in striatum. It is concluded that activity in inferior parietal and medial prefrontal cortex reflects the amount of evidence accumulated in favor of competing and uncertain outcomes. PMID:23401673

  1. Transient accumulation of 5-carboxylcytosine indicates involvement of active demethylation in lineage specification of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, Lee M; Abakir, Abdulkadir; Ferjentsik, Zoltan; Dudnakova, Tatiana; Strohbuecker, Stephanie; Christie, Denise; Dai, Nan; Guan, Shengxi; Foster, Jeremy M; Corrêa, Ivan R; Loose, Matthew; Dixon, James E; Sottile, Virginie; Johnson, Andrew D; Ruzov, Alexey

    2014-06-12

    5-Methylcytosine (5mC) is an epigenetic modification involved in regulation of gene activity during differentiation. Tet dioxygenases oxidize 5mC to 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), 5-formylcytosine (5fC), and 5-carboxylcytosine (5caC). Both 5fC and 5caC can be excised from DNA by thymine-DNA glycosylase (TDG) followed by regeneration of unmodified cytosine via the base excision repair pathway. Despite evidence that this mechanism is operative in embryonic stem cells, the role of TDG-dependent demethylation in differentiation and development is currently unclear. Here, we demonstrate that widespread oxidation of 5hmC to 5caC occurs in postimplantation mouse embryos. We show that 5fC and 5caC are transiently accumulated during lineage specification of neural stem cells (NSCs) in culture and in vivo. Moreover, 5caC is enriched at the cell-type-specific promoters during differentiation of NSCs, and TDG knockdown leads to increased 5fC/5caC levels in differentiating NSCs. Our data suggest that active demethylation contributes to epigenetic reprogramming determining lineage specification in embryonic brain. PMID:24882006

  2. Energy release, beam attenuation radiation damage, gas production and accumulation of long-lived activity in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets

    SciTech Connect

    Shubin, Yu.N.

    1996-06-01

    The calculation and analysis of the nuclei concentrations and long-lived residual radioactivity accumulated in Pb, Pb-Bi and Hg targets irradiated by 800 MeV, 30 mA proton beam have been performed. The dominating components to the total radioactivity of radionuclides resulting from fission and spallation reactions and radiative capture by both target nuclei and accumulated radioactive nuclei for various irradiation and cooling times were analyzed. The estimations of spectral component contributions of neutron and proton fluxes to the accumulated activity were carried out. The contributions of fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products to the targets activity and partial activities of main long-lived fission products were evaluated. The accumulation of Po isotopes due to reactions induced by secondary alpha-particles were found to be important for the Pb target as compared with two-step radiative capture. The production of Tritium in the targets and its contribution to the total targets activity was considered in detail. It is found that total activities of both targets are close to one another.

  3. Cadmium accumulation retard activity of functional components of photo assimilation and growth of rice cultivars amended with vermicompost.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2013-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) uptake mediated alterations in functional components of photo assimilation during conversion of cow dung and poultry cast to vermicompost were studied in two Indian rice cultivars; MO 16 and MTU 7029. It was found that higher amount of Cd accumulate in plants grown in soil amended with vermicompost which in turn damaged functional components in photo assimilation. Enhancement of root growth was recognized as reason for Cd accumulation. Metabolic alterations noticed among plants were not taken place during application of raw materials used for vermicomposting such as cow dung and poultry cast amendment. Rice varieties accumulated Cd differentially where MTU 7029 accumulated more Cd compare to MO 16. It was also noticed that existence of negative correlation between zinc status of the plant and Cd accumulation. PMID:23819289

  4. Myeloperoxidase acts as a source of free iron during steady-state catalysis by a feedback inhibitory pathway

    PubMed Central

    Maitra, Dhiman; Shaeib, Faten; Abdulhamid, Ibrahim; Abdulridha, Rasha M.; Saed, Ghassan M.; Diamond, Michael P.; Pennathur, Subramaniam; Abu-Soud, Husam M.

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme-containing enzyme that generates hypochlorous acid (HOCl) from chloride (Cl−) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). It is implicated in the pathology of several chronic inflammatory conditions such as cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and cancer. Recently we have shown that HOCl can destroy the heme prosthetic group of hemoproteins. Here, we investigated whether the HOCl formed during steady-state catalysis is able to destroy the MPO heme moiety and thereby function as a major source of free iron. UV–visible spectra and H2O2-specific electrode measurements recorded during steady-state HOCl synthesis by MPO showed that the degree of MPO heme destruction increased after multiple additions of H2O2 (10 μM), precluding the enzyme from functioning at maximum activity (80–90% inhibition). MPO heme destruction occurred only in the presence of Cl−. Stopped-flow measurements revealed that the HOCl-mediated MPO heme destruction was complex and occurred through transient ferric species whose formation and decay kinetics indicated it participates in heme destruction along with subsequent free iron release. MPO heme depletion was confirmed by the buildup of free iron utilizing the ferrozine assay. Hypochlorous acid, once generated, first equilibrates in the solution as a whole before binding to the heme iron and initiating heme destruction. Eliminating HOCl from the MPO milieu by scavenging HOCl, destabilizing the MPO–Compound I–Cl complex that could be formed during catalysis, and/or inhibiting MPO catalytic activity partially or completely protects MPO from HOCl insults. Collectively, this study elucidates the bidirectional relationship between MPO and HOCl, which highlights the potential role of MPO as a source of free iron. PMID:23624305

  5. Canthin-6-one displays antiproliferative activity and causes accumulation of cancer cells in the G2/M phase.

    PubMed

    Dejos, Camille; Voisin, Pierre; Bernard, Marianne; Régnacq, Matthieu; Bergès, Thierry

    2014-11-26

    Canthinones are natural substances with a wide range of biological activities, including antipyretic, antiparasitic, and antimicrobial. Antiproliferative and/or cytotoxic effects of canthinones on cancer cells have also been described, although their mechanism of action remains ill defined. To gain better insight into this mechanism, the antiproliferative effect of a commercially available canthin-6-one (1) was examined dose-dependently on six cancer cell lines (human prostate, PC-3; human colon, HT-29; human lymphocyte, Jurkat; human cervix, HeLa; rat glioma, C6; and mouse embryonic fibroblasts, NIH-3T3). Cytotoxic effects of 1 were investigated on the same cancer cell lines by procaspase-3 cleavage and on normal human skin fibroblasts. Strong antiproliferative effects of the compound were observed in all cell lines, whereas cytotoxic effects were very dependent on cell type. A better definition of the mechanism of action of 1 was obtained on PC-3 cells, by showing that it decreases BrdU incorporation into DNA by 60% to 80% and mitotic spindle formation by 70% and that it causes a 2-fold accumulation of cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Together, the data suggest that the primary effect of canthin-6-one (1) is antiproliferative, possibly by interfering with the G2/M transition. Proapoptotic effects might result from this disturbance of the cell cycle. PMID:25379743

  6. Canine parvovirus NS1 induced apoptosis involves mitochondria, accumulation of reactive oxygen species and activation of caspases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shishir Kumar; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Rosh, Nighil; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Saxena, Lovleen; Singh, Arvind Kumar; Harish, D R; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar

    2016-02-01

    The non-structural protein (NS1) of parvoviruses plays an important role in viral replication and is thought to be responsible for inducing cell death. However, the detailed mechanism and the pathways involved in canine parvovirus type 2 NS1 (CPV2.NS1) induced apoptosis are not yet known. In the present study, we report that expression of CPV2.NS1 in HeLa cells arrests cells in G1 phase of the cell cycle and the apoptosis is mitochondria mediated as indicated by mitochondrial depolarization, release of cytochrome-c and activation of caspase 9. Treatment of cells with caspase 9 inhibitor Z-LEHD-FMK reduced the induction of apoptosis significantly. We also report that expression of CPV2.NS1 causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and treatment with an antioxidant reduces the ROS levels and the extent of apoptosis. Our results provide an insight into the mechanism of CPV2.NS1 induced apoptosis, which might prove valuable in developing NS1 protein as an oncolytic agent. PMID:26555166

  7. The Arabidopsis ABHD11 Mutant Accumulates Polar Lipids in Leaves as a Consequence of Absent Acylhydrolase Activity1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Anitha; Vijayaraj, Panneerselvam; Vijayakumar, Arun Kumar; Rajasekharan, Ram

    2016-01-01

    Alpha/beta hydrolase domain (ABHD)-containing proteins are structurally related with diverse catalytic activities. In various species, some ABHD proteins have been characterized and shown to play roles in lipid homeostasis. However, little is known about ABHD proteins in plants. Here, we characterized AT4G10030 (AtABHD11), an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) homolog of a human ABHD11 gene. In silico analyses of AtABHD11 revealed homology with other plant species with a conserved GXSXG lipid motif. Interestingly, Arabidopsis abhd11 mutant plants exhibited an enhanced growth rate compared with wild-type plants. Quantitative analyses of the total lipids showed that the mutant abhd11 has a high amount of phospholipid and galactolipid in Arabidopsis leaves. The overexpression of AtABHD11 in Escherichia coli led to a reduction in phospholipid levels. The bacterially expressed recombinant AtABHD11 hydrolyzed lyso(phospho)lipid and monoacylglycerol. Furthermore, using whole-genome microarray and real-time PCR analyses of abhd11 and wild-type plants, we noted the up-regulation of MGD1, -2, and -3 and DGD1. Together, these findings suggested that AtABHD11 is a lyso(phospho)lipase. The disruption of AtABHD11 caused the accumulation of the polar lipids in leaves, which in turn promoted a higher growth rate compared with wild-type plants. PMID:26589672

  8. Age‐related remodeling of small arteries is accompanied by increased sphingomyelinase activity and accumulation of long‐chain ceramides

    PubMed Central

    Ohanian, Jacqueline; Liao, Aiyin; Forman, Simon P.; Ohanian, Vasken

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The structure and function of large arteries alters with age leading to increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Age‐related large artery remodeling and arteriosclerosis is associated with increased collagen deposition, inflammation, and endothelial dysfunction. Bioactive sphingolipids are known to regulate these processes, and are also involved in aging and cellular senescence. However, less is known about age‐associated alterations in small artery morphology and function or whether changes in arterial sphingolipids occur in aging. We show that mesenteric small arteries from old sheep have increased lumen diameter and media thickness without a change in media to lumen ratio, indicative of outward hypertrophic remodeling. This remodeling occurred without overt changes in blood pressure or pulse pressure indicating it was a consequence of aging per se. There was no age‐associated change in mechanical properties of the arteries despite an increase in total collagen content and deposition of collagen in a thickened intima layer in arteries from old animals. Analysis of the sphingolipid profile showed an increase in long‐chain ceramide (C14–C20), but no change in the levels of sphingosine or sphingosine‐1‐phosphate in arteries from old compared to young animals. This was accompanied by a parallel increase in acid and neutral sphingomyelinase activity in old arteries compared to young. This study demonstrates remodeling of small arteries during aging that is accompanied by accumulation of long‐chain ceramides. This suggests that sphingolipids may be important mediators of vascular aging. PMID:24872355

  9. Effect of a microbiota activator on accumulated ammonium and microbial community structure in a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuya; Hori, Tomoyuki; Navarro, Ronald R; Ronald, Navarro R; Habe, Hiroshi; Ogata, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    Microbiota activators (MAs) have been used to improve the reactor performances of biological wastewater treatment processes. In this study, to remove ammonium (NH4(+)) accumulated during the pre-operation of a pilot-scale membrane bioreactor (MBR) under high-organic-loading conditions, an MA was added to the MBR system and the resulting changes in reactor performances and microbial communities were monitored for 12 days. The NH4(+) concentrations in the sludge and effluent decreased (from 427 to 246 mg/L in the sludge (days 1-9)), and mixed liquor suspended solid increased (from 6,793 to 11,283 mg/L (days 1-12)) after the addition of MA. High-throughput Illumina sequencing of 16S rRNA genes revealed that the microbial community structure changed along with the NH4(+) removal resulting from the MA addition. In particular, the relative abundance of an Acidovorax-related operational taxonomic unit (OTU) increased significantly, accounting for approximately 50% of the total microbial population at day 11. In contrast, the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea showed low abundances (<0.05%), and no anaerobic ammonia oxidizers were detected. These results suggested that the Acidovorax-related OTU was mainly involved in the NH4(+) removal in the MBR, probably due to its ammonia-assimilating metabolism. PMID:26377133

  10. Houttuynia cordata attenuates lipid accumulation via activation of AMP-activated protein kinase signaling pathway in HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyun; Koppula, Sushruta

    2014-01-01

    Houttuynia cordata (H. cordata) from the family Saururaceae is a perennial herb native to Southeast Asia. It possesses a range of medicinal properties to treat several disease symptoms including allergic inflammation and anaphylaxis. In the present investigation, we provided the molecular mechanisms underlying the role of H. cordata extract (HCE) in the prevention of high glucose-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes. HepG2 cells were pre-treated with various concentrations of HCE (0, 10, 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL) and treated with serum-free medium with normal glucose (5 mM) for 1 h, followed by exposure to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) for 24 h. HCE significantly and dose-dependently attenuated lipid accumulation in human HepG2 hepatocytes when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) (p < 0.05, p < 0.01 and p < 0.001 at 20, 40, and 80 μg/mL concentrations, respectively). Further, HCE attenuated the expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and glycerol 3-phosphate acyltransferases (GPATs). The adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated by HCE treatment when exposed to high glucose (25 mM D-glucose) in human HepG2 hepatocytes. This study suggests the hypolipidemic effects of HCE by the inhibition of lipid biosynthesis mediated through AMPK signaling, which may play an active role and can be developed as an anti-obesity agent. PMID:24871657

  11. Monocyte and granulocyte-mediated tumor cell destruction. A role for the hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, S J; Slivka, A

    1982-01-01

    Human monocytes stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate were able to destroy a T lymphoblast cell target (CEM). Stimulated human granulocytes were also capable of mediating CEM cytotoxicity to a comparable degree as the monocyte. CEM destruction was dependent on the pH and the effector cell number. Both monocyte or granulocyte mediated cytotoxicity were inhibited by the addition of catalase, whereas superoxide dismutase had no inhibitory effect. In addition, CEM were protected from cytolysis by the effector cells by the myeloperoxidase inhibitors, azide and cyanide, or by performing the experiment under halide-free conditions. Glucose oxidase, an enzyme system capable of generating hydrogen peroxide, did not mediate CEM cytotoxicity, while the addition of purified myeloperoxidase dramatically enhanced cytolysis. Hypochlorous acid scavengers prevented CEM destruction by the glucose oxidase-myeloperoxidase-chloride system but neither hydroxyl radical nor singlet oxygen scavengers had any protective effect. These hypochlorous acid scavengers were also successful in inhibiting monocyte or granulocyte-mediated CEM cytotoxicity. Based on these observations we propose that human monocytes or granulocytes can utilize the hydrogen peroxide-myeloperoxidase-chloride system to generate hypochlorous acid or species of similar reactivity as a potential mediator of CEM destruction. PMID:6276438

  12. Decreased myeloperoxidase expressing cells in the aged rat brain after excitotoxic damage.

    PubMed

    Campuzano, Oscar; Castillo-Ruiz, Maria del Mar; Acarin, Laia; Gonzalez, Berta; Castellano, Bernardo

    2011-09-01

    Brain aging is associated to several morphological and functional alterations that influence the evolution and outcome of CNS damage. Acute brain injury such as an excitotoxic insult induces initial tissue damage followed by associated inflammation and oxidative stress, partly attributed to neutrophil recruitment and the expression of oxidative enzymes such as myeloperoxidase (MPO), among others. However, to date, very few studies have focused on how age can influence neutrophil infiltration after acute brain damage. Therefore, to evaluate the age-dependent pattern of neutrophil cell infiltration following an excitotoxic injury, intrastriatal injection of N-methyl-d-aspartate was performed in young and aged male Wistar rats. Animals were sacrificed at different times between 12h post-lesion (hpl) to 14 days post-lesion (dpl). Cryostat sections were processed for myeloperoxidase (MPO) immunohistochemistry, and double labeling for either neuronal cells (NeuN), astrocytes (GFAP), perivascular macrophages (ED-2), or microglia/macrophages (tomato lectin histochemistry). Our observations showed that MPO + cells were observed in the injured striatum from 12 hpl (when maximum values were found) until 7 dpl, when cell density was strongly diminished. However, at all survival times analyzed, the overall density of MPO + cells was lower in the aged versus the adult injured striatum. MPO + cells were mainly identified as neutrophils (especially at 12 hpl and 1 dpl), but it should be noted that MPO + neurons and microglia/macrophages were also found. MPO + neurons were most commonly observed at 12 hpl and reduced in the aged. MPO + microglia/macrophages were the main population expressing MPO from 3 dpl, when density was also reduced in aged subjects. These results point to neutrophil infiltration as another important factor contributing to the different responses of the adult and aged brain to damage, highlighting the need of using aged animals for the study of acute age

  13. The vinyl-sulfonium bond in human myeloperoxidase: Impact on compound I formation and reduction by halides and thiocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Zederbauer, Martina; Furtmueller, Paul Georg; Ganster, Bernadette; Moguilevsky, Nicole; Obinger, Christian . E-mail: christian.obinger@boku.ac.at

    2007-05-04

    In human myeloperoxidase (MPO) the heme is covalently attached to the protein via two ester linkages and a unique sulfonium ion linkage between the sulfur atom of Met243 and the {beta}-carbon of the vinyl ring on pyrrole ring A. Here, we have investigated the variant Met243Val produced in Chinese hamster ovary cells in order to elucidate the role of the electron withdrawing sulfonium bond in compound I formation and reduction. Disruption of this MPO-typical bond causes a blue-shifted UV-vis spectrum and an increase in the heme flexibility. This had no impact on compound I formation mediated by hydrogen peroxide (2.2 x 10{sup 7} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} at pH 7.0 and 25 {sup o}C). Compared with wild-type recombinant MPO the cyanide association rate with ferric Met243Val was significantly enhanced as were also the calculated apparent bimolecular compound I reduction rates by iodide (>10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) and thiocyanate (>10{sup 8} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}). By contrast, the overall chlorination and bromination activities were decreased by 98.1% and 87.4%, respectively, compared with the wild-type protein. Compound I reduction by chloride was slower than compound I decay to a compound II-like species (0.4 s{sup -1}), whereas compound I reduction by bromide was about 10-times slower (1.3 x 10{sup 4} M{sup -1} s{sup -1}) than the wild-type rate. These findings are discussed with respect to the known crystal structure of MPO and its bromide complex as well as the known redox chemistry of its intermediates and substrates.

  14. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    'Hong Anliu' (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of 'Anliu' (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between 'HAL' and 'AL'. Compared with 'AL', the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in 'HAL'. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, vacuolar H(+)-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in 'HAL'. These results implied that 'HAL' has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with 'AL'. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in 'HAL'. PMID:27385485

  15. Citrate Accumulation-Related Gene Expression and/or Enzyme Activity Analysis Combined With Metabolomics Provide a Novel Insight for an Orange Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ling-Xia; Shi, Cai-Yun; Liu, Xiao; Ning, Dong-Yuan; Jing, Long-Fei; Yang, Huan; Liu, Yong-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    ‘Hong Anliu’ (HAL, Citrus sinensis cv. Hong Anliu) is a bud mutant of ‘Anliu’ (AL), characterized by a comprehensive metabolite alteration, such as lower accumulation of citrate, high accumulation of lycopene and soluble sugars in fruit juice sacs. Due to carboxylic acid metabolism connects other metabolite biosynthesis and/or catabolism networks, we therefore focused analyzing citrate accumulation-related gene expression profiles and/or enzyme activities, along with metabolic fingerprinting between ‘HAL’ and ‘AL’. Compared with ‘AL’, the transcript levels of citrate biosynthesis- and utilization-related genes and/or the activities of their respective enzymes such as citrate synthase, cytosol aconitase and ATP-citrate lyase were significantly higher in ‘HAL’. Nevertheless, the mitochondrial aconitase activity, the gene transcript levels of proton pumps, including vacuolar H+-ATPase, vacuolar H+-PPase, and the juice sac-predominant p-type proton pump gene (CsPH8) were significantly lower in ‘HAL’. These results implied that ‘HAL’ has higher abilities for citrate biosynthesis and utilization, but lower ability for the citrate uptake into vacuole compared with ‘AL’. Combined with the metabolites-analyzing results, a model was then established and suggested that the reduction in proton pump activity is the key factor for the low citrate accumulation and the comprehensive metabolite alterations as well in ‘HAL’. PMID:27385485

  16. Whole structure-activity relationships of the fat-accumulation inhibitor (-)-ternatin: recognition of the importance of each amino acid residue.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Kenichiro; Iwase, Yoshiaki; Miwa, Ryoka; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke

    2008-10-01

    A series of Ala and Aoc analogues of (-)-ternatin were prepared, and their bioactivities were assessed by a fat-accumulation inhibition assay using 3T3-L1 adipocytes, which led to the discovery of key structure-activity relationships (SAR). PMID:18798610

  17. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  18. [Effects of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhiza on activities of antioxidant enzymes, accumulation and chemical forms of cadmium in different varieties of tomato].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ling; Yang, Yun; Xu, Wei-Hong; Wang, Chong-Li; Chen, Rong; Xiong, Shi-Juan; Xie, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Jin-Zhong; Xiong, Zhi-Ting; Wang, Zheng-Yin; Xie, De-Ti

    2014-06-01

    Pot experiments were carried out to investigate the effects of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhiza on the plant growth, malondialdehyde (MDA), antioxidant enzyme activities of leaf and root, accumulation and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in tow varieties of tomato when exposed to Cd (20 mg x kg(-1)). The results showed that dry weights of fruit and plant, and contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) and antioxidant enzyme activities of leaf and root, and concentrations and accumulations of Cd significantly differed between two varieties of tomato. Dry weights of fruit, roots, stem, leaf and plant were increased by single or combined remediation of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhiza, while MDA contents and antioxidant enzyme activities of leaf and root reduced. The total extractable Cd, F(E), F(W), F(NaCl), F(HAc), F(HCl), and F(R) in fruit of two varieties of tomato reduced by 19.4% - 52.4%, 31.0% - 75.2%, 19.7% - 59.1%, 3.1% - 48.2%, 20.0% - 65.0%, 40.7% - 100.0% and 15.2% - 50.0%, respectively. Cadmium accumulations in tomato were in the order of leaf > stem > fruit > root. Cadmium concentrations in leaf, stem, root and fruit of both varieties decreased by single or combined remediation of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhiza, and Cd accumulations of stem and plant of two varieties also reduced. Cd accumulations in fruit of two varieties decreased by 42.9% and 43.7% in the combined remediation treatments, respectively. Tolerance and resistance of 'LUO BEI QI' on Cd was more than 'De Fu mm-8', and Cd concentrations and Cd accumulations in fruit and plant were in the order of 'LUO BEI QI' < 'De Fu mm-8' in the presence or absence of single or combined remediation of ryegrass and arbuscular mycorrhiza. PMID:25158517

  19. Spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental embolic stroke depending on treatment with tissue plasminogen activator and its combination with hyperbaric oxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Michalski, D.; Heindl, M.; Kacza, J.; Laignel, F.; Küppers-Tiedt, L.; Schneider, D.; Grosche, J.; Boltze, J.; Löhr, M.; Hobohm, C.; Härtig, W.

    2012-01-01

    Inflammation following ischaemic stroke attracts high priority in current research, particularly using human-like models and long-term observation periods considering translational aspects. The present study aimed on the spatio-temporal course of macrophage-like cell accumulation after experimental thromboembolic stroke and addressed microglial and astroglial reactions in the ischaemic border zone. Further, effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) as currently best treatment for stroke and the potentially neuroprotective co-administration of hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) were investigated. Rats underwent middle cerebral artery occlusion and were assigned to control, tPA or tPA+HBO. Twenty-four hours, 7, 14 and 28 days were determined as observation time points. The accumulation of macrophage-like cells was semiquantitatively assessed by CD68 staining in the ischaemic area and ischaemic border zone, and linked to the clinical course. CD11b, ionized calcium binding adaptor molecule 1 (Iba), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN) were applied to reveal delayed glial and neuronal alterations. In all groups, the accumulation of macrophage-like cells increased distinctly from 24 hours to 7 days post ischaemia. tPA+HBO tended to decrease macrophage-like cell accumulation at day 14 and 28. Overall, a trend towards an association of increased accumulation and pronounced reduction of the neurological deficit was found. Concerning delayed inflammatory reactions, an activation of microglia and astrocytes with co-occurring neuronal loss was observed on day 28. Thereby, astrogliosis was found circularly in contrast to microglial activation directly in the ischaemic area. This study supports previous data on long-lasting inflammatory processes following experimental stroke, and additionally provides region-specific details on glial reactions. The tendency towards a decreasing macrophage-like cell accumulation after tPA+HBO needs to be discussed

  20. Supplementation with Sodium Selenite and Selenium-Enriched Microalgae Biomass Show Varying Effects on Blood Enzymes Activities, Antioxidant Response, and Accumulation in Common Barbel (Barbus barbus)

    PubMed Central

    Kouba, Antonín; Velíšek, Josef; Stará, Alžběta; Masojídek, Jiří; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Yearling common barbel (Barbus barbus L.) were fed four purified casein-based diets for 6 weeks in outdoor cages. Besides control diet, these were supplemented with 0.3 mg kg−1 dw selenium (Se) from sodium selenite, or 0.3 and 1.0 mg kg−1 from Se-enriched microalgae biomass (Chlorella), a previously untested Se source for fish. Fish mortality, growth, Se accumulation in muscle and liver, and activity of selected enzymes in blood plasma, muscle, liver, and intestine were evaluated. There was no mortality, and no differences in fish growth, among groups. Se concentrations in muscle and liver, activity of alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase in blood plasma, glutathione reductase (GR) in muscle, and GR and catalase in muscle and liver suggested that selenium from Se-enriched Chlorella is more readily accumulated and biologically active while being less toxic than sodium selenite. PMID:24772422

  1. Supplementation with sodium selenite and selenium-enriched microalgae biomass show varying effects on blood enzymes activities, antioxidant response, and accumulation in common barbel (Barbus barbus).

    PubMed

    Kouba, Antonín; Velíšek, Josef; Stará, Alžběta; Masojídek, Jiří; Kozák, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Yearling common barbel (Barbus barbus L.) were fed four purified casein-based diets for 6 weeks in outdoor cages. Besides control diet, these were supplemented with 0.3 mg kg(-1) dw selenium (Se) from sodium selenite, or 0.3 and 1.0 mg kg(-1) from Se-enriched microalgae biomass (Chlorella), a previously untested Se source for fish. Fish mortality, growth, Se accumulation in muscle and liver, and activity of selected enzymes in blood plasma, muscle, liver, and intestine were evaluated. There was no mortality, and no differences in fish growth, among groups. Se concentrations in muscle and liver, activity of alanine aminotransferase and creatine kinase in blood plasma, glutathione reductase (GR) in muscle, and GR and catalase in muscle and liver suggested that selenium from Se-enriched Chlorella is more readily accumulated and biologically active while being less toxic than sodium selenite. PMID:24772422

  2. Decreased cytochrome-c oxidase activity and lack of age-related accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in the brains of schizophrenics

    SciTech Connect

    Cavelier, L.; Jazin, E.E.; Eriksson, I.

    1995-09-01

    Defects in mitochondrial energy production have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. To study the contribution of mitochondrial defects to Alzheimer disease and schizophrenia, cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) activity and levels of the mtDNA{sup 4977} deletion in postmortem brain tissue specimens of patients were compared with those of asymptomatic age-matched controls. No difference in COX activity was observed between Alzheimer patients and controls in any of five brain regions investigated. In contrast, schizophrenic patients had a 63% reduction of the COX activity in the nucleus caudatus (P<0.0001) and a 43% reduction in the cortex gyrus frontalis (P<0.05) as compared to controls. The average levels of the mtDNA{sup 4977} deletion did not differ significantly between Alzheimer patients and controls, and the deletion followed similar modes of accumulation with age in the two groups. In contrast, no age-related accumulation of mtDNA deletions was found in schizophrenic patients. The reduction in COX activity in schizophrenic patients did not correlate with changes in the total amount of mtDNA or levels of the mtDNA{sup 4977} deletion. The lack of age-related accumulation of the mtDNA{sup 4977} deletion and reduction in COX activity suggest that a mitochondrial dysfunction may be involved in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. 41 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  3. Beta-conglycinin embeds active peptides that inhibit lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is a worldwide health concern because it is a well recognized predictor of premature mortality. The objective was to identify soybean varieties that have improved potential to inhibit fat accumulation in adipocytes by testing the effects of soy hydrolysates having a range of protein subunit...

  4. T-cell accumulation and regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted upregulation in adipose tissue in obesity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with chronic inflammation, which includes increased macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue (AT) and upregulation of chemokines and cytokines. T cells also play important roles in chronic inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis but have not been well studied in obesity....

  5. Transcriptional activation of a MYB gene controls the tissue-specific anthocyanin accumulation in a purple cauliflower mutant

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids such as anthocyanins possess significant health benefits to humans and play important physiological roles in plants. An interesting Purple gene mutation in cauliflower confers an abnormal pattern of anthocyanin accumulation, giving intense purple color in very young leaves, curds, and see...

  6. Moderate physical activity from childhood contributes to metabolic health and reduces hepatic fat accumulation in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Obesity, oxidative stress and inflammation, by triggering insulin resistance, may contribute to the accumulation of hepatic fat, and this accumulation by lipotoxicity can lead the organ to fail. Because obesity is growing at an alarming rate and, worryingly, in a precocious way, the present study aimed to investigate the effects of moderate physical training performed from childhood to adulthood on liver fat metabolism in rats. Methods Twenty rats that were 28 days old were divided into two groups: control (C) and trained (T). The C Group was kept in cages without exercise, and the T group was submitted to swimming exercise for 1 hour/day, 5 days/week from 28 to 90 days of age (8 weeks) at 80% of the anaerobic threshold determined by the lactate minimum test. At the end of the experiment, the body weight gain, insulin sensitivity (glucose disappearance rate during the insulin tolerance test), concentrations of free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG) and hepatic lipogenic rate were analyzed. For the statistical analysis, the Student t-test was used with the level of significance preset at 5%. Results The T group showed lower body weight gain, FFA concentrations, fat accumulation, hepatic lipogenic rate and insulin resistance. Conclusion The regular practice of moderate physical exercise from childhood can contribute to the reduction of obesity and insulin resistance and help prevent the development of accumulation of hepatic fat in adulthood. PMID:23496920

  7. Differential activation of ammonium transporters during the accumulation of ammonia by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and its effect on appressoria formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Shnaiderman, Chen; Miyara, Itay; Kobiler, Ilana; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2013-03-01

    Ammonium secreted by the post-harvest pathogen Colletotrichum gloeosporioides during host colonization accumulates in the host environment due to enhanced fungal nitrogen metabolism. Two types of ammonium transporter-encoding genes, AMET and MEP, are expressed during pathogenicity. Gene disruption of AMET, a gene modulating ammonia secretion, showed twofold reduced ammonia secretion and 45% less colonization on avocado fruit, suggesting a contribution to pathogenicity. MEPB, a gene modulating ammonium transport, is expressed by C. gloeosporioides during pathogenicity and starvation conditions in culture. Gene disruption of MEPB, the most highly expressed gene of the MEP family, resulted in twofold overexpression of MEPA and MEPC but reduced colonization, suggesting MEPB expression's contribution to pathogenicity. Analysis of internal and external ammonia accumulation by ΔmepB strains in mycelia and germinated spores showed rapid uptake and accumulation, and reduced secretion of ammonia in the mutant versus wild-type (WT) strains. Ammonia uptake by the WT germinating spores but not by the ΔmepB strain with compromised ammonium transport activated cAMP and transcription of PKA subunits PKAR and PKA2. ΔmepB mutants showed 75% less appressorium formation and colonization than the WT, which was partially restored by 10 mM exogenous ammonia. Thus, whereas both AMET and MEPB genes modulate ammonia secretion, only MEPB contributes to ammonia accumulation by mycelia and germinating spores that activate the cAMP pathways, inducing the morphogenetic processes contributing to C. gloeosporioides pathogenicity. PMID:23387470

  8. [The mechanism of bactericidal activity in phagosomes of neutrophils].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, R A; But, P G; Fomina, V A; Rogovin, V V

    2002-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase plays the key role in antimicrobial of phagocytes. This enzyme uses hydrogen peroxide and chloride to catalyze hypochlorous acid formation. HOCl is the most probable agent in the oxygen-dependent bactericidal activity in the phagocyte phagosome. Chlorination markers indicate HOCl generation in the quantities lethal for bacteria. Enzymatic assay for myeloperoxidase indicates proceeding of other reactions involved in bactericidal activity. Superoxide integrates many activities of this kind and is important for physiological function of myeloperoxidase. Elucidation of phagosomes biochemistry can help us to understand why certain pathogens survive in such unfavorable environment. PMID:12180008

  9. Activity and protein kinase C regulate synaptic accumulation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors independently of GluN1 splice variant.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Joana S; Rooyakkers, Amanda; She, Kevin; Ribeiro, Luis; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Craig, Ann Marie

    2011-08-12

    NMDA receptors are calcium-permeable ionotropic receptors that detect coincident glutamate binding and membrane depolarization and are essential for many forms of synaptic plasticity in the mammalian brain. The obligatory GluN1 subunit of NMDA receptors is alternatively spliced at multiple sites, generating forms that vary in N-terminal N1 and C-terminal C1, C2, and C2' cassettes. Based on expression of GluN1 constructs in heterologous cells and in wild type neurons, the prevalent view is that the C-terminal cassettes regulate synaptic accumulation and its modulation by homeostatic activity blockade and by protein kinase C (PKC). Here, we tested the role of GluN1 splicing in regulated synaptic accumulation of NMDA receptors by lentiviral expression of individual GluN1 splice variants in hippocampal neurons cultured from GluN1 (-/-) mice. High efficiency transduction of GluN1 at levels similar to endogenous was achieved. Under control conditions, the C2' cassette mediated enhanced synaptic accumulation relative to the alternate C2 cassette, whereas the presence or absence of N1 or C1 had no effect. Surprisingly all GluN1 splice variants showed >2-fold increased synaptic accumulation with chronic blockade of NMDA receptor activity. Furthermore, in this neuronal rescue system, all GluN1 splice variants were equally rapidly dispersed upon activation of PKC. These results indicate that the major mechanisms mediating homeostatic synaptic accumulation and PKC dispersal of NMDA receptors occur independently of GluN1 splice isoform. PMID:21676872

  10. Pathways for oxidation of low density lipoprotein by myeloperoxidase: tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine.

    PubMed

    Heinecke, J W

    1997-01-01

    Many lines of evidence implicate oxidation of low density lipoprotein (LDL) in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, a chronic inflammatory disease. The physiologically relevant mechanisms have not been identified, but phagocytic white cells may play an important role because macrophage-rich lesions characterize the disorder. Recent studies have shown that myeloperoxidase, a heme enzyme secreted only by phagocytes, is present in human atherosclerotic tissue. The enzyme is a potent catalyst of LDL oxidation in vitro, it co-localizes with macrophages in lesions, and it generates products that are detectable in atherosclerotic plaque. These findings suggest that myeloperoxidase may promote LDL oxidation in the artery wall. This article reviews the enzyme's ability to generate a range of oxidants, including tyrosyl radical, reactive aldehydes, hypochlorous acid and molecular chlorine. These products have the potential to damage host molecules as well as microbes, suggesting a mechanism that may contribute to atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:9259996

  11. Changes in the viscosity of hyaluronic acid after exposure to a myeloperoxidase-derived oxidant

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, M.S.; Green, S.P.; Lowther, D.A.

    1989-04-01

    Both purified hyaluronic acid (HA) and bovine synovial fluid react with OCI-, the major oxidant produced by the myeloperoxidase (MPO)/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system, resulting in a decrease in their specific viscosity. This reaction is inhibited in the presence of excess methionine. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ alone decreases the viscosity of HA, presumably by the Fenton reaction, in the absence (but not in the presence) of the iron chelator, diethyltriaminepentacetic acid (DETAPAC). In the presence of DETAPAC, incubation of HA with the complete MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system lowered the viscosity of HA. Analysis of 3H-HA exposed to OCI- by gel filtration chromatography indicated that cleavage of HA occurred only at higher OCI- concentrations. We suggest that the reduction in viscosity of HA by the MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system may be due to a combination of oxidative cleavage and changes in the conformation of the molecule. We speculate that the changes in the molecular size of rheumatoid synovial fluid HA may be due to the action of the neutrophil MPO/H/sub 2/O/sub 2//CI- system.

  12. Impact of HDL oxidation by the myeloperoxidase system on sterol efflux by the ABCA1 pathway.

    PubMed

    Shao, Baohai; Heinecke, Jay W

    2011-10-19

    Protein oxidation by phagocytic white blood cells is implicated in tissue injury during inflammation. One important target might be high-density lipoprotein (HDL), which protects against atherosclerosis by removing excess cholesterol from artery wall macrophages. In the human artery wall, cholesterol-laden macrophages are a rich source of myeloperoxidase (MPO), which uses hydrogen peroxide for oxidative reactions in the extracellular milieu. Levels of two characteristic products of MPO-chlorotyrosine and nitrotyrosine-are markedly elevated in HDL from human atherosclerotic lesions. Here, we describe how MPO-dependent chlorination impairs the ability of apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I), HDL's major protein, to transport cholesterol by the ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) pathway. Faulty interactions between apoA-I and ABCA1 are involved. Tandem mass spectrometry and investigations of mutated forms of apoA-I demonstrate that tyrosine residues in apoA-I are chlorinated in a site-specific manner by chloramine intermediates on suitably juxtaposed lysine residues. Plasma HDL isolated from subjects with coronary artery disease (CAD) also contains higher levels of chlorinated and nitrated tyrosine residues than HDL from healthy subjects. Thus, the presence of chlorinated HDL might serve as a marker of CAD risk. Because HDL damaged by MPO in vitro becomes dysfunctional, inhibiting MPO in vivo might be cardioprotective. PMID:21501700

  13. Cellular cholesterol accumulation modulates high fat high sucrose (HFHS) diet-induced ER stress and hepatic inflammasome activation in the development of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis.

    PubMed

    Bashiri, Amir; Nesan, Dinushan; Tavallaee, Ghazaleh; Sue-Chue-Lam, Ian; Chien, Kevin; Maguire, Graham F; Naples, Mark; Zhang, Jing; Magomedova, Lilia; Adeli, Khosrow; Cummins, Carolyn L; Ng, Dominic S

    2016-07-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), is the form of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease posing risk to progress into serious long term complications. Human and pre-clinical models implicate cellular cholesterol dysregulation playing important role in its development. Mouse model studies suggest synergism between dietary cholesterol and fat in contributing to NASH but the mechanisms remain poorly understood. Our laboratory previously reported the primary importance of hepatic endoplasmic reticulum cholesterol (ER-Chol) in regulating hepatic ER stress by comparing the responses of wild type, Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ and Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, to a 2% high cholesterol diet (HCD). Here we further investigated the roles of ER-Chol and ER stress in HFHS diet-induced NASH using the same strains. With HFHS diet feeding, both WT and Ldlr-/-xLcat+/+ accumulate ER-Chol in association with ER stress and inflammasome activation but the Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice are protected. By contrast, all three strains accumulate cholesterol crystal, in correlation with ER-Chol, albeit less so in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice. By comparison, HCD feeding per se (i) is sufficient to promote steatosis and activate inflammasomes, and (ii) results in dramatic accumulation of cholesterol crystal which is linked to inflammasome activation in Ldlr-/-xLcat-/- mice, independent of ER-Chol. Our data suggest that both dietary fat and cholesterol each independently promote steatosis, cholesterol crystal accumulation and inflammasome activation through distinct but complementary pathways. In vitro studies using palmitate-induced hepatic steatosis in HepG2 cells confirm the key roles by cellular cholesterol in the induction of steatosis and inflammasome activations. These novel findings provide opportunities for exploring a cellular cholesterol-focused strategy for treatment of NASH. PMID:27090939

  14. AMPK-HDAC5 pathway facilitates nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α and functional activation of HIF-1 by deacetylating Hsp70 in the cytosol.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuyang; Yin, Chengqian; Lao, Taotao; Liang, Dongming; He, Dan; Wang, Chenguang; Sang, Nianli

    2015-08-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) transcriptionally promotes production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas AMPK senses and regulates cellular energy homeostasis. A histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been proven to be critical for HIF-1 activation but the underlying mechanism and its role in energy homesostasis remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that HIF-1 activation depends on a cytosolic, enzymatically active HDAC5. HDAC5 knockdown impairs hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1 transactivation, whereas HDAC5 overexpression enhances HIF-1α stabilization and nuclear translocation. Mechanistically, we show that Hsp70 is a cytosolic substrate of HDAC5; and hyperacetylation renders Hsp70 higher affinity for HIF-1α binding, which correlates with accelerated degradation and attenuated nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. Physiologically, AMPK-triggered cytosolic shuttling of HDAC5 is critical; inhibition of either AMPK or HDAC5 impairs HIF-1α nuclear accumulation under hypoxia or low glucose conditions. Finally, we show specifically suppressing HDAC5 is sufficient to inhibit tumor cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions. Our data delineate a novel link between AMPK, the energy sensor, and HIF-1, the major driver of ATP production, indicating that specifically inhibiting HDAC5 may selectively suppress the survival and proliferation of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:26061431

  15. The Tyrosine Kinase c-Abl Promotes Homeodomain-interacting Protein Kinase 2 (HIPK2) Accumulation and Activation in Response to DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Reuven, Nina; Adler, Julia; Porat, Ziv; Polonio-Vallon, Tilman; Hofmann, Thomas G; Shaul, Yosef

    2015-07-01

    The non-receptor tyrosine kinase c-Abl is activated in response to DNA damage and induces p73-dependent apoptosis. Here, we investigated c-Abl regulation of the homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2), an important regulator of p53-dependent apoptosis. c-Abl phosphorylated HIPK2 at several sites, and phosphorylation by c-Abl protected HIPK2 from degradation mediated by the ubiquitin E3 ligase Siah-1. c-Abl and HIPK2 synergized in activating p53 on apoptotic promoters in a reporter assay, and c-Abl was required for endogenous HIPK2 accumulation and phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46) in response to DNA damage by γ- and UV radiation. Accumulation of HIPK2 in nuclear speckles and association with promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) in response to DNA damage were also dependent on c-Abl activity. At high cell density, the Hippo pathway inhibits DNA damage-induced c-Abl activation. Under this condition, DNA damage-induced HIPK2 accumulation, phosphorylation of p53 at Ser(46), and apoptosis were attenuated. These data demonstrate a new mechanism for the induction of DNA damage-induced apoptosis by c-Abl and illustrate network interactions between serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases that dictate cell fate. PMID:25944899

  16. Temporal Resolution of Misfolded Prion Protein Transport, Accumulation, Glial Activation, and Neuronal Death in the Retinas of Mice Inoculated with Scrapie.

    PubMed

    West Greenlee, M Heather; Lind, Melissa; Kokemuller, Robyn; Mammadova, Najiba; Kondru, Naveen; Manne, Sireesha; Smith, Jodi; Kanthasamy, Anumantha; Greenlee, Justin

    2016-09-01

    Currently, there is a lack of pathological landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. Our goal was to use an experimental model to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrP(Sc) in the retina, the response of the surrounding retinal tissue, and loss of neurons. Retinal samples from mice inoculated with RML scrapie were collected at 30, 60, 90, 105, and 120 days post inoculation (dpi) or at the onset of clinical signs of disease (153 dpi). Retinal homogenates were tested for prion seeding activity. Antibody staining was used to assess accumulation of PrP(Sc) and the resulting response of retinal tissue. Loss of photoreceptors was used as a measure of neuronal death. PrP(Sc) seeding activity was first detected in all samples at 60 dpi. Accumulation of PrP(Sc) and coincident activation of retinal glia were first detected at 90 dpi. Activation of microglia was first detected at 105 dpi, but neuronal death was not detectable until 120 dpi. Our results demonstrate that by using the retina we can resolve the temporal separation between several key events in the pathogenesis of prion disease. PMID:27521336

  17. AMPK-HDAC5 pathway facilitates nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α and functional activation of HIF-1 by deacetylating Hsp70 in the cytosol

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shuyang; Yin, Chengqian; Lao, Taotao; Liang, Dongming; He, Dan; Wang, Chenguang; Sang, Nianli

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1) transcriptionally promotes production of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas AMPK senses and regulates cellular energy homeostasis. A histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity has been proven to be critical for HIF-1 activation but the underlying mechanism and its role in energy homesostasis remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that HIF-1 activation depends on a cytosolic, enzymatically active HDAC5. HDAC5 knockdown impairs hypoxia-induced HIF-1α accumulation and HIF-1 transactivation, whereas HDAC5 overexpression enhances HIF-1α stabilization and nuclear translocation. Mechanistically, we show that Hsp70 is a cytosolic substrate of HDAC5; and hyperacetylation renders Hsp70 higher affinity for HIF-1α binding, which correlates with accelerated degradation and attenuated nuclear accumulation of HIF-1α. Physiologically, AMPK-triggered cytosolic shuttling of HDAC5 is critical; inhibition of either AMPK or HDAC5 impairs HIF-1α nuclear accumulation under hypoxia or low glucose conditions. Finally, we show specifically suppressing HDAC5 is sufficient to inhibit tumor cell proliferation under hypoxic conditions. Our data delineate a novel link between AMPK, the energy sensor, and HIF-1, the major driver of ATP production, indicating that specifically inhibiting HDAC5 may selectively suppress the survival and proliferation of hypoxic tumor cells. PMID:26061431

  18. Increased Variation in Adh Enzyme Activity in Drosophila Mutation-Accumulation Experiment Is Not Due to Transposable Elements at the Adh Structural Gene

    PubMed Central

    Aquadro, C. F.; Tachida, H.; Langley, C. H.; Harada, K.; Mukai, T.

    1990-01-01

    We present here a molecular analysis of the region surrounding the structural gene encoding alcohol dehydrogenase (Adh) in 47 lines of Drosophila melanogaster that have each accumulated mutations for 300 generations. While these lines show a significant increase in variation of alcohol dehydrogenase enzyme activity compared to control lines, we found no restriction map variation in a 13-kb region including the complete Adh structural gene and roughly 5 kb of both 5' and 3' sequences. Thus, the rapid accumulation of ADH activity variation after 28,200 allele generations does not appear to have been due to the mobilization of transposable elements into or out of the Adh structural gene region. PMID:1963870

  19. Role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in platelet accumulation in rabbit skin: effect of the novel long-acting PAF antagonist, UK-74,505.

    PubMed Central

    Pons, F.; Rossi, A. G.; Norman, K. E.; Williams, T. J.; Nourshargh, S.

    1993-01-01

    1. The contribution of platelet-activating factor (PAF) to platelet deposition and oedema formation induced by exogenous soluble mediators, zymosan particles and associated with a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in rabbit skin was investigated by use of a novel long-acting PAF receptor antagonist, UK-74,505. 2. Oedema formation and platelet accumulation were simultaneously measured by i.v. injection of [125I]-albumin and 111In-labelled rabbit platelets. UK-74,505 was either administered i.v. or used to pretreat radiolabelled platelets in vitro before their injection into recipient animals. Platelets pretreated with UK-74,505 were also labelled with the fluorescent calcium indicator, Fura-2, to assess their ex vivo reactivity to PAF at the end of the in vivo experiment. 3. UK-74,505 (0.5 mg kg-1), administered i.v., inhibited PAF-induced oedema formation, but did not affect oedema induced by zymosan particles, bradykinin (BK), histamine, formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (FMLP), zymosan-activated plasma (ZAP, as a source of C5a des Arg), leukotriene B4 (LTB4) or interleukin-8 (IL-8). 4. UK-74,505, administered i.v. also suppressed the small platelet accumulation induced by exogenous PAF, but had no effect on accumulation induced by IL-8 or ZAP. Although oedema induced by zymosan was not affected by i.v. UK-74,505, zymosan-induced platelet accumulation was significantly attenuated by the antagonist. 5. The RPA reaction in rabbit skin was associated with marked oedema formation and platelet accumulation which were both inhibited by i.v. UK-74,505.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8495241

  20. The activity of HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE 1 regulates accumulation of galactolipids containing 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Nilsson, Anders K.; Fahlberg, Per; Johansson, Oskar N.; Hamberg, Mats; Andersson, Mats X.; Ellerström, Mats

    2016-01-01

    Arabidopsis produces galactolipids containing esters of 12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (OPDA) and dinor-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (dnOPDA). These lipids are referred to as arabidopsides and accumulate in response to abiotic and biotic stress. We explored the natural genetic variation found in 14 different Arabidopsis accessions to identify genes involved in the formation of arabidopsides. The accession C24 was identified as a poor accumulator of arabidopsides whereas the commonly used accession Col-0 was found to accumulate comparably large amounts of arabidopsides in response to tissue damage. A quantitative trait loci analysis of an F2 population created from a cross between C24 and Col-0 located a region on chromosome four strongly linked to the capacity to form arabidopsides. Expression analysis of HYDROPEROXIDE LYASE 1 (HPL1) showed large differences in transcript abundance between accessions. Transformation of Col-0 plants with the C24 HPL1 allele under transcriptional regulation of the 35S promoter revealed a strong negative correlation between HPL1 expression and arabidopside accumulation after tissue damage, thereby strengthening the view that HPL1 competes with ALLENE OXIDE SYNTHASE (AOS) for lipid-bound hydroperoxide fatty acids. We further show that the last step in the synthesis of galactolipid-bound OPDA and dnOPDA from unstable allene oxides is exclusively enzyme-catalyzed and not the result of spontaneous cyclization. Thus, the results presented here together with previous studies suggest that all steps in arabidopside biosynthesis are enzyme-dependent and apparently all reactions can take place with substrates being esterified to galactolipids. PMID:27422994

  1. Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase 1 is regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ in human hepatocytes and increases lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Jung Hwan; Lee, Yoo Jeong; Kim, Hyo Jung; Choi, Hyeonjin; Choi, Yoonjeong; Seok, Jo Woon; Kim, Jae-woo

    2015-05-08

    Monoacylglycerol O-acyltransferase (MGAT) is an enzyme that is involved in triglyceride synthesis by catalyzing the formation of diacylglycerol from monoacylglycerol and fatty acyl CoAs. Recently, we reported that MGAT1 has a critical role in hepatic TG accumulation and that its suppression ameliorates hepatic steatosis in a mouse model. However, the function of MGAT enzymes in hepatic lipid accumulation has not been investigated in humans. Unlike in rodents, MGAT3 as well as MGAT1 and MGAT2 are present in humans. In this study, we evaluated the differences between MGAT subtypes and their association with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), a regulator of mouse MGAT1 expression. In human primary hepatocytes, basal expression of MGAT1 was lower than that of MGAT2 or MGAT3, but was strongly induced by PPARγ overexpression. A luciferase assay as well as an electromobility shift assay revealed that human MGAT1 promoter activity is driven by PPARγ by direct binding to at least two regions of the promoter in 293T and HepG2 cells. Moreover, siRNA-mediated suppression of MGAT1 expression significantly attenuated lipid accumulation by PPARγ overexpression in HepG2 cells, as evidenced by oil-red-O staining. These results suggest that human MGAT1 has an important role in fatty liver formation as a target gene of PPARγ, and blocking MGAT1 activity could be an efficient therapeutic way to reduce nonalcoholic fatty liver diseases in humans. - Highlights: • PPARγ promotes MGAT1 expression in human primary hepatocytes. • PPARγ directly regulates MGAT1 promoter activity. • Human MGAT1 promoter has at least two PPARγ-binding elements. • Inhibition of MGAT1 expression attenuates hepatic lipid accumulation in humans.

  2. Tyrosine decarboxylase activity of enterococci grown in media with different nutritional potential: tyramine and 2-phenylethylamine accumulation and tyrDC gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Bargossi, Eleonora; Tabanelli, Giulia; Montanari, Chiara; Lanciotti, Rosalba; Gatto, Veronica; Gardini, Fausto; Torriani, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    The ability to accumulate tyramine and 2-phenylethylamine by two strains of Enterococcus faecalis and two strains Enterococcus faecium was evaluated in two cultural media added or not with tyrosine. All the enterococcal strains possessed a tyrosine decarboxylase (tyrDC) which determined tyramine accumulation in all the conditions tested, independently on the addition of high concentration of free tyrosine. Enterococci differed in rate and level of biogenic amines accumulation. E. faecalis EF37 and E. faecium FC12 produced tyramine in high amount since the exponential growth phase, while 2-phenylethylamine was accumulated when tyrosine was depleted. E. faecium FC12 and E. faecalis ATCC 29212 showed a slower tyraminogenic activity which took place mainly in the stationary phase up to 72 h of incubation. Moreover, E. faecalis ATCC 29212 produced 2-phenylethylamine only in the media without tyrosine added. In BHI added or not with tyrosine the tyrDC gene expression level differed considerably depending on the strains and the growth phase. In particular, the tyrDC gene expression was high during the exponential phase in rich medium for all the strains and subsequently decreased except for E. faecium FC12. Even if tyrDC presence is common among enterococci, this study underlines the extremely variable decarboxylating potential of strains belonging to the same species, suggesting strain-dependent implications in food safety. PMID:25914676

  3. Silencing of WIPK and SIPK mitogen-activated protein kinases reduces tobacco mosaic virus accumulation but permits systemic viral movement in tobacco possessing the N resistance gene.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Michie; Seo, Shigemi; Hirai, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto-Katou, Ayako; Katou, Shinpei; Seto, Hideharu; Meshi, Tetsuo; Mitsuhara, Ichiro; Ohashi, Yuko

    2010-08-01

    Infection of tobacco cultivars possessing the N resistance gene with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) results in confinement of the virus by necrotic lesions at the infection site. Although the mitogen-activated protein kinases WIPK and SIPK have been implicated in TMV resistance, evidence linking them directly to disease resistance is, as yet, insufficient. Viral multiplication was reduced slightly in WIPK- or SIPK-silenced plants but substantially in WIPK/SIPK-silenced plants, and was correlated with an increase in salicylic acid (SA) and a decrease in jasmonic acid (JA). Silencing of WIPK and SIPK in a tobacco cultivar lacking the N gene did not inhibit viral accumulation. The reduction in viral accumulation was attenuated by expressing a gene for an SA-degrading enzyme or by exogenously applying JA. Inoculation of lower leaves resulted in the systemic spread of TMV and formation of necrotic lesions in uninoculated upper leaves. These results suggested that WIPK and SIPK function to negatively regulate local resistance to TMV accumulation, partially through modulating accumulation of SA and JA in an N-dependent manner, but positively regulate systemic resistance. PMID:20615114

  4. Pathogenicity of Pepper mild mottle virus Is Controlled by the RNA Silencing Suppression Activity of Its Replication Protein but Not the Viral Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Shinya; Kubota, Kenji; Kanda, Ayami; Ohki, Takehiro; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2007-04-01

    ABSTRACT Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) infects pepper plants, causing mosaic symptoms on the upper developing leaves. We investigated the relationship between a virus pathogenicity determinant domain and the appearance of mosaic symptoms. Genetically modified PMMoV mutants were constructed, which had a base substitution in the 130K replication protein gene causing an amino acid change or a truncation of the 3' terminal pseudoknot structure. Only one substitution mutant (at amino acid residue 349) failed to cause symptoms, although its accumulation was relatively high. Conversely, the pseudoknot mutants showed the lower accumulation, but they still caused mosaic symptoms as severe as the wild-type virus. Therefore, the level of virus accumulation in a plant does not necessarily correlate with the development of mosaic symptoms. The activity to suppress posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS) was impaired in the asymptomatic mutant. Consequently, pathogenicity causing mosaic symptoms should be controlled by combat between host PTGS and its suppression by the 130K replication protein rather than virus accumulation. PMID:18943281

  5. Reduction of exportin 6 activity leads to actin accumulation via failure of RanGTP restoration and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei of senescent cells

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Su Hyun; Park, Tae Jun; Lim, In Kyoung

    2011-04-15

    We have previously reported that G-actin accumulation in nuclei is a universal phenomenon of cellular senescence. By employing primary culture of human diploid fibroblast (HDF) and stress-induced premature senescence (SIPS), we explored whether the failure of actin export to cytoplasm is responsible for actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells. Expression of exportin 6 (Exp6) and small G-protein, Ran, was significantly reduced in the replicative senescence, but not yet in SIPS, whereas nuclear import of actin by cofilin was already increased in SIPS. After treatment of young HDF cells with H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, rapid reduction of nuclear RanGTP was observed along with cytoplasmic increase of RanGDP. Furthermore, significantly reduced interaction of Exp6 with RanGTP was found by GST-Exp6 pull-down analysis. Failure of RanGTP restoration was accompanied with inhibition of ATP synthesis and NTF2 sequestration in the nuclei along with accordant change of senescence morphology. Indeed, knockdown of Exp6 expression significantly increased actin molecule in the nuclei of young HDF cells. Therefore, actin accumulation in nuclei of senescent cells is most likely due to the failure of RanGTP restoration with ATP deficiency and NTF2 accumulation in nuclei, which result in the decrease of actin export via Exp6 inactivation, in addition to actin import by cofilin activation.

  6. Eosinophil accumulation in pulmonary airways of guinea-pigs induced by exposure to an aerosol of platelet-activating factor: effect of anti-asthma drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Sanjar, S.; Aoki, S.; Boubekeur, K.; Chapman, I. D.; Smith, D.; Kings, M. A.; Morley, J.

    1990-01-01

    1. Exposure of guinea-pigs to aerosols of platelet activating factor (PAF) (0.01 to 100 micrograms ml-1) induced a dose-dependent increased incidence of eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BAL) at 48 h. Total leucocyte numbers and the percentages of lymphocytes and neutrophils were unchanged in BAL fluid. 2. Increased numbers of eosinophils were detected in BAL 1 h after exposure to PAF but eosinophilia was not maximal until 48 h. One week after exposure to PAF, the percentage of eosinophils in BAL was within the normal range. 3. Depletion of circulating platelets or neutrophils by intravenous injection of specific antisera did not modify accumulation of eosinophils in the airway lumen following inhalation of PAF (10 micrograms ml-1). 4. PAF-induced pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation was inhibited by treatment with SDZ 64-412, a selective PAF-antagonist, whether the compound was administered before, or 30 min after, inhalation of PAF. 5. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was inhibited by prior treatment with aminophylline, cromoglycate, ketotifen, dexamethasone and AH 21-132. 6. Pulmonary airway eosinophil accumulation due to inhaled PAF (10 micrograms ml-1) was not inhibited by prior treatment with indomethacin, salbutamol or mepyramine. PMID:2328394

  7. Development of a novel transgenic rice with hypocholesterolemic activity via high-level accumulation of the α' subunit of soybean β-conglycinin.

    PubMed

    Cabanos, Cerrone; Kato, Naoki; Amari, Yoshiki; Fujiwara, Keigo; Ohno, Tomoki; Shimizu, Kousuke; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Shimada, Masaya; Kuroda, Masaharu; Masuda, Taro; Takaiwa, Fumio; Utsumi, Shigeru; Nagaoka, Satoshi; Maruyama, Nobuyuki

    2014-08-01

    Soybean 7S globulin, known as β-conglycinin, has been shown to regulate human plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. Furthermore, the α' subunit of β-conglycinin has specifically been shown to possess low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol-lowering activity. Therefore, accumulation of the α' subunit of β-conglycinin in rice seeds could lead to the production of new functional rice that could promote human health. Herein, we used the low-glutelin rice mutant 'Koshihikari' (var. a123) and suppressed its glutelins and prolamins, the major seed storage proteins of rice, by RNA interference. The accumulation levels of the α' subunit in the lines with suppressed glutelin and prolamin levels were >20 mg in 1 g of rice seeds, which is considerably higher than those in previous studies. Oral administration of the transgenic rice containing the α' subunit exhibited a hypocholesterolemic activity in rats; the serum total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels were significantly reduced when compared to those of the control rice (var. a123). The cholesterol-lowering action by transgenic rice accumulating the α' subunit induces a significant increase in fecal bile acid excretion and a tendency to increase in fecal cholesterol excretion. This is the first report that transgenic rice exhibits a hypocholesterolemic activity in rats in vivo by using the β-conglycinin α' subunit. PMID:24676962

  8. CD28/B7 Deficiency Attenuates Systolic Overload-Induced Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial and Pulmonary Inflammation, and Activated T Cell Accumulation in the Heart and Lungs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-Bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac, and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T cells (CD3(+)CD44(high) cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction. CD28 or B7 knockout significantly attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight and less reduction of left ventricle contractility. CD28 or B7 knockout also significantly reduced transverse aortic constriction-induced CD45(+) leukocyte, T cell, and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered proinflammatory cytokine expression (such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250 μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced T cell activation, left ventricle hypertrophy, and left ventricle dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T cell activation may be useful in treating CHF. PMID:27432861

  9. Carbonic anhydrase activity and photosynthetic rate in the tree species Paulownia tomentosa Steud. Effect of dimethylsulfoxide treatment and zinc accumulation in leaves.

    PubMed

    Lazova, Galia N; Naidenova, Tsveta; Velinova, Katya

    2004-03-01

    The enzyme carbonic anhydrase (CA) (EC 4.2.1.1) catalyzes the reversible conversion of CO2 to HCO3- and has been shown to be involved in photosynthesis. The enzyme has been shown in animals, plants, eubacteria and viruses, but similar reports on the evidence for CA activity in tree plants does not be appear to be available. In the preliminary analyses of the work, the CA activity in leaf extracts from the tree species Paulownia tomentosa Steud. (introduced in Bulgaria) is described. A connection between CA activity and the rate of photosynthetic CO2 fixation is shown. In the second portion of the work, the effect of 10(-4) mol/L and 10(-2) mol/L dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) on the zinc accumulation in leaves is demonstrated. It is suggested that CA activity is an indicator of the level of physiologically active zinc in leaves of P. tomentosa Steud. A connection between the process of zinc accumulation in leaves and the activity of the enzymes CA and glycolate oxidase (GO) (EC 1.1.3.1) is established. PMID:15077628

  10. Acceleration of large active earthflows triggered by massive snow accumulation events: evidences from monitoring the Corvara landslide in early 2014 (Dolomites, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corsini, Alessandro; Mulas, Marco; Marcato, Gianluca; Chinellato, Giulia; Mair, Volkmar

    2015-04-01

    In the Dolomites of Italy, snowfall during winter 2013/2014 was exceptionally abundant. Major snowfall events occurred from late December 2013 to mid-March 2014. Snow accumulation in Badia Valley peaked in early February: from 2 to 4 meters with a positive gradient respect to altimetry and accordingly to wind accumulation zones. Below 2000 m asl, due to the mild temperatures recorded before the onset of snowfall, the relatively dry snow cover was mostly deposited on top of unfrozen soils. The Corvara landslide is a large active earthflow located close to Corvara in Badia, at an elevation from 2000 to 1600 m. It's displacement rate before, during and after the exceptional snowfall period was monitored at high temporal frequency. Surface displacement was measured bi-weekly by differential GPS in several benchmarks in the source, track and accumulation zone. Deep displacement was monitored semi-continuously by two in-place inclinometers at 48 m depth in the accumulation zone, across the main deep-seated sliding surface. Results show an acceleration of movements, both at surface and at depth, soon after the massive snow accumulation event of 31st January to 2nd February 2014, which suddenly increased snow thickness from 1 to more than 2 metres. Short time lags between the onset of the acceleration of movements in the source, the track and the accumulation zones were also recorded. The landslide then maintained a relatively constant velocity during the high snow cover period extended to earlyApril and underwent a progressive deceleration during the snowmelt period that lasted until mid-June. The fact that the acceleration of the Corvara earthflow was triggered by a massive and rapid snow accumulation event, provides a quite different perspective from the generally adopted one that considers the destabilizing effect of snow only in relation to the increase of groundwater level during rapid snowmelt. A full explanation of the processes associated to the dynamics observed

  11. Accumulation of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate in mutant cells of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa as an evidence of phosphofructokinase activity.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, P C

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoglucose isomerase negative mutant of mucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa accumulated relatively higher concentration of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate (Fru-1,6-P2) when mannitol induced cells were incubated with this sugar alcohol. Also the toluene-treated cells of fructose 1,6-bisphosphate aldolase negative mutant of this organism produced Fru-1,6-P2 from fructose 6-phosphate in presence of ATP, but not from 6-phosphogluconate. The results together suggested the presence of an ATP-dependent fructose 6-phosphate kinase (EC 2.7.1.11) in mucoid P. aeruginosa. PMID:3017251

  12. Monocytes and neutrophils expressing myeloperoxidase occur in fibrous caps and thrombi in unstable coronary plaques

    PubMed Central

    Tavora, Fabio R; Ripple, Mary; Li, Ling; Burke, Allen P

    2009-01-01

    Background Myeloperoxidase (MPO) -containing macrophages and neutrophils have been described at sites of plaque rupture. The presence of these cells in precursor lesions to acute rupture (thin cap atheroma, or vulnerable plaque) and within thrombi adjacent to ruptures has not been described, nor an association with iron-containing macrophages within unstable plaques. Methods We studied 61 acute ruptures, 15 organizing ruptures, 31 thin cap fibroatheromas, and 28 fibroatheromas from 72 sudden coronary death victims by immunohistochemical and histochemical techniques. Inflammatory cells were typed with anti-CD68 (macrophages), anti-BP-30 (neutrophil bactericidal glycoprotein), and anti-MPO. Iron was localized by Mallory's Prussian blue stain. In selected plaques alpha smooth muscle actin (DAKO, Carpinteria, CA, clone M0851) was performed. Results MPO positive cells were present in 79% of ruptured caps, 28% of thin cap fibroatheroma, and no fibroatheromas; neutrophils were present in 72% of ruptures, 8% of thin cap fibroatheromas, and no fibroatheromas. Iron containing foam cells were present in the caps of 93% of acute ruptures, of 85% of organizing ruptures, 20% of thin cap atheromas, and 10% of fibroatheromas. MPO positive cells were more frequent in occlusive than non-occlusive thrombi adjacent to ruptures (p = .006) and were more numerous in diabetics compared to non-diabetics (p = .002) Conclusion Unstable fibrous caps are more likely to contain MPO-positive cells, neutrophils, and iron-containing macrophages than fibrous caps of stable fibroatheromas. MPO-positive cells in thrombi adjacent to disrupted plaques are associated with occlusive thrombi and are more numerous in diabetic patients. PMID:19549340

  13. The Use of Delta Neutrophil Index and Myeloperoxidase Index for Predicting Acute Complicated Appendicitis in Children

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Oh Hyun; Cha, Yong Sung; Hwang, Sung Oh; Jang, Ji Young; Choi, Eun Hee; Kim, Hyung Il; Cha, KyoungChul; Kim, Hyun; Lee, Kang Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Background In children with acute appendicitis, 30% to 75% present with a complication, such as perforation, and the early diagnosis of complications is known to improve outcomes. Serum delta neutrophil index (DNI) and myeloperoxidase index (MPXI) are new inflammatory markers, and thus, in the present study, the authors evaluated the predictive values of these two markers for the presence of a complication in children with acute appendicitis. Methods This retrospective observational study was conducted on 105 consecutive children (<12 years old) with acute appendicitis treated over a 31-month period. DNI, MPXI, C-reactive protein (CRP), and white blood cells (WBCs) were measured in an emergency department and investigated with respect to their abilities to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis. Results Twenty-nine of the 105 patients (median age, 9 years) were allocated to the complicated group (27.6%) and 76 to the non-complicated group (72.4%). Median serum DNI and CRP were significantly higher in the complicated group [0% vs. 2.2%, p<0.001 and 0.65 mg/dL vs. 8.0 mg/dL, p<0.001], but median MPXI was not (p = 0.316). Area under curve (AUC) for the ability of serum DNI and CRP to predict the presence of acute complicated appendicitis were 0.738 and 0.840, respectively. Multiple logistic regression analyses showed initial CRP [odds ratio 1.301, 95% confidence interval (1.092–1.549), p = 0.003] significantly predicted the presence of a complication. The optimal cutoff for serum CRP was 4.0 mg/dL (sensitivity 69%, specificity 83%, AUC 0.840). Conclusions Although serum DNI values were significantly higher in children with acute complicated appendicitis, no evidence was obtained to support the notion that serum DNI or serum MPXI aid the differentiation of acute complicated and non-complicated appendicitis in the ED setting. PMID:26859663

  14. The reactions of hypochlorous acid, the reactive oxygen species produced by myeloperoxidase, with lipids.

    PubMed

    Spickett, C M; Jerlich, A; Panasenko, O M; Arnhold, J; Pitt, A R; Stelmaszyńska, T; Schaur, R J

    2000-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO), an abundant enzyme in phagocytes, has been implicated in the pathogenesis of various inflammatory diseases including atherosclerosis. The major oxidant produced by MPO, hypochlorous acid (HOCl), is able to modify a great variety of biomolecules by chlorination and/or oxidation. In this paper the reactions of lipids (preferentially unsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol) with either reagent HOCl or HOCl generated by the MPO-hydrogen peroxide-chloride system are reviewed. One of the major issues has been whether the reaction of HOCl with lipids of low density lipoprotein (LDL) yields predominantly chlorohydrins or lipid hydroperoxides. Electrospray mass spectrometry provided direct evidence that chlorohydrins rather than peroxides are the major products of HOCl- or MPO-treated LDL phosphatidylcholines. Nevertheless lipid peroxidation is a possible alternative reaction of HOCl with polyunsaturated fatty acids if an additional radical source such as pre-formed lipid hydroperoxides is available. In phospholipids carrying a primary amino group such as phosphatidylethanolamine chloramines are the preferred products compared to chlorohydrins. Cholesterol can be converted by HOCl to great variety of oxysterols besides three isomers of chlorohydrins. For the situation in vivo it appears that the type of reaction occurring between HOCl and lipids would very much depend on the circumstances, e.g. the pH and the presence of radical initiators. The biological effects of lipid chlorohydrins are not yet well understood. It has been shown that chlorohydrins of both unsaturated fatty acids as well as of cholesterol may cause lysis of target cells, possibly by disruption of membrane structures. PMID:11996112

  15. Myeloperoxidase Polymorphism, Menopausal Status, and Breast Cancer Risk: An Update Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qi-Liu; Huang, Xiu-Li; Mo, Cui-Ju; Li, Shan; Zhao, Jin-Min

    2013-01-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a metabolic/oxidative lysosomal enzyme secreted by reactive neutrophils at the sites of inflamed organs and tissues during phagocytosis. MPO has been either directly or indirectly linked to neoplasia, which is a well-established risk factor for many types of cancer. A large number of studies have reported the role of MPO G-463A polymorphism regarding breast-cancer risk. However, the published findings are inconsistent. Therefore, we conducted a meta-analysis to determine more precise estimations for the relationship. Eligible studies were identified by searching several electronic databases for relevant reports published before June 2012. According to the inclusion criteria and exclusion criteria, a total of five eligible studies were included in the pooled analyses. When the five eligible studies concerning MPO G-463A polymorphism were pooled into this meta-analysis, there was no evidence found for a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. We also categorized by ethnicity (Caucasian or Asian) for subgroup analysis; according to this subgroup analysis, we found no significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk in any genetic model. However, in the stratified analysis for the premenopausal group, women carrying the AA genotype were found to have a significantly reduced risk (OR = 0.56, 95% CI 0.34–0.94, p = 0.027). Under the recessive model, there was a significant association between MPO G-463A polymorphism and breast-cancer risk (OR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.34–0.93, p = 0.025). We conclude that MPO-G463A polymorphism might not be a good predictor of breast-cancer risk, though menopausal status modified women’s risk of developing breast cancer. PMID:23991124

  16. The effects of high-intensity exercise on skeletal muscle neutrophil myeloperoxidase in untrained and trained rats.

    PubMed

    Morozov, Vladimir I; Tsyplenkov, Pavel V; Golberg, Natalia D; Kalinski, Michael I

    2006-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the effects of high-intensity acute exercise on neutrophil infiltration in different muscle fiber types of untrained rats and to compare postexercise neutrophil accumulation in muscles of untrained and trained animals. The effect of high-intensity acute exercise on blood neutrophil degranulation reaction in trained animals was also elucidated. Neutrophil enzyme myeloperoxidase (MPO) was determined as a measure of neutrophil migration into muscles and blood neutrophil degranulation. Male albino rats were subjected to acute exercise and 5 weeks of training. The used model of intensive acute exercise consisted of 5, 15, and 25 intermittent swimming bouts with the addition of weight (8% of total body mass) for 1-min each, followed by 1.5-min rest intervals. MPO was analyzed in quadriceps muscle (white and red portion) and in soleus muscle 24 h after acute exercise. MPO content in resting blood plasma and neutrophils was determined 48-h following the completion of a training process. In addition, MPO content in the trained rats was measured immediately (in blood plasma and neutrophils) after and 24 h (in muscles) following a single-bout of exercise to exhaustion. The remaining two-third of the trained animals were exposed to a single-bout of nonstop swimming with the addition of 6% body mass until exhaustion. These animals were sacrificed immediately and 24 h after loaded swimming to analyze leukocyte count, MPO content in blood plasma and neutrophils and in muscles, respectively. About 24 h after exercise MPO concentrations in the red portion of quadriceps muscle and in soleus muscle were 4-7-fold higher as compared to the white portion of m. quadriceps. There was an association between the quantity of repetitive bouts of swimming and MPO content in the muscles. The duration of swimming to exhaustion of trained rats was 3.8-fold longer than untrained sedentary control. At rest, plasma MPO concentration was found to be 40

  17. Cigarette smoke induces cell motility via platelet-activating factor accumulation in breast cancer cells: a potential mechanism for metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Kispert, Shannon; Marentette, John; McHowat, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Most cancer deaths are a result of metastasis rather than the primary tumor. Although cigarette smoking has been determined as a risk factor for several cancers, its role in metastasis has not been studied in detail. We propose that cigarette smoking contributes to metastatic disease via inhibition of breast cancer cell platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH), resulting in PAF accumulation and a subsequent increase in cell motility. We studied several breast cell lines, including immortalized mammary epithelial cells (MCF-10A), luminal A hormone positive MCF-7, basal-like triple negative MDA-MB-468, and claudin-low triple-negative highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast tumor cells. We exposed cells to cigarette smoke extract (CSE) for up to 48 h. CSE inhibited PAF-AH activity, increased PAF accumulation, and increased cell motility in MDA-MB-231 metastatic triple negative breast cancer cells. The calcium-independent phospholipase A2 (iPLA2) inhibitor, (S) bromoenol lactone ((S)-BEL) was used to prevent the accumulation of PAF and further prevented the increase in cell motility seen previously when cells were exposed to CSE. Thus, iPLA2 or PAF may represent a therapeutic target to manage metastatic disease, particularly in triple-negative breast cancer patients who smoke. PMID:25802360

  18. High osmolarity glycerol (HOG) pathway-induced phosphorylation and activation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase are essential for glycerol accumulation and yeast cell proliferation under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Dihazi, Hassan; Kessler, Renate; Eschrich, Klaus

    2004-06-01

    In response to changes in the environment, yeast cells coordinate intracellular activities to optimize survival and proliferation. The transductions of diverse extracellular stimuli are exerted through multiple mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades. The high osmolarity glycerol (HOG) MAPK pathway is activated by increased environmental osmolarity and results in a rise of the cellular glycerol concentration to adapt the intracellular osmotic pressure. We studied the importance of the short time regulation of glycolysis under hyperosmotic stress for the survival and proliferation of yeast cells. A stimulation of the HOG-MAPK pathway by increasing the medium osmolarity through addition of salt or glucose to cultivated yeast leads to an activation of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase (PFK2), which is accompanied by a complex phosphorylation pattern of the enzyme. An increase in medium osmolarity with 5% NaCl activates PFK2 3-fold over the initial value. This change in the activity is the result of a 4-fold phosphorylation of the enzyme mediated by protein kinases from the HOG-MAPK pathway. In the case of hyperosmolar glucose a 5-fold PFK2 activation was achieved by a single phosphorylation with protein kinase A near the carboxyl terminus of the protein on Ser(644) and an additional 5-fold phosphorylation within the same amino-terminal fragment as in the presence of salt. The effect of hyperosmolar glucose is the result of an activation of the Ras-cAMP pathway together with the HOG-MAPK pathway. The activation of PFK2 leads to an activation of the upper part of glycolysis, which is a precondition for glycerol accumulation. Yeast cells containing PFK2 accumulate three times more glycerol than cells lacking PFK2, which are not able to grow under hypertonic stress. PMID:15037628

  19. Increasing sediment accumulation rates in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon axis and their relationship with bottom trawling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Martín, J.; Masqué, P.; Palanques, A.

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies conducted in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) found that trawling activities along the canyon flanks cause resuspension and transport of sediments toward the canyon axis. 210Pb chronology supported by 137Cs dating applied to a sediment core collected at 1750 m in 2002 suggested a doubling of the sediment accumulation rate since the 1970s, coincident with the rapid industrialization of the local trawling fleet. The same canyon area has been revisited a decade later, and new data are consistent with a sedimentary regime shift during the 1970s and also suggest that the accumulation rate during the last decade could be greater than expected, approaching ~2.4 cm yr-1 (compared to ~0.25 cm yr-1 pre-1970s). These results support the hypothesis that commercial bottom trawling can substantially affect sediment dynamics and budgets on continental margins, eventually initiating the formation of anthropogenic depocenters in submarine canyon environments.

  20. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  1. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Activation beyond Robust Nuclear β-Catenin Accumulation in Nondysplastic Barrett’s Esophagus: Regulation via Dickkopf-112

    PubMed Central

    Lyros, Orestis; Rafiee, Parvaneh; Nie, Linghui; Medda, Rituparna; Jovanovic, Nebojsa; Otterson, Mary F.; Behmaram, Behnaz; Gockel, Ιnes; Mackinnon, Alexander; Shaker, Reza

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Wnt/β-catenin signaling activation has been reported only during the late steps of Barrett’s esophagus (BE) neoplastic progression, but not in BE metaplasia, based on the absence of nuclear β-catenin. However, β-catenin transcriptional activity has been recorded in absence of robust nuclear accumulation. Thus, we aimed to investigate the Wnt/β-catenin signaling in nondysplastic BE. METHODS: Esophageal tissues from healthy and BE patients without dysplasia were analyzed for Wnt target gene expression by quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and immunohistochemistry. Esophageal squamous (EPC1-& EPC2-hTERT), BE metaplastic (CP-A), and adenocarcinoma (OE33) cell lines were characterized for Wnt activation by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and luciferase assay. Wnt activity regulation was examined by using recombinant Wnt3a and Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) as well as Dkk1 short interfering RNA. RESULTS: Wnt target genes (AXIN2, c-MYC, Cyclin D1, Dkk1) and Wnt3a were significantly upregulated in nondysplastic BE compared with squamous mucosa. Elevated levels of dephosphorylated β-catenin were detected in nondysplastic BE. Nuclear active β-catenin and TOPflash activity were increased in CP-A and OE33 cells compared with squamous cells. Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin signaling activation was abolished by Dkk1 in CP-A cells. TOPFlash activity was elevated following Dkk1 silencing in CP-A but not in OE33 cells. Dysplastic and esophageal adenocarcinoma tissues demonstrated further Dkk1 and AXIN2 overexpression. CONCLUSIONS: Despite the absence of robust nuclear accumulation, β-catenin is transcriptionally active in nondysplastic BE. Dkk1 overexpression regulates β-catenin signaling in BE metaplastic but not in adenocarcinoma cells, suggesting that early perturbation of Dkk1-mediated signaling suppression may contribute to BE malignant transformation. PMID:26297437

  2. Effect of Light Wavelengths and Coherence on Growth, Enzymes Activity, and Melanin Accumulation of Liquid-Cultured Inonotus obliquus (Ach.:Pers.) Pilát.

    PubMed

    Poyedinok, Natalia; Mykhaylova, Oksana; Tugay, Tatyana; Tugay, Andrei; Negriyko, Anatoly; Dudka, Irina

    2015-05-01

    To investigate effects of light wavelengths and coherence on growth of liquid-cultured Inonotus obliquus mycelia, melanin accumulation and enzymes activity, culture condition as light of different wavelengths and coherence were studied. Short-term exposure of the vegetative mycelium by low-intensity coherent blue light was optimal for stimulation of growth, melanin synthesis, and increase in extracellular and intracellular activities of tyrosinase and polyphenoloxidase and extracellular catalase. Red coherent light, in the same mode, can effectively be used to stimulate the growth of mycelium and to increase intracellular and extracellular activity of polyphenoloxidase, extracellular catalase and tyrosinase, and intracellular peroxidase. Low-coherent light had less stimulating effect on the biosynthetic activity of I. оbliquus. It should be used in the cultivation directed at the obtaining endomelanin, polyphenoloxidase, and extracellular tyrosinase. PMID:25809995

  3. Dietary freshwater clam (Corbicula fluminea) extract suppresses accumulation of hepatic lipids and increases in serum cholesterol and aminotransferase activities induced by dietary chloretone in rats.

    PubMed

    Chijimatsu, Takeshi; Umeki, Miki; Kobayashi, Satoru; Kataoka, Yutaro; Yamada, Koji; Oda, Hiroaki; Mochizuki, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the ameliorative effect of freshwater clam extract (FCE) on fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. Furthermore, we examined the effects of major FCE components (fat and protein fractions) to determine the active components in FCE. Chloretone increased serum aminotransferase activities and led to hepatic lipid accumulation. Serum aminotransferase activities and hepatic lipid content were lower in rats fed total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE. Expression of fatty acid synthase and fatty acid desaturase genes was upregulated by chloretone. Total FCE and fat/protein fractions of FCE suppressed the increase in gene expression involved in fatty acid synthesis. Serum cholesterol levels increased twofold upon chloretone exposure. Total FCE or fat/protein fractions of FCE showed hypocholesterolemic effects in rats with hypercholesterolemia induced by chloretone. These suggest that FCE contains at least two active components against fatty liver, hypercholesterolemia, and liver injury in rats exposed to chloretone. PMID:25704646

  4. Effect of operational strategies on activated sludge's acclimation to phenol, subsequent aerobic granulation, and accumulation of polyhydoxyalkanoates.

    PubMed

    Wosman, Afrida; Lu, Yuhao; Sun, Supu; Liu, Xiang; Wan, Chunli; Zhang, Yi; Lee, Duu-Jong; Tay, JooHwa

    2016-11-01

    Aerobic granules, a relative novel form of microbial aggregate, are capable of degrading many toxic organic pollutants. Appropriate strategy is needed to acclimate seed sludge to the toxic compounds for successful granulation. In this study, two distinct strategies, i.e. mixed or single carbon sources, were experimented to obtain phenol-acclimated sludge. Their effects on reactor performance, biomass characteristics, microbial population and the granulation process were analyzed. Sludge fed with phenol alone exhibited faster acclimation and earlier appearance of granules, but possibly lower microbial diversity and reactor stability. Using a mixture of acetate and phenol in the acclimation stage, on the other hand, led to a reactor with slower phenol degradation and granulation, but eventual formation of strong and stable aerobic granules. In addition, the content of intracellular polyhydoxyakanoates (PHA) was also monitored, and significant accumulation was observed during the pre-granulation stage, where PHA >50% of dry weight was observed in both reactors. PMID:27281169

  5. Differential regulation of grain sucrose accumulation and metabolism in Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) revealed through gene expression and enzyme activity analysis.

    PubMed

    Privat, Isabelle; Foucrier, Séverine; Prins, Anneke; Epalle, Thibaut; Eychenne, Magali; Kandalaft, Laurianne; Caillet, Victoria; Lin, Chenwei; Tanksley, Steve; Foyer, Christine; McCarthy, James

    2008-01-01

    * Coffea arabica (Arabica) and Coffea canephora (Robusta) are the two main cultivated species used for coffee bean production. Arabica genotypes generally produce a higher coffee quality than Robusta genotypes. Understanding the genetic basis for sucrose accumulation during coffee grain maturation is an important goal because sucrose is an important coffee flavor precursor. * Nine new Coffea genes encoding sucrose metabolism enzymes have been identified: sucrose phosphate synthase (CcSPS1, CcSPS2), sucrose phosphate phosphatase (CcSP1), cytoplasmic (CaInv3) and cell wall (CcInv4) invertases and four invertase inhibitors (CcInvI1, 2, 3, 4). * Activities and mRNA abundance of the sucrose metabolism enzymes were compared at different developmental stages in Arabica and Robusta grains, characterized by different sucrose contents in mature grain. * It is concluded that Robusta accumulates less sucrose than Arabica for two reasons: Robusta has higher sucrose synthase and acid invertase activities early in grain development - the expression of CcSS1 and CcInv2 appears to be crucial at this stage and Robusta has a lower SPS activity and low CcSPS1 expression at the final stages of grain development and hence has less capacity for sucrose re-synthesis. Regulation of vacuolar invertase CcInv2 activity by invertase inhibitors CcInvI2 and/or CcInvI3 during Arabica grain development is considered. PMID:18384509

  6. Diversity of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi Associated with a Sb Accumulator Plant, Ramie (Boehmeria nivea), in an Active Sb Mining.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Chen, ZhiPeng; Wu, FengChang; Li, JiNing; ShangGuan, YuXian; Li, FaSheng; Zeng, Qing Ru; Hou, Hong

    2015-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have great potential for assisting heavy metal hyperaccumulators in the remediation of contaminated soils. However, little information is available about the symbiosis of AMF associated with an antimony (Sb) accumulator plant under natural conditions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the colonization and molecular diversity of AMF associated with the Sb accumulator ramie (Boehmeria nivea) growing in Sb-contaminated soils. Four Sb mine spoils and one adjacent reference area were selected from Xikuangshan in southern China. PCR-DGGE was used to analyze the AMF community composition in ramie roots. Morphological identification was also used to analyze the species in the rhizosphere soil of ramie. Results obtained showed that mycorrhizal symbiosis was established successfully even in the most heavily polluted sites. From the unpolluted site Ref to the highest polluted site T4, the spore numbers and AMF diversity increased at first and then decreased. Colonization increased consistently with the increasing Sb concentrations in the soil. A total of 14 species were identified by morphological analysis. From the total number of species, 4 (29%) belonged to Glomus, 2 (14%) belonged to Acaulospora, 2 (14%) belonged to Funneliformis, 1 (7%) belonged to Claroideoglomus, 1 (7%) belonged to Gigaspora, 1 (7%) belonged to Paraglomus, 1 (7%) belonging to Rhizophagus, 1 (7%) belonging to Sclervocystis, and 1 (7%) belonged to Scutellospora. Some AMF sequences were present even in the most polluted site. Morphological identification and phylogenetic analysis both revealed that most species were affiliated withGlomus, suggesting that Glomus was the dominant genus in this AMF community. This study demonstrated that ramie associated with AMF may have great potential for remediation of Sb-contaminated soils. PMID:25876600

  7. Artesunate has its enhancement on antibacterial activity of β-lactams via increasing the antibiotic accumulation within methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Weiwei; Li, Bin; Zheng, Xinchuan; Liu, Xin; Pan, Xichun; Qing, Rongxin; Cen, Yanyan; Zheng, Jiang; Zhou, Hong

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has now emerged as a predominant and serious pathogen because of its resistance to a large group of antibiotics, leading to high morbidity and mortality. Therefore, to develop new agents against resistance is urgently required. Previously, artesunate (AS) was found to enhance the antibacterial effect of β-lactams against MRSA. In this study, AS was first found to increase the accumulation of antibiotics (daunorubicin and oxacillin) within MRSA by laser confocal microscopy and liquid chromatography-tandem MS method, suggesting the increased antibiotics accumulation might be related to the enhancement of AS on antibiotics. Furthermore, AS was found not to destroy the cell structure of MRSA by transmission electron microscope. AS was found to inhibit gene expressions of important efflux pumps such as NorA, NorB and NorC, but not MepA, SepA and MdeA. In conclusion, our results showed that AS was capable of enhancing the antibacterial activity of β-lactams via increasing antibiotic accumulations within MRSA through inhibiting gene expressions of efflux pumps such as NorA, NorB and NorC, but did not destroy the cell structure of MRSA. AS could be further investigated as a candidate drug for treatment of MRSA infection. PMID:23549351

  8. Short-term fasting induces intra-hepatic lipid accumulation and decreases intestinal mass without reduced brush-border enzyme activity in mink (Mustela vison) small intestine.

    PubMed

    Bjornvad, C R; Elnif, J; Sangild, P T

    2004-11-01

    For many mammalian species short-term fasting is associated with intestinal atrophy and decreased digestive capacity. Under natural conditions, strictly carnivorous animals often experience prey scarcity during winter, and they may therefore be particularly well adapted to short-term food deprivation. To examine how the carnivorous gastrointestinal tract is affected by fasting, small-intestinal structure, brush-border enzyme activities and hepatic structure and function were examined in fed mink (controls) and mink that had been fasted for 1-10 days. During the first 1-2 days of fasting, intestinal mass decreased more rapidly than total body mass and villus heights were reduced 25-40%. In contrast, tissue-specific activity of the brush-border enzymes sucrase, maltase, lactase, aminopeptidase A and dipeptidylpeptidase IV increased 0.5- to 1.5-fold at this time, but returned to prefasting levels after 6 days of fasting. After 6-10 days of fasting there was a marked increase in the activity of hepatic enzymes and accumulation of intra-hepatic lipid vacuoles. Thus, mink may be a useful model for studying fasting-induced intestinal atrophy and adaptation as well as mechanisms involved in accumulation of intra-hepatic lipids following food deprivation in strictly carnivorous domestic mammals, such as cats and ferrets. PMID:15503054

  9. Quercetin and Allopurinol Ameliorate Kidney Injury in STZ-Treated Rats with Regulation of Renal NLRP3 Inflammasome Activation and Lipid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qing-Yu; Wang, Fu-Meng; Kong, Ling-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Hyperuricemia, hyperlipidemia and inflammation are associated with diabetic nephropathy. The NLRP3 inflammasome-mediated inflammation is recently recognized in the development of kidney injury. Urate and lipid are considered as danger signals in the NLRP3 inflammasome activation. Although dietary flavonoid quercetin and allopurinol alleviate hyperuricemia, dyslipidmia and inflammation, their nephroprotective effects are currently unknown. In this study, we used streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic nephropathy model with hyperuricemia and dyslipidemia in rats, and found over-expression of renal inflammasome components NLRP3, apoptosis-associated speck-like protein and Caspase-1, resulting in elevation of IL-1β and IL-18, with subsequently deteriorated renal injury. These findings demonstrated the possible association between renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation and lipid accumulation to superimpose causes of nephrotoxicity in STZ-treated rats. The treatment of quercetin and allopurinol regulated renal urate transport-related proteins to reduce hyperuricemia, and lipid metabolism-related genes to alleviate kidney lipid accumulation in STZ-treated rats. Furthermore, quercetin and allopurinol were found to suppress renal NLRP3 inflammasome activation, at least partly, via their anti-hyperuricemic and anti-dyslipidemic effects, resulting in the amelioration of STZ-induced the superimposed nephrotoxicity in rats. These results may provide a basis for the prevention of diabetes-associated nephrotoxicity with urate-lowering agents such as quercetin and allopurinol. PMID:22701621

  10. [The accumulation of proteins with chitinase activity in the culture media of the parent and mutant Serratia marcescens strain grown in the presence of mitomycin C].

    PubMed

    Iusupova, D V; Petukhova, E V; Sokolova, R B; Gabdrakhmanova, L A

    2002-01-01

    The study of the accumulation pattern of extracellular proteins with chitinase activity in the parent Serratia marcescens strain Bú 211 (ATCC 9986) grown in the presence of mitomycin C and its mutant strain with the constitutive synthesis of chitinases grown in the absence of the inducer showed that chitinase activity appeared in the culture liquids of both strains at the end of the exponential phase (4 h of growth) and reached a maximum in the stationary phase (18-20 h of growth). The analysis of the culture liquids (12 h of growth) by denaturing electrophoresis in PAAG followed by the protein renaturation step revealed the presence of four extracellular proteins with chitinase activity and molecular masses of 21, 38, 52, and 58 kDa. PMID:12449629

  11. Correlated Changes in the Activity, Amount of Protein, and Abundance of Transcript of NADPH:Protochlorophyllide Oxidoreductase and Chlorophyll Accumulation during Greening of Cucumber Cotyledons.

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, K.; Chen, R. M.; Tanaka, A.; Teramoto, H.; Tanaka, R.; Timko, M. P.; Tsuji, H.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in the activity and abundance of NADPH:protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase (NPR) and the abundance of mRNA encoding it were examined during the greening of 5-d-old etiolated cucumber cotyledons under continuous illumination. To measure NPR activity in the extracts from fully greened tissues, we have developed an improved method of assay. Upon exposure of etiolated cotyledons to light, NPR activity decreased rapidly within the first 2 h of exposure. Thereafter, enzymatic activity increased transiently, reaching a submaximum level at 12 h, and decreased slowly. The level of immunodetectable NPR protein followed the same pattern of changes during 96 h of greening as observed for NPR activity. The NPR mRNA in etiolated cotyledons disappeared quickly in the 1st h of irradiation. However, the level of mRNA increased thereafter to reach 3-fold or more of the dark level at 12 h and then decreased. The changes in the activity, protein level, and mRNA level after the first rapid decreases corresponded chronologically and nearly paralleled the increase in the rate of chlorophyll accumulation. These findings suggest that the greening of cucumber cotyledons is regulated basically by the level of NPR protein without activation or repression of enzymatic activity and that NPR mRNA increased by light maintains the level of enzyme protein necessary for greening. PMID:12228591

  12. Extensive macrophage accumulation in young and old Niemann-Pick C1 model mice involves the alternative, M2, activation pathway and inhibition of macrophage apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Gail; Muralidhar, Akshay; Le, Ellen; Borbon, Ivan A; Erickson, Robert P

    2016-03-10

    We have studied the pathophysiology of lung disease which occurs in two mouse models of Niemann-Pick C1 disease. We utilized Npc1(-/-) mice transgenic for normal gene expression in glia or neurons and glia at ages several fold the usual and a mouse model of the juvenile form of NPC1, a point mutation, at one age to confirm some findings. Lung weights, as per cent of body weight, increase much more than liver and spleen weights. Although pulmonary function parameters only vary for hysteresis between young and older Npc1(-/-) mice, they are markedly different than those found in normal control mice. Cholesterol accumulation continued in the older mice but sphingosine-1-phosphate was not increased. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) showed a massive increase (26×) in the number of macrophages. Histologic examination from the older, transgenic Npc1(-/-) mice showed small foci of alveolar proteinosis and evidence of hemorrhage, as well as dense macrophage accumulation. A large subset of macrophages was immunopositive for Fizz1 or arginase-1, markers of the alternative activation pathway, while no Fizz1 or arginase-1 positive macrophages were found in wild-type mice. The percentage of marker positive macrophages was relatively stable at 5-10% at various ages and within the 2 transgenic models. Phosphohistone H3 and Ki67 showed low levels of proliferation of these macrophages. Apoptosis was prominent within lung capillary endothelial cells, but limited within macrophages. Thus, activation of the alternative pathway is involved in Niemann-Pick C1 associated pulmonary macrophage accumulation, with low proliferation of these cells balanced by low levels of apoptosis. PMID:26707209

  13. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation

    PubMed Central

    Laura, Richard P.; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F.; Maki, Richard A.

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO’s single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO’s unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  14. T47D Cells Expressing Myeloperoxidase Are Able to Process, Traffic and Store the Mature Protein in Lysosomes: Studies in T47D Cells Reveal a Role for Cys319 in MPO Biosynthesis that Precedes Its Known Role in Inter-Molecular Disulfide Bond Formation.

    PubMed

    Laura, Richard P; Dong, David; Reynolds, Wanda F; Maki, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Among the human heme-peroxidase family, myeloperoxidase (MPO) has a unique disulfide-linked oligomeric structure resulting from multi-step processing of the pro-protein monomer (proMPO) after it exits the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Related family members undergo some, but not all, of the processing steps involved with formation of mature MPO. Lactoperoxidase has its pro-domain proteolytically removed and is a monomer in its mature form. Eosinophil peroxidase undergoes proteolytic removal of its pro-domain followed by proteolytic separation into heavy and light chains and is a heterodimer. However, only MPO undergoes both these proteolytic modifications and then is further oligomerized into a heterotetramer by a single inter-molecular disulfide bond. The details of how and where the post-ER processing steps of MPO occur are incompletely understood. We report here that T47D breast cancer cells stably transfected with an MPO expression plasmid are able to efficiently replicate all of the processing steps that lead to formation of the mature MPO heterotetramer. MPO also traffics to the lysosome granules of T47D cells where it accumulates, allowing in-depth immunofluorescent microscopy studies of MPO trafficking and storage for the first time. Using this novel cell model we show that formation of MPO's single inter-molecular disulfide bond can occur normally in the absence of the proteolytic events that lead to separation of the MPO heavy and light chains. We further demonstrate that Cys319, which forms MPO's unique inter-molecular disulfide bond, is important for events that precede this step. Mutation of this residue alters the glycosylation and catalytic activity of MPO and blocks its entry into the endocytic pathway where proteolytic processing and disulfide bonding occur. Finally, using the endocytic trafficking of lysosomal hydrolases as a guide, we investigate the role of candidate receptors in the endocytic trafficking of MPO. PMID:26890638

  15. Functional characterization of NAC55 transcription factor from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) as a novel transcriptional activator modulating reactive oxygen species accumulation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Niu, Fangfang; Wang, Chen; Yan, Jingli; Guo, Xiaohua; Wu, Feifei; Yang, Bo; Deyholos, Michael K; Jiang, Yuan-Qing

    2016-09-01

    NAC transcription factors (TFs) are plant-specific and play important roles in development, responses to biotic and abiotic cues and hormone signaling. So far, only a few NAC genes have been reported to regulate cell death. In this study, we identified and characterized a NAC55 gene isolated from oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.). BnaNAC55 responds to multiple stresses, including cold, heat, abscisic acid (ABA), jasmonic acid (JA) and a necrotrophic fungal pathogen Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. BnaNAC55 has transactivation activity and is located in the nucleus. BnaNAC55 is able to form homodimers in planta. Unlike ANAC055, full-length BnaNAC55, but not either the N-terminal NAC domain or C-terminal regulatory domain, induces ROS accumulation and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death when expressed both in oilseed rape protoplasts and Nicotiana benthamiana. Furthermore, BnaNAC55 expression causes obvious nuclear DNA fragmentation. Moreover, quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis identified that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating ROS production and scavenging, defense response as well as senescence are significantly induced. Using a dual luciferase reporter assay, we further confirm that BnaNAC55 could activate the expression of a few ROS and defense-related gene expression. Taken together, our work has identified a novel NAC TF from oilseed rape that modulates ROS accumulation and cell death. PMID:27312204

  16. Intraneuronal Aβ accumulation induces hippocampal neuron hyperexcitability through A-type K+ current inhibition mediated by activation of caspases and GSK-3

    PubMed Central

    Scala, Federico; Fusco, Salvatore; Ripoli, Cristian; Piacentini, Roberto; Li Puma, Domenica Donatella; Spinelli, Matteo; Laezza, Fernanda; Grassi, Claudio; D’Ascenzo, Marcello

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid β-protein (Aβ) pathologies have been linked to dysfunction of excitability in neurons of the hippocampal circuit, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are still poorly understood. Here, we applied whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology to primary hippocampal neurons and show that intracellular Aβ42 delivery leads to increased spike discharge and action potential broadening through downregulation of A-type K+ currents. Pharmacologic studies showed that caspases and glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK-3) activation are required for these Aβ42-induced effects. Extracellular perfusion and subsequent internalization of Aβ42 increase spike discharge and promote GSK-3-dependent phosphorylation of the Kv4.2 α-subunit, a molecular determinant of A-type K+ currents, at Ser-616. In acute hippocampal slices derived from an adult triple-transgenic Alzheimer’s mouse model, characterized by endogenous intracellular accumulation of Aβ42, CA1 pyramidal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability accompanied by increased phosphorylation of Kv4.2 at Ser-616. Collectively, these data suggest that intraneuronal Aβ42 accumulation leads to an intracellular cascade culminating into caspases activation and GSK-3-dependent phosphorylation of Kv4.2 channels. These findings provide new insights into the toxic mechanisms triggered by intracellular Aβ42 and offer potentially new therapeutic targets for Alzheimer’s disease treatment. PMID:25541422

  17. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John; Begg, John; Townsend, Dougal; Hristopulos, Dionissios

    2013-04-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this study we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ∼50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  18. Fault-slip accumulation in an active rift over thousands to millions of years and the importance of paleoearthquake sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mouslopoulou, Vasiliki; Nicol, Andrew; Walsh, John J.; Begg, John G.; Townsend, Dougal B.; Hristopulos, Dionissios T.

    2012-03-01

    The catastrophic earthquakes that recently (September 4th, 2010 and February 22nd, 2011) hit Christchurch, New Zealand, show that active faults, capable of generating large-magnitude earthquakes, can be hidden beneath the Earth's surface. In this article we combine near-surface paleoseismic data with deep (<5 km) onshore seismic-reflection lines to explore the growth of normal faults over short (<27 kyr) and long (>1 Ma) timescales in the Taranaki Rift, New Zealand. Our analysis shows that the integration of different timescale datasets provides a basis for identifying active faults not observed at the ground surface, estimating maximum fault-rupture lengths, inferring maximum short-term displacement rates and improving earthquake hazard assessment. We find that fault displacement rates become increasingly irregular (both faster and slower) on shorter timescales, leading to incomplete sampling of the active-fault population. Surface traces have been recognised for <50% of the active faults and along ≤50% of their lengths. The similarity of along-strike displacement profiles for short and long time intervals suggests that fault lengths and maximum single-event displacements have not changed over the last 3.6 Ma. Therefore, rate changes are likely to reflect temporal adjustments in earthquake recurrence intervals due to fault interactions and associated migration of earthquake activity within the rift.

  19. Tregs Modulate Lymphocyte Proliferation, Activation, and Resident-Memory T-Cell Accumulation within the Brain during MCMV Infection

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Sujata; Hu, Shuxian; Sheng, Wen S.; Singh, Amar; Lokensgard, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation and retention of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been reported within post viral-encephalitic brains, however, the full extent to which these cells modulate neuroinflammation is yet to be elucidated. Here, we used Foxp3-DTR (diphtheria toxin receptor) knock-in transgenic mice, which upon administration of low dose diphtheria toxin (DTx) results in specific deletion of Tregs. We investigated the proliferation status of various immune cell subtypes within inflamed central nervous system (CNS) tissue. Depletion of Tregs resulted in increased proliferation of both CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell subsets within the brain at 14 d post infection (dpi) when compared to Treg-sufficient animals. At 30 dpi, while proliferation of CD8+ T-cells was controlled within brains of both Treg-depleted and undepleted mice, proliferation of CD4+ T-cells remained significantly enhanced with DTx-treatment. Previous studies have demonstrated that Treg numbers within the brain rebound following DTx treatment to even higher numbers than in untreated animals. Despite this rebound, CD8+ and CD4+ T-cells proliferated at a higher rate when compared to that of Treg-sufficient mice, thus maintaining sustained neuroinflammation. Furthermore, at 30 dpi we found the majority of CD8+ T-cells were CD127hi KLRG1- indicating that the cells were long lived memory precursor cells. These cells showed marked elevation of CD103 expression, a marker of tissue resident-memory T-cells (TRM) in the CNS, in untreated animals when compared to DTx-treated animals suggesting that generation of TRM is impaired upon Treg depletion. Moreover, the effector function of TRM as indicated by granzyme B production in response to peptide re-stimulation was found to be more potent in Treg-sufficient animals. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that Tregs limit neuroinflammatory responses to viral infection by controlling cell proliferation and may direct a larger proportion of lymphocytes within the brain to be maintained

  20. Rare Earth Ion Mediated Fluorescence Accumulation on a Single Microbead: An Ultrasensitive Strategy for the Detection of Protein Kinase Activity at the Single-Cell Level.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Liu, Chenghui; Wang, Honghong; Wang, Hui; Li, Zhengping

    2015-12-01

    A single microbead-based fluorescence imaging (SBFI) strategy that enables detection of protein kinase activity from single cell lysates is reported. We systematically investigated the ability of various rare earth (RE) ions, immobilized on the microbead, for specific capturing of kinase-induced phosphopeptides, and Dy(3+) was found to be the most prominent one. Through the efficient concentration of kinase-induced fluorescent phosphopeptides on a Dy(3+) -functionalized single microbead, kinase activity can be detected and quantified by reading the fluorescence on the microbead with a confocal fluorescence microscope. Owing to the extremely specific recognition of Dy(3+) towards phosphopeptides and the highly-concentrated fluorescence accumulation on only one microbead, ultrahigh sensitivity has been achieved for the SBFI strategy which allows direct kinase analysis at the single-cell level. PMID:26482714

  1. Accumulation of recalcitrant xylan in mushroom-compost is due to a lack of xylan substituent removing enzyme activities of Agaricus bisporus.

    PubMed

    Jurak, Edita; Patyshakuliyeva, Aleksandrina; Kapsokalyvas, Dimitris; Xing, Lia; van Zandvoort, Marc A M J; de Vries, Ronald P; Gruppen, Harry; Kabel, Mirjam A

    2015-11-01

    The ability of Agaricus bisporus to degrade xylan in wheat straw based compost during mushroom formation is unclear. In this paper, xylan was extracted from the compost with water, 1M and 4M alkali. Over the phases analyzed, the remaining xylan was increasingly substituted with (4-O-methyl-)glucuronic acid and arabinosyl residues, both one and two arabinosyl residues per xylosyl residue remained. In the 1M and 4M KOH soluble solids of spent compost, 33 and 49 out of 100 xylosyl residues, respectively, were substituted. The accumulation of glucuronic acid substituents matched with the analysis that the two A. bisporus genes encoding for α-glucuronidase activity (both GH115) were not expressed in the A. bisporus mycelium in the compost during fruiting. Also, in a maximum likelihood tree it was shown that it is not likely that A. bisporus possesses genes encoding for the activity to remove arabinose from xylosyl residues having two arabinosyl residues. PMID:26256360

  2. RKIP phosphorylation-dependent ERK1 activation stimulates adipogenic lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes overexpressing LC3.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Ahmed, Mahmoud; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2016-09-01

    3T3-L1 preadipocytes undergo adipogenesis in response to treatment with dexamethaxone, 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, and insulin (DMI) through activation of several adipogenic transcription factors. Many autophagy-related proteins are also highly activated in the earlier stages of adipogenesis, and the LC3 conjugation system is required for formation of lipid droplets. Here, we investigated the effect of overexpression of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-LC3 fusion protein on adipogenesis. Overexpression of GFP-LC3 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes using poly-l-lysine-assisted adenoviral GFP-LC3 transduction was sufficient to produce intracellular lipid droplets. Indeed, GFP-LC3 overexpression stimulated expression of some adipogenic transcription factors (e.g., C/EBPα or β, PPARγ, SREBP2). In particular, SREBP2 was highly activated in preadipocytes transfected with adenoviral GFP-LC3. Also, phosphorylation of Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) at serine 153, consequently stimulating extracellular-signal regulated kinase (ERK)1 activity, was significantly increased during adipogenesis induced by either poly-l-lysine-assisted adenoviral GFP-LC3 transduction or culture in the presence of dexamethasone, 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine, and insulin. Furthermore, RKIP knockdown promoted ERK1 and PPARγ activation, and significantly increased the intracellular accumulation of triacylglycerides in DMI-induced adipogenesis. In conclusion, GFP-LC3 overexpression in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes stimulates adipocyte differentiation via direct modulation of RKIP-dependent ERK1 activity. PMID:27470585

  3. Inactivation of alpha-1-proteinase inhibitor by neutrophil metalloproteinases. Crucial role of the myeloperoxidase system and effects of the anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide.

    PubMed

    Ottonello, L; Dapino, P; Dallegri, F

    1993-01-01

    Supernatants, obtained from normal neutrophil polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN), challenged with opsonized zymosan (OPZ), were found to inactivate the PMN elastase inhibitor, alpha 1-proteinase inhibitor (A1PI). As the supernatants were treated with methionine to quench residual oxidants, primarily chloramines, the observed inactivation of A1PI appears to be due to enzymes. The activity of the supernatants was in fact inhibited by metal-chelators and by the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMP), which is consistent with the intervention of metalloproteinases. Supernatants from normal PMN triggered by OPZ in the presence of inhibitors of the myeloperoxidase (MPO) system as well as supernatants from MPO-deficient PMN were inactive but displayed the capacity of inactivating A1PI after treatment with the metalloproteinases activator 4-aminophenylmercuric acetate. These data suggest that the A1PI inactivation is due to metalloenzymes released by PMN as latent molecules, in turn activated by the MPO system. The MPO-dependent autoactivation of latent metalloenzymes by PMN, with consequent A1PI inactivation, was inhibited by the nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug nimesulide (NMS). As PMN-derived HOCl is well known to inactivate A1PI directly, through a process previously shown to be inhibitable by NMS, the present results suggest: (1) both the oxidative and proteolytic inactivation of A1PI depend on the HOCl-generating MPO system; (2) the tissue-destructive activity of PMN elastase could be controlled by interfering pharmacologically with the PMN-MPO system, directly and indirectly responsible for the breakdown of the tissue antielastase screen. PMID:8385794

  4. Enhancing Cell Nucleus Accumulation and DNA Cleavage Activity of Anti-Cancer Drug via Graphene Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chong; Wu, Congyu; Zhou, Xuejiao; Han, Ting; Xin, Xiaozhen; Wu, Jiaying; Zhang, Jingyan; Guo, Shouwu

    2013-10-01

    Graphene quantum dots (GQDs) maintain the intrinsic layered structural motif of graphene but with smaller lateral size and abundant periphery carboxylic groups, and are more compatible with biological system, thus are promising nanomaterials for therapeutic applications. Here we show that GQDs have a superb ability in drug delivery and anti-cancer activity boost without any pre-modification due to their unique structural properties. They could efficiently deliver doxorubicin (DOX) to the nucleus through DOX/GQD conjugates, because the conjugates assume different cellular and nuclear internalization pathways comparing to free DOX. Also, the conjugates could enhance DNA cleavage activity of DOX markedly. This enhancement combining with efficient nuclear delivery improved cytotoxicity of DOX dramatically. Furthermore, the DOX/GQD conjugates could also increase the nuclear uptake and cytotoxicity of DOX to drug-resistant cancer cells indicating that the conjugates may be capable to increase chemotherapy efficacy of anti-cancer drugs that are suboptimal due to the drug resistance.

  5. Effect of lipopolysaccharide on protein accumulation by murine peritoneal macrophages: the correlation to activation for macrophage tumoricidal function

    SciTech Connect

    Tannenbaum, C.S.

    1987-01-01

    The protein synthetic patterns of tumoricidal murine peritoneal macrophage populations have been compared to those of non-tumoricidal populations utilizing two dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE) of (/sup 35/S)-methionine-labeled proteins. While the protein synthetic patterns exhibited by resident, inflammatory and activated macrophages had numerous common features which distinguished them from the other normal non-macrophage cell types examined, unique proteins also distinguished each macrophage population from the others. Peritoneal macrophages elicited by treatment with heat killed Propionibacterium acnes, the live, attenuated Mycobacterium bovis strain BCG, Listeria monocytogenes and the protozoan flagellate Trypanosoma rhodesiense, all exhibited tumoricidal activity in 16h or 72h functional assays, and shared a common protein synthetic profile which differentiated them from the synthetic patterns characteristic of the non-tumoricidal resident and inflammatory macrophages.

  6. Hydrogen peroxide-induced antioxidant activities and cardiotonic glycoside accumulation in callus cultures of endemic Digitalis species.

    PubMed

    Cingoz, Gunce Sahin; Verma, Sandeep Kumar; Gurel, Ekrem

    2014-09-01

    The effect of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) on callus cultures of four Digitalis species (Digitalis lamarckii, Digitalis trojana, Digitalis davisiana and Digitalis cariensis) increased catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), total phenolic, proline activity and cardiotonic glycoside production. Callus derived from hypocotyl explants was cultured on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 0.25 mg L(-1) indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 0.5 mg L(-1) thidiazuron (TDZ). After a month of culture, callus was transferred to MS medium containing 10 mM H2O2 and then incubated for 6 h. The amount of five cardenolides (Lanatoside C, Digitoxin, Digoxigenin, Gitoxigenin and Digoxin) as well as CAT, SOD, total phenolic, proline activity from Digitalis species were compared. No digoxin was detected in all treatments and control groups. The total cardenolides estimated were in the order of D. lamarckii (586.65  μg g(-1) dw), D. davisiana (506.79 μg g(-1) dw), D. cariensis (376.60 μg g(-1) dw) and D. trojana (282.39 μg g(-1) dw). It was clear that H2O2 pre-treatment resulted in an increase in enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidants. However, a significant negative relationship between cardenolides production and overall activities of CAT, SOD, total phenolic and proline was evident. The described protocol here will be useful for the development of new strategies for a large-scale production of cardenolides. PMID:24915111

  7. Impact of high dietary zinc on zinc accumulation, enzyme activity and proteomic profiles in the pancreas of piglets.

    PubMed

    Pieper, R; Martin, L; Schunter, N; Villodre Tudela, C; Weise, C; Klopfleisch, R; Zentek, J; Einspanier, R; Bondzio, A

    2015-04-01

    The exocrine pancreas plays an important role in zinc homeostasis. Feeding very high (2000-3000mgzinc/kg diet) levels of zinc oxide to piglets for short periods is a common practice in the swine industry to improve performance and prevent diseases. The impact on pancreatic function and possible side effects during long-term feeding of high dietary zinc levels are still poorly understood. A total of 54 weaned piglets were either fed with low (57mg/kg, LZn), normal (164mg/kg, NZn) or high (2425mg/kg, HZn) zinc concentration in the diets. After 4 weeks of feeding, ten piglets per treatment were euthanized and pancreas samples were taken. Tissue zinc concentration and metallothionein abundance was greater with HZn compared with NZn and LZn (P<0.05). Similarly, activity of α-amylase, lipase, trypsin and chymotrypsin was higher with HZn as compared with NZn and LZn diets (P<0.05), whereas elastase activity was unchanged. Total trolox equivalent antioxidative capacity of pancreas tissue was higher with HZn diets compared with the other treatments (P<0.05). Pancreatic protein profiles of NZn and HZn fed piglets were obtained by 2D-DIGE technique and revealed 15 differentially expressed proteins out of 2100 detected spots (P<0.05). The differentially expressed proteins aldose reductase, eukaryotic elongation factor II and peroxiredoxin III were confirmed by immunoblotting. Identified proteins include zinc finger-containing transcription factors and proteins mainly associated with oxidative stress response and signal transduction in HZn compared with NZn pigs. Histologic examination however showed no morphologic changes. The results suggest that long-term supply of very high dietary zinc increases zinc and metallothionein concentration, and digestive enzyme activity, but also triggers oxidative stress reactions in the pancreas of young pigs. The data provide new insights into pancreatic function under outbalanced zinc homeostasis. PMID:25744507

  8. Effect of inhibition of sterol delta 14-reductase on accumulation of meiosis-activating sterol and meiotic resumption in cumulus-enclosed mouse oocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Leonardsen, L; Strömstedt, M; Jacobsen, D; Kristensen, K S; Baltsen, M; Andersen, C Y; Byskov, A G

    2000-01-01

    Two sterols of the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway induce resumption of meiosis in mouse oocytes in vitro. The sterols, termed meiosis-activating sterols (MAS), have been isolated from human follicular fluid (FF-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,14,24-triene-3 beta-ol) and from bull testicular tissue (T-MAS, 4,4-dimethyl-5 alpha-cholest-8,24-diene-3 beta-ol). FF-MAS is the first intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthesis from lanosterol and is converted to T-MAS by sterol delta 14-reductase. An inhibitor of delta 7-reductase and delta 14 reductase, AY9944-A-7, causes cells with a constitutive cholesterol biosynthesis to accumulate FF-MAS and possibly other intermediates between lanosterol and cholesterol. The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether AY9944-A-7 added to cultures of cumulus-oocyte complexes (COC) from mice resulted in accumulation of MAS and meiotic maturation. AY9944-A-7 stimulated dose dependently (5-25 mumol l-1) COC to resume meiosis when cultured for 22 h in alpha minimal essential medium (alpha-MEM) containing 4 mmol hypoxanthine l-1, a natural inhibitor of meiotic maturation. In contrast, naked oocytes were not induced to resume meiosis by AY9944-A-7. When cumulus cells were separated from their oocytes and co-cultured, AY9944-A-7 did not affect resumption of meiosis, indicating that intact oocyte-cumulus cell connections are important for AY9944-A-7 to exert its effect on meiosis. Cultures of COC with 10 mumol AY9944-A-7 l-1 in the presence of [3H]mevalonic acid, a natural precursor for steroid synthesis, resulted in accumulation of labelled FF-MAS, which had an 11-fold greater amount of radioactivity incorporated per COC compared with the control culture without AY9944-A-7. In contrast, incorporation of radioactivity into the cholesterol fraction was reduced 30-fold in extracts from the same oocytes. The present findings demonstrate for the first time that COC can synthesize cholesterol from mevalonate and accumulate FF-MAS in

  9. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibits alkaline pH- and PKA-induced apical vacuolar H+-ATPase accumulation in epididymal clear cells.

    PubMed

    Hallows, Kenneth R; Alzamora, Rodrigo; Li, Hui; Gong, Fan; Smolak, Christy; Neumann, Dietbert; Pastor-Soler, Núria M

    2009-04-01

    Acidic luminal pH and low [HCO(3)(-)] maintain sperm quiescent during maturation in the epididymis. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) in clear cells is a major contributor to epididymal luminal acidification. We have shown previously that protein kinase A (PKA), acting downstream of soluble adenylyl cyclase stimulation by alkaline luminal pH or HCO(3)(-), induces V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation in clear cells. Here we examined whether the metabolic sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates this PKA-induced V-ATPase apical membrane accumulation. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat and non-human primate epididymides revealed specific AMPK expression in epithelial cells. Immunofluorescence labeling of rat epididymis showed that perfusion in vivo with the AMPK activators 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-d-ribofuranoside (AICAR) or A-769662 induced a redistribution of the V-ATPase into subapical vesicles, even in the presence of a luminal alkaline (pH 7.8) buffer compared with that of controls perfused without drug. Moreover, preperfusion with AICAR blocked the PKA-mediated V-ATPase translocation to clear cell apical membranes induced by N(6)-monobutyryl-cAMP (6-MB-cAMP). Purified PKA and AMPK both phosphorylated V-ATPase A subunit in vitro. In HEK-293 cells [(32)P]orthophosphate in vivo labeling of the A subunit increased following PKA stimulation and decreased following RNA interference-mediated knockdown of AMPK. Finally, the extent of PKA-dependent in vivo phosphorylation of the A subunit increased with AMPK knockdown. In summary, our findings suggest that AMPK inhibits PKA-mediated V-ATPase apical accumulation in epididymal clear cells, that both kinases directly phosphorylate the V-ATPase A subunit in vitro and in vivo, and that AMPK inhibits PKA-dependent phosphorylation of this subunit. V-ATPase activity may be coupled to the sensing of acid-base status via PKA and to metabolic status via AMPK. PMID:19211918

  10. Interaction of Yna1 and Yna2 Is Required for Nuclear Accumulation and Transcriptional Activation of the Nitrate Assimilation Pathway in the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha

    PubMed Central

    Silvestrini, Lucia; Rossi, Beatrice; Gallmetzer, Andreas; Mathieu, Martine; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Berardi, Enrico; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    A few yeasts, including Hansenula polymorpha are able to assimilate nitrate and use it as nitrogen source. The genes necessary for nitrate assimilation are organised in this organism as a cluster comprising those encoding nitrate reductase (YNR1), nitrite reductase (YNI1), a high affinity transporter (YNT1), as well as the two pathway specific Zn(II)2Cys2 transcriptional activators (YNA1, YNA2). Yna1p and Yna2p mediate induction of the system and here we show that their functions are interdependent. Yna1p activates YNA2 as well as its own (YNA1) transcription thus forming a nitrate-dependent autoactivation loop. Using a split-YFP approach we demonstrate here that Yna1p and Yna2p form a heterodimer independently of the inducer and despite both Yna1p and Yna2p can occupy the target promoter as mono- or homodimer individually, these proteins are transcriptionally incompetent. Subsequently, the transcription factors target genes containing a conserved DNA motif (termed nitrate-UAS) determined in this work by in vitro and in vivo protein-DNA interaction studies. These events lead to a rearrangement of the chromatin landscape on the target promoters and are associated with the onset of transcription of these target genes. In contrast to other fungi and plants, in which nuclear accumulation of the pathway-specific transcription factors only occur in the presence of nitrate, Yna1p and Yna2p are constitutively nuclear in H. polymorpha. Yna2p is needed for this nuclear accumulation and Yna1p is incapable of strictly positioning in the nucleus without Yna2p. In vivo DNA footprinting and ChIP analyses revealed that the permanently nuclear Yna1p/Yna2p heterodimer only binds to the nitrate-UAS when the inducer is present. The nitrate-dependent up-regulation of one partner protein in the heterodimeric complex is functionally similar to the nitrate-dependent activation of nuclear accumulation in other systems. PMID:26335797

  11. Myeloperoxidase-derived hypochlorous acid promotes ox-LDL-induced senescence of endothelial cells through a mechanism involving β-catenin signaling in hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Yin-Zhuang; Wu, Yan; Zhang, Jie-Jie; Li, Tin-Bo; Jiang, Tian; Xiong, Xiao-Ming; Luo, Xiu-Ju; Ma, Qi-Lin; Peng, Jun

    2015-11-27

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO)-derived product hypochlorous acid (HOCl) is able to induce cellular senescence and MPO is also expressed in endothelial cells besides the well-recognized immune cells. This study aims to clarify the association of endothelium-derived MPO with endothelial senescence in hyperlipidemia. The rats were fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks to establish a hyperlipidemic model, which showed an increase in plasma lipids, endothelium-derived MPO expression, endothelial senescence and endothelial dysfunction concomitant with a reduction in glycogen synthase kinase 3 beta (GSK-3β) activity and phosphorylated β-catenin (p-β-catenin) level as well as an increase in β-catenin and p53 levels within the endothelium. Next, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated with oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL, 100 μg/ml) for 24 h to establish a senescent cell model in vitro. Consistent with the finding in vivo, ox-LDL-induced MPO expression and HUVECs senescence, accompanied by a decrease in GSK-3β activity and p-β-catenin level as well as an increase in HOCl content, β-catenin and p53 levels; these phenomena were attenuated by MPO inhibitor. Replacement of ox-LDL with HOCl could also induce HUVECs senescence and activate the β-catenin/p53 pathway. Based on these observations, we conclude that endothelium-derived MPO is upregulated in hyperlipidemic rats, which may contribute to the accelerated vascular endothelial senescence through a mechanism involving the β-catenin/p53 pathway. PMID:26474698

  12. Activity-dependent extracellular K+ accumulation in rat optic nerve: the role of glial and axonal Na+ pumps

    PubMed Central

    Ransom, Christopher B; Ransom, Bruce R; Sontheimer, Harald

    2000-01-01

    We measured activity-dependent changes in [K+]o with K+-selective microelectrodes in adult rat optic nerve, a CNS white matter tract, to investigate the factors responsible for post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o followed a double-exponential time course with an initial, fast time constant, τfast, of 0.9 ± 0.2 s (mean ±s.d.) and a later, slow time constant, τslow, of 4.2 ± 1 s following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus. τfast, but not τslow, decreased with increasing activity-dependent rises in [K+]o. τslow, but not τfast, increased with increasing stimulus duration.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was temperature sensitive. The apparent temperature coefficients (Q10, 27–37°C) for the fast and slow components following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus were 1.7 and 2.6, respectively.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was sensitive to Na+ pump inhibition with 50 μM strophanthidin. Following a 1 s, 100 Hz stimulus, 50 μM strophanthidin increased τfast and τslow by 81 and 464%, respectively. Strophanthidin reduced the temperature sensitivity of post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o.Post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o was minimally affected by the K+ channel blocker Ba2+ (0.2 mm). Following a 10 s, 100 Hz stimulus, 0.2 mm Ba2+ increased τfast and τslow by 24 and 18%, respectively.Stimulated increases in [K+]o were followed by undershoots of [K+]o. Post-stimulus undershoot amplitude increased with stimulus duration but was independent of the peak preceding [K+]o increase.These observations imply that two distinct processes contribute to post-stimulus recovery of [K+]o in central white matter. The results are compatible with a model of K+ removal that attributes the fast, initial phase of K+ removal to K+ uptake by glial Na+ pumps and the slower, sustained decline to K+ uptake via axonal Na+ pumps. PMID:10713967

  13. Effect of surfactant on hydrolysis products accumulation and short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production during mesophilic and thermophilic fermentation of waste activated sludge: kinetic studies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Peng; Chen, Yinguang; Zhou, Qi

    2010-09-01

    In the presence of surfactant sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS) the hydrolysis products accumulation and the short-chain fatty acids (SCFA) production during waste activated sludge fermentation under mesophilic and thermophilic conditions was compared with that at room temperature. In order to understand the mechanism of significant amounts of mesophilic and thermophilic hydrolysis products and SCFA observed in the presence of surfactant, the kinetic models at different SDBS dosages were developed. It was found that SDBS increased the mesophilic and thermophilic hydrolysis rate significantly, and the maximum specific utilization of hydrolysis products increased at low SDBS and decreased at high one. However, the observed maximum specific utilization of SCFA decreased seriously with SDBS increase. In the presence of SDBS the decay rate of acidogenic bacteria not only was lower than that in the absence of SDBS but decreased with the increase of SDBS under either mesophilic or thermophilic conditions. PMID:20409704

  14. Separation and Identification of Isomeric Glycans by Selected Accumulation-Trapped Ion Mobility Spectrometry-Electron Activated Dissociation Tandem Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Pu, Yi; Ridgeway, Mark E; Glaskin, Rebecca S; Park, Melvin A; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2016-04-01

    One of the major challenges in structural characterization of oligosaccharides is the presence of many structural isomers in most naturally occurring glycan mixtures. Although ion mobility spectrometry (IMS) has shown great promise in glycan isomer separation, conventional IMS separation occurs on the millisecond time scale, largely restricting its implementation to fast time-of-flight (TOF) analyzers which often lack the capability to perform electron activated dissociation (ExD) tandem MS analysis and the resolving power needed to resolve isobaric fragments. The recent development of trapped ion mobility spectrometry (TIMS) provides a promising new tool that offers high mobility resolution and compatibility with high-performance Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometers when operated under the selected accumulation-TIMS (SA-TIMS) mode. Here, we present our initial results on the application of SA-TIMS-ExD-FTICR MS to the separation and identification of glycan linkage isomers. PMID:26959868

  15. A spliceosome intermediate with loosely associated tri-snRNP accumulates in the absence of Prp28 ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Anokhina, Maria M; Tauchert, Marcel J; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The precise role of the spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. We show that stable tri-snRNP association during pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complex formation is blocked by a dominant-negative hPrp28 mutant lacking ATPase activity. Complexes formed in the presence of ATPase-deficient hPrp28 represent a novel assembly intermediate, the pre-B complex, that contains U1, U2 and loosely associated tri-snRNP and is stalled before disruption of the U1/5'ss base pairing interaction, consistent with a role for hPrp28 in the latter. Pre-B and B complexes differ structurally, indicating that stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by substantial rearrangements in the spliceosome. Disruption of the U1/5'ss interaction alone is not sufficient to bypass the block by ATPase-deficient hPrp28, suggesting hPrp28 has an additional function at this stage of splicing. Our data provide new insights into the function of Prp28 in higher eukaryotes, and the requirements for stable tri-snRNP binding during B complex formation. PMID:27377154

  16. A spliceosome intermediate with loosely associated tri-snRNP accumulates in the absence of Prp28 ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Anokhina, Maria M.; Tauchert, Marcel J.; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The precise role of the spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. We show that stable tri-snRNP association during pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complex formation is blocked by a dominant-negative hPrp28 mutant lacking ATPase activity. Complexes formed in the presence of ATPase-deficient hPrp28 represent a novel assembly intermediate, the pre-B complex, that contains U1, U2 and loosely associated tri-snRNP and is stalled before disruption of the U1/5′ss base pairing interaction, consistent with a role for hPrp28 in the latter. Pre-B and B complexes differ structurally, indicating that stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by substantial rearrangements in the spliceosome. Disruption of the U1/5′ss interaction alone is not sufficient to bypass the block by ATPase-deficient hPrp28, suggesting hPrp28 has an additional function at this stage of splicing. Our data provide new insights into the function of Prp28 in higher eukaryotes, and the requirements for stable tri-snRNP binding during B complex formation. PMID:27377154

  17. Soil organic carbon (SOC) accumulation in rice paddies under long-term agro-ecosystem experiments in southern China - VI. Changes in microbial community structure and respiratory activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, D.; Liu, X.; Liu, Y.; Li, L.; Pan, G.; Crowley, D.; Tippkötter, R.

    2011-02-01

    Biological stabilization within accumulated soil organic carbon (SOC) has not been well understood, while its role in physical and chemical protection as well as of chemical recalcitrance had been addressed in Chinese rice paddies. In this study, topsoil samples were collected and respiratory activity measured in situ following rice harvest under different fertilization treatments of three long-term experimental sites across southern China in 2009. The SOC contents, microbial biomass carbon (SMBC) and nitrogen (SMBN) were analysed using chemical digestion and microbial community structure assessment via clony dilute plate counting methods. While SOC contents were consistently higher under compound chemical fertilization (Comp-Fert) or combined organic and inorganic fertilization (Comb-Fert) compared to N fertilization only (N-Fert), there was significantly higher fungal-bacterial ratio under Comb-Fert than under N-Fert and Comp-Fert. When subtracting the background effect under no fertilization treatment (Non-Fert), the increase both in SMBC and SMBN under fertilization treatment was found very significantly correlated to the increase in SOC over controls across the sites. Also, the ratio of culturable fungal to bacterial population numbers (F/B ratio) was well correlated with soil organic carbon contents in all samples across the sites studied. SOC accumulation favoured a build-up the microbial community with increasing fungal dominance in the rice paddies under fertilization treatments. While soil respiration rates were high under Comb-Fert as a result of enhanced microbial community build-up, the specific soil respiratory activity based on microbial biomass carbon was found in a significantly negatively correlation with the SOC contents for overall samples. Thus, a fungal-dominated microbial community seemed to slow SOC turnover, thereby favouring SOC accumulation under Comp-Fert or under Comb-Fert in the rice paddies. Therefore, the biological stabilization

  18. Metabolism of isoniazid by neutrophil myeloperoxidase leads to isoniazid-NAD(+) adduct formation: A comparison of the reactivity of isoniazid with its known human metabolites.

    PubMed

    Khan, Saifur R; Morgan, Andrew G M; Michail, Karim; Srivastava, Nutan; Whittal, Randy M; Aljuhani, Naif; Siraki, Arno G

    2016-04-15

    The formation of isonicotinyl-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (INH-NAD(+)) via the mycobacterial catalase-peroxidase enzyme, KatG, has been described as the major component of the mode of action of isoniazid (INH). However, there are numerous human peroxidases that may catalyze this reaction. The role of neutrophil myeloperoxidase (MPO) in INH-NAD(+) adduct formation has never been explored; this is important, as neutrophils are recruited at the site of tuberculosis infection (granuloma) through infected macrophages' cell death signals. In our studies, we showed that neutrophil MPO is capable of INH metabolism using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spin-trapping and UV-Vis spectroscopy. MPO or activated human neutrophils (by phorbol myristate acetate) catalyzed the oxidation of INH and formed several free radical intermediates; the inclusion of superoxide dismutase revealed a carbon-centered radical which is considered to be the reactive metabolite that binds with NAD(+). Other human metabolites, including N-acetyl-INH, N-acetylhydrazine, and hydrazine did not show formation of carbon-centered radicals, and either produced no detectable free radicals, N-centered free radicals, or superoxide, respectively. A comparison of these free radical products indicated that only the carbon-centered radical from INH is reducing in nature, based on UV-Vis measurement of nitroblue tetrazolium reduction. Furthermore, only INH oxidation by MPO led to a new product (λmax=326nm) in the presence of NAD(+). This adduct was confirmed to be isonicotinyl-NAD(+) using LC-MS analysis where the intact adduct was detected (m/z=769). The findings of this study suggest that neutrophil MPO may also play a role in INH pharmacological activity. PMID:26867495

  19. Menopausal Status Modifies Breast Cancer Risk Associated with the Myeloperoxidase (MPO) G463A Polymorphism in Caucasian Women: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pabalan, Noel; Jarjanazi, Hamdi; Sung, Lillian; Li, Hong; Ozcelik, Hilmi

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer susceptibility may be modulated partly through polymorphisms in oxidative enzymes, one of which is myeloperoxidase (MPO). Association of the low transcription activity variant allele A in the G463A polymorphism has been investigated for its association with breast cancer risk, considering the modifying effects of menopausal status and antioxidant intake levels of cases and controls. Methodology/Principal Findings To obtain a more precise estimate of association using the odds ratio (OR), we performed a meta-analysis of 2,975 cases and 3,427 controls from three published articles of Caucasian populations living in the United States. Heterogeneity among studies was tested and sensitivity analysis was applied. The lower transcriptional activity AA genotype of MPO in the pre-menopausal population showed significantly reduced risk (OR 0.56–0.57, p = 0.03) in contrast to their post-menopausal counterparts which showed non-significant increased risk (OR 1.14; p = 0.34–0.36). High intake of antioxidants (OR 0.67–0.86, p = 0.04–0.05) and carotenoids (OR 0.68–0.86, p = 0.03–0.05) conferred significant protection in the women. Stratified by menopausal status, this effect was observed in pre-menopausal women especially those whose antioxidant intake was high (OR 0.42–0.69, p = 0.04). In post-menopausal women, effect of low intake elicited susceptibility (OR 1.19–1.67, p = 0.07–0.17) to breast cancer. Conclusions/Significance Based on a homogeneous Caucasian population, the MPO G463A polymorphism places post-menopausal women at risk for breast cancer, where this effect is modified by diet. PMID:22427832

  20. Impaired Clearance and Enhanced Pulmonary Inflammatory/Fibrotic Response to Carbon Nanotubes in Myeloperoxidase-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Kapralov, Alexandr A.; Feng, Wei Hong; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Mercer, Robert R.; St. Croix, Claudette M.; Lang, Megan A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Konduru, Nagarjun V.; Allen, Brett L.; Conroy, Jennifer; Kotchey, Gregg P.; Mohamed, Bashir M.; Meade, Aidan D.; Volkov, Yuri; Star, Alexander; Fadeel, Bengt; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2012-01-01

    Advancement of biomedical applications of carbonaceous nanomaterials is hampered by their biopersistence and pro-inflammatory action in vivo. Here, we used myeloperoxidase knockout B6.129X1-MPO (MPO k/o) mice and showed that oxidation and clearance of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) from the lungs of these animals after pharyngeal aspiration was markedly less effective whereas the inflammatory response was more robust than in wild-type C57Bl/6 mice. Our results provide direct evidence for the participation of MPO – one of the key-orchestrators of inflammatory response – in the in vivo pulmonary oxidative biodegradation of SWCNT and suggest new ways to control the biopersistence of nanomaterials through genetic or pharmacological manipulations. PMID:22479306

  1. Suppression of T Cell Activation and Collagen Accumulation by an Anti-IFNAR1 mAb, Anifrolumab, in Adult Patients with Systemic Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiang; Higgs, Brandon W; Bay-Jensen, Anne C; Karsdal, Morten A; Yao, Yihong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-10-01

    Type I IFNs are implicated in the pathophysiology of systemic sclerosis (SSc). Recently, a Phase I open-label trial was conducted with an anti-IFNAR1 receptor antibody (anifrolumab) in adult SSc patients. In this study, we aim to assess the downstream effects of anifrolumab and elucidate the role of type I IFN in SSc. Serum proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) markers were measured in relation to IFN pathway activation status and SSc disease activity. Our results demonstrated a robust overexpression of multiple serum proteins in SSc patients, particularly those with an elevated baseline type I IFN gene signature. Anifrolumab administration was associated with significant downregulation of T cell-associated proteins and upregulation of type III collagen degradation marker. Whole-blood and skin microarray results also indicated the inhibition of T cell receptor and ECM-related transcripts by anifrolumab. In summary, our study demonstrates suppressive effects of anifrolumab on T cell activation and collagen accumulation through which tissue fibrosis may be reduced in SSc patients. The relationship between these peripheral markers and the clinical response to anifrolumab may be examined in larger double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. PMID:25993119

  2. CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G- Cells with Suppressive Activity Towards T Cells Accumulate in Lungs of Influenza a Virus-Infected Mice

    PubMed Central

    Milanez-Almeida, P.; Ulas, T.; Pasztoi, M.; Glage, S.; Schughart, K.; Lutz, M. B.; Schultze, J. L.; Huehn, J.

    2015-01-01

    Influenza A virus (IAV) infection causes an acute respiratory disease characterized by a strong inflammatory immune response and severe immunopathology. Proinflammatory mechanisms are well described in the murine IAV infection model, but less is known about the mechanisms leading to the resolution of inflammation. Here, we analyzed the contribution of CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells to this process. An accumulation of CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells within the lungs was observed during the course of IAV infection. Phenotypic characterization of these CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells by flow cytometry and RNA-Seq revealed an activated phenotype showing both pro- and anti-inflammatory features, including the expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) by a fraction of cells in an IFN-γ-dependent manner. Moreover, CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells isolated from lungs of IAV-infected animals displayed suppressive activity when tested in vitro, and iNOS inhibitors could abrogate this suppressive activity. Collectively, our data suggest that during IAV infection, CD11b+Ly6C++Ly6G– cells acquire immunoregulatory function, which might contribute to the prevention of pathology during this life-threatening disease. PMID:26716013

  3. Conformational and thermal stability of mature dimeric human myeloperoxidase and a recombinant monomeric form from CHO cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Srijib; Stampler, Johanna; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2011-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a lysosomal heme enzyme present in the azurophilic granules of human neutrophils and monocytes. It is a critical element of the human innate immune system by exerting antimicrobial effects. It is a disulfide bridged dimer with each monomer containing a light and a heavy polypeptide and its biosynthesis and intracellular transport includes several posttranslational processing steps. By contrast, MPO recombinantly produced in Chinese hamster ovary cell lines is monomeric, partially unprocessed and contains a N-terminal propeptide (proMPO). It mirrors a second form of MPO constitutively secreted from normal bone marrow myeloid precursors. In order to clarify the impact of posttranslational modifications on the structural integrity and enzymology of these two forms of human myeloperoxidase, we have undertaken an investigation on the conformational and thermal stability of leukocyte MPO and recombinant proMPO by using complementary biophysical techniques including UV-Vis, circular dichroism and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as differential scanning calorimetry. Mature leucocyte MPO exhibits a peculiar high chemical and thermal stability under oxidizing conditions but is significantly destabilized by addition of dithiothreitol. Unfolding of secondary and tertiary structure occurs concomitantly with denaturation of the heme cavity, reflecting the role of three MPO-typical heme to protein linkages and of six intra-chain disulfides for structural integrity by bridging N- and C-terminal regions of the protein. Recombinant monomeric proMPO follows a similar unfolding pattern but has a lower conformational and thermal stability. Spectroscopic and thermodynamic data of unfolding are discussed with respect to the known three-dimensional structure of leukocyte MPO as well as to known physiological roles. PMID:20933108

  4. Copper-dependent metabolism of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in human K562 cells. Lack of specific transcriptional activation and accumulation of a partially inactivated enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    Steinkühler, C; Carrì, M T; Micheli, G; Knoepfel, L; Weser, U; Rotilio, G

    1994-01-01

    The regulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by copper was investigated in human K562 cells. Copper ions caused a dose- and time-dependent increase, up to 3-fold, of the steady-state level of Cu,Zu-superoxide dismutase mRNA. A comparable increase was also observed for actin and ribosomal protein L32 mRNAs, but not for metallothionein mRNA which was augmented more than 50-fold and showed a different induction pattern. The copper-induced mRNAs were actively translated as judged from their enhanced loading on polysomes, the concomitantly increased cellular protein levels and an augmented incorporation of [3H]lysine into acid-precipitable material. Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase protein followed this general trend, as demonstrated by dose- and time-dependent increases in immunoreactive and enzymically active protein. However, a specific accumulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was noticed in cells grown in the presence of copper, that was not detectable for other proteins. Purification of the enzyme demonstrated that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was present as a reconstitutable, copper-deficient protein with high specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.89 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in untreated K562 cells and as a fully metallated protein with low specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.54 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in copper-treated cells. Pulse-chase experiments using [3H]lysine indicated that turnover rates of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in K562 cells were not affected by growth in copper-enriched medium, whereas turnover of total protein was significantly enhanced as a function of metal supplementation. From these results we conclude that: (i) unlike in yeast [Carrì, Galiazzo, Ciriolo and Rotilio (1991) FEBS Lett. 278, 263-266] Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is not specifically regulated by copper at the transcriptional level in human K562 cells, suggesting that this type of regulation has not been conserved during the evolution of higher eukaryotes; (ii) copper ions cause an inactivation of the enzyme in

  5. Copper-dependent metabolism of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in human K562 cells. Lack of specific transcriptional activation and accumulation of a partially inactivated enzyme.

    PubMed

    Steinkühler, C; Carrì, M T; Micheli, G; Knoepfel, L; Weser, U; Rotilio, G

    1994-09-15

    The regulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase by copper was investigated in human K562 cells. Copper ions caused a dose- and time-dependent increase, up to 3-fold, of the steady-state level of Cu,Zu-superoxide dismutase mRNA. A comparable increase was also observed for actin and ribosomal protein L32 mRNAs, but not for metallothionein mRNA which was augmented more than 50-fold and showed a different induction pattern. The copper-induced mRNAs were actively translated as judged from their enhanced loading on polysomes, the concomitantly increased cellular protein levels and an augmented incorporation of [3H]lysine into acid-precipitable material. Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase protein followed this general trend, as demonstrated by dose- and time-dependent increases in immunoreactive and enzymically active protein. However, a specific accumulation of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was noticed in cells grown in the presence of copper, that was not detectable for other proteins. Purification of the enzyme demonstrated that Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase was present as a reconstitutable, copper-deficient protein with high specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.89 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in untreated K562 cells and as a fully metallated protein with low specific activity (kcat./Cu = 0.54 x 10(9) M-1.s-1) in copper-treated cells. Pulse-chase experiments using [3H]lysine indicated that turnover rates of Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase in K562 cells were not affected by growth in copper-enriched medium, whereas turnover of total protein was significantly enhanced as a function of metal supplementation. From these results we conclude that: (i) unlike in yeast [Carrì, Galiazzo, Ciriolo and Rotilio (1991) FEBS Lett. 278, 263-266] Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase is not specifically regulated by copper at the transcriptional level in human K562 cells, suggesting that this type of regulation has not been conserved during the evolution of higher eukaryotes; (ii) copper ions cause an inactivation of the enzyme in

  6. A synthetic gene increases TGFβ3 accumulation by 75-fold in tobacco chloroplasts enabling rapid purification and folding into a biologically active molecule.

    PubMed

    Gisby, Martin F; Mellors, Philip; Madesis, Panagiotis; Ellin, Marianne; Laverty, Hugh; O'Kane, Sharon; Ferguson, Mark W J; Day, Anil

    2011-06-01

    Human transforming growth factor-β3 (TGFβ3) is a new therapeutic protein used to reduce scarring during wound healing. The active molecule is a nonglycosylated, homodimer comprised of 13-kDa polypeptide chains linked by disulphide bonds. Expression of recombinant human TGFβ3 in chloroplasts and its subsequent purification would provide a sustainable source of TGFβ3 free of animal pathogens. A synthetic sequence (33% GC) containing frequent chloroplast codons raised accumulation of the 13-kDa TGFβ3 polypeptide by 75-fold compared to the native coding region (56% GC) when expressed in tobacco chloroplasts. The 13-kDa TGFβ3 monomer band was more intense than the RuBisCO 15-kDa small subunit on Coomassie blue-stained SDS-PAGE gels. TGFβ3 accumulated in insoluble aggregates and was stable in leaves of different ages but was not detected in seeds. TGFβ3 represented 12% of leaf protein and appeared as monomer, dimer and trimer bands on Western blots of SDS-PAGE gels. High yield and insolubility facilitated initial purification and refolding of the 13-kDa polypeptide into the TGFβ3 homodimer recognized by a conformation-dependent monoclonal antibody. The TGFβ3 homodimer and trace amounts of monomer were the only bands visible on silver-stained gels following purification by hydrophobic interaction chromatography and cation exchange chromatography. N-terminal sequencing and electronspray ionization mass spectrometry showed the removal of the initiator methionine and physical equivalence of the chloroplast-produced homodimer to standard TGFβ3. Functional equivalence was demonstrated by near-identical dose-response curves showing the inhibition of mink lung epithelial cell proliferation. We conclude that chloroplasts are an attractive production platform for synthesizing recombinant human TGFβ3. PMID:21535357

  7. Reactivity of selenium-containing compounds with myeloperoxidase-derived chlorinating oxidants: Second-order rate constants and implications for biological damage.

    PubMed

    Carroll, Luke; Pattison, David I; Fu, Shanlin; Schiesser, Carl H; Davies, Michael J; Hawkins, Clare L

    2015-07-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl) and N-chloramines are produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO) as part of the immune response to destroy invading pathogens. However, MPO also plays a detrimental role in inflammatory pathologies, including atherosclerosis, as inappropriate production of oxidants, including HOCl and N-chloramines, causes damage to host tissue. Low molecular mass thiol compounds, including glutathione (GSH) and methionine (Met), have demonstrated efficacy in scavenging MPO-derived oxidants, which prevents oxidative damage in vitro and ex vivo. Selenium species typically have greater reactivity toward oxidants compared to the analogous sulfur compounds, and are known to be efficient scavengers of HOCl and other hypohalous acids produced by MPO. In this study, we examined the efficacy of a number of sulfur and selenium compounds to scavenge a range of biologically relevant N-chloramines and oxidants produced by both isolated MPO and activated neutrophils and characterized the resulting selenium-derived oxidation products in each case. A dose-dependent decrease in the concentration of each N-chloramine was observed on addition of the sulfur compounds (cysteine, methionine) and selenium compounds (selenomethionine, methylselenocysteine, 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol, 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol) studied. In general, selenomethionine was the most reactive with N-chloramines (k2 0.8-3.4×10(3)M(-1) s(-1)) with 1,5-anhydro-5-selenogulitol and 1,4-anhydro-4-seleno-L-talitol (k2 1.1-6.8×10(2)M(-1) s(-1)) showing lower reactivity. This resulted in the formation of the respective selenoxides as the primary oxidation products. The selenium compounds demonstrated greater ability to remove protein N-chloramines compared to the analogous sulfur compounds. These reactions may have implications for preventing cellular damage in vivo, particularly under chronic inflammatory conditions. PMID:25841785

  8. Increased neuronal PreP activity reduces Aβ accumulation, attenuates neuroinflammation and improves mitochondrial and synaptic function in Alzheimer disease's mouse model.

    PubMed

    Fang, Du; Wang, Yongfu; Zhang, Zhihua; Du, Heng; Yan, Shiqiang; Sun, Qinru; Zhong, Changjia; Wu, Long; Vangavaragu, Jhansi Rani; Yan, Shijun; Hu, Gang; Guo, Lan; Rabinowitz, Molly; Glaser, Elzbieta; Arancio, Ottavio; Sosunov, Alexander A; McKhann, Guy M; Chen, John Xi; Yan, Shirley ShiDu

    2015-09-15

    Accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in synaptic mitochondria is associated with mitochondrial and synaptic injury. The underlying mechanisms and strategies to eliminate Aβ and rescue mitochondrial and synaptic defects remain elusive. Presequence protease (PreP), a mitochondrial peptidasome, is a novel mitochondrial Aβ degrading enzyme. Here, we demonstrate for the first time that increased expression of active human PreP in cortical neurons attenuates Alzheimer disease's (AD)-like mitochondrial amyloid pathology and synaptic mitochondrial dysfunction, and suppresses mitochondrial oxidative stress. Notably, PreP-overexpressed AD mice show significant reduction in the production of proinflammatory mediators. Accordingly, increased neuronal PreP expression improves learning and memory and synaptic function in vivo AD mice, and alleviates Aβ-mediated reduction of long-term potentiation (LTP). Our results provide in vivo evidence that PreP may play an important role in maintaining mitochondrial integrity and function by clearance and degradation of mitochondrial Aβ along with the improvement in synaptic and behavioral function in AD mouse model. Thus, enhancing PreP activity/expression may be a new therapeutic avenue for treatment of AD. PMID:26123488

  9. Inborn Error of Cobalamin Metabolism Associated with the Intracellular Accumulation of Transcobalamin-Bound Cobalamin and Mutations in ZNF143, Which Codes for a Transcriptional Activator.

    PubMed

    Pupavac, Mihaela; Watkins, David; Petrella, Francis; Fahiminiya, Somayyeh; Janer, Alexandre; Cheung, Warren; Gingras, Anne-Claude; Pastinen, Tomi; Muenzer, Joseph; Majewski, Jacek; Shoubridge, Eric A; Rosenblatt, David S

    2016-09-01

    Vitamin B12 (cobalamin, Cbl) cofactors adenosylcobalamin (AdoCbl) and methylcobalamin (MeCbl) are required for the activity of the enzymes methylmalonyl-CoA mutase (MCM) and methionine synthase (MS). Inborn errors of Cbl metabolism are rare Mendelian disorders associated with hematological and neurological manifestations, and elevations of methylmalonic acid and/or homocysteine in the blood and urine. We describe a patient whose fibroblasts had decreased functional activity of MCM and MS and decreased synthesis of AdoCbl and MeCbl (3.4% and 1.0% of cellular Cbl, respectively). The defect in cultured patient fibroblasts complemented those from all known complementation groups. Patient cells accumulated transcobalamin-bound-Cbl, a complex which usually dissociates in the lysosome to release free Cbl. Whole-exome sequencing identified putative disease-causing variants c.851T>G (p.L284*) and c.1019C>T (p.T340I) in transcription factor ZNF143. Proximity biotinylation analysis confirmed the interaction between ZNF143 and HCFC1, a protein that regulates expression of the Cbl trafficking enzyme MMACHC. qRT-PCR analysis revealed low MMACHC expression levels both in patient fibroblasts, and in control fibroblasts incubated with ZNF143 siRNA. PMID:27349184

  10. Bidens pilosa and its active compound inhibit adipogenesis and lipid accumulation via down-modulation of the C/EBP and PPARγ pathways

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Meng-Ting; Lin, Chuan-Ju; Chang, Cicero Lee-Tian; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its complications are a major global health problem. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect and mechanism of an edible plant, Bidens pilosa, and its active constituent. We first assessed the long-term effect of B. pilosa on body composition, body weight, blood parameters in ICR mice. We observed that it significantly decreased fat content and increased protein content in ICR mice. Next, we verified the anti-obesity effect of B. pilosa in ob/ob mice. It effectively and dose-dependently reduced fat content, adipocyte size and/or body weight in mice. Moreover, mechanistic studies showed that B. pilosa inhibited the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) and Egr2 in adipose tissue. Finally, we examined the effect of 2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-1-hydroxytrideca-5,7,9,11-tetrayne (GHT) on adipogenesis in adipocytes. We found that B. pilosa significantly decreased the adipogenesis and lipid accumulation. This decrease was associated with the down-regulation of expression of Egr2, C/EBPs, PPARγ, adipocyte Protein 2 (aP2) and adiponectin. In summary, this work demonstrated that B. pilosa and GHT suppressed adipogenesis and lipid content in adipocytes and/or animals via the down-regulation of the Egr2, C/EBPs and PPARγ pathways, suggesting a novel application of B. pilosa and GHT against obesity. PMID:27063434

  11. Different-Sized Gold Nanoparticle Activator/Antigen Increases Dendritic Cells Accumulation in Liver-Draining Lymph Nodes and CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qianqian; Zhang, Yulong; Du, Juan; Li, Yuan; Zhou, Yong; Fu, Qiuxia; Zhang, Jingang; Wang, Xiaohui; Zhan, Linsheng

    2016-02-23

    The lack of efficient antigen and activator delivery systems, as well as the restricted migration of dendritic cells (DCs) to secondary lymph organs, dramatically limits DC-based adoptive immunotherapy. We selected two spherical gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-based vehicles of optimal size for activator and antigen delivery. Their combination (termed the NanoAu-Cocktail) was associated with the dual targeting of CpG oligonucleotides (CpG-ODNs) and an OVA peptide (OVAp) to DC subcellular compartments, inducing enhanced antigen cross-presentation, upregulated expression of costimulatory molecules and elevated secretion of T helper1 cytokines. We demonstrated that the intravenously transfused NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs showed dramatically improved in vivo homing ability to lymphoid tissues and were settled in T cell area. Especially, by tissue-distribution analysis, we found that more than 60% of lymphoid tissues-homing DCs accumulated in liver-draining lymph nodes (LLNs). The improved homing ability of NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs was associated with the high expression of chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) and rearrangement of the cytoskeletons. In addition, by antigen-specific tetramers detection, NanoAu-Cocktail pulsed DCs were proved able to elicit strong antigen-specific CD8+ T cell responses, which provided enhanced protection from viral invasions. This study highlights the importance of codelivering antigen/adjuvant using different sized gold nanoparticles to improve DC homing and therapy. PMID:26771692

  12. Expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase variant in tobacco reduces tobacco-specific nitrosamine accumulation in cured leaves and cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jianli; Zhang, Leichen; Lewis, Ramsey S; Bovet, Lucien; Goepfert, Simon; Jack, Anne M; Crutchfield, James D; Ji, Huihua; Dewey, Ralph E

    2016-07-01

    Burley tobaccos (Nicotiana tabacum) display a nitrogen-use-deficiency phenotype that is associated with the accumulation of high levels of nitrate within the leaf, a trait correlated with production of a class of compounds referred to as tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs). Two TSNA species, 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) and N-nitrosonornicotine (NNN), have been shown to be strong carcinogens in numerous animal studies. We investigated the potential of molecular genetic strategies to lower nitrate levels in burley tobaccos by overexpressing genes encoding key enzymes of the nitrogen-assimilation pathway. Of the various constructs tested, only the expression of a constitutively active nitrate reductase (NR) dramatically decreased free nitrate levels in the leaves. Field-grown tobacco plants expressing this NR variant exhibited greatly reduced levels of TSNAs in both cured leaves and mainstream smoke of cigarettes made from these materials. Decreasing leaf nitrate levels via expression of a constitutively active NR enzyme represents an exceptionally promising means for reducing the production of NNN and NNK, two of the most well-documented animal carcinogens found in tobacco products. PMID:26800860

  13. Bidens pilosa and its active compound inhibit adipogenesis and lipid accumulation via down-modulation of the C/EBP and PPARγ pathways.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yu-Chuan; Yang, Meng-Ting; Lin, Chuan-Ju; Chang, Cicero Lee-Tian; Yang, Wen-Chin

    2016-01-01

    Obesity and its complications are a major global health problem. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity effect and mechanism of an edible plant, Bidens pilosa, and its active constituent. We first assessed the long-term effect of B. pilosa on body composition, body weight, blood parameters in ICR mice. We observed that it significantly decreased fat content and increased protein content in ICR mice. Next, we verified the anti-obesity effect of B. pilosa in ob/ob mice. It effectively and dose-dependently reduced fat content, adipocyte size and/or body weight in mice. Moreover, mechanistic studies showed that B. pilosa inhibited the expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins (C/EBPs) and Egr2 in adipose tissue. Finally, we examined the effect of 2-β-D-glucopyranosyloxy-1-hydroxytrideca-5,7,9,11-tetrayne (GHT) on adipogenesis in adipocytes. We found that B. pilosa significantly decreased the adipogenesis and lipid accumulation. This decrease was associated with the down-regulation of expression of Egr2, C/EBPs, PPARγ, adipocyte Protein 2 (aP2) and adiponectin. In summary, this work demonstrated that B. pilosa and GHT suppressed adipogenesis and lipid content in adipocytes and/or animals via the down-regulation of the Egr2, C/EBPs and PPARγ pathways, suggesting a novel application of B. pilosa and GHT against obesity. PMID:27063434

  14. The freshwater Amazonian stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, up-regulates glutamine synthetase activity and protein abundance, and accumulates glutamine when exposed to brackish (15 per thousand) water.

    PubMed

    Ip, Y K; Loong, A M; Ching, B; Tham, G H Y; Wong, W P; Chew, S F

    2009-12-01

    This study aimed to examine whether the stenohaline freshwater stingray, Potamotrygon motoro, which lacks a functional ornithine-urea cycle, would up-regulate glutamine synthetase (GS) activity and protein abundance, and accumulate glutamine during a progressive transfer from freshwater to brackish (15 per thousand) water with daily feeding. Our results revealed that, similar to other freshwater teleosts, P. motoro performed hyperosmotic regulation, with very low urea concentrations in plasma and tissues, in freshwater. In 15 per thousand water, it was non-ureotelic and non-ureoosmotic, acting mainly as an osmoconformer with its plasma osmolality, [Na+] and [Cl-] comparable to those of the external medium. There were significant increases in the content of several free amino acids (FAAs), including glutamate, glutamine and glycine, in muscle and liver, but not in plasma, indicating that FAAs could contribute in part to cell volume regulation. Furthermore, exposure of P. motoro to 15 per thousand water led to up-regulation of GS activity and protein abundance in both liver and muscle. Thus, our results indicate for the first time that, despite the inability to synthesize urea and the lack of functional carbamoyl phosphate synthetase III (CPS III) which uses glutamine as a substrate, P. motoro retained the capacity to up-regulate the activity and protein expression of GS in response to salinity stress. Potamotrygon motoro was not nitrogen (N) limited when exposed to 15 per thousand water with feeding, and there were no significant changes in the amination and deamination activities of hepatic glutamate dehydrogenase. In contrast, P. motoro became N limited when exposed to 10 per thousand water with fasting and could not survive well in 15 per thousand water without food. PMID:19915125

  15. SirT1 knockdown potentiates radiation-induced bystander effect through promoting c-Myc activity and thus facilitating ROS accumulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yuexia; Tu, Wenzhi; Zhang, Jianghong; He, Mingyuan; Ye, Shuang; Dong, Chen; Shao, Chunlin

    2015-02-01

    Radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) has important implications for secondary cancer risk assessment during cancer radiotherapy, but the bystander signaling processes, especially under hypoxic condition, are still largely unclear. The present study found that micronuclei (MN) formation could be induced in the non-irradiated HL-7702 hepatocyte cells after being treated with the conditioned medium from irradiated hepatoma HepG2 and SK-Hep-1 cells under either normoxia or hypoxia. This bystander response was dramatically diminished or enhanced when the SirT1 gene of irradiated hepatoma cells was overexpressed or knocked down, respectively, especially under hypoxia. Meanwhile, SirT1 knockdown promoted transcriptional activity for c-Myc and facilitated ROS accumulation. But both of the increased bystander responses and ROS generation due to SirT1-knockdown were almost completely suppressed by c-Myc interference. Moreover, ROS scavenger effectively abolished the RIBE triggered by irradiated hepatoma cells even with SirT1 depletion. These findings provide new insights that SirT1 has a profound role in regulating RIBE where a c-Myc-dependent release of ROS may be involved. PMID:25772107

  16. Activation of GPR55 Receptors Exacerbates oxLDL-Induced Lipid Accumulation and Inflammatory Responses, while Reducing Cholesterol Efflux from Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lanuti, Mirko; Talamonti, Emanuela; Maccarrone, Mauro; Chiurchiù, Valerio

    2015-01-01

    The G protein-coupled receptor GPR55 has been proposed as a new cannabinoid receptor associated with bone remodelling, nervous system excitability, vascular homeostasis as well as in several pathophysiological conditions including obesity and cancer. However, its physiological role and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In the present work, we demonstrate for the first time its presence in human macrophages and its increased expression in ox-LDL-induced foam cells. In addition, pharmacological activation of GPR55 by its selective agonist O-1602 increased CD36- and SRB-I-mediated lipid accumulation and blocked cholesterol efflux by downregulating ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1, as well as enhanced cytokine- and pro-metalloprotease-9 (pro-MMP-9)-induced proinflammatory responses in foam cells. Treatment with cannabidiol, a selective antagonist of GPR55, counteracted these pro-atherogenic and proinflammatory O-1602-mediated effects. Our data suggest that GPR55 could play deleterious role in ox-LDL-induced foam cells and could be a novel pharmacological target to manage atherosclerosis and other related cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25970609

  17. Selective V(1a) agonism attenuates vascular dysfunction and fluid accumulation in ovine severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Rehberg, Sebastian; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Sousse, Linda; Bartha, Eva; Jonkam, Collette; Hasselbach, Anthony K; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Westphal, Martin; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Traber, Daniel L

    2012-11-15

    Vasopressin analogs are used as a supplement to norepinephrine in septic shock. The isolated effects of vasopressin agonists on sepsis-induced vascular dysfunction, however, remain controversial. Because V(2)-receptor stimulation induces vasodilation and procoagulant effects, a higher V(1a)- versus V(2)-receptor selectivity might be advantageous. We therefore hypothesized that a sole, titrated infusion of the selective V(1a)-agonist Phe(2)-Orn(8)-Vasotocin (POV) is more effective than the mixed V(1a)-/V(2)-agonist AVP for the treatment of vascular and cardiopulmonary dysfunction in methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus pneumonia-induced, ovine sepsis. After the onset of hemodynamic instability, awake, chronically instrumented, mechanically ventilated, and fluid resuscitated sheep were randomly assigned to receive continuous infusions of either POV, AVP, or saline solution (control; each n = 6). AVP and POV were titrated to maintain mean arterial pressure above baseline - 10 mmHg. When compared with that of control animals, AVP and POV reduced neutrophil migration (myeloperoxidase activity, alveolar neutrophils) and plasma levels of nitric oxide, resulting in higher mean arterial pressures and a reduced vascular leakage (net fluid balance, chest and abdominal fluid, pulmonary bloodless wet-to-dry-weight ratio, alveolar and septal edema). Notably, POV stabilized hemodynamics at lower doses than AVP. In addition, POV, but not AVP, reduced myocardial and pulmonary tissue concentrations of 3-nitrotyrosine, VEGF, and angiopoietin-2, thereby leading to an abolishment of cumulative fluid accumulation (POV, 9 ± 15 ml/kg vs. AVP, 110 ± 13 ml/kg vs. control, 213 ± 16 ml/kg; P < 0.001 each) and an attenuated cardiopulmonary dysfunction (left ventricular stroke work index, PaO(2)-to-FiO(2) ratio) versus control animals. Highly selective V(1a)-agonism appears to be superior to unselective vasopressin analogs for the treatment of sepsis-induced vascular dysfunction. PMID

  18. Astaxanthin reduces hepatic lipid accumulations in high-fat-fed C57BL/6J mice via activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) alpha and inhibition of PPAR gamma and Akt.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yaoyao; Wu, Chunyan; Kim, Jiyoung; Kim, Bobae; Lee, Sung-Joon

    2016-02-01

    We have previously reported that astaxanthin (AX), a dietary carotenoid, directly interacts with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors PPARα and PPARγ, activating PPARα while inhibiting PPARγ, and thus reduces lipid accumulation in hepatocytes in vitro. To investigate the effects of AX in vivo, high-fat diet (HFD)-fed C57BL/6J mice were orally administered AX (6 or 30mg/kg body weight) or vehicle for 8weeks. AX significantly reduced the levels of triglyceride both in plasma and in liver compared with the control HFD mice. AX significantly improved liver histology and thus reduced both steatosis and inflammation scores of livers with hematoxylin and eosin staining. The number of inflammatory macrophages and Kupffer cells were reduced in livers by AX administration assessed with F4/80 staining. Hepatic PPARα-responsive genes involved in fatty acid uptake and β-oxidation were upregulated, whereas inflammatory genes were downregulated by AX administration. In vitro radiolabeled assays revealed that hepatic fatty acid oxidation was induced by AX administration, whereas fatty acid synthesis was not changed in hepatocytes. In mechanism studies, AX inhibited Akt activity and thus decreased SREBP1 phosphorylation and induced Insig-2a expression, both of which delayed nuclear translocation of SREBP1 and subsequent hepatic lipogenesis. Additionally, inhibition of the Akt-mTORC1 signaling axis by AX stimulated hepatic autophagy that could promote degradation of lipid droplets. These suggest that AX lowers hepatic lipid accumulation in HFD-fed mice via multiple mechanisms. In addition to the previously reported differential regulation of PPARα and PPARγ, inhibition of Akt activity and activation of hepatic autophagy reduced hepatic steatosis in mouse livers. PMID:26878778

  19. Importance of the backbone conformation of (-)-ternatin in its fat-accumulation inhibitory activity against 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, Kenichiro; Miwa, Ryoka; Yamada, Kaoru; Uemura, Daisuke

    2009-02-21

    Key relationships between the intramolecular H-bond-derived backbone conformation and the bioactivity of the novel fat-accumulation inhibitor (-)-ternatin are examined by analyses of the NMR spectroscopic data and CD spectra of designed analogues. The results reveal that the beta-turn structure of (-)-ternatin is responsible for its potent fat-accumulation inhibitory effect against 3T3-L1 murine adipocytes. PMID:19194593

  20. Ecology: accumulating threats to life

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, R.W.

    1980-04-01

    The accumulating impacts of toxic materials like polychloridnated bephenyls (PCBs), acid rain, deforestation in the Amazon River Basin, and nuclear energy are examined as life-threatening actions that the public must recognize. Immediate action is needed to abandon destructive human activities and search out those life-supporting choices which will replace immediate gratification with long-range benefits. (DCK)

  1. Accumulation of Advanced Glycation End-Products and Activation of the SCAP/SREBP Lipogenetic Pathway Occur in Diet-Induced Obese Mouse Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Mastrocola, Raffaella; Collino, Massimo; Nigro, Debora; Chiazza, Fausto; D’Antona, Giuseppe; Aragno, Manuela; Minetto, Marco A.

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this study was to investigate whether advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) accumulate in skeletal myofibers of two different animal models of diabesity and whether this accumulation could be associated to myosteatosis. Male C57Bl/6j mice and leptin-deficient ob/ob mice were divided into three groups and underwent 15 weeks of dietary manipulation: standard diet-fed C57 group (C57, n = 10), high-fat high-sugar diet-fed C57 group (HFHS, n = 10), and standard diet-fed ob/ob group (OB/OB, n = 8). HFHS mice and OB/OB mice developed glycometabolic abnormalities in association with decreased mass of the gastrocnemius muscle, fast-to-slow transition of muscle fibers, and lipid accumulation (that occurred preferentially in slow compared to fast fibers). Moreover, we found in muscle fibers of HFHS and OB/OB mice accumulation of AGEs that was preferential for the lipid-accumulating cells, increased expression of the lipogenic pathway SCAP/SREBP, and co-localisation between AGEs and SCAP-(hyper)expressing cells (suggestive for SCAP glycosylation). The increased expression of the SCAP/SREBP lipogenic pathway in muscle fibers is a possible mechanism underlying lipid accumulation and linking myosteatosis to muscle fiber atrophy and fast-to-slow transition that occur in response to diabesity. PMID:25750996

  2. Major Basic Protein from Eosinophils and Myeloperoxidase from Neutrophils Are Required for Protective Immunity to Strongyloides stercoralis in Mice ▿

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Amy E.; Hess, Jessica A.; Santiago, Gilberto A.; Nolan, Thomas J.; Lok, James B.; Lee, James J.; Abraham, David

    2011-01-01

    Eosinophils and neutrophils contribute to larval killing during the primary immune response, and neutrophils are effector cells in the secondary response to Strongyloides stercoralis in mice. The objective of this study was to determine the molecular mechanisms used by eosinophils and neutrophils to control infections with S. stercoralis. Using mice deficient in the eosinophil granule products major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), it was determined that eosinophils kill the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism in the primary immune response if other effector cells are absent. Infecting PHIL mice, which are eosinophil deficient, with S. stercoralis resulted in development of primary and secondary immune responses that were similar to those of wild-type mice, suggesting that eosinophils are not an absolute requirement for larval killing or development of secondary immunity. Treating PHIL mice with a neutrophil-depleting antibody resulted in a significant impairment in larval killing. Naïve and immunized mice with neutrophils deficient in myeloperoxidase (MPO) infected with S. stercoralis had significantly decreased larval killing. It was concluded that there is redundancy in the primary immune response, with eosinophils killing the larvae through an MBP-dependent mechanism and neutrophils killing the worms through an MPO-dependent mechanism. Eosinophils are not required for the development or function of secondary immunity, but MPO from neutrophils is required for protective secondary immunity. PMID:21482685

  3. Distinct regulation of the anterior and posterior myeloperoxidase expression by Etv2 and Gata1 during primitive Granulopoiesis in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Glenn, Nicole O; Schumacher, Jennifer A; Kim, Hyon J; Zhao, Emma J; Skerniskyte, Jurate; Sumanas, Saulius

    2014-09-01

    Neutrophilic granulocytes are the most abundant type of myeloid cells and form an essential part of the innate immune system. In vertebrates the first neutrophils are thought to originate during primitive hematopoiesis, which precedes hematopoietic stem cell formation. In zebrafish embryos, it has been suggested that primitive neutrophils may originate in two distinct sites, the anterior (ALPM) and posterior lateral plate mesoderm (PLPM). An ETS-family transcription factor Etsrp/Etv2/ER71 has been implicated in vasculogenesis and hematopoiesis in multiple vertebrates. However, its role during neutrophil development is not well understood. Here we demonstrate using zebrafish embryos that Etv2 has a specific cell-autonomous function during primitive neutropoiesis in the anterior lateral plate mesoderm (ALPM) but has little effect on erythropoiesis or the posterior lateral plate mesoderm (PLPM) expression of neutrophil marker myeloperoxidase mpo/mpx. Our results argue that ALPM-derived neutrophils originate from etv2-expressing cells which downregulate etv2 during neutropoiesis. We further show that Scl functions downstream of Etv2 in anterior neutropoiesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that mpx expression within the PLPM overlaps with gata1 expression, potentially marking the cells with a dual myelo-erythroid potential. Intriguingly, initiation of mpx expression in the PLPM is dependent on gata1 but not etv2 function. Our results demonstrate that mpx expression is controlled differently in the ALPM and PLPM regions and describe novel roles for etv2 and gata1 during primitive neutropoiesis. PMID:24956419

  4. Association between serum myeloperoxidase levels and coronary artery disease in patients without diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Hasanpour, Zahra; Javanmard, Shaghayegh Haghjooy; Gharaaty, Maryam; Sadeghi, Masoumeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an enzyme, elevated in the atheroma and serum of a patient with atherosclerotic vessels. The aim of this study is to investigate whether the serum MPO level is related to the presence of plaque in patients without risk factors, such as, diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. Materials and Methods: A serum sample was collected from patients who referred for angiography. The MPO level was measured in the serum samples of 40 patients without risk factors for atherosclerosis using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: The MPO level was 245.5 ± 13.8 (ng/ml) in patients with atherosclerosis and 213.9 ± 8.9 (ng/ml) in patients without atherosclerosis. There was a significant difference between the groups (P = 0.002). The odds ratio was 0.67 (0.95 CI, 0.17 – 2.5) for patients with and without coronary atherosclerosis. Conclusion: Although the MPO concentration is higher in patients suffering from atherosclerosis, it is not a predictor of coronary artery disease in patients without diabetes, hypertension, obesity, and hyperlipidemia. PMID:27376042

  5. Binding of human myeloperoxidase to red blood cells: Molecular targets and biophysical consequences at the plasma membrane level.

    PubMed

    Gorudko, Irina V; Sokolov, Alexey V; Shamova, Ekaterina V; Grigorieva, Daria V; Mironova, Elena V; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Gusev, Sergey A; Gusev, Alexander A; Chekanov, Andrey V; Vasilyev, Vadim B; Cherenkevich, Sergey N; Panasenko, Oleg M; Timoshenko, Alexander V

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an oxidant-producing enzyme that can also bind to cellular surface proteins. We found that band 3 protein and glycophorins A and B were the key MPO-binding targets of human red blood cells (RBCs). The interaction of MPO with RBC proteins was mostly electrostatic in nature because it was inhibited by desialation, exogenic sialic acid, high ionic strength, and extreme pH. In addition, MPO failed to interfere with the lectin-induced agglutination of RBCs, suggesting a minor role of glycan-recognizing mechanisms in MPO binding. Multiple biophysical properties of RBCs were altered in the presence of native (i.e., not hypochlorous acid-damaged) MPO. These changes included transmembrane potential, availability of intracellular Ca(2+), and lipid organization in the plasma membrane. MPO-treated erythrocytes became larger in size, structurally more rigid, and hypersensitive to acidic and osmotic hemolysis. Furthermore, we found a significant correlation between the plasma MPO concentration and RBC rigidity index in type-2 diabetes patients with coronary heart disease. These findings suggest that MPO functions as a mediator of novel regulatory mechanism in microcirculation, indicating the influence of MPO-induced abnormalities on RBC deformability under pathological stress conditions. PMID:26714302

  6. Myeloperoxidase Interacts with Endothelial Cell-Surface Cytokeratin 1 and Modulates Bradykinin Production by the Plasma Kallikrein-Kinin System

    PubMed Central

    Astern, Joshua M.; Pendergraft, William F.; Falk, Ronald J.; Jennette, J. Charles; Schmaier, Alvin H.; Mahdi, Fakhri; Preston, Gloria A.

    2007-01-01

    During an inflammatory state, functional myeloperoxidase (MPO) is released into the vessel as a result of intravascular neutrophil degradation. One mechanism of resulting cellular injury involves endothelial internalization of MPO, which causes oxidative damage and impairs endothelial signaling. We report the discovery of a protein that facilitates MPO internalization, cytokeratin 1 (CK1), identified using affinity chromatography and mass spectrometry. CK1 interacts with MPO in vitro, even in the presence of 100% human plasma, thus substantiating biological relevance. Immunofluorescent microscopy confirmed that MPO added to endothelial cells can co-localize with endogenously expressed CK1. CK1 acts as a scaffolding protein for the assembly of the vasoregulatory plasma kallikrein-kinin system; thus we explored whether MPO and high molecular weight kininogen (HK) reside on CK1 together or whether they compete for binding. The data support cooperative binding of MPO and HK on cells such that MPO masked the plasma kallikrein cleavage site on HK, and MPO-generated oxidants caused inactivation of both HK and kallikrein. Collectively, interactions between MPO and the components of the plasma kallikrein-kinin system resulted in decreased bradykinin production. This study identifies CK1 as a facilitator of MPO-mediated vascular responses and thus provides a new paradigm by which MPO affects vasoregulatory systems. PMID:17591979

  7. Detection of anti-lactoferrin antibodies and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in autoimmune hepatitis: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liming; Zhang, Yuhong; Peng, Weihua; Chen, Juanjuan; Li, Hua; Ming, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Anti-lactoferrin antibodies (ALA) and anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies (AMPA) are specific serological markers for autoimmune hepatitis (AIH). The project aimed to detect ALA and AMPA and explore their clinical significances in AIH patients. 59 AIH patients, 217 non AIH patients, and 50 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. ALA and AMPA were detected by ELISA. Antineutropil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) and anti-smooth muscle antibodies (ASMA) were examined by indirect immunofluorescence. Antimitochondrial antibody M2 subtype (AMA-M2), anti-liver kidney microsomal antibody Type 1 (LKM1), anti-liver cytosol antibody Type 1 (LC1), and anti-soluble liver antigen/liver-pancreas antibodies (SLA/LP) were tested by immunoblot. The positivity for ALA was 18.6% in AIH group, only one patient in non-AIH group was positive for ALA; the positivity for AMPA was 59.3% in AIH group, with significant differences (P < 0.01) compared with other groups. The specificities for ALA and AMPA were 99.63% and 97.75%; the sensitivities were 18.64% and 59.32%; and the accuracy rates were 84.97% and 90.80%, respectively. A certain correlation was observed between ALA and SLA/LP, AMPA and ANCA, ASMA in AIH group. ALA and AMPA were associated with AIH, and had high clinical diagnostic value. Co-detection with other relative autoantibodies could play an important role in differential diagnosis of AIH. PMID:24547729

  8. Real-time monitoring of superoxide accumulation and antioxidant activity in a brain slice model using an electrochemical cytochrome c biosensor

    PubMed Central

    Ganesana, Mallikarjunarao; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    The overproduction of reactive oxygen species and resulting damage are central to the pathology of many diseases. The study of the temporal and spatial accumulation of reactive oxygen species has been limited due to the lack of specific probes and techniques capable of continuous measurement. We demonstrate the use of a miniaturized electrochemical cytochrome C (Cyt C) biosensor for real-time measurements and quantitative assessment of superoxide production and inactivation by natural and engineered antioxidants in acutely prepared brain slices from mice. During control conditions, superoxide radicals produced from the hippocampal region of the brain in 400 μm thick sections were well within the range of detection of the electrode. Exposure of the slices to ischemic conditions increased the superoxide production two fold and measurements from the slices were stable over a 3–4 hour period. The stilbene derivative and anion channel inhibitor, 4,4′-diisothiocyano-2,2′-disulfonic stilbene (DIDS), markedly reduced the extracellular superoxide signal under control conditions suggesting that a transmembrane flux of superoxide into the extracellular space may occur as part of normal redox signaling. The specificity of the electrode for superoxide released by cells in the hippocampus was verified by the exogenous addition of superoxide dismutase (SOD) which decreased the superoxide signal in a dose-dependent manner. Similar results were seen with the addition of the SOD-mimetic, cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) where the superoxide anion radical scavenging activity of nanoceria with an average diameter of 15 nm was equivalent to 527 U of SOD for each 1 μg/ml of nanoceria added. This study demonstrates the potential of electrochemical biosensors for studying real-time dynamics of reactive oxygen species in a biological model and the utility of these measurements in defining the relative contribution of superoxide to oxidative injury. PMID:23085519

  9. Organic UV filters inhibit multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) activity in Tetrahymena thermophila: investigations by the Rhodamine 123 accumulation assay and molecular docking.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Yuan, Tao; Cheng, Peng; Zhou, Chuanqi; Ao, Junjie; Wang, Wenhua; Zhang, Haimou

    2016-09-01

    Multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) transporters, which belong to ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family proteins, are present in living organisms as a first line of defense system against xenobiotics and environmental contaminants. The effects of six organic UV filters (4-methyl -benzylidene camphor, 4-MBC; benzophenone-3, BP-3; butyl methoxydibenzoyl-methane, BM-DBM; ethylhexyl methoxy cinnamate, EHMC; octocrylene, OC and homosalate, HMS) on multixenobiotic resistance (MXR) in Tetrahymena thermophila were investigated in this study. It was found that 4-MBC, BP-3 and BM-DBM could significantly inhibit activity of the MXR system, causing concentration dependent accumulation of rhodamine 123; while EHMC, OC and HMS had weak MXR inhibition. The IC50 (50 % inhibition concentration) values of 4-MBC, BP-3 and BM-DBM were 23.54, 40.59 and 26.37 μM, respectively, with inhibitory potentials of 23.1, 13.4 and 20.6 % relative to verapamil (VER, a model inhibitor of P-glycoprotein). Our results firstly provide the evidence for UV filters inhibition effect on MXR in aquatic organisms. In addition, it was revealed by molecular docking analysis that the selected six UV filters can occupy the same binding site on T. thermophila P-gp as VER does; and form H-bonds with residues Ser 328 and/or Asn 281. This study raises the awareness of aquatic ecological risk from the organic UV filters exposure, as they would be involved in potentiating toxic effects by chemosensitizing. PMID:27315091

  10. Downregulation of a putative plastid PDC E1α subunit impairs photosynthetic activity and triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shtaida, Nastassia; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Solovchenko, Alexei; Chekanov, Konstantin; Didi-Cohen, Shoshana; Leu, Stefan; Cohen, Zvi; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-CoA, an immediate primer for the initial reactions of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Little is known about the source of acetyl-CoA in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microalgae, which are capable of producing high amounts of the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) under conditions of nutrient stresses. We generated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-1618 mutants with decreased expression of the PDC2_E1α gene, encoding the putative chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E1α, using artificial microRNA. A comparative study on the effects of PDC2_E1α silencing on FAs and TAG production in C. reinhardtii, grown photoautotrophically and mixotrophically, with and without a nitrogen source in the nutrient medium, was carried out. Reduced expression of PDC2 _E1α led to a severely hampered photoautotrophic growth phenotype with drastic impairment in TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation. In the presence of acetate, downregulation of PDC2_E1α exerted little to no effect on TAG production and photosynthetic activity. In contrast, under photoautotrophic conditions, especially in the absence of a nitrogen source, a dramatic decline in photosynthetic oxygen evolution and photosystem II quantum yield against a background of the apparent over-reduction of the photosynthetic electron chain was recorded. Our results suggest an essential role of cpPDC in the supply of carbon precursors for de novo FA synthesis in microalgae under conditions of photoautotrophy. A shortage of this supply is detrimental to the nitrogen-starvation-induced synthesis of storage TAG, an important carbon and energy sink in stressed Chlamydomonas cells, thereby impairing the acclimation ability of the microalga. PMID:25210079

  11. Downregulation of a putative plastid PDC E1α subunit impairs photosynthetic activity and triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shtaida, Nastassia; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Solovchenko, Alexei; Chekanov, Konstantin; Didi-Cohen, Shoshana; Leu, Stefan; Cohen, Zvi; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-12-01

    The chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-CoA, an immediate primer for the initial reactions of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Little is known about the source of acetyl-CoA in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microalgae, which are capable of producing high amounts of the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) under conditions of nutrient stresses. We generated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-1618 mutants with decreased expression of the PDC2_E1α gene, encoding the putative chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E1α, using artificial microRNA. A comparative study on the effects of PDC2_E1α silencing on FAs and TAG production in C. reinhardtii, grown photoautotrophically and mixotrophically, with and without a nitrogen source in the nutrient medium, was carried out. Reduced expression of PDC2 _E1α led to a severely hampered photoautotrophic growth phenotype with drastic impairment in TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation. In the presence of acetate, downregulation of PDC2_E1α exerted little to no effect on TAG production and photosynthetic activity. In contrast, under photoautotrophic conditions, especially in the absence of a nitrogen source, a dramatic decline in photosynthetic oxygen evolution and photosystem II quantum yield against a background of the apparent over-reduction of the photosynthetic electron chain was recorded. Our results suggest an essential role of cpPDC in the supply of carbon precursors for de novo FA synthesis in microalgae under conditions of photoautotrophy. A shortage of this supply is detrimental to the nitrogen-starvation-induced synthesis of storage TAG, an important carbon and energy sink in stressed Chlamydomonas cells, thereby impairing the acclimation ability of the microalga. PMID:25210079

  12. Nutrient-contaminant (Pu) plant accumulation model

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, C.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Simpson, J.C.; Cataldo, D.A.

    1981-12-01

    A model was developed which simulates the movement and daily accumulation of nutrients and contaminants in crop plants resulting from known physiological processes in the plant. In the model, the daily contaminant accumulation is governed by daily increase in plant biomass derived from photosynthesis and by the specified thermodynamic activity of the bioavailable contaminant species in soil or hydroponic solutin. Total accumulation and resulting concentration in the plant's root, stem and branch, leaf, and reproductive compartments can be simulated any time during the growing season. Parameters were estimated from data on plutonium accumulation in soybeans and the model was calibrated against this same data set. The plutonium distribution in the plant was found to be most sensitive to parameters related to leaf accumulation. Contamination at different times during the growing season resulted in a large change in predicted leaf accumulation but very little change in predicted accumulation in other plant parts except when contamination occurred very late in the growing season.

  13. Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 mediates hypoxia-induced cardiomyocyte lipid accumulation by reducing the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha}/retinoid X receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, Adam J.; Luo Zhengyu; Vincent, Karen A.; Akita, Geoffrey Y.; Cheng, Seng H.; Gregory, Richard J.; Jiang Canwen

    2007-12-21

    In response to cellular hypoxia, cardiomyocytes adapt to consume less oxygen by shifting ATP production from mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation to glycolysis. The transcriptional activation of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes by hypoxia is mediated by hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1). In this study, we examined whether HIF-1 was involved in the suppression of mitochondrial fatty acid {beta}-oxidation in hypoxic cardiomyocytes. We showed that either hypoxia or adenovirus-mediated expression of a constitutively stable hybrid form (HIF-1{alpha}/VP16) suppressed mitochondrial fatty acid metabolism, as indicated by an accumulation of intracellular neutral lipid. Both treatments also reduced the mRNA levels of muscle carnitine palmitoyltransferase I which catalyzes the rate-limiting step in the mitochondrial import of fatty acids for {beta}-oxidation. Furthermore, adenovirus-mediated expression of HIF-1{alpha}/VP16 in cardiomyocytes under normoxic conditions also mimicked the reduction in the DNA binding activity of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {alpha} (PPAR{alpha})/retinoid X receptor (RXR), in the presence or absence of a PPAR{alpha} ligand. These results suggest that HIF-1 may be involved in hypoxia-induced suppression of fatty acid metabolism in cardiomyocytes by reducing the DNA binding activity of PPAR{alpha}/RXR.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase (MAPKKK) 4 from rapeseed (Brassica napus L.) is a novel member inducing ROS accumulation and cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Ye, Chaofei; Zhao, Rui; Li, Xin; Liu, Wu-zhen; Wu, Feifei; Yan, Jingli; Jiang, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Bo

    2015-11-27

    MAPKKK is the largest family of MAPK cascade, which is known to play important roles in plant growth, development and immune responses. So far, only a few have been functionally characterized even in the model plant, Arabidopsis due to the potential functional redundancy of MAPKKK. We previously identified and cloned a few MAPKKK family genes from rapeseed. In this study, BnaMAPKKK4 was characterized as a member in eliciting accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and hypersensitive response (HR)-like cell death. This is accompanied with accumulation of malondialdehyde (MDA), anthocyanin as well as nuclear DNA fragmentation. The transcript abundance of a series of ROS accumulation, cell death, and defense response related genes were up-regulated by the expression of MAPKKK4. Further investigation identified BnaMAPKKK4 elicited ROS through the downstream MPK3. These results indicate that BnaMAPKKK4 and its downstream components function in the ROS-induced cell death. PMID:26498521

  15. Solids Accumulation Scouting Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Duignan, M. R.; Steeper, T. J.; Steimke, J. L.

    2012-09-26

    The objective of Solids Accumulation activities was to perform scaled testing to understand the behavior of remaining solids in a Double Shell Tank (DST), specifically AW-105, at Hanford during multiple fill, mix, and transfer operations. It is important to know if fissionable materials can concentrate when waste is transferred from staging tanks prior to feeding waste treatment plants. Specifically, there is a concern that large, dense particles containing plutonium could accumulate in poorly mixed regions of a blend tank heel for tanks that employ mixing jet pumps. At the request of the DOE Hanford Tank Operations Contractor, Washington River Protection Solutions, the Engineering Development Laboratory of the Savannah River National Laboratory performed a scouting study in a 1/22-scale model of a waste staging tank to investigate this concern and to develop measurement techniques that could be applied in a more extensive study at a larger scale. Simulated waste tank solids: Gibbsite, Zirconia, Sand, and Stainless Steel, with stainless steel particles representing the heavier particles, e.g., plutonium, and supernatant were charged to the test tank and rotating liquid jets were used to mix most of the solids while the simulant was pumped out. Subsequently, the volume and shape of the mounds of residual solids and the spatial concentration profiles for the surrogate for heavier particles were measured. Several techniques were developed and equipment designed to accomplish the measurements needed and they included: 1. Magnetic particle separator to remove simulant stainless steel solids. A device was designed and built to capture these solids, which represent the heavier solids during a waste transfer from a staging tank. 2. Photographic equipment to determine the volume of the solids mounds. The mounds were photographed as they were exposed at different tank waste levels to develop a composite of topographical areas. 3. Laser rangefinders to determine the volume of

  16. Oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces β-amyloid 1-42 overproduction and mitochondrial accumulation by activating the amyloidogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, L F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2015-09-24

    Oxidative stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has been suggested to be the trigger of AD pathology. However, whether oxidative damage precedes and contributes directly to the intracellular accumulation of beta amyloid 1-42 (βA42) peptide remains a matter of debate. Chronic exposure to low doses of ozone similar to the levels during a day of high pollution in México City causes a state of oxidative stress that elicits progressive neurodegeneration in the hippocampi of rats. Several reports have demonstrated that the mitochondria are among the first organelles to be affected by oxidative stress and βA42 toxicity and act as sites of the accumulation of βA42, which affects energy metabolism. However, the mechanisms related to the neurodegeneration process and organelle damage that occur in conditions of chronic exposure to low doses of ozone have not been demonstrated. To analyze the effect of chronic ozone chronic exposure on changes in the production and accumulation of the βA42 and βA40 peptides in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons of rats exposed to ozone, we examined the mitochondrial expression levels of Presenilins 1 and 2 and ADAM10 to detect changes related to the oxidative stress caused by low doses of ozone (0.25ppm). The results revealed significant accumulations of βA42 peptide in the mitochondrial fractions on days 60 and 90 of ozone exposure along with reductions in beta amyloid 1-40 accumulation, significant overexpressions of Pres2 and significant reductions in ADAM10 expression. Beta amyloid immunodetection revealed that there were some intracellular deposits of βA42 and that βA42 and the mitochondrial markers OPA1 and COX1 colocalized. These results indicate that the time of exposure to ozone and the accumulation of βA42 in the mitochondria of the hippocampal cells of rats were correlated. Our results suggest that the accumulation of the βA42 peptide may promote mitochondrial dysfunction due to its

  17. Bilirubin scavenges chloramines and inhibits myeloperoxidase-induced protein/lipid oxidation in physiologically relevant hyperbilirubinemic serum.

    PubMed

    Boon, A C; Hawkins, C L; Coombes, J S; Wagner, K H; Bulmer, A C

    2015-09-01

    Hypochlorous acid (HOCl), an oxidant produced by myeloperoxidase (MPO), induces protein and lipid oxidation, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Individuals with mildly elevated bilirubin concentrations (i.e., Gilbert syndrome; GS) are protected from atherosclerosis, cardiovascular disease, and related mortality. We aimed to investigate whether exogenous/endogenous unconjugated bilirubin (UCB), at physiological concentrations, can protect proteins/lipids from oxidation induced by reagent and enzymatically generated HOCl. Serum/plasma samples supplemented with exogenous UCB (≤250µM) were assessed for their susceptibility to HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) oxidation, by measuring chloramine, protein carbonyl, and malondialdehyde (MDA) formation. Serum/plasma samples from hyperbilirubinemic Gunn rats and humans with GS were also exposed to MPO/H2O2/Cl(-) to: (1) validate in vitro data and (2) determine the relevance of endogenously elevated UCB in preventing protein and lipid oxidation. Exogenous UCB dose-dependently (P<0.05) inhibited HOCl and MPO/H2O2/Cl(-)-induced chloramine formation. Albumin-bound UCB efficiently and specifically (3.9-125µM; P<0.05) scavenged taurine, glycine, and N-α-acetyllysine chloramines. These results were translated into Gunn rat and GS serum/plasma, which showed significantly (P<0.01) reduced chloramine formation after MPO-induced oxidation. Protein carbonyl and MDA formation was also reduced after MPO oxidation in plasma supplemented with UCB (P<0.05; 25 and 50µM, respectively). Significant inhibition of protein and lipid oxidation was demonstrated within the physiological range of UCB, providing a hypothetical link to protection from atherosclerosis in hyperbilirubinemic individuals. These data demonstrate a novel and physiologically relevant mechanism whereby UCB could inhibit protein and lipid modification by quenching chloramines induced by MPO-induced HOCl. PMID:26057938

  18. Temporal resolution of misfolded prion protein transport, accumulation, glial activation, and neuronal death in the retinas of mice inoculated with scrapie: relevance to biomarkers of prion disease progression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Currently, there is a lack of pathologic landmarks to describe the progression of prion disease in vivo. The goal of this work was to determine the temporal relationship between the transport of misfolded prion protein from the brain to the retina, the accumulation of PrPSc in the retina, the respon...

  19. Fast carry accumulator design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mastin, W. C.

    1971-01-01

    Simple iterative accumulator combined with gated-carry, carry-completion detection, and skip-carry circuits produces three accumulators with decreased carry propagation times. Devices are used in machine control, measurement equipment, and computer applications to increase speed of binary addition. NAND gates are used in combining network.

  20. Discovery of 2-(6-(5-Chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999): A Highly Selective Mechanism-Based Myeloperoxidase Inhibitor for the Treatment of Cardiovascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Bagley, Scott W; Carpino, Philip A; Conn, Edward L; Dowling, Matthew S; Fernando, Dilinie P; Jiao, Wenhua; Kung, Daniel W; Orr, Suvi T M; Qi, Yingmei; Rocke, Benjamin N; Smith, Aaron; Warmus, Joseph S; Zhang, Yan; Bowles, Daniel; Widlicka, Daniel W; Eng, Heather; Ryder, Tim; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Okerberg, Carlin; Walters, Karen; Maurer, Tristan S; Zhang, Yanwei; Bonin, Paul D; Spath, Samantha N; Xing, Gang; Hepworth, David; Ahn, Kay; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2015-11-12

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a heme peroxidase that catalyzes the production of hypochlorous acid. Clinical evidence suggests a causal role for MPO in various autoimmune and inflammatory disorders including vasculitis and cardiovascular and Parkinson's diseases, implying that MPO inhibitors may represent a therapeutic treatment option. Herein, we present the design, synthesis, and preclinical evaluation of N1-substituted-6-arylthiouracils as potent and selective inhibitors of MPO. Inhibition proceeded in a time-dependent manner by a covalent, irreversible mechanism, which was dependent upon MPO catalysis, consistent with mechanism-based inactivation. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils exhibited low partition ratios and high selectivity for MPO over thyroid peroxidase and cytochrome P450 isoforms. N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils also demonstrated inhibition of MPO activity in lipopolysaccharide-stimulated human whole blood. Robust inhibition of plasma MPO activity was demonstrated with the lead compound 2-(6-(5-chloro-2-methoxyphenyl)-4-oxo-2-thioxo-3,4-dihydropyrimidin-1(2H)-yl)acetamide (PF-06282999, 8) upon oral administration to lipopolysaccharide-treated cynomolgus monkeys. On the basis of its pharmacological and pharmacokinetic profile, PF-06282999 has been advanced to first-in-human pharmacokinetic and safety studies. PMID:26509551

  1. Lithium stimulates glutamate "release" and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate accumulation via activation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor in monkey and mouse cerebral cortex slices.

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, J F; Los, G V; Hokin, L E

    1994-01-01

    Beginning at therapeutic concentrations (1-1.5 mM), the anti-manic-depressive drug lithium stimulated the release of glutamate, a major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, in monkey cerebral cortex slices in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, and this was associated with increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate [Ins(1,4,5)P3] accumulation. (+/-)-3-(2-Carboxypiperazin-4-yl)propyl-1-phosphoric acid (CPP), dizocilpine (MK-801), ketamine, and Mg(2+)-antagonists to the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor/channel complex selectively inhibited lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Antagonists to cholinergic-muscarinic, alpha 1-adrenergic, 5-hydroxytryptamine2 (serotoninergic), and H1 histaminergic receptors had no effect. Antagonists to non-NMDA glutamate receptors had no effect on lithium-stimulated Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation. Possible reasons for this are discussed. Similar results were obtained in mouse cerebral cortex slices. Carbetapentane, which inhibits glutamate release, inhibited lithium-induced Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation in this model. It is concluded that the primary effect of lithium in the cerebral cortex slice model is stimulation of glutamate release, which, presumably via activation of the NMDA receptor, leads to Ca2+ entry. Ins(1,4,5)P3 accumulation increases due to the presumed increased influx of intracellular Ca2+, which activates phospholipase C. These effects may have relevance to the therapeutic action of lithium in the treatment of manic depression as well as its toxic effects, especially at lithium blood levels above 1.5 mM. Images PMID:8078888

  2. Impact of land-use and long-term (>150 years) charcoal accumulation on microbial activity, biomass and community structure in temperate soils (Belgium).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardy, Brieuc; Cornelis, Jean-Thomas; Dufey, Joseph E.

    2015-04-01

    In the last decade, biochar has been increasingly investigated as a soil amendment for long-term soil carbon sequestration while improving soil fertility. On the short term, biochar application to soil generally increases soil respiration as well as microbial biomass and activity and affects significantly the microbial community structure. However, such effects are relatively short-term and tend to vanish over time. In our study, we investigated the long-term impact of charcoal accumulation and land-use on soil biota in temperate haplic Luvisols developed in the loess belt of Wallonia (Belgium). Charcoal-enriched soils were collected in the topsoil of pre-industrial (>150 years old) charcoal kilns in forest (4 sites) and cropland (5 sites). The topsoil of the adjacent charcoal-unaffected soils was sampled in a comparable way. Soils were characterized (pH, total, organic and inorganic C, total N, exchangeable Ca, Mg, K, Na, cation exchange capacity and available P) and natural soil organic matter (SOM) and black carbon (BC) contents were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. After rewetting at pF 2.5, soils were incubated during 140 days at 20 °C. At 70 days of incubation, 10 g of each soil were freeze dried in order to measure total microbial biomass and community structure by PLFA analysis. The PLFA dataset was analyzed by principal component analysis (PCA) while soil parameters were used as supplementary variables. For both agricultural and forest soils, the respiration rate is highly related to the total microbial biomass (R²=0.90). Both soil respiration and microbial biomass greatly depend on the SOM content, which indicates that the BC pool is relatively inert microbiologically. Land-use explains most of the variance in the PLFA dataset, largely governing the first principal component of the ACP. In forest soils, we observe a larger proportion of gram + bacteria, actinomycetes and an increased bacteria:fungi ratio compared to cropland, where gram

  3. Procainamide, but not N-Acetylprocainamide, Induces Protein Free Radical Formation on Myeloperoxidase: A Potential Mechanism of Agranulocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Siraki, Arno G.; Deterding, Leesa J.; Bonini, Marcelo G.; Jiang, JinJie; Ehrenshaft, Marilyn; Tomer, Kenneth B.; Mason, Ronald P.

    2009-01-01

    Procainamide (PA) is a drug that is used to treat tachycardia in post-operative patients or for long term maintenance of cardiac arrythmias. Unfortunately, its use has also been associated with agranulocytosis. Here we have investigated the metabolism of PA by myeloperoxidase (MPO) and the formation of an MPO protein free radical. We hypothesized that PA oxidation by MPO/H2O2 would produce a PA cation radical that, in the absence of a biochemical reductant, would lead to the free-radical oxidation of MPO. We utilized a novel anti-DMPO antibody to detect DMPO (5,5-dimethyl-1-pyrroline N-oxide) covalently bound to protein, which forms only by the reaction of DMPO with a protein free radical. We found that PA metabolism by MPO/H2O2 induced the formation of DMPO-MPO, which was inhibited by MPO inhibitors and ascorbate. N-acetyl-PA did not cause DMPO-MPO formation, indicating that the unsubstituted aromatic amine was more oxidizable. PA had a lower calculated ionization potential than N-acetyl-PA. The DMPO adducts of MPO metabolism, as analyzed by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, included a nitrogen-centered radical and a phenyl radical derived from PA, either of which may be involved in the free radical formation on MPO. Furthermore, we also found protein-DMPO adducts in MPO-containing, intact human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60). MPO was affinity-purified from HL-60 cells treated with PA/H2O2 and was found to contain DMPO using the anti-DMPO antibody. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the identity of the protein as human MPO. These findings were also supported by the detection of protein free radicals with electron spin resonance in the cellular cytosolic lysate. The formation of an MPO protein free radical is believed to be mediated by free radical metabolites of PA, which we characterized by spin trapping. We propose that drug-induced free radical formation on MPO may play a role in the origin of agranulocytosis. PMID:18489081

  4. Effects of native and myeloperoxidase-modified apolipoprotein A-I on reverse cholesterol transport and atherosclerosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hewing, Bernd; Parathath, Saj; Barrett, Tessa; Chung, Wing Ki Kellie; Astudillo, Yaritzy M.; Hamada, Tadateru; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Tallant, Thomas C.; Yusufishaq, Mohamed Shaif S.; DiDonato, Joseph A.; Huang, Ying; Buffa, Jennifer; Berisha, Stela Z.; Smith, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Stanley L.; Fisher, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Preclinical and clinical studies have shown beneficial effects of infusions of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) on atherosclerosis. ApoA-I is also a target for myeloperoxidase (MPO)-mediated oxidation, leading in vitro to a loss of its ability to promote ABCA1-dependent macrophage cholesterol efflux. Therefore, we hypothesized that MPO-mediated ApoA-I oxidation would impair its promotion of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT) in vivo and the beneficial effects on atherosclerotic plaques. Approach and Results ApoA-I−/− or ApoE−/− mice were subcutaneously injected with native human ApoA-I, oxidized human ApoA-I (oxApoAI; MPO/hydrogen peroxide/chloride treated) or carrier. While early post injection (8 hours) levels of total ApoA-I in plasma were similar for native versus oxApoA-I, native ApoA-I primarily resided within the HDL fraction, whereas the majority of oxApoA-I was highly cross-linked and not HDL particle associated, consistent with impaired ABCA1 interaction. In ApoA-I−/− mice, ApoA-I oxidation significantly impaired RCT in vivo. In advanced aortic root atherosclerotic plaques of ApoE−/− mice, native ApoA-I injections led to significant decreases in lipid content, macrophage number, and an increase in collagen content; in contrast, oxApoA-I failed to mediate these changes. The decrease in plaque macrophages with native ApoA-I was accompanied by significant induction of their chemokine receptor CCR7. Furthermore, only native ApoA-I injections led to a significant reduction of inflammatory M1 and increase in anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage markers in the plaques. Conclusions MPO-mediated oxidation renders ApoA-I dysfunctional and unable to: (i) promote RCT; (ii) mediate beneficial changes in the composition of atherosclerotic plaques; and (iii) pacify the inflammatory status of plaque macrophages. PMID:24407029

  5. Species Differences in the Oxidative Desulfurization of a Thiouracil-Based Irreversible Myeloperoxidase Inactivator by Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Eng, Heather; Sharma, Raman; Wolford, Angela; Di, Li; Ruggeri, Roger B; Buckbinder, Leonard; Conn, Edward L; Dalvie, Deepak K; Kalgutkar, Amit S

    2016-08-01

    N1-Substituted-6-arylthiouracils, represented by compound 1 [6-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-1-(2-hydroxyethyl)-2-thioxo-2,3-dihydropyrimidin-4(1H)-one], are a novel class of selective irreversible inhibitors of human myeloperoxidase. The present account is a summary of our in vitro studies on the facile oxidative desulfurization in compound 1 to a cyclic ether metabolite M1 [5-(2,4-dimethoxyphenyl)-2,3-dihydro-7H-oxazolo[3,2-a]pyrimidin-7-one] in NADPH-supplemented rats (t1/2 [half-life = mean ± S.D.] = 8.6 ± 0.4 minutes) and dog liver microsomes (t1/2 = 11.2 ± 0.4 minutes), but not in human liver microsomes (t1/2 > 120 minutes). The in vitro metabolic instability also manifested in moderate-to-high plasma clearances of the parent compound in rats and dogs with significant concentrations of M1 detected in circulation. Mild heat deactivation of liver microsomes or coincubation with the flavin-containing monooxygenase (FMO) inhibitor imipramine significantly diminished M1 formation. In contrast, oxidative metabolism of compound 1 to M1 was not inhibited by the pan cytochrome P450 inactivator 1-aminobenzotriazole. Incubations with recombinant FMO isoforms (FMO1, FMO3, and FMO5) revealed that FMO1 principally catalyzed the conversion of compound 1 to M1. FMO1 is not expressed in adult human liver, which rationalizes the species difference in oxidative desulfurization. Oxidation by FMO1 followed Michaelis-Menten kinetics with Michaelis-Menten constant, maximum rate of oxidative desulfurization, and intrinsic clearance values of 209 μM, 20.4 nmol/min/mg protein, and 82.7 μl/min/mg protein, respectively. Addition of excess glutathione essentially eliminated the conversion of compound 1 to M1 in NADPH-supplemented rat and dog liver microsomes, which suggests that the initial FMO1-mediated S-oxygenation of compound 1 yields a sulfenic acid intermediate capable of redox cycling to the parent compound in a glutathione-dependent fashion or undergoing further oxidation to a more

  6. (Accumulation of methyl-deficient rat liver messenger ribonucleic acid on ethionine administration). Progress report. [Methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites tumor cells and effects of phorbol ester on methyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Borek, E.

    1980-01-01

    Enzyme fractions were isolated from Ehrlich ascites cells which introduced methyl groups into methyl deficient rat liver mRNA and unmethylated vaccinia mRNA. The methyl groups were incorporated at the 5' end into cap 1 structures by the viral enzyme, whereas both cap 0 and cap 1 structures were formed by the Ehrlich ascites cell enzymes. Preliminary results indicate the presence of adenine N/sup 6/-methyltransferase activity in Ehrlich ascites cells. These results indicate that mRNA deficient in 5'-cap methylation and in internal methylation of adenine accumulated in rats on exposure to ethionine. The methyl-deficient mRNA isolated from the liver of ethionine-fed rats differed in its translational properties from mRNA isolated from control animals. Preliminary experiments indicate that single topical application of 17n moles of TPA to mouse skin altered tRNA methyltransferases. The extent of methylation was increased over 2-fold in mouse skin treated with TPA for 48 hours. These changes have been observed as early as 12 hours following TPA treatment. In contrast, the application of initiating dose of DMBA had no effect on these enzymes. It should be emphasized that the changes in tRNA methyltransferases produced by TPA are not merely an increase of the concentration of the enzyme, rather that they represent alterations of specificity of a battery of enzymes. In turn the change in enzyme specificity can produce alterations in the structure of tRNA. (ERB)

  7. Association among active seafloor deformation, mound formation, and gas hydrate growth and accumulation within the seafloor of the Santa Monica Basin, offshore California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Normark, W.R.; Ussler, W., III; Caress, D.W.; Keaten, R.

    2008-01-01

    Seafloor blister-like mounds, methane migration and gas hydrate formation were investigated through detailed seafloor surveys in Santa Monica Basin, offshore of Los Angeles, California. Two distinct deep-water (??? 800??m water depth) topographic mounds were surveyed using an autonomous underwater vehicle (carrying a multibeam sonar and a chirp sub-bottom profiler) and one of these was explored with the remotely operated vehicle Tiburon. The mounds are > 10??m high and > 100??m wide dome-shaped bathymetric features. These mounds protrude from crests of broad anticlines (~ 20??m high and 1 to 3??km long) formed within latest Quaternary-aged seafloor sediment associated with compression between lateral offsets in regional faults. No allochthonous sediments were observed on the mounds, except slumped material off the steep slopes of the mounds. Continuous streams of methane gas bubbles emanate from the crest of the northeastern mound, and extensive methane-derived authigenic carbonate pavements and chemosynthetic communities mantle the mound surface. The large local vertical displacements needed to produce these mounds suggests a corresponding net mass accumulation has occurred within the immediate subsurface. Formation and accumulation of pure gas hydrate lenses in the subsurface is proposed as a mechanism to blister the seafloor and form these mounds. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation Information Page Synonym(s): Hallervorden-Spatz Disease, ... done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Neurodegeneration with Brain Iron Accumulation? Neurodegeneration with brain iron accumulation (NBIA) ...

  9. Plastids and Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Yuan, Hui; Zeng, Yunliu; Xu, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Plastids are ubiquitously present in plants and are the organelles for carotenoid biosynthesis and storage. Based on their morphology and function, plastids are classified into various types, i.e. proplastids, etioplasts, chloroplasts, amyloplasts, and chromoplasts. All plastids, except proplastids, can synthesize carotenoids. However, plastid types have a profound effect on carotenoid accumulation and stability. In this chapter, we discuss carotenoid biosynthesis and regulation in various plastids with a focus on carotenoids in chromoplasts. Plastid transition related to carotenoid biosynthesis and the different capacity of various plastids to sequester carotenoids and the associated effect on carotenoid stability are described in light of carotenoid accumulation in plants. PMID:27485226

  10. Inhibition of Macrophage CD36 Expression and Cellular Oxidized Low Density Lipoprotein (oxLDL) Accumulation by Tamoxifen: A PEROXISOME PROLIFERATOR-ACTIVATED RECEPTOR (PPAR)γ-DEPENDENT MECHANISM.

    PubMed

    Yu, Miao; Jiang, Meixiu; Chen, Yuanli; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Wenwen; Yang, Xiaoxiao; Li, Xiaoju; Li, Yan; Duan, Shengzhong; Han, Jihong; Duan, Yajun

    2016-08-12

    Macrophage CD36 binds and internalizes oxidized low density lipoprotein (oxLDL) to facilitate foam cell formation. CD36 expression is activated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Tamoxifen, an anti-breast cancer medicine, has demonstrated pleiotropic functions including cardioprotection with unfully elucidated mechanisms. In this study, we determined that treatment of ApoE-deficient mice with tamoxifen reduced atherosclerosis, which was associated with decreased CD36 and PPARγ expression in lesion areas. At the cellular level, we observed that tamoxifen inhibited CD36 protein expression in human THP-1 monocytes, THP-1/PMA macrophages, and human blood monocyte-derived macrophages. Associated with decreased CD36 protein expression, tamoxifen reduced cellular oxLDL accumulation in a CD36-dependent manner. At the transcriptional level, tamoxifen decreased CD36 mRNA expression, promoter activity, and the binding of the PPARγ response element in CD36 promoter to PPARγ protein. Tamoxifen blocked ligand-induced PPARγ nuclear translocation and CD36 expression, but it increased PPARγ phosphorylation, which was due to that tamoxifen-activated ERK1/2. Furthermore, deficiency of PPARγ expression in macrophages abolished the inhibitory effect of tamoxifen on CD36 expression or cellular oxLDL accumulation both in vitro and in vivo Taken together, our study demonstrates that tamoxifen inhibits CD36 expression and cellular oxLDL accumulation by inactivating the PPARγ signaling pathway, and the inhibition of macrophage CD36 expression can be attributed to the anti-atherogenic properties of tamoxifen. PMID:27358406

  11. Time profile of oxidative stress and neutrophil activation in ovine acute lung injury and sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lange, Matthias; Szabo, Csaba; Traber, Daniel L; Horvath, Eszter; Hamahata, Atsumori; Nakano, Yoshimitsu; Traber, Lillian D; Cox, Robert A; Schmalstieg, Frank C; Herndon, David N; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei

    2012-05-01

    The formation of oxidative stress in the lung and activation of neutrophils are major determinants in the development of respiratory failure after acute lung injury and sepsis. However, the time changes of these pathogenic factors have not been sufficiently described. Twenty-four chronically instrumented sheep were subjected to cotton smoke inhalation injury and instillation of live Pseudomonas aeruginosa into both lungs. The sheep were euthanized at 4, 8, 12, 18, and 24 h after injury. Additional sheep received sham injury and were euthanized after 24 h. Pulmonary function was assessed by determination of oxygenation index and pulmonary shunt fraction. In addition, lung tissue was harvested at the respective time points for the measurement of malondialdehyde, interleukin 6, poly(ADP ribose), myeloperoxidase, and alveolar polymorphonuclear neutrophil score. The injury induced severe respiratory failure that was associated with an early increase in lipid peroxidation and interleukin 6 expression. The injury further led to an increase in poly(ADP ribose) activity that reached its peak at 12 h after injury and declined afterward. In addition, progressive increases in markers of neutrophil accumulation in the lung were observed. The peak of neutrophil accumulation in the lung was associated with a severe depletion of circulating neutrophils. The results from our model may enhance the understanding of the pathophysiological alterations after acute lung injury and sepsis and thus be useful in exploring therapeutic interventions directed at modifying the expression or activation of inflammatory mediators. PMID:22266977

  12. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing.

    PubMed

    Kühl, Hjalmar S; Kalan, Ammie K; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D'Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  13. Chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing

    PubMed Central

    Kühl, Hjalmar S.; Kalan, Ammie K.; Arandjelovic, Mimi; Aubert, Floris; D’Auvergne, Lucy; Goedmakers, Annemarie; Jones, Sorrel; Kehoe, Laura; Regnaut, Sebastien; Tickle, Alexander; Ton, Els; van Schijndel, Joost; Abwe, Ekwoge E.; Angedakin, Samuel; Agbor, Anthony; Ayimisin, Emmanuel Ayuk; Bailey, Emma; Bessone, Mattia; Bonnet, Matthieu; Brazolla, Gregory; Buh, Valentine Ebua; Chancellor, Rebecca; Cipoletta, Chloe; Cohen, Heather; Corogenes, Katherine; Coupland, Charlotte; Curran, Bryan; Deschner, Tobias; Dierks, Karsten; Dieguez, Paula; Dilambaka, Emmanuel; Diotoh, Orume; Dowd, Dervla; Dunn, Andrew; Eshuis, Henk; Fernandez, Rumen; Ginath, Yisa; Hart, John; Hedwig, Daniela; Ter Heegde, Martijn; Hicks, Thurston Cleveland; Imong, Inaoyom; Jeffery, Kathryn J.; Junker, Jessica; Kadam, Parag; Kambi, Mohamed; Kienast, Ivonne; Kujirakwinja, Deo; Langergraber, Kevin; Lapeyre, Vincent; Lapuente, Juan; Lee, Kevin; Leinert, Vera; Meier, Amelia; Maretti, Giovanna; Marrocoli, Sergio; Mbi, Tanyi Julius; Mihindou, Vianet; Moebius, Yasmin; Morgan, David; Morgan, Bethan; Mulindahabi, Felix; Murai, Mizuki; Niyigabae, Protais; Normand, Emma; Ntare, Nicolas; Ormsby, Lucy Jayne; Piel, Alex; Pruetz, Jill; Rundus, Aaron; Sanz, Crickette; Sommer, Volker; Stewart, Fiona; Tagg, Nikki; Vanleeuwe, Hilde; Vergnes, Virginie; Willie, Jacob; Wittig, Roman M.; Zuberbuehler, Klaus; Boesch, Christophe

    2016-01-01

    The study of the archaeological remains of fossil hominins must rely on reconstructions to elucidate the behaviour that may have resulted in particular stone tools and their accumulation. Comparatively, stone tool use among living primates has illuminated behaviours that are also amenable to archaeological examination, permitting direct observations of the behaviour leading to artefacts and their assemblages to be incorporated. Here, we describe newly discovered stone tool-use behaviour and stone accumulation sites in wild chimpanzees reminiscent of human cairns. In addition to data from 17 mid- to long-term chimpanzee research sites, we sampled a further 34 Pan troglodytes communities. We found four populations in West Africa where chimpanzees habitually bang and throw rocks against trees, or toss them into tree cavities, resulting in conspicuous stone accumulations at these sites. This represents the first record of repeated observations of individual chimpanzees exhibiting stone tool use for a purpose other than extractive foraging at what appear to be targeted trees. The ritualized behavioural display and collection of artefacts at particular locations observed in chimpanzee accumulative stone throwing may have implications for the inferences that can be drawn from archaeological stone assemblages and the origins of ritual sites. PMID:26923684

  14. Accumulation of the planets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherill, G. W.

    1987-01-01

    In modeling the accumulation of planetesimals into planets, it is appropriate to distinguish between two stages: an early stage, during which approximately 10 km diameter planetesimals accumulate locally to form bodies approxi