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Sample records for accumulation oxidative stress

  1. Iron accumulation with age, oxidative stress and functional decline.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jinze; Knutson, Mitchell D; Carter, Christy S; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength) in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age) at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR) rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects.

  2. Iron Accumulation with Age, Oxidative Stress and Functional Decline

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jinze; Knutson, Mitchell D.; Carter, Christy S.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2008-01-01

    Identification of biological mediators in sarcopenia is pertinent to the development of targeted interventions to alleviate this condition. Iron is recognized as a potent pro-oxidant and a catalyst for the formation of reactive oxygen species in biological systems. It is well accepted that iron accumulates with senescence in several organs, but little is known about iron accumulation in muscle and how it may affect muscle function. In addition, it is unclear if interventions which reduced age-related loss of muscle quality, such as calorie restriction, impact iron accumulation. We investigated non-heme iron concentration, oxidative stress to nucleic acids in gastrocnemius muscle and key indices of sarcopenia (muscle mass and grip strength) in male Fischer 344 X Brown Norway rats fed ad libitum (AL) or a calorie restricted diet (60% of ad libitum food intake starting at 4 months of age) at 8, 18, 29 and 37 months of age. Total non-heme iron levels in the gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats increased progressively with age. Between 29 and 37 months of age, the non-heme iron concentration increased by approximately 200% in AL-fed rats. Most importantly, the levels of oxidized RNA in gastrocnemius muscle of AL rats were significantly increased as well. The striking age-associated increase in non-heme iron and oxidized RNA levels and decrease in sarcopenia indices were all attenuated in the calorie restriction (CR) rats. These findings strongly suggest that the age-related iron accumulation in muscle contributes to increased oxidative damage and sarcopenia, and that CR effectively attenuates these negative effects. PMID:18682742

  3. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance.

  4. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C.; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A.; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27379130

  5. Accumulation of Flavonols over Hydroxycinnamic Acids Favors Oxidative Damage Protection under Abiotic Stress.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Vicente; Mestre, Teresa C; Rubio, Francisco; Girones-Vilaplana, Amadeo; Moreno, Diego A; Mittler, Ron; Rivero, Rosa M

    2016-01-01

    Efficient detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is thought to play a key role in enhancing the tolerance of plants to abiotic stresses. Although multiple pathways, enzymes, and antioxidants are present in plants, their exact roles during different stress responses remain unclear. Here, we report on the characterization of the different antioxidant mechanisms of tomato plants subjected to heat stress, salinity stress, or a combination of both stresses. All the treatments applied induced an increase of oxidative stress, with the salinity treatment being the most aggressive, resulting in plants with the lowest biomass, and the highest levels of H2O2 accumulation, lipid peroxidation, and protein oxidation. However, the results obtained from the transcript expression study and enzymatic activities related to the ascorbate-glutathione pathway did not fully explain the differences in the oxidative damage observed between salinity and the combination of salinity and heat. An exhaustive metabolomics study revealed the differential accumulation of phenolic compounds depending on the type of abiotic stress applied. An analysis at gene and enzyme levels of the phenylpropanoid metabolism concluded that under conditions where flavonols accumulated to a greater degree as compared to hydroxycinnamic acids, the oxidative damage was lower, highlighting the importance of flavonols as powerful antioxidants, and their role in abiotic stress tolerance. PMID:27379130

  6. The association of very high hair manganese accumulation and high oxidative stress in Mongolian people.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Fumio; Kagawa, Yasuo; Ishiguro, Kiyomi; Kawabata, Terue; Purvee, Baatar; Otgon, Jugder; Chimedregzen, Ulziiburen

    2009-03-01

    Oxidative stress induces several diseases and early aging. Previously, we reported that Mongolians are exposed in high oxidative stress, which may cause their early aging. In this study, to know the reason of high oxidative stress, we measured hair metals. This investigation was performed in Murun city, in the northern area of this country, and 469 healthy subjects, ranging from 10 to 82 years of age, were randomly enrolled. Oxidative stress was evaluated by the levels of serum reactive oxygen metabolites (ROM), malondialdehyde-modified low-density lipoprotein (MDA-LDL) and urinary 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Antioxidant capacity (AOC) was estimated by the levels of biological antioxidant potential (BAP) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity. Scalp hair metals were measured using an inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry method. Murun subjects showed high ROM levels of 394+/-75 Carr U (n=342), compared with Japanese healthy subjects (n=356, 326+/-51 Carr U, p<0.001). MDA-LDL and 8-OHdG levels also showed high levels. While, BAP levels of Murun subjects were 2263+/-203 micromol/L (n=210), Japanese subjects (n=356, 2087+/-215 micromol/L, p<0.001). SOD activities were also high, suggesting that the high oxidative may accelerate the state of AOC. Murun subjects demonstrated high accumulation of several metals in the hairs. In particular, Mn accumulation exhibited from 2 fold to 40 fold increases of Japanese standard. These findings are indicative that the high Mn accumulation may contribute to the high oxidative stress. The mechanism of its high accumulation was not explained by food materials or drinking water. We should further investigate another influence such as sandy wind. In order to suppress the high oxidative stress, elimination of the high Mn accumulation should be urgently studied. PMID:20021397

  7. High hydrostatic pressure leads to free radicals accumulation in yeast cells triggering oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bravim, Fernanda; Mota, Mainã M; Fernandes, A Alberto R; Fernandes, Patricia M B

    2016-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a unicellular organism that during the fermentative process is exposed to a variable environment; hence, resistance to multiple stress conditions is a desirable trait. The stress caused by high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) in S. cerevisiae resembles the injuries generated by other industrial stresses. In this study, it was confirmed that gene expression pattern in response to HHP displays an oxidative stress response profile which is expanded upon hydrostatic pressure release. Actually, reactive oxygen species (ROS) concentration level increased in yeast cells exposed to HHP treatment and an incubation period at room pressure led to a decrease in intracellular ROS concentration. On the other hand, ethylic, thermic and osmotic stresses did not result in any ROS accumulation in yeast cells. Microarray analysis revealed an upregulation of genes related to methionine metabolism, appearing to be a specific cellular response to HHP, and not related to other stresses, such as heat and osmotic stresses. Next, we investigated whether enhanced oxidative stress tolerance leads to enhanced tolerance to HHP stress. Overexpression of STF2 is known to enhance tolerance to oxidative stress and we show that it also leads to enhanced tolerance to HHP stress. PMID:27388472

  8. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in octopus (Octopus vulgaris) from Northwest Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Semedo, Miguel; Reis-Henriques, Maria Armanda; Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Oliveira, Marta; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Morais, Simone; Ferreira, Marta

    2012-09-01

    Metals are ubiquitous in the environment and accumulate in aquatic organisms and are known for their ability to enhance the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In aquatic species, oxidative stress mechanisms have been studied by measuring antioxidant enzyme activities and oxidative damages in tissues. The aim of this study was to apply and validate a set of oxidative stress biomarkers and correlate responses with metal contents in tissues of common octopus (Octopus vulgaris). Antioxidant enzyme activity (catalase--CAT, superoxide dismutase--SOD and glutathione S-transferases--GST), oxidative damages (lipid peroxidation--LPO and protein carbonyl content--PCO) and metal content (Cu, Zn, Pb, Cd and As) in the digestive gland and arm of octopus, collected in the NW Portuguese coast in different periods, were assessed after capture and after 14 days in captivity. CAT and SOD activities were highly responsive to fluctuations in metal concentrations and able to reduce oxidative damage, LPO and PCO in the digestive gland. CAT activity was also positively correlated with SOD and GST activities, which emphasizes that the three enzymes respond in a coordinated way to metal induced oxidative stress. Our results validate the use of oxidative stress biomarkers to assess metal pollution effects in this ecological and commercial relevant species. Moreover, octopus seems to have the ability to control oxidative damage by triggering an antioxidant enzyme coordinated response in the digestive gland.

  9. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:26675819

  10. Soluble Moringa oleifera leaf extract reduces intracellular cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kerdsomboon, Kittikhun; Tatip, Supinda; Kosasih, Sattawat; Auesukaree, Choowong

    2016-05-01

    Moringa oleifera leaves are a well-known source of antioxidants and traditionally used for medicinal applications. In the present study, the protective action of soluble M. oleifera leaf extract (MOLE) against cadmium toxicity was investigated in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The results showed that this extract exhibited a protective effect against oxidative stress induced by cadmium and H2O2 through the reduction of intracellular reactive oxygen species. Interestingly, not only the co-exposure of soluble MOLE with cadmium but also pretreatment of this extract prior to cadmium exposure significantly reduced the cadmium uptake through an inhibition of Fet4p, a low-affinity iron(II) transporter. In addition, the supplementation of soluble MOLE significantly reduced intracellular iron accumulation in a Fet4p-independent manner. Our findings suggest the potential use of soluble extract from M. oleifera leaves as a dietary supplement for protection against cadmium accumulation and oxidative stress.

  11. Silicon dioxide nanoparticles increase macrophage atherogenicity: Stimulation of cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and triglycerides accumulation.

    PubMed

    Petrick, Lauren; Rosenblat, Mira; Paland, Nicole; Aviram, Michael

    2016-06-01

    Nanoparticle research has focused on their toxicity in general, while increasing evidence points to additional specific adverse effects on atherosclerosis development. Arterial macrophage cholesterol and triglyceride (TG) accumulation and foam cell formation are the hallmark of early atherogenesis, leading to cardiovascular events. To investigate the in vitro atherogenic effects of silicon dioxide (SiO2 ), J774.1 cultured macrophages (murine cell line) were incubated with SiO2 nanoparticle (SP, d = 12 nm, 0-20 µg/mL), followed by cellular cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, TG and cholesterol metabolism analyses. A significant dose-dependent increase in oxidative stress (up to 164%), in cytotoxicity (up to 390% measured by lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release), and in TG content (up to 63%) was observed in SiO2 exposed macrophages compared with control cells. A smaller increase in macrophage cholesterol mass (up to 22%) was noted. TG accumulation in macrophages was not due to a decrease in TG cell secretion or to an increased TG biosynthesis rate, but was the result of attenuated TG hydrolysis secondary to decreased lipase activity and both adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) and hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) protein expression (by 42 and 25%, respectively). Overall, SPs showed pro-atherogenic effects on macrophages as observed by cytotoxicity, increased oxidative stress and TG accumulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Environ Toxicol 31: 713-723, 2016.

  12. Oxidative stress is a mediator for increased lipid accumulation in a newly isolated Dunaliella salina strain.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels.

  13. Oxidative Stress Is a Mediator for Increased Lipid Accumulation in a Newly Isolated Dunaliella salina Strain

    PubMed Central

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels. PMID:24651514

  14. Oxidative stress is a mediator for increased lipid accumulation in a newly isolated Dunaliella salina strain.

    PubMed

    Yilancioglu, Kaan; Cokol, Murat; Pastirmaci, Inanc; Erman, Batu; Cetiner, Selim

    2014-01-01

    oxidative stress mediates lipid accumulation. Understanding such relationships may provide guidance for efficient production of algal biodiesels. PMID:24651514

  15. No Evidence of Elevated Germline Mutation Accumulation Under Oxidative Stress in Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Joyner-Matos, Joanna; Bean, Laura C.; Richardson, Heidi L.; Sammeli, Tammy; Baer, Charles F.

    2011-01-01

    Variation in rates of molecular evolution has been attributed to numerous, interrelated causes, including metabolic rate, body size, and generation time. Speculation concerning the influence of metabolic rate on rates of evolution often invokes the putative mutagenic effects of oxidative stress. To isolate the effects of oxidative stress on the germline from the effects of metabolic rate, generation time, and other factors, we allowed mutations to accumulate under relaxed selection for 125 generations in two strains of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, the canonical wild-type strain (N2) and a mutant strain with elevated steady-state oxidative stress (mev-1). Contrary to our expectation, the mutational decline in fitness did not differ between N2 and mev-1. This result suggests that the mutagenic effects of oxidative stress in C. elegans are minor relative to the effects of other types of mutations, such as errors during DNA replication. However, mev-1 MA lines did go extinct more frequently than wild-type lines; some possible explanations for the difference in extinction rate are discussed. PMID:21979932

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhizal influence on leaf water potential, solute accumulation, and oxidative stress in soybean plants subjected to drought stress.

    PubMed

    Porcel, Rosa; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel

    2004-08-01

    This study investigated several aspects related to drought tolerance in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) soybean plants. The investigation included both shoot and root tissues in order to reveal the preferred target tissue for AM effects against drought stress. Non-AM and AM soybean plants were grown under well-watered or drought-stressed conditions, and leaf water status, solute accumulation, oxidative damage to lipids, and other parameters were determined. Results showed that AM plants were protected against drought, as shown by their significantly higher shoot-biomass production. The leaf water potential was also higher in stressed AM plants (-1.9 MPa) than in non-AM plants (-2.5 MPa). The AM roots had accumulated more proline than non-AM roots, while the opposite was observed in shoots. Lipid peroxides were 55% lower in shoots of droughted AM plants than in droughted non-AM plants. Since there was no correlation between the lower oxidative damage to lipids in AM plants and the activity of antioxidant enzymes, it seems that first the AM symbiosis enhanced osmotic adjustment in roots, which could contribute to maintaining a water potential gradient favourable to the water entrance from soil into the roots. This enabled higher leaf water potential in AM plants during drought and kept the plants protected against oxidative stress, and these cumulative effects increased the plant tolerance to drought.

  17. Triacylglycerol accumulation and oxidative stress in Rhodococcus species: differential effects of pro-oxidants on lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Susana Bequer; Di Capua, Cecilia; Cortez, Néstor; Farías, María E; Alvarez, Héctor M

    2014-03-01

    In general, members of Rhodococcus genus are highly resistant to desiccation. Desiccation is a complex process which includes the formation of reactive oxygen species that results in significant damage to cells. In this study, we demonstrate that extremophile actinobacterial strains isolated from diverse environments, mainly belonging to Rhodococcus genus, exhibited high tolerance to the pro-oxidants hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and methyl viologen (MV). In addition, we investigated the possible interconnections between the responses of the oleaginous Rhodococcus opacus PD630 to oxidative stress and lipid metabolism, since both processes demand a metabolic reorganization of cells. Experiments with metabolic inhibitors showed differential effects of both pro-oxidants on lipid metabolism in PD630 cells. The inhibition of carotenoid biosynthesis by the addition of diphenylamine to the media negatively affected the tolerance of cells to H2O2, but not to MV. The inhibition of triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis and accumulation in PD630 did not affect the tolerance of cells to H2O2 and MV; whereas, the blockage of lipolysis decreased the tolerance of cells to H2O2 (but not MV) under carbon-starvation conditions. Interestingly, the addition of MV to the media (but not H2O2) induced a reduction of TAG accumulation by cells. Resuming, results of this study revealed metabolic connections between lipid metabolism and oxidative stress responses in R. opacus PD630, and probably in other extremophile TAG-accumulating rhodococci.

  18. Copper accumulation and oxidative stress in the sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, after waterborne copper exposure.

    PubMed

    Main, W P L; Ross, C; Bielmyer, G K

    2010-03-01

    Copper is a common marine pollutant yet its effects on symbiotic cnidarians are largely understudied. To further understand the impact of elevated copper concentrations on marine symbiotic organisms, toxicity tests were conducted using the model sea anemone, Aiptasia pallida, with and without its zooxanthellae symbiont. Symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida were exposed to sublethal copper concentrations (0, 5, 15, and 50 microg/L) for 7d and copper accumulation, behavior, and the activity of the oxidative stress enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), and catalase (CAT) were measured. Additionally, acute 96-h toxicity tests were conducted to determine LC(50) values of the organisms after copper exposure. Both symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida rapidly accumulated copper in a time and dose dependent manner. However, higher copper concentrations accumulated in the aposymbiotic as compared to the symbiotic A. pallida. In response to the highest two copper exposures (15 and 50 microg/L) symbiotic A. pallida upregulated CAT activity to combat the damaging effects of hydrogen peroxide. Contrary to these results, SOD activity significantly decreased during the highest copper exposure, when compared to controls. CAT activity was not detected and SOD was substantially (>10 fold) reduced in aposymbiotic A. pallida, suggesting that the zooxanthellae are associated with the oxidative stress response. Copper exposure as low as 5 microg/L caused tentacle retraction and increased mucus production in both symbiotic and aposymbiotic anemones. The LC(50) values for symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida exposed to copper for 96 h were 148 microg/L (95% confidence interval=126.4, 173.8) and 206 microg/L (95% confidence interval=175.2, 242.2), respectively. Understanding the varying responses of symbiotic and aposymbiotic A. pallida to copper stress may advance our comprehension of the functional roles of zooxanthellae and host. Although the mechanism of copper toxicity has not been

  19. Transgenic tobacco plants accumulating osmolytes show reduced oxidative damage under freezing stress.

    PubMed

    Parvanova, Daniela; Ivanov, Sergei; Konstantinova, Tatyana; Karanov, Emanuil; Atanassov, Atanas; Tsvetkov, Tsvetan; Alexieva, Vera; Djilianov, Dimitar

    2004-01-01

    We studied the reaction to the oxidative component of freezing in several tobacco lines, transformed with genes coding for enzymes involved in the synthesis of osmoprotectants (proline, fructan or glycine betaine) along with their wild type. The levels of some oxidative stress markers (leakage of electrolytes, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde) as well as the activity of antioxidative enzymes catalase (EC 1.11.1.6.) and guaiacol peroxidase (EC 1.11.1.7.) have been followed at acclimation, 12 and 24 h freezing and at recovery. Freezing for 24 h resulted in severe damages for the wild type. A corresponding increase of electrolyte leakage, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde contents, a rise of peroxidase activity and inhibition of catalase activity occurred in the non-transformants. Similar, but significantly lower trend of the same parameters has been found for the transgenic lines. Moreover, the oxidative markers returned to their normal levels when the transformants were able to recover from freezing. It could be speculated that transfer of genes, coding for accumulation of osmoprotectants, is related to reduced intensity of freezing-induced oxidative processes. Our lines and model system could serve as a good prerequisite for additional studies to gain further insights into the complex role of osmoprotectants in freezing tolerance.

  20. Intracellular accumulation of indium ions released from nanoparticles induces oxidative stress, proinflammatory response and DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Tabei, Yosuke; Sonoda, Akinari; Nakajima, Yoshihiro; Biju, Vasudevanpillai; Makita, Yoji; Yoshida, Yasukazu; Horie, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Due to the widespread use of indium tin oxide (ITO), it is important to investigate its effect on human health. In this study, we evaluated the cellular effects of ITO nanoparticles (NPs), indium chloride (InCl3) and tin chloride (SnCl3) using human lung epithelial A549 cells. Transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry were employed to study cellular ITO NP uptake. Interestingly, greater uptake of ITO NPs was observed, as compared with soluble salts. ITO NP species released could be divided into two types: 'indium release ITO' or 'tin release ITO'. We incubated A549 cells with indium release ITO, tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2 and investigated oxidative stress, proinflammatory response, cytotoxicity and DNA damage. We found that intracellular reactive oxygen species were increased in cells incubated with indium release ITO, but not tin release ITO, InCl3 or SnCl2. Messenger RNA and protein levels of the inflammatory marker, interleukin-8, also increased following exposure to indium release ITO. Furthermore, the alkaline comet assay revealed that intracellular accumulation of indium ions induced DNA damage. Our results demonstrate that the accumulation of ionic indium, but not ionic tin, from ITO NPs in the intracellular matrix has extensive cellular effects.

  1. Role of Nrf2 in preventing ethanol-induced oxidative stress and lipid accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kai Connie; Liu, Jie; Klaassen, Curtis D.

    2012-08-01

    Oxidative stress and lipid accumulation play important roles in alcohol-induced liver injury. Previous reports showed that, in livers of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2)-activated mice, genes involved in antioxidant defense are induced, whereas genes involved in lipid biosynthesis are suppressed. To investigate the role of Nrf2 in ethanol-induced hepatic alterations, Nrf2-null mice, wild-type mice, kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1-knockdown (Keap1-KD) mice with enhanced Nrf2, and Keap1-hepatocyte knockout (Keap1-HKO) mice with maximum Nrf2 activation, were treated with ethanol (5 g/kg, po). Blood and liver samples were collected 6 h thereafter. Ethanol increased alanine aminotransferase and lactate dehydrogenase activities as well as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in serum of Nrf2-null and wild-type mice, but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. After ethanol administration, mitochondrial glutathione concentrations decreased markedly in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. H{sub 2}DCFDA staining of primary hepatocytes isolated from the four genotypes of mice indicates that oxidative stress was higher in Nrf2-null cells, and lower in Nrf2-enhanced cells than in wild-type cells. Ethanol increased serum triglycerides and hepatic free fatty acids in Nrf2-null mice, and these increases were blunted in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In addition, the basal mRNA and nuclear protein levels of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 1(Srebp-1) were decreased with graded Nrf2 activation. Ethanol further induced Srebp-1 mRNA in Nrf2-null mice but not in Nrf2-enhanced mice. In conclusion, Nrf2 activation prevented alcohol-induced oxidative stress and accumulation of free fatty acids in liver by increasing genes involved in antioxidant defense and decreasing genes involved in lipogenesis. -- Highlights: ► Ethanol depleted mitochondrial GSH in Nrf2-null mice but not in Keap1-KD mice. ► Ethanol increased ROS in hepatocytes isolated from Nrf2-null and wild

  2. Accumulation of nickel ions in seedlings of Vicia sativa L. and manifestations of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ivanishchev, V V; Abramova, E A

    2015-05-01

    The accumulation of nickel ions in the roots and shoots of vetch seedlings (Vicia sativa L.) at increasing concentrations of nickel chloride in the medium was studied. It was shown that the accumulation of nickel in the shoots was increased when the concentration of nickel chloride in the medium was more than 50 μM. The bioconcentration factor and sustainability index for vetch seedlings were calculated under the experimental conditions. The obtained results were similar to parameters for other plants, grown on a nutrient medium or soil substrate. First, the obtained results allowed estimate the limits of nickel chloride concentrations for four of five zones, which correspond to the theoretical concept of dose-response curves in the studies on the influence of physiologically essential heavy metals on plants (Prasad 2010). Some parameters of oxidative stress caused by the presence of nickel chloride in the medium were shown. It seems that at low nickel concentrations in the medium in vetch seedlings the increase of several biochemical parameters (catalase activity and proline) caused by the high amylase activity in seeds.

  3. Biomarkers of oxidative stress and metal accumulation in marsh frog (Pelophylax ridibundus).

    PubMed

    Borković-Mitić, Slavica S; Prokić, Marko D; Krizmanić, Imre I; Mutić, Jelena; Trifković, Jelena; Gavrić, Jelena; Despotović, Svetlana G; Gavrilović, Branka R; Radovanović, Tijana B; Pavlović, Slađan Z; Saičić, Zorica S

    2016-05-01

    To understand the effect of metals on the marsh frog Pelophylax ridibundus and the possible environment-induced changes in oxidative stress enzymes, we determined the concentrations of 18 metals: Al, As, Ba, Ca, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, In, Li, Mn, Ni, Pb, Sr, and Zn, in the tissues (liver, skin, and muscle) and water samples collected from different locations in Serbia. The activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), glutathione reductase (GR), glutathione S-transferase (GST), acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and changes in concentrations of reduced glutathione (GSH) and sulfhydryl groups (SH) were analyzed in the tissues of the sampled frogs. The concentrations of Al, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Ga, Hg, and Ni were highest in the liver, whereas those of Ba, Ca, Li, Mn, Pb, Sr, and Zn were highest in the skin. Hg correlated positively with liver SOD (in frogs from Danube-Tisza-Danube Canal (DTD)), muscle CAT (DTD), and muscle GST Ponjavica River (PO); Pb demonstrated a strong positive correlation with liver GR in frogs from Mt. Fruška Gora (FG); Cd only exhibited a positive correlation with AChE in the skin of frogs from DTD. In the skin, Zn correlated positively with AChE (DTD), SH groups (PO), and CAT (FG), and negatively with CAT, GST, and SH in the liver of frogs from DTD. Examination of these oxidative stress biomarkers, together with analysis of metal accumulation in the liver and skin of marsh frogs, provides a powerful tool for the assessment of metal pollution. PMID:26846240

  4. Trehalose accumulation induced during the oxidative stress response is independent of TPS1 mRNA levels in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Zaragoza, Oscar; González-Párraga, Pilar; Pedreño, Yolanda; Alvarez-Peral, Francisco J; Argüelles, Juan-Carlos

    2003-06-01

    Growing cells of the Candida albicans trehalose-deficient mutant tps1/tps1 were extremely sensitive to severe oxidative stress exposure (H2O2). However, their viability was not affected after saline stress or heat-shock treatments, being roughly equivalent to that of the parental strain. In wild-type cells, these adverse conditions induced the intracellular accumulation of trehalose together with activation of trehalose-6P synthase, whereas the endogenous trehalose content and the corresponding biosynthetic activity were barely detectable in the tps1/tps1 mutant. The addition of cycloheximide did not prevent the marked induction of trehalose-6P synthase activity. Furthermore, the presence of H2O2 decreased the level of TPS1 mRNA expression. Hence, the conspicuous trehalose accumulation in response to oxidative stress is not induced by increased transcription of TPS1. Our results are consistent with a specific requirement of trehalose in order to withstand a severe oxidative stress in C. albicans, and suggest that trehalose accumulation observed under these conditions is a complex process that most probably involves post-translational modifications of the trehalose synthase complex.

  5. Sulfur Dioxide Enhances Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Accumulation and Alleviates Oxidative Stress Induced by Aluminum Stress in Germinating Wheat Seeds.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dong-Bo; Hu, Kang-Di; Guo, Xi-Kai; Liu, Yong; Hu, Lan-Ying; Li, Yan-Hong; Wang, Song-Hua; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    Aluminum ions are especially toxic to plants in acidic soils. Here we present evidences that SO2 protects germinating wheat grains against aluminum stress. SO2 donor (NaHSO3/Na2SO3) pretreatment at 1.2 mM reduced the accumulation of superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide, and malondialdehyde, enhanced the activities of guaiacol peroxidase, catalase, and ascorbate peroxidase, and decreased the activity of lipoxygenase in germinating wheat grains exposed to Al stress. We also observed higher accumulation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) in SO2-pretreated grain, suggesting the tight relation between sulfite and sulfide. Wheat grains geminated in water for 36 h were pretreated with or without 1 mM SO2 donor for 12 h prior to exposure to Al stress for 48 h and the ameliorating effects of SO2 on wheat radicles were studied. SO2 donor pretreatment reduced the content of reactive oxygen species, protected membrane integrity, and reduced Al accumulation in wheat radicles. Gene expression analysis showed that SO2 donor pretreatment decreased the expression of Al-responsive genes TaWali1, TaWali2, TaWali3, TaWali5, TaWali6, and TaALMT1 in radicles exposed to Al stress. These results suggested that SO2 could increase endogenous H2S accumulation and the antioxidant capability and decrease endogenous Al content in wheat grains to alleviate Al stress. PMID:26078810

  6. Optimized Rapeseed Oils Rich in Endogenous Micronutrients Protect High Fat Diet Fed Rats from Hepatic Lipid Accumulation and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jiqu; Liu, Xiaoli; Gao, Hui; Chen, Chang; Deng, Qianchun; Huang, Qingde; Ma, Zhonghua; Huang, Fenghong

    2015-01-01

    Micronutrients in rapeseed exert a potential benefit to hepatoprotection, but most of them are lost during the conventional refining processing. Thus some processing technologies have been optimized to improve micronutrient retention in oil. The aim of this study is to assess whether optimized rapeseed oils (OROs) have positive effects on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress induced by a high-fat diet. Methods: Rats received experiment diets containing 20% fat and refined rapeseed oil or OROs obtained with various processing technologies as lipid source. After 10 weeks of treatment, liver was assayed for lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. Results: All OROs reduced hepatic triglyceride contents. Microwave pretreatment-cold pressing oil (MPCPO) which had the highest micronutrients contents also reduced hepatic cholesterol level. MPCPO significantly decreased hepatic sterol regulatory element-binding transcription factor 1 (SREBP1) but increased peroxisome proliferator activated receptor α (PPARα) expressions, and as a result, MPCPO significantly suppressed acetyl CoA carboxylase and induced carnitine palmitoyl transferase-1 and acyl CoA oxidase expression. Hepatic catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities as well as reduced glutathione (GSH) contents remarkably increased and lipid peroxidation levels decreased in parallel with the increase of micronutrients. Conclusion: OROs had the ability to reduce excessive hepatic fat accumulation and oxidative stress, which indicated that OROs might contribute to ameliorating nonalcoholic fatty liver induced by high-fat diet. PMID:26473919

  7. Micronutrients-fortified rapeseed oil improves hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats fed a high-fat diet

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intake of high-fat diet is associated with increased fatty livers. Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are key pathophysiological mechanisms in this disease. Micronutrients polyphenols, tocopherols and phytosterols in rapeseed exert potential benefit to hepatoprotection, but most of these micronutrients are removed by the traditional refining process. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether rapeseed oil fortified with these micronutrients can decrease hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress induced by high-fat diet. Sprague–Dawley rats received rodent diet contained 20% fat whose source was refined rapeseed oil (RRO) or fortified RRO with low, middle and high quantities of these micronutrients for 10 weeks. Intake of RRO caused a remarkable hepatic steatosis. Micronutrients supplementation was effective in reducing steatosis as well as total triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in liver. These micronutrients also significantly increased hepatic antioxidant defense capacities, as evaluated by the significant elevation in the activities of SOD and GPx as well as the level of GSH, and the significant decline in lipid peroxidation. These findings suggest that rapeseed oil fortified with micronutrients polyphenols, tocopherols and phytosterols may contribute to prevent fatty livers such as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:23510587

  8. Curcumin Supplementation Decreases Intestinal Adiposity Accumulation, Serum Cholesterol Alterations, and Oxidative Stress in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Morrone, Maurilio da Silva; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Behr, Guilherme Antônio; Gasparotto, Juciano; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; da Boit Martinello, Katia; Saldanha Henkin, Bernardo; Rabello, Thallita Kelly; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of curcumin oral supplementation (50 and 100 mg/Kg/day, for 30 days) in circumventing menopause-associated oxidative stress and lipid profile dysfunctions in a rat ovariectomy (OVX) model. Female Wistar rats were operated and randomly divided into either sham-operated or OVX groups. Sham-operated group (n = 8) and one OVX group (n = 11) were treated with vehicle (refined olive oil), and the other two OVX groups received curcumin at 50 or 100 mg/Kg/day doses (n = 8/group). OVX vehicle-treated animals presented a higher deposition of intestinal adipose tissue as well as increased serum levels of IL-6, LDL, and total cholesterol when compared to sham-operated rats. In addition, several oxidative stress markers in serum, blood, and liver (such as TBARS, carbonyl, reduced-sulphydryl, and nonenzymatic antioxidant defenses) were altered toward a prooxidant status by OVX. Interestingly, curcumin supplementation attenuated most of these parameters to sham comparable values. Thus, the herein presented results show that curcumin may be useful to ameliorate lipid metabolism alterations and oxidative damage associated with hormone deprivation in menopause.

  9. Curcumin Supplementation Decreases Intestinal Adiposity Accumulation, Serum Cholesterol Alterations, and Oxidative Stress in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Morrone, Maurilio da Silva; Schnorr, Carlos Eduardo; Behr, Guilherme Antônio; Gasparotto, Juciano; Bortolin, Rafael Calixto; da Boit Martinello, Katia; Saldanha Henkin, Bernardo; Rabello, Thallita Kelly; Zanotto-Filho, Alfeu; Gelain, Daniel Pens; Moreira, José Cláudio Fonseca

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of curcumin oral supplementation (50 and 100 mg/Kg/day, for 30 days) in circumventing menopause-associated oxidative stress and lipid profile dysfunctions in a rat ovariectomy (OVX) model. Female Wistar rats were operated and randomly divided into either sham-operated or OVX groups. Sham-operated group (n = 8) and one OVX group (n = 11) were treated with vehicle (refined olive oil), and the other two OVX groups received curcumin at 50 or 100 mg/Kg/day doses (n = 8/group). OVX vehicle-treated animals presented a higher deposition of intestinal adipose tissue as well as increased serum levels of IL-6, LDL, and total cholesterol when compared to sham-operated rats. In addition, several oxidative stress markers in serum, blood, and liver (such as TBARS, carbonyl, reduced-sulphydryl, and nonenzymatic antioxidant defenses) were altered toward a prooxidant status by OVX. Interestingly, curcumin supplementation attenuated most of these parameters to sham comparable values. Thus, the herein presented results show that curcumin may be useful to ameliorate lipid metabolism alterations and oxidative damage associated with hormone deprivation in menopause. PMID:26640615

  10. Effects of Waterborne Lead Exposure in Mozambique Tilapia: Oxidative Stress, Osmoregulatory Responses, and Tissue Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hasan; Akbulut, Mehmet

    2015-06-01

    We studied the oxidative stress and osmoregulatory damage as well as the accumulation of lead in Mozambique Tilapia Oreochromis mossambicus exposed to different sublethal concentrations-low, medium, and high (0.5, 2.5, and 5.0 mg/L)-of waterborne lead for 14 d in a semistatic condition. The accumulated levels of Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase, glutathione (GSH), and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) were determined from samples of gill, liver, intestine, brain, kidney, and muscle tissues. At the end of the experiment, the GSH levels of most tissues were higher in the treated group than in the control group (especially in the liver and kidney) but lower in the intestine. The levels of TBARS in the gill and brain tissues of the fish exposed to high lead doses were significantly higher than those of fish in the control group. Na⁺, K⁺-ATPase activity seemed to be significantly inhibited in the gill, intestine, and brain tissues across all treatment groups. At the end of the study, the total amount of lead that had accumulated within the various tissues ranked as follows: intestines > kidney > brain > gill > liver > muscle. Our findings suggest that sublethal concentrations of lead can disrupt the health of Mozambique Tilapia and cause oxidative stress and osmoregulatory damage.

  11. Flaxseed oil and alpha-lipoic acid combination ameliorates hepatic oxidative stress and lipid accumulation in comparison to lard

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Intake of high-fat diet is associated with increased non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress are key pathophysiological mechanisms in NAFLD. Both flaxseed oil (FO) and α-lipoic acid (LA) exert potential benefit to NAFLD. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the combination of FO and LA on hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in rats induced by high-fat diet. Methods LA was dissolved in flaxseed oil to a final concentration of 8 g/kg (FO + LA). The rodent diet contained 20% fat. One-fifth of the fat was soybean oil and the others were lard (control group), or 75% lard and 25% FO + LA (L-FO + LA group), or 50% lard and 50% FO + LA (M-FO + LA group), or FO + LA (H-FO + LA group). Male Sprague–Dawley rats were fed for 10 weeks and then killed for liver collection. Results Intake of high-fat lard caused a significant hepatic steatosis. Replacement with FO + LA was effective in reducing steatosis as well as total triglyceride and total cholesterol contents in liver. The combination of FO and LA also significantly elevated hepatic antioxidant defense capacities, as evaluated by the remarkable increase in the activities of SOD, CAT and GPx as well as the level of GSH, and the significant decline in lipid peroxidation. Conclusion The combination of FO and LA may contribute to prevent fatty livers such as NAFLD by ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and oxidative stress. PMID:23634883

  12. Salt stress reduces root meristem size by nitric oxide-mediated modulation of auxin accumulation and signaling in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-05-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels.

  13. Integrated Autofluorescence Characterization of a Modified-Diet Liver Model with Accumulation of Lipids and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Croce, Anna Cleta; Tarantola, Eleonora

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress in fatty livers is mainly generated by impaired mitochondrial β-oxidation, inducing tissue damages and disease progression. Under suitable excitation, light liver endogenous fluorophores can give rise to autofluorescence (AF) emission, the properties of which depend on the organ morphofunctional state. In this work, we characterized the AF properties of a rat liver model of lipid accumulation and oxidative stress, induced by a 1–9-week hypercaloric methionine-choline deficient (MCD) diet administration. The AF analysis (excitation at 366 nm) was performed in vivo, via fiber optic probe, or ex vivo. The contribution of endogenous fluorophores involved in redox reactions and in tissue organization was estimated through spectral curve fitting analysis, and AF results were validated by means of different histochemical and biochemical assays (lipids, collagen, vitamin A, ROS, peroxidised proteins, and lipid peroxidation -TBARS-, GSH, and ATP). In comparison with the control, AF spectra changes found already at 1 week of MCD diet reflect alterations both in tissue composition and organization (proteins, lipopigments, and vitamin A) and in oxidoreductive pathway engagement (NAD(P)H, flavins), with a subsequent attempt to recover redox homeostasis. These data confirm the AF analysis potential to provide a comprehensive diagnostic information on negative effects of oxidative metabolism alteration. PMID:25006587

  14. A Chimeric Cfh Transgene Leads to Increased Retinal Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Accumulation of Activated Subretinal Microglia in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Aredo, Bogale; Li, Tao; Chen, Xiao; Zhang, Kaiyan; Wang, Cynthia Xin-Zhao; Gou, Darlene; Zhao, Biren; He, Yuguang; Ufret-Vincenty, Rafael L.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. Variants of complement factor H (Cfh) affecting short consensus repeats (SCRs) 6 to 8 increase the risk of age-related macular degeneration. Our aim was to explore the effect of expressing a Cfh variant on the in vivo susceptibility of the retina and RPE to oxidative stress and inflammation, using chimeric Cfh transgenic mice (chCfhTg). Methods. The chCfhTg and age-matched C57BL/6J (B6) mice were subjected to oxidative stress by either normal aging, or by exposure to a combination of oral hydroquinone (0.8% HQ) and increased light. Eyes were collected for immunohistochemistry of RPE–choroid flat mounts and of retinal sections, ELISA, electron microscopy, and RPE/microglia gene expression analysis. Results. Aging mice to 2 years led to an increased accumulation of basal laminar deposits, subretinal microglia/macrophages (MG/MΦ) staining for CD16 and for malondialdehyde (MDA), and MDA-modified proteins in the retina in chCfhTg compared to B6 mice. The chCfhTg mice maintained on HQ diet and increased light showed greater deposition of basal laminar deposits, more accumulation of fundus spots suggestive of MG/MΦ, and increased deposition of C3d in the sub-RPE space, compared to controls. In addition, chCfhTg mice demonstrated upregulation of NLRP3, IP-10, CD68, and TREM-2 in the RNA isolates from RPE/MG/MΦ. Conclusions. Expression of a Cfh transgene introducing a variant in SCRs 6 to 8 was sufficient to lead to increased retinal/RPE susceptibility to oxidative stress, a proinflammatory MG/MΦ phenotype, and a proinflammatory RPE/MG/MΦ gene expression profile in a transgenic mouse model. Our data suggest that altered interactions of Cfh with MDA-modified proteins may be relevant in explaining the effects of the Cfh variant. PMID:26030099

  15. The influence of sedimentation on metal accumulation and cellular oxidative stress markers in the Antarctic bivalve Laternula elliptica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husmann, G.; Abele, D.; Monien, D.; Monien, P.; Kriews, M.; Philipp, E. E. R.

    2012-10-01

    Recent rapid climate warming at the western Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) results in elevated glacial melting, enhanced sedimentary run-off, increased turbidity and impact of ice-scouring in shallow coastal areas. Discharge of mineral suspension from volcanic bedrock ablation and chronic physical disturbance is expected to influence sessile filter feeders such as the Antarctic soft shell clam Laternula elliptica (King and Broderip, 1832). We investigated effects of sedimentary run-off on the accumulation of trace metals, and together with physical disturbance, the cumulative effect on oxidative stress parameters in younger and older L. elliptica from two stations in Potter Cove (King George Island, Antarctica) which are distinctly impacted by turbidity and ice-scouring. Fe, Mn, Sr, V and Zn concentrations were slightly higher in sediments of the station receiving more sediment run-off, but not enriched in bivalves of this station. The only element that increased in bivalves experimentally exposed to sediment suspension for 28 days was Mn. Concentration of the waste accumulation biomarker lipofuscin in nervous tissue was higher in L. elliptica from the “exposed” compared to the “less exposed” site, whereas protein carbonyl levels in bivalve mantle tissue were higher at the less sediment impacted site. Tissue metal content and lipofuscin in nervous tissue were generally higher in older compared to younger individuals from both field stations. We conclude that elevated sediment ablation does not per se result in higher metal accumulation in L. elliptica. Instead of direct absorbance from sediment particles, metal accumulation in gills seems to indicate uptake of compounds dissolved in the water column, whereas metals in digestive gland appear to originate from enriched planktonic or detritic food. Accumulation of cellular waste products and potentially reactive metals over lifetime presumably alters L. elliptica physiological performance with age and may

  16. Ceramides in Alzheimer's Disease: Key Mediators of Neuronal Apoptosis Induced by Oxidative Stress and Aβ Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Jazvinšćak Jembrek, Maja; Hof, Patrick R.; Šimić, Goran

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common chronic and progressive neurodegenerative disorder, is characterized by extracellular deposits of amyloid β-peptides (Aβ) and intracellular deposits of hyperphosphorylated tau (phospho-tau) protein. Ceramides, the major molecules of sphingolipid metabolism and lipid second messengers, have been associated with AD progression and pathology via Aβ generation. Enhanced levels of ceramides directly increase Aβ through stabilization of β-secretase, the key enzyme in the amyloidogenic processing of Aβ precursor protein (APP). As a positive feedback loop, the generated oligomeric and fibrillar Aβ induces a further increase in ceramide levels by activating sphingomyelinases that catalyze the catabolic breakdown of sphingomyelin to ceramide. Evidence also supports important role of ceramides in neuronal apoptosis. Ceramides may initiate a cascade of biochemical alterations, which ultimately leads to neuronal death by diverse mechanisms, including depolarization and permeabilization of mitochondria, increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cytochrome c release, Bcl-2 depletion, and caspase-3 activation, mainly by modulating intracellular signalling, particularly along the pathways related to Akt/PKB kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). This review summarizes recent findings related to the role of ceramides in oxidative stress-driven neuronal apoptosis and interplay with Aβ in the cascade of events ending in neuronal degeneration. PMID:26090071

  17. Phytotoxic effects of cyanobacteria extract on the aquatic plant Lemna gibba: microcystin accumulation, detoxication and oxidative stress induction.

    PubMed

    Saqrane, Sana; Ghazali, Issam El; Ouahid, Youness; Hassni, Majida El; Hadrami, Ismaïl El; Bouarab, Lahcen; del Campo, Franscica F; Oudra, Brahim; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2007-08-01

    The occurrence of toxic cyanobacteria in the aquatic environment constitutes a serious risk for the ecological balance and the functioning of ecosystems. The presence of cyanotoxins in ecosystems could have eventual adverse effects on aquatic plants, which play an important biological role as primary producers. The original aim of this study was to investigate microcystin (MC) accumulation, detoxication and oxidative stress induction in the free-floating aquatic vascular plant Lemna gibba (Duckweed, Lemnaceae). Experiments were carried out with a range of MC levels, obtained from toxic Microcystis culture extracts (0.075, 0.15, 0.22 and 0.3 microg equiv.MC-LR mL(-1)). During chronic exposure of the plant to MC, we examined the growth, photosynthetic pigment contents and also the physiological behavior related to toxin accumulation, possible biodegradation and stress oxidative processes of L. gibba. For the last reason, changes in peroxidase activity and phenol compound content were determined. This is a first report using phenol compounds as indicators of biotic stress induced by MC contamination in aquatic plants. Following MC exposure, a significant decrease of plant growth and chlorophyll content was observed. Also, it was demonstrated that L. gibba could take up and bio-transform microcystins. A suspected MC degradation metabolite was detected in treated Lemna cells. In response to chronic contamination with MCs, changes in the peroxidase activity and qualitative and quantitative changes in phenolic compounds were observed after 24h of plant exposure. The physiological effects induced by chronic exposure to microcystins confirm that in aquatic ecosystems plants coexisting with toxic cyanobacterial blooms may suffer an important negative ecological impact. This may represent a sanitary risk due to toxin bioaccumulation and biotransfer through the food chain. PMID:17582520

  18. Lead accumulation pattern and molecular biomarkers of oxidative stress in seabream (Sparus aurata) under short-term metal treatment.

    PubMed

    Souid, Ghada; Souayed, Nouha; Yaktiti, Fatma; Maaroufi, Khira

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to look at the distribution and accumulation pattern of Lead (Pb) within the fish body after 2 h, 4 h and 24 h of waterborne exposure to the metal at 0.75 mg/L. Tests of lead acute toxicity and bioaccumulation were performed in the common fish species Sparus aurata. In our study, we assessed the oxidative stress damages extent after 2 h, 4 h and 24 h of exposure to lead using the enzymatic stress biomarkers: Superoxide Dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT) and Gluthathione (GSH). The lipid peroxidation (LPO) was also investigated by dosing Malondyhaldéhyde (MDA) quantities in the liver tissue. The acute neurotoxicity of Pb was evaluated in the dorsal white muscle using the Acethylcholenesterase (AchE) activity. The liver tissue accumulates preferentially the metal, followed by the intestines, the gills and finally the dorsal muscle. The antioxidant response failed to prevent the lipid peroxidation and the neurotoxic effect of lead after 24 h of exposure.

  19. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-01-01

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress. PMID:26426027

  20. Photo-Oxidative Stress-Driven Mutagenesis and Adaptive Evolution on the Marine Diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum for Enhanced Carotenoid Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Zhiqian; Xu, Maonian; Magnusdottir, Manuela; Zhang, Yuetuan; Brynjolfsson, Sigurdur; Fu, Weiqi

    2015-09-29

    Marine diatoms have recently gained much attention as they are expected to be a promising resource for sustainable production of bioactive compounds such as carotenoids and biofuels as a future clean energy solution. To develop photosynthetic cell factories, it is important to improve diatoms for value-added products. In this study, we utilized UVC radiation to induce mutations in the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum and screened strains with enhanced accumulation of neutral lipids and carotenoids. Adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was also used in parallel to develop altered phenotypic and biological functions in P. tricornutum and it was reported for the first time that ALE was successfully applied on diatoms for the enhancement of growth performance and productivity of value-added carotenoids to date. Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) was utilized to study the composition of major pigments in the wild type P. tricornutum, UV mutants and ALE strains. UVC radiated strains exhibited higher accumulation of fucoxanthin as well as neutral lipids compared to their wild type counterpart. In addition to UV mutagenesis, P. tricornutum strains developed by ALE also yielded enhanced biomass production and fucoxanthin accumulation under combined red and blue light. In short, both UV mutagenesis and ALE appeared as an effective approach to developing desired phenotypes in the marine diatoms via electromagnetic radiation-induced oxidative stress.

  1. Curcumin Attenuates Iron Accumulation and Oxidative Stress in the Liver and Spleen of Chronic Iron-Overloaded Rats

    PubMed Central

    Badria, Farid A.; Ibrahim, Ahmed S.; Badria, Adel F.; Elmarakby, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Iron overload is now recognized as a health problem in industrialized countries, as excessive iron is highly toxic for liver and spleen. The potential use of curcumin as an iron chelator has not been clearly identified experimentally in iron overload condition. Here, we evaluate the efficacy of curcumin to alleviate iron overload-induced hepatic and splenic abnormalities and to gain insight into the underlying mechanisms. Design and Methods Three groups of male adult rats were treated as follows: control rats, rats treated with iron in a drinking water for 2 months followed by either vehicle or curcumin treatment for 2 more months. Thereafter, we studied the effects of curcumin on iron overload-induced lipid peroxidation and anti-oxidant depletion. Results Treatment of iron-overloaded rats with curcumin resulted in marked decreases in iron accumulation within liver and spleen. Iron-overloaded rats had significant increases in malonyldialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipid peroxidation and nitric oxide (NO) in liver and spleen when compared to control group. The effects of iron overload on lipid peroxidation and NO levels were significantly reduced by the intervention treatment with curcumin (P<0.05). Furthermore, the endogenous anti-oxidant activities/levels in liver and spleen were also significantly decreased in chronic iron overload and administration of curcumin restored the decrease in the hepatic and splenic antioxidant activities/levels. Conclusion Our study suggests that curcumin may represent a new horizon in managing iron overload-induced toxicity as well as in pathological diseases characterized by hepatic iron accumulation such as thalassemia, sickle cell anemia, and myelodysplastic syndromes possibly via iron chelation, reduced oxidative stress derived lipid peroxidation and improving the body endogenous antioxidant defense mechanism. PMID:26230491

  2. SNCA triplication Parkinson's patient's iPSC-derived DA neurons accumulate α-synuclein and are susceptible to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Byers, Blake; Cord, Branden; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain.

  3. SNCA Triplication Parkinson's Patient's iPSC-derived DA Neurons Accumulate α-Synuclein and Are Susceptible to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C.; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J. William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain. PMID:22110584

  4. SNCA triplication Parkinson's patient's iPSC-derived DA neurons accumulate α-synuclein and are susceptible to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Byers, Blake; Cord, Branden; Nguyen, Ha Nam; Schüle, Birgitt; Fenno, Lief; Lee, Patrick C; Deisseroth, Karl; Langston, J William; Pera, Renee Reijo; Palmer, Theo D

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an incurable age-related neurodegenerative disorder affecting both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Although common, the etiology of PD remains poorly understood. Genetic studies infer that the disease results from a complex interaction between genetics and environment and there is growing evidence that PD may represent a constellation of diseases with overlapping yet distinct underlying mechanisms. Novel clinical approaches will require a better understanding of the mechanisms at work within an individual as well as methods to identify the specific array of mechanisms that have contributed to the disease. Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) strategies provide an opportunity to directly study the affected neuronal subtypes in a given patient. Here we report the generation of iPSC-derived midbrain dopaminergic neurons from a patient with a triplication in the α-synuclein gene (SNCA). We observed that the iPSCs readily differentiated into functional neurons. Importantly, the PD-affected line exhibited disease-related phenotypes in culture: accumulation of α-synuclein, inherent overexpression of markers of oxidative stress, and sensitivity to peroxide induced oxidative stress. These findings show that the dominantly-acting PD mutation is intrinsically capable of perturbing normal cell function in culture and confirm that these features reflect, at least in part, a cell autonomous disease process that is independent of exposure to the entire complexity of the diseased brain. PMID:22110584

  5. Free Fatty Acids Increase Intracellular Lipid Accumulation and Oxidative Stress by Modulating PPARα and SREBP-1c in L-02 Cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shumin; Yin, Jinjin; Huang, Keer

    2016-07-01

    Excessive fat accumulation and increased oxidative stress contribute to the pathogenesis of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). However, the mechanisms underlying the development of steatosis are not entirely understood. The present study was undertaken to establish an experimental model of hepatocellular steatosis with a fat overaccumulation profile in which the effects of oxidative stress could be studied in L-02 cells. We investigated the effects of free fatty acids (FFA) (palmitate:oleate, 1:2) on lipid accumulation and oxidative stress and their possible mechanisms in L-02 cells. High concentrations of fatty acids significantly induced excessive lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in L-02 cells, which could only be reversed with 50 μΜ WY14643 (the PPARα agonist). Immunoblotting and qPCR analyses revealed that FFA downregulated the expression of proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα), which contributed to the increased activation of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c). These results suggest that FFA induce lipid accumulation and oxidative stress in L-02 cells by upregulating SREBP-1c expression through the suppression of PPARα. PMID:27270405

  6. Oxidative stress in marine bivalves tissues in response to accumulation of heavy metals

    SciTech Connect

    Chelomin, V.P.; Belcheva, N.N.; Zakartsev, M.V.

    1995-12-31

    Using model aquarium experiments the authors have shown that the accumulation of heavy metals (copper and cadmium) by the tissues of marine bivalves (Mytilus edulis, Mizuhopecten yessoensis) is followed by a complex of alterations in the lipid matrix of some membrane organelles. It is supposed that the disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes is the main mechanism in heavy metal-inducible damage, of membranes. This possibility is supported by results of levels of conjugated dienes, malondialdehyde and Shiff`s bases, determined as indicators of lipid peroxidation in different tissues of molluscs, markedly increased with metal accumulation. Unlike to cadmium, the copper possess prooxidative activity, stimulating the peroxidation of membrane lipids directly. In spite of some distinctions the intracellular antioxidative systems (glutathione system and tocopherol) showed extreme sensitivity to the accumulation of both metals. It was demonstrated that the accumulation of these metals was followed by die changes of glutathione and tocopherol contents and the inhibition of glutathione-reductase. activity,, but it was not correlated with changes of Se-depending glutathioneperoxidase activity. As it results from kinetic data the most damages of glutathione system are revealed on this earliest stages of metal accumulation when metallothionein synthesis is on the low level. The amount of glutathione in the tissues was restored almost to their original level when metallothionein synthesis increases markedly. But, total amount of peroxides is retained on the high level for a long period of time. On the basis of results it is reasonable to assume that the accumulation of these metals by mollusc tissues does not proceed without leaving a trace. This process is a potential menace for increasing of destructive events in consequence of disturbance of balance of prooxidant and antioxidant processes.

  7. Delayed uric Acid accumulation in plasma provides additional anti-oxidant protection against iron-triggered oxidative stress after a wingate test.

    PubMed

    Souza-Junior, Tp; Lorenço-Lima, L; Ganini, D; Vardaris, Cv; Polotow, Tg; Barros, Mp

    2014-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species are produced during anaerobic exercise mostly by Fe ions released into plasma and endothelial/muscle xanthine oxidase activation that generates uric acid (UA) as the endpoint metabolite. Paradoxically, UA is considered a major antioxidant by virtue of being able to chelate pro-oxidative iron ions. This work aimed to evaluate the relationship between UA and plasma markers of oxidative stress following the exhaustive Wingate test. Plasma samples of 17 male undergraduate students were collected before, 5 and 60 min after maximal anaerobic effort for the measurement of total iron, haem iron, UA, ferric-reducing antioxidant activity in plasma (FRAP), and malondialdehyde (MDA, biomarker of lipoperoxidation). Iron and FRAP showed similar kinetics in plasma, demonstrating an adequate pro-/antioxidant balance immediately after exercise and during the recovery period (5-60 min). Slight variations of haem iron concentrations did not support a relevant contribution of rhabdomyolysis or haemolysis for iron overload following exercise. UA concentration did not vary immediately after exercise but rather increased 29% during the recovery period. Unaltered MDA levels were concomitantly measured. We propose that delayed UA accumulation in plasma is an auxiliary antioxidant response to post-exercise (iron-mediated) oxidative stress, and the high correlation between total UA and FRAP in plasma (R-Square = 0.636; p = 0.00582) supports this hypothesis. PMID:25435669

  8. DELAYED URIC ACID ACCUMULATION IN PLASMA PROVIDES ADDITIONAL ANTI-OXIDANT PROTECTION AGAINST IRON-TRIGGERED OXIDATIVE STRESS AFTER A WINGATE TEST

    PubMed Central

    Souza-Junior, TP; Lorenço-Lima, L; Ganini, D; Vardaris, CV; Polotow, TG

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are produced during anaerobic exercise mostly by Fe ions released into plasma and endothelial/muscle xanthine oxidase activation that generates uric acid (UA) as the endpoint metabolite. Paradoxically, UA is considered a major antioxidant by virtue of being able to chelate pro-oxidative iron ions. This work aimed to evaluate the relationship between UA and plasma markers of oxidative stress following the exhaustive Wingate test. Plasma samples of 17 male undergraduate students were collected before, 5 and 60 min after maximal anaerobic effort for the measurement of total iron, haem iron, UA, ferric-reducing antioxidant activity in plasma (FRAP), and malondialdehyde (MDA, biomarker of lipoperoxidation). Iron and FRAP showed similar kinetics in plasma, demonstrating an adequate pro-/antioxidant balance immediately after exercise and during the recovery period (5–60 min). Slight variations of haem iron concentrations did not support a relevant contribution of rhabdomyolysis or haemolysis for iron overload following exercise. UA concentration did not vary immediately after exercise but rather increased 29% during the recovery period. Unaltered MDA levels were concomitantly measured. We propose that delayed UA accumulation in plasma is an auxiliary antioxidant response to post-exercise (iron-mediated) oxidative stress, and the high correlation between total UA and FRAP in plasma (R-Square = 0.636; p = 0.00582) supports this hypothesis. PMID:25435669

  9. Hepatic oxidative stress and catalyst metals accumulation in goldfish exposed to carbon nanotubes under different pH levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Huang, Qingguo; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three different carbon nanotubes [single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs), and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs)] on antioxidant parameters and metals accumulation in the liver of Carassius auratus. A semi-static test system was used to expose C. auratus to either a freshwater control, 0.1, or 0.5mg/L CNTs at three pH levels (5.0, 7.25, and 9.0) for 3 and 12 days. The activities of three antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), together with the level of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined in liver on the 3rd and 12th day. The results showed that there was a significant increase in MDA concentration and SOD activity in fish exposed to CNTs, indicating that CNTs exposure induces an oxidative stress response in fish. According to integrated biomarker response (IBR) index, the effect of these three CNTs on liver can be ordered as SWCNTs>OH-MWCNTs>COOH-MWCNTs and they are more toxic to fish in an alkaline environment. Moreover, the concentrations of catalyst metals (Co, Ni, and Mo) and bioelements (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se) in liver were changed, depending on the CNTs concentration, the pH level, and the exposure duration. Generally, all CNTs groups showed that catalyst metals could be concentrated significantly into the liver of fish, and changes in hepatic Cu, Zn, Fe, and Se contents are consistent with the activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  10. Hepatic oxidative stress and catalyst metals accumulation in goldfish exposed to carbon nanotubes under different pH levels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xinghao; Qu, Ruijuan; Huang, Qingguo; Wei, Zhongbo; Wang, Zunyao

    2015-03-01

    Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect of three different carbon nanotubes [single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), hydroxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (OH-MWCNTs), and carboxylated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (COOH-MWCNTs)] on antioxidant parameters and metals accumulation in the liver of Carassius auratus. A semi-static test system was used to expose C. auratus to either a freshwater control, 0.1, or 0.5mg/L CNTs at three pH levels (5.0, 7.25, and 9.0) for 3 and 12 days. The activities of three antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), together with the level of glutathione (GSH) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were determined in liver on the 3rd and 12th day. The results showed that there was a significant increase in MDA concentration and SOD activity in fish exposed to CNTs, indicating that CNTs exposure induces an oxidative stress response in fish. According to integrated biomarker response (IBR) index, the effect of these three CNTs on liver can be ordered as SWCNTs>OH-MWCNTs>COOH-MWCNTs and they are more toxic to fish in an alkaline environment. Moreover, the concentrations of catalyst metals (Co, Ni, and Mo) and bioelements (Cu, Fe, Zn, and Se) in liver were changed, depending on the CNTs concentration, the pH level, and the exposure duration. Generally, all CNTs groups showed that catalyst metals could be concentrated significantly into the liver of fish, and changes in hepatic Cu, Zn, Fe, and Se contents are consistent with the activity of antioxidant enzymes. PMID:25625523

  11. Oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces β-amyloid 1-42 overproduction and mitochondrial accumulation by activating the amyloidogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, L F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2015-09-24

    Oxidative stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has been suggested to be the trigger of AD pathology. However, whether oxidative damage precedes and contributes directly to the intracellular accumulation of beta amyloid 1-42 (βA42) peptide remains a matter of debate. Chronic exposure to low doses of ozone similar to the levels during a day of high pollution in México City causes a state of oxidative stress that elicits progressive neurodegeneration in the hippocampi of rats. Several reports have demonstrated that the mitochondria are among the first organelles to be affected by oxidative stress and βA42 toxicity and act as sites of the accumulation of βA42, which affects energy metabolism. However, the mechanisms related to the neurodegeneration process and organelle damage that occur in conditions of chronic exposure to low doses of ozone have not been demonstrated. To analyze the effect of chronic ozone chronic exposure on changes in the production and accumulation of the βA42 and βA40 peptides in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons of rats exposed to ozone, we examined the mitochondrial expression levels of Presenilins 1 and 2 and ADAM10 to detect changes related to the oxidative stress caused by low doses of ozone (0.25ppm). The results revealed significant accumulations of βA42 peptide in the mitochondrial fractions on days 60 and 90 of ozone exposure along with reductions in beta amyloid 1-40 accumulation, significant overexpressions of Pres2 and significant reductions in ADAM10 expression. Beta amyloid immunodetection revealed that there were some intracellular deposits of βA42 and that βA42 and the mitochondrial markers OPA1 and COX1 colocalized. These results indicate that the time of exposure to ozone and the accumulation of βA42 in the mitochondria of the hippocampal cells of rats were correlated. Our results suggest that the accumulation of the βA42 peptide may promote mitochondrial dysfunction due to its

  12. Oxidative stress caused by ozone exposure induces β-amyloid 1-42 overproduction and mitochondrial accumulation by activating the amyloidogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zimbrón, L F; Rivas-Arancibia, S

    2015-09-24

    Oxidative stress is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) that has been suggested to be the trigger of AD pathology. However, whether oxidative damage precedes and contributes directly to the intracellular accumulation of beta amyloid 1-42 (βA42) peptide remains a matter of debate. Chronic exposure to low doses of ozone similar to the levels during a day of high pollution in México City causes a state of oxidative stress that elicits progressive neurodegeneration in the hippocampi of rats. Several reports have demonstrated that the mitochondria are among the first organelles to be affected by oxidative stress and βA42 toxicity and act as sites of the accumulation of βA42, which affects energy metabolism. However, the mechanisms related to the neurodegeneration process and organelle damage that occur in conditions of chronic exposure to low doses of ozone have not been demonstrated. To analyze the effect of chronic ozone chronic exposure on changes in the production and accumulation of the βA42 and βA40 peptides in the mitochondria of hippocampal neurons of rats exposed to ozone, we examined the mitochondrial expression levels of Presenilins 1 and 2 and ADAM10 to detect changes related to the oxidative stress caused by low doses of ozone (0.25ppm). The results revealed significant accumulations of βA42 peptide in the mitochondrial fractions on days 60 and 90 of ozone exposure along with reductions in beta amyloid 1-40 accumulation, significant overexpressions of Pres2 and significant reductions in ADAM10 expression. Beta amyloid immunodetection revealed that there were some intracellular deposits of βA42 and that βA42 and the mitochondrial markers OPA1 and COX1 colocalized. These results indicate that the time of exposure to ozone and the accumulation of βA42 in the mitochondria of the hippocampal cells of rats were correlated. Our results suggest that the accumulation of the βA42 peptide may promote mitochondrial dysfunction due to its

  13. Abscisic acid-induced nitric oxide and proline accumulation in independent pathways under water-deficit stress during seedling establishment in Medicago truncatula.

    PubMed

    Planchet, Elisabeth; Verdu, Isabelle; Delahaie, Julien; Cukier, Caroline; Girard, Clément; Morère-Le Paven, Marie-Christine; Limami, Anis M

    2014-05-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production and amino acid metabolism modulation, in particular abscisic acid (ABA)-dependent proline accumulation, are stimulated in planta by most abiotic stresses. However, the relationship between NO production and proline accumulation under abiotic stress is still poorly understood, especially in the early phases of plant development. To unravel this question, this work investigated the tight relationship between NO production and proline metabolism under water-deficit stress during seedling establishment. Endogenous nitrate reductase-dependent NO production in Medicago truncatula seedlings increased in a time-dependent manner after short-term water-deficit stress. This water-deficit-induced endogenous NO accumulation was mediated through a ABA-dependent pathway and accompanied by an inhibition of seed germination, a loss of water content, and a decrease in elongation of embryo axes. Interestingly, a treatment with a specific NO scavenger (cPTIO) alleviated these water-deficit detrimental effects. However, the content of total amino acids, in particular glutamate and proline, as well as the expression of genes encoding enzymes of synthesis and degradation of proline were not affected by cPTIO treatment under water-deficit stress. Under normal conditions, exogenous NO donor stimulated neither the expression of P5CS2 nor the proline content, as observed after PEG treatment. These results strongly suggest that the modulation of proline metabolism is independent of NO production under short-term water-deficit stress during seedling establishment.

  14. Elevated oxidative stress, iron accumulation around microvessels and increased 4-hydroxynonenal immunostaining in zone 1 of the liver acinus in hypercholesterolemic rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ong, Wei-Yi; Jenner, Andrew M; Pan, Ning; Ong, Choon-Nam; Halliwell, Barry

    2009-03-01

    Rabbits were fed a diet containing 1% cholesterol for 8 weeks and the levels of iron and oxidized lipids in liver analysed using atomic absorption spectroscopy and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. A non-significant trend to an increase in iron level, but significant increases in the lipid peroxidation products, F(2)-isoprostanes and the cholesterol oxidation products 7 beta hydroxycholesterol, 7 ketocholesterol and cholesterol 5,6-alpha epoxide were detected in the liver of the cholesterol-fed rabbits. Histological analysis showed greater accumulation of lipids by Sudan red labelling in hepatocytes of zone I than zones II and III of the liver acinus. The increase in lipids coincided with an increase in iron staining in macrophages around liver microvessels and increased immunostaining to melanotransferrin and the lipid peroxidation product, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), in zone 1. The results are suggestive of microvascular damage associated with iron accumulation and oxidative stress in the liver during hypercholesterolemia.

  15. Evidence That G-quadruplex DNA Accumulates in the Cytoplasm and Participates in Stress Granule Assembly in Response to Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Byrd, Alicia K; Zybailov, Boris L; Maddukuri, Leena; Gao, Jun; Marecki, John C; Jaiswal, Mihir; Bell, Matthew R; Griffin, Wezley C; Reed, Megan R; Chib, Shubeena; Mackintosh, Samuel G; MacNicol, Angus M; Baldini, Giulia; Eoff, Robert L; Raney, Kevin D

    2016-08-19

    Cells engage numerous signaling pathways in response to oxidative stress that together repair macromolecular damage or direct the cell toward apoptosis. As a result of DNA damage, mitochondrial DNA or nuclear DNA has been shown to enter the cytoplasm where it binds to "DNA sensors," which in turn initiate signaling cascades. Here we report data that support a novel signaling pathway in response to oxidative stress mediated by specific guanine-rich sequences that can fold into G-quadruplex DNA (G4DNA). In response to oxidative stress, we demonstrate that sequences capable of forming G4DNA appear at increasing levels in the cytoplasm and participate in assembly of stress granules. Identified proteins that bind to endogenous G4DNA in the cytoplasm are known to modulate mRNA translation and participate in stress granule formation. Consistent with these findings, stress granule formation is known to regulate mRNA translation during oxidative stress. We propose a signaling pathway whereby cells can rapidly respond to DNA damage caused by oxidative stress. Guanine-rich sequences that are excised from damaged genomic DNA are proposed to enter the cytoplasm where they can regulate translation through stress granule formation. This newly proposed role for G4DNA provides an additional molecular explanation for why such sequences are prevalent in the human genome.

  16. Comparative proteomics of a lycopene-accumulating mutant reveals the important role of oxidative stress on carotenogenesis in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis [L.] osbeck).

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhiyong; Liu, Qing; Yun, Ze; Guan, Rui; Zeng, Wenfang; Xu, Qiang; Deng, Xiuxin

    2009-12-01

    A spontaneous sweet orange (Citrus sinenesis [L.] Osbeck) mutant 'Hong Anliu' is of high value due to lycopene accumulation in the pulp. In this study, we analyzed the proteomic alterations in the pulp of 'Hong Anliu' versus its wild type (WT) at four maturing stages by using 2-DE combined with MALDI-TOF-TOF MS. Among the 74 differentially expressed proteins identified, the majority are predicted to be involved in stress response, carbohydrate/energy metabolism and regulation, or protein fate, modification and degradation. Particularly, expression levels of six anti-oxidative enzymes were altered by the mutation; and assays of their respective enzymatic activities indicated an enhanced level of oxidative stress in 'Hong Anliu', implying a regulatory role of oxidative stress on carotenogenesis. This conclusion was further confirmed by our observation that treatment of fruit pulps with tert-butylhydroperoxide (a ROS progenitor) induced lycopene accumulation in 'Hong Anliu' only. Gene expression showed that genes predicted to function upstream of lycopene biosynthesis were generally upregulated in juice sacs, but downregulated in segment membranes in both 'Hong Anliu' and its WT. The result suggests an important role of post-transcriptional regulation on carotenogenesis since lycopene was induced in 'Hong Anliu' but not WT. The result also implies that carotenogenesis in juice sacs and segment membranes of citrus fruits may be regulated by different mechanisms.

  17. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in liver of freshwater fish Carassius auratus following in vivo exposure to waterborne zinc under different pH values.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Qin, Li; Wang, Chao; Wang, Zunyao; Wang, Liansheng

    2014-05-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the combined effect of zinc and pH on metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to 0.1 and 1.0mg Zn/L at three pH values (5.0, 7.25, 9.0) for 3, 12, and 30 d. After each exposure, the contents of three trace elements (Zn, Fe and Cu) were determined in liver. Generally, longer exposure to zinc (12d and 30 d) increased hepatic Zn and Cu deposition, but decreased Fe content. Increasing accumulation of Zn in the tissue was also observed with increasing zinc concentration in the exposure medium. Moreover, hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), together with the level of glutathione (GSH) were measured to evaluate the oxidative stress status. The decreases in the four measured biochemical parameters after 3d exposure might reflect the failure of the antioxidant defense system in neutralizing the ROS generated during the metabolic process, while the recovery of the antioxidants at days 12 and 30 suggested a possible shift toward a detoxification mechanism. With regard to the influence of pH on zinc toxicity, the general observation was that the living environment became more stressful when the water conditions changed from an acidic state toward a near-neutral or alkaline state. PMID:24632310

  18. Peroxisomes Are Required for in Vivo Nitric Oxide Accumulation in the Cytosol following Salinity Stress of Arabidopsis Plants1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Corpas, Francisco J.; Hayashi, Makoto; Mano, Shoji; Nishimura, Mikio; Barroso, Juan B.

    2009-01-01

    Peroxisomes are unique organelles involved in multiple cellular metabolic pathways. Nitric oxide (NO) is a free radical active in many physiological functions under normal and stress conditions. Using Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) wild type and mutants expressing green fluorescent protein through the addition of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1), which enables peroxisomes to be visualized in vivo, this study analyzes the temporal and cell distribution of NO during the development of 3-, 5-, 8-, and 11-d-old Arabidopsis seedlings and shows that Arabidopsis peroxisomes accumulate NO in vivo. Pharmacological analyses using nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitors detected the presence of putative calcium-dependent NOS activity. Furthermore, peroxins Pex12 and Pex13 appear to be involved in transporting the putative NOS protein to peroxisomes, since pex12 and pex13 mutants, which are defective in PTS1- and PTS2-dependent protein transport to peroxisomes, registered lower NO content. Additionally, we show that under salinity stress (100 mm NaCl), peroxisomes are required for NO accumulation in the cytosol, thereby participating in the generation of peroxynitrite (ONOO−) and in increasing protein tyrosine nitration, which is a marker of nitrosative stress. PMID:19783645

  19. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in liver of freshwater fish Carassius auratus following in vivo exposure to waterborne zinc under different pH values.

    PubMed

    Qu, Ruijuan; Feng, Mingbao; Wang, Xinghao; Qin, Li; Wang, Chao; Wang, Zunyao; Wang, Liansheng

    2014-05-01

    In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the combined effect of zinc and pH on metal accumulation and oxidative stress biomarkers in Carassius auratus. Fish were exposed to 0.1 and 1.0mg Zn/L at three pH values (5.0, 7.25, 9.0) for 3, 12, and 30 d. After each exposure, the contents of three trace elements (Zn, Fe and Cu) were determined in liver. Generally, longer exposure to zinc (12d and 30 d) increased hepatic Zn and Cu deposition, but decreased Fe content. Increasing accumulation of Zn in the tissue was also observed with increasing zinc concentration in the exposure medium. Moreover, hepatic antioxidant enzyme activities including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), together with the level of glutathione (GSH) were measured to evaluate the oxidative stress status. The decreases in the four measured biochemical parameters after 3d exposure might reflect the failure of the antioxidant defense system in neutralizing the ROS generated during the metabolic process, while the recovery of the antioxidants at days 12 and 30 suggested a possible shift toward a detoxification mechanism. With regard to the influence of pH on zinc toxicity, the general observation was that the living environment became more stressful when the water conditions changed from an acidic state toward a near-neutral or alkaline state.

  20. Hydrodynamic stress induces monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloid accumulation by Uncaria tomentosa (Willd) D. C. cell suspension cultures via oxidative burst.

    PubMed

    Trejo-Tapia, Gabriela; Sepúlveda-Jiménez, Gabriela; Trejo-Espino, José Luis; Cerda-García-Rojas, Carlos M; de la Torre, Mayra; Rodríguez-Monroy, Mario; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C

    2007-09-01

    Uncaria tomentosa cell suspension cultures were grown in a 2-L stirred tank bioreactor operating at a shear rate gamma(.)(avg)=86 s(-1). The cultures showed an early monophasic oxidative burst measured as H2O2 production (2.15 micromol H2O2 g(-1) dw). This response was followed by a transient production of monoterpenoid oxindole alkaloids (178 +/- 40 microg L(-1) at 24 h). At the stationary phase (144 h), the increase of the shear rate gamma(.)(avg) up to 150 s(-1) and/or oxygen tension up to 85% generated H2O2, restoring oxindole alkaloid production. U. tomentosa cells cultured in Erlenmeyer flasks also exhibited the monophasic oxidative burst but the H2O2 production was 16-fold lower and the alkaloids were not detected. These cells exposed to H2O2 generated in situ produced oxindole alkaloids reaching a maximum of 234 +/- 40 microg L(-1). A positive correlation was observed between the oxindole alkaloid production and the endogenous H2O2 level. On the other hand, addition of 1 microM diphenyleneiodonium (NAD(P)H oxidase inhibitor) or 10 microM sodium azide (peroxidases inhibitor) reduced both H2O2 production and oxindole alkaloids build up, suggesting that these enzymes might play a role in the oxidative burst induced by the hydrodynamic stress.

  1. Salt Stress Reduces Root Meristem Size by Nitric Oxide-Mediated Modulation of Auxin Accumulation and Signaling in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wen; Li, Rong-Jun; Han, Tong-Tong; Cai, Wei; Fu, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    The development of the plant root system is highly plastic, which allows the plant to adapt to various environmental stresses. Salt stress inhibits root elongation by reducing the size of the root meristem. However, the mechanism underlying this process remains unclear. In this study, we explored whether and how auxin and nitric oxide (NO) are involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) using physiological, pharmacological, and genetic approaches. We found that salt stress significantly reduced root meristem size by down-regulating the expression of PINFORMED (PIN) genes, thereby reducing auxin levels. In addition, salt stress promoted AUXIN RESISTANT3 (AXR3)/INDOLE-3-ACETIC ACID17 (IAA17) stabilization, which repressed auxin signaling during this process. Furthermore, salt stress stimulated NO accumulation, whereas blocking NO production with the inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine-methylester compromised the salt-mediated reduction of root meristem size, PIN down-regulation, and stabilization of AXR3/IAA17, indicating that NO is involved in salt-mediated inhibition of root meristem growth. Taken together, these findings suggest that salt stress inhibits root meristem growth by repressing PIN expression (thereby reducing auxin levels) and stabilizing IAA17 (thereby repressing auxin signaling) via increasing NO levels. PMID:25818700

  2. Synechocystis PCC6803 and PCC6906 dnaK2 expression confers salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis via reduction of hydrogen peroxide accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jonghyun; Ahn, Myung Suk; Park, Young Min; Kim, Suk Weon; Min, Sung Ran; Jeong, Weon Joong; Liu, Jang R

    2014-02-01

    Abiotic stress slows plant growth and development. Because salt stress, particularly from NaCl, acts as an important limiting factor in agricultural productivity, the identification and manipulation of genes related to salt tolerance could improve crop productivity. Prokaryotic, heat shock protein (Hsp), DnaK from the ubiquitous Hsp70 family is upregulated in cells that are under abiotic stress. Synechocystis spp. cyanobacteria encode at least three potential DnaK proteins in their genome. Here, expressions of dnaK1s and dnaK2s from two Synechocystis spp. PCC6803 (Sy6803) and PCC6906 (Sy6906), enhanced salt tolerance in a dnaK-defective Escherichia coli strain. In contrast, dnaK3s in both strains were ineffective, indicating that dnaK3 is functionally different from dnaK1 and dnaK2 in Synechocystis spp. under salt stress. Ectopic expression of dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 conferred salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis plants, which exhibited greater root length, chlorophyll content, fresh weight, and survival rate than wild type plants, all in the presence of NaCl. In transgenic plants, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation was reduced under NaCl stress and loss of chlorophyll content was reduced under H2O2 stress. Overall results suggest that dnaK2s from Sy6803 and Sy6906 confer salt and oxidative tolerance in transgenic plants by reduction of H2O2 accumulation.

  3. Oxidative and nitrative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients: effect of long-term enzyme replacement therapy and relation with glycosaminoglycan accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Donida, Bruna; Mescka, Caroline P; Rodrigues, Daiane G B; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Bitencourt, Fernanda H; Burin, Maira G; de Souza, Carolina F M; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The main treatment for MPS II is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previous studies described potential benefits of six months of ERT against oxidative stress in patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate oxidative, nitrative and inflammatory biomarkers in MPS II patients submitted to long term ERT. It were analyzed urine and blood samples from patients on ERT (mean time: 5.2years) and healthy controls. Patients presented increased levels of lipid peroxidation, assessed by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane and plasmatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Concerning to protein damage, urinary di-tyrosine (di-Tyr) was increased in patients; however, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups in plasma were not altered. It were also verified increased levels of urinary nitrate+nitrite and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) in MPS II patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were increased in treated patients. GAG levels were correlated to di-Tyr and nitrate+nitrite. Furthermore, IL-1β was positively correlated with TNF-α and NO. Contrastingly, we did not observed alterations in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, in reduced glutathione content and in the plasmatic antioxidant capacity. Although some parameters were still altered in MPS II patients, these results may suggest a protective role of long-term ERT against oxidative stress, especially upon oxidative damage to protein and enzymatic and non-enzymatic defenses. Moreover, the redox imbalance observed in treated patients seems to be GAG- and pro-inflammatory cytokine-related.

  4. Oxidative and nitrative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines in Mucopolysaccharidosis type II patients: effect of long-term enzyme replacement therapy and relation with glycosaminoglycan accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Carlos Eduardo Diaz; Donida, Bruna; Mescka, Caroline P; Rodrigues, Daiane G B; Marchetti, Desirèe P; Bitencourt, Fernanda H; Burin, Maira G; de Souza, Carolina F M; Giugliani, Roberto; Vargas, Carmen Regla

    2016-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type II (MPS II) is a lysosomal storage disease caused by a deficient activity of iduronate-2-sulfatase, leading to abnormal accumulation of glycosaminoglycans (GAG). The main treatment for MPS II is enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Previous studies described potential benefits of six months of ERT against oxidative stress in patients. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate oxidative, nitrative and inflammatory biomarkers in MPS II patients submitted to long term ERT. It were analyzed urine and blood samples from patients on ERT (mean time: 5.2years) and healthy controls. Patients presented increased levels of lipid peroxidation, assessed by urinary 15-F2t-isoprostane and plasmatic thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances. Concerning to protein damage, urinary di-tyrosine (di-Tyr) was increased in patients; however, sulfhydryl and carbonyl groups in plasma were not altered. It were also verified increased levels of urinary nitrate+nitrite and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) in MPS II patients. Pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β and TNF-α were increased in treated patients. GAG levels were correlated to di-Tyr and nitrate+nitrite. Furthermore, IL-1β was positively correlated with TNF-α and NO. Contrastingly, we did not observed alterations in erythrocyte superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase activities, in reduced glutathione content and in the plasmatic antioxidant capacity. Although some parameters were still altered in MPS II patients, these results may suggest a protective role of long-term ERT against oxidative stress, especially upon oxidative damage to protein and enzymatic and non-enzymatic defenses. Moreover, the redox imbalance observed in treated patients seems to be GAG- and pro-inflammatory cytokine-related. PMID:27251652

  5. Impaired response to oxidative stress in senescent cells may lead to accumulation of DNA damage in mesothelial cells from aged donors

    SciTech Connect

    Ksiazek, Krzysztof Piatek, Katarzyna; Witowski, Janusz

    2008-08-22

    The accumulation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) exemplifies oxidative DNA injury, which is strongly implicated in ageing. We show that human peritoneal mesothelial cells (HPMCs) from donors >75 years have lower proliferative capacity but increased 8-OH-dG content compared with cells from individuals <25 years. We detected a positive relationship between the donor's age and the 8-OH-dG level in early-passage HPMCs, and an inverse relationship between those 8-OH-dG levels and subsequent replicative lifespan of HPMCs (n = 30). In early-passage cells from donors >75 years, the repair of oxidant-induced 8-OH-dG was delayed compared to cells from donors <25 years. This was coupled with prolonged removal of reactive oxygen species and faster decline in superoxide dismutase activity. Similar effects were observed in HPMCs rendered senescent in vitro. These results indicate that increased 8-OH-dG levels in HPMCs from aged individuals may reflect the in vivo presence of senescent cells with increased vulnerability to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage.

  6. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates.

    PubMed

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias D J; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos L V; Ramaekers, Frans C S; Koopman, Werner J H; Willems, Peter H G M; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies.

  7. Sustained accumulation of prelamin A and depletion of lamin A/C both cause oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction but induce different cell fates

    PubMed Central

    Sieprath, Tom; Corne, Tobias DJ; Nooteboom, Marco; Grootaert, Charlotte; Rajkovic, Andreja; Buysschaert, Benjamin; Robijns, Joke; Broers, Jos LV; Ramaekers, Frans CS; Koopman, Werner JH; Willems, Peter HGM; De Vos, Winnok H

    2015-01-01

    The cell nucleus is structurally and functionally organized by lamins, intermediate filament proteins that form the nuclear lamina. Point mutations in genes that encode a specific subset of lamins, the A-type lamins, cause a spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. Recent evidence points to a role for A-type lamins in intracellular redox homeostasis. To determine whether lamin A/C depletion and prelamin A accumulation differentially induce oxidative stress, we have performed a quantitative microscopy-based analysis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in human fibroblasts subjected to sustained siRNA-mediated knockdown of LMNA and ZMPSTE24, respectively. We measured a highly significant increase in basal ROS levels and an even more prominent rise of induced ROS levels in lamin A/C depleted cells, eventually resulting in Δψm hyperpolarization and apoptosis. Depletion of ZMPSTE24 on the other hand, triggered a senescence pathway that was associated with moderately increased ROS levels and a transient Δψm depolarization. Both knockdowns were accompanied by an upregulation of several ROS detoxifying enzymes. Taken together, our data suggest that both persistent prelamin A accumulation and lamin A/C depletion elevate ROS levels, but to a different extent and with different effects on cell fate. This may contribute to the variety of disease phenotypes witnessed in laminopathies. PMID:25996284

  8. The free-radical damage theory: Accumulating evidence against a simple link of oxidative stress to ageing and lifespan.

    PubMed

    Speakman, John R; Selman, Colin

    2011-04-01

    Recent work on a small European cave salamander (Proteus anguinus) has revealed that it has exceptional longevity, yet it appears to have unexceptional defences against oxidative damage. This paper comes at the end of a string of other studies that are calling into question the free-radical damage theory of ageing. This theory rose to prominence in the 1990s as the dominant theory for why we age and die. Despite substantial correlative evidence to support it, studies in the last five years have raised doubts over its importance. In particular, these include studies of mice with the major antioxidant genes knocked out (both singly and in combination), which show the expected elevation in oxidative damage but no impact on lifespan. Combined, these findings raise fundamental questions over whether the free-radical damage theory remains useful for understanding the ageing process, and variation in lifespan and life histories.

  9. Sodium chloride stress induces nitric oxide accumulation in root tips and oil body surface accompanying slower oleosin degradation in sunflower seedlings.

    PubMed

    David, Anisha; Yadav, Sunita; Bhatla, Satish C

    2010-12-01

    Present work highlights the involvement of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in sodium chloride (NaCl)-induced biochemical regulation of seedling growth in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L., cv. Morden). The growth response is dependent on NaCl concentration to which seedlings are exposed, they being tolerant to 40 mM NaCl and showing a reduction in extension growth at 120 mM NaCl. NaCl sensitivity of sunflower seedlings accompanies a fourfold increase in Na(+) /K(+) ratio in roots (as compared to that in cotyledons) and rapid transport of Na(+) to the cotyledons, thereby enhancing Na(+) /K(+) ratio in cotyledons as well. A transient increase in endogenous NO content, primarily contributed by putative NOS activity in roots of 4-day-old seedlings subjected to NaCl stress and the relative reduction in Na(+) /K(+) ratio after 4 days, indicates that NO regulates Na(+) accumulation, probably by affecting the associated transporter proteins. Root tips exhibit an early and transient enhanced expression of 4,5-diaminofluorescein diacetate (DAF-2DA) positive NO signal in the presence of 120 mM NaCl. Oil bodies from 2-day-old seedling cotyledons exhibit enhanced localization of NO signal in response to 120 mM NaCl treatment, coinciding with a greater retention of the principal oil body membrane proteins, i.e. oleosins. Abolition of DAF positive fluorescence by the application of specific NO scavenger [2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethyllimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (PTIO)] authenticates the presence of endogenous NO. These novel findings provide evidence for a possible protective role of NO during proteolytic degradation of oleosins prior to/accompanying lipolysis.

  10. Effect of chronic accumulation of aluminum on renal function, cortical renal oxidative stress and cortical renal organic anion transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Gionotti, Marisa; Millen, Néstor; Elías, María Mónica

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the nephrotoxicity of aluminum lactate administered for 3 months (0.57 mg/100 g bodyweight aluminum, i.p., three times per week) to male Wistar rats. Renal function was studied after 6 weeks of treatment (urine was obtained from rats in metabolic cages) and at the end of the treatment using clearance techniques. Another group of rats was used as kidneys donors at the end of treatment. The renal cortex was separated and homogenized to determine glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. Renal cortex slices were also used to study the p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) accumulation during steady-state conditions and the kinetics of uptake process. Clearance results, at the end of the treatment, indicated that renal functions in treated-rats were not different from those measured in control rats, although the renal concentration parameters differ when they were measured in treated rats after 24 h of food and water deprivation. Balances of water and sodium were also modified at both 1.5 and 3 months of treatment. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) relative to inulin excreted in urine was significantly impaired: controls 2.2+/-0.6 IUI/mg, Al-treated 5.1+/-0.5 IU/mg, P<0.05. These data indicated that proximal tubular cells were loosing apical brush border membranes. Data obtained in cortex homogenates indicated that both GSH and GST activity were significantly decreased, and a significant increase of LPO was noted simultaneously in Al-treated rats. Renal accumulation of PAH, estimated as slice-to-medium ratio, decreased significantly in the Al-treated rats: control rats 3.06+/-0.02 ( n=12), Al-treated rats 2.26+/-0.04 ( n=12), P<0.0001. The maximal rate of uptake was also diminished in treated rats, while the apparent affinity remained unchanged. All these results indicate that aluminum accumulation in renal tissue affects cellular metabolism, promotes oxidative stress and

  11. Effect of chronic accumulation of aluminum on renal function, cortical renal oxidative stress and cortical renal organic anion transport in rats.

    PubMed

    Mahieu, Stella T; Gionotti, Marisa; Millen, Néstor; Elías, María Mónica

    2003-11-01

    The aim of the present work was to study the nephrotoxicity of aluminum lactate administered for 3 months (0.57 mg/100 g bodyweight aluminum, i.p., three times per week) to male Wistar rats. Renal function was studied after 6 weeks of treatment (urine was obtained from rats in metabolic cages) and at the end of the treatment using clearance techniques. Another group of rats was used as kidneys donors at the end of treatment. The renal cortex was separated and homogenized to determine glutathione (GSH) level, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity and lipid peroxidation (LPO) level. Renal cortex slices were also used to study the p-aminohippuric acid (PAH) accumulation during steady-state conditions and the kinetics of uptake process. Clearance results, at the end of the treatment, indicated that renal functions in treated-rats were not different from those measured in control rats, although the renal concentration parameters differ when they were measured in treated rats after 24 h of food and water deprivation. Balances of water and sodium were also modified at both 1.5 and 3 months of treatment. The activity of alkaline phosphatase (AP) relative to inulin excreted in urine was significantly impaired: controls 2.2+/-0.6 IUI/mg, Al-treated 5.1+/-0.5 IU/mg, P<0.05. These data indicated that proximal tubular cells were loosing apical brush border membranes. Data obtained in cortex homogenates indicated that both GSH and GST activity were significantly decreased, and a significant increase of LPO was noted simultaneously in Al-treated rats. Renal accumulation of PAH, estimated as slice-to-medium ratio, decreased significantly in the Al-treated rats: control rats 3.06+/-0.02 ( n=12), Al-treated rats 2.26+/-0.04 ( n=12), P<0.0001. The maximal rate of uptake was also diminished in treated rats, while the apparent affinity remained unchanged. All these results indicate that aluminum accumulation in renal tissue affects cellular metabolism, promotes oxidative stress and

  12. Today's oxidative stress markers.

    PubMed

    Czerska, Marta; Mikołajewska, Karolina; Zieliński, Marek; Gromadzińska, Jolanta; Wąsowicz, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress represents a situation where there is an imbalance between the reactive oxygen species (ROS) and the availability and the activity of antioxidants. This balance is disturbed by increased generation of free radicals or decreased antioxidant activity. It is very important to develop methods and find appropriate biomarkers that may be used to assess oxidative stress in vivo. It is significant because appropriate measurement of such stress is necessary in identifying its role in lifestyle-related diseases. Previously used markers of oxidative stress, such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) or malondialdehyde (MDA), are progressively being supplemented by new ones, such as isoprostanes (IsoPs) and their metabolites or allantoin. This paper is focusing on the presentation of new ones, promising markers of oxidative stress (IsoPs, their metabolites and allantoin), taking into account the advantage of those markers over markers used previously. PMID:26325052

  13. Staphylococcal response to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaupp, Rosmarie; Ledala, Nagender; Somerville, Greg A.

    2012-01-01

    Staphylococci are a versatile genus of bacteria that are capable of causing acute and chronic infections in diverse host species. The success of staphylococci as pathogens is due in part to their ability to mitigate endogenous and exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress. Endogenous oxidative stress is a consequence of life in an aerobic environment; whereas, exogenous oxidative and nitrosative stress are often due to the bacteria's interaction with host immune systems. To overcome the deleterious effects of oxidative and nitrosative stress, staphylococci have evolved protection, detoxification, and repair mechanisms that are controlled by a network of regulators. In this review, we summarize the cellular targets of oxidative stress, the mechanisms by which staphylococci sense oxidative stress and damage, oxidative stress protection and repair mechanisms, and regulation of the oxidative stress response. When possible, special attention is given to how the oxidative stress defense mechanisms help staphylococci control oxidative stress in the host. PMID:22919625

  14. Protective effect of panax notoginseng saponins on acute ethanol-induced liver injury is associated with ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing ethanol-mediated oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ren-Bo; Tian, Ke; Cao, Yi-Wei; Bao, Jiao-Lin; Wang, Meng; He, Chengwei; Hu, Yuanjia; Su, Huanxing; Wan, Jian-Bo

    2015-03-11

    The aim of present study was to evaluate the effects of Panax notoginseng saponins (PNS) against acute ethanol-induced liver injury and further to elucidate its probable mechanisms. Mice were treated with PNS (100 or 300 mg/kg) once daily for seven consecutive days priors to ethanol gavage (4.7 g/kg) every 12 h for a total of three doses. Acute alcohol gavage dramatically significantly increased serum activities of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (23.4 ± 5.0 IU/L vs 11.7 ± 4.1 IU/L) and aspartate aminotransferase (AST) (52.6 ± 14.9 IU/L vs 31.1 ± 12.9 IU/L), and hepatic triglyceride level (4.04 ± 0.64 mg/g vs 1.92 ± 0.34 mg/g), these elevations were significantly diminished by pretreatment with PNS at dose of 100 mg/kg or 300 mg/kg. Alcohol exposure markedly induced the lipolysis of white adipose tissue (WAT), up-regulated protein expression of the phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (p-HSL, p < 0.01), and total HSL (p < 0.01), and enhanced fatty acid uptake capacity in liver as indicated by increasing hepatic CD36 expression (p < 0.01), these effects were attenuated by PNS treatment. Additionally, PNS suppressed the elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and malondialdehyde (MDA) content, reduced TNF-α and IL-6 levels, restored glutathione (GSH) level, enhanced the superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in liver, and abrogated cytochrome P450 2E1 (CYP2E1) induction. These data demonstrated that pretreatment with PNS protected against acute ethanol-induced liver injury, possibly through ameliorating hepatic lipid accumulation and reducing CYP2E1-mediated oxidative stress. Our findings also suggested that PNS may be potential to be developed as an effective agent for acute ethanol-induced liver injury. PMID:25665731

  15. Vitamin C deficiency in the brain impairs cognition, increases amyloid accumulation and deposition, and oxidative stress in APP/PSEN1 and normally-aging mice

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Shilpy; Bernardo, Alexandra; Walker, Michelle Jennifer; Kennard, John Andrew; Kim, Grace Youngeun; Kessler, Eric Sean; Harrison, Fiona Edith

    2015-01-01

    Subclinical vitamin C deficiency is widespread in many populations, but its role in both Alzheimer’s disease and normal aging is understudied. In the present study we decreased brain vitamin C in the APPSWE/PSEN1deltaE9 mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, by crossing APP/PSEN1+ bigenic mice with SVCT2+/− heterozygous knockout mice, which have lower numbers of the sodium-dependent vitamin C transporter required for neuronal vitamin C transport. SVCT2+/− mice performed less well on the rotarod task at both 5 and 12 months of age compared to littermates. SVCT2+/− and APP/PSEN1+, mice, and the combination genotype SVCT2+/−APP/PSEN1+, were also impaired on multiple tests of cognitive ability (olfactory memory task, Y-maze alternation, conditioned fear, Morris water maze). In younger mice, both low vitamin C (SVCT2+/−) and APP/PSEN1 mutations increased brain cortex oxidative stress (malondialdehyde, protein carbonyls, F2-isoprostanes) and decreased total glutathione compared to wild-type controls. SVCT2+/− mice also had increased amounts of both soluble and insoluble Aβ1-42 and a higher Aβ1-42/1-40 ratio. By 14 months of age, oxidative stress levels were similar among groups, but there were more amyloid-β plaque deposits in both hippocampus and cortex of SVCT2+/−APP/PSEN1+ mice compared to APP/PSEN1+ mice with normal brain vitamin C. The data suggest that even moderate intracellular vitamin C deficiency plays an important role in accelerating amyloid pathogenesis, particularly during early stages of disease development, and that these effects are likely modulated by oxidative stress pathways. PMID:25642732

  16. Cutaneous oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Polefka, Thomas G; Meyer, Thomas A; Agin, Patricia P; Bianchini, Robert J

    2012-03-01

    The earliest known microfossil records suggest that microorganisms existed on the earth approximately 3.8 billion years ago. Not only did sunlight drive this evolutionary process, but it also allowed photosynthetic organisms to elaborate oxygen and fundamentally change the earth's atmosphere and subsequent evolution. Paradoxically, however, an atmosphere of 20% oxygen offers aerobic organisms both benefits and some key challenges, particularly, to the external integument. This mini-review summarizes almost 40 years of research and provides a "60 000-foot" perspective on cutaneous oxidative stress. Topics reviewed include the following: What are free radicals and reactive oxygen species? Where do they come from? What is their chemistry? What are their roles and/or impact on the skin? What antioxidant defenses are available to mitigate oxidative stress. PMID:22360336

  17. Neuroprotective effects of chronic exposure of SH-SY5Y to low lithium concentration involve glycolysis stimulation, extracellular pyruvate accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nciri, Riadh; Desmoulin, Frank; Allagui, Mohamed Saleh; Murat, Jean-Claude; Feki, Abdelfattah El; Vincent, Christian; Croute, Françoise

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that lithium protects neurons from death induced by a wide array of neurotoxic insults, stimulates neurogenesis and could be used to prevent age-related neurodegenerative diseases. In this study, SH-SY5Y human neuronal cells were cultured in the absence (Con) or in the presence (Li+) of a low lithium concentration (0.5 mm Li2CO3, i.e. 1 mm lithium ion) for 25-50 wk. In the course of treatment, growth rate of Con and Li+ cells was regularly analysed using Alamar Blue dye. Resistance to oxidative stress was investigated by evaluating: (1) the adverse effects of high concentrations of lithium (4-8 mm) or glutamate (20-90 mm) on cell growth rate; (2) the levels of lipid peroxidation (TBARS) and total glutathione; (3) the expression levels of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein. In addition, glucose metabolism was investigated by analysing selected metabolites in culture media and cell extracts by 1H-NMR spectroscopy. As compared to Con, Li+ cells multiplied faster and were more resistant to stress, as evidenced by a lower dose-dependent decrease of Alamar Blue reduction and dose-dependent increase of TBARS levels induced by toxic doses of lithium and glutamate. Total glutathione content and Bcl-2 level were increased in Li+ cells. Glucose consumption and glycolytic activity were enhanced in Li+ cells and an important release of pyruvate was observed. We conclude that chronic exposure to lithium induces adaptive changes in metabolism of SH-SY5Y cells involving a higher cell growth rate and a better resistance to oxidative stress.

  18. Oxidative Stress in Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Percário, Sandro; Moreira, Danilo R.; Gomes, Bruno A. Q.; Ferreira, Michelli E. S.; Gonçalves, Ana Carolina M.; Laurindo, Paula S. O. C.; Vilhena, Thyago C.; Dolabela, Maria F.; Green, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    Malaria is a significant public health problem in more than 100 countries and causes an estimated 200 million new infections every year. Despite the significant effort to eradicate this dangerous disease, lack of complete knowledge of its physiopathology compromises the success in this enterprise. In this paper we review oxidative stress mechanisms involved in the disease and discuss the potential benefits of antioxidant supplementation as an adjuvant antimalarial strategy. PMID:23208374

  19. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    PubMed Central

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  20. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016.

  1. Curcuma longa polyphenols improve insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and attenuate proinflammatory response of 3T3-L1 adipose cells during oxidative stress through regulation of key adipokines and antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Septembre-Malaterre, Axelle; Le Sage, Fanny; Hatia, Sarah; Catan, Aurélie; Janci, Laurent; Gonthier, Marie-Paule

    2016-07-01

    Plant polyphenols may exert beneficial action against obesity-related oxidative stress and inflammation which promote insulin resistance. This study evaluated the effect of polyphenols extracted from French Curcuma longa on 3T3-L1 adipose cells exposed to H2 O2 -mediated oxidative stress. We found that Curcuma longa extract exhibited high amounts of curcuminoids identified as curcumin, demethoxycurcumin, and bisdemethoxycurcumin, which exerted free radical-scavenging activities. Curcuma longa polyphenols improved insulin-mediated lipid accumulation and upregulated peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma gene expression and adiponectin secretion which decreased in H2 O2 -treated cells. Curcuminoids attenuated H2 O2 -enhanced production of pro-inflammatory molecules such as interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and nuclear factor κappa B. Moreover, they reduced intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species elevated by H2 O2 and modulated the expression of genes encoding superoxide dismutase and catalase antioxidant enzymes. Collectively, these findings highlight that Curcuma longa polyphenols protect adipose cells against oxidative stress and may improve obesity-related metabolic disorders. © 2016 BioFactors, 42(4):418-430, 2016. PMID:27094023

  2. Oxide charge accumulation in metal oxide semiconductor devices during irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, D. ); Chan, C. )

    1991-05-15

    An analysis of a simple physical model for radiation induced oxide charge accumulation in the SiO{sub 2} layer of metal oxide semiconductor (MOS) structure has been developed. The model assumes that both electron and hole traps exist in the oxide layer. These traps can capture electrons as well as holes during irradiation. Using this model, final oxide charge distributions in the oxide layer of MOS capacitors exposed to a total dose radiation can be predicted. The resulting charge distribution is calculated to yield the midgap voltage shifts as functions of total dose, bias voltage, and oxide thickness. The results are shown to agree well with the experimental data. Furthermore, the model successfully analyzes the radiation-induced negative oxide charge distribution in an ion-implanted, radiation-hard MOS capacitor. These negative oxide charge distributions not only partially compensate the effects of trapped positive oxide charges but also reduced the density of positive oxide charges trapped near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. We found the reduction of the positive oxide charge density near the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface is due to internal electric field modification in the oxide layer.

  3. Evaluation of 3-hydroxybutyrate as an enzyme-protective agent against heating and oxidative damage and its potential role in stress response of poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) accumulating cells.

    PubMed

    Obruca, Stanislav; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Samek, Ota; Marova, Ivana

    2016-02-01

    Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) is a common carbon- and energy-storage compound simultaneously produced and degraded into its monomer 3-hydroxybutyrate (3HB) by numerous bacteria and Archae in a metabolic pathway called the PHB cycle. We investigated 3HB as a chemical chaperone capable of protecting model enzymes, namely lipase and lysozyme, from adverse effects of high temperature and oxidation. Heat-mediated denaturation of lipase in the presence or absence of 3HB was monitored by dynamic light scattering (DLS) revealing a significant protective effect of 3HB which increased as its concentration rose. Furthermore, when compared at the same molar concentration, 3HB showed a greater protective effect than the well-known chemical chaperones trehalose and hydroxyectoine. The higher protective effect of 3HB was also confirmed when employing differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and lysozyme as a model enzyme. Furthermore, 3HB was capable of protecting lipase not only against thermal-mediated denaturation but also against oxidative damage by Cu(2+) and H2O2; its protection was higher than that of trehalose and comparable to that of hydroxyectoine. Taking into account that the PHB-producing strain Cupriavidus necator H16 reveals a 16.5-fold higher intracellular concentration than the PHB non-producing mutant C. necator PHB(-4), it might be expected that the functional PHB cycle might be responsible for maintaining a higher intracellular level of 3HB which, aside from other positive aspects of functional PHB metabolism, enhances stress resistance of bacterial strains capable of simultaneous PHB synthesis and mobilization. In addition, 3HB can be used in various applications and formulations as an efficient enzyme-stabilizing and enzyme-protecting additive. PMID:26590589

  4. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  5. Oxidative stress by inorganic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tee, Jie Kai; Ong, Choon Nam; Bay, Boon Huat; Ho, Han Kiat; Leong, David Tai

    2016-05-01

    Metallic and metallic oxide nanoparticles (NPs) have been increasingly used for various bio-applications owing to their unique physiochemical properties in terms of conductivity, optical sensitivity, and reactivity. With the extensive usage of NPs, increased human exposure may cause oxidative stress and lead to undesirable health consequences. To date, various endogenous and exogenous sources of oxidants contributing to oxidative stress have been widely reported. Oxidative stress is generally defined as an imbalance between the production of oxidants and the activity of antioxidants, but it is often misrepresented as a single type of cellular stress. At the biological level, NPs can initiate oxidative stress directly or indirectly through various mechanisms, leading to profound effects ranging from the molecular to the disease level. Such effects of oxidative stress have been implicated owing to their small size and high biopersistence. On the other hand, cellular antioxidants help to counteract oxidative stress and protect the cells from further damage. While oxidative stress is commonly known to exert negative biological effects, measured and intentional use of NPs to induce oxidative stress may provide desirable effects to either stimulate cell growth or promote cell death. Hence, NP-induced oxidative stress can be viewed from a wide paradigm. Because oxidative stress is comprised of a wide array of factors, it is also important to use appropriate assays and methods to detect different pro-oxidant and antioxidant species at molecular and disease levels. WIREs Nanomed Nanobiotechnol 2016, 8:414-438. doi: 10.1002/wnan.1374 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26359790

  6. Thiamin confers enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Tunc-Ozdemir, Meral; Miller, Gad; Song, Luhua; Kim, James; Sodek, Ahmet; Koussevitzky, Shai; Misra, Amarendra Narayan; Mittler, Ron; Shintani, David

    2009-09-01

    Thiamin and thiamin pyrophosphate (TPP) are well known for their important roles in human nutrition and enzyme catalysis. In this work, we present new evidence for an additional role of these compounds in the protection of cells against oxidative damage. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants subjected to abiotic stress conditions, such as high light, cold, osmotic, salinity, and oxidative treatments, accumulated thiamin and TPP. Moreover, the accumulation of these compounds in plants subjected to oxidative stress was accompanied by enhanced expression of transcripts encoding thiamin biosynthetic enzymes. When supplemented with exogenous thiamin, wild-type plants displayed enhanced tolerance to oxidative stress induced by paraquat. Thiamin application was also found to protect the reactive oxygen species-sensitive ascorbate peroxidase1 mutant from oxidative stress. Thiamin-induced tolerance to oxidative stress was accompanied by decreased production of reactive oxygen species in plants, as evidenced from decreased protein carbonylation and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. Because thiamin could protect the salicylic acid induction-deficient1 mutant against oxidative stress, thiamin-induced oxidative protection is likely independent of salicylic acid signaling or accumulation. Taken together, our studies suggest that thiamin and TPP function as important stress-response molecules that alleviate oxidative stress during different abiotic stress conditions.

  7. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers.

  8. Investigation of the effects of distance from sources on apoptosis, oxidative stress and cytosolic calcium accumulation via TRPV1 channels induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Çiğ, Bilal; Nazıroğlu, Mustafa

    2015-10-01

    TRPV1 is a Ca2+ permeable channel and gated by noxious heat, oxidative stress and capsaicin (CAP). Some reports have indicated that non-ionized electromagnetic radiation (EMR)-induces heat and oxidative stress effects. We aimed to investigate the effects of distance from sources on calcium signaling, cytosolic ROS production, cell viability, apoptosis, plus caspase-3 and -9 values induced by mobile phones and Wi-Fi in breast cancer cells MCF-7 human breast cancer cell lines were divided into A, B, C and D groups as control, 900, 1800 and 2450 MHz groups, respectively. Cells in Group A were used as control and were kept in cell culture conditions without EMR exposure. Groups B, C and D were exposed to the EMR frequencies at different distances (0 cm, 1 cm, 5 cm, 10 cm, 20 cm and 25 cm) for 1h before CAP stimulation. The cytosolic ROS production, Ca2+ concentrations, apoptosis, caspase-3 and caspase-9 values were higher in groups B, C and D than in A group at 0 cm, 1 cm and 5 cm distances although cell viability (MTT) values were increased by the distances. There was no statistically significant difference in the values between control, 20 and 25 cm. Wi-Fi and mobile phone EMR placed within 10 cm of the cells induced excessive oxidative responses and apoptosis via TRPV1-induced cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation in the cancer cells. Using cell phones and Wi-Fi sources which are farther away than 10 cm may provide useful protection against oxidative stress, apoptosis and overload of intracellular Ca2+. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Membrane channels and transporters in cancers. PMID:25703814

  9. AarF Domain Containing Kinase 3 (ADCK3) Mutant Cells Display Signs of Oxidative Stress, Defects in Mitochondrial Homeostasis and Lysosomal Accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Jason K.; Abdul Murad, Norazian; Yeo, Abrey; McKenzie, Matthew; Ward, Micheal; Chong, Kok Leong; Schieber, Nicole L.; Parton, Robert G.; Lim, Yi Chieh; Wolvetang, Ernst; Maghzal, Ghassan J.; Stocker, Roland; Lavin, Martin F.

    2016-01-01

    Autosomal recessive ataxias are a clinically diverse group of syndromes that in some cases are caused by mutations in genes with roles in the DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation or mitochondrial function. One of these ataxias, known as Autosomal Recessive Cerebellar Ataxia Type-2 (ARCA-2, also known as SCAR9/COQ10D4; OMIM: #612016), arises due to mutations in the ADCK3 gene. The product of this gene (ADCK3) is an atypical kinase that is thought to play a regulatory role in coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) biosynthesis. Although much work has been performed on the S. cerevisiae orthologue of ADCK3, the cellular and biochemical role of its mammalian counterpart, and why mutations in this gene lead to human disease is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that ADCK3 localises to mitochondrial cristae and is targeted to this organelle via the presence of an N-terminal localisation signal. Consistent with a role in CoQ10 biosynthesis, ADCK3 deficiency decreased cellular CoQ10 content. In addition, endogenous ADCK3 was found to associate in vitro with recombinant Coq3, Coq5, Coq7 and Coq9, components of the CoQ10 biosynthetic machinery. Furthermore, cell lines derived from ARCA-2 patients display signs of oxidative stress, defects in mitochondrial homeostasis and increases in lysosomal content. Together, these data shed light on the possible molecular role of ADCK3 and provide insight into the cellular pathways affected in ARCA-2 patients. PMID:26866375

  10. Diabetes, Oxidative Stress and Physical Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Atalay, Mustafa; Laaksonen, David E.

    2002-01-01

    Oxidative stress, an imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant defense capacity of the body, is closely associated with aging and a number of diseases including cancer, cardiovascular diseases, diabetes and diabetic complications. Several mechanisms may cause oxidative insult in diabetes, although their exact contributions are not entirely clear. Accumulating evidence points to many interrelated mechanisms that increase production of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species or decrease antioxidant protection in diabetic patients. In modern medicine, regular physical exercise is an important tool in the prevention and treatment of diseases including diabetes. Although acute exhaustive exercise increases oxidative stress, exercise training has been shown to up regulate antioxidant protection. This review aims to summarize the mechanisms of increased oxidative stress in diabetes and with respect to acute and chronic exercise. PMID:24672266

  11. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Sánchez, Alba; Madrigal-Santillán, Eduardo; Bautista, Mirandeli; Esquivel-Soto, Jaime; Morales-González, Ángel; Esquivel-Chirino, Cesar; Durante-Montiel, Irene; Sánchez-Rivera, Graciela; Valadez-Vega, Carmen; Morales-González, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6); other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS). Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO), and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease. PMID:21686173

  12. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response.

    PubMed

    Busch, Andrea W U; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  13. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-01-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stress signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25618582

  14. Nitric oxide stress in sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle fibres: inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase prevents interleukin-1β-induced accumulation of β-amyloid and cell death.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Jens; Barthel, Konstanze; Zschüntzsch, Jana; Muth, Ingrid E; Swindle, Emily J; Hombach, Anja; Sehmisch, Stephan; Wrede, Arne; Lühder, Fred; Gold, Ralf; Dalakas, Marinos C

    2012-04-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis is a severely disabling myopathy. The design of effective treatment strategies is hampered by insufficient understanding of the complex disease pathology. Particularly, the nature of interrelationships between inflammatory and degenerative pathomechanisms in sporadic inclusion body myositis has remained elusive. In Alzheimer's dementia, accumulation of β-amyloid has been shown to be associated with upregulation of nitric oxide. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction, an overexpression of inducible nitric oxide synthase was observed in five out of ten patients with sporadic inclusion body myositis, two of eleven with dermatomyositis, three of eight with polymyositis, two of nine with muscular dystrophy and two of ten non-myopathic controls. Immunohistochemistry confirmed protein expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase and demonstrated intracellular nitration of tyrosine, an indicator for intra-fibre production of nitric oxide, in sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle samples, but much less in dermatomyositis or polymyositis, hardly in dystrophic muscle and not in non-myopathic controls. Using fluorescent double-labelling immunohistochemistry, a significant co-localization was observed in sporadic inclusion body myositis muscle between β-amyloid, thioflavine-S and nitrotyrosine. In primary cultures of human myotubes and in myoblasts, exposure to interleukin-1β in combination with interferon-γ induced a robust upregulation of inducible nitric oxide synthase messenger RNA. Using fluorescent detectors of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide, dichlorofluorescein and diaminofluorescein, respectively, flow cytometry revealed that interleukin-1β combined with interferon-γ induced intracellular production of nitric oxide, which was associated with necrotic cell death in muscle cells. Intracellular nitration of tyrosine was noted, which partly co-localized with amyloid precursor protein, but not with desmin

  15. Propensity to metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses of two benthic species (Cerastoderma edule and Nephtys hombergii): are tolerance processes limiting their responsiveness?

    PubMed

    Marques, Ana; Piló, David; Araújo, Olinda; Pereira, Fábio; Guilherme, Sofia; Carvalho, Susana; Santos, Maria Ana; Pacheco, Mário; Pereira, Patrícia

    2016-05-01

    The chronic exposure of benthic organisms to metals in sediments can lead to the development of tolerance mechanisms, thus diminishing their responsiveness. This study aims to evaluate the accumulation profiles of V, Cr, Co, Ni, As, Cd, Pb and Hg and antioxidant system responses of two benthic organisms (Cerastoderma edule, Bivalvia; Nephtys hombergii, Polychaeta). This approach will provide clarifications about the ability of each species to signalise metal contamination. Organisms of both species were collected at the Tagus estuary, in two sites with distinct contamination degrees (ALC, slightly contaminated; BAR, highly contaminated). Accordingly, C. edule accumulated higher concentrations of As, Pb and Hg at BAR compared to ALC. However, antioxidant responses of C. edule were almost unaltered at BAR and no peroxidative damage occurred, suggesting adjustment mechanisms to the presence of metals. In contrast, N. hombergii showed a minor propensity to metal accumulation, only signalising spatial differences for As and Pb and accumulating lower concentrations of metals than C. edule. The differences in metal accumulation observed between species might be due to their distinctive foraging behaviour and/or the ability of N. hombergii to minimise the metal uptake. Despite that, the accumulation of As and Pb was on the basis of the polychaete antioxidant defences inhibition at BAR, including CAT, SOD, GR and GPx. The integrated biomarker response index (IBRv2) confirmed that N. hombergii was more affected by metal exposure than C. edule. In the light of current findings, in field-based studies, the information of C. edule as a bioindicator should be complemented by that provided by another benthic species, since tolerance mechanisms to metals can hinder a correct diagnosis of sediment contamination and of the system's health. Overall, the present study contributed to improve the lack of fundamental knowledge of two widespread and common estuarine species, providing

  16. Rapamycin reverses age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, oxidative stress, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, and lipofuscin level, and increases autophagy, in the liver of middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cisuelo, V; Gómez, J; García-Junceda, I; Naudí, A; Cabré, R; Mota-Martorell, N; López-Torres, M; González-Sánchez, M; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2016-10-01

    Rapamycin consistently increases longevity in mice although the mechanism of action of this drug is unknown. In the present investigation we studied the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial oxidative stress at the same dose that is known to increase longevity in mice (14mgofrapamycin/kg of diet). Middle aged mice (16months old) showed significant age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, mitochondrial protein lipoxidation, and lipofuscin accumulation compared to young animals (4months old) in the liver. After 7weeks of dietary treatment all those increases were totally or partially (lipofuscin) abolished by rapamycin, middle aged rapamycin-treated animals showing similar levels in those parameters to young animals. The decrease in mitochondrial ROS production was due to qualitative instead of quantitative changes in complex I. The decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoxidation was not due to decreases in the amount of highly oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids. Rapamycin also decreased the amount of RAPTOR (of mTOR complex) and increased the amounts of the PGC1-α and ATG13 proteins. The results are consistent with the possibility that rapamycin increases longevity in mice at least in part by lowering mitochondrial ROS production and increasing autophagy, decreasing the derived final forms of damage accumulated with age which are responsible for increased longevity. The decrease in lipofuscin accumulation induced by rapamycin adds to previous information suggesting that the increase in longevity induced by this drug can be due to a decrease in the rate of aging. PMID:27498120

  17. Rapamycin reverses age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, oxidative stress, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, and lipofuscin level, and increases autophagy, in the liver of middle-aged mice.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Cisuelo, V; Gómez, J; García-Junceda, I; Naudí, A; Cabré, R; Mota-Martorell, N; López-Torres, M; González-Sánchez, M; Pamplona, R; Barja, G

    2016-10-01

    Rapamycin consistently increases longevity in mice although the mechanism of action of this drug is unknown. In the present investigation we studied the effect of rapamycin on mitochondrial oxidative stress at the same dose that is known to increase longevity in mice (14mgofrapamycin/kg of diet). Middle aged mice (16months old) showed significant age-related increases in mitochondrial ROS production at complex I, accumulation of mtDNA fragments inside nuclear DNA, mitochondrial protein lipoxidation, and lipofuscin accumulation compared to young animals (4months old) in the liver. After 7weeks of dietary treatment all those increases were totally or partially (lipofuscin) abolished by rapamycin, middle aged rapamycin-treated animals showing similar levels in those parameters to young animals. The decrease in mitochondrial ROS production was due to qualitative instead of quantitative changes in complex I. The decrease in mitochondrial protein lipoxidation was not due to decreases in the amount of highly oxidizable unsaturated fatty acids. Rapamycin also decreased the amount of RAPTOR (of mTOR complex) and increased the amounts of the PGC1-α and ATG13 proteins. The results are consistent with the possibility that rapamycin increases longevity in mice at least in part by lowering mitochondrial ROS production and increasing autophagy, decreasing the derived final forms of damage accumulated with age which are responsible for increased longevity. The decrease in lipofuscin accumulation induced by rapamycin adds to previous information suggesting that the increase in longevity induced by this drug can be due to a decrease in the rate of aging.

  18. A Molecular Web: Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress, Inflammation, and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhari, Namrata; Talwar, Priti; Parimisetty, Avinash; Lefebvre d’Hellencourt, Christian; Ravanan, Palaniyandi

    2014-01-01

    Execution of fundamental cellular functions demands regulated protein folding homeostasis. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an active organelle existing to implement this function by folding and modifying secretory and membrane proteins. Loss of protein folding homeostasis is central to various diseases and budding evidences suggest ER stress as being a major contributor in the development or pathology of a diseased state besides other cellular stresses. The trigger for diseases may be diverse but, inflammation and/or ER stress may be basic mechanisms increasing the severity or complicating the condition of the disease. Chronic ER stress and activation of the unfolded-protein response (UPR) through endogenous or exogenous insults may result in impaired calcium and redox homeostasis, oxidative stress via protein overload thereby also influencing vital mitochondrial functions. Calcium released from the ER augments the production of mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS). Toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria disturbs fundamental organelle functions. Sustained ER stress is known to potentially elicit inflammatory responses via UPR pathways. Additionally, ROS generated through inflammation or mitochondrial dysfunction could accelerate ER malfunction. Dysfunctional UPR pathways have been associated with a wide range of diseases including several neurodegenerative diseases, stroke, metabolic disorders, cancer, inflammatory disease, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and others. In this review, we have discussed the UPR signaling pathways, and networking between ER stress-induced inflammatory pathways, oxidative stress, and mitochondrial signaling events, which further induce or exacerbate ER stress. PMID:25120434

  19. Vascular oxidative stress, nitric oxide and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Huige; Horke, Sven; Förstermann, Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    In the vascular wall, reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by several enzyme systems including NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase, uncoupled endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and the mitochondrial electron transport chain. On the other hand, the vasculature is protected by antioxidant enzyme systems, including superoxide dismutases, catalase, glutathione peroxidases and paraoxonases, which detoxify ROS. Cardiovascular risk factors such as hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus enhance ROS generation, resulting in oxidative stress. This leads to oxidative modification of lipoproteins and phospholipids, mechanisms that contribute to atherogenesis. In addition, oxidation of tetrahydrobiopterin may cause eNOS uncoupling and thus potentiation of oxidative stress and reduction of eNOS-derived NO, which is a protective principle in the vasculature. This review summarizes the latest advances in the role of ROS-producing enzymes, antioxidative enzymes as well as NO synthases in the initiation and development of atherosclerosis.

  20. High Potency of a Novel Resveratrol Derivative, 3,3',4,4'-Tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene, against Ovarian Cancer Is Associated with an Oxidative Stress-Mediated Imbalance between DNA Damage Accumulation and Repair.

    PubMed

    Mikuła-Pietrasik, Justyna; Sosińska, Patrycja; Murias, Marek; Wierzchowski, Marcin; Brewińska-Olchowik, Marta; Piwocka, Katarzyna; Szpurek, Dariusz; Książek, Krzysztof

    2015-01-01

    We explored the effect of a new resveratrol (RVT) derivative, 3,3',4,4'-tetrahydroxy-trans-stilbene (3,3',4,4'-THS), on viability, apoptosis, proliferation, and senescence of three representative lines of ovarian cancer cells, that is, A2780, OVCAR-3, and SKOV-3, in vitro. In addition, the mechanistic aspects of 3,3',4,4'-THS activity, including cell redox homeostasis (the production of reactive oxygen species, activity of enzymatic antioxidants, and magnitude of DNA damage accumulation and repair), and the activity of caspases (3, 8, and 9) and p38 MAPK were examined. The study showed that 3,3',4,4'-THS affects cancer cell viability much more efficiently than its parent drug. This effect coincided with increased generation of reactive oxygen species, downregulated activity of superoxide dismutase and catalase, and excessive accumulation of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine and its insufficient repair due to decreased expression of DNA glycosylase I. Cytotoxicity elicited by 3,3',4,4'-THS was related to increased incidence of apoptosis, which was mediated by caspases 3 and 9. Moreover, 3,3',4,4'-THS inhibited cancer cell proliferation and accelerated senescence, which was accompanied by the activation of p38 MAPK. Collectively, our findings indicate that 3,3',4,4'-THS may constitute a valuable tool in the fight against ovarian malignancy and that the anticancer capabilities of this stilbene proceed in an oxidative stress-dependent mechanism. PMID:26229578

  1. Oxidative Stress Resistance in Deinococcus radiodurans†

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Radman, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Summary: Deinococcus radiodurans is a robust bacterium best known for its capacity to repair massive DNA damage efficiently and accurately. It is extremely resistant to many DNA-damaging agents, including ionizing radiation and UV radiation (100 to 295 nm), desiccation, and mitomycin C, which induce oxidative damage not only to DNA but also to all cellular macromolecules via the production of reactive oxygen species. The extreme resilience of D. radiodurans to oxidative stress is imparted synergistically by an efficient protection of proteins against oxidative stress and an efficient DNA repair mechanism, enhanced by functional redundancies in both systems. D. radiodurans assets for the prevention of and recovery from oxidative stress are extensively reviewed here. Radiation- and desiccation-resistant bacteria such as D. radiodurans have substantially lower protein oxidation levels than do sensitive bacteria but have similar yields of DNA double-strand breaks. These findings challenge the concept of DNA as the primary target of radiation toxicity while advancing protein damage, and the protection of proteins against oxidative damage, as a new paradigm of radiation toxicity and survival. The protection of DNA repair and other proteins against oxidative damage is imparted by enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant defense systems dominated by divalent manganese complexes. Given that oxidative stress caused by the accumulation of reactive oxygen species is associated with aging and cancer, a comprehensive outlook on D. radiodurans strategies of combating oxidative stress may open new avenues for antiaging and anticancer treatments. The study of the antioxidation protection in D. radiodurans is therefore of considerable potential interest for medicine and public health. PMID:21372322

  2. Effect of short-term cold stress on oxidative damage and transcript accumulation of defense-related genes in chickpea seedlings.

    PubMed

    Kazemi-Shahandashti, Seyyedeh-Sanam; Maali-Amiri, Reza; Zeinali, Hassan; Khazaei, Mona; Talei, Alireza; Ramezanpour, Seyyedeh-Sanaz

    2014-08-15

    Cold stress affects many plant physiological and biochemical components and induces cascades of alterations in metabolic pathways, amongst them the membrane fatty acid compositions, the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the regulation of gene expression. The present work aimed to characterize the changes of some of these factors in both cold acclimated (CA) and non-acclimated (NA) plants of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) to identify the role of the acclimation process in adjusting plant responses to severe cold stress. The results showed an increase in the unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) ratio compared to saturated fatty acids, which was more obvious in CA plants. Defense enzymes had an important role in CA plants to create greater cold tolerance compared to NA ones in the cases of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), guaiacol peroxidase (GPX) and lipoxygenase (LOX) activities. During cold stress, a high transcription level of CaCAT and CaSOD genes was detected in CA plants, but a low transcription of CaLOX gene was observed in CA plants compared to NA plants, which might have prevented the decline of UFAs (confirmed by double bond index (DBI) data). Moreover, the transcription level of the Carubisco gene, as an energy producing agent, was higher in CA plants than in NA plants and the transcription of the Catubulin gene, as a crucial substance of cell cytoskeleton, showed a decreasing trend in both CA and NA plants, but this decline was greater in NA plants. These responses showed the possible targets of cold stress as chloroplast and signal transduction to balance stress programs. The above results indicate the crucial role of FA compositions in creating cold tolerance in susceptible chickpea plants with possible responsive components and the possible interactions in protein and transcript levels even in facing extreme cold stress. PMID:24972025

  3. Oxidative stress and seasonal coral bleaching.

    PubMed

    Downs, C A; Fauth, John E; Halas, John C; Dustan, Phillip; Bemiss, John; Woodley, Cheryl M

    2002-08-15

    During the past two decades, coral reefs have experienced extensive degradation worldwide. One etiology for this global degradation is a syndrome known as coral bleaching. Mass coral bleaching events are correlated with increased sea-surface temperatures, however, the cellular mechanism underlying this phenomenon is uncertain. To determine if oxidative stress plays a mechanistic role in the process of sea-surface temperature-related coral bleaching, we examined corals along a depth transect in the Florida Keys over a single season that was characterized by unusually high sea-surface temperatures. We observed strong positive correlations between accumulation of oxidative damage products and bleaching in corals over a year of sampling. High levels of antioxidant enzymes and small heat-shock proteins were negatively correlated with levels of oxidative damage products. Corals that experienced oxidative stress had higher chaperonin levels and protein turnover activity. Our results indicate that coral bleaching is tightly coupled to the antioxidant and cellular stress capacity of the symbiotic coral, supporting the mechanistic model that coral bleaching (zooxanthellae loss) may be a final strategy to defend corals from oxidative stress.

  4. The metabolomics of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Noctor, Graham; Lelarge-Trouverie, Caroline; Mhamdi, Amna

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress resulting from increased availability of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key component of many responses of plants to challenging environmental conditions. The consequences for plant metabolism are complex and manifold. We review data on small compounds involved in oxidative stress, including ROS themselves and antioxidants and redox buffers in the membrane and soluble phases, and we discuss the wider consequences for plant primary and secondary metabolism. While metabolomics has been exploited in many studies on stress, there have been relatively few non-targeted studies focused on how metabolite signatures respond specifically to oxidative stress. As part of the discussion, we present results and reanalyze published datasets on metabolite profiles in catalase-deficient plants, which can be considered to be model oxidative stress systems. We emphasize the roles of ROS-triggered changes in metabolites as potential oxidative signals, and discuss responses that might be useful as markers for oxidative stress. Particular attention is paid to lipid-derived compounds, the status of antioxidants and antioxidant breakdown products, altered metabolism of amino acids, and the roles of phytohormone pathways. PMID:25306398

  5. Oxidative stress in marine environments: biochemistry and physiological ecology.

    PubMed

    Lesser, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Oxidative stress-the production and accumulation of reduced oxygen intermediates such as superoxide radicals, singlet oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and hydroxyl radicals-can damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. Many disease processes of clinical interest and the aging process involve oxidative stress in their underlying etiology. The production of reactive oxygen species is also prevalent in the world's oceans, and oxidative stress is an important component of the stress response in marine organisms exposed to a variety of insults as a result of changes in environmental conditions such as thermal stress, exposure to ultraviolet radiation, or exposure to pollution. As in the clinical setting, reactive oxygen species are also important signal transduction molecules and mediators of damage in cellular processes, such as apoptosis and cell necrosis, for marine organisms. This review brings together the voluminous literature on the biochemistry and physiology of oxidative stress from the clinical and plant physiology disciplines with the fast-increasing interest in oxidative stress in marine environments.

  6. Effect of metal accumulation-associated oxidative stress on the combined toxicity of quantum dots with Cu(2+) to Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; Zhao, Yuxia; Liu, Bo; Zhong, Ken; Yao, Hejin; Lin, Kuangfei

    2016-06-01

    Quantum dot (QD) nanoparticles can coexist with Cu(2+) in soil and can adsorb Cu(2+) entering into bacterial cells, thereby promoting cellular copper accumulation and enhancing the combined toxicity of these two chemicals. Toxicity test results on Bacillus subtilis showed that the addition of safe concentrations of MPA-CdTe QDs to Cu(2+) culture (levels under IC50 value) resulted in higher toxicity with about twofold reduction in cell viability and increased intracellular Cu content. ROS levels also increased by about 500%, and SOD activity was altered after QD addition. Treatment with Cu(2+) alone decreased the α-amylase activity of B. subtilis by 8%-35%. This finding was not affected by QD addition. Moreover, increased cellular copper concentration as a result of QD addition enhanced toxicity primarily by producing superoxide anions. However, this phenomenon did not interrupt the physical-biological responses of soil microbes. PMID:27131749

  7. Nitric oxide evoked p53-accumulation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Brüne, Bernhard; Schneiderhan, Nicole

    2003-04-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 accumulates under conditions of cellular stress and affects cell cycle progression and/or apoptosis. This has been exemplified for endogenously produced or exogenously supplied nitric oxide (NO) and thus accounts at least in part for cell destructive signaling qualities of this bioactive molecule and/or derived reactive nitrogen species. However, detailed mechanisms of toxicity and pathways of cell demise remain to be elucidated. Establishing that NO-treatment left the ubiquitination and the p53-Mdm2 interaction intact may point to an impaired nuclear-cytoplasmic shuttling to account for p53 stabilization. This was verified by heterokaryon analysis. We conclude that attenuated nuclear export contributes to stabilization and activation of p53 under the influence of NO.

  8. Metal accumulation and oxidative stress responses in Ulva spp. in the presence of nocturnal pulses of metals from sediment: a field transplantation experiment under eutrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Patrícia; de Pablo, Hilda; Guilherme, Sofia; Carvalho, Susana; Santos, Maria Ana; Vale, Carlos; Pacheco, Mário

    2014-03-01

    In aquatic systems under eutrophic conditions, remobilization of metals from sediment to the overlying water may occur. Consequently, adaptive responses of local organisms could result from the accumulation of metals intermittently released from the sediment. In summer 2007, a field transplantation experiment was performed in the Óbidos lagoon (Portugal) with Ulva spp. comprising three short-term exposures (between 15:30-23:30; 23:30-07:30; 07:30-15:30) during a 24-h period. In each period, Ulva spp. was collected at a reference site located in the lower lagoon (LL) and transplanted to a eutrophic site located at the Barrosa branch (BB), characterized by moderate metal contamination. For comparison purposes, macroalgae samples were simultaneously exposed at LL under the same conditions. Both sites were surveyed in short-time scales (2-4 h) for the analysis of the variability of physical-chemical parameters in the water and metal levels in suspended particulate matter. The ratios to Al of particulate Mn, Fe, Cu and Pb increased during the period of lower water oxygenation at the eutrophic site, reaching 751 × 10⁻⁴, 0.67, 12 × 10⁻⁴, 9.9 × 10⁻⁴, respectively, confirming the release of metals from the sediment to water during the night. At the reference site, dissolved oxygen oscillated around 100%, Mn/Al ratios were considerably lower (81 × 10⁻⁴-301 × 10⁻⁴) compared to BB (234 × 10⁻⁴-790 × 10⁻⁴), and no increases of metal/Al ratios were found during the night. In general, algae uptake of Mn, Cu, Fe, Pb and Cd was significantly higher at the eutrophic site compared to the reference site. The results confirmed the potential of Ulva spp. as bioindicator of metal contamination and its capability to respond within short periods. An induction of SOD, an inhibition of CAT and the increase of LPO were recorded in Ulva spp. exposed at BB (between 23:30 and 7:30) probably as a response to the higher incorporation of Mn, Fe and Pb in

  9. Inflammatory and oxidative stress in rotavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A; Acosta, Orlando

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses are the single leading cause of life-threatening diarrhea affecting children under 5 years of age. Rotavirus entry into the host cell seems to occur by sequential interactions between virion proteins and various cell surface molecules. The entry mechanisms seem to involve the contribution of cellular molecules having binding, chaperoning and oxido-reducing activities. It appears to be that the receptor usage and tropism of rotaviruses is determined by the species, cell line and rotavirus strain. Rotaviruses have evolved functions which can antagonize the host innate immune response, whereas are able to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, oxidative stress and inflammatory signaling. A networking between ER stress, inflammation and oxidative stress is suggested, in which release of calcium from the ER increases the generation of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to toxic accumulation of ROS within ER and mitochondria. Sustained ER stress potentially stimulates inflammatory response through unfolded protein response pathways. However, the detailed characterization of the molecular mechanisms underpinning these rotavirus-induced stressful conditions is still lacking. The signaling events triggered by host recognition of virus-associated molecular patterns offers an opportunity for the development of novel therapeutic strategies aimed at interfering with rotavirus infection. The use of N-acetylcysteine, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and PPARγ agonists to inhibit rotavirus infection opens a new way for treating the rotavirus-induced diarrhea and complementing vaccines. PMID:27175349

  10. Roles of TRPM2 in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Nobuaki; Kozai, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Ryohei; Ebert, Maximilian; Mori, Yasuo

    2011-09-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play critical roles in cell death, diseases, and normal cellular processes. TRPM2 is a member of transient receptor potential (TRP) protein superfamily and forms a Ca(2+)-permeable nonselective cation channel activated by ROS, specifically by hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), and at least in part via second-messenger mechanisms. Accumulating evidence has indicated that TRPM2 mediates multiple cellular responses, after our finding that Ca(2+) influx via TRPM2 regulates H(2)O(2)-induced cell death. Recently, we have demonstrated that Ca(2+) influx through TRPM2 induces chemokine production in monocytes and macrophages, which aggravates inflammatory neutrophil infiltration in mice. However, understanding is still limited for in vivo physiological or pathophysiological significance of ROS-induced TRPM2 activation. In this review, we summarize mechanisms underlying activation of TRPM2 channels by oxidative stress and downstream biological responses, and discuss the biological importance of oxidative stress-activated TRP channels.

  11. Role of mitochondria in toxic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Fariss, Marc W; Chan, Catherine B; Patel, Manisha; Van Houten, Bennett; Orrenius, Sten

    2005-04-01

    Oxidative stress and mitochondrial oxidative damage have been implicated in the etiology of numerous common diseases. The critical mitochondrial events responsible for oxidative stress-mediated cell death (toxic oxidative stress), however, have yet to be defined. Several oxidative events implicated in toxic oxidative stress include alterations in mitochondrial lipids (e.g., cardiolipin), mitochondrial DNA, and mitochondrial proteins (eg. aconitase and uncoupling protein 2). Furthermore, recent findings indicate the enrichment of mitochondrial membranes with vitamin E protects cells against the toxic effects of oxidative stress. This review briefly summarizes the role of these mitochondrial events in toxic oxidative stress, including: 1) the protective role of mitochondrial vitamin E in toxic oxidative stress, 2) the role of mitochondrial DNA in toxic oxidative stress, 3) the interaction between cardiolipin and cytochrome c in mitochondrial regulation of apoptosis, 4) the role of mitochondrial aconitase in oxidative neurodegeneration, and 5) the role of mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 in the pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes. PMID:15821158

  12. [Vitamins and oxidative stress].

    PubMed

    Kodentsova, V M; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Mazo, V K

    2013-01-01

    The central and local stress limiting systems, including the antioxidant defense system involved in defending the organism at the cellular and systemic levels from excess activation response to stress influence, leading to damaging effects. The development of stress, regardless of its nature [cold, increased physical activity, aging, the development of many pathologies (cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, ischemia, the effects of burns), immobilization, hypobaric hypoxia, hyperoxia, radiation effects etc.] leads to a deterioration of the vitamin status (vitamins E, A, C). Damaging effect on the antioxidant defense system is more pronounced compared to the stress response in animals with an isolated deficiency of vitamins C, A, E, B1 or B6 and the combined vitamins deficiency in the diet. Addition missing vitamin or vitamins restores the performance of antioxidant system. Thus, the role of vitamins in adaptation to stressors is evident. However, vitamins C, E and beta-carotene in high doses, significantly higher than the physiological needs of the organism, may be not only antioxidants, but may have also prooxidant properties. Perhaps this explains the lack of positive effects of antioxidant vitamins used in extreme doses for a long time described in some publications. There is no doubt that to justify the current optimal doses of antioxidant vitamins and other dietary antioxidants specially-designed studies, including biochemical testing of initial vitamin and antioxidant status of the organism, as well as monitoring their change over time are required.

  13. Different responses of low grain-Cd-accumulating and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice cultivars to Cd stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijuan; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhouping; Shi, Yan; Han, Tiqian; Ye, Yaoyao; Gong, Ning; Sun, Junwei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. The accumulation of Cd in rice grains is a major agricultural problem in regions with Cd pollution. A hydroponics experiment using low grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 11) and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 110) was carried out to characterize the different responses of rice cultivars to Cd stress. We found that xiushui 11 was more tolerant to Cd than xiushui 110, and xiushui 11 suffered less oxidative damage. Cell walls played an important role in limiting the amount of Cd that entered the protoplast, especially in xiushui 11. Cd stored in organelles as soluble fractions, leading to greater physiological stress of Cd detoxification. We found that Cd can disturb the ion homeostasis in rice roots because Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) may have a similar uptake route. Xiushui 11 had a faster root-to-shoot transport of Cd, and the expression level of OsPCR1 gene which was predicted related with Cd accumulation in rice was consist with the Cd transport of root-to-shoot in rice and maintain the greater Cd tolerance of xiushui 11. These results suggest there are different Cd detoxification and accumulation mechanisms in rice cultivars.

  14. Different responses of low grain-Cd-accumulating and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice cultivars to Cd stress.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feijuan; Wang, Min; Liu, Zhouping; Shi, Yan; Han, Tiqian; Ye, Yaoyao; Gong, Ning; Sun, Junwei; Zhu, Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is a major heavy metal pollutant which is highly toxic to plants and animals. The accumulation of Cd in rice grains is a major agricultural problem in regions with Cd pollution. A hydroponics experiment using low grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 11) and high grain-Cd-accumulating rice (xiushui 110) was carried out to characterize the different responses of rice cultivars to Cd stress. We found that xiushui 11 was more tolerant to Cd than xiushui 110, and xiushui 11 suffered less oxidative damage. Cell walls played an important role in limiting the amount of Cd that entered the protoplast, especially in xiushui 11. Cd stored in organelles as soluble fractions, leading to greater physiological stress of Cd detoxification. We found that Cd can disturb the ion homeostasis in rice roots because Cd(2+) and Ca(2+) may have a similar uptake route. Xiushui 11 had a faster root-to-shoot transport of Cd, and the expression level of OsPCR1 gene which was predicted related with Cd accumulation in rice was consist with the Cd transport of root-to-shoot in rice and maintain the greater Cd tolerance of xiushui 11. These results suggest there are different Cd detoxification and accumulation mechanisms in rice cultivars. PMID:26318143

  15. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Atopic Dermatitis

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Hongxiu; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2016-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic pruritic skin disorder affecting many people especially young children. It is a disease caused by the combination of genetic predisposition, immune dysregulation, and skin barrier defect. In recent years, emerging evidence suggests oxidative stress may play an important role in many skin diseases and skin aging, possibly including AD. In this review, we give an update on scientific progress linking oxidative stress to AD and discuss future treatment strategies for better disease control and improved quality of life for AD patients. PMID:27006746

  17. TIA1 oxidation inhibits stress granule assembly and sensitizes cells to stress-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Arimoto-Matsuzaki, Kyoko; Saito, Haruo; Takekawa, Mutsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Cytoplasmic stress granules (SGs) are multimolecular aggregates of stalled translation pre-initiation complexes that prevent the accumulation of misfolded proteins, and that are formed in response to certain types of stress including ER stress. SG formation contributes to cell survival not only by suppressing translation but also by sequestering some apoptosis regulatory factors. Because cells can be exposed to various stresses simultaneously in vivo, the regulation of SG assembly under multiple stress conditions is important but unknown. Here we report that reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as H2O2 oxidize the SG-nucleating protein TIA1, thereby inhibiting SG assembly. Thus, when cells are confronted with a SG-inducing stress such as ER stress caused by protein misfolding, together with ROS-induced oxidative stress, they cannot form SGs, resulting in the promotion of apoptosis. We demonstrate that the suppression of SG formation by oxidative stress may underlie the neuronal cell death seen in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26738979

  18. Oxidative Stress and Neurodegenerative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; O, Wuliji; Li, Wei; Jiang, Zhi-Gang; Ghanbari, Hossein A.

    2013-01-01

    Living cells continually generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) through the respiratory chain during energetic metabolism. ROS at low or moderate concentration can play important physiological roles. However, an excessive amount of ROS under oxidative stress would be extremely deleterious. The central nervous system (CNS) is particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to its high oxygen consumption, weakly antioxidative systems and the terminal-differentiation characteristic of neurons. Thus, oxidative stress elicits various neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, chemotherapy could result in severe side effects on the CNS and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of cancer patients, and a growing body of evidence demonstrates the involvement of ROS in drug-induced neurotoxicities as well. Therefore, development of antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs is a potentially beneficial strategy for clinical therapy. In this review, we summarize the source, balance maintenance and physiologic functions of ROS, oxidative stress and its toxic mechanisms underlying a number of neurodegenerative diseases, and the possible involvement of ROS in chemotherapy-induced toxicity to the CNS and PNS. We ultimately assess the value for antioxidants as neuroprotective drugs and provide our comments on the unmet needs. PMID:24351827

  19. Space flight and oxidative stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.

    2002-01-01

    Space flight is associated with an increase in oxidative stress after return to 1g. The effect is more pronounced after long-duration space flight. The effects lasts for several weeks after landing. In humans there is increased lipid peroxidation in erythrocyte membranes, reduction in some blood antioxidants, and increased urinary excretion of 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine. Isoprostane 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2alpha) and 8-oxo-7,8 dihydro-2 deoxyguanosine are markers for oxidative damage to lipids and DNA, respectively. The changes have been attributed to a combination of the energy deficiency that occurs during flight and substrate competition for amino acids occurring between repleting muscle and other tissues during the recovery phase. The observations in humans have been complemented by rodent studies. Most rodent studies showed increased production of lipid peroxidation products postflight and decreased antioxidant enzyme activity postflight. The rodent observations were attributed to the stress associated with reentry into Earth's gravity. Decreasing the imbalance between the production of endogenous oxidant defenses and oxidant production by increasing the supply of dietary antioxidants may lessen the severity of the postflight increase in oxidative stress.

  20. Stress tolerance of transgenic barley accumulating the alfalfa aldose reductase in the cytoplasm and the chloroplast.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Bettina; Majer, Petra; Mihály, Róbert; Pauk, János; Horváth, Gábor V

    2016-09-01

    Barley represents one of the major crops grown worldwide; its genetic transformation provides an important tool for the improvement of crop quality and tolerance to environmental stress factors. Biotic and abiotic stresses produce reactive oxygen species in the plant cells that can directly oxidize the cellular components including lipid membranes; resulting in lipid peroxidation and subsequently the accumulation of reactive carbonyl compounds. In order to protect barley plants from the effects of stress-produced reactive carbonyls, an Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out using the Medicago sativa aldose reductase (MsALR) gene. In certain transgenic lines the produced MsALR enzyme was targeted to the chloroplasts to evaluate its protective effect in these organelles. The dual fluorescent protein-based method was used for the evaluation of tolerance of young seedlings to diverse stresses; our results demonstrated that this technique could be reliably applied for the detection of cellular stress in a variety of conditions. The chlorophyll and carotenoid content measurements also supported the results of the fluorescent protein-based method and the stress-protective effect of the MsALR enzyme. Targeting of MsALR into the chloroplast has also resulted in increased stress tolerance, similarly to the observed effect of the cytosolic MsALR accumulation. The results of the DsRed/GFP fluorescent protein-based method indicated that both the cytosol and chloroplast accumulation of MsALR can increase the abiotic stress tolerance of transgenic barley lines. PMID:27469099

  1. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    PubMed

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood. PMID:23643278

  2. Oxidative stress in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Khandrika, Lakshmipathi; Kumar, Binod; Koul, Sweaty; Maroni, Paul; Koul, Hari K

    2009-09-18

    As prostate cancer and aberrant changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) become more common with aging, ROS signaling may play an important role in the development and progression of this malignancy. Increased ROS, otherwise known as oxidative stress, is a result of either increased ROS generation or a loss of antioxidant defense mechanisms. Oxidative stress is associated with several pathological conditions including inflammation and infection. ROS are products of normal cellular metabolism and play vital roles in stimulation of signaling pathways in response to changing intra- and extracellular environmental conditions. Chronic increases in ROS over time are known to induce somatic mutations and neoplastic transformation. In this review we summarize the causes for increased ROS generation and its potential role in etiology and progression of prostate cancer. PMID:19185987

  3. Oxidative stress in industrial fungi.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiang; Harvey, Linda M; McNeil, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Fungi are amongst the most industrially important microorganisms in current use within the biotechnology industry. Most such fungal cultures are highly aerobic in nature, a character that has been frequently referred to in both reactor design and fungal physiology. The most fundamentally significant outcome of the highly aerobic growth environment in fermenter vessels is the need for the fungal culture to effectively combat in the intracellular environment the negative consequences of high oxygen transfer rates. The use of oxygen as the respiratory substrate is frequently reported to lead to the development of oxidative stress, mainly due to oxygen-derived free radicals, which are collectively termed as reactive oxygen species (ROS). Recently, there has been extensive research on the occurrence, extent, and consequences of oxidative stress in microorganisms, and the underlying mechanisms through which cells prevent and repair the damage caused by ROS. In the present study, we critically review the current understanding of oxidative stress events in industrially relevant fungi. The review first describes the current state of knowledge of ROS concisely, and then the various antioxidant strategies employed by fungal cells to counteract the deleterious effects, together with their implications in fungal bioprocessing are also discussed. Finally, some recommendations for further research are made. PMID:19514862

  4. p66Shc-generated oxidative signal promotes fat accumulation.

    PubMed

    Berniakovich, Ina; Trinei, Mirella; Stendardo, Massimo; Migliaccio, Enrica; Minucci, Saverio; Bernardi, Paolo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Giorgio, Marco

    2008-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin signaling in the adipose tissue are critical determinants of aging and age-associated diseases. It is not clear, however, if they represent independent factors or they are mechanistically linked. We investigated the effects of ROS on insulin signaling using as model system the p66(Shc)-null mice. p66(Shc) is a redox enzyme that generates mitochondrial ROS and promotes aging in mammals. We report that insulin activates the redox enzyme activity of p66(Shc) specifically in adipocytes and that p66(Shc)-generated ROS regulate insulin signaling through multiple mechanisms, including AKT phosphorylation, Foxo localization, and regulation of selected insulin target genes. Deletion of p66(Shc) resulted in increased mitochondrial uncoupling and reduced triglyceride accumulation in adipocytes and in vivo increased metabolic rate and decreased fat mass and resistance to diet-induced obesity. In addition, p66(Shc-/-) mice showed impaired thermo-insulation. These findings demonstrate that p66(Shc)-generated ROS regulate the effect of insulin on the energetic metabolism in mice and suggest that intracellular oxidative stress might accelerate aging by favoring fat deposition and fat-related disorders.

  5. Osmotic Stress-Induced Polyamine Accumulation in Cereal Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Hector E.; Galston, Arthur W.

    1984-01-01

    Arginine decarboxylase activity increases 2- to 3-fold in osmotically stressed oat leaves in both light and dark, but putrescine accumulation in the dark is only one-third to one-half of that in light-stressed leaves. If arginine or ornithine are supplied to dark-stressed leaves, putrescine rises to levels comparable to those obtained by incubation under light. Thus, precursor amino acid availability is limiting to the stress response. Amino acid levels change rapidly upon osmotic treatment; notably, glutamic acid decreases with a corresponding rise in glutamine. Difluoromethylarginine (0.01-0.1 millimolar), the enzyme-activated irreversible inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase, prevents the stress-induced putrescine rise, as well as the incorporation of label from [14C]arginine, with the expected accumulation of free arginine, but has no effect on the rest of the amino acid pool. The use of specific inhibitors such as α-difluoromethylarginine is suggested as probes for the physiological significance of stress responses by plant cells. PMID:16663552

  6. Proline accumulation in baker's yeast enhances high-sucrose stress tolerance and fermentation ability in sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Sasano, Yu; Haitani, Yutaka; Ohtsu, Iwao; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    During bread-making processes, yeast cells are exposed to various baking-associated stresses. High-sucrose concentrations exert severe osmotic stress that seriously damages cellular components by generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Previously, we found that the accumulation of proline conferred freeze-thaw stress tolerance and the baker's yeast strain that accumulated proline retained higher-level fermentation abilities in frozen doughs than the wild-type strain. In this study, we constructed self-cloning diploid baker's yeast strains that accumulate proline. These resultant strains showed higher cell viability and lower intracellular oxidation levels than that observed in the wild-type strain under high-sucrose stress condition. Proline accumulation also enhanced the fermentation ability in high-sucrose-containing dough. These results demonstrate the usefulness of proline-accumulating baker's yeast for sweet dough baking. PMID:22041027

  7. Clinical Perspective of Oxidative Stress in Sporadic ALS

    PubMed Central

    D’Amico, Emanuele; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Santella, Regina M.; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (sALS) is one of the most devastating neurological diseases; most patients die within 3 to 4 years after symptom onset. Oxidative stress is a disturbance in the pro-oxidative/anti-oxidative balance favoring the pro-oxidative state. Autopsy and laboratory studies in ALS indicate that oxidative stress plays a major role in motor neuron degeneration and astrocyte dysfunction. Oxidative stress biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and urine, are elevated, suggesting that abnormal oxidative stress is generated outside of the central nervous system. Our review indicates that agricultural chemicals, heavy metals, military service, professional sports, excessive physical exertion, chronic head trauma, and certain foods might be modestly associated with ALS risk, with a stronger association between risk and smoking. At the cellular level, these factors are all involved in generating oxidative stress. Experimental studies indicate that a combination of insults that induce modest oxidative stress can exert additive deleterious effects on motor neurons, suggesting multiple exposures in real-world environments are important. As the disease progresses, nutritional deficiency, cachexia, psychological stress, and impending respiratory failure may further increase oxidative stress. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that ALS is possibly a systemic disease. Laboratory, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence clearly support the hypothesis that oxidative stress is central in the pathogenic process, particularly in genetically susceptive individuals. If we are to improve ALS treatment, well-designed biochemical and genetic epidemiological studies, combined with a multidisciplinary research approach, are needed and will provide knowledge crucial to our understanding of ALS etiology, pathophysiology, and prognosis. PMID:23797033

  8. Role of oxidative stress in infectious diseases. A review.

    PubMed

    Pohanka, Miroslav

    2013-11-01

    Oxidative stress plays a dual role in infections. Free radicals protect against invading microorganisms, and they can also cause tissue damage during the resulting inflammation. In the process of infection, there is generation of reactive species by myeloperoxidase, NADPH oxidase, and nitric oxide synthase. On the other hand, reactive species can be generated among others, by cytochrome P450, some metals, and xanthine oxidase. Some pathologies arising during infection can be attributed to oxidative stress and generation of reactive species in infection can even have fatal consequences. This article reviews the basic pathways in which reactive species can accumulate during infectious diseases and discusses the related health consequences.

  9. Oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction and the mitochondria theory of aging.

    PubMed

    Kong, Yahui; Trabucco, Sally E; Zhang, Hong

    2014-01-01

    Aging is characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-associated diseases and death. One potential cause of aging is the progressive accumulation of dysfunctional mitochondria and oxidative damage with age. Considerable efforts have been made in our understanding of the role of mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress in aging and age-associated diseases. This chapter outlines the interplay between oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, and discusses their impact on senescence, cell death, stem cell function, age-associated diseases and longevity.

  10. [Does nitric oxide stress exist?].

    PubMed

    Torreilles, J; Guérin, M C

    1995-01-01

    Ten years ago, the term "oxidative stress" (sigma -O2) was created to define oxidative damage inflicted to the organism. This definition brings together processes involving reactive oxygen species production and action such as free radical production during univalent reduction of oxygen within mitochondria, activation of NADPH-dependent oxidase system on the membrane surface of neutrophils, flavoprotein-catalyzed redox cycling of xenobiotics and exposure to chemical and physical agents in the environment. Since the discovery of the nitric oxide biosynthetic pathway, the deleterious effects of uncontrolled nitric oxide generation are generally classified as oxidative stress. Indeed, products of the reaction of NO and superoxide lead to oxidants such as peroxinitrite, nitrogen dioxide and hydroxyl radical, which are involved in mechanisms of cell-mediated immune reactions and defence of the intracellular environment against microbiol invasion. However NO can also regulate many biological reactions and signal transduction pathways that lead to a variety of physiological responses such as blood pressure, neurotransmission, platelet aggregation, endothelin generation or smooth muscle cell proliferation. Then the uncontrolled NO production can lead to a variety of physiological and pathophysiological responses similar to a Nitric Oxide Stress: activation of guanylate cyclase and production of cGMP: overstimulation of the inducible L-arginine to L-citrulline and NO pathway by bactericidal endotoxins and cytokines has been shown to promote undesired increases in vasodilatation, which may account for hypotension in septic shock and cytokine therapy. stimulation of auto-ADP-ribosylation and modification of SH-groups of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in a cGMP-independent mechanism: by this way, NO in excess can strongly inhibits this important glycolytic enzyme and reduce the cellular energy production. inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase: extensive inhibition

  11. Oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueping; Guo, Chunyan; Kong, Jiming

    2012-02-15

    Reactive oxygen species are constantly produced in aerobic organisms as by-products of normal oxygen metabolism and include free radicals such as superoxide anion (O2 (-)) and hydroxyl radical (OH(-)), and non-radical hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The mitochondrial respiratory chain and enzymatic reactions by various enzymes are endogenous sources of reactive oxygen species. Exogenous reactive oxygen species -inducing stressors include ionizing radiation, ultraviolet light, and divergent oxidizing chemicals. At low concentrations, reactive oxygen species serve as an important second messenger in cell signaling; however, at higher concentrations and long-term exposure, reactive oxygen species can damage cellular macromolecules such as DNA, proteins, and lipids, which leads to necrotic and apoptotic cell death. Oxidative stress is a condition of imbalance between reactive oxygen species formation and cellular antioxidant capacity due to enhanced ROS generation and/or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. Biochemical alterations in these macromolecular components can lead to various pathological conditions and human diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Neurodegenerative diseases are morphologically featured by progressive cell loss in specific vulnerable neuronal cells, often associated with cytoskeletal protein aggregates forming inclusions in neurons and/or glial cells. Deposition of abnormal aggregated proteins and disruption of metal ions homeostasis are highly associated with oxidative stress. The main aim of this review is to present as much detailed information as possible that is available on various neurodegenerative disorders and their connection with oxidative stress. A variety of therapeutic strategies designed to address these pathological processes are also described. For the future therapeutic direction, one specific pathway that involves the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 is receiving considerable attention.

  12. Impairment of lon-induced protection against the accumulation of oxidized proteins in senescent wi-38 fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Ngo, Jenny K; Pomatto, Laura C D; Bota, Daniela A; Koop, Alison L; Davies, Kelvin J A

    2011-11-01

    Oxidative damage to mitochondrial proteins is thought to contribute to the aging process, but the Lon protease normally degrades such proteins. In early-passage WI-38 human lung fibroblasts, Lon expression is rapidly induced during H(2)O(2) stress, which prevents the accumulation of oxidized proteins and protects cell viability. In contrast, middle passage cells exhibit only sluggish induction of Lon expression in oxidative stress, and oxidized proteins initially accumulate. Late-passage, or senescent, cells have low basal levels of Lon and high levels of accumulated oxidized proteins; in response to oxidative stress, they fail to induce Lon expression and exhibit continually increasing accumulation of oxidized proteins. Senescent cells separated into two populations, one exhibiting normal mitochondrial mass and a second displaying significant loss of mitochondria; both populations had diminished mitochondrial transmembrane potential. These senescent changes are similar to the effects of Lon silencing in young cells. We suggest that loss of Lon stress inducibility is part of a pattern of diminishing stress adaptability that predisposes cells to senescence.

  13. Clinical perspective on oxidative stress in sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    D'Amico, Emanuele; Factor-Litvak, Pam; Santella, Regina M; Mitsumoto, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    Sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is one of the most devastating neurological diseases; most patients die within 3 to 4 years after symptom onset. Oxidative stress is a disturbance in the pro-oxidative/antioxidative balance favoring the pro-oxidative state. Autopsy and laboratory studies in ALS indicate that oxidative stress plays a major role in motor neuron degeneration and astrocyte dysfunction. Oxidative stress biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid, plasma, and urine are elevated, suggesting that abnormal oxidative stress is generated outside of the central nervous system. Our review indicates that agricultural chemicals, heavy metals, military service, professional sports, excessive physical exertion, chronic head trauma, and certain foods might be modestly associated with ALS risk, with a stronger association between risk and smoking. At the cellular level, these factors are all involved in generating oxidative stress. Experimental studies indicate that a combination of insults that induce modest oxidative stress can exert additive deleterious effects on motor neurons, suggesting that multiple exposures in real-world environments are important. As the disease progresses, nutritional deficiency, cachexia, psychological stress, and impending respiratory failure may further increase oxidative stress. Moreover, accumulating evidence suggests that ALS is possibly a systemic disease. Laboratory, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence clearly supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress is central in the pathogenic process, particularly in genetically susceptive individuals. If we are to improve ALS treatment, well-designed biochemical and genetic epidemiological studies, combined with a multidisciplinary research approach, are needed and will provide knowledge crucial to our understanding of ALS etiology, pathophysiology, and prognosis. PMID:23797033

  14. Management of oxidative stress by microalgae.

    PubMed

    Cirulis, Judith T; Scott, J Ashley; Ross, Gregory M

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current research on oxidative stress in eukaryotic microalgae and the antioxidant compounds microalgae utilize to control oxidative stress. With the potential to exploit microalgae for the large-scale production of antioxidants, interest in how microalgae manage oxidative stress is growing. Microalgae can experience increased levels of oxidative stress and toxicity as a result of environmental conditions, metals, and chemicals. The defence mechanisms for microalgae include antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase, peroxidases, and glutathione reductase, as well as non-enzymatic antioxidant molecules such as phytochelatins, pigments, polysaccharides, and polyphenols. Discussed herein are the 3 areas the literature has focused on, including how conditions stress microalgae and how microalgae respond to oxidative stress by managing reactive oxygen species. The third area is how beneficial microalgae antioxidants are when administered to cancerous mammalian cells or to rodents experiencing oxidative stress.

  15. Stress accumulation and release at complex transform plate boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Verdonck, D.; Furlong, K.P. )

    1992-10-01

    Finite element methods are used to model the dynamics of deformation along complex transform plate boundaries, specifically the San Andreas fault system, California. Effects of mantle rheology and fault geometry on the stress buildup and release are investigated. No prior knowledge of the earthquake cycle time or amount of fault slip is assumed that the results suggest that the San Andreas fault slips at low shear stress (about 15 MPa). Although the maximum stress on the fault is 15 MPa, models with an upper mantle shear zone deforming entirely by dislocation creep accumulate stresses that exceed 100 MPa, a stress level high enough to drive localized dynamic recrystallization and a shift in dominant deformation mechanism to diffusion creep. Models in which the mantle shear zone deform locally by diffusion creep reach a dynamic steady state where lithospheric shear stresses never exceed the specified fault stress anywhere in the model and indicate that the strength of the upper mantle is an important parameter in the dynamics of plate boundary deformation. 17 refs.

  16. Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Csányi, Gábor; Miller, Francis J.

    2014-01-01

    In the special issue “Oxidative Stress in Cardiovascular Disease” authors were invited to submit papers that investigate key questions in the field of cardiovascular free radical biology. The original research articles included in this issue provide important information regarding novel aspects of reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated signaling, which have important implications in physiological and pathophysiological cardiovascular processes. The issue also included a number of review articles that highlight areas of intense research in the fields of free radical biology and cardiovascular medicine. PMID:24722571

  17. Restraint Stress Intensifies Interstitial K+ Accumulation during Severe Hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Schnell, Christian; Janc, Oliwia A.; Kempkes, Belinda; Callis, Carolina Araya; Flügge, Gabriele; Hülsmann, Swen; Müller, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Chronic stress affects neuronal networks by inducing dendritic retraction, modifying neuronal excitability and plasticity, and modulating glial cells. To elucidate the functional consequences of chronic stress for the hippocampal network, we submitted adult rats to daily restraint stress for 3 weeks (6 h/day). In acute hippocampal tissue slices of stressed rats, basal synaptic function and short-term plasticity at Schaffer collateral/CA1 neuron synapses were unchanged while long-term potentiation was markedly impaired. The spatiotemporal propagation pattern of hypoxia-induced spreading depression episodes was indistinguishable among control and stress slices. However, the duration of the extracellular direct current potential shift was shortened after stress. Moreover, K+ fluxes early during hypoxia were more intense, and the postsynaptic recoveries of interstitial K+ levels and synaptic function were slower. Morphometric analysis of immunohistochemically stained sections suggested hippocampal shrinkage in stressed rats, and the number of cells that are immunoreactive for glial fibrillary acidic protein was increased in the CA1 subfield indicating activation of astrocytes. Western blots showed a marked downregulation of the inwardly rectifying K+ channel Kir4.1 in stressed rats. Yet, resting membrane potentials, input resistance, and K+-induced inward currents in CA1 astrocytes were indistinguishable from controls. These data indicate an intensified interstitial K+ accumulation during hypoxia in the hippocampus of chronically stressed rats which seems to arise from a reduced interstitial volume fraction rather than impaired glial K+ buffering. One may speculate that chronic stress aggravates hypoxia-induced pathophysiological processes in the hippocampal network and that this has implications for the ischemic brain. PMID:22470344

  18. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-01-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  19. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases. PMID:23933092

  20. Peroxisomal metabolism and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Nordgren, Marcus; Fransen, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous and multifunctional organelles that are primarily known for their role in cellular lipid metabolism. As many peroxisomal enzymes catalyze redox reactions as part of their normal function, these organelles are also increasingly recognized as potential regulators of oxidative stress-related signaling pathways. This in turn suggests that peroxisome dysfunction is not only associated with rare inborn errors of peroxisomal metabolism, but also with more common age-related diseases such as neurodegeneration, type 2 diabetes, and cancer. This review intends to provide a comprehensive picture of the complex role of mammalian peroxisomes in cellular redox metabolism. We highlight how peroxisomal metabolism may contribute to the bioavailability of important mediators of oxidative stress, with particular emphasis on reactive oxygen species. In addition, we review the biological properties of peroxisome-derived signaling messengers and discuss how these molecules may mediate various biological responses. Furthermore, we explore the emerging concepts that peroxisomes and mitochondria share an intricate redox-sensitive relationship and cooperate in cell fate decisions. This is particularly relevant to the observed demise of peroxisome function which accompanies cellular senescence, organismal aging, and age-related diseases.

  1. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sabeti, Parvin; Pourmasumi, Soheila; Rahiminia, Tahereh; Akyash, Fatemeh; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2016-04-01

    Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS) during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN) leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions. PMID:27351024

  2. Amyloids, melanins and oxidative stress in melanomagenesis.

    PubMed

    Liu-Smith, Feng; Poe, Carrie; Farmer, Patrick J; Meyskens, Frank L

    2015-03-01

    Melanoma has traditionally been viewed as an ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced malignancy. While UV is a common inducing factor, other endogenous stresses such as metal ion accumulation or the melanin pigment itself may provide alternative pathways to melanoma progression. Eumelanosomes within melanoma often exhibit disrupted membranes and fragmented pigment which may be due to alterations in their amyloid-based striated matrix. The melanosomal amyloid can itself be toxic, especially in combination with reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) generated by endogenous NADPH oxidase (NOX) and nitric oxide synthase (NOS) enzymes, a toxic mix that may initiate melanomagenesis. Further understanding of the loss of the melanosomal organization, the behaviour of the exposed melanin and the induction of ROS/RNS in melanomas may provide critical insights into this deadly disease.

  3. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment.

    PubMed

    Farrow, Eric M; Wang, Jianmin; Burken, Joel G; Shi, Honglan; Yan, Wengui; Yang, John; Hua, Bin; Deng, Baolin

    2015-08-01

    Effects of soil-arsenic (As), phosphorus and iron oxide on As accumulation in rice grain were investigated. Cultivars that have significantly different sensitivity to As, straighthead-resistant Zhe 733 and straighthead-susceptible Cocodrie, were used to represent different cultivar varieties. The grain accumulation of other elements of concern, selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) was also monitored. Results demonstrated that high soil-As not only resulted in high grain-As, but could also result in high grain-Se, and Zhe 733 had significantly less grain-As than Cocodrie did. However, soil-As did not impact grain-Mo and Cd. Among all elements monitored, iron oxide amendment significantly reduced grain-As for both cultivars, while the phosphate application only reduced grain-Se for Zhe 733. Results also indicated that cultivar type significantly impacted grain accumulation of all monitored trace elements. Therefore, applying iron oxide to As-contaminated land, in addition to choosing appropriate rice cultivar, can effectively reduce the grain accumulation of As. PMID:25910688

  4. Age-related Oxidative Stress Compromises Endosomal Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Cannizzo, Elvira S.; Clement, Cristina C.; Morozova, Kateryna; Valdor, Rut; Kaushik, Susmita; Almeida, Larissa N.; Follo, Carlo; Sahu, Ranjit; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Macian, Fernando; Santambrogio, Laura

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of aging is an imbalance between production and clearance of reactive oxygen species and increased levels of oxidatively damaged biomolecules. Herein we demonstrate that splenic and nodal antigen presenting cells purified from old mice accumulate oxidatively modified proteins with side chain carbonylation, advanced glycation end products and lipid peroxidation. We show further that the endosomal accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins interferes with the efficient processing of exogenous antigens and degradation of macroautophagy-delivered proteins. In support of a causative role for oxidized products in the inefficient immune response, a decrease in oxidative stress improved the adaptive immune response to immunizing antigens. These findings underscore a previously unrecognized negative effect of age-dependent changes in cellular proteostasis on the immune response. PMID:22840404

  5. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Loren P.; Al-Hasan, Yazan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that protect against organ dysfunction in the programmed offspring. PMID:22848830

  6. Osmotic Stress-Induced Polyamine Accumulation in Cereal Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Hector E.; Galston, Arthur W.

    1984-01-01

    Putrescine and spermidine accumulate in cereal cells and protoplasts exposed to various osmotica (sorbitol, mannitol, proline, betaine, or sucrose). The response is fast (1-2 hour lag), massive (50- to 60-fold increase in putrescine), and is not due to release of putrescine from a bound form or to conversion from spermidine. It rather involves the activation of the biosynthetic pathway mediated by arginine decarboxylase (ADC; EC 4.1.1.19) (Flores and Galston 1982 Science 217: 1259). Polyamine accumulation and the rise in ADC activity in osmotically stressed tissue are prevented by ADC inhibitors (α-difluoromethylarginine, d-arginine, and l-canavanine) but are not affected by α-difluoromethylornithine and methylornithine, inhibitors of the alternative putrescine biosynthetic enzyme ornithine decarboxylase (EC 4.1.1.17). Putrescine accumulation by oat and corn leaves is maximal in solutions only slightly hyperosmotic (0.4 molar). The stress response, which declines with leaf age, is completely prevented by cycloheximide (10 to 50 micrograms per milliliter) when added during the first hour of exposure to osmoticum, and partially by transcription inhibitors (cordycepin, Actinomycin D, 5 to 20 micrograms per milliliter). Oat seedlings allowed to wilt by withholding water also show a rise in polyamine titer and ADC activity. This response is not readily reversible upon rewatering. PMID:16663551

  7. Regulation of the Arabidopsis Transcriptome by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Desikan, Radhika; A.-H.-Mackerness, Soheila; Hancock, John T.; Neill, Steven J.

    2001-01-01

    Oxidative stress, resulting from an imbalance in the accumulation and removal of reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), is a challenge faced by all aerobic organisms. In plants, exposure to various abiotic and biotic stresses results in accumulation of H2O2 and oxidative stress. Increasing evidence indicates that H2O2 functions as a stress signal in plants, mediating adaptive responses to various stresses. To analyze cellular responses to H2O2, we have undertaken a large-scale analysis of the Arabidopsis transcriptome during oxidative stress. Using cDNA microarray technology, we identified 175 non-redundant expressed sequence tags that are regulated by H2O2. Of these, 113 are induced and 62 are repressed by H2O2. A substantial proportion of these expressed sequence tags have predicted functions in cell rescue and defense processes. RNA-blot analyses of selected genes were used to verify the microarray data and extend them to demonstrate that other stresses such as wilting, UV irradiation, and elicitor challenge also induce the expression of many of these genes, both independently of, and, in some cases, via H2O2. PMID:11553744

  8. [Mitochondria and oxidative stress participation in renal inflammatory process].

    PubMed

    Manucha, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The apoptosis and renal fibrosis are processes inherent to the chronic kidney disease, and consequently a clear deregulation of the mitochondrial respiratory mechanism has been described in patients with chronic renal disease associated to an increase of the oxidative stress. The injured tubular cells linked to the interstitial macrophages and myofibroblasts produce cytokines and growth factors that encourage an inflammatory condition, inducing the apoptosis of the tubular cells and enabling the accumulation of the extracellular matrix. The angiotensin II has a central role in the renal fibrogenesis leading to a rapid progression of the chronic kidney disease. The growing levels of the angiotensin II induce pro-inflammatory cytokines, the activation of NF-kB, adhesion molecules,chemokines, growth factors, and oxidative stress. The current evidence suggests that the angiotensin II increases the mitochondrial oxidative stress, regulates the induction of the apoptosis and conditions the inflammatory process. Therefore the mitochondria and the oxidative stress would play a determinant role in the renal inflammatory process. Finally, this review summarizes our present knowledge regarding the possible mechanisms that would contribute to the apoptosis conditioned by inflammation and/or oxidative stress during the chronic renal disease. Additionally, a new concept of the anti-inflammatory tools is proposed to regulate the mitochondrial oxidative stress that would directly affect the inflammatory process and apoptosis. This concept could have positive consequences on the treatment of renal inflammatory pathologies and related diseases.

  9. Intracerebral Hemorrhage, Oxidative Stress, and Antioxidant Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Xiaochun; Wen, Zunjia; Shen, Haitao; Shen, Meifen

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic stroke is a common and severe neurological disorder and is associated with high rates of mortality and morbidity, especially for intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Increasing evidence demonstrates that oxidative stress responses participate in the pathophysiological processes of secondary brain injury (SBI) following ICH. The mechanisms involved in interoperable systems include endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, neuronal apoptosis and necrosis, inflammation, and autophagy. In this review, we summarized some promising advances in the field of oxidative stress and ICH, including contained animal and human investigations. We also discussed the role of oxidative stress, systemic oxidative stress responses, and some research of potential therapeutic options aimed at reducing oxidative stress to protect the neuronal function after ICH, focusing on the challenges of translation between preclinical and clinical studies, and potential post-ICH antioxidative therapeutic approaches. PMID:27190572

  10. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes.

  11. Oxidative stress contributes to autophagy induction in response to endoplasmic reticulum stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D; Crespo, José L

    2014-10-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  12. Accumulation of polyphosphate in Lactobacillus spp. and its involvement in stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Blasco, Amalia; Zúñiga, Manuel; Monedero, Vicente

    2014-03-01

    Polyphosphate (poly-P) is a polymer of phosphate residues synthesized and in some cases accumulated by microorganisms, where it plays crucial physiological roles such as the participation in the response to nutritional stringencies and environmental stresses. Poly-P metabolism has received little attention in Lactobacillus, a genus of lactic acid bacteria of relevance for food production and health of humans and animals. We show that among 34 strains of Lactobacillus, 18 of them accumulated intracellular poly-P granules, as revealed by specific staining and electron microscopy. Poly-P accumulation was generally dependent on the presence of elevated phosphate concentrations in the culture medium, and it correlated with the presence of polyphosphate kinase (ppk) genes in the genomes. The ppk gene from Lactobacillus displayed a genetic arrangement in which it was flanked by two genes encoding exopolyphosphatases of the Ppx-GppA family. The ppk functionality was corroborated by its disruption (LCABL_27820 gene) in Lactobacillus casei BL23 strain. The constructed ppk mutant showed a lack of intracellular poly-P granules and a drastic reduction in poly-P synthesis. Resistance to several stresses was tested in the ppk-disrupted strain, showing that it presented a diminished growth under high-salt or low-pH conditions and an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results show that poly-P accumulation is a characteristic of some strains of lactobacilli and may thus play important roles in the physiology of these microorganisms.

  13. Accumulation of Polyphosphate in Lactobacillus spp. and Its Involvement in Stress Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Alcántara, Cristina; Blasco, Amalia; Zúñiga, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Polyphosphate (poly-P) is a polymer of phosphate residues synthesized and in some cases accumulated by microorganisms, where it plays crucial physiological roles such as the participation in the response to nutritional stringencies and environmental stresses. Poly-P metabolism has received little attention in Lactobacillus, a genus of lactic acid bacteria of relevance for food production and health of humans and animals. We show that among 34 strains of Lactobacillus, 18 of them accumulated intracellular poly-P granules, as revealed by specific staining and electron microscopy. Poly-P accumulation was generally dependent on the presence of elevated phosphate concentrations in the culture medium, and it correlated with the presence of polyphosphate kinase (ppk) genes in the genomes. The ppk gene from Lactobacillus displayed a genetic arrangement in which it was flanked by two genes encoding exopolyphosphatases of the Ppx-GppA family. The ppk functionality was corroborated by its disruption (LCABL_27820 gene) in Lactobacillus casei BL23 strain. The constructed ppk mutant showed a lack of intracellular poly-P granules and a drastic reduction in poly-P synthesis. Resistance to several stresses was tested in the ppk-disrupted strain, showing that it presented a diminished growth under high-salt or low-pH conditions and an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results show that poly-P accumulation is a characteristic of some strains of lactobacilli and may thus play important roles in the physiology of these microorganisms. PMID:24375133

  14. Accumulation of polyphosphate in Lactobacillus spp. and its involvement in stress resistance.

    PubMed

    Alcántara, Cristina; Blasco, Amalia; Zúñiga, Manuel; Monedero, Vicente

    2014-03-01

    Polyphosphate (poly-P) is a polymer of phosphate residues synthesized and in some cases accumulated by microorganisms, where it plays crucial physiological roles such as the participation in the response to nutritional stringencies and environmental stresses. Poly-P metabolism has received little attention in Lactobacillus, a genus of lactic acid bacteria of relevance for food production and health of humans and animals. We show that among 34 strains of Lactobacillus, 18 of them accumulated intracellular poly-P granules, as revealed by specific staining and electron microscopy. Poly-P accumulation was generally dependent on the presence of elevated phosphate concentrations in the culture medium, and it correlated with the presence of polyphosphate kinase (ppk) genes in the genomes. The ppk gene from Lactobacillus displayed a genetic arrangement in which it was flanked by two genes encoding exopolyphosphatases of the Ppx-GppA family. The ppk functionality was corroborated by its disruption (LCABL_27820 gene) in Lactobacillus casei BL23 strain. The constructed ppk mutant showed a lack of intracellular poly-P granules and a drastic reduction in poly-P synthesis. Resistance to several stresses was tested in the ppk-disrupted strain, showing that it presented a diminished growth under high-salt or low-pH conditions and an increased sensitivity to oxidative stress. These results show that poly-P accumulation is a characteristic of some strains of lactobacilli and may thus play important roles in the physiology of these microorganisms. PMID:24375133

  15. Oxidative Stress and Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Maria Luisa; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the major cause of pulmonary disease in infants. The pathophysiology and management of BPD changed with the improvement of neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) management and with the increase of survival rates. Despite the improvements made, BPD is still a public health concern, resulting in frequent hospitalizations with high rates of mortality, impaired weight and height growth, and neurodevelopmental disorders. Lung injury in the neonatal period has multiple etiologic factors – genetic, hemodynamic, metabolic, nutritional, mechanical, and infectious mechanisms – act in a cumulative and synergic way. Free radical (FR) generation is largely recognized as the major cause of lung damage. Oxidative stress (OS) is the final common endpoint for a complex convergence of events, some genetically determined and some triggered by in utero stressors. Inflammatory placental disorders and chorioamnionitis also play an important role due to the coexistence of inflammatory and oxidative lesions. In addition, the contribution of airway inflammation has been extensively studied. The link between inflammation and OS injury involves the direct activation of inflammatory cells, especially granulocytes, which potentiates the inflammatory reaction. Individualized interventions to support ventilation, minimize oxygen exposure, minimize apnea, and encourage growth should decrease both the frequency and severity of BPD. Future perspectives suggest supplementation with enzymatic and/or non-enzymatic antioxidants. The use of antioxidants in preterm newborns particularly exposed to OS and at risk for BPD represents a logical strategy to ameliorate FRs injury, but further studies are needed to support this hypothesis. PMID:24027702

  16. Ubiquitin-proteasome pathway and cellular responses to oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Allen

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) is the primary cytosolic proteolytic machinery for the selective degradation of various forms of damaged proteins. Thus, the UPP is an important protein quality control mechanism. In the canonical UPP, both ubiquitin and the 26S proteasome are involved. Substrate proteins of the canonical UPP are first tagged by multiple ubiquitin molecules and then degraded by the 26S proteasome. However, in non-canonical UPP, proteins can be degraded by the 26S or the 20S proteasome without being ubiquitinated. It is clear that a proteasome is responsible for selective degradation of oxidized proteins, but the extent to which ubiquitination is involved in this process remains a subject of debate. While many publications suggest that the 20S proteasome degrades oxidized proteins independent of ubiquitin, there is also solid evidence indicating that ubiquitin and ubiquitination are involved in degradation of some forms of oxidized proteins. A fully functional UPP is required for cells to cope with oxidative stress and the activity of the UPP is also modulated by cellular redox status. Mild or transient oxidative stress up-regulates the ubiquitination system and proteasome activity in cells and tissues and transiently enhances intracellular proteolysis. Severe or sustained oxidative stress impairs the function of the UPP and decreases intracellular proteolysis. Both the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the proteasome can be inactivated by sustained oxidative stress, especially the 26S proteasome. Differential susceptibilities of the ubiquitin conjugation enzymes and the 26S proteasome to oxidative damage lead to an accumulation of ubiquitin conjugates in cells in response to mild oxidative stress. Thus, increased levels of ubiquitin conjugates in cells appear to be an indicator of mild oxidative stress. PMID:21530648

  17. High-Mobility Group Box 1, Oxidative Stress, and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Rui; Zeh, Herbert J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Oxidative stress and associated reactive oxygen species can modify lipids, proteins, carbohydrates, and nucleic acids, and induce the mitochondrial permeability transition, providing a signal leading to the induction of autophagy, apoptosis, and necrosis. High-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein, a chromatin-binding nuclear protein and damage-associated molecular pattern molecule, is integral to oxidative stress and downstream apoptosis or survival. Accumulation of HMGB1 at sites of oxidative DNA damage can lead to repair of the DNA. As a redox-sensitive protein, HMGB1 contains three cysteines (Cys23, 45, and 106). In the setting of oxidative stress, it can form a Cys23-Cys45 disulfide bond; a role for oxidative homo- or heterodimerization through the Cys106 has been suggested for some of its biologic activities. HMGB1 causes activation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase and increased reactive oxygen species production in neutrophils. Reduced and oxidized HMGB1 have different roles in extracellular signaling and regulation of immune responses, mediated by signaling through the receptor for advanced glycation end products and/or Toll-like receptors. Antioxidants such as ethyl pyruvate, quercetin, green tea, N-acetylcysteine, and curcumin are protective in the setting of experimental infection/sepsis and injury including ischemia-reperfusion, partly through attenuating HMGB1 release and systemic accumulation. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1315–1335. PMID:20969478

  18. Uptake and Accumulation of Oxidized Low-Density Lipoprotein during Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infection in Guinea Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Gopinath S.; Kirk, Natalie M.; Ackart, David F.; Obregón-Henao, Andrés; Shanley, Crystal A.; Orme, Ian M.; Basaraba, Randall J.

    2012-01-01

    The typical host response to infection of humans and some animals by M. tuberculosis is the accumulation of reactive oxygen species generating inflammatory cells into discrete granulomas, which frequently develop central caseous necrosis. In previous studies we showed that infection of immunologically naïve guinea pigs with M. tuberculosis leads to localized and systemic oxidative stress that results in a significant depletion of serum total antioxidant capacity and the accumulation of malondialdehyde, a bi-product of lipid peroxidation. Here we show that in addition, the generation of excessive reactive oxygen species in vivo resulted in the accumulation of oxidized low density lipoproteins (OxLDL) in pulmonary and extrapulmonary granulomas, serum and lung macrophages collected by bronchoalveolar lavage. Macrophages from immunologically naïve guinea pigs infected with M. tuberculosis also had increased surface expression of the type 1 scavenger receptors CD36 and LOX1, which facilitate the uptake of oxidized host macromolecules including OxLDL. Vaccination of guinea pigs with Bacillus Calmette Guerin (BCG) prior to aerosol challenge reduced the bacterial burden as well as the intracellular accumulation of OxLDL and the expression of macrophage CD36 and LOX1. In vitro loading of guinea pig lung macrophages with OxLDL resulted in enhanced replication of bacilli compared to macrophages loaded with non-oxidized LDL. Overall, this study provides additional evidence of oxidative stress in M. tuberculosis infected guinea pigs and the potential role OxLDL laden macrophages have in supporting intracellular bacilli survival and persistence. PMID:22493658

  19. Encapsulation of the flavonoid quercetin with an arsenic chelator into nanocapsules enables the simultaneous delivery of hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs with a synergistic effect against chronic arsenic accumulation and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Swarupa; Dungdung, Sandhya Rekha; Chowdhury, Somsubhra Thakur; Mandal, Ardhendu K; Sarkar, Sibani; Ghosh, Debasree; Das, Nirmalendu

    2011-11-15

    Chronic arsenic exposure causes oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in the liver and brain. The ideal treatment would be to chelate arsenic and prevent oxidative stress. meso-2,3-Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) is used to chelate arsenic but its hydrophilicity makes it membrane-impermeative. Conversely, quercetin (QC) is a good antioxidant with limited clinical application because of its hydrophobic nature and limited bioavailability, and it is not possible to solubilize these two compounds in a single nontoxic solvent. Nanocapsules have emerged as a potent drug delivery system and make it feasible to incorporate both hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds. Nanoencapsulated formulations with QC and DMSA either alone or coencapsulated in polylactide-co-glycolide [N(QC+DMSA)] were synthesized to explore their therapeutic application in a rat model of chronic arsenic toxicity. These treatments were compared to administration of quercetin or DMSA alone using conventional delivery methods. Both nanoencapsulated quercetin and nanoencapsulated DMSA were more effective at decreasing oxidative injury in liver or brain compared to conventional delivery methods, but coencapsulation of quercetin and DMSA into nanoparticles had a marked synergistic effect, decreasing liver and brain arsenic levels from 9.5 and 4.8μg/g to 2.2 and 1.5μg/g, respectively. Likewise, administration of coencapsulated quercetin and DMSA virtually normalized changes in mitochondrial function, formation of reactive oxygen species, and liver injury. We conclude that coencapsulation of quercetin and DMSA may provide a more effective therapeutic strategy in the management of arsenic toxicity and also presents a novel way of combining hydrophilic and hydrophobic drugs into a single delivery system.

  20. Induction of Oxidative Stress in Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Ozbek, Emin

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative stress has a critical role in the pathophysiology of several kidney diseases, and many complications of these diseases are mediated by oxidative stress, oxidative stress-related mediators, and inflammation. Several systemic diseases such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia; infection; antibiotics, chemotherapeutics, and radiocontrast agents; and environmental toxins, occupational chemicals, radiation, smoking, as well as alcohol consumption induce oxidative stress in kidney. We searched the literature using PubMed, MEDLINE, and Google scholar with “oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, oxygen free radicals, kidney, renal injury, nephropathy, nephrotoxicity, and induction”. The literature search included only articles written in English language. Letters or case reports were excluded. Scientific relevance, for clinical studies target populations, and study design, for basic science studies full coverage of main topics, are eligibility criteria for articles used in this paper. PMID:22577546

  1. Deuterium accumulation in beryllium oxide layer exposed to deuterium atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. M.; Alimov, V. Kh.; Gavrilov, L. E.

    1998-10-01

    The interaction of deuterium atoms with beryllium TIP-30 was studied at temperatures of 340, 500 and 740 K. After D atom exposure, the depth distributions of deuterium atoms and molecules in Be were measured using combined Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Residual Gas Analysis (RGA) methods. It was shown that deuterium is mainly accumulated in the oxide layer although long tails are also observed. Deuterium is retained in two states - atomic and molecular forms. The amount of trapped deuterium in samples decreases during the sample storage in vacuum or air at room temperature. The results were explained by the chemical bonding of D atoms in BeO oxide with beryllium hydroxide formation and the trapping of deuterium molecules in bubbles which are formed at growth defects in the oxide layer.

  2. Cardiac oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokines response after myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Neri, Margherita; Fineschi, Vittorio; Di Paolo, Marco; Pomara, Cristoforo; Riezzo, Irene; Turillazzi, Emanuela; Cerretani, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in heart failure or during ischemia/reperfusion occurs as a result of the excessive generation or accumulation of free radicals or their oxidation products. Free radicals formed during oxidative stress can initiate lipid peroxidation, oxidize proteins to inactive states and cause DNA strand breaks. Oxidative stress is a condition in which oxidant metabolites exert toxic effects because of their increased production or an altered cellular mechanism of protection. In the early phase of acute heart ischemia cytokines have the feature to be functional pleiotropy and redundancy, moreover, several cytokines exert similar and overlapping actions on the same cell type and one cytokine shows a wide range of biological effects on various cell types. Activation of cytokine cascades in the infarcted myocardium was established in numerous studies. In experimental models of myocardial infarction, induction and release of the pro-inflammatory cytokines like TNF-α (Tumor Necrosis Factor α), IL-1β (Interleukin- 1β) and IL-6 (Interleukin-6) and chemokines are steadily described. The current review examines the role of oxidative stress and pro-inflammatory cytokines response following acute myocardial infarction and explores the inflammatory mechanisms of cardiac injury.

  3. Clinical Relevance of Biomarkers of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Frijhoff, Jeroen; Winyard, Paul G.; Zarkovic, Neven; Davies, Sean S.; Stocker, Roland; Cheng, David; Knight, Annie R.; Taylor, Emma Louise; Oettrich, Jeannette; Ruskovska, Tatjana; Gasparovic, Ana Cipak; Cuadrado, Antonio; Weber, Daniela; Poulsen, Henrik Enghusen; Grune, Tilman; Schmidt, Harald H.H.W.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Oxidative stress is considered to be an important component of various diseases. A vast number of methods have been developed and used in virtually all diseases to measure the extent and nature of oxidative stress, ranging from oxidation of DNA to proteins, lipids, and free amino acids. Recent Advances: An increased understanding of the biology behind diseases and redox biology has led to more specific and sensitive tools to measure oxidative stress markers, which are very diverse and sometimes very low in abundance. Critical Issues: The literature is very heterogeneous. It is often difficult to draw general conclusions on the significance of oxidative stress biomarkers, as only in a limited proportion of diseases have a range of different biomarkers been used, and different biomarkers have been used to study different diseases. In addition, biomarkers are often measured using nonspecific methods, while specific methodologies are often too sophisticated or laborious for routine clinical use. Future Directions: Several markers of oxidative stress still represent a viable biomarker opportunity for clinical use. However, positive findings with currently used biomarkers still need to be validated in larger sample sizes and compared with current clinical standards to establish them as clinical diagnostics. It is important to realize that oxidative stress is a nuanced phenomenon that is difficult to characterize, and one biomarker is not necessarily better than others. The vast diversity in oxidative stress between diseases and conditions has to be taken into account when selecting the most appropriate biomarker. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 1144–1170. PMID:26415143

  4. Oxidative Stress and Programmed Cell Death in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Farrugia, Gianluca; Balzan, Rena

    2012-01-01

    Yeasts, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, have long served as useful models for the study of oxidative stress, an event associated with cell death and severe human pathologies. This review will discuss oxidative stress in yeast, in terms of sources of reactive oxygen species (ROS), their molecular targets, and the metabolic responses elicited by cellular ROS accumulation. Responses of yeast to accumulated ROS include upregulation of antioxidants mediated by complex transcriptional changes, activation of pro-survival pathways such as mitophagy, and programmed cell death (PCD) which, apart from apoptosis, includes pathways such as autophagy and necrosis, a form of cell death long considered accidental and uncoordinated. The role of ROS in yeast aging will also be discussed. PMID:22737670

  5. Nicotine enantiomers and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yildiz, D; Ercal, N; Armstrong, D W

    1998-09-15

    Nicotine affects a variety of cellular processes ranging from induction of gene expression to secretion of hormones and modulation of enzymatic activities. The objective of this study was to characterize the toxicity of nicotine enantiomers as well as their ability to induce oxidative stress in an in vitro model using Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Colony formation assay has demonstrated that (-)-nicotine is the more toxic of the enantiomers. At 6 mM concentrations, (-)-nicotine was found to be approximately 28- and 19-fold more potent than (+)-, and (+/-)-nicotine (racemic), respectively. Results also indicated that the toxicity of (+/-)-nicotine is higher than that of (+)-nicotine. (-)-Nicotine at a 10 mM concentration substantially decreased glutathione (GSH) levels (46% decrease). In addition, a 3-fold increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level was evident in cells after exposure to 10 mM (-)-nicotine. Increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activities in the media demonstrated that cellular membrane integrity was disturbed in nicotine treated cells. In the presence of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT), the LDH activities returned to control value in 24 h with all concentrations of (-)-, (+)-, and (+/-)-nicotine. The decreases in LDH activities in the presence of the radical scavenging enzymes SOD and CAT suggest that membrane damage may be due to free radical generation. PMID:9865482

  6. Nitrogen Substituent Polarity Influences Dithiocarbamate-Mediated Lipid Oxidation, Nerve Copper Accumulation, and Myelin Injury

    PubMed Central

    Valentine, Holly L.; Viquez, Olga M.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Amarnath, Venkataraman; Zyskowski, Justin; Kassa, Endalkachew N.; Valentine, William M.

    2009-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture, and medicine, with new applications being investigated. Past studies have suggested that the neurotoxicity of some dithiocarbamates may result from copper accumulation, protein oxidative damage, and lipid oxidation. The polarity of a dithiocarbamate’s nitrogen substituents influences the lipophilicity of the copper complexes it generates and thus potentially determines its ability to promote copper accumulation within nerve and induce myelin injury. In the current study, a series of dithiocarbamate-copper complexes differing in their lipophilicity were evaluated for their relative abilities to promote lipid peroxidation determined by malondialdehyde levels generated in an ethyl arachidonate oil-in-water emulsion. In a second component of this study, rats were exposed to either N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate or sarcosine dithiocarbamate; both generate dithiocarbamate-copper complexes that are lipid and water soluble, respectively. Following the exposures, brain, tibial nerve, spinal cord and liver tissue copper levels were measured by inductively coupled mass spectroscopy to assess the relative abilities of these two dithiocarbamates to promote copper accumulation. Peripheral nerve injury was evaluated using grip strengths, nerve conduction velocities and morphologic changes at the light microscope level. Additionally, the protein expression levels of glutathione transferase alpha and heme-oxygenase-1 in nerve were determined and the quantity of protein carbonyls measured to assess levels of oxidative stress and injury. The data provide evidence that dithiocarbamate-copper complexes are redox active; and that the ability of dithiocarbamate complexes to promote lipid peroxidation is correlated to the lipophilicity of the complex. Consistent with neurotoxicity requiring the formation of a lipid soluble copper complex, significant increases in copper accumulation, oxidative stress and myelin

  7. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  8. Oxidative Stress Related Diseases in Newborns.

    PubMed

    Ozsurekci, Yasemin; Aykac, Kubra

    2016-01-01

    We review oxidative stress-related newborn disease and the mechanism of oxidative damage. In addition, we outline diagnostic and therapeutic strategies and future directions. Many reports have defined oxidative stress as an imbalance between an enhanced reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and the lack of protective ability of antioxidants. From that point of view, free radical-induced damage caused by oxidative stress seems to be a probable contributing factor to the pathogenesis of many newborn diseases, such as respiratory distress syndrome, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, periventricular leukomalacia, necrotizing enterocolitis, patent ductus arteriosus, and retinopathy of prematurity. We share the hope that the new understanding of the concept of oxidative stress and its relation to newborn diseases that has been made possible by new diagnostic techniques will throw light on the treatment of those diseases. PMID:27403229

  9. Oxidative stress and oxidative damage in chemical carcinogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Klaunig, James E. Wang Zemin; Pu Xinzhu; Zhou Shaoyu

    2011-07-15

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are induced through a variety of endogenous and exogenous sources. Overwhelming of antioxidant and DNA repair mechanisms in the cell by ROS may result in oxidative stress and oxidative damage to the cell. This resulting oxidative stress can damage critical cellular macromolecules and/or modulate gene expression pathways. Cancer induction by chemical and physical agents involves a multi-step process. This process includes multiple molecular and cellular events to transform a normal cell to a malignant neoplastic cell. Oxidative damage resulting from ROS generation can participate in all stages of the cancer process. An association of ROS generation and human cancer induction has been shown. It appears that oxidative stress may both cause as well as modify the cancer process. Recently association between polymorphisms in oxidative DNA repair genes and antioxidant genes (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and human cancer susceptibility has been shown.

  10. Genetic and Environmental Controls on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation in Lakes

    PubMed Central

    Saarenheimo, Jatta; Rissanen, Antti J.; Arvola, Lauri; Nykänen, Hannu; Lehmann, Moritz F.; Tiirola, Marja

    2015-01-01

    We studied potential links between environmental factors, nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation, and genetic indicators of nitrite and N2O reducing bacteria in 12 boreal lakes. Denitrifying bacteria were investigated by quantifying genes encoding nitrite and N2O reductases (nirS/nirK and nosZ, respectively, including the two phylogenetically distinct clades nosZI and nosZII) in lake sediments. Summertime N2O accumulation and hypolimnetic nitrate concentrations were positively correlated both at the inter-lake scale and within a depth transect of an individual lake (Lake Vanajavesi). The variability in the individual nirS, nirK, nosZI, and nosZII gene abundances was high (up to tenfold) among the lakes, which allowed us to study the expected links between the ecosystem’s nir-vs-nos gene inventories and N2O accumulation. Inter-lake variation in N2O accumulation was indeed connected to the relative abundance of nitrite versus N2O reductase genes, i.e. the (nirS+nirK)/nosZI gene ratio. In addition, the ratios of (nirS+nirK)/nosZI at the inter-lake scale and (nirS+nirK)/nosZI+II within Lake Vanajavesi correlated positively with nitrate availability. The results suggest that ambient nitrate concentration can be an important modulator of the N2O accumulation in lake ecosystems, either directly by increasing the overall rate of denitrification or indirectly by controlling the balance of nitrite versus N2O reductase carrying organisms. PMID:25756328

  11. [Oxidative stress in bipolar affective disorder].

    PubMed

    Reininghaus, E Z; Zelzer, S; Reininghaus, B; Lackner, N; Birner, A; Bengesser, S A; Fellendorf, F T; Kapfhammer, H-P; Mangge, H

    2014-09-01

    The results of mortality studies have indicated that medical conditions, such as cardiovascular disease, obesity and diabetes are the most important causes of mortality among patients with bipolar disorder. The reasons for the increased incidence and mortality are not fully understood. Oxidative stress and an inadequate antioxidative system might be one missing link and could also help to further elucidate the pathophysiological basis of bipolar disorder. This article provides a comprehensive review of oxidative stress in general and about the existing data for bipolar disorder. In addition information is given about possible therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress and the use in bipolar disorder. PMID:24441847

  12. Bacterial responses to photo-oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Ziegelhoffer, Eva C.; Donohue, Timothy J.

    2009-01-01

    Singlet oxygen is one of several reactive oxygen species that can destroy biomolecules, microorganisms and other cells. Traditionally, the response to singlet oxygen has been termed photo-oxidative stress, as light-dependent processes in photosynthetic cells are major biological sources of singlet oxygen. Recent work identifying a core set of singlet oxygen stress response genes across various bacterial species highlights the importance of this response for survival by both photosynthetic and non-photosynthetic cells. Here, we review how bacterial cells mount a transcriptional response to photo-oxidative stress in the context of what is known about bacterial stress responses to other reactive oxygen species. PMID:19881522

  13. Oxidative stress and the ageing endocrine system.

    PubMed

    Vitale, Giovanni; Salvioli, Stefano; Franceschi, Claudio

    2013-04-01

    Ageing is a process characterized by a progressive decline in cellular function, organismal fitness and increased risk of age-related diseases and death. Several hundred theories have attempted to explain this phenomenon. One of the most popular is the 'oxidative stress theory', originally termed the 'free radical theory'. The endocrine system seems to have a role in the modulation of oxidative stress; however, much less is known about the role that oxidative stress might have in the ageing of the endocrine system and the induction of age-related endocrine diseases. This Review outlines the interactions between hormones and oxidative metabolism and the potential effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine organs. Many different mechanisms that link oxidative stress and ageing are discussed, all of which converge on the induction or regulation of inflammation. All these mechanisms, including cell senescence, mitochondrial dysfunction and microRNA dysregulation, as well as inflammation itself, could be targets of future studies aimed at clarifying the effects of oxidative stress on ageing of endocrine glands.

  14. Glycinebetaine accumulation is more effective in chloroplasts than in the cytosol for protecting transgenic tomato plants against abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Park, Eung-Jun; Jeknić, Zoran; Pino, María-Teresa; Murata, Norio; Chen, Tony Hwei-Hwang

    2007-08-01

    Tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. cv. Moneymaker) plants were transformed with a gene for choline oxidase (codA) from Arthrobacter globiformis. The gene product (CODA) was targeted to the chloroplasts (Chl-codA), cytosol (Cyt-codA) or both compartments simultaneously (ChlCyt-codA). These three transgenic plant types accumulated different amounts and proportions of glycinebetaine (GB) in their chloroplasts and cytosol. Targeting CODA to either the cytosol or both compartments simultaneously increased total GB content by five- to sixfold over that measured from the chloroplast targeted lines. Accumulation of GB in codA transgenic plants was tissue dependent, with the highest levels being recorded in reproductive organs. Despite accumulating, the lowest amounts of GB, Chl-codA plants exhibited equal or higher degrees of enhanced tolerance to various abiotic stresses. This suggests that chloroplastic GB is more effective than cytosolic GB in protecting plant cells against chilling, high salt and oxidative stresses. Chloroplastic GB levels were positively correlated with the degree of oxidative stress tolerance conferred, whereas cytosolic GB showed no such a correlation. Thus, an increase in total GB content does not necessarily lead to enhanced stress tolerance, but additional accumulation of chloroplastic GB is likely to further raise the level of stress tolerance beyond what we have observed.

  15. ER Protein Processing Under Oxidative Stress: Implications and Prevention.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Mahmoud F; Valenzuela, Carlos; Sisniega, Daniella; Skouta, Rachid; Narayan, Mahesh

    2016-06-01

    Elevated levels of mitochondrial nitrosative stress have been associated with the pathogenesis of both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The mechanism involves catalytic poisoning of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident oxidoreductase chaperone, protein disulfide isomerase (PDI), and the subsequent accumulation of ER-processed substrate proteins. Using a model system to mimic mitochondrial oxidative and nitrosative stress, we demonstrate a PDI-independent mechanism whereby reactive oxygen species (ROS) compromise regeneration rates of disulfide bond-containing ER-processed proteins. Under ROS-duress, the secretion-destined traffic adopts disulfide-exposed structures making the protein flux retrotranslocation biased. We also demonstrate that ROS-compromised protein maturation rates can be rescued by the polyphenol ellagic acid (EA). Our results are significant in that they reveal an additional mechanism which could promote neurodegenerative disorders. Furthermore, our data reveal that EA possesses therapeutic potential as a lead prophylactic agent against oxidative/nitrosative stress-related neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26983927

  16. Aldose Reductase, Oxidative Stress, and Diabetic Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  17. Aldose reductase, oxidative stress, and diabetic mellitus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wai Ho; Martin, Kathleen A; Hwa, John

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a complex metabolic disorder arising from lack of insulin production or insulin resistance (Diagnosis and classification of diabetes mellitus, 2007). DM is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the developed world, particularly from vascular complications such as atherothrombosis in the coronary vessels. Aldose reductase (AR; ALR2; EC 1.1.1.21), a key enzyme in the polyol pathway, catalyzes nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent reduction of glucose to sorbitol, leading to excessive accumulation of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in various tissues of DM including the heart, vasculature, neurons, eyes, and kidneys. As an example, hyperglycemia through such polyol pathway induced oxidative stress, may have dual heart actions, on coronary blood vessel (atherothrombosis) and myocardium (heart failure) leading to severe morbidity and mortality (reviewed in Heather and Clarke, 2011). In cells cultured under high glucose conditions, many studies have demonstrated similar AR-dependent increases in ROS production, confirming AR as an important factor for the pathogenesis of many diabetic complications. Moreover, recent studies have shown that AR inhibitors may be able to prevent or delay the onset of cardiovascular complications such as ischemia/reperfusion injury, atherosclerosis, and atherothrombosis. In this review, we will focus on describing pivotal roles of AR in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases as well as other diabetic complications, and the potential use of AR inhibitors as an emerging therapeutic strategy in preventing DM complications. PMID:22582044

  18. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in aging and healthspan

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The free radical theory of aging proposes that reactive oxygen species (ROS)-induced accumulation of damage to cellular macromolecules is a primary driving force of aging and a major determinant of lifespan. Although this theory is one of the most popular explanations for the cause of aging, several experimental rodent models of antioxidant manipulation have failed to affect lifespan. Moreover, antioxidant supplementation clinical trials have been largely disappointing. The mitochondrial theory of aging specifies more particularly that mitochondria are both the primary sources of ROS and the primary targets of ROS damage. In addition to effects on lifespan and aging, mitochondrial ROS have been shown to play a central role in healthspan of many vital organ systems. In this article we review the evidence supporting the role of mitochondrial oxidative stress, mitochondrial damage and dysfunction in aging and healthspan, including cardiac aging, age-dependent cardiovascular diseases, skeletal muscle aging, neurodegenerative diseases, insulin resistance and diabetes as well as age-related cancers. The crosstalk of mitochondrial ROS, redox, and other cellular signaling is briefly presented. Potential therapeutic strategies to improve mitochondrial function in aging and healthspan are reviewed, with a focus on mitochondrial protective drugs, such as the mitochondrial antioxidants MitoQ, SkQ1, and the mitochondrial protective peptide SS-31. PMID:24860647

  19. Proteomics, oxidative stress and male infertility.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Ashok; Durairajanayagam, Damayanthi; Halabi, Jacques; Peng, Jason; Vazquez-Levin, Monica

    2014-07-01

    Oxidative stress has been established as one of the main causes of male infertility and has been implicated in many diseases associated with infertile men. It results from high concentrations of free radicals and suppressed antioxidant potential, which may alter protein expression in seminal plasma and/or spermatozoa. In recent years, proteomic analyses have been performed to characterize the protein profiles of seminal ejaculate from men with different clinical conditions, such as high oxidative stress. The aim of the present review is to summarize current findings on proteomic studies performed in men with high oxidative stress compared with those with physiological concentrations of free radicals, to better understand the aetiology of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. Each of these studies has suggested candidate biomarkers of oxidative stress, among them are DJ-1, PIP, lactotransferrin and peroxiredoxin. Changes in protein concentrations in seminal plasma samples with oxidative stress conditions were related to stress responses and to regulatory pathways, while alterations in sperm proteins were mostly associated to metabolic responses (carbohydrate metabolism) and stress responses. Future studies should include assessment of post-translational modifications in the spermatozoa as well as in seminal plasma proteomes of men diagnosed with idiopathic infertility. Oxidative stress, which occurs due to a state of imbalance between free radicals and antioxidants, has been implicated in most cases of male infertility. Cells that are in a state of oxidative stress are more likely to have altered protein expression. The aim of this review is to better understand the causes of oxidative stress-induced male infertility. To achieve this, we assessed proteomic studies performed on the seminal plasma and spermatozoa of men with high levels of oxidative stress due to various clinical conditions and compared them with men who had physiological concentrations of free

  20. Oxidative stress in severe acute illness.

    PubMed

    Bar-Or, David; Bar-Or, Raphael; Rael, Leonard T; Brody, Edward N

    2015-01-01

    The overall redox potential of a cell is primarily determined by oxidizable/reducible chemical pairs, including glutathione-glutathione disulfide, reduced thioredoxin-oxidized thioredoxin, and NAD(+)-NADH (and NADP-NADPH). Current methods for evaluating oxidative stress rely on detecting levels of individual byproducts of oxidative damage or by determining the total levels or activity of individual antioxidant enzymes. Oxidation-reduction potential (ORP), on the other hand, is an integrated, comprehensive measure of the balance between total (known and unknown) pro-oxidant and antioxidant components in a biological system. Much emphasis has been placed on the role of oxidative stress in chronic diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis. The role of oxidative stress in acute diseases often seen in the emergency room and intensive care unit is considerable. New tools for the rapid, inexpensive measurement of both redox potential and total redox capacity should aid in introducing a new body of literature on the role of oxidative stress in acute illness and how to screen and monitor for potentially beneficial pharmacologic agents.

  1. Temporal Onset of Hypoxia and Oxidative Stress After Pulmonary Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Fleckenstein, Katharina; Zgonjanin, Larisa; Chen Liguang; Rabbani, Zahid; Jackson, Isabel L.; Thrasher, Bradley; Kirkpatrick, John; Foster, W. Michael; Vujaskovic, Zeljko . E-mail: vujas@radonc.duke.edu

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To investigate the temporal onset of hypoxia following irradiation, and to show how it relates to pulmonary vascular damage, macrophage accumulation, and the production of reactive oxygen species and cytokines. Our previous studies showed that tissue hypoxia in the lung after irradiation contributed to radiation-induced injury. Methods and Materials: Female Fisher 344 rats were irradiated to the right hemithorax with a single dose of 28 Gy. Serial studies were performed up to 20 weeks following irradiation. Radionuclide lung-perfusion studies were performed to detect changes in pulmonary vasculature. Immunohistochemical studies were conducted to study macrophages, tissue hypoxia (carbonic anhydrase-9 marker), oxidative stress (8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine), and the expression of profibrogenic (transforming growth factor-{beta} [TGF-{beta}]) and proangiogenic (vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]) cytokines. Results: Significant changes in lung perfusion along with tissue hypoxia were observed 3 days after irradiation. Significant oxidative stress was detected 1 week after radiation, whereas macrophages started to accumulate at 4 weeks. A significant increase in TGF-{beta} expression was seen within 1 day after radiation, and for VEGF at 2 weeks after radiation. Levels of hypoxia, oxidative stress, and both cytokines continued to rise with time after irradiation. The steepest increase correlated with vast macrophage accumulation. Conclusions: Early changes in lung perfusion, among other factors initiate, the development of hypoxia and chronic oxidative stress after irradiation. Tissue hypoxia is associated with a significant increase in the activation of macrophages and their continuous production of reactive oxygen species, stimulating the production of fibrogenic and angiogenic cytokines, and maintaining the development of chronic radiation-induced lung injury.

  2. Gamma amino butyric acid accumulation in medicinal plants without stress

    PubMed Central

    Anju, P.; Moothedath, Ismail; Rema Shree, Azhimala Bhaskaranpillai

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gamma amino butyric acid (GABA) is an important ubiquitous four carbon nonprotein amino acid with an amino group attached to gamma carbon instead of beta carbon. It exists in different organisms including bacteria, plants, and animals and plays a crucial role in humans by regulating neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system. It is directly responsible for the regulation of muscle tone and also effective in lowering stress, blood pressure, and hypertension. Aim and Objective: The aim of the study was to develop the fingerprint profile of selected medicinally and economically important plants having central nervous system (CNS) activity and to determine the quantity of GABA in the selected plants grown under natural conditions without any added stress. Materials and Methods: The high-performance thin layer chromatography analysis was performed on precoated silica gel plate 60F–254 plate (20 cm × 10 cm) in the form of bands with width 8 mm using Hamilton syringe (100 μl) using n-butanol, acetic acid, and water in the proportion 5:2:2 as mobile phase in a CAMAG chamber which was previously saturated for 30 min. CAMAG TLC scanner 3 was used for the densitometric scanning at 550 nm. Specific marker compounds were used for the quantification. Results and Conclusion: Among the screened medicinal plants, Zingiber officinale and Solanum torvum were found to have GABA. The percentage of GABA present in Z. officinale and S. torvum were found to be 0.0114% and 0.0119%, respectively. The present work confirmed that among the selected CNS active medicinal plants, only two plants contain GABA. We found a negative correlation with plant having CNS activity and accumulation of GABA. The GABA shunt is a conserved pathway in eukaryotes and prokaryotes but, although the role of GABA as a neurotransmitter in mammals is clearly established, its role in plants is still vague. PMID:25861139

  3. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, William A; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-03-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  4. Upregulated autophagy protects cardiomyocytes from oxidative stress-induced toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Debapriya; Xu, Jinze; Kim, Jae-Sung; Dunn, Jr., William A.; Leeuwenburgh, Christiaan

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is a cellular self-digestion process that mediates protein quality control and serves to protect against neurodegenerative disorders, infections, inflammatory diseases and cancer. Current evidence suggests that autophagy can selectively remove damaged organelles such as the mitochondria. Mitochondria-induced oxidative stress has been shown to play a major role in a wide range of pathologies in several organs, including the heart. Few studies have investigated whether enhanced autophagy can offer protection against mitochondrially-generated oxidative stress. We induced mitochondrial stress in cardiomyocytes using antimycin A (AMA), which increased mitochondrial superoxide generation, decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and depressed cellular respiration. In addition, AMA augmented nuclear DNA oxidation and cell death in cardiomyocytes. Interestingly, although oxidative stress has been proposed to induce autophagy, treatment with AMA did not result in stimulation of autophagy or mitophagy in cardiomyocytes. Our results showed that the MTOR inhibitor rapamycin induced autophagy, promoted mitochondrial clearance and protected cardiomyocytes from the cytotoxic effects of AMA, as assessed by apoptotic marker activation and viability assays in both mouse atrial HL-1 cardiomyocytes and human ventricular AC16 cells. Importantly, rapamycin improved mitochondrial function, as determined by cellular respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential and morphology analysis. Furthermore, autophagy induction by rapamycin suppressed the accumulation of ubiquitinylated proteins induced by AMA. Inhibition of rapamycin-induced autophagy by pharmacological or genetic interventions attenuated the cytoprotective effects of rapamycin against AMA. We propose that rapamycin offers cytoprotection against oxidative stress by a combined approach of removing dysfunctional mitochondria as well as by degrading damaged, ubiquitinated proteins. We conclude that autophagy induction by

  5. Maillard reaction, mitochondria and oxidative stress: potential role of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Edeas, M; Attaf, D; Mailfert, A-S; Nasu, M; Joubet, R

    2010-06-01

    Glycation and oxidative stress are two important processes known to play a key role in complications of many disease processes. Oxidative stress, either via increasing reactive oxygen species (ROS), or by depleting the antioxidants may modulate the genesis of early glycated proteins in vivo. Maillard Reactions, occur in vivo as well as in vitro and are associated with the chronic complications of diabetes, aging and age-related diseases. Hyperglycaemia causes the autoxidation of glucose, glycation of proteins, and the activation of polyol metabolism. These changes facilitate the generation of reactive oxygen species and decrease the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase, resulting in a remarkable increase of oxidative stress. A large body of evidence indicates that mitochondria alteration is involved and plays a central role in various oxidative stress-related diseases. The damaged mitochondria produce more ROS (increase oxidative stress) and less ATP (cellular energy) than normal mitochondria. As they are damaged, they cannot burn or use glucose or lipid and cannot provide cell with ATP. Further, glucose, amino acids and lipid will not be correctly used and will accumulate outside the mitochondria; they will undergo more glycation (as observed in diabetes, obesity, HIV infection and lipodystrophia). The objective of this paper is to discuss how to stop the vicious circle established between oxidative stress, Maillard Reaction and mitochondria. The potential application of some antioxidants to reduce glycation phenomenon and to increase the antioxidant defence system by targeting mitochondria will be discussed. Food and pharmaceutical companies share the same challenge, they must act now, urgently and energetically. PMID:20031340

  6. Oxidative stress in aging human skin.

    PubMed

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-04-21

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Aging Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Rinnerthaler, Mark; Bischof, Johannes; Streubel, Maria Karolin; Trost, Andrea; Richter, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress in skin plays a major role in the aging process. This is true for intrinsic aging and even more for extrinsic aging. Although the results are quite different in dermis and epidermis, extrinsic aging is driven to a large extent by oxidative stress caused by UV irradiation. In this review the overall effects of oxidative stress are discussed as well as the sources of ROS including the mitochondrial ETC, peroxisomal and ER localized proteins, the Fenton reaction, and such enzymes as cyclooxygenases, lipoxygenases, xanthine oxidases, and NADPH oxidases. Furthermore, the defense mechanisms against oxidative stress ranging from enzymes like superoxide dismutases, catalases, peroxiredoxins, and GSH peroxidases to organic compounds such as L-ascorbate, α-tocopherol, beta-carotene, uric acid, CoQ10, and glutathione are described in more detail. In addition the oxidative stress induced modifications caused to proteins, lipids and DNA are discussed. Finally age-related changes of the skin are also a topic of this review. They include a disruption of the epidermal calcium gradient in old skin with an accompanying change in the composition of the cornified envelope. This modified cornified envelope also leads to an altered anti-oxidative capacity and a reduced barrier function of the epidermis. PMID:25906193

  8. Intraneuronal amyloid beta accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A; Perry, George

    2010-03-01

    In an analysis of amyloid pathology in Alzheimer disease, we used an in situ approach to identify amyloid-beta (Abeta) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal-specific antibodies directed against Abeta40 and Abeta42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Abeta42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Abeta-oligomer. In comparison to the Abeta42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Abeta42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r=- 0.61, p<0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Abeta peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Abeta may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease.

  9. Intraneuronal Amyloid β Accumulation and Oxidative Damage to Nucleic Acids in Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nunomura, Akihiko; Tamaoki, Toshio; Tanaka, Koich; Motohashi, Nobutaka; Nakamura, Masao; Hayashi, Takaaki; Yamaguchi, Haruyasu; Shimohama, Shun; Lee, Hyoung-gon; Zhu, Xiongwei; Smith, Mark A.; Perry, George

    2010-01-01

    An in situ approach was used to identify amyloid-β (Aβ) accumulation and oxidative damage to nucleic acids in postmortem brain tissue of the hippocampal formation from subjects with Alzheimer disease. When carboxyl-terminal specific antibodies directed against Aβ40 and Aβ42 were used for immunocytochemical analyses, Aβ42 was especially apparent within the neuronal cytoplasm, at sites not detected by the antibody specific to Aβ-oligomer. In comparison to the Aβ42-positive neurons, neurons bearing oxidative damage to nucleic acids were more widely distributed in the hippocampus. Comparative density measurements of the immunoreactivity revealed that levels of intraneuronal Aβ42 were inversely correlated with levels of intraneuronal 8-hydroxyguanosine, an oxidized nucleoside (r = − 0.61, p < 0.02). Together with recent evidence that the Aβ peptide can act as an antioxidant, these results suggest that intraneuronal accumulation of non-oligomeric Aβ may be a compensatory response in neurons to oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease. PMID:20034567

  10. Oxidative Stress in Placenta: Health and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Tian, Fu-Ju; Lin, Yi

    2015-01-01

    During pregnancy, development of the placenta is interrelated with the oxygen concentration. Embryo development takes place in a low oxygen environment until the beginning of the second trimester when large amounts of oxygen are conveyed to meet the growth requirements. High metabolism and oxidative stress are common in the placenta. Reactive oxidative species sometimes harm placental development, but they are also reported to regulate gene transcription and downstream activities such as trophoblast proliferation, invasion, and angiogenesis. Autophagy and apoptosis are two crucial, interconnected processes in the placenta that are often influenced by oxidative stress. The proper interactions between them play an important role in placental homeostasis. However, an imbalance between the protective and destructive mechanisms of autophagy and apoptosis seems to be linked with pregnancy-related disorders such as miscarriage, preeclampsia, and intrauterine growth restriction. Thus, potential therapies to hold oxidative stress in leash, promote placentation, and avoid unwanted apoptosis are discussed. PMID:26693479

  11. Mammalian Metallothionein-2A and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Xue-Bin; Wei, Hong-Wei; Wang, Jun; Kong, Yue-Qiong; Wu, Yu-You; Guo, Jun-Li; Li, Tian-Fa; Li, Ji-Ke

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian metallothionein-2A (MT2A) has received considerable attention in recent years due to its crucial pathophysiological role in anti-oxidant, anti-apoptosis, detoxification and anti-inflammation. For many years, most studies evaluating the effects of MT2A have focused on reactive oxygen species (ROS), as second messengers that lead to oxidative stress injury of cells and tissues. Recent studies have highlighted that oxidative stress could activate mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and MT2A, as a mediator of MAPKs, to regulate the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, the molecule mechanism of MT2A remains elusive. A deeper understanding of the functional, biochemical and molecular characteristics of MT2A would be identified, in order to bring new opportunities for oxidative stress therapy. PMID:27608012

  12. Role of oxidative stress on platelet hyperreactivity during aging.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Palomo, Iván

    2016-03-01

    Thrombotic events are common causes of morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Age-accelerated vascular injury is commonly considered to result from increased oxidative stress. There is abundant evidence that oxidative stress regulate several components of thrombotic processes, including platelet activation. Thus oxidative stress can trigger platelet hyperreactivity by decreasing nitric oxide bioavailability. Therefore oxidative stress measurement may help in the early identification of asymptomatic subjects at risk of thrombosis. In addition, oxidative stress inhibitors and platelet-derived nitric oxide may represent a novel anti-aggregation/-activation approach. In this article the relative contribution of oxidative stress and platelet activation in aging is explored.

  13. Accumulation of lipids and oxidatively damaged DNA in hepatocytes exposed to particles

    SciTech Connect

    Vesterdal, Lise K.; Danielsen, Pernille H.; Folkmann, Janne K.; Jespersen, Line F.; Aguilar-Pelaez, Karin; Roursgaard, Martin; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2014-01-15

    Exposure to particles has been suggested to generate hepatosteatosis by oxidative stress mechanisms. We investigated lipid accumulation in cultured human hepatocytes (HepG2) and rat liver after exposure to four different carbon-based particles. HepG2 cells were exposed to particles for 3 h and subsequently incubated for another 18 h to manifest lipid accumulation. In an animal model of metabolic syndrome we investigated the association between intake of carbon black (CB, 14 nm) particles and hepatic lipid accumulation, inflammation and gene expression of Srebp-1, Fasn and Scd-1 involved in lipid synthesis. There was a concentration-dependent increase in intracellular lipid content after exposure to CB in HepG2 cells, which was only observed after co-exposure to oleic/palmitic acid. Similar results were observed in HepG2 cells after exposure to diesel exhaust particles, fullerenes C{sub 60} or pristine single-walled carbon nanotubes. All four types of particles also generated oxidatively damaged DNA, assessed as formamidopyrimidine DNA glycosylase (FPG) sensitive sites, in HepG2 cells after 3 h exposure. The animal model of metabolic syndrome showed increased lipid load in the liver after one oral exposure to 6.4 mg/kg of CB in lean Zucker rats. This was not associated with increased iNOS staining in the liver, indicating that the oral CB exposure was associated with hepatic steatosis rather than steatohepatitis. The lipid accumulation did not seem to be related to increased lipogenesis because there were unaltered gene expression levels in both the HepG2 cells and rat livers. Collectively, exposure to particles is associated with oxidative stress and steatosis in hepatocytes. - Highlights: • Oral exposure to nanosized carbon black was associated with hepatosteatosis in rats. • In vitro studies included carbon black, C{sub 60}, diesel exhaust particles and SWCNTs. • Exposure to particles and free fatty acids increased lipid load in HepG2 cells. • Unaltered

  14. The plant Apolipoprotein D ortholog protects Arabidopsis against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Charron, Jean-Benoit F; Ouellet, Francois; Houde, Mario; Sarhan, Fathey

    2008-01-01

    Background Lipocalins are a large and diverse family of small, mostly extracellular proteins implicated in many important functions. This family has been studied in bacteria, invertebrate and vertebrate animals but little is known about these proteins in plants. We recently reported the identification and molecular characterization of the first true lipocalins from plants, including the Apolipoprotein D ortholog AtTIL identified in the plant model Arabidopsis thaliana. This study aimed to determine its physiological role in planta. Results Our results demonstrate that the AtTIL lipocalin is involved in modulating tolerance to oxidative stress. AtTIL knock-out plants are very sensitive to sudden drops in temperature and paraquat treatment, and dark-grown plants die shortly after transfer to light. These plants accumulate a high level of hydrogen peroxide and other ROS, which causes an oxidative stress that is associated with a reduction in hypocotyl growth and sensitivity to light. Complementation of the knock-out plants with the AtTIL cDNA restores the normal phenotype. On the other hand, overexpression enhances tolerance to stress caused by freezing, paraquat and light. Moreover, this overexpression delays flowering and maintains leaf greenness. Microarray analyses identified several differentially-regulated genes encoding components of oxidative stress and energy balance. Conclusion This study provides the first functional evidence that a plant lipocalin is involved in modulating tolerance to oxidative stress. These findings are in agreement with recently published data showing that overexpression of ApoD enhances tolerance to oxidative stress and increases life span in mice and Drosophila. Together, the three papers strongly support a similar function of lipocalins in these evolutionary-distant species. PMID:18671872

  15. Diabetic Cardiovascular Disease Induced by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Kayama, Yosuke; Raaz, Uwe; Jagger, Ann; Adam, Matti; Schellinger, Isabel N; Sakamoto, Masaya; Suzuki, Hirofumi; Toyama, Kensuke; Spin, Joshua M; Tsao, Philip S

    2015-10-23

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality among patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). DM can lead to multiple cardiovascular complications, including coronary artery disease (CAD), cardiac hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). HF represents one of the most common causes of death in patients with DM and results from DM-induced CAD and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Oxidative stress is closely associated with the pathogenesis of DM and results from overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS overproduction is associated with hyperglycemia and metabolic disorders, such as impaired antioxidant function in conjunction with impaired antioxidant activity. Long-term exposure to oxidative stress in DM induces chronic inflammation and fibrosis in a range of tissues, leading to formation and progression of disease states in these tissues. Indeed, markers for oxidative stress are overexpressed in patients with DM, suggesting that increased ROS may be primarily responsible for the development of diabetic complications. Therefore, an understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms mediated by oxidative stress is crucial to the prevention and treatment of diabetes-induced CVD. The current review focuses on the relationship between diabetes-induced CVD and oxidative stress, while highlighting the latest insights into this relationship from findings on diabetic heart and vascular disease.

  16. Repression of gene expression by oxidative stress.

    PubMed Central

    Morel, Y; Barouki, R

    1999-01-01

    Gene expression is modulated by both physiological signals (hormones, cytokines, etc.) and environmental stimuli (physical parameters, xenobiotics, etc.). Oxidative stress appears to be a key pleiotropic modulator which may be involved in either pathway. Indeed, reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been described as second messengers for several growth factors and cytokines, but have also been shown to rise following cellular insults such as xenobiotic metabolism or enzymic deficiency. Extensive studies on the induction of stress-response genes by oxidative stress have been reported. In contrast, owing to the historical focus on gene induction, less attention has been paid to gene repression by ROS. However, a growing number of studies have shown that moderate (i.e. non-cytotoxic) oxidative stress specifically down-regulates the expression of various genes. In this review, we describe the alteration of several physiological functions resulting from oxidative-stress-mediated inhibition of gene transcription. We will then focus on the repressive oxidative modulation of various transcription factors elicited by ROS. PMID:10477257

  17. Diabetic Neuropathy and Oxidative Stress: Therapeutic Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Asieh; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic neuropathy (DN) is a widespread disabling disorder comprising peripheral nerves' damage. DN develops on a background of hyperglycemia and an entangled metabolic imbalance, mainly oxidative stress. The majority of related pathways like polyol, advanced glycation end products, poly-ADP-ribose polymerase, hexosamine, and protein kinase c all originated from initial oxidative stress. To date, no absolute cure for DN has been defined; although some drugs are conventionally used, much more can be found if all pathophysiological links with oxidative stress would be taken into account. In this paper, although current therapies for DN have been reviewed, we have mainly focused on the links between DN and oxidative stress and therapies on the horizon, such as inhibitors of protein kinase C, aldose reductase, and advanced glycation. With reference to oxidative stress and the related pathways, the following new drugs are under study such as taurine, acetyl-L-carnitine, alpha lipoic acid, protein kinase C inhibitor (ruboxistaurin), aldose reductase inhibitors (fidarestat, epalrestat, ranirestat), advanced glycation end product inhibitors (benfotiamine, aspirin, aminoguanidine), the hexosamine pathway inhibitor (benfotiamine), inhibitor of poly ADP-ribose polymerase (nicotinamide), and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor (trandolapril). The development of modern drugs to treat DN is a real challenge and needs intensive long-term comparative trials. PMID:23738033

  18. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health. PMID:26574302

  19. The impact of oxidative stress on hair.

    PubMed

    Trüeb, R M

    2015-12-01

    Oxidative stress reflects an imbalance between the systemic manifestation of reactive oxygen species and a biological system's ability to detoxify the reactive intermediates or to repair the resulting damage. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage lipids, proteins, and DNA. They are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges, while the body possesses endogenous defense mechanisms. With age, production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defense mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the aging phenotype. While the role of oxidative stress has been widely discussed in skin aging, little focus has been placed on its impact on hair condition. Moreover, most literature on age-related hair changes focuses on alopecia, but it is equally important that the hair fibers that emerge from the scalp exhibit significant age-related changes that have equal impact on the overall cosmetic properties of hair. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the pre-emerging fiber include: oxidative metabolism, smoking, UVR, and inflammation from microbial, pollutant, or irritant origins. Sources of oxidative stress with impact on the post-emerging fiber include: UVR (enhanced by copper), chemical insults, and oxidized scalp lipids. The role of the dermatologist is recognition and treatment of pre- and post-emerging factors for lifetime scalp and hair health.

  20. Oxidative stress in pregnancy and reproduction.

    PubMed

    Duhig, Kate; Chappell, Lucy C; Shennan, Andrew H

    2016-09-01

    Oxidative stress is implicated in the pathophysiology of many reproductive complications including infertility, miscarriage, pre-eclampsia, fetal growth restriction and preterm labour. The presence of excess reactive oxygen species can lead to cellular damage of deoxyribonucleic acids, lipids and proteins. Antioxidants protect cells from peroxidation reactions, limiting cellular damage and helping to maintain cellular membrane integrity. There is overwhelming evidence for oxidative stress causing harm in reproduction. However, there is sparse evidence that supplementation with commonly used antioxidants (mostly vitamins C and E) makes any difference in overcoming oxidative stress or reversing disease processes. There may be potential for antioxidant therapy to ameliorate or prevent disease, but this requires a thorough understanding of the mechanism of action and specificity of currently used antioxidants. PMID:27630746

  1. Tyrosine promotes oxidative stress in cerebral cortex of young rats.

    PubMed

    Sgaravatti, Angela M; Vargas, Bethânia A; Zandoná, Bernardo R; Deckmann, Kátia B; Rockenbach, Francieli J; Moraes, Tarsila B; Monserrat, José M; Sgarbi, Mirian B; Pederzolli, Carolina D; Wyse, Angela T S; Wannmacher, Clóvis M D; Wajner, Moacir; Dutra-Filho, Carlos Severo

    2008-10-01

    Tyrosine accumulates in inborn errors of tyrosine catabolism, especially in tyrosinemia type II, where tyrosine levels are highly elevated in tissues and physiological fluids of affected patients. In tyrosinemia type II, high levels of tyrosine are correlated with eyes, skin and central nervous system disturbances. Considering that the mechanisms of brain damage in these disorders are poorly known, in the present study, we investigated whether oxidative stress is elicited by l-tyrosine in cerebral cortex homogenates of 14-day-old Wistar rats. The in vitro effect of 0.1-4.0mM l-tyrosine was studied on the following oxidative stress parameters: total radical-trapping antioxidant potential (TRAP), total antioxidant reactivity (TAR), ascorbic acid content, reduced glutathione (GSH) content, spontaneous chemiluminescence, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBA-RS), thiol-disulfide redox state (SH/SS ratio), protein carbonyl content, formation of DNA-protein cross-links, and the activities of the enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH). TRAP, TAR, ascorbic acid content, SH/SS ratio and CAT activity were significantly diminished, while formation of DNA-protein cross-link was significantly enhanced by l-tyrosine in vitro. In contrast, l-tyrosine did not affect the other parameters of oxidative stress evaluated. These results indicate that l-tyrosine decreases enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant defenses, changes the redox state and stimulates DNA damage in cerebral cortex of young rats in vitro. This suggests that oxidative stress may represent a pathophysiological mechanism in tyrosinemic patients, in which this amino acid accumulates.

  2. Markers of Oxidative Stress during Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Brahm Kumar; Pandey, Kanti Bhooshan; Abidi, A. B.; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus is rising all over the world. Uncontrolled state of hyperglycemia due to defects in insulin secretion/action leads to a variety of complications including peripheral vascular diseases, nephropathy, neuropathy, retinopathy, morbidity, and/or mortality. Large body of evidence suggests major role of reactive oxygen species/oxidative stress in development and progression of diabetic complications. In the present paper, we have discussed the recent researches on the biomarkers of oxidative stress during type 2 diabetes mellitus. PMID:26317014

  3. Oxidative Stress in Schizophrenia: An Integrated Approach

    PubMed Central

    Bitanihirwe, Byron K.Y.; Woo, Tsung-Ung W.

    2010-01-01

    Oxidative stress has been suggested to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. In particular, oxidative damage to lipids, proteins, and DNA as observed in schizophrenia is known to impair cell viability and function, which may subsequently account for the deteriorating course of the illness. Currently available evidence points towards an alteration in the activities of enzymatic and nonenzymatic antioxidant systems in schizophrenia. In fact, experimental models have demonstrated that oxidative stress induces behavioural and molecular anomalies strikingly similar to those observed in schizophrenia. These findings suggest that oxidative stress is intimately linked to a variety of pathophysiological processes, such as inflammation, oligodendrocyte abnormalities, mitochondrial dysfunction, hypoactive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and the impairment of fast-spiking gamma-aminobutyric acid interneurons.[bkyb1] Such self-sustaining mechanisms may progressively worsen producing the functional and structural consequences associated with schizophrenia. Recent clinical studies have shown antioxidant treatment to be effective in ameliorating schizophrenic symptoms. Hence, identifying viable therapeutic strategies to tackle oxidative stress and the resulting physiological disturbances provide an exciting opportunity for the treatment and ultimately prevention of schizophrenia. PMID:20974172

  4. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1-7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  5. Potential Modulation of Sirtuins by Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Leonardo; Escande, Carlos; Denicola, Ana

    2016-01-01

    Sirtuins are a conserved family of NAD-dependent protein deacylases. Initially proposed as histone deacetylases, it is now known that they act on a variety of proteins including transcription factors and metabolic enzymes, having a key role in the regulation of cellular homeostasis. Seven isoforms are identified in mammals (SIRT1–7), all of them sharing a conserved catalytic core and showing differential subcellular localization and activities. Oxidative stress can affect the activity of sirtuins at different levels: expression, posttranslational modifications, protein-protein interactions, and NAD levels. Mild oxidative stress induces the expression of sirtuins as a compensatory mechanism, while harsh or prolonged oxidant conditions result in dysfunctional modified sirtuins more prone to degradation by the proteasome. Oxidative posttranslational modifications have been identified in vitro and in vivo, in particular cysteine oxidation and tyrosine nitration. In addition, oxidative stress can alter the interaction with other proteins, like SIRT1 with its protein inhibitor DBC1 resulting in a net increase of deacetylase activity. In the same way, manipulation of cellular NAD levels by pharmacological inhibition of other NAD-consuming enzymes results in activation of SIRT1 and protection against obesity-related pathologies. Nevertheless, further research is needed to establish the molecular mechanisms of redox regulation of sirtuins to further design adequate pharmacological interventions. PMID:26788256

  6. Linking phosphorus availability with photo-oxidative stress in plants.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Iker; Munné-Bosch, Sergi

    2015-05-01

    Plants have evolved a plethora of mechanisms to circumvent the potential damaging effects of living under low phosphorus availability in the soil. These mechanisms include different levels of organization, from root-shoot signalling at the whole-plant level to specific biochemical responses at the subcellular level, such as reductions in photosynthesis and the consequent activation of photo- and antioxidant mechanisms in chloroplasts. Some recent studies clearly indicate that severe phosphorus deficiency can lead to alterations in the photosynthetic apparatus, including reductions in CO2 assimilation rates, a down-regulation of photosynthesis-related genes and photoinhibition at the photosystem II level, thus causing potential photo-oxidative stress. Photo-oxidative stress is characterized by an increased production of reactive oxygen species in chloroplasts, which at low concentrations can serve a signalling, protective role, but when present at high concentrations can cause damage to lipids, proteins and nucleic acids, thus leading to irreversible injuries. We discuss here the mechanisms that phosphate-starved plants have evolved to withstand photo-oxidative stress, including changes at the subcellular level (e.g. activation of photo- and antioxidant protection mechanisms in chloroplasts), cellular and tissular levels (e.g. activation of photorespiration and anthocyanin accumulation) and whole-plant level (alterations in source-sink relationships modulated by hormones). Of particular importance is the current evidence demonstrating that phosphate-starved plants activate simultaneous responses at multiple levels, from transcriptional changes to root-shoot signalling, to prevent oxidative damage. In this review, we summarize current knowledge about the occurrence of photo-oxidative stress in phosphate-starved plants and highlight the mechanisms these plants have evolved to prevent oxidative damage under phosphorus limitation at the subcellular, cellular and whole

  7. Kinins— The Kallikrein-Kinin System and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kayashima, Yukako; Smithies, Oliver; Kakoki, Masao

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of review The Kallikrein-kinin system (KKS) constitutes a complex multi-enzyme cascade that produces several bioactive kinin peptides and their derivatives including bradykinin. In addition to the classical notion of the KKS as a potent vasodilator and a mediator of inflammatory responses, recent studies suggest a link between the KKS and oxidative stress. A number of established mouse model with altered levels of KKS components opened the way to evaluate precise functions of the KKS. Here we review recent findings on the role of the KKS in cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney diseases, and discuss potential benefits of KKS activation in these diseases. Recent findings Deletion of both B1R and B2R in a diabetic mouse model exacerbates its renal phenotypes, suggesting that the KKS exerts protective effects on diabetic nephropathy by suppressing oxidative stress, presumably via nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandins (PGs). Summary Accumulating evidence has highlighted the importance of the KKS as a protective system against oxidative stress and organ damage in the heart and kidney. The activation of the KKS by ACE inhibitors and vasopeptidase inhibitors is likely to be beneficial in senescence-associated cardiovascular diseases and chronic kidney diseases. PMID:22048723

  8. Role of oxidative stress in pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoub, Soleiman; Masrour-Roudsari, Jila

    2012-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome (MS) recognized as a major cause of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases, has become one of the major public health challenges worldwide. The pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome is multiple and still poorly understood. No single factor has yet been identified as an underlying causal factor. There is a growing belief, however, that obesity, especially visceral obesity, may play an important role in the development of the syndrome. Visceral adiposity seems to be an independent predictor of insulin sensitivity, impaired glucose tolerance, dyslipidemia and elevated blood pressure. An increasing number of studies confirm that oxidative stress, chronic inflammation and angiogenesis all play important roles in the pathogenesis of MS. Chronic hyperglycemia causes oxidative stress in tissues prone to complications in patients with diabetes. Oxidative stress occurs in a cellular system when the production of free radical moieties exceeds the antioxidant capacity of that system. If cellular antioxidants do not remove free radicals, radicals attack and damage proteins, lipids, and nucleic acids. The oxidized or nitrosylated products of free radical attack have decreased biological activity, leading to loss of energy metabolism, cell signaling, transport, and other major functions. These altered products are also targeted for proteosome degradation, further decreasing cellular function. Accumulation of such injury ultimately leads a cell to die through necrotic or apoptotic mechanisms. In conclusion, a puzzle of many pieces of evidence suggests that free radical overgeneration may be considered the key in the generation of insulin resistance, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26557292

  9. A novel approach in psoriasis: first usage of known protein oxidation markers to prove oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Yazici, Cevat; Köse, Kader; Utaş, Serap; Tanrikulu, Esen; Taşlidere, Nazan

    2016-04-01

    Oxidative stress may play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, an inflammatory/hyperproliferative skin disease characterized by the cutaneous accumulation of neutrophils releasing reactive oxygen species, as revealed in a number of studies. This study was performed to demonstrate the presence of oxidative stress in psoriasis, as measured by protein oxidation markers. Twenty-nine psoriasis patients were selected based on disease severity assessment using body surface area as well as the psoriasis area severity index (PASI), and were grouped as mild (PASI ≤ 10) and moderate-to-severe (PASI > 10). The measured parameters in psoriatic patients and fourteen healthy volunteers were as follows: erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), high sensitive C-reactive protein (CRP), myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity, neopterin, total lipid hydroperoxides (LHP), pyrrolized protein (PP), protein carbonyl compounds (PCC), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), thiol levels, along with complete blood count. Except lower thiols, all parameters were found to be higher in total patients as well as in subgroups, compared to controls. There was no significant difference among the subgroups. In conclusion, protein oxidation in psoriatics, not only in moderate-to-severe, but also in mild patients, may be explained by the findings of inflammation, phagocytic cell oxidation, and MPO-hypochlorous acid-oxidation reactions; as reflected by increased total/differential leucocytes counts, CRP, ESR as well as MPO, neopterin, AOPP, PCC, PP, LHP, and decreased thiol levels. Demonstrating the AOPP and PP formation for the first time, oxidants from active neutrophils/monocytes may play an important role in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, leading to oxidative stress, especially by protein oxidation.

  10. Analysis of Strains Lacking Known Osmolyte Accumulation Mechanisms Reveals Contributions of Osmolytes and Transporters to Protection against Abiotic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Murdock, Lindsay; Burke, Tangi; Coumoundouros, Chelsea; Culham, Doreen E.; Deutch, Charles E.; Ellinger, James; Kerr, Craig H.; Plater, Samantha M.; To, Eric; Wright, Geordie

    2014-01-01

    Osmolyte accumulation and release can protect cells from abiotic stresses. In Escherichia coli, known mechanisms mediate osmotic stress-induced accumulation of K+ glutamate, trehalose, or zwitterions like glycine betaine. Previous observations suggested that additional osmolyte accumulation mechanisms (OAMs) exist and their impacts may be abiotic stress specific. Derivatives of the uropathogenic strain CFT073 and the laboratory strain MG1655 lacking known OAMs were created. CFT073 grew without osmoprotectants in minimal medium with up to 0.9 M NaCl. CFT073 and its OAM-deficient derivative grew equally well in high- and low-osmolality urine pools. Urine-grown bacteria did not accumulate large amounts of known or novel osmolytes. Thus, CFT073 showed unusual osmotolerance and did not require osmolyte accumulation to grow in urine. Yeast extract and brain heart infusion stimulated growth of the OAM-deficient MG1655 derivative at high salinity. Neither known nor putative osmoprotectants did so. Glutamate and glutamine accumulated after growth with either organic mixture, and no novel osmolytes were detected. MG1655 derivatives retaining individual OAMs were created. Their abilities to mediate osmoprotection were compared at 15°C, 37°C without or with urea, and 42°C. Stress protection was not OAM specific, and variations in osmoprotectant effectiveness were similar under all conditions. Glycine betaine and dimethylsulfoniopropionate (DMSP) were the most effective. Trimethylamine-N-oxide (TMAO) was a weak osmoprotectant and a particularly effective urea protectant. The effectiveness of glycine betaine, TMAO, and proline as osmoprotectants correlated with their preferential exclusion from protein surfaces, not with their propensity to prevent protein denaturation. Thus, their effectiveness as stress protectants correlated with their ability to rehydrate the cytoplasm. PMID:24951793

  11. Good stress, bad stress and oxidative stress: insights from anticipatory cortisol reactivity.

    PubMed

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M; Dhabhar, Firdaus S; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2013-09-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-oxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as "peak" cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as "anticipatory" cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-oxoG and IsoP (but not 8-OHd

  12. Good Stress, Bad Stress and Oxidative Stress: Insights from Anticipatory Cortisol Reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Aschbacher, Kirstin; O'Donovan, Aoife; Wolkowitz, Owen M.; Dhabhar, Firdaus S.; Su, Yali; Epel, Elissa

    2014-01-01

    Chronic psychological stress appears to accelerate biological aging, and oxidative damage is an important potential mediator of this process. However, the mechanisms by which psychological stress promotes oxidative damage are poorly understood. This study investigates the theory that cortisol increases in response to an acutely stressful event have the potential to either enhance or undermine psychobiological resilience to oxidative damage, depending on the body's prior exposure to chronic psychological stress. In order to achieve a range of chronic stress exposure, forty-eight post-menopausal women were recruited in a case-control design that matched women caring for spouses with dementia (a chronic stress model) with similarly aged control women whose spouses were healthy. Participants completed a questionnaire assessing perceived stress over the previous month and provided fasting blood. Three markers of oxidative damage were assessed: 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (IsoP), lipid peroxidation, 8-hydroxyguanosine (8-OxoG) and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), reflecting oxidative damage to RNA/DNA respectively. Within approximately one week, participants completed a standardized acute laboratory stress task while salivary cortisol responses were measured. The increase from 0 to 30 min was defined as “peak” cortisol reactivity, while the increase from 0 to 15 min was defined as “anticipatory” cortisol reactivity, representing a cortisol response that began while preparing for the stress task. Women under chronic stress had higher 8-oxoG, oxidative damage to RNA (p<.01). A moderated mediation model was tested, in which it was hypothesized that heightened anticipatory cortisol reactivity would mediate the relationship between perceived stress and elevated oxidative stress damage, but only among women under chronic stress. Consistent with this model, bootstrapped path analysis found significant indirect paths from perceived stress to 8-OxoG and IsoP (but not

  13. Assessment of oxidative stress parameters of brain-derived neurotrophic factor heterozygous mice in acute stress model

    PubMed Central

    Hacioglu, Gulay; Senturk, Ayse; Ince, Imran; Alver, Ahmet

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Exposing to stress may be associated with increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, high level of oxidative stress may eventually give rise to accumulation of oxidative damage and development of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. It has been presented that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) supports neurons against various neurodegenerative conditions. Lately, there has been growing evidence that changes in the cerebral neurotrophic support and especially in the BDNF expression and its engagement with ROS might be important in various disorders and neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we aimed to investigate protective effects of BDNF against stress-induced oxidative damage. Materials and Methods: Five- to six-month-old male wild-type and BDNF knock-down mice were used in this study. Activities of catalase (CAT) and superoxide dismutase (SOD) enzymes, and the amount of malondialdehyde (MDA) were assessed in the cerebral homogenates of studied groups in response to acute restraint stress. Results: Exposing to acute physiological stress led to significant elevation in the markers of oxidative stress in the cerebral cortexes of experimental groups. Conclusion: As BDNF-deficient mice were observed to be more susceptible to stress-induced oxidative damage, it can be suggested that there is a direct interplay between oxidative stress indicators and BDNF levels in the brain. PMID:27279982

  14. Oxidative stress and tardive dyskinesia: pharmacogenetic evidence.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chul-Hyun; Lee, Heon-Jeong

    2013-10-01

    Tardive dyskinesia (TD) is a serious adverse effect of long-term antipsychotic use. Because of genetic susceptibility for developing TD and because it is difficult to predict and prevent its development prior to or during the early stages of medication, pharmacogenetic research of TD is important. Additionally, these studies enhance our knowledge of the genetic mechanisms underlying abnormal dyskinetic movements, such as Parkinson's disease. However, the pathophysiology of TD remains unclear. The oxidative stress hypothesis of TD is one of the possible pathophysiologic models for TD. Preclinical and clinical studies of the oxidative stress hypothesis of TD indicate that neurotoxic free radical production is likely a consequence of antipsychotic medication and is related to the occurrence of TD. Several studies on TD have focused on examining the genes involved in oxidative stress. Among them, manganese superoxide dismutase gene Ala-9Val polymorphisms show a relatively consistent association with TD susceptibility, although not all studies support this. Numerous pharmacogenetic studies have found a positive relationship between TD and oxidative stress based on genes involved in the antioxidant defense mechanism, dopamine turnover and metabolism, and other antioxidants such as estrogen and melatonin. However, many of the positive findings have not been replicated. We expect that more research will be needed to address these issues. PMID:23123399

  15. Oxidative Stress Control by Apicomplexan Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Izui, Natália M.; Schettert, Isolmar; Liebau, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Apicomplexan parasites cause infectious diseases that are either a severe public health problem or an economic burden. In this paper we will shed light on how oxidative stress can influence the host-pathogen relationship by focusing on three major diseases: babesiosis, coccidiosis, and toxoplasmosis. PMID:25722976

  16. Oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Galli, Francesco; Piroddi, Marta; Annetti, Claudia; Aisa, Cristina; Floridi, Emanuela; Floridi, Ardesio

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses different aspects concerning classification/nomenclature, biochemical properties and pathophysiological roles of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which are pivotal to interpret the concept of oxidative stress. In vitro studies in both the prokaryotes and eukaryotes clearly demonstrate that exogenous or constitutive and inducible endogenous sources of ROS together with cofactors such as transition metals can damage virtually all the biomolecules. This adverse chemistry is at the origin of structural and metabolic defects that ultimately may lead to cell dysfunction and death as underlying mechanisms in tissue degeneration processes. The same biomolecular interpretation of aging has been proposed to embodies an oxidative stress-based process and oxidative stress may virtually accompany all the inflammatory events. As a consequence, ROS have proposed to play several roles in the pathogenesis of chronic-degenerative conditions, such as athero-thrombotic events, neurodegeneration, cancer, some forms of anemia, auto-immune diseases, and the entire comorbidity of uremia and diabetes. Nowadays, the chance to investigate biochemical and toxicological aspects of ROS with advanced biomolecular tools has, if needed, still more emphasized the interest on this area of biomedicine. These technological advancements and the huge information available in literature represent in our time a challenge to further understand the clinical meaning of oxidative stress and to develop specific therapeutic strategies.

  17. IGF-1, oxidative stress, and atheroprotection

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Yusuke; Sukhanov, Sergiy; Anwar, Asif; Shai, Shaw-Yung; Delafontaine, Patrice

    2009-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease in which early endothelial dysfunction and subintimal modified lipoprotein deposition progress to complex, advanced lesions that are predisposed to erosion, rupture and thrombosis. Oxidative stress plays a critical role not only in initial lesion formation but also in lesion progression and destabilization. While growth factors are thought to promote vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration, thereby increasing neointima, recent animal studies indicate that IGF-1 exerts pleiotropic anti-oxidant effects along with anti-inflammatory effects that together reduce atherosclerotic burden. This review discusses the effects of IGF-1 in vascular injury and atherosclerosis models, emphasizing the relationship between oxidative stress and potential atheroprotective actions of IGF-1. PMID:20071192

  18. Multimarker Screening of Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Syslová, Kamila; Böhmová, Adéla; Kuzma, Marek; Pelclová, Daniela; Kačer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Aging is a complex process of organism decline in physiological functions. There is no clear theory explaining this phenomenon, but the most accepted one is the oxidative stress theory of aging. Biomarkers of oxidative stress, substances, which are formed during oxidative damage of phospholipids, proteins, and nucleic acids, are present in body fluids of diseased people as well as the healthy ones (in a physiological concentration). 8-iso prostaglandin F2α is the most prominent biomarker of phospholipid oxidative damage, o-tyrosine, 3-chlorotyrosine, and 3-nitrotyrosine are biomarkers of protein oxidative damage, and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine and 8-hydroxyguanosine are biomarkers of oxidative damage of nucleic acids. It is thought that the concentration of biomarkers increases as the age of people increases. However, the concentration of biomarkers in body fluids is very low and, therefore, it is necessary to use a sensitive analytical method. A combination of HPLC and MS was chosen to determine biomarker concentration in three groups of healthy people of a different age (twenty, forty, and sixty years) in order to find a difference among the groups. PMID:25147595

  19. Oxidative Stress Contributes to Autophagy Induction in Response to Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, Marta; Pérez-Pérez, María Esther; Lemaire, Stéphane D.; Crespo, José L.

    2014-01-01

    The accumulation of unfolded/misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) results in the activation of stress responses, such as the unfolded protein response or the catabolic process of autophagy to ultimately recover cellular homeostasis. ER stress also promotes the production of reactive oxygen species, which play an important role in autophagy regulation. However, it remains unknown whether reactive oxygen species are involved in ER stress-induced autophagy. In this study, we provide evidence connecting redox imbalance caused by ER stress and autophagy activation in the model unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Treatment of C. reinhardtii cells with the ER stressors tunicamycin or dithiothreitol resulted in up-regulation of the expression of genes encoding ER resident endoplasmic reticulum oxidoreductin1 oxidoreductase and protein disulfide isomerases. ER stress also triggered autophagy in C. reinhardtii based on the protein abundance, lipidation, cellular distribution, and mRNA levels of the autophagy marker ATG8. Moreover, increases in the oxidation of the glutathione pool and the expression of oxidative stress-related genes were detected in tunicamycin-treated cells. Our results revealed that the antioxidant glutathione partially suppressed ER stress-induced autophagy and decreased the toxicity of tunicamycin, suggesting that oxidative stress participates in the control of autophagy in response to ER stress in C. reinhardtii In close agreement, we also found that autophagy activation by tunicamycin was more pronounced in the C. reinhardtii sor1 mutant, which shows increased expression of oxidative stress-related genes. PMID:25143584

  20. Oxidative stress: a pathogenic mechanism for Niemann-Pick type C disease.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Mary Carmen; Balboa, Elisa; Alvarez, Alejandra R; Zanlungo, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    Niemann-Pick type C (NPC) disease is a neurovisceral atypical lipid storage disorder involving the accumulation of cholesterol and other lipids in the late endocytic pathway. The pathogenic mechanism that links the accumulation of intracellular cholesterol with cell death in NPC disease in both the CNS and the liver is currently unknown. Oxidative stress has been observed in the livers and brains of NPC mice and in different NPC cellular models. Moreover, there is evidence of an elevation of oxidative stress markers in the serum of NPC patients. Recent evidence strongly suggests that mitochondrial dysfunction plays an important role in NPC pathogenesis and that mitochondria could be a significant source of oxidative stress in this disease. In this context, the accumulation of vitamin E in the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments in NPC could lead to a potential decrease of its bioavailability and could be another possible cause of oxidative damage. Another possible source of reactive species in NPC is the diminished activity of different antioxidant enzymes. Moreover, because NPC is mainly caused by the accumulation of free cholesterol, oxidized cholesterol derivatives produced by oxidative stress may contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease.

  1. [Mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging].

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Sümegi, Balázs

    2014-03-23

    The free radical theory of aging was defined in the 1950s. On the base of this theory, the reactive oxygen species formed in the metabolic pathways can play pivotal role in ageing. The theory was modified by defining the mitochondrial respiration as the major cellular source of reactive oxygen species and got the new name mitochondrial theory of aging. Later on the existence of a "vicious cycle" was proposed, in which the reactive oxygen species formed in the mitochondrial respiration impair the mitochondrial DNA and its functions. The formation of reactive oxygen species are elevated due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The formation of mitochondrial DNA mutations can be accelerated by this "vicious cycle", which can lead to accelerated aging. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ, the polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA was impaired in mtDNA mutator mouse recently. The rate of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA was elevated and an aging phenotype could have been observed in these mice. Surprisingly, no oxidative impairment neither elevated reactive oxygen species formation could have been observed in the mtDNA mutator mice, which may question the existence of the "vicious cycle".

  2. [Mitochondria, oxidative stress and aging].

    PubMed

    Szarka, András; Bánhegyi, Gábor; Sümegi, Balázs

    2014-03-23

    The free radical theory of aging was defined in the 1950s. On the base of this theory, the reactive oxygen species formed in the metabolic pathways can play pivotal role in ageing. The theory was modified by defining the mitochondrial respiration as the major cellular source of reactive oxygen species and got the new name mitochondrial theory of aging. Later on the existence of a "vicious cycle" was proposed, in which the reactive oxygen species formed in the mitochondrial respiration impair the mitochondrial DNA and its functions. The formation of reactive oxygen species are elevated due to mitochondrial dysfunction. The formation of mitochondrial DNA mutations can be accelerated by this "vicious cycle", which can lead to accelerated aging. The exonuclease activity of DNA polymerase γ, the polymerase responsible for the replication of mitochondrial DNA was impaired in mtDNA mutator mouse recently. The rate of somatic mutations in mitochondrial DNA was elevated and an aging phenotype could have been observed in these mice. Surprisingly, no oxidative impairment neither elevated reactive oxygen species formation could have been observed in the mtDNA mutator mice, which may question the existence of the "vicious cycle". PMID:24631932

  3. Dysregulated autophagy in the RPE is associated with increased susceptibility to oxidative stress and AMD.

    PubMed

    Mitter, Sayak K; Song, Chunjuan; Qi, Xiaoping; Mao, Haoyu; Rao, Haripriya; Akin, Debra; Lewin, Alfred; Grant, Maria; Dunn, William; Ding, Jindong; Bowes Rickman, Catherine; Boulton, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Autophagic dysregulation has been suggested in a broad range of neurodegenerative diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD). To test whether the autophagy pathway plays a critical role to protect retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells against oxidative stress, we exposed ARPE-19 and primary cultured human RPE cells to both acute (3 and 24 h) and chronic (14 d) oxidative stress and monitored autophagy by western blot, PCR, and autophagosome counts in the presence or absence of autophagy modulators. Acute oxidative stress led to a marked increase in autophagy in the RPE, whereas autophagy was reduced under chronic oxidative stress. Upregulation of autophagy by rapamycin decreased oxidative stress-induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), whereas inhibition of autophagy by 3-methyladenine (3-MA) or by knockdown of ATG7 or BECN1 increased ROS generation, exacerbated oxidative stress-induced reduction of mitochondrial activity, reduced cell viability, and increased lipofuscin. Examination of control human donor specimens and mice demonstrated an age-related increase in autophagosome numbers and expression of autophagy proteins. However, autophagy proteins, autophagosomes, and autophagy flux were significantly reduced in tissue from human donor AMD eyes and 2 animal models of AMD. In conclusion, our data confirm that autophagy plays an important role in protection of the RPE against oxidative stress and lipofuscin accumulation and that impairment of autophagy is likely to exacerbate oxidative stress and contribute to the pathogenesis of AMD. PMID:25484094

  4. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Cordero, Mario D; de Miguel, Manuel; Carmona-López, Inés; Bonal, Pablo; Campa, Francisco; Moreno-Fernández, Ana María

    2010-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a chronic pain syndrome with unknown etiology and pathophysiology. Recent studies have shown some evidence demonstrating that oxidative stress may have a role in the pathophysiology of FM. Furthermore, it is controversial the role of mitochondria in the oxidant imbalance documented in FM. Signs and symptoms associated with muscular alteration and mitochondrial dysfunction, including oxidative stress, have been observed in patients with FM. To this respect, Coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) deficiency, an essential electron carrier in the mitochondrial respiratory chain and a strong antioxidant, alters mitochondria function and mitochondrial respiratory complexes organization and leading to increased ROS generation. Recently have been showed CoQ10 deficiency in blood mononuclear cells in FM patients, so if the hypothesis that mitochondrial dysfunction is the origin of oxidative stress in FM patients is demonstrated, could help to understand the complex pathophysiology of this disorder and may lead to development of new therapeutic strategies for prevention and treatment of this disease.

  5. Increased DNA damage and oxidative stress among silver jewelry workers.

    PubMed

    Aktepe, Necmettin; Kocyigit, Abdurrahim; Yukselten, Yunus; Taskin, Abdullah; Keskin, Cumali; Celik, Hakim

    2015-04-01

    Silver has long been valued as a precious metal, and it is used to make ornaments, jewelry, high-value tableware, utensils, and currency coins. Human exposures to silver and silver compounds can occur oral, dermal, or by inhalation. In this study, we investigated genotoxic and oxidative effects of silver exposure among silver jewelry workers. DNA damage in peripheral mononuclear leukocytes was measured by using the comet assay. Serum total antioxidative status (TAS), total oxidative status (TOS), total thiol contents, and ceruloplasmin levels were measured by using colorimetric methods among silver jewelry workers. Moreover, oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Results were compared with non-exposed healthy subjects. The mean values of mononuclear leukocyte DNA damage were significantly higher than control subjects (p < 0.001). Serum TOS, OSI, and ceruloplasmin levels were also found to be higher in silver particles exposed group than those of non-exposed group (p < 0.001, p < 0.001, p < 0.01, respectively). However, serum TAS levels and total thiol contents of silver exposed group were found significantly lower (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). Exposure to silver particles among silver jewelry workers caused oxidative stress and accumulation of severe DNA damage.

  6. Roles of the tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine and ortho-tyrosine in oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ipson, Brett R; Fisher, Alfred L

    2016-05-01

    The damage to cellular components by reactive oxygen species, termed oxidative stress, both increases with age and likely contributes to age-related diseases including Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cataract formation. In the setting of oxidative stress, hydroxyl radicals can oxidize the benzyl ring of the amino acid phenylalanine, which then produces the abnormal tyrosine isomers meta-tyrosine or ortho-tyrosine. While elevations in m-tyrosine and o-tyrosine concentrations have been used as a biological marker of oxidative stress, there is emerging evidence from bacterial, plant, and mammalian studies demonstrating that these isomers, particularly m-tyrosine, directly produce adverse effects to cells and tissues. These new findings suggest that the abnormal tyrosine isomers could in fact represent mediators of the effects of oxidative stress. Consequently the accumulation of m- and o-tyrosine may disrupt cellular homeostasis and contribute to disease pathogenesis, and as result, effective defenses against oxidative stress can encompass not only the elimination of reactive oxygen species but also the metabolism and ultimately the removal of the abnormal tyrosine isomers from the cellular amino acid pool. Future research in this area is needed to clarify the biologic mechanisms by which the tyrosine isomers damage cells and disrupt the function of tissues and organs and to identify the metabolic pathways involved in removing the accumulated isomers after exposure to oxidative stress.

  7. Mechanism of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress regulating viability and biocontrol ability of Rhodotorula glutinis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Li, Boqiang; Qin, Guozheng; Tian, Shiping

    2015-01-16

    The use of antagonistic yeasts to control postharvest pathogens is a promising alternative to fungicides. The effectiveness of the antagonists against fungal pathogens is greatly dependent on their viability, which is usually mediated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here, we investigated the effects of H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress on the viability and biocontrol efficacy of Rhodotorula glutinis and, using flow cytometric analysis, observed the changes of ROS accumulation and apoptosis in the yeast cells with or without H₂O₂ treatment. We found that the viability of R. glutinis decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner under H₂O₂-induced oxidative stress. Compared to the control, yeast cells exposed to oxidative stress exhibited more accumulation of ROS and higher levels of protein oxidative damage, but showed lower efficacy for biocontrol of Penicillium expansum causing blue mold rot on peach fruit. The results indicate that apoptosis is a main cause of the cell viability loss in R. glutinis, which is attributed to ROS accumulation under oxidative stress. These findings offer a plausible explanation that oxidative stress affects biocontrol efficacy of R. glutinis via regulating its viability and cell apoptosis.

  8. Oxidative stress and anti-oxidative mobilization in burn injury.

    PubMed

    Parihar, Arti; Parihar, Mordhwaj S; Milner, Stephen; Bhat, Satyanarayan

    2008-02-01

    A severe burn is associated with release of inflammatory mediators which ultimately cause local and distant pathophysiological effects. Mediators including Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) and Reactive Nitrogen Species (RNS) are increased in affected tissue, which are implicated in pathophysiological events observed in burn patients. The purpose of this article is to understand the role of oxidative stress in burns, in order to develop therapeutic strategies. All peer-reviewed, original and review articles published in the English language literature relevant to the topic of oxidative stress in burns in animals and human subjects were selected for this review and the possible roles of ROS and RNS in the pathophysiology of burns are discussed. Both increased xanthine oxidase and neutrophil activation appear to be the oxidant sources in burns. Free radicals have been found to have beneficial effects on antimicrobial action and wound healing. However following a burn, there is an enormous production of ROS which is harmful and implicated in inflammation, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, immunosuppression, infection and sepsis, tissue damage and multiple organ failure. Thus clinical response to burn is dependent on the balance between production of free radicals and its detoxification. Supplementation of antioxidants in human and animal models has proven benefit in decreasing distant organ failure suggesting a cause and effect relationship. We conclude that oxidative damage is one of the mechanisms responsible for the local and distant pathophysiological events observed after burn, and therefore anti-oxidant therapy might be beneficial in minimizing injury in burned patients.

  9. Oxidative Stress and Air Pollution Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lodovici, Maura; Bigagli, Elisabetta

    2011-01-01

    Air pollution is associated with increased cardiovascular and pulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanisms of air pollution-induced health effects involve oxidative stress and inflammation. As a matter of fact, particulate matter (PM), especially fine (PM2.5, PM < 2.5 μm) and ultrafine (PM0.1, PM < 0.1 μm) particles, ozone, nitrogen oxides, and transition metals, are potent oxidants or able to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS). Oxidative stress can trigger redox-sensitive pathways that lead to different biological processes such as inflammation and cell death. However, it does appear that the susceptibility of target organ to oxidative injury also depends upon its ability to upregulate protective scavenging systems. As vehicular traffic is known to importantly contribute to PM exposure, its intensity and quality must be strongly relevant determinants of the qualitative characteristics of PM spread in the atmosphere. Change in the composition of this PM is likely to modify its health impact. PMID:21860622

  10. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Dursun, Erhan; Akaln, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-03-01

    Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women.Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated.Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status markers

  11. Oxidative Stress and Periodontal Disease in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Dursun, Erhan; Akalın, Ferda Alev; Genc, Tolga; Cinar, Nese; Erel, Ozcan; Yildiz, Bulent Okan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Periodontal disease is a chronic inflammatory disease of the jaws and is more prevalent in obesity. Local and systemic oxidative stress may be an early link between periodontal disease and obesity. The primary aim of this study was to detect whether increased periodontal disease susceptibility in obese individuals is associated with local and systemic oxidative stress. Accordingly; we analyzed periodontal status and systemic (serum) and local (gingival crevicular fluid [GCF]) oxidative status markers in young obese women in comparison with age-matched lean women. Twenty obese and 20 lean women participated. Periodontal condition was determined by clinical periodontal indices including probing depth, clinical attachment level, gingival index, gingival bleeding index, and plaque index. Anthropometric, hormonal, and metabolic measurements were also performed. Blood and GCF sampling was performed at the same time after an overnight fasting. Serum and GCF total antioxidant capacity (TAOC), and total oxidant status (TOS) levels were determined, and oxidative stress index (OSI) was calculated. Clinical periodontal analyses showed higher gingival index and gingival bleeding index in the obese group (P = 0.001 for both) with no significant difference in probing depth, clinical attachment level, and plaque index between the obese and the lean women. Oxidant status analyses revealed lower GCF and serum TAOC, and higher GCF and serum OSI values in the obese women (P < 0.05 for all). GCF TOS was higher in the obese women (P < 0.05), whereas there was a nonsignificant trend for higher serum TOS in obese women (P = 0.074). GCF TAOC values showed a negative correlation with body mass index, whereas GCF OSI was positively correlated with fasting insulin and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels (P < 0.05 for all). Clinical periodontal indices showed significant correlations with body mass index, insulin, and lipid levels, and also oxidant status

  12. Emerging applications for zebrafish as a model organism to study oxidative mechanisms and their roles in inflammation and vascular accumulation of oxidized lipids.

    PubMed

    Fang, Longhou; Miller, Yury I

    2012-10-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were recognized as an attractive model organism to study many biological processes. Remarkably, the small size and optical transparency of zebrafish larvae enable high-resolution imaging of live animals. Zebrafish respond to various environmental and pathological factors with robust oxidative stress. In this article, we provide an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress and antioxidant response in zebrafish. Existing applications of genetically encoded fluorescent sensors allow imaging, in real time, of the production of H(2)O(2) and studying its involvement in inflammatory responses, as well as activation of the oxidation-sensitive transcription factors HIF and NRF2. Oxidative stress, combined with hyperlipidemia, leads to oxidation of lipoproteins, the process that contributes significantly to the development of atherosclerosis in humans. Recent work found that feeding zebrafish a high-cholesterol diet results in hypercholesterolemia, vascular lipid accumulation, and extreme lipoprotein oxidation. Generation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing a green fluorescent protein-tagged human antibody to malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL makes possible the in vivo visualization of MDA epitopes in the vascular wall and testing of the efficacy of antioxidants and dietary interventions. Thus, using zebrafish as a model organism provides important advantages in studying the roles of reactive oxygen species and lipid oxidation in basic biologic and pathologic processes.

  13. Emerging applications of zebrafish as a model organism to study oxidative mechanisms and their role in inflammation and vascular accumulation of oxidized lipids

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Longhou; Miller, Yury I.

    2012-01-01

    With the advent of genetic engineering, zebrafish (Danio rerio) were recognized as an attractive model organism to study many biological processes. Remarkably, the small size and optical transparency of zebrafish larvae enable high-resolution imaging of live animals. Zebrafish respond to various environmental and pathological factors with robust oxidative stress. In this article, we provide an overview of molecular mechanisms involved in oxidative stress and antioxidant response in zebrafish. Existing applications of generically-encoded fluorescent sensors allow imaging, in real time, production of H2O2 and studying its involvement in inflammatory responses, as well as activation of oxidation-sensitive transcription factors HIF and NRF2. Oxidative stress, combined with hypelipidemia, leads to oxidation of lipoproteins, the process that contributes significantly to development of human atherosclerosis. Recent work found that feeding zebrafish a high-cholesterol diet results in hypercholesterolemia, vascular lipid accumulation and extreme lipoprotein oxidation. Generation of a transgenic zebrafish expressing a GFP-tagged human antibody to malondialdehyde (MDA)-modified LDL makes possible in vivo visualization of MDA epitopes in the vascular wall and testing the efficacy of antioxidants and dietary interventions. Thus, using zebrafish as a model organism provides important advantages in studying the role of ROS and lipid oxidation in basic biologic and pathologic processes. PMID:22906686

  14. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2015-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  15. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticles Affect Biomass Accumulation and Photosynthesis in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Yang, Xiyu; Chen, Siyu; Li, Qianqian; Wang, Wei; Hou, Chunjiang; Gao, Xiao; Wang, Li; Wang, Shucai

    2016-01-01

    Dramatic increase in the use of nanoparticles (NPs) in a variety of applications greatly increased the likelihood of the release of NPs into the environment. Zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs) are among the most commonly used NPs, and it has been shown that ZnO NPs were harmful to several different plants. We report here the effects of ZnO NPs exposure on biomass accumulation and photosynthesis in Arabidopsis. We found that 200 and 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treatments reduced Arabidopsis growth by ∼20 and 80%, respectively, in comparison to the control. Pigments measurement showed that Chlorophyll a and b contents were reduced more than 50%, whereas carotenoid contents remain largely unaffected in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated Arabidopsis plants. Consistent with this, net rate of photosynthesis, leaf stomatal conductance, intercellular CO2 concentration and transpiration rate were all reduced more than 50% in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. Quantitative RT-PCR results showed that expression levels of chlorophyll synthesis genes including CHLOROPHYLL A OXYGENASE (CAO), CHLOROPHYLL SYNTHASE (CHLG), COPPER RESPONSE DEFECT 1 (CRD1), MAGNESIUM-PROTOPORPHYRIN IX METHYLTRANSFERASE (CHLM) and MG-CHELATASE SUBUNIT D (CHLD), and photosystem structure gene PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT D-2 (PSAD2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT E-2 (PSAE2), PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAK) and PHOTOSYSTEM I SUBUNIT K (PSAN) were reduced about five folds in 300 mg/L ZnO NPs treated plants. On the other hand, elevated expression, though to different degrees, of several carotenoids synthesis genes including GERANYLGERANYL PYROPHOSPHATE SYNTHASE 6 (GGPS6), PHYTOENE SYNTHASE (PSY) PHYTOENE DESATURASE (PDS), and ZETA-CAROTENE DESATURASE (ZDS) were observed in ZnO NPs treated plants. Taken together, these results suggest that toxicity effects of ZnO NPs observed in Arabidopsis was likely due to the inhibition of the expression of chlorophyll synthesis genes and photosystem structure genes, which results in the inhibition of

  16. Oxidative stress and Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Blesa, Javier; Trigo-Damas, Ines; Quiroga-Varela, Anna; Jackson-Lewis, Vernice R.

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a chronic, progressive neurological disease that is associated with a loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta of the brain. The molecular mechanisms underlying the loss of these neurons still remain elusive. Oxidative stress is thought to play an important role in dopaminergic neurotoxicity. Complex I deficiencies of the respiratory chain account for the majority of unfavorable neuronal degeneration in PD. Environmental factors, such as neurotoxins, pesticides, insecticides, dopamine (DA) itself, and genetic mutations in PD-associated proteins contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction which precedes reactive oxygen species formation. In this mini review, we give an update of the classical pathways involving these mechanisms of neurodegeneration, the biochemical and molecular events that mediate or regulate DA neuronal vulnerability, and the role of PD-related gene products in modulating cellular responses to oxidative stress in the course of the neurodegenerative process. PMID:26217195

  17. Exercise and oxidative stress methodology: a critique.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, R R

    2000-08-01

    Historically, exercise physiologists' interest in oxygen has primarily centered on the problem of oxygen consumption. However, the interest of the general scientific community in oxygen-centered radicals has raised awareness of the oxygen paradox and has motivated investigators to question whether exercise-stimulated "overconsumption" of oxygen might induce an oxidative stress and pose some risk to biological systems. In recent years, a considerable amount of research has demonstrated that radicals are capable of damaging a vast array of biological targets. Unfortunately, the work related to oxidative stress and antioxidants subsequent to exercise has been narrow in scope. This paper provides a brief review of the shortcomings of the present state of knowledge in this discipline and outlines topics requiring attention. PMID:10919973

  18. Nitric oxide mitigates arsenic-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in Vicia faba L.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pratiksha; Singh, A K

    2015-09-01

    The protective effects of nitric oxide (NO) against arsenic (As)-induced structural disturbances in Vicia faba have been investigated. As treatment (0.25, 0.50, and 1 mM) resulted in a declined growth of V. faba seedlings. Arsenic treatment stimulates the activity of SOD and CAT while the activities of APX and GST content were decreased. The oxidative stress markers such as superoxide radical, hydrogen peroxide and malondialdehyde (lipid peroxidation) contents were enhanced by As. Overall results revealed that significant accumulation of As suppressed growth, photosynthesis, antioxidant enzymes (SOD, CAT, APX, and GST activity), mitotic index, and induction of different chromosomal abnormalities, hence led to oxidative stress. The concentration of SNP (0.02 mM) was very effective in counteracting the adverse effect of As toxicity. These abnormalities use partially or fully reversed by a simultaneous application of As and NO donor and sodium nitroprusside and has an ameliorating effect against As-induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in V. faba roots.

  19. Oxidative stress in coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dias, Amaury Edgardo Mont’Serrat Ávila Souza; Melnikov, Petr; Cônsolo, Lourdes Zélia Zanoni

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this prospective study was to assess the dynamics of oxidative stress during coronary artery bypass surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass. Methods Sixteen patients undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting were enrolled. Blood samples were collected from the systemic circulation during anesthesia induction (radial artery - A1), the systemic venous return (B1 and B2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping, of the coronary sinus (CS1 and CS2) four minutes after removal of the aortic cross-clamping and the systemic circulation four minutes after completion of cardiopulmonary bypass (radial artery - A2). The marker of oxidative stress, malondialdehyde, was measured using spectrophotometry. Results The mean values of malondialdehyde were (ng/dl): A1 (265.1), B1 (490.0), CS1 (527.0), B2 (599.6), CS2 (685.0) and A2 (527.2). Comparisons between A1/B1, A1/CS1, A1/B2, A1/CS2, A1/A2 were significant, with ascending values (P<0.05). Comparisons between the measurements of the coronary sinus and venous reservoir after the two moments of reperfusion (B1/B2 and CS1/CS2) were higher when CS2 (P<0.05). Despite higher values ​​after the end of cardiopulmonary bypass (A2), when compared to samples of anesthesia (A1), those show a downward trend when compared to the samples of the second moment of reperfusion (CS2) (P<0.05). Conclusion The measurement of malondialdehyde shows that coronary artery bypass grafting with cardiopulmonary bypass is accompanied by increase of free radicals and this trend gradually decreases after its completion. Aortic clamping exacerbates oxidative stress but has sharper decline after reperfusion when compared to systemic metabolism. The behavior of thiobarbituric acid species indicates that oxidative stress is an inevitable pathophysiological component. PMID:27163415

  20. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host. PMID:15634847

  1. Symbiosis-induced adaptation to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Richier, Sophie; Furla, Paola; Plantivaux, Amandine; Merle, Pierre-Laurent; Allemand, Denis

    2005-01-01

    Cnidarians in symbiosis with photosynthetic protists must withstand daily hyperoxic/anoxic transitions within their host cells. Comparative studies between symbiotic (Anemonia viridis) and non-symbiotic (Actinia schmidti) sea anemones show striking differences in their response to oxidative stress. First, the basal expression of SOD is very different. Symbiotic animal cells have a higher isoform diversity (number and classes) and a higher activity than the non-symbiotic cells. Second, the symbiotic animal cells of A. viridis also maintain unaltered basal values for cellular damage when exposed to experimental hyperoxia (100% O(2)) or to experimental thermal stress (elevated temperature +7 degrees C above ambient). Under such conditions, A. schmidti modifies its SOD activity significantly. Electrophoretic patterns diversify, global activities diminish and cell damage biomarkers increase. These data suggest symbiotic cells adapt to stress while non-symbiotic cells remain acutely sensitive. In addition to being toxic, high O(2) partial pressure (P(O(2))) may also constitute a preconditioning step for symbiotic animal cells, leading to an adaptation to the hyperoxic condition and, thus, to oxidative stress. Furthermore, in aposymbiotic animal cells of A. viridis, repression of some animal SOD isoforms is observed. Meanwhile, in cultured symbionts, new activity bands are induced, suggesting that the host might protect its zooxanthellae in hospite. Similar results have been observed in other symbiotic organisms, such as the sea anemone Aiptasia pulchella and the scleractinian coral Stylophora pistillata. Molecular or physical interactions between the two symbiotic partners may explain such variations in SOD activity and might confer oxidative stress tolerance to the animal host.

  2. Lamins as mediators of oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Sieprath, Tom; Darwiche, Rabih; De Vos, Winnok H.

    2012-05-18

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear lamina defines structural and functional properties of the cell nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Lamina dysfunction leads to a broad spectrum of laminopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Recent data is reviewed connecting laminopathies to oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A framework is proposed to explain interactions between lamins and oxidative stress. -- Abstract: The nuclear lamina defines both structural and functional properties of the eukaryotic cell nucleus. Mutations in the LMNA gene, encoding A-type lamins, lead to a broad spectrum of diseases termed laminopathies. While different hypotheses have been postulated to explain disease development, there is still no unified view on the mechanistic basis of laminopathies. Recent observations indicate that laminopathies are often accompanied by altered levels of reactive oxygen species and a higher susceptibility to oxidative stress at the cellular level. In this review, we highlight the role of reactive oxygen species for cell function and disease development in the context of laminopathies and present a framework of non-exclusive mechanisms to explain the reciprocal interactions between a dysfunctional lamina and altered redox homeostasis.

  3. Chrononutrition against Oxidative Stress in Aging

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, M.; Terrón, M. P.; Rodríguez, A. B.

    2013-01-01

    Free radicals and oxidative stress have been recognized as important factors in the biology of aging and in many age-associated degenerative diseases. Antioxidant systems deteriorate during aging. It is, thus, considered that one way to reduce the rate of aging and the risk of chronic disease is to avoid the formation of free radicals and reduce oxidative stress by strengthening antioxidant defences. Phytochemicals present in fruits, vegetables, grains, and other foodstuffs have been linked to reducing the risk of major oxidative stress-induced diseases. Some dietary components of foods possess biological activities which influence circadian rhythms in humans. Chrononutrition studies have shown that not only the content of food, but also the time of ingestion contributes to the natural functioning of the circadian system. Dietary interventions with antioxidant-enriched foods taking into account the principles of chrononutrition are of particular interest for the elderly since they may help amplify the already powerful benefits of phytochemicals as natural instruments with which to prevent or delay the onset of common age-related diseases. PMID:23861994

  4. Oxidative Stress in Ageing of Hair

    PubMed Central

    Trüeb, Ralph M

    2009-01-01

    Experimental evidence supports the hypothesis that oxidative stress plays a major role in the ageing process. Reactive oxygen species are generated by a multitude of endogenous and environmental challenges. Reactive oxygen species or free radicals are highly reactive molecules that can directly damage cellular structural membranes, lipids, proteins, and DNA. The body possesses endogenous defence mechanisms, such as antioxidative enzymes and non-enzymatic antioxidative molecules, protecting it from free radicals by reducing and neutralizing them. With age, the production of free radicals increases, while the endogenous defence mechanisms decrease. This imbalance leads to the progressive damage of cellular structures, presumably resulting in the ageing phenotype. Ageing of hair manifests as decrease of melanocyte function or graying, and decrease in hair production or alopecia. There is circumstantial evidence that oxidative stress may be a pivotal mechanism contributing to hair graying and hair loss. New insights into the role and prevention of oxidative stress could open new strategies for intervention and reversal of the hair graying process and age-dependent alopecia. PMID:20805969

  5. Oxidative Stress in Patients With Acne Vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Arican, Ozer; Belge Kurutas, Ergul; Sasmaz, Sezai

    2005-01-01

    Acne vulgaris is one of the common dermatological diseases and its pathogenesis is multifactorial. In this study, we aim to determine the effects of oxidative stress in acne vulgaris. Forty-three consecutive acne patients and 46 controls were enrolled. The parameters of oxidative stress such as catalase (CAT), glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and malondialdehyde (MDA) in the venous blood of cases were measured spectrophotometrically. The values compared with control group, the relation between the severity and distribution of acne, and the correlation of each enzyme level were researched. CAT and G6PD levels in patients were found to be statistically decreased, and SOD and MDA levels were found to be statistically increased (P < .001). However, any statistical difference and correlation could not be found between the severity and distribution of lesions and the mean levels of enzymes. In addition, we found that each enzyme is correlated with one another. Our findings show that oxidative stress exists in the acne patients. It will be useful to apply at least one antioxidant featured drug along with the combined acne treatment. PMID:16489259

  6. Proline accumulation protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase from ethanol stress by reducing reactive oxygen species levels.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Junpei; Kaino, Tomohiro

    2016-08-01

    During fermentation processes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are exposed to multiple stresses, including a high concentration of ethanol that represents toxicity through intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. We previously reported that proline protected yeast cells from damage caused by various stresses, such as freezing and ethanol. As an anti-oxidant, proline is suggested to scavenge intracellular ROS. In this study, we examined the role of intracellular proline during ethanol treatment in S. cerevisiae strains that accumulate different concentrations of proline. When cultured in YPD medium, there was a significant accumulation of proline in the put1 mutant strain, which is deficient in proline oxidase, in the stationary phase. Expression of the mutant PRO1 gene, which encodes the γ-glutamyl kinase variant (Asp154Asn or Ile150Thr) with desensitization to feedback inhibition by proline in the put1 mutant strain, showed a prominent increase in proline content as compared with that of the wild-type strain. The oxidation level was clearly increased in wild-type cells after exposure to ethanol, indicating that the generation of ROS occurred. Interestingly, proline accumulation significantly reduces the ROS level and increases the survival rate of yeast cells in the stationary phase under ethanol stress conditions. However, there was not a clear correlation between proline content and survival rate in yeast cells. An appropriate level of intracellular proline in yeast might be important for its stress-protective effect. Hence, the engineering of proline metabolism could be promising for breeding stress-tolerant industrial yeast strains. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26833688

  7. K63 polyubiquitination is a new modulator of the oxidative stress response

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Gustavo M.; Finley, Daniel; Vogel, Christine

    2014-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification that signals multiple processes, including protein degradation, trafficking, and DNA repair. Polyubiquitin accumulates globally during the oxidative stress response, which has been mainly attributed to increased ubiquitin conjugation and perturbations in protein degradation. Here we show that the unconventional K63-linked polyubiquitin accumulates in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae subjected to peroxides in a highly sensitive and regulated manner. We demonstrated that hydrogen peroxide inhibits the deubiquitinating enzyme Ubp2 leading to accumulation of K63 conjugates assembled by the Rad6-Bre1 ubiquitin conjugase and ligase, respectively. Using linkage-specific isolation methods and SILAC-based quantitative proteomics, we identified >100 new K63 polyubiquitinated targets, which were significantly enriched in ribosomal proteins. Finally, we demonstrated that impairment of K63 ubiquitination during oxidative stress impacts polysome stability and protein expression, rendering cells more sensitive to stress, revealing a new redox-regulatory role for this modification. PMID:25622294

  8. Melanocytes as instigators and victims of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Denat, Laurence; Kadekaro, Ana L; Marrot, Laurent; Leachman, Sancy A; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa A

    2014-06-01

    Epidermal melanocytes are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress owing to the pro-oxidant state generated during melanin synthesis, and to the intrinsic antioxidant defenses that are compromised in pathologic conditions. Melanoma is thought to be oxidative stress driven, and melanocyte death in vitiligo is thought to be instigated by a highly pro-oxidant state in the epidermis. We review the current knowledge about melanin and the redox state of melanocytes, how paracrine factors help counteract oxidative stress, the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression and in melanocyte death in vitiligo, and how this knowledge can be harnessed for melanoma and vitiligo treatment. PMID:24573173

  9. Melanocytes as Instigators and Victims of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Denat, L.; Kadekaro, A.L.; Marrot, L.; Leachman, S.; Abdel-Malek, Z.A.

    2014-01-01

    Epidermal melanocytes are particularly vulnerable to oxidative stress due to the pro-oxidant state generated during melanin synthesis, and to intrinsic antioxidant defences that are compromised in pathologic conditions. Melanoma is thought to be oxidative stress-driven, and melanocyte death in vitiligo is thought to be instigated by a highly pro-oxidant state in the epidermis. We review the current knowledge about melanin and the redox state of melanocytes, how paracrine factors help counteract oxidative stress, the role of oxidative stress in melanoma initiation and progression and in melanocyte death in vitiligo, and how this knowledge can be harnessed for melanoma and vitiligo treatment. PMID:24573173

  10. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials.

  11. Preferential Osmolyte Accumulation: a Mechanism of Osmotic Stress Adaptation in Diazotrophic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Madkour, Magdy A.; Smith, Linda Tombras; Smith, Gary M.

    1990-01-01

    A common cellular mechanism of osmotic-stress adaptation is the intracellular accumulation of organic solutes (osmolytes). We investigated the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in the diazotrophic bacteria Azotobacter chroococcum, Azospirillum brasilense, and Klebsiella pneumoniae, which are adversely affected by high osmotic strength (i.e., soil salinity and/or drought). We used natural-abundance 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy to identify all the osmolytes accumulating in these strains during osmotic stress generated by 0.5 M NaCl. Evidence is presented for the accumulation of trehalose and glutamate in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4, proline and glutamate in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6, and trehalose and proline in K. pneumoniae. Glycine betaine was accumulated in all strains grown in culture media containing yeast extract as the sole nitrogen source. Alternative nitrogen sources (e.g., NH4Cl or casamino acids) in the culture medium did not result in measurable glycine betaine accumulation. We suggest that the mechanism of osmotic adaptation in these organisms entails the accumulation of osmolytes in hyperosmotically stressed cells resulting from either enhanced uptake from the medium (of glycine betaine, proline, and glutamate) or increased net biosynthesis (of trehalose, proline, and glutamate) or both. The preferred osmolyte in Azotobacter chroococcum ZSM4 shifted from glutamate to trehalose as a consequence of a prolonged osmotic stress. Also, the dominant osmolyte in Azospirillum brasilense SHS6 shifted from glutamate to proline accumulation as the osmotic strength of the medium increased. PMID:16348295

  12. Modulatory role of mineral nutrients on cadmium accumulation and stress tolerance in Oryza sativa L. seedlings.

    PubMed

    Sebastian, Abin; Prasad, M N V

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd)-contaminated rice is a serious health concern. In the present study, Cd accumulation and stress responses in Oryza sativa L. cv MTU 7029 seedlings were characterized under varying concentrations of plant nutrients in Hoagland media. It has been found that nutrient supplement modulates Cd accumulation and related stress tolerance while efficacy of each nutrient varies. Supplementation of Fe, Mn, N, Ca, and S were found to reduce Cd accumulation in leaf whereas Mn and Fe supply effect was also observed in roots. Analysis of maximum quantum efficiency of photosynthesis indicated that Fe and S supplements confer highest Cd stress tolerance. The present study highlighted the potential of plant nutrients for minimizing Cd accumulation and its toxicity in rice seedlings.

  13. Oxidative stress in obesity: a critical component in human diseases.

    PubMed

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D'Angelo, Gabriella; Nicotera, Antonio; Parisi, Eleonora; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Arrigo, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, a social problem worldwide, is characterized by an increase in body weight that results in excessive fat accumulation. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to several diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, fatty liver diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence allows us to understand the critical role of adipose tissue in controlling the physic-pathological mechanisms of obesity and related comorbidities. Recently, adipose tissue, especially in the visceral compartment, has been considered not only as a simple energy depository tissue, but also as an active endocrine organ releasing a variety of biologically active molecules known as adipocytokines or adipokines. Based on the complex interplay between adipokines, obesity is also characterized by chronic low grade inflammation with permanently increased oxidative stress (OS). Over-expression of oxidative stress damages cellular structures together with under-production of anti-oxidant mechanisms, leading to the development of obesity-related complications. The aim of this review is to summarize what is known in the relationship between OS in obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:25548896

  14. Oxidative Stress in Obesity: A Critical Component in Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Marseglia, Lucia; Manti, Sara; D’Angelo, Gabriella; Nicotera, Antonio; Parisi, Eleonora; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Gitto, Eloisa; Arrigo, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, a social problem worldwide, is characterized by an increase in body weight that results in excessive fat accumulation. Obesity is a major cause of morbidity and mortality and leads to several diseases, including metabolic syndrome, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular, fatty liver diseases, and cancer. Growing evidence allows us to understand the critical role of adipose tissue in controlling the physic-pathological mechanisms of obesity and related comorbidities. Recently, adipose tissue, especially in the visceral compartment, has been considered not only as a simple energy depository tissue, but also as an active endocrine organ releasing a variety of biologically active molecules known as adipocytokines or adipokines. Based on the complex interplay between adipokines, obesity is also characterized by chronic low grade inflammation with permanently increased oxidative stress (OS). Over-expression of oxidative stress damages cellular structures together with under-production of anti-oxidant mechanisms, leading to the development of obesity-related complications. The aim of this review is to summarize what is known in the relationship between OS in obesity and obesity-related diseases. PMID:25548896

  15. Deferasirox Reduces Oxidative Stress in Patients With Transfusion Dependency

    PubMed Central

    Saigo, Katsuyasu; Kono, Mari; Takagi, Yuri; Takenokuchi, Mariko; Hiramatsu, Yasushi; Tada, Hiroshi; Hishita, Terutoshi; Misawa, Masahito; Imoto, Shion; Imashuku, Shinsaku

    2013-01-01

    Background Iron chelation therapy is useful against the over-accumulation of iron and is expected to reduce oxidative stress resulting from the Fenton reaction and Haber-Weiss reaction. We monitored oxidative status and serum ferritin levels after in vivo administration of deferasirox (DFS) and studied the in vitro effects of iron chelators on neutrophil function. Methods Nine patients suffering from transfusion dependency were recruited for this study, and derivatives of reactive oxygen metabolite (dROM) tests to detect serum hydroperoxide levels were evaluated in addition to serum ferritin levels. Human neutrophil reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was determined with flow cytometry. Results Ferritin levels decreased after DFS treatment (P = 0.068), and a significant reduction in dROM levels was measured (P = 0.031). Fifty microM DFS significantly inhibited ROS production induced by fMLP in vitro (P < 0.0001), and tended to inhibit that induced by PMA. On the other hand, deferioxamine failed to inhibit ROS production even at high concentrations. Conclusions In vivo administration of DFS resulted in the reduction of oxidative stress, and this effect was considered to depend not only on a reduction in iron storage but also on the ability of DFS to inhibit neutrophil ROS production in vitro at clinically relevant plasma levels. Further studies are needed to examine the effects of iron chelators. PMID:23390477

  16. Update on the oxidative stress theory of aging: does oxidative stress play a role in aging or healthy aging?

    PubMed

    Salmon, Adam B; Richardson, Arlan; Pérez, Viviana I

    2010-03-01

    The oxidative stress theory of aging predicts that manipulations that alter oxidative stress/damage will alter aging. The gold standard for determining whether aging is altered is life span, i.e., does altering oxidative stress/damage change life span? Mice with genetic manipulations in their antioxidant defense system designed to directly address this prediction have, with few exceptions, shown no change in life span. However, when these transgenic/knockout mice are tested using models that develop various types of age-related pathology, they show alterations in progression and/or severity of pathology as predicted by the oxidative stress theory: increased oxidative stress accelerates pathology and reduced oxidative stress retards pathology. These contradictory observations might mean that (a) oxidative stress plays a very limited, if any, role in aging but a major role in health span and/or (b) the role that oxidative stress plays in aging depends on environment. In environments with minimal stress, as expected under optimal husbandry, oxidative damage plays little role in aging. However, under chronic stress, including pathological phenotypes that diminish optimal health, oxidative stress/damage plays a major role in aging. Under these conditions, enhanced antioxidant defenses exert an "antiaging" action, leading to changes in life span, age-related pathology, and physiological function as predicted by the oxidative stress theory of aging.

  17. High-density carrier-accumulated and electrically stable oxide thin-film transistors from ion-gel gate dielectric

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujii, Mami N.; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Miwa, Kazumoto; Okada, Hiromi; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ono, Shimpei

    2015-12-01

    The use of indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) has paved the way for high-resolution uniform displays or integrated circuits with transparent and flexible devices. However, achieving highly reliable devices that use IGZO for low-temperature processes remains a technological challenge. We propose the use of IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an ionic-liquid gate dielectric in order to achieve high-density carrier-accumulated IGZO TFTs with high reliability, and we discuss a distinctive mechanism for the degradation of this organic-inorganic hybrid device under long-term electrical stress. Our results demonstrated that an ionic liquid or gel gate dielectric provides highly reliable and low-voltage operation with IGZO TFTs. Furthermore, high-density carrier accumulation helps improve the TFT characteristics and reliability, and it is highly relevant to the electronic phase control of oxide materials and the degradation mechanism for organic-inorganic hybrid devices.

  18. High-density carrier-accumulated and electrically stable oxide thin-film transistors from ion-gel gate dielectric.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Mami N; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Miwa, Kazumoto; Okada, Hiromi; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ono, Shimpei

    2015-01-01

    The use of indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) has paved the way for high-resolution uniform displays or integrated circuits with transparent and flexible devices. However, achieving highly reliable devices that use IGZO for low-temperature processes remains a technological challenge. We propose the use of IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an ionic-liquid gate dielectric in order to achieve high-density carrier-accumulated IGZO TFTs with high reliability, and we discuss a distinctive mechanism for the degradation of this organic-inorganic hybrid device under long-term electrical stress. Our results demonstrated that an ionic liquid or gel gate dielectric provides highly reliable and low-voltage operation with IGZO TFTs. Furthermore, high-density carrier accumulation helps improve the TFT characteristics and reliability, and it is highly relevant to the electronic phase control of oxide materials and the degradation mechanism for organic-inorganic hybrid devices. PMID:26677773

  19. High-density carrier-accumulated and electrically stable oxide thin-film transistors from ion-gel gate dielectric

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Mami N.; Ishikawa, Yasuaki; Miwa, Kazumoto; Okada, Hiromi; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Ono, Shimpei

    2015-01-01

    The use of indium–gallium–zinc oxide (IGZO) has paved the way for high-resolution uniform displays or integrated circuits with transparent and flexible devices. However, achieving highly reliable devices that use IGZO for low-temperature processes remains a technological challenge. We propose the use of IGZO thin-film transistors (TFTs) with an ionic-liquid gate dielectric in order to achieve high-density carrier-accumulated IGZO TFTs with high reliability, and we discuss a distinctive mechanism for the degradation of this organic–inorganic hybrid device under long-term electrical stress. Our results demonstrated that an ionic liquid or gel gate dielectric provides highly reliable and low-voltage operation with IGZO TFTs. Furthermore, high-density carrier accumulation helps improve the TFT characteristics and reliability, and it is highly relevant to the electronic phase control of oxide materials and the degradation mechanism for organic–inorganic hybrid devices. PMID:26677773

  20. Nitric oxide is involved in heat-induced HSP70 accumulation.

    PubMed

    Malyshev IYu; Manukhina, E B; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Vanin, A F

    1995-08-21

    Heat shock potentiated the nitric oxide production (EPR assay) in the liver, kidney, heart, spleen, intestine, and brain. The heat shock-induced sharp transient increase in the rate of nitric oxide production preceded the accumulation of heat shock proteins (HSP70) (Western blot analysis) as measured in the heart and liver. In all organs the nitric oxide formation was completely blocked by the NO-synthase inhibitor N omega-nitro-L-arginine (L-NNA). L-NNA also markedly attenuated the heat shock-induced accumulation of HSP70. The results suggests that nitric oxide is involved in the heat shock-induced activation of HSP70 synthesis. PMID:7544743

  1. Balance between salt stress and endogenous hormones influence dry matter accumulation in Jerusalem artichoke.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Lingling; Wu, Yawen; Chen, Manxia; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-10-15

    Salinity is one of the most serious environmental stresses limiting agricultural production. Production of Jerusalem artichoke on saline land is strategically important for using saline land resources. The interaction between plant hormones and salinity stress in governing Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) growth is unclear. Jerusalem artichoke (variety Nanyu-1) was grown under variable salinity stress in the field, and a role of endogenous hormones [zeatin (ZT), auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA)] in regulating sugar and dry matter accumulation in tubers was characterized. Under mild salt stress (≤2.2gNaClkg(-1) soil), Nanyu-1 grew well with no significant alteration of dry matter distribution to stems and tubers. In contrast, under moderate salt stress (2.7gNaClkg(-1) soil), the distribution to stem decreased and to tubers decreased significantly. Mild salt stress induced sugar accumulation in tubers at the beginning of the tuber-expansion period, but significantly inhibited (i) transfer of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (ii) polymerization and accumulation of fructan during the tuber-expansion stage. Under different salinity stress, before the stolon growth, the ratio of IAA/ABA in leaves increased significantly and that of GA3/ABA increased slightly; during tuber development, these ratios continued to decrease and reached the minimum late in the tuber-expansion period. While, salt stress inhibited (i) underground dry matter accumulation, (ii) tuber dry matter accumulation efficiency, (iii) transport of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (iv) fructan accumulation efficiency during the tuber-expansion period; these effects were accompanied by significantly decreased tuber yield with an increase in salinity. With soil salinity increasing, the synthesis of IAA and GA3 was inhibited in leaves and tubers, while ABA synthesis was stimulated. In brief, tuber yield would significantly decreased with the increase of salinity. PMID

  2. Balance between salt stress and endogenous hormones influence dry matter accumulation in Jerusalem artichoke.

    PubMed

    Shao, Tianyun; Li, Lingling; Wu, Yawen; Chen, Manxia; Long, Xiaohua; Shao, Hongbo; Liu, Zhaopu; Rengel, Zed

    2016-10-15

    Salinity is one of the most serious environmental stresses limiting agricultural production. Production of Jerusalem artichoke on saline land is strategically important for using saline land resources. The interaction between plant hormones and salinity stress in governing Jerusalem artichoke (Helianthus tuberosus) growth is unclear. Jerusalem artichoke (variety Nanyu-1) was grown under variable salinity stress in the field, and a role of endogenous hormones [zeatin (ZT), auxins (IAA), gibberellins (GA3) and abscisic acid (ABA)] in regulating sugar and dry matter accumulation in tubers was characterized. Under mild salt stress (≤2.2gNaClkg(-1) soil), Nanyu-1 grew well with no significant alteration of dry matter distribution to stems and tubers. In contrast, under moderate salt stress (2.7gNaClkg(-1) soil), the distribution to stem decreased and to tubers decreased significantly. Mild salt stress induced sugar accumulation in tubers at the beginning of the tuber-expansion period, but significantly inhibited (i) transfer of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (ii) polymerization and accumulation of fructan during the tuber-expansion stage. Under different salinity stress, before the stolon growth, the ratio of IAA/ABA in leaves increased significantly and that of GA3/ABA increased slightly; during tuber development, these ratios continued to decrease and reached the minimum late in the tuber-expansion period. While, salt stress inhibited (i) underground dry matter accumulation, (ii) tuber dry matter accumulation efficiency, (iii) transport of non-reducing sugars to tubers, and (iv) fructan accumulation efficiency during the tuber-expansion period; these effects were accompanied by significantly decreased tuber yield with an increase in salinity. With soil salinity increasing, the synthesis of IAA and GA3 was inhibited in leaves and tubers, while ABA synthesis was stimulated. In brief, tuber yield would significantly decreased with the increase of salinity.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Autophagy in Cardiovascular Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Cyndi R.; Pedrozo, Zully; Lavandero, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Autophagy is an evolutionarily ancient process of intracellular protein and organelle recycling required to maintain cellular homeostasis in the face of a wide variety of stresses. Dysregulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) leads to oxidative damage. Both autophagy and ROS/RNS serve pathological or adaptive roles within cardiomyocytes, depending on the context. Recent Advances: ROS/RNS and autophagy communicate with each other via both transcriptional and post-translational events. This cross talk, in turn, regulates the structural integrity of cardiomyocytes, promotes proteostasis, and reduces inflammation, events critical to disease pathogenesis. Critical Issues: Dysregulation of either autophagy or redox state has been implicated in many cardiovascular diseases. Cardiomyocytes are rich in mitochondria, which make them particularly sensitive to oxidative damage. Maintenance of mitochondrial homeostasis and elimination of defective mitochondria are each critical to the maintenance of redox homeostasis. Future Directions: The complex interplay between autophagy and oxidative stress underlies a wide range of physiological and pathological events and its elucidation holds promise of potential clinical applicability. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 507–518. PMID:23641894

  4. Oxidative stress, thyroid dysfunction & Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Carlos; Casado, Ángela

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is one of the most common chromosomal disorders, occurring in one out of 700-1000 live births, and the most common cause of mental retardation. Thyroid dysfunction is the most typical endocrine abnormality in patients with DS. It is well known that thyroid dysfunction is highly prevalent in children and adults with DS and that both hypothyroidism and hyperthyroidism are more common in patients with DS than in the general population. Increasing evidence has shown that DS individuals are under unusual increased oxidative stress, which may be involved in the higher prevalence and severity of a number of pathologies associated with the syndrome, as well as the accelerated ageing observed in these individuals. The gene for Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is coded on chromosome 21 and it is overexpressed (~50%) resulting in an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) due to overproduction of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). ROS leads to oxidative damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, therefore, oxidative stress may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS. PMID:26354208

  5. Reducing arsenic accumulation in rice grain through iron oxide amendment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this research, we investigated the accumulation of arsenic (As), selenium (Se), molybdenum (Mo), and cadmium (Cd) in rice grain under different soil conditions in standard straighthead-resistant and straighthead-susceptible cultivars, Zhe 733 and Cocodrie, respectively. Results demonstrated that,...

  6. Mesophyll-localized phytochromes gate stress- and light-inducible anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sookyung; Warnasooriya, Sankalpi N; Montgomery, Beronda L

    2014-01-01

    Abiotic stress and light induce anthocyanin accumulation in Arabidopsis. Here, we demonstrate that mesophyll-localized phytochromes regulate nitrogen-, phosphate- and cold-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots of Arabidopsis. Whereas ecotype-dependent differences result in distinct total levels of anthocyanin accumulation in response to light, cold, or nutrient-deficient treatments, phytochromes generally gate light- and/or stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation in shoots, as plants depleted of mesophyll-localized phytochromes lack or have highly attenuated induction of anthocyanins. Observed interactions between light and stress were found to be wavelength dependent, with red and far-red light stimulating higher total levels of anthocyanin accumulation under cold temperatures, especially in response to nitrogen limitation, whereas blue light did not. The roots of plants depleted of mesophyll-localized phytochromes still respond to nutrient deficiency as determined by elongation of primary roots and root hair elongation when plants are grown under nitrogen- or phosphate-limited conditions. Plants which are constitutively deficient in photoreceptors in both shoots and roots, i.e., phy or cry mutants, exhibit defects in light- and stress-induced anthocyanin accumulation and defects in root development. Taken together, these results suggest that the response to nutrient limitation in roots and shoots is under distinct control by spatial-specific pools of phytochromes in Arabidopsis. PMID:24535251

  7. Dissecting root proteome of transgenic rice cultivars unravels metabolic alterations and accumulation of novel stress responsive proteins under drought stress.

    PubMed

    Paul, Soumitra; Gayen, Dipak; Datta, Swapan K; Datta, Karabi

    2015-05-01

    Generation of drought tolerant rice plants by overexpressing Arabidopsis DREB1A is a significant development for abiotic stress research. However, the metabolic network regulated in the drought tolerant transgenic rice plants is poorly understood. In this research study, we have demonstrated the comparative proteome analysis between the roots of wild type and transgenic DREB1A overexpressing homozygous plants under drought stress condition. After 7d of dehydration stress at reproductive stage, the plants were re-watered for 24h. The roots were collected separately from wild type and transgenic plants grown under water, drought stress and re-watering conditions and total proteins were analyzed by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS). Among the large number of differentially accumulated spots, 30, 27 and 20 spots were successfully identified as differentially expressed proteins in three different conditions respectively. The major class of identified proteins belongs to carbohydrate and energy metabolism category while stress and defense related proteins are especially up-accumulated under drought stress in both the plants. A novel protein, R40C1 was reported to be up-accumulated in roots of transgenic plants which may play an important role in generation of drought tolerant plants. Protein-protein interaction helps to identify the network of drought stress signaling pathways. PMID:25804816

  8. Oxidative stress in prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Udensi, Udensi K; Tchounwou, Paul B

    2016-01-01

    Prostatic hyperplasia (PH) is a common urologic disease that affects mostly elderly men. PH can be classified as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), or prostate cancer (PCa) based on its severity. Oxidative stress (OS) is known to influence the activities of inflammatory mediators and other cellular processes involved in the initiation, promotion and progression of human neoplasms including prostate cancer. Scientific evidence also suggests that micronutrient supplementation may restore the antioxidant status and hence improve the clinical outcomes for patients with BPH and PCa. This review highlights the recent studies on prostate hyperplasia and carcinogenesis, and examines the role of OS on the molecular pathology of prostate cancer progression and treatment. PMID:27609145

  9. Oxidative Stress and Carbonyl Lesions in Ulcerative Colitis and Associated Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhiqi; Li, Sai; Cao, Yu; Tian, Xuefei; Zeng, Rong; Liao, Duan-Fang; Cao, Deliang

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress has long been known as a pathogenic factor of ulcerative colitis (UC) and colitis-associated colorectal cancer (CAC), but the effects of secondary carbonyl lesions receive less emphasis. In inflammatory conditions, reactive oxygen species (ROS), such as superoxide anion free radical (O2∙−), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), and hydroxyl radical (HO∙), are produced at high levels and accumulated to cause oxidative stress (OS). In oxidative status, accumulated ROS can cause protein dysfunction and DNA damage, leading to gene mutations and cell death. Accumulated ROS could also act as chemical messengers to activate signaling pathways, such as NF-κB and p38 MAPK, to affect cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. More importantly, electrophilic carbonyl compounds produced by lipid peroxidation may function as secondary pathogenic factors, causing further protein and membrane lesions. This may in turn exaggerate oxidative stress, forming a vicious cycle. Electrophilic carbonyls could also cause DNA mutations and breaks, driving malignant progression of UC. The secondary lesions caused by carbonyl compounds may be exceptionally important in the case of host carbonyl defensive system deficit, such as aldo-keto reductase 1B10 deficiency. This review article updates the current understanding of oxidative stress and carbonyl lesions in the development and progression of UC and CAC. PMID:26823956

  10. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays.

  11. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    PubMed

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. PMID:26071933

  12. Oxidative stress and antioxidants: Distress or eustress?

    PubMed

    Niki, Etsuo

    2016-04-01

    There is a growing consensus that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are not just associated with various pathologies, but that they act as physiological redox signaling messenger with important regulatory functions. It is sometimes stated that "if ROS is a physiological signaling messenger, then removal of ROS by antioxidants such as vitamins E and C may not be good for human health." However, it should be noted that ROS acting as physiological signaling messenger and ROS removed by antioxidants are not the same. The lipid peroxidation products of polyunsaturated fatty acids and cholesterol induce adaptive response and enhance defense capacity against subsequent oxidative insults, but it is unlikely that these lipid peroxidation products are physiological signaling messenger produced on purpose. The removal of ROS and inhibition of lipid peroxidation by antioxidants should be beneficial for human health, although it has to be noted also that they may not be an effective inhibitor of oxidative damage mediated by non-radical oxidants. The term ROS is vague and, as there are many ROS and antioxidants which are different in chemistry, it is imperative to explicitly specify ROS and antioxidant to understand the effects and role of oxidative stress and antioxidants properly.

  13. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role.

  14. Vitiligo: How do oxidative stress-induced autoantigens trigger autoimmunity?

    PubMed

    Xie, Heng; Zhou, Fubo; Liu, Ling; Zhu, Guannan; Li, Qiang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2016-01-01

    Vitiligo is a common depigmentation disorder characterized by a loss of functional melanocytes and melanin from epidermis, in which the autoantigens and subsequent autoimmunity caused by oxidative stress play significant roles according to hypotheses. Various factors lead to reactive oxygen species (ROS) overproduction in the melanocytes of vitiligo: the exogenous and endogenous stimuli that cause ROS production, low levels of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, disturbed antioxidant pathways and polymorphisms of ROS-associated genes. These factors synergistically contribute to the accumulation of ROS in melanocytes, finally leading to melanocyte damage and the production of autoantigens through the following ways: apoptosis, accumulation of misfolded peptides and cytokines induced by endoplasmic reticulum stress as well as the sustained unfolded protein response, and an 'eat me' signal for phagocytic cells triggered by calreticulin. Subsequently, autoantigens presentation and dendritic cells maturation occurred mediated by the release of antigen-containing exosomes, adenosine triphosphate and melanosomal autophagy. With the involvement of inducible heat shock protein 70, cellular immunity targeting autoantigens takes the essential place in the destruction of melanocytes, which eventually results in vitiligo. Several treatments, such as narrow band ultraviolet, quercetin and α-melanophore-stimulating hormone, are reported to be able to lower ROS thereby achieving repigmentation in vitiligo. In therapies targeting autoimmunity, restore of regulatory T cells is absorbing attention, in which narrow band ultraviolet also plays a role. PMID:26387449

  15. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea.

  16. Accumulation and oxidation of elemental mercury in tropical soils.

    PubMed

    Soares, Liliane Catone; Egreja Filho, Fernando Barboza; Linhares, Lucília Alves; Windmoller, Cláudia Carvalhinho; Yoshida, Maria Irene

    2015-09-01

    The role of chemical and mineralogical soil properties in the retention and oxidation of atmospheric mercury in tropical soils is discussed based on thermal desorption analysis. The retention of gaseous mercury by tropical soils varied greatly both quantitatively and qualitatively with soil type. The average natural mercury content of soils was 0.08 ± 0.06 μg g(-1) with a maximum of 0.215 ± 0.009 μg g(-1). After gaseous Hg(0) incubation experiments, mercury content of investigated soils ranged from 0.6 ± 0.2 to 735 ± 23 μg g(-1), with a mean value of 44 ± 146 μg g(-1). Comparatively, A horizon of almost all soil types adsorbed more mercury than B horizon from the same soil, which demonstrates the key role of organic matter in mercury adsorption. In addition to organic matter, pH and CEC also appear to be important soil characteristics for the adsorption of mercury. All thermograms showed Hg(2+) peaks, which were predominant in most of them, indicating that elemental mercury oxidized in tropical soils. After four months of incubation, the thermograms showed oxidation levels from 70% to 100%. As none of the samples presented only the Hg(0) peak, and the soils retained varying amounts of mercury despite exposure under the same incubation conditions, it became clear that oxidation occurred on soil surface. Organic matter seemed to play a key role in mercury oxidation through complexation/stabilization of the oxidized forms. The lower percentages of available mercury (extracted with KNO3) in A horizons when compared to B horizons support this idea. PMID:25950134

  17. Epigenetics, oxidative stress and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zawia, Nasser H.; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Cardozo–Pelaez, Fernando

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder whose clinical manifestations appear in old age. The sporadic nature of 90% of AD cases, the differential susceptibility and course of illness, as well as the late age onset of the disease suggest that epigenetic and environmental components play a role in the etiology of late onset AD (LOAD). Animal exposure studies demonstrated that AD may begin early in life and may involve the interplay between the environment, epigenetics and oxidative stress. Early life exposure of rodents and primates to the xenobiotic metal lead (Pb) enhanced the expression of genes associated with AD, repressed the expression of others, and increased the burden of oxidative DNA damage in the aged brain. Epigenetic mechanisms that control gene expression and promote the accumulation of oxidative DNA damage are mediated through alterations in the methylation or oxidation of CpG dinucleotides. We found that environmental influences occurring during brain development inhibit DNA methyltransferases, thus hypomethylating promoters of genes associated with AD such as the beta- amyloid precursor protein (APP). This early life imprint was sustained and triggered later in life to increase the levels of APP and amyloid-beta (Aβ). Increased Aβ levels promoted the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which damage DNA and accelerate neurodegenerative events. While AD-associated genes were over-expressed late in life, others were repressed, suggesting that these early life perturbations result in hypomethylation as well as hypermethylation of genes. The hypermethylated genes are rendered susceptible to Aβ-enhanced oxidative DNA damage because methylcytosines restrict repair of adjacent hydroxyguanosines. While the conditions leading to early life hypo or hyper methylation of specific genes are not known, these changes can impact gene expression and imprint susceptibility to oxidative DNA damage in the aged brain. PMID

  18. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathi-one peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway. PMID:26545251

  19. Melamine Induces Oxidative Stress in Mouse Ovary.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiao-Xin; Duan, Xing; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xiong, Bo; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Melamine is a nitrogen heterocyclic triazine compound which is widely used as an industrial chemical. Although melamine is not considered to be acutely toxic with a high LD50 in animals, food contaminated with melamine expose risks to the human health. Melamine has been reported to be responsible for the renal impairment in mammals, its toxicity on the reproductive system, however, has not been adequately assessed. In the present study, we examined the effect of melamine on the follicle development and ovary formation. The data showed that melamine increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, and induced granulosa cell apoptosis as well as follicle atresia. To further analyze the mechanism by which melamine induces oxidative stress, the expression and activities of two key antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPX) were analyzed, and the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA) were compared between control and melamine-treated ovaries. The result revealed that melamine changed the expression and activities of SOD and GPX in the melamine-treated mice. Therefore, we demonstrate that melamine causes damage to the ovaries via oxidative stress pathway.

  20. Vascular oxidant stress and inflammation in hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Papatheodorou, Louisa; Weiss, Norbert

    2007-11-01

    Elevated plasma levels of homocysteine are a metabolic risk factor for atherosclerotic vascular disease, as shown in numerous clinical studies that linked elevated homocysteine levels to de novo and recurrent cardiovascular events. High levels of homocysteine promote oxidant stress in vascular cells and tissue because of the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which have been strongly implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. In particular, ROS have been shown to cause endothelial injury, dysfunction, and activation. Elevated homocysteine stimulates proinflammatory pathways in vascular cells, resulting in leukocyte recruitment to the vessel wall, mediated by the expression of adhesion molecules on endothelial cells and circulating monocytes and neutrophils, in the infiltration of leukocytes into the arterial wall mediated by increased secretion of chemokines, and in the differentiation of monocytes into cholesterol-scavenging macrophages. Furthermore, it stimulates the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells followed by the production of extracellular matrix. Many of these events involve redox-sensitive signaling events, which are promoted by elevated homocysteine, and result in the formation of atherosclerotic lesions. In this article, we review current knowledge about the role of homocysteine on oxidant stress-mediated vascular inflammation during the development of atherosclerosis.

  1. Effect of Oxidative Stress in Hemodialysed Patients

    PubMed Central

    Peti, Attila; Csiky, Botond; Guth, Eszter; Kenyeres, Peter; Mezosi, Emese; Kovacs, Gabor L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims, subjects and methods Markers of oxidative stress and inflammatory activation of endothelium, as well as the adipose tissue secreted adipokines, e.g. adiponectin show altered pattern in renal failure. However, their internal relations have not been fully evaluated in this special patient population. In our cross sectional study, beside the routine clinical and biochemical parameters, plasma malondialdehyde, glutathione (GSH), catalase, total peroxidase, as well as serum E-selectin and adiponectin were measured in 70 hemodialysed (HD) patients. Results GSH showed negative correlations with systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP) values, while a positive one with HDL-cholesterol level, as expected. Interestingly, the level of sE-selectin was inversely correlated only with the age. In multiple regression analyses where anthropometric, BP and laboratory parameters were included and sE-selectin was the dependent variable, the inverse association between the age and level of sE-Selectin turned out being an independent factor. Conclusions In HD kidney failure patients of the biochemical cardiovascular risk markers those related to oxidative stress, endothelial dysfunction, or altered adipokine homeostasis are not necessarily strongly associated. Larger studies may be needed to confirm our novel observation, a negative and independent correlation of age to sE-Selectin level.

  2. Nutritionally Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Alexandra; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    There are many sources of nutritionally mediated oxidative stress that trigger inflammatory cascades along short and long time frames. These events are primarily mediated via NFκB. On the short-term scale postprandial inflammation is characterized by an increase in circulating levels of IL-6 and TNF-α and is mirrored on the long-term by proinflammatory gene expression changes in the adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of obese individuals. Specifically the upregulation of CCL2/MCP-1, CCL3/MIP-1α, CCL4/MIP-1β, CXCL2/MIP-2α, and CXCL3/MIP-2β is noted because these changes have been observed in both adipocytes and PBMC of obese humans. In comparing numerous human intervention studies it is clear that pro-inflammatory and anti-inflammatory consumption choices mediate gene expression in humans adipocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Arachidonic acid and saturated fatty acids (SFAs) both demonstrate an ability to increase pro-inflammatory IL-8 along with numerous other inflammatory factors including IL-6, TNFα, IL-1β, and CXCL1 for arachidonic acid and IGB2 and CTSS for SFA. Antioxidant rich foods including olive oil, fruits, and vegetables all demonstrate an ability to lower levels of IL-6 in PBMCs. Thus, dietary choices play a complex role in the mediation of unavoidable oxidative stress and can serve to exacerbate or dampen the level of inflammation. PMID:23844276

  3. Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome, cardiovascular disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Trigueros-Motos, Laia; Gonzalez, Jose M; Rivera, Jose; Andres, Vicente

    2011-06-01

    Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), a rare human disease characterized by premature aging, is mainly caused by the abnormal accumulation of progerin, a mutant form of the mammalian nuclear envelope component lamin A. HGPS patients exhibit vascular alterations and die at an average age of 13 years, predominantly from myocardial infarction or stroke. Animal models of HGPS have been a valuable tool in the study of the pathological processes implicated in the origin of this disease and its associated cardiovascular alterations. Some of the molecular mechanisms of HGPS might be relevant to the process of normal aging, since progerin is detected in cells from normal elderly humans. Conversely, processes linked to normal aging, such as the increase in oxidative stress, might be relevant to the pathogenic mechanisms of HGPS. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the cardiovascular alterations associated with HGPS, the potential role of oxidative stress, and therapeutic approaches for the treatment of this devastating disease.

  4. Increased Oxidative Stress as a Selective Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiahui; Wang, Zhichong

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are closely related to tumorgenesis. Under hypoxic environment, increased levels of ROS induce the expression of hypoxia inducible factors (HIFs) in cancer stem cells (CSCs), resulting in the promotion of the upregulation of CSC markers, and the reduction of intracellular ROS level, thus facilitating CSCs survival and proliferation. Although the ROS level is regulated by powerful antioxidant defense mechanisms in cancer cells, it is observed to remain higher than that in normal cells. Cancer cells may be more sensitive than normal cells to the accumulation of ROS; consequently, it is supposed that increased oxidative stress by exogenous ROS generation therapy has an effect on selectively killing cancer cells without affecting normal cells. This paper reviews the mechanisms of redox regulation in CSCs and the pivotal role of ROS in anticancer treatment. PMID:26273420

  5. Oxidative Stress in Genetic Mouse Models of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Varçin, Mustafa; Bentea, Eduard; Michotte, Yvette; Sarre, Sophie

    2012-01-01

    There is extensive evidence in Parkinson's disease of a link between oxidative stress and some of the monogenically inherited Parkinson's disease-associated genes. This paper focuses on the importance of this link and potential impact on neuronal function. Basic mechanisms of oxidative stress, the cellular antioxidant machinery, and the main sources of cellular oxidative stress are reviewed. Moreover, attention is given to the complex interaction between oxidative stress and other prominent pathogenic pathways in Parkinson's disease, such as mitochondrial dysfunction and neuroinflammation. Furthermore, an overview of the existing genetic mouse models of Parkinson's disease is given and the evidence of oxidative stress in these models highlighted. Taken into consideration the importance of ageing and environmental factors as a risk for developing Parkinson's disease, gene-environment interactions in genetically engineered mouse models of Parkinson's disease are also discussed, highlighting the role of oxidative damage in the interplay between genetic makeup, environmental stress, and ageing in Parkinson's disease. PMID:22829959

  6. A Nucleocytoplasmic Shuttling Protein in Oxidative Stress Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Ow, David W.; Song, Wen

    2003-03-26

    Plants for effective extraction of toxic metals and radionuclides must tolerate oxidative stress. To identify genes that enhance oxidative stress tolerance, an S. pombe cDNA expression plasmid library was screened for the ability to yield hypertolerant colonies. Here, we report on the properties of one gene that confers hypertolerance to cadmium and oxidizing chemicals. This gene appears to be conserved in other organisms as homologous genes are found in human, mouse, fruitfly and Arabidopsis. The fruitfly and Arabidopsis genes likewise enhance oxidative stress tolerance in fission yeast. During oxidative stress, the amount of mRNA does not change, but protein fusions to GFP relocate from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. The same pattern is observed with the Arabidopsis homologue-GFP fusion protein. This behavior suggests a signaling role in oxidative stress tolerance and these conserved proteins may be targets for engineering stress tolerant plants for phytoremediation.

  7. Chasing great paths of Helmut Sies "Oxidative Stress".

    PubMed

    Majima, Hideyuki J; Indo, Hiroko P; Nakanishi, Ikuo; Suenaga, Shigeaki; Matsumoto, Ken-Ichiro; Matsui, Hirofumi; Minamiyama, Yukiko; Ichikawa, Hiroshi; Yen, Hsiu-Chuan; Hawkins, Clare L; Davies, Michael J; Ozawa, Toshihiko; St Clair, Daret K

    2016-04-01

    Prof. Dr. Helmut Sies is a pioneer of "Oxidative Stress", and has published over 18 papers with the name of "Oxidative Stress" in the title. He has been Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Archives of Biochemistry and Biophysics" for many years, and is a former Editor-in-Chief of the journal "Free Radical Research". He has clarified our understanding of the causes of chronic developing diseases, and has studied antioxidant factors. In this article, importance of "Oxidative Stress" and our mitochondrial oxidative stress studies; roles of mitochondrial ROS, effects of vitamin E and its homologues in oxidative stress-related diseases, effects of antioxidants in vivo and in vitro, and a mitochondrial superoxide theory for oxidative stress diseases and aging are introduced, and some of our interactions with Helmut are described, congratulating and appreciating his great path.

  8. Going retro: Oxidative stress biomarkers in modern redox biology.

    PubMed

    Margaritelis, N V; Cobley, J N; Paschalis, V; Veskoukis, A S; Theodorou, A A; Kyparos, A; Nikolaidis, M G

    2016-09-01

    The field of redox biology is inherently intertwined with oxidative stress biomarkers. Oxidative stress biomarkers have been utilized for many different objectives. Our analysis indicates that oxidative stress biomarkers have several salient applications: (1) diagnosing oxidative stress, (2) pinpointing likely redox components in a physiological or pathological process and (3) estimating the severity, progression and/or regression of a disease. On the contrary, oxidative stress biomarkers do not report on redox signaling. Alternative approaches to gain more mechanistic insights are: (1) measuring molecules that are integrated in pathways linking redox biochemistry with physiology, (2) using the exomarker approach and (3) exploiting -omics techniques. More sophisticated approaches and large trials are needed to establish oxidative stress biomarkers in the clinical setting.

  9. Diabetes and the Brain: Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and Autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Muriach, María; Flores-Bellver, Miguel; Romero, Francisco J.; Barcia, Jorge M.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common metabolic disorder associated with chronic complications including a state of mild to moderate cognitive impairment, in particular psychomotor slowing and reduced mental flexibility, not attributable to other causes, and shares many symptoms that are best described as accelerated brain ageing. A common theory for aging and for the pathogenesis of this cerebral dysfunctioning in diabetes relates cell death to oxidative stress in strong association to inflammation, and in fact nuclear factor κB (NFκB), a master regulator of inflammation and also a sensor of oxidative stress, has a strategic position at the crossroad between oxidative stress and inflammation. Moreover, metabolic inflammation is, in turn, related to the induction of various intracellular stresses such as mitochondrial oxidative stress, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, and autophagy defect. In parallel, blockade of autophagy can relate to proinflammatory signaling via oxidative stress pathway and NFκB-mediated inflammation. PMID:25215171

  10. Oxidative stress in psoriasis and potential therapeutic use of antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiran; Huang, Tian

    2016-06-01

    The pathophysiology of psoriasis is complex and dynamic. Recently, the involvement of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed. Oxidative stress is an imbalance between oxidants and antioxidants in favor of the oxidants, leading to a disruption of redox signaling and control and/or molecular damage. In this article, the published studies on the role of oxidative stress in psoriasis pathogenesis are reviewed, focusing on the impacts of oxidative stress on dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and keratinocytes, on angiogenesis and on inflammatory signaling (mitogen-activated protein kinase, nuclear factor-κB, and Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription). As there is compelling evidence that oxidative stress is involved in the pathogenesis of psoriasis, the possibility of using this information to develop novel strategies for treatment of patients with psoriasis is of considerable interest. In this article, we also review the published studies on treating psoriasis with antioxidants and drugs with antioxidant activity. PMID:27098416

  11. Interfacial stress transfer in graphene oxide nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheling; Young, Robert J; Kinloch, Ian A

    2013-01-23

    Raman spectroscopy has been used for the first time to monitor interfacial stress transfer in poly(vinyl alcohol) nanocomposites reinforced with graphene oxide (GO). The graphene oxide nanocomposites were prepared by a simple mixing method and casting from aqueous solution. They were characterized using scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and polarized Raman spectroscopy and their mechanical properties determined by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical thermal analysis. It was found that GO was fully exfoliated during the nanocomposite preparation process and that the GO nanoplatelets tended align in the plane of the films. The stiffness and yield stress of the nanocomposites were found to increase with GO loading but the extension to failure decreased. It was shown that the Raman D band at ~1335 cm(-1) downshifted as the nanocomposites were strained as a result of the interfacial stress transfer between the polymer matrix and GO reinforcement. From knowledge of the Grüneisen parameter for graphene, it was possible to estimate the effective Young's modulus of the GO from the Raman D band shift rate per unit strain to be of the order of 120 GPa. A similar value of effective modulus was found from the tensile mechanical data using the "rule of mixtures" that decreased with GO loading. The accepted value of Young's modulus for GO is in excess of 200 GPa and it is suggested that the lower effective Young's modulus values determined may be due to a combination of finite flake dimensions, waviness and wrinkles, aggregation, and misalignment of the GO flakes.

  12. Management of multicellular senescence and oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Haines, David D; Juhasz, Bela; Tosaki, Arpad

    2013-01-01

    Progressively sophisticated understanding of cellular and molecular processes that contribute to age-related physical deterioration is being gained from ongoing research into cancer, chronic inflammatory syndromes and other serious disorders that increase with age. Particularly valuable insight has resulted from characterization of how senescent cells affect the tissues in which they form in ways that decrease an organism's overall viability. Increasingly, the underlying pathophysiology of ageing is recognized as a consequence of oxidative damage. This leads to hyperactivity of cell growth pathways, prominently including mTOR (mammalian target of rapamycin), that contribute to a build-up in cells of toxic aggregates such as progerin (a mutant nuclear cytoskeletal protein), lipofuscin and other cellular debris, triggering formation of senescent cellular phenotypes, which interact destructively with surrounding tissue. Indeed, senescent cell ablation dramatically inhibits physical deterioration in progeroid (age-accelerated) mice. This review explores ways in which oxidative stress creates ageing-associated cellular damage and triggers induction of the cell death/survival programs’ apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy and ‘necroapoptophagy’. The concept of ‘necroapoptophagy’ is presented here as a strategy for varying tissue oxidative stress intensity in ways that induce differential activation of death versus survival programs, resulting in enhanced and sustained representation of healthy functional cells. These strategies are discussed in the context of specialized mesenchymal stromal cells with the potential to synergize with telocytes in stabilizing engrafted progenitor cells, thereby extending periods of healthy life. Information and concepts are summarized in a hypothetical approach to suppressing whole-organism senescence, with methods drawn from emerging understandings of ageing, gained from Cnidarians (jellyfish, corals and anemones) that undergo a

  13. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Behavior, Physiology, and the Redox Thiol Proteome of Caenorhabditis elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kumsta, Caroline; Thamsen, Maike

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Accumulation of reactive oxygen species has been implicated in various diseases and aging. However, the precise physiological effects of accumulating oxidants are still largely undefined. Here, we applied a short-term peroxide stress treatment to young Caenorhabditis elegans and measured behavioral, physiological, and cellular consequences. We discovered that exposure to peroxide stress causes a number of immediate changes, including loss in mobility, decreased growth rate, and decreased cellular adenosine triphosphate levels. Many of these alterations, which are highly reminiscent of changes in aging animals, are reversible, suggesting the presence of effective antioxidant systems in young C. elegans. One of these antioxidant systems involves the highly abundant protein peroxiredoxin 2 (PRDX-2), whose gene deletion causes phenotypes symptomatic of chronic peroxide stress and shortens lifespan. Applying the quantitative redox proteomic technique OxICAT to oxidatively stressed wild-type and prdx-2 deletion worms, we identified oxidation-sensitive cysteines in 40 different proteins, including proteins involved in mobility and feeding (e.g., MYO-2 and LET-75), protein translation and homeostasis (e.g., elongation factor 1 [EFT-1] and heat shock protein 1), and adenosine triphosphate regeneration (e.g., nucleoside diphosphate kinase). The oxidative modification of some of these redox-sensitive cysteines may contribute to the physiological and behavioral changes observed in oxidatively stressed animals. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 14, 1023–1037. PMID:20649472

  14. Development of accumulated heat stress index based on time-weighted function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ji-Sun; Byun, Hi-Ryong; Kim, Do-Woo

    2016-05-01

    Heat stress accumulates in the human body when a person is exposed to a thermal condition for a long time. Considering this fact, we have defined the accumulated heat stress (AH) and have developed the accumulated heat stress index (AHI) to quantify the strength of heat stress. AH represents the heat stress accumulated in a 72-h period calculated by the use of a time-weighted function, and the AHI is a standardized index developed by the use of an equiprobability transformation (from a fitted Weibull distribution to the standard normal distribution). To verify the advantage offered by the AHI, it was compared with four thermal indices the humidex, the heat index, the wet-bulb globe temperature, and the perceived temperature used by national governments. AH and the AHI were found to provide better detection of thermal danger and were more useful than other indices. In particular, AH and the AHI detect deaths that were caused not only by extremely hot and humid weather, but also by the persistence of moderately hot and humid weather (for example, consecutive daily maximum temperatures of 28-32 °C), which the other indices fail to detect.

  15. Nitrogen Starvation Induced Oxidative Stress in an Oil-Producing Green Alga Chlorella sorokiniana C3

    PubMed Central

    He, Chen-Liu; Wang, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microalgal lipid is one of the most promising feedstocks for biodiesel production. Chlorella appears to be a particularly good option, and nitrogen (N) starvation is an efficient environmental pressure used to increase lipid accumulation in Chlorella cells. The effects of N starvation of an oil-producing wild microalga, Chlorella sorokiniana C3, on lipid accumulation were investigated using thin layer chromatography (TLC), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and flow cytometry (FCM). The results showed that N starvation resulted in lipid accumulation in C. sorokiniana C3 cells, oil droplet (OD) formation and significant lipid accumulation in cells were detected after 2 d and 8 d of N starvation, respectively. During OD formation, reduced photosynthetic rate, respiration rate and photochemistry efficiency accompanied by increased damage to PSII were observed, demonstrated by chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence, 77K fluorescence and oxygen evolution tests. In the mean time the rate of cyclic electron transportation increased correspondingly to produce more ATP for triacylglycerols (TAGs) synthesis. And 0.5 d was found to be the turning point for the early stress response and acclimation of cells to N starvation. Increased level of membrane peroxidation was also observed during OD formation, and superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxide dismutase (POD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activity assays suggested impaired reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenging ability. Significant neutral lipid accumulation was also observed by artificial oxidative stress induced by H2O2 treatment. These results suggested coupled neutral lipid accumulation and oxidative stress during N starvation in C. sorokiniana C3. PMID:23874918

  16. Oxidative stress modulates theophylline effects on steroid responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Marwick, John A; Wallis, Gillian; Meja, Koremu; Kuster, Bernhard; Bouwmeester, Tewis; Chakravarty, Probir; Fletcher, Danielle; Whittaker, Paul A; Barnes, Peter J; Ito, Kazuhiro; Adcock, Ian M; Kirkham, Paul A

    2008-12-19

    Oxidative stress is a central factor in many chronic inflammatory diseases such as severe asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxidative stress reduces the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid action and may therefore contribute to the relative corticosteroid insensitivity seen in these diseases. Low concentrations of theophylline can restore the anti-inflammatory action of corticosteroids in oxidant exposed cells, however the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate that a low concentration of theophylline restores corticosteroid repression of pro-inflammatory mediator release and histone acetylation in oxidant exposed cells. Global gene expression analysis shows that theophylline regulates distinct pathways in naïve and oxidant exposed cells and reverses oxidant mediated modulated of pathways. Furthermore, quantitative chemoproteomics revealed that theophylline has few high affinity targets in naive cells but an elevated affinity in oxidant stressed cells. In conclusion, oxidative stress alters theophylline binding profile and gene expression which may result in restoration of corticosteroid function. PMID:18951874

  17. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL.

    PubMed

    Plaisance, Valérie; Brajkovic, Saška; Tenenbaum, Mathie; Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  18. Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Links Oxidative Stress to Impaired Pancreatic Beta-Cell Function Caused by Human Oxidized LDL

    PubMed Central

    Favre, Dimitri; Ezanno, Hélène; Bonnefond, Amélie; Bonner, Caroline; Gmyr, Valéry; Kerr-Conte, Julie; Gauthier, Benoit R.; Widmann, Christian; Waeber, Gérard; Pattou, François; Froguel, Philippe; Abderrahmani, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentration of the pro-atherogenic oxidized low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL) triggers adverse effects in pancreatic beta-cells and is associated with type 2 diabetes. Here, we investigated whether the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is a key player coupling oxidative stress to beta-cell dysfunction and death elicited by human oxidized LDL. We found that human oxidized LDL activates ER stress as evidenced by the activation of the inositol requiring 1α, and the elevated expression of both DDIT3 (also called CHOP) and DNAJC3 (also called P58IPK) ER stress markers in isolated human islets and the mouse insulin secreting MIN6 cells. Silencing of Chop and inhibition of ER stress markers by the chemical chaperone phenyl butyric acid (PBA) prevented cell death caused by oxidized LDL. Finally, we found that oxidative stress accounts for activation of ER stress markers induced by oxidized LDL. Induction of Chop/CHOP and p58IPK/P58IPK by oxidized LDL was mimicked by hydrogen peroxide and was blocked by co-treatment with the N-acetylcystein antioxidant. As a conclusion, the harmful effects of oxidized LDL in beta-cells requires ER stress activation in a manner that involves oxidative stress. This mechanism may account for impaired beta-cell function in diabetes and can be reversed by antioxidant treatment. PMID:27636901

  19. Matrix metalloproteinase gene expressions might be oxidative stress targets in gastric cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Gencer, Salih; Cebeci, Anil

    2013-01-01

    Objective Oxidative stress is linked to increased risk of gastric cancer and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are important in the invasion and metastasis of gastric cancer. We aimed to analyze the effect of the accumulation of oxidative stress in the gastric cancer MKN-45 and 23132/87 cells following hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) exposure on the expression patterns of MMP-1, MMP-3, MMP-7, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-11, MMP-12, MMP-14, MMP-15, MMP-17, MMP-23, MMP-28, and β-catenin genes. Methods The mRNA transcripts in the cells were determined by RT-PCR. Following H2O2 exposure, oxidative stress in the viable cells was analyzed by 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). Caffeic acid phenethyl ester (CAPE) was used to eliminate oxidative stress and the consequence of H2O2 exposure and its removal on the expressions of the genes were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Results The expressions of MMP-1, MMP-7, MMP-14, MMP-15, MMP-17 and β-catenin in MKN-45 cells and only the expression of MMP-15 in 23132/87 cells were increased. Removal of the oxidative stress resulted in decrease in the expressions of MMP genes of which the expressions were increased after H2O2 exposure. β-catenin, a transcription factor for many genes including MMPs, also displayed decreased levels of expression in both of the cell lines following CAPE treatment. Conclusions Our data suggest that there is a remarkable link between the accumulation of oxidative stress and the increased expressions of MMP genes in the gastric cancer cells and MMPs should be considered as potential targets of therapy in gastric cancers due to its continuous exposure to oxidative stress. PMID:23825909

  20. Effects of oxidative stress on erythrocyte deformability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, Rainer; Wasser, Gerd

    1996-05-01

    Hemolysis as a consequence of open heart surgery is well investigated and explained by the oxidative and/or mechanical stress produced, e.g. by the heart lung machine. In Europe O3 is widely used by physicians, dedicated to alternative medicine. They apply O3 mostly by means of the Major Autohematotherapy (MAH, a process of removing 50 - 100 ml of blood, adding O3 gas to it and returning it to the patient's body). No controlled studies on the efficacy of O3 are available so far, but several anecdotal cases appear to confirm that MAH improves microcirculation, possibly due to increased RBC flexibility. Most methods established to estimate RBC deformability are hard to standardize and include high error of measurement. For our present investigation we used the method of laser diffraction in combination with image analysis. The variation coefficient of the measurement is less than 1%. Previous investigations of our group have shown, that mechanical stress decreases deformability, already at rather low levels of mechanical stress which do not include hemolysis. On the other hand exposure to O2, H2O2 or O3 does not alter the deformability of RBC and--except O3--does not induce considerably hemolysis. However this only holds true if deformability (shear rates 36/s - 2620/s) is determined in isotonic solutions. In hypertonic solutions O3 decreases RBC deformability, but improves it in hypotonic solutions. The results indicate that peroxidative stress dehydrates RBC and reduces their size. To explain the positive effect of O3 on the mechanical fragility of RBC we tentatively assume, that the reduction of RBC size facilitates the feed through small pore filters. In consequence, the size reduction in combination with undisturbed deformability at iso-osmolarity may have a beneficial effect on microcirculation.

  1. Arsenic: toxicity, oxidative stress and human disease.

    PubMed

    Jomova, K; Jenisova, Z; Feszterova, M; Baros, S; Liska, J; Hudecova, D; Rhodes, C J; Valko, M

    2011-03-01

    Arsenic (As) is a toxic metalloid element that is present in air, water and soil. Inorganic arsenic tends to be more toxic than organic arsenic. Examples of methylated organic arsenicals include monomethylarsonic acid [MMA(V)] and dimethylarsinic acid [DMA(V)]. Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage is a common denominator in arsenic pathogenesis. In addition, arsenic induces morphological changes in the integrity of mitochondria. Cascade mechanisms of free radical formation derived from the superoxide radical, combined with glutathione-depleting agents, increase the sensitivity of cells to arsenic toxicity. When both humans and animals are exposed to arsenic, they experience an increased formation of ROS/RNS, including peroxyl radicals (ROO•), the superoxide radical, singlet oxygen, hydroxyl radical (OH•) via the Fenton reaction, hydrogen peroxide, the dimethylarsenic radical, the dimethylarsenic peroxyl radical and/or oxidant-induced DNA damage. Arsenic induces the formation of oxidized lipids which in turn generate several bioactive molecules (ROS, peroxides and isoprostanes), of which aldehydes [malondialdehyde (MDA) and 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE)] are the major end products. This review discusses aspects of chronic and acute exposures of arsenic in the etiology of cancer, cardiovascular disease (hypertension and atherosclerosis), neurological disorders, gastrointestinal disturbances, liver disease and renal disease, reproductive health effects, dermal changes and other health disorders. The role of antioxidant defence systems against arsenic toxicity is also discussed. Consideration is given to the role of vitamin C (ascorbic acid), vitamin E (α-tocopherol), curcumin, glutathione and antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase in their protective roles against arsenic-induced oxidative stress.

  2. Genetic variation of the weaning weight of beef cattle as a function of accumulated heat stress.

    PubMed

    Santana, M L; Bignardi, A B; Eler, J P; Ferraz, J B S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the genetic variation in the weaning weight (WW) of beef cattle as a function of heat stress. The WWs were recorded at approximately 205 days of age in three Brazilian beef cattle populations: Nelore (93,616), Brangus (18,906) and Tropical Composite (62,679). In view of the cumulative nature of WW, the effect of heat stress was considered as the accumulation of temperature and humidity index units (ACTHI) from the animal's birth to weaning. A reaction norm model was used to estimate the (co)variance components of WW across the ACTHI scale. The accumulation of THI units from birth to weaning negatively affected the WW. The definition of accumulated THI units as an environmental descriptor permitted to identify important genetic variation in the WW as a function of heat stress. As evidence of genotype by environment interaction, substantial heterogeneity was observed in the (co)variance components for WW across the environmental gradient. In this respect, the best animals in less stressful environments are not necessarily the best animals in more stressful environments. Furthermore, the response to selection for WW is expected to be lower in more stressful environments.

  3. Genetic variation of the weaning weight of beef cattle as a function of accumulated heat stress.

    PubMed

    Santana, M L; Bignardi, A B; Eler, J P; Ferraz, J B S

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the genetic variation in the weaning weight (WW) of beef cattle as a function of heat stress. The WWs were recorded at approximately 205 days of age in three Brazilian beef cattle populations: Nelore (93,616), Brangus (18,906) and Tropical Composite (62,679). In view of the cumulative nature of WW, the effect of heat stress was considered as the accumulation of temperature and humidity index units (ACTHI) from the animal's birth to weaning. A reaction norm model was used to estimate the (co)variance components of WW across the ACTHI scale. The accumulation of THI units from birth to weaning negatively affected the WW. The definition of accumulated THI units as an environmental descriptor permitted to identify important genetic variation in the WW as a function of heat stress. As evidence of genotype by environment interaction, substantial heterogeneity was observed in the (co)variance components for WW across the environmental gradient. In this respect, the best animals in less stressful environments are not necessarily the best animals in more stressful environments. Furthermore, the response to selection for WW is expected to be lower in more stressful environments. PMID:26061790

  4. The Oxidative Stress Product Carboxyethylpyrrole Potentiates TLR2/TLR1 Inflammatory Signaling in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Saeed, Ali M.; Duffort, Stephanie; Ivanov, Dmitry; Wang, Hua; Laird, James M.; Salomon, Robert G.; Cruz-Guilloty, Fernando; Perez, Victor L.

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress is key in the pathogenesis of several diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), atherosclerosis, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease. It has previously been established that a lipid peroxidation product, carboxyethylpyrrole (CEP), accumulates in the retinas of AMD patients. Retinal infiltrating macrophages also accumulate in the retinas of both AMD patients and in a murine model of AMD. We therefore investigated the ability of CEP-adducts to activate innate immune signaling in murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDMs). We found that CEP specifically synergizes with low-dose TLR2-agonists (but not agonists for other TLRs) to induce production of inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, CEP selectively augments TLR2/TLR1-signaling instead of TLR2/TLR6-signaling. These studies uncover a novel synergistic inflammatory relationship between an endogenously produced oxidation molecule and a pathogen-derived product, which may have implications in the AMD disease process and other oxidative stress-driven pathologies. PMID:25184331

  5. Loss of the oxidative stress sensor NPGPx compromises GRP78 chaperone activity and induces systemic disease

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Pei-Chi; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Su, Mei-I; Jiang, X-J; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Lo, Wen-Ting; Jeng, Yung-Ming; Wang, Ju-Ming; Chen, Phang-lang; Chang, Yi-Cheng; Lee, Kuo-Fen; Tsai, Ming-Daw; Shew, Jin-Yuh; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2013-01-01

    Summary NPGPx is a member of the glutathione peroxidase (GPx) family; however, it lacks GPx enzymatic activity due to the absence of a critical selenocysteine residue, rendering its function an enigma. We report that NPGPx is a novel stress sensor that transmits oxidative stress signals by transferring the disulfide bond between its Cys57 and Cys86 residues to downstream effectors. Oxidized NPGPx binds and oxidizes the chaperone glucose-regulated protein (GRP)78 in the endoplasmic reticulum through covalent bonding between Cys86 of NPGPx and Cys41/Cys420 of GRP78, and facilitates the refolding of misfolded proteins by GRP78 to alleviate stress. NPGPx-deficient cells display impaired GRP78 chaperone activity, accumulate misfolded proteins, and suffer oxidative stress. Complete loss of NPGPx in animals causes systemic oxidative stress, increases carcinogenesis, and shortens lifespan. These results, for the first time, suggest that NPGPx is essential for mediating the oxidative stress response by modulating GRP78 chaperone activity to maintain physiological homeostasis. PMID:23123197

  6. Copper Accumulation and Lipid Oxidation Precede Inflammation and Myelin Lesions in N,N-Diethyldithiocarbamate Peripheral Myelinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Viquez, Olga M.; Valentine, Holly L.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Milatovic, Dejan; Valentine, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture and medicine with new applications being actively investigated. One adverse effect of dithiocarbamates is the neurotoxicity observed in humans and experimental animals. Results from previous studies have suggested that dithiocarbamates elevate copper and promote lipid oxidation within myelin membranes. In the current study, copper levels, lipid oxidation, protein oxidative damage and markers of inflammation were monitored as a function of N,N-diethyldithiocarbmate (DEDC) exposure duration in an established model for DEDC-mediated myelinopathy in the rat. Intraabdominal administration of DEDC was performed using osmotic pumps for periods of 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Metals in brain, liver and tibial nerve were measured using ICP-MS and lipid oxidation assessed through HPLC measurement of malondialdehyde in tibial nerve, and GC/MS measurement of F2 isoprostanes in sciatic nerve. Protein oxidative injury of sciatic nerve proteins was evaluated through quantification of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts using immunoassay, and inflammation monitored by quantifying levels of IgGs and activated macrophages using immunoassay and immunhistochemistry methods, respectively. Changes in these parameters were then correlated to the onset of structural lesions, determined by light and electron microscopy, to delineate the temporal relationship of copper accumulation and oxidative stress in peripheral nerve to the onset of myelin lesions. The data provide evidence that DEDC mediates lipid oxidation and elevation of total copper in peripheral nerve well before myelin lesions or activated macrophages are evident. This relationship is consistent with copper-mediated oxidative stress contributing to the myelinopathy. PMID:18284930

  7. Copper accumulation and lipid oxidation precede inflammation and myelin lesions in N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate peripheral myelinopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Viquez, Olga M.; Valentine, Holly L.; Amarnath, Kalyani; Milatovic, Dejan; Valentine, William M.

    2008-05-15

    Dithiocarbamates have a wide spectrum of applications in industry, agriculture and medicine with new applications being actively investigated. One adverse effect of dithiocarbamates is the neurotoxicity observed in humans and experimental animals. Results from previous studies have suggested that dithiocarbamates elevate copper and promote lipid oxidation within myelin membranes. In the current study, copper levels, lipid oxidation, protein oxidative damage and markers of inflammation were monitored as a function of N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate (DEDC) exposure duration in an established model for DEDC-mediated myelinopathy in the rat. Intra-abdominal administration of DEDC was performed using osmotic pumps for periods of 2, 4, and 8 weeks. Metals in brain, liver and tibial nerve were measured using ICP-MS and lipid oxidation assessed through HPLC measurement of malondialdehyde in tibial nerve, and GC/MS measurement of F{sub 2} isoprostanes in sciatic nerve. Protein oxidative injury of sciatic nerve proteins was evaluated through quantification of 4-hydroxynonenal protein adducts using immunoassay, and inflammation monitored by quantifying levels of IgGs and activated macrophages using immunoassay and immunohistochemistry methods, respectively. Changes in these parameters were then correlated to the onset of structural lesions, determined by light and electron microscopy, to delineate the temporal relationship of copper accumulation and oxidative stress in peripheral nerve to the onset of myelin lesions. The data provide evidence that DEDC mediates lipid oxidation and elevation of total copper in peripheral nerve well before myelin lesions or activated macrophages are evident. This relationship is consistent with copper-mediated oxidative stress contributing to the myelinopathy.

  8. Is stress accumulating on the creeping section of the San Andreas fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, K. M.

    2013-12-01

    The creeping section of the San Andreas fault (CSAF) in central California is a proposed barrier to propagation of large earthquakes. Yet, recent studies show that the creeping section is not entirely uncoupled but is accumulating slip deficit at a rate equivalent to a Mw=7.2-7.4 earthquake every 150years. A critical piece to understanding earthquake potential on the CSAF is determining whether slip deficit is occurring with stress accumulation on stick‒slip regions or without stress accumulation on stable‒sliding regions shadowed by surrounding locked areas. We use a physical model to estimate the spatial distribution of locked, stress‒accumulating areas of the fault constrained by surface creep rate measurements and GPS‒derived velocities. We find that the area of the fault accumulating stress, if ruptured every 150years, would release slip equivalent to at most a Mw=6.75 earthquake, significantly less than the Mw=7.2-7.4, 150year equivalent total slip deficit rate.

  9. Indium and indium tin oxide induce endoplasmic reticulum stress and oxidative stress in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    PubMed

    Brun, Nadja Rebecca; Christen, Verena; Furrer, Gerhard; Fent, Karl

    2014-10-01

    Indium and indium tin oxide (ITO) are extensively used in electronic technologies. They may be introduced into the environment during production, use, and leaching from electronic devices at the end of their life. At present, surprisingly little is known about potential ecotoxicological implications of indium contamination. Here, molecular effects of indium nitrate (In(NO3)3) and ITO nanoparticles were investigated in vitro in zebrafish liver cells (ZFL) cells and in zebrafish embryos and novel insights into their molecular effects are provided. In(NO3)3 led to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response, induction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and induction of transcripts of pro-apoptotic genes and TNF-α in vitro at a concentration of 247 μg/L. In(NO3)3 induced the ER stress key gene BiP at mRNA and protein level, as well as atf6, which ultimately led to induction of the important pro-apoptotic marker gene chop. The activity of In(NO3)3 on ER stress induction was much stronger than that of ITO, which is explained by differences in soluble free indium ion concentrations. The effect was also stronger in ZFL cells than in zebrafish embryos. Our study provides first evidence of ER stress and oxidative stress induction by In(NO3)3 and ITO indicating a critical toxicological profile that needs further investigation.

  10. Oxidative stress, free radicals and protein peroxides.

    PubMed

    Gebicki, Janusz M

    2016-04-01

    Primary free radicals generated under oxidative stress in cells and tissues produce a cascade of reactive secondary radicals, which attack biomolecules with efficiency determined by the reaction rate constants and target concentration. Proteins are prominent targets because they constitute the bulk of the organic content of cells and tissues and react readily with many of the secondary radicals. The reactions commonly lead to the formation of carbon-centered radicals, which generally convert in vivo to peroxyl radicals and finally to semistable hydroperoxides. All of these intermediates can initiate biological damage. This article outlines the advantages of the application of ionizing radiations to studies of radicals, with particular reference to the generation of desired radicals, studies of the kinetics of their reactions and correlating the results with events in biological systems. In one such application, formation of protein hydroperoxides in irradiated cells was inhibited by the intracellular ascorbate and glutathione.

  11. Oxidative stress in normal and diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Torres, M D; Canal, J R; Pérez, C

    1999-01-01

    Parameters related to oxidative stress were studied in a group of 10 Wistar diabetic rats and 10 control rats. The levels of total erythrocyte catalase activity in the diabetic animals were significantly (p<0.001) greater than the control levels. The diabetic animals presented an amount of vitamin E far greater (p<0.0001) than the controls, as was also the case for the vitaminE/polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) and vitaminE/linoleic acid (C18:2) ratios. Greater vitaminE/triglyceride (TG) ratio, however, appeared in the control group. The corresponding vitamin A ratios (vitaminA/TG, vitaminA/PUFA, vitaminA/C 18:2) were higher in the control group. Our work corroborates the findings that fatty acid metabolism presents alterations in the diabetes syndrome and that the antioxidant status is affected. PMID:10523056

  12. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  13. Acrolein induces oxidative stress in brain mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jian; Shi, Riyi

    2005-02-01

    Acrolein, a byproduct of lipid peroxidation, has been shown to inflict significant structural and functional damage to isolated guinea pig spinal cord. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are thought to mediate such detrimental effects. The current study demonstrates that acrolein can directly stimulate mitochondrial oxidative stress. Specifically, exposure of purified brain mitochondria to acrolein resulted in a dose-dependent increase of ROS and decreases in glutathione content and aconitase activity. This effect was not accompanied by significant intramitochondrial calcium influx or mitochondrial permeability transition, but rather by impaired function of the mitochondrial electron transport system. As well, we detected a significant inhibition of mitochondrial adenine nucleotide translocase (ANT) in the presence of acrolein. This inhibition of ANT likely contributes to acrolein-induced ROS elevation since application of atractyloside, a specific ANT inhibitor, induced significant increase of ROS. We hypothesize that inhibition of ANT may mediate, in part, the acrolein-induced ROS increase in mitochondria.

  14. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Antonio; Di Segni, Chantal; Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Silvestrini, Andrea; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases.

  15. Thyroid Hormones, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Raimondo, Sebastiano; Olivieri, Giulio; Meucci, Elisabetta; Currò, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress (OS) are closely related processes, as well exemplified in obesity and cardiovascular diseases. OS is also related to hormonal derangement in a reciprocal way. Among the various hormonal influences that operate on the antioxidant balance, thyroid hormones play particularly important roles, since both hyperthyroidism and hypothyroidism have been shown to be associated with OS in animals and humans. In this context, the nonthyroidal illness syndrome (NTIS) that typically manifests as reduced conversion of thyroxine (T4) to triiodothyronine (T3) in different acute and chronic systemic conditions is still a debated topic. The pathophysiological mechanisms of this syndrome are reviewed, together with the roles of deiodinases, the enzymes responsible for the conversion of T4 to T3, in both physiological and pathological situations. The presence of OS indexes in NTIS supports the hypothesis that it represents a condition of hypothyroidism at the tissue level and not only an adaptive mechanism to diseases. PMID:27051079

  16. Sertraline accumulation and effects in the estuarine decapod Carcinus maenas: importance of the history of exposure to chemical stress.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Aurélie P; Santos, Lúcia H M L M; Ramalhosa, Maria João; Delerue-Matos, Cristina; Guimarães, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Sertraline is widely prescribed worldwide and frequently detected in aquatic systems. There is, however, a remarkable gap of information on its potential impact on estuarine and coastal invertebrates. This study investigated sertraline accumulation and effects in Carcinus maenas. Crabs from a moderately contaminated (Lima) and a low-impacted (Minho) estuary were exposed to environmental and high levels of sertraline (0.05, 5, 500 μg L(-1)). A battery of biomarkers related to sertraline mode of action was employed to assess neurotransmission, energy metabolism, biotransformation and oxidative stress pathways. After a seven-day exposure, sertraline accumulation in crabs' soft tissues was found in Lima (5 μg L(-1): 15.3 ng L(-1) ww; 500 μg L(-1): 1010 ng L(-1) ww) and Minho (500 μg L(-1): 605 ng L(-1) ww) animals. Lima crabs were also more sensitive to sertraline than those from Minho, exhibiting decreased acetylcholinesterase activity, indicative of ventilatory and locomotory dysfunction, inhibition of anti-oxidant enzymes and increased oxidative damage at ≥ 0.05 μg L(-1). The Integrated Biomarker Response (IBR) index indicated their low health status. In addition, Minho crabs showed non-monotonic responses of acetylcholinesterase suggestive of hormesis. The results pointed an influence of the exposure history on differential sensitivity to sertraline and the need to perform evaluations with site-specific ecological receptors to increase relevance of risk estimations when extrapolating from laboratory to field conditions. PMID:25305364

  17. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-11-02

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed.

  18. The Role of Oxidative Stress and Antioxidants in Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sha; Tan, Hor-Yue; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Zhang-Jin; Lao, Lixing; Wong, Chi-Woon; Feng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    A complex antioxidant system has been developed in mammals to relieve oxidative stress. However, excessive reactive species derived from oxygen and nitrogen may still lead to oxidative damage to tissue and organs. Oxidative stress has been considered as a conjoint pathological mechanism, and it contributes to initiation and progression of liver injury. A lot of risk factors, including alcohol, drugs, environmental pollutants and irradiation, may induce oxidative stress in liver, which in turn results in severe liver diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease and non-alcoholic steatohepatitis. Application of antioxidants signifies a rational curative strategy to prevent and cure liver diseases involving oxidative stress. Although conclusions drawn from clinical studies remain uncertain, animal studies have revealed the promising in vivo therapeutic effect of antioxidants on liver diseases. Natural antioxidants contained in edible or medicinal plants often possess strong antioxidant and free radical scavenging abilities as well as anti-inflammatory action, which are also supposed to be the basis of other bioactivities and health benefits. In this review, PubMed was extensively searched for literature research. The keywords for searching oxidative stress were free radicals, reactive oxygen, nitrogen species, anti-oxidative therapy, Chinese medicines, natural products, antioxidants and liver diseases. The literature, including ours, with studies on oxidative stress and anti-oxidative therapy in liver diseases were the focus. Various factors that cause oxidative stress in liver and effects of antioxidants in the prevention and treatment of liver diseases were summarized, questioned, and discussed. PMID:26540040

  19. Strategies for Reducing or Preventing the Generation of Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Poljsak, B.

    2011-01-01

    The reduction of oxidative stress could be achieved in three levels: by lowering exposure to environmental pollutants with oxidizing properties, by increasing levels of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants, or by lowering the generation of oxidative stress by stabilizing mitochondrial energy production and efficiency. Endogenous oxidative stress could be influenced in two ways: by prevention of ROS formation or by quenching of ROS with antioxidants. However, the results of epidemiological studies where people were treated with synthetic antioxidants are inconclusive and contradictory. Recent evidence suggests that antioxidant supplements (although highly recommended by the pharmaceutical industry and taken by many individuals) do not offer sufficient protection against oxidative stress, oxidative damage or increase the lifespan. The key to the future success of decreasing oxidative-stress-induced damage should thus be the suppression of oxidative damage without disrupting the wellintegrated antioxidant defense network. Approach to neutralize free radicals with antioxidants should be changed into prevention of free radical formation. Thus, this paper addresses oxidative stress and strategies to reduce it with the focus on nutritional and psychosocial interventions of oxidative stress prevention, that is, methods to stabilize mitochondria structure and energy efficiency, or approaches which would increase endogenous antioxidative protection and repair systems. PMID:22191011

  20. Oxidative stress decreases with elevation in the lizard Psammodromus algirus.

    PubMed

    Reguera, Senda; Zamora-Camacho, Francisco J; Trenzado, Cristina E; Sanz, Ana; Moreno-Rueda, Gregorio

    2014-06-01

    Oxidative stress is considered one of the main ecological and evolutionary forces. Several environmental stressors vary geographically and thus organisms inhabiting different sites face different oxidant environments. Nevertheless, there is scarce information about how oxidative damage and antioxidant defences vary geographically in animals. Here we study how oxidative stress varies from lowlands (300-700 m asl) to highlands (2200-2500 m asl) in the lizard Psammodromus algirus. To accomplish this, antioxidant enzymatic activity (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase, glutathione transferase, DT-diaphorase) and lipid peroxidation were assayed in tissue samples from the lizards' tail. Lipid peroxidation was higher in individuals from lowlands than from highlands, indicating higher oxidative stress in lowland lizards. These results suggest that environmental conditions are less oxidant at high elevations with respect to low ones. Therefore, our study shows that oxidative stress varies geographically, which should have important consequences for our understanding of geographic variation in physiology and life-history of organisms.

  1. [Carbonyl stress and oxidatively modified proteins in chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Bargnoux, A-S; Morena, M; Badiou, S; Dupuy, A-M; Canaud, B; Cristol, J-P

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly observed in chronic renal failure patients resulting from an unbalance between overproduction of reactive oxygen species and impairement of defense mechanisms. Proteins appear as potential targets of uremia-induced oxidative stress and may undergo qualitative modifications. Proteins could be directly modified by reactive oxygen species which leads to amino acid oxydation and cross-linking. Proteins could be indirectly modified by reactive carbonyl compounds produced by glycoxidation and lipo-peroxidation. The resulting post-traductional modifications are known as carbonyl stress. In addition, thiols could be oxidized or could react with homocystein leading to homocysteinylation. Finally, tyrosin could be oxidized by myeloperoxidase leading to advanced oxidative protein products (AOPP). Oxidatively modified proteins are increased in chronic renal failure patients and may contribute to exacerbate the oxidative stress/inflammation syndrome. They have been involved in long term complications of uremia such as amyloidosis and accelerated atherosclerosis. PMID:19297289

  2. Sport and oxidative stress in oncological patients.

    PubMed

    Knop, K; Schwan, R; Bongartz, M; Bloch, W; Brixius, K; Baumann, F

    2011-12-01

    Oxidative stress is thought to be an important factor in the onset, progression and recurrence of cancer. In order to investigate how it is influenced by physical activity, we measured oxidative stress and antioxidative capacity (aoC) in 12 women with breast cancer and 6 men with prostate cancer, before and after long hiking trips. Before the hike, the men had a ROS-concentration of 1.8±0.6 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 0.7±0.6 mM Trolox-equivalent (Tro), while the women had a ROS-concentration of 3.1±0.7 mM H2O2 and an aoC of 1.2±0.2 mM Tro. After the hike, women showed no significant change in ROS and a significant increase in aoC (1.3±0.2 mM Tro), while the ROS concentration in men increased significantly (2.1±0.3 mM H2O2) and their aoC decreased (0.25±0.1 mM Tro). After a regenerative phase, the ROS concentration of the men decreased to 1.7±0.4 mM H2O2 and their aoC recovered significantly (1.2±0.4 mM Tro), while the women presented no significant change in the concentration of H2O2 but showed an ulterior increase in antioxidant capacity (2.05±0.43 mM Tro). From this data we conclude that physical training programs as for example long distance hiking trips can improve the aoC in the blood of oncological patients.

  3. Anti-Oxidative Defences Are Modulated Differentially in Three Freshwater Teleosts in Response to Ammonia-Induced Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Giblen, Terri; Zinta, Gaurav; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA) were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h–48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h–180 h); which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant

  4. Anti-oxidative defences are modulated differentially in three freshwater teleosts in response to ammonia-induced oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Amit Kumar; AbdElgawad, Hamada; Giblen, Terri; Zinta, Gaurav; De Rop, Michelle; Asard, Han; Blust, Ronny; De Boeck, Gudrun

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the antioxidant response induced by high environmental ammonia (HEA) were investigated in the liver and gills of three freshwater teleosts differing in their sensitivities to ammonia. The highly ammonia-sensitive salmonid Oncorhynchus mykiss (rainbow trout), the less ammonia sensitive cyprinid Cyprinus carpio (common carp) and the highly ammonia-resistant cyprinid Carassius auratus (goldfish) were exposed to 1 mM ammonia (as NH4HCO3) for 0 h (control), 3 h, 12 h, 24 h, 48 h, 84 h and 180 h. Results show that HEA exposure increased ammonia accumulation significantly in the liver of all the three fish species from 24 h-48 h onwards which was associated with an increment in oxidative stress, evidenced by elevation of xanthine oxidase activity and levels of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Unlike in trout, H2O2 and MDA accumulation in carp and goldfish liver was restored to control levels (84 h-180 h); which was accompanied by a concomitant increase in superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase activity and reduced ascorbate content. Many of these defence parameters remained unaffected in trout liver, while components of the glutathione redox cycle (reduced glutathione, glutathione peroxidase and glutathione reductase) enhanced to a greater extent. The present findings suggest that trout rely mainly on glutathione dependent defensive mechanism while carp utilize SOD, CAT and ascorbate as anti-oxidative sentinels. Hepatic cells of goldfish appear to utilize each of these protective systems, and showed more effective anti-oxidative compensatory responses towards HEA than carp, while trout were least effective. The present work also indicates that HEA exposure resulted in a relatively mild oxidative stress in the gills of all three species. This probably explains the almost complete lack of anti-oxidative responses in branchial tissue. This research suggests that oxidative stress, as well as the antioxidant

  5. Accumulation of inorganic polyphosphate enables stress endurance and catalytic vigour in Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accumulation of inorganic polyphosphate (polyP), a persistent trait throughout the whole Tree of Life, is claimed to play a fundamental role in enduring environmental insults in a large variety of microorganisms. The share of polyP in the tolerance of the soil bacterium Pseudomonas putida KT2440 to a suite of physicochemical stresses has been studied on the background of its capacity as a host of oxidative biotransformations. Results Cells lacking polyphosphate kinase (Ppk), which expectedly presented a low intracellular polyP level, were more sensitive to a number of harsh external conditions such as ultraviolet irradiation, addition of β-lactam antibiotics and heavy metals (Cd2+ and Cu2+). Other phenotypes related to a high-energy phosphate load (e.g., swimming) were substantially weakened as well. Furthermore, the ppk mutant was consistently less tolerant to solvents and its survival in stationary phase was significantly affected. In contrast, the major metabolic routes were not significantly influenced by the loss of Ppk as diagnosed from respiration patterns of the mutant in phenotypic microarrays. However, the catalytic vigour of the mutant decreased to about 50% of that in the wild-type strain as estimated from the specific growth rate of cells carrying the catabolic TOL plasmid pWW0 for m-xylene biodegradation. The catalytic phenotype of the mutant was restored by over-expressing ppk in trans. Some of these deficits could be explained by the effect of the ppk mutation on the expression profile of the rpoS gene, the stationary phase sigma factor, which was revealed by the analysis of a PrpoS → rpoS‘-’lacZ translational fusion. Still, every stress-related effect of lacking Ppk in P. putida was relatively moderate as compared to some of the conspicuous phenotypes reported for other bacteria. Conclusions While polyP can be involved in a myriad of cellular functions, the polymer seems to play a relatively secondary role in the genetic and

  6. Traumatic stress, oxidative stress and posttraumatic stress disorder: neurodegeneration and the accelerated-aging hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Mark W.; Sadeh, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with elevated risk for a variety of age-related diseases and neurodegeneration. In this paper, we review evidence relevant to the hypothesis that chronic PTSD constitutes a form of persistent life stress that potentiates oxidative stress (OXS) and accelerates cellular aging. We provide an overview of empirical studies that have examined the effects of psychological stress on OXS, discuss the stress-perpetuating characteristics of PTSD, and then identify mechanisms by which PTSD might promote OXS and accelerated aging. We review studies on OXS-related genes and the role that they may play in moderating the effects of PTSD on neural integrity and conclude with a discussion of directions for future research on antioxidant treatments and biomarkers of accelerated aging in PTSD. PMID:25245500

  7. Nitric oxide and reactive oxygen species regulate the accumulation of heat shock proteins in tomato leaves in response to heat shock and pathogen infection.

    PubMed

    Piterková, Jana; Luhová, Lenka; Mieslerová, Barbora; Lebeda, Aleš; Petřivalský, Marek

    2013-06-01

    Heat shock proteins (HSP) are produced in response to various stress stimuli to prevent cell damage. We evaluated the involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the accumulation of Hsp70 proteins in tomato leaves induced by abiotic and biotic stress stimuli. A model system of leaf discs was used with two tomato genotypes, Solanum lycopersicum cv. Amateur and Solanum chmielewskii, differing in their resistance to fungal pathogen Oidium neolycopersici. Leaf discs were exposed to stress factors as heat shock and pathogen infection alone or in a combination, and treated with substances modulating endogenous NO and ROS levels. Two proteins of Hsp70 family were detected in stressed tomato leaf discs: a heat-inducible 72 kDa protein and a constitutive 75 kDa protein. The pathogenesis and mechanical stress influenced Hsp75 accumulation, whereas heat stress induced mainly Hsp72 production. Treatment with NO donor and NO scavenger significantly modulated the level of Hsp70 in variable manner related to the genotype resistance. Hsp70 accumulation correlated with endogenous NO level in S. lycopersicum and ROS levels in S. chmielewskii. We conclude NO and ROS are involved in the regulation of Hsp70 production and accumulation under abiotic and biotic stresses in dependence on plant ability to trigger its defence mechanisms. PMID:23602099

  8. Brain imaging for oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Okazawa, H; Ikawa, M; Tsujikawa, T; Kiyono, Y; Yoneda, M

    2014-12-01

    Oxidative stress, one of the most probable molecular mechanisms for neuronal impairment, is reported to occur in the affected brain regions of various neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, many studies showed evidence of a link between oxidative stress or mitochondrial damage and neuronal degeneration. Basic in vitro experiments and postmortem studies demonstrated that biomarkers for oxidative damage can be observed in the pathogenic regions of the brain and the affected neurons. Model animal studies also showed oxidative damage associated with neuronal degeneration. The molecular imaging method with positron emission tomography (PET) is expected to delineate oxidatively stressed microenvironments to elucidate pathophysiological changes of the in vivo brain; however, only a few studies have successfully demonstrated enhanced stress in patients. Radioisotope copper labeled diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM) may be the most promising candidate for this oxidative stress imaging. The tracer is usually known as a hypoxic tissue imaging PET probe, but the accumulation mechanism is based on the electron rich environment induced by mitochondrial impairment and/or microsomal over-reduction, and thus it is considered to represent the oxidative stress state correlated with the degree of disease severity. In this review, Cu-ATSM PET is introduced in detail from the basics to practical methods in clinical studies, as well as recent clinical studies on cerebrovascular diseases and neurodegenerative diseases. Several other PET probes are also introduced from the point of view of neuronal oxidative stress imaging. These molecular imaging methods should be promising tools to reveal oxidative injuries in various brain diseases.

  9. Oxidative and nitrative stress in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Cobb, Catherine A; Cole, Marsha P

    2015-12-01

    Aerobes require oxygen for metabolism and normal free radical formation. As a result, maintaining the redox homeostasis is essential for brain cell survival due to their high metabolic energy requirement to sustain electrochemical gradients, neurotransmitter release, and membrane lipid stability. Further, brain antioxidant levels are limited compared to other organs and less able to compensate for reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS/RNS) generation which contribute oxidative/nitrative stress (OS/NS). Antioxidant treatments such as vitamin E, minocycline, and resveratrol mediate neuroprotection by prolonging the incidence of or reversing OS and NS conditions. Redox imbalance occurs when the antioxidant capacity is overwhelmed, consequently leading to activation of alternate pathways that remain quiescent under normal conditions. If OS/NS fails to lead to adaptation, tissue damage and injury ensue, resulting in cell death and/or disease. The progression of OS/NS-mediated neurodegeneration along with contributions from microglial activation, dopamine metabolism, and diabetes comprise a detailed interconnected pathway. This review proposes a significant role for OS/NS and more specifically, lipid peroxidation (LPO) and other lipid modifications, by triggering microglial activation to elicit a neuroinflammatory state potentiated by diabetes or abnormal dopamine metabolism. Subsequently, sustained stress in the neuroinflammatory state overwhelms cellular defenses and prompts neurotoxicity resulting in the onset or amplification of brain damage. PMID:26024962

  10. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Domej, W; Földes-Papp, Z; Flögel, E; Haditsch, B

    2006-04-01

    The respiratory tract as the main entrance for various inhalative substances has great potential to generate reactive species directly or indirectly in excess. Thus, heavy smokers are at high risk for development, impairment and failed response to treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The article is an update regarding the influence of reactive oxygen (ROS) and nitrogen (RNS) species on COPD; however, we do not intend to describe ROS and RNS actions on the entire lung tissue. Here, we focus on the airways, because in human most of the described effects of ROS and RNS species are measured on respiratory epithelial cells obtained by bronchoscopy. ROS and RNS species are physiological compounds in cells and risk factors for several respiratory diseases. In general, both kinds of species are thermodynamically stabile, but their reaction behaviors in cellular environments are very different. For example, the life times of the superoxide anion radical range from micro/milliseconds up to minutes and even hours in in-vitro model systems. Oxidative stress by cigarette smoke was investigated in detail by the authors of this article. In addition, original studies by the authors on the amount of fine particulate matter and trace elements in lung biopsies after defined inhalation indicate a distortion of the equilibrium between oxidants and antioxidants. We also try to present some modern views with respect to genomic medicine for future therapeutic perspectives, although this is an upcoming sector of COPD therapy. PMID:16724946

  11. Correlation of Zinc with Oxidative Stress Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    Morales-Suárez-Varela, María; Llopis-González, Agustín; González-Albert, Verónica; López-Izquierdo, Raúl; González-Manzano, Isabel; Cháves, Javier; Huerta-Biosca, Vicente; Martin-Escudero, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Hypertension and smoking are related with oxidative stress (OS), which in turn reports on cellular aging. Zinc is an essential element involved in an individual’s physiology. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relation of zinc levels in serum and urine with OS and cellular aging and its effect on the development of hypertension. In a Spanish sample with 1500 individuals, subjects aged 20–59 years were selected, whose zinc intake levels fell within the recommended limits. These individuals were classified according to their smoking habits and hypertensive condition. A positive correlation was found (Pearson’s C = 0.639; p = 0.01) between Zn serum/urine quotient and oxidized glutathione levels (GSSG). Finally, risk of hypertension significantly increased when the GSSG levels exceeded the 75 percentile; OR = 2.80 (95%CI = 1.09–7.18) and AOR = 3.06 (95%CI = 0.96–9.71). Low zinc levels in serum were related with OS and cellular aging and were, in turn, to be a risk factor for hypertension.  PMID:25774936

  12. p66Shc-generated Oxidative Signal Promotes Fat Accumulation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Berniakovich, Ina; Trinei, Mirella; Stendardo, Massimo; Migliaccio, Enrica; Minucci, Saverio; Bernardi, Paolo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe; Giorgio, Marco

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and insulin signaling in the adipose tissue are critical determinants of aging and age-associated diseases. It is not clear, however, if they represent independent factors or they are mechanistically linked. We investigated the effects of ROS on insulin signaling using as model system the p66Shc-null mice. p66Shc is a redox enzyme that generates mitochondrial ROS and promotes aging in mammals. We report that insulin activates the redox enzyme activity of p66Shc specifically in adipocytes and that p66Shc-generated ROS regulate insulin signaling through multiple mechanisms, including AKT phosphorylation, Foxo localization, and regulation of selected insulin target genes. Deletion of p66Shc resulted in increased mitochondrial uncoupling and reduced triglyceride accumulation in adipocytes and in vivo increased metabolic rate and decreased fat mass and resistance to diet-induced obesity. In addition, p66Shc-/- mice showed impaired thermo-insulation. These findings demonstrate that p66Shc-generated ROS regulate the effect of insulin on the energetic metabolism in mice and suggest that intracellular oxidative stress might accelerate aging by favoring fat deposition and fat-related disorders. PMID:18838380

  13. Sudden infant death syndrome: oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Reid, G M; Tervit, H

    1999-06-01

    In studies of oxidative stress in sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) there were two major findings: (1) During normal post-natal development, there was a gradual decline in the number of Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSHPx) immunoreactive neurons in the hippocampus and parahippocampus gyrus in the brain; (2) The total number of immunoreactive neurons was elevated in SIDS victims compared to age-matched controls in infants 6 months of age and under (1). SOD and neuronal aging and degeneration in the hippocampus and neocortex were features of SIDS, Alzheimer's disease and Down's syndrome. In the SIDS study of infants from 3-6 months of age, the elevation of SOD in SIDS victims was significant, whereas no significant elevation of GSHPx was detected. An imbalance between SOD and GSHPx was said to be crucial in the prevention of toxicity of free radicals (1). Zinc-deficient cells cannot up-regulate gene expression of the scavenger enzymes SOD and GSHPx in cells exposed to high levels of superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (2). GSHPx coupled to reduced nicotine adenine diphosphate (NADPH) regenerating systems via glutathione reductase is virtually able to guarantee an effective protection of biological structures against oxidative attack (22). When the capacity of the cell to regenerate GSH is exceeded - primarily due to an insufficient supply of NADPH-oxidised glutathione (GSSG) is released from the cell and protein synthesis turns off (20). We hypothesize that the increased incidence of aging and neuronal death and increased incidence of SOD and GSHPx reactive neurons in early post-natal development indicates an increased up-regulation of gene expression of scavenger enzymes during high exposure to oxidative stress after birth. GSH-dependent peroxide metabolism is linked to the pentose phosphate shunt via NADPH-dependent glutathione reductase (GR). GSHPx is a selenium containing enzyme which together with catalase (CAT) SOD and vitamin E

  14. Altered Gravity Induces Oxidative Stress in Drosophila Melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharya, Sharmila; Hosamani, Ravikumar

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity environments can induce increased oxidative stress in biological systems. Microarray data from our previous spaceflight experiment (FIT experiment on STS-121) indicated significant changes in the expression of oxidative stress genes in adult fruit flies after spaceflight. Currently, our lab is focused on elucidating the role of hypergravity-induced oxidative stress and its impact on the nervous system in Drosophila melanogaster. Biochemical, molecular, and genetic approaches were combined to study this effect on the ground. Adult flies (2-3 days old) exposed to acute hypergravity (3g, for 1 hour and 2 hours) showed significantly elevated levels of Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) in fly brains compared to control samples. This data was supported by significant changes in mRNA expression of specific oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes. As anticipated, a stress-resistant mutant line, Indy302, was less vulnerable to hypergravity-induced oxidative stress compared to wild-type flies. Survival curves were generated to study the combined effect of hypergravity and pro-oxidant treatment. Interestingly, many of the oxidative stress changes that were measured in flies showed sex specific differences. Collectively, our data demonstrate that altered gravity significantly induces oxidative stress in Drosophila, and that one of the organs where this effect is evident is the brain.

  15. Curcumin alleviates oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Daverey, Amita; Agrawal, Sandeep K

    2016-10-01

    Oxidative stress plays a critical role in various neurodegenerative diseases, thus alleviating oxidative stress is a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention and/or prevention of neurodegenerative diseases. In the present study, alleviation of oxidative stress through curcumin is investigated in A172 (human glioblastoma cell line) and HA-sp (human astrocytes cell line derived from the spinal cord) astrocytes. H2O2 was used to induce oxidative stress in astrocytes (A172 and HA-sp). Data show that H2O2 induces activation of astrocytes in dose- and time-dependent manner as evident by increased expression of GFAP in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24 and 12h respectively. An upregulation of Prdx6 was also observed in A172 and HA-sp cells after 24h of H2O2 treatment as compared to untreated control. Our data also showed that curcumin inhibits oxidative stress-induced cytoskeleton disarrangement, and impedes the activation of astrocytes by inhibiting upregulation of GFAP, vimentin and Prdx6. In addition, we observed an inhibition of oxidative stress-induced inflammation, apoptosis and mitochondria fragmentation after curcumin treatment. Therefore, our results suggest that curcumin not only protects astrocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress but also reverses the mitochondrial damage and dysfunction induced by oxidative stress. This study also provides evidence for protective role of curcumin on astrocytes by showing its effects on attenuating reactive astrogliosis and inhibiting apoptosis.

  16. Protein Sulfenylation: A Novel Readout of Environmental Oxidant Stress

    EPA Science Inventory

    Oxidative stress is a commonly cited mechanism of toxicity of environmental agents. Ubiquitous environmental chemicals such as the diesel exhaust component 1,2-naphthoquinone (1,2-NQ)induce oxidative stress by redox cycling, which generates hydrogen peroxide (H202). Cysteinylthio...

  17. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation. PMID:27025055

  18. FREE RADICALS, REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES, OXIDATIVE STRESSES AND THEIR CLASSIFICATIONS.

    PubMed

    Lushchak, V I

    2015-01-01

    The phrases "free radicals" and "reactive oxygen species" (ROS) are frequently used interchangeably although this is not always correct. This article gives a brief description of two mentioned oxygen forms. During the first two-three decades after ROS discovery in biological systems (1950-1970 years) they were considered only as damaging agents, but later their involvement in organism protection and regulation of the expression of certain genes was found. The physiological state of increased steady-state ROS level along with certain physiological effects has been called oxidative stress. This paper describes ROS homeostasis and provides several classifications of oxidative stresses. The latter are based on time-course and intensity principles. Therefore distinguishing between acute and chronic stresses on the basis of the dynamics, and the basal oxidative stress, low intensity oxidative stress, strong oxidative stress, and finally a very strong oxidative stress based on the intensity of the action of the inductor of the stress are described. Potential areas of research include the development of this field with complex classification of oxidative stresses, an accurate identification of cellular targets of ROS action, determination of intracellular spatial and temporal distribution of ROS and their effects, deciphering the molecular mechanisms responsible for cell response to ROS attacks, and their participation in the normal cellular functions, i.e. cellular homeostasis and its regulation.

  19. Melatonin protects against oxidative stress caused by delta-aminolevulinic acid: implications for cancer reduction.

    PubMed

    Karbownik, Małgorzata; Reiter, Russel J

    2002-01-01

    delta-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) is a precursor of haem. The increased concentration of ALA is typically related to acute intermittent porphyria, hereditary tyrosinemia, and lead poisoning. delta-Aminolevulinic acid produced in excess accumulates in a number of organs, causes oxidative damage, and often leads to cancer. Melatonin (N-acetyl-5-methoxytryptamine) is a well-known antioxidant, free radical scavenger, and exhibits anticarcinogenic properties. It protects DNA, lipids, and proteins from oxidative damage. The protective effects of melatonin against ALA-induced oxidation of guanine bases, lipid peroxidation, and alterations in membrane fluidity in several organs have been documented. There is an inverse relationship between melatonin and ALA concentrations in both experimental and clinical conditions of porphyria. The marked efficacy of melatonin in protecting against ALA-related oxidative stress, its oncostatic properties, and low toxicity constitute reasons to consider the use of this indoleamine as a co-treatment in patients suffering from disturbances related to ALA accumulation.

  20. Plasma deuterium oxide accumulation following ingestion of different carbohydrate beverages.

    PubMed

    Currell, Kevin; Urch, Joanna; Cerri, Erika; Jentjens, Roy L P; Blannin, Andy K; Jeukendrup, Asker E

    2008-12-01

    Optimal fluid delivery from carbohydrate solutions such as oral rehydration solutions or sports drinks is essential. The aim of the study was to investigate whether a beverage containing glucose and fructose would result in greater fluid delivery than a beverage containing glucose alone. Six male subjects were recruited (average age (+/-SD): 22 +/- 2 y). Subjects entered the laboratory between 0700 h and 0900 h after an overnight fast. A 600 mL bolus of 1 of the 3 experimental beverages was then given. The experimental beverages were water (W), 75 g glucose (G), or 50 g glucose and 25 g fructose (GF); each beverage also contained 3.00 g of D2O. Following administration of the experimental beverage subjects remained in a seated position for 180 min. Blood and saliva samples were then taken every 5 min in the first hour and every 15 min thereafter. Plasma and saliva samples were analyzed for deuterium enrichment by isotope ratio mass spectrometry. Deuterium oxide enrichments were compared using a 2-way repeated measures analysis of variance. The water trial (33 +/- 3 min) showed a significantly shorter time to peak than either G (82 +/- 40 min) or GF (59 +/- 25 min), but the difference between G and GF did not reach statistical significance. There was a significantly greater AUC for GF (55 673 +/- 10 020 delta per thousand vs. Vienna Standard Mean Ocean Water (VSMOW).180 min) and W (60 497 +/- 9864 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min) compared with G (46 290 +/- 9622 delta per thousand vs. VSMOW.180 min); W and GF were not significantly different from each other. These data suggest that a 12.5% carbohydrate beverage containing glucose and fructose results in more rapid fluid delivery in the first 75 min than a beverage containing glucose alone.

  1. Molecular basis for arsenic-induced alteration in nitric oxide production and oxidative stress: implication of endothelial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kumagai, Yoshito; Pi, Jingbo

    2004-08-01

    Accumulated epidemiological studies have suggested that prolonged exposure of humans to arsenic in drinking water is associated with vascular diseases. The exact mechanism of how this occurs currently unknown. Nitric oxide (NO), formed by endothelial NO synthase (eNOS), plays a crucial role in the vascular system. Decreased availability of biologically active NO in the endothelium is implicated in the pathophysiology of several vascular diseases and inhibition of eNOS by arsenic is one of the proposed mechanism s for arsenic-induced vascular diseases. In addition, during exposure to arsenic, overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can occur, resulting in oxidative stress, which is another major risk factor for vascular dysfunction. The molecular basis for decreased NO levels and increased oxidative stress during arsenic exposure is poorly understood. In this article, evidence for arsenic-mediated alteration in NO production and oxidative stress is reviewed. The results of a cross-sectional study in an endemic area of chronic arsenic poisoning and experimental animal studies to elucidate a potential mechanism for the impairment of NO formation and oxidative stress caused by prolonged exposure to arsenate in the drinking water are also reviewed.

  2. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  3. Oxidative stress-induced autophagy: Role in pulmonary toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Malaviya, Rama; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Laskin, Debra L.

    2014-03-01

    Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved catabolic process important in regulating the turnover of essential proteins and in elimination of damaged organelles and protein aggregates. Autophagy is observed in the lung in response to oxidative stress generated as a consequence of exposure to environmental toxicants. Whether autophagy plays role in promoting cell survival or cytotoxicity is unclear. In this article recent findings on oxidative stress-induced autophagy in the lung are reviewed; potential mechanisms initiating autophagy are also discussed. A better understanding of autophagy and its role in pulmonary toxicity may lead to the development of new strategies to treat lung injury associated with oxidative stress. - Highlights: • Exposure to pulmonary toxicants is associated with oxidative stress. • Oxidative stress is known to induce autophagy. • Autophagy is upregulated in the lung following exposure to pulmonary toxicants. • Autophagy may be protective or pathogenic.

  4. OGG1 is essential in oxidative stress induced DNA demethylation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaolong; Zhuang, Ziheng; Wang, Wentao; He, Lingfeng; Wu, Huan; Cao, Yan; Pan, Feiyan; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Zhigang; Sekhar, Chandra; Guo, Zhigang

    2016-09-01

    DNA demethylation is an essential cellular activity to regulate gene expression; however, the mechanism that triggers DNA demethylation remains unknown. Furthermore, DNA demethylation was recently demonstrated to be induced by oxidative stress without a clear molecular mechanism. In this manuscript, we demonstrated that 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase-1 (OGG1) is the essential protein involved in oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation. Oxidative stress induced the formation of 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). We found that OGG1, the 8-oxoG binding protein, promotes DNA demethylation by interacting and recruiting TET1 to the 8-oxoG lesion. Downregulation of OGG1 makes cells resistant to oxidative stress-induced DNA demethylation, while over-expression of OGG1 renders cells susceptible to DNA demethylation by oxidative stress. These data not only illustrate the importance of base excision repair (BER) in DNA demethylation but also reveal how the DNA demethylation signal is transferred to downstream DNA demethylation enzymes.

  5. Nanoparticles, Lung Injury, and the Role of Oxidant Stress

    PubMed Central

    Madl, Amy K.; Plummer, Laurel E.; Carosino, Christopher; Pinkerton, Kent E.

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of engineered nanoscale materials has provided significant advancements in electronic, biomedical, and material science applications. Both engineered nanoparticles and nanoparticles derived from combustion or incidental processes exhibit a range of physical and chemical properties, which have been shown to induce inflammation and oxidative stress in biologic systems. Oxidative stress reflects the imbalance between the generation of reaction oxygen species (ROS) and the biochemical mechanisms to detoxify and repair resulting damage of reactive intermediates. This review examines current research incidental and engineered nanoparticles in terms of their health effects on the lungs and mechanisms by which oxidative stress via physicochemical characteristics influence toxicity or biocompatibility. Although oxidative stress has generally been thought of as an adverse biological outcome, this review will also briefly discuss some of the potential emerging technologies to use nanoparticle-induced oxidative stress to treat disease in a site specific fashion. PMID:24215442

  6. Effects of Oxidative Stress on Mesenchymal Stem Cell Biology.

    PubMed

    Denu, Ryan A; Hematti, Peiman

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent stem cells present in most fetal and adult tissues. Ex vivo culture-expanded MSCs are being investigated for tissue repair and immune modulation, but their full clinical potential is far from realization. Here we review the role of oxidative stress in MSC biology, as their longevity and functions are affected by oxidative stress. In general, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibit MSC proliferation, increase senescence, enhance adipogenic but reduce osteogenic differentiation, and inhibit MSC immunomodulation. Furthermore, aging, senescence, and oxidative stress reduce their ex vivo expansion, which is critical for their clinical applications. Modulation of sirtuin expression and activity may represent a method to reduce oxidative stress in MSCs. These findings have important implications in the clinical utility of MSCs for degenerative and immunological based conditions. Further study of oxidative stress in MSCs is imperative in order to enhance MSC ex vivo expansion and in vivo engraftment, function, and longevity. PMID:27413419

  7. Leukotriene C4 is the major trigger of stress-induced oxidative DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Dvash, Efrat; Har-Tal, Michal; Barak, Sara; Meir, Ofir; Rubinstein, Menachem

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and major chemotherapeutic agents damage DNA by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). Here we show that ER stress and chemotherapy induce leukotriene C4 (LTC4) biosynthesis by transcriptionally upregulating and activating the enzyme microsomal glutathione-S-transferase 2 (MGST2) in cells of non-haematopoietic lineage. ER stress and chemotherapy also trigger nuclear translocation of the two LTC4 receptors. Acting in an intracrine manner, LTC4 then elicits nuclear translocation of NADPH oxidase 4 (NOX4), ROS accumulation and oxidative DNA damage. Mgst2 deficiency, RNAi and LTC4 receptor antagonists abolish ER stress- and chemotherapy-induced ROS and oxidative DNA damage in vitro and in mouse kidneys. Cell death and mouse morbidity are also significantly attenuated. Hence, MGST2-generated LTC4 is a major mediator of ER stress- and chemotherapy-triggered oxidative stress and oxidative DNA damage. LTC4 inhibitors, commonly used for asthma, could find broad clinical use in major human pathologies associated with ER stress-activated NOX4. PMID:26656251

  8. Lipid-Mediated Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in the Pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Farooqui, Tahira; Farooqui, Akhlaq A.

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative movement disorder of unknown etiology. PD is characterized by the progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra, depletion of dopamine in the striatum, abnormal mitochondrial and proteasomal functions, and accumulation of α-synuclein that may be closely associated with pathological and clinical abnormalities. Increasing evidence indicates that both oxidative stress and inflammation may play a fundamental role in the pathogenesis of PD. Oxidative stress is characterized by increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and depletion of glutathione. Lipid mediators for oxidative stress include 4-hydroxynonenal, isoprostanes, isofurans, isoketals, neuroprostanes, and neurofurans. Neuroinflammation is characterized by activated microglial cells that generate proinflammatory cytokines, such as TNF-α and IL-1β. Proinflammatory lipid mediators include prostaglandins and platelet activating factor, together with cytokines may play a prominent role in mediating the progressive neurodegeneration in PD. PMID:21403820

  9. Oxidative stress in multiple sclerosis: Central and peripheral mode of action.

    PubMed

    Ohl, Kim; Tenbrock, Klaus; Kipp, Markus

    2016-03-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS). Reactive oxygen species (ROS), which if produced in excess lead to oxidative stress, have been implicated as mediators of demyelination and axonal damage in both MS and its animal models. One of the most studied cell populations in the context of ROS-mediated tissue damage in MS are macrophages and their CNS companion, microglia cells. However, and this aspect is less well appreciated, the extracellular and intracellular redox milieu is integral to many processes underlying T cell activation, proliferation and apoptosis. In this review article we discuss how oxidative stress affects central as well as peripheral aspects of MS and how manipulation of ROS pathways can potentially affect the course of the disease. It is our strong belief that the well-directed shaping of ROS pathways has the potential to ameliorate disease progression in MS. PMID:26626971

  10. The Ambiguous Relationship of Oxidative Stress, Tau Hyperphosphorylation, and Autophagy Dysfunction in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhenzhen; Li, Tao; Li, Ping; Wei, Nannan; Zhao, Zhiquan; Liang, Huimin; Ji, Xinying; Chen, Wenwu; Xue, Mengzhou; Wei, Jianshe

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia. The pathological hallmarks of AD are amyloid plaques [aggregates of amyloid-beta (Aβ)] and neurofibrillary tangles (aggregates of tau). Growing evidence suggests that tau accumulation is pathologically more relevant to the development of neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in AD patients than Aβ plaques. Oxidative stress is a prominent early event in the pathogenesis of AD and is therefore believed to contribute to tau hyperphosphorylation. Several studies have shown that the autophagic pathway in neurons is important under physiological and pathological conditions. Therefore, this pathway plays a crucial role for the degradation of endogenous soluble tau. However, the relationship between oxidative stress, tau protein hyperphosphorylation, autophagy dysregulation, and neuronal cell death in AD remains unclear. Here, we review the latest progress in AD, with a special emphasis on oxidative stress, tau hyperphosphorylation, and autophagy. We also discuss the relationship of these three factors in AD. PMID:26171115

  11. Graphene oxide induces plasma membrane damage, reactive oxygen species accumulation and fatty acid profiles change in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Qilin; Liang, Chen; Liu, Zhe; Zhang, Biao; Li, Mingchun

    2016-10-01

    During the past couple of years, graphene nanomaterials were extremely popular among the scientists due to the promising properties in many aspects. Before the materials being well applied, we should first focus on their biosafety and toxicity. In this study, we investigated the toxicity of synthesized graphene oxide (GO) against the model industrial organism Pichia pastoris. We found that the synthesized GO showed dose-dependent toxicity to P. pastoris, through cell membrane damage and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In response to these cell stresses, cells had normal unsaturated fatty acid (UFA) levels but increased contents of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) with up-regulation of UFA synthesis-related genes on the transcriptional level, which made it overcome the stress under GO attack. Two UFA defective strains (spt23Δ and fad12Δ) were used to demonstrate the results above. Hence, this study suggested a close connection between PUFAs and cell survival against GO. PMID:27376352

  12. Chlorophyll accumulation is enhanced by osmotic stress in graminaceous chlorophyllic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Valenzuela, Xóchitl; Garcá-Moya, Edmundo; Rascón-Cruz, Quintín; Herrera-Estrella, Luis; Aguado-Santacruz, Gerardo Armando

    2005-06-01

    We have developed a new chlorophyllic cell line ('TADH-XO') from the highly water stress tolerant grass Bouteloua gracilis (blue grama). When grown under normal (non-stress) conditions, this new cell line accumulates higher levels of chlorophyll (up to 368.1 microg total chlorophyll g(-1) FW) than a previously obtained cell line ('TIANSJ98'). Both cell lines are capable of developing substantially higher amounts of chlorophyll when subjected to osmotic stress. In order to explain these changes in the chlorophyll kinetics of the chlorophyllic cells, we analyzed the following population variables in cells subjected to polyethylene glycol 8000-induced osmotic stress: growth, viability, chlorophyll (total, 'a' and 'b'), cell size, percentage of green cells and chloroplast (number and size). Although previous studies in some chlorophyllic cells of dicots have already reported that chlorophyll increases under saline stress, in this report we show that, at least in this graminaceous cell line, the increase in chlorophyll is an immediate and proportional response to the osmotic stress applied and not the result of a progressive adaptation process. Consistent with previous studies, the increase in chlorophyll accumulation could be the result of chloroplast development (increased thylakoid number per chloroplast). On the basis of our results, the increases in chlorophyll accumulation previously observed in salt-adapted dicot cells may be the result of the osmotic shock (water deficit), rather than the ionic effect of salt on the physiology of chlorophyllic cells of dicots. Under the cell population experimental approach we followed, our study provides important insights related to the physiological behavior of chlorophyllic cells subjected to osmotic stress.

  13. Hypertension and physical exercise: The role of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Korsager Larsen, Monica; Matchkov, Vladimir V

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is associated with the pathogenesis of hypertension. Decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO) is one of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis. It has been suggested that physical exercise could be a potential non-pharmacological strategy in treatment of hypertension because of its beneficial effects on oxidative stress and endothelial function. The aim of this review is to investigate the effect of oxidative stress in relation to hypertension and physical exercise, including the role of NO in the pathogenesis of hypertension. Endothelial dysfunction and decreased NO levels have been found to have the adverse effects in the correlation between oxidative stress and hypertension. Most of the previous studies found that aerobic exercise significantly decreased blood pressure and oxidative stress in hypertensive subjects, but the intense aerobic exercise can also injure endothelial cells. Isometric exercise decreases normally only systolic blood pressure. An alternative exercise, Tai chi significantly decreases blood pressure and oxidative stress in normotensive elderly, but the effect in hypertensive subjects has not yet been studied. Physical exercise and especially aerobic training can be suggested as an effective intervention in the prevention and treatment of hypertension and cardiovascular disease via reduction in oxidative stress. PMID:26987496

  14. Proline accumulation and metabolism-related genes expression profiles in Kosteletzkya virginica seedlings under salt stress

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongyan; Tang, Xiaoli; Wang, Honglei; Shao, Hong-Bo

    2015-01-01

    Proline accumulation is a common response to salt stress in many plants. Salt stress also increased proline concentration in roots, stems, and leaves of Kosteletzkya virginica seedling treated with 300 mM NaCl for 24 h and reached 3.75-, 4.76-, and 6.83-fold higher than controls. Further study on proline content in leaves under salt stress showed that proline content increased with increasing NaCl concentrations or time. The proline level peaked at 300 mM NaCl for 24 h and reached more than sixfold higher than control, but at 400 mM NaCl for 24 h proline content fell back slightly along with wilting symptom. To explore the cause behind proline accumulation, we first cloned full length genes related to proline metabolism including KvP5CS1, KvOAT, KvPDH, and KvProT from K. virginica and investigated their expression profiles. The results revealed that the expressions of KvP5CS1 and KvProT were sharply up-regulated by salt stress and the expression of KvOAT showed a slight increase with increasing salt concentrations or time, while the expression of KvPDH was not changed much and slightly decreased before 12 h and then returned to the original level. As the key enzyme genes for proline biosynthesis, the up-regulated expression of KvP5CS1 played a more important role than KvOAT for proline accumulation in leaves under salt stress. The low expression of KvPDH for proline catabolism also made a contribution to proline accumulation before 12 h. PMID:26483809

  15. Nitric Oxide Alleviates Salt Stress Inhibited Photosynthetic Performance by Interacting with Sulfur Assimilation in Mustard.

    PubMed

    Fatma, Mehar; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S; Khan, Nafees A

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur (S) on stomatal responses and photosynthetic performance was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in presence or absence of salt stress. The combined application of 100 μM NO (as sodium nitroprusside) and 200 mg S kg(-1) soil (S) more prominently influenced stomatal behavior, photosynthetic and growth performance both in the absence and presence of salt stress. The chloroplasts from salt-stressed plants had disorganized chloroplast thylakoids, but combined application of NO and S resulted in well-developed chloroplast thylakoids and properly stacked grana. The leaves from plants receiving NO plus S exhibited lower superoxide ion accumulation under salt stress than the plants receiving NO or S. These plants also exhibited increased activity of ATP-sulfurylase (ATPS), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and optimized NO generation that helped in minimizing oxidative stress. The enhanced S-assimilation of these plants receiving NO plus S resulted in increased production of cysteine (Cys) and reduced glutathione (GSH). These findings indicated that NO influenced photosynthesis under salt stress by regulating oxidative stress and its effects on S-assimilation, an antioxidant system and NO generation. The results suggest that NO improves photosynthetic performance of plants grown under salt stress more effectively when plants received S. PMID:27200007

  16. Nitric Oxide Alleviates Salt Stress Inhibited Photosynthetic Performance by Interacting with Sulfur Assimilation in Mustard

    PubMed Central

    Fatma, Mehar; Masood, Asim; Per, Tasir S.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2016-01-01

    The role of nitric oxide (NO) and sulfur (S) on stomatal responses and photosynthetic performance was studied in mustard (Brassica juncea L.) in presence or absence of salt stress. The combined application of 100 μM NO (as sodium nitroprusside) and 200 mg S kg−1 soil (S) more prominently influenced stomatal behavior, photosynthetic and growth performance both in the absence and presence of salt stress. The chloroplasts from salt-stressed plants had disorganized chloroplast thylakoids, but combined application of NO and S resulted in well-developed chloroplast thylakoids and properly stacked grana. The leaves from plants receiving NO plus S exhibited lower superoxide ion accumulation under salt stress than the plants receiving NO or S. These plants also exhibited increased activity of ATP-sulfurylase (ATPS), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and glutathione reductase (GR) and optimized NO generation that helped in minimizing oxidative stress. The enhanced S-assimilation of these plants receiving NO plus S resulted in increased production of cysteine (Cys) and reduced glutathione (GSH). These findings indicated that NO influenced photosynthesis under salt stress by regulating oxidative stress and its effects on S-assimilation, an antioxidant system and NO generation. The results suggest that NO improves photosynthetic performance of plants grown under salt stress more effectively when plants received S. PMID:27200007

  17. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  18. Aloin Protects Skin Fibroblasts from Heat Stress-Induced Oxidative Stress Damage by Regulating the Oxidative Defense System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu-Wei; Liu, Fu-Chao; Wang, Yu-Ren; Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is commonly involved in the pathogenesis of skin damage induced by environmental factors, such as heat stress. Skin fibroblasts are responsible for the connective tissue regeneration and the skin recovery from injury. Aloin, a bioactive compound in Aloe vera, has been reported to have various pharmacological activities, such as anti-inflammatory effects. The aim of this study was to investigate the protective effect of aloin against heat stress-mediated oxidative stress in human skin fibroblast Hs68 cells. Hs68 cells were first incubated at 43°C for 30 min to mimic heat stress. The study was further examined if aloin has any effect on heat stress-induced oxidative stress. We found that aloin protected Hs68 cells against heat stress-induced damage, as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assay. Aloin protected Hs68 cells by regulating reactive oxygen species production and increasing the levels of glutathione, cytosolic and mitochondrial superoxide dismutase. Aloin also prevented the elevation of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances and the reduction of 8-OH-dG induced by heat stress. These results indicated that aloin protected human skin fibroblasts from heat stress-induced oxidative stress damage by regulating the oxidative defense system. PMID:26637174

  19. Aldehyde Dehydrogenases in Cellular Responses to Oxidative/electrophilic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Ying, Chen; Jackson, Brian; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C.; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors like dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an ‘aldehyde scavenger’ during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Up-regulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation) and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that significantly contributes to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, underscoring the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  20. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes. PMID:23195683

  1. Aldehyde dehydrogenases in cellular responses to oxidative/electrophilic stress.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra; Brocker, Chad; Koppaka, Vindhya; Chen, Ying; Jackson, Brian C; Matsumoto, Akiko; Thompson, David C; Vasiliou, Vasilis

    2013-03-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are continuously generated within living systems and the inability to manage ROS load leads to elevated oxidative stress and cell damage. Oxidative stress is coupled to the oxidative degradation of lipid membranes, also known as lipid peroxidation. This process generates over 200 types of aldehydes, many of which are highly reactive and toxic. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDHs) metabolize endogenous and exogenous aldehydes and thereby mitigate oxidative/electrophilic stress in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. ALDHs are found throughout the evolutionary gamut, from single-celled organisms to complex multicellular species. Not surprisingly, many ALDHs in evolutionarily distant, and seemingly unrelated, species perform similar functions, including protection against a variety of environmental stressors such as dehydration and ultraviolet radiation. The ability to act as an "aldehyde scavenger" during lipid peroxidation is another ostensibly universal ALDH function found across species. Upregulation of ALDHs is a stress response in bacteria (environmental and chemical stress), plants (dehydration, salinity, and oxidative stress), yeast (ethanol exposure and oxidative stress), Caenorhabditis elegans (lipid peroxidation), and mammals (oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation). Recent studies have also identified ALDH activity as an important feature of cancer stem cells. In these cells, ALDH expression helps abrogate oxidative stress and imparts resistance against chemotherapeutic agents such as oxazaphosphorine, taxane, and platinum drugs. The ALDH superfamily represents a fundamentally important class of enzymes that contributes significantly to the management of electrophilic/oxidative stress within living systems. Mutations in various ALDHs are associated with a variety of pathological conditions in humans, highlighting the fundamental importance of these enzymes in physiological and pathological processes.

  2. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-01-01

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source. PMID:26463891

  3. Evaluating the Role of Microbial Internal Storage Turnover on Nitrous Oxide Accumulation During Denitrification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yiwen; Peng, Lai; Guo, Jianhua; Chen, Xueming; Yuan, Zhiguo; Ni, Bing-Jie

    2015-10-14

    Biological wastewater treatment processes under a dynamic regime with respect to carbon substrate can result in microbial storage of internal polymers (e.g., polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB)) and their subsequent utilizations. These storage turnovers play important roles in nitrous oxide (N2O) accumulation during heterotrophic denitrification in biological wastewater treatment. In this work, a mathematical model is developed to evaluate the key role of PHB storage turnovers on N2O accumulation during denitrification for the first time, aiming to establish the key relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB storage production. The model is successfully calibrated and validated using N2O data from two independent experimental systems with PHB storage turnovers. The model satisfactorily describes nitrogen reductions, PHB storage/utilization, and N2O accumulation from both systems. The results reveal a linear relationship between N2O accumulation and PHB production, suggesting a substantial effect of PHB storage on N2O accumulation during denitrification. Application of the model to simulate long-term operations of a denitrifying sequencing batch reactor and a denitrifying continuous system indicates the feeding pattern and sludge retention time would alter PHB turnovers and thus affect N2O accumulation. Increasing PHB utilization could substantially raise N2O accumulation due to the relatively low N2O reduction rate when using PHB as carbon source.

  4. Stress-induced accumulation of wheat germ agglutinin and abscisic acid in roots of wheat seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Cammue, B.P.A.; Broekaert, W.F.; Kellens, J.T.C.; Peumans, W.J. ); Raikhel, N.V. )

    1989-12-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) levels in roots of 2-day-old wheat seedlings increased up to three-fold when stressed by air-drying. Similar results were obtained when seedling roots were incubated either in 0.5 molar mannitol or 180 grams per liter polyethylene glycol 6,000, with a peak level of WGA after 5 hours of stress. Longer periods of osmotic treatment resulted in a gradual decline of WGA in the roots. Since excised wheat roots incorporate more ({sup 35}S)cysteine into WGA under stress conditions, the observed increase of lectin levels is due to de novo synthesis. Measurement of abscisic acid (ABA) levels in roots of control and stressed seedlings indicated a 10-fold increase upon air-drying. Similarly, a five- and seven-fold increase of ABA content of seedling roots was found after 2 hours of osmotic stress by polyethylene glycol 6,000 and mannitol, respectively. Finally, the stress-induced increase of WGA in wheat roots could be inhibited by growing seedlings in the presence of fluridone, an inhibitor of ABA synthesis. These results indicate that roots of water-stressed wheat seedlings (a) contain more WGA as a result of an increased de novo synthesis of this lectin, and (b) exhibit higher ABA levels. The stress-induced increase of lectin accumulation seems to be under control of ABA.

  5. Loss of ACS7 confers abiotic stress tolerance by modulating ABA sensitivity and accumulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Hui; Zhen, Zhiqin; Peng, Jinying; Chang, Li; Gong, Qingqiu; Wang, Ning Ning

    2011-10-01

    The phytohormones ethylene and abscisic acid (ABA) play essential roles in the abiotic stress adaptation of plants, with both cross-talk of ethylene signalling and ABA biosynthesis and signalling reported. Any reciprocal effects on each other's biosynthesis, however, remain elusive. ACC synthase (ACS) acts as the key enzyme in ethylene biosynthesis. A pilot study on changes in ACS promoter activities in response to abiotic stresses revealed the unique involvement in abiotic stress responses of the only type 3 ACC synthase, ACS7, among all nine ACSs of Arabidopsis. Hence an acs7 mutant was characterized and its abiotic stress responses were analysed. The acs7 mutant germinated slightly faster than the wild type and subsequently maintained a higher growth rate at the vegetative growth stage. Ethylene emission of acs7 was merely one-third of that of the wild type. acs7 exhibited enhanced tolerance to salt, osmotic, and heat stresses. Furthermore, acs7 seeds were hypersensitive to both ABA and glucose during germination. Transcript analyses revealed that acs7 had elevated transcript levels of the stress-responsive genes involved in the ABA-dependent pathway under salt stress. The ABA level was also higher in acs7 following salt treatment. Our data suggest that ACS7 acts as a negative regulator of ABA sensitivity and accumulation under stress and appears as a node in the cross-talk between ethylene and ABA.

  6. Tocopherol deficiency reduces sucrose export from salt-stressed potato leaves independently of oxidative stress and symplastic obstruction by callose.

    PubMed

    Asensi-Fabado, María Amparo; Ammon, Alexandra; Sonnewald, Uwe; Munné-Bosch, Sergi; Voll, Lars M

    2015-02-01

    Tocopherol cyclase, encoded by the gene SUCROSE EXPORT DEFECTIVE1, catalyses the second step in the synthesis of the antioxidant tocopherol. Depletion of SXD1 activity in maize and potato leaves leads to tocopherol deficiency and a 'sugar export block' phenotype that comprises massive starch accumulation and obstruction of plasmodesmata in paraveinal tissue by callose. We grew two transgenic StSXD1:RNAi potato lines with severe tocopherol deficiency under moderate light conditions and subjected them to salt stress. After three weeks of salt exposure, we observed a strongly reduced sugar exudation rate and a lack of starch mobilization in leaves of salt-stressed transgenic plants, but not in wild-type plants. However, callose accumulation in the vasculature declined upon salt stress in all genotypes, indicating that callose plugging of plasmodesmata was not the sole cause of the sugar export block phenotype in tocopherol-deficient leaves. Based on comprehensive gene expression analyses, we propose that enhanced responsiveness of SnRK1 target genes in mesophyll cells and altered redox regulation of phloem loading by SUT1 contribute to the attenuation of sucrose export from salt-stressed SXD:RNAi source leaves. Furthermore, we could not find any indication that elevated oxidative stress may have served as a trigger for the salt-induced carbohydrate phenotype of SXD1:RNAi transgenic plants. In leaves of the SXD1:RNAi plants, sodium accumulation was diminished, while proline accumulation and pools of soluble antioxidants were increased. As supported by phytohormone contents, these differences seem to increase longevity and prevent senescence of SXD:RNAi leaves under salt stress.

  7. Hydrogen peroxide-mediated oxidative stress disrupts calcium binding on calmodulin: More evidence for oxidative stress in vitiligo

    SciTech Connect

    Schallreuter, K.U. . E-mail: k.schallreuter@bradford.ac.uk; Gibbons, N.C.J.; Zothner, C.; Abou Elloof, M.M.; Wood, J.M.

    2007-08-17

    Patients with acute vitiligo have low epidermal catalase expression/activities and accumulate 10{sup -3} M H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. One consequence of this severe oxidative stress is an altered calcium homeostasis in epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes. Here, we show decreased epidermal calmodulin expression in acute vitiligo. Since 10{sup -3}M H{sub 2}O{sub 2} oxidises methionine and tryptophan residues in proteins, we examined calcium binding to calmodulin in the presence and absence of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} utilising {sup 45}calcium. The results showed that all four calcium atoms exchanged per molecule of calmodulin. Since oxidised calmodulin looses its ability to activate calcium ATPase, enzyme activities were followed in full skin biopsies from lesional skin of patients with acute vitiligo (n = 6) and healthy controls (n = 6). The results yielded a 4-fold decrease of ATPase activities in the patients. Computer simulation of native and oxidised calmodulin confirmed the loss of all four calcium ions from their specific EF-hand domains. Taken together H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-mediated oxidation affects calcium binding in calmodulin leading to perturbed calcium homeostasis and perturbed L-phenylalanine-uptake in the epidermis of acute vitiligo.

  8. Effects of zinc oxide nanoparticles on bioaccumulation and oxidative stress in different organs of tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus).

    PubMed

    Kaya, Hasan; Aydın, Fatih; Gürkan, Mert; Yılmaz, Sevdan; Ates, Mehmet; Demir, Veysel; Arslan, Zikri

    2015-11-01

    Nano-size zinc oxide particles (ZnO NPs) are used in diverse industrial and commercial fields. However, the information from existing studies is not sufficient in evaluating the potential toxic effects of ZnO NPs. In this study, tilapia fish (Oreochromis niloticus) were exposed to different concentrations of small and large ZnO NPs in vivo. Accumulation in various organs/tissues (liver, gill, intestine, kidney, brain and muscle) and possible oxidative stress mechanisms were investigated comparatively. Fish were exposed to 1 and 10mg/L concentrations of small (10-30 nm) and large (100 nm) ZnO NPs semi-statically for 14 days. Both small and large ZnO NPs accumulated substantially in the tissues. Accumulation for the small ZnO NPs was significantly higher compared to larger NPs under same exposure regimes. Significant fluctuations were observed in antioxidant defense system biomarkers, including Superoxide dismutase (SOD), Catalase (CAT) and Glutathione (GSH) levels depending on particle size, exposure time and concentration. Lipid peroxidation measured with TBARS levels were higher in groups exposed to the suspensions of small ZnO NPs than that of large ZnO NPs and controls. These results imply that colloidal suspensions of small ZnO NPs induce elevated oxidative stress and toxic effects on tilapia compared to the larger NPs.

  9. ROS accumulation and oxidative damage to cell structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains during fermentation of high-sugar-containing medium.

    PubMed

    Landolfo, Sara; Politi, Huguette; Angelozzi, Daniele; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2008-06-01

    To further elucidate the impact of fermentative stress on Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, we have here evaluated markers of oxidative stress, oxidative damage and antioxidant response in four oenological strains of S. cerevisiae, relating these to membrane integrity, ethanol production and cell viability during fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium. The cells were sampled at different fermentation stages and analysed by flow cytometry to evaluate membrane integrity and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At the same time, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, trehalose accumulation, and protein carbonylation and degradation were measured. The results indicate that the stress conditions occurring during hypoxic fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium result in the production of ROS and trigger an antioxidant response. This involves superoxide dismutase and trehalose for the protection of cell structures from oxidative damage, and protein catabolism for the removal of damaged proteins. Cell viability, membrane integrity and ethanol production depend on the extent of oxidative damage to cellular components. This is, in turn, related to the 'fitness' of each strain, which depends on the contribution of individual cells to ROS accumulation and scavenging. These findings highlight that the differences in individual cell resistances to ROS contribute to the persistence of wine strains during growth under unfavourable culture conditions, and they provide further insights into our understanding of yeast behaviour during industrial fermentation.

  10. Effect of Oxidative Stress on Male Reproduction

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Gurpriya; Ong, Chloe; du Plessis, Stefan S

    2014-01-01

    Infertility affects approximately 15% of couples trying to conceive, and a male factor contributes to roughly half of these cases. Oxidative stress (OS) has been identified as one of the many mediators of male infertility by causing sperm dysfunction. OS is a state related to increased cellular damage triggered by oxygen and oxygen-derived free radicals known as reactive oxygen species (ROS). During this process, augmented production of ROS overwhelms the body's antioxidant defenses. While small amounts of ROS are required for normal sperm functioning, disproportionate levels can negatively impact the quality of spermatozoa and impair their overall fertilizing capacity. OS has been identified as an area of great attention because ROS and their metabolites can attack DNA, lipids, and proteins; alter enzymatic systems; produce irreparable alterations; cause cell death; and ultimately, lead to a decline in the semen parameters associated with male infertility. This review highlights the mechanisms of ROS production, the physiological and pathophysiological roles of ROS in relation to the male reproductive system, and recent advances in diagnostic methods; it also explores the benefits of using antioxidants in a clinical setting. PMID:24872947

  11. Peroxiredoxins, oxidative stress, and cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Immenschuh, Stephan; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline

    2005-01-01

    Peroxiredoxins (Prxs) are a family of multifunctional antioxidant thioredoxin-dependent peroxidases that have been identified in a large variety of organisms. The major functions of Prxs comprise cellular protection against oxidative stress, modulation of intracellular signaling cascades that apply hydrogen peroxide as a second messenger molecule, and regulation of cell proliferation. In the present review, we discuss pertinent findings on the protein structure, the cell- and tissue-specific distribution, as well as the subcellular localization of Prxs. A particular emphasis is put on Prx I, which is the most abundant and ubiquitously distributed member of the mammalian Prxs. Major transcriptional and posttranslational regulatory mechanisms and signaling pathways that control Prx gene expression and activity are summarized. The interaction of Prx I with the oncogene products c-Abl and c-Myc and the regulatory role of Prx I for cell proliferation and apoptosis are highlighted. Recent findings on phenotypical alterations of mouse models with targeted disruptions of Prx genes are discussed, confirming the physiological functions of Prxs for antioxidant cell and tissue protection along with an important role as tumor suppressors.

  12. Tyrosine phosphorylation of clathrin heavy chain under oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Yoshito; Yasuoka, Chie; Kageyama, Kan; Wada, Yoshinao; Kondo, Takahito

    2002-09-20

    In mouse pancreatic insulin-producing betaTC cells, oxidative stress due to H(2)O(2) causes tyrosine phosphorylation in various proteins. To identify proteins bearing phosphotyrosine under stress, the proteins were affinity purified using an anti-phosphotyrosine antibody-conjugated agarose column. A protein of 180kDa was identified as clathrin heavy chain (CHC) by electrophoresis and mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitated CHC showed tyrosine phosphorylation upon H(2)O(2) treatment and the phosphorylation was suppressed by the Src kinase inhibitor, PP2. The phosphorylation status of CHC affected the intracellular localization of CHC and the clathrin-dependent endocytosis of transferrin under oxidative stress. In conclusion, CHC is a protein that is phosphorylated at tyrosine by H(2)O(2) and this phosphorylation status is implicated in the intracellular localization and functions of CHC under oxidative stress. The present study demonstrates that oxidative stress affects intracellular vesicular trafficking via the alteration of clathrin-dependent vesicular trafficking.

  13. Oxidative Stress and Inflammation: What Polyphenols Can Do for Us?

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Tarique; Yin, Yulong; Blachier, Francois; Tossou, Myrlene C. B.; Rahu, Najma

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is viewed as an imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and their elimination by protective mechanisms, which can lead to chronic inflammation. Oxidative stress can activate a variety of transcription factors, which lead to the differential expression of some genes involved in inflammatory pathways. The inflammation triggered by oxidative stress is the cause of many chronic diseases. Polyphenols have been proposed to be useful as adjuvant therapy for their potential anti-inflammatory effect, associated with antioxidant activity, and inhibition of enzymes involved in the production of eicosanoids. This review aims at exploring the properties of polyphenols in anti-inflammation and oxidation and the mechanisms of polyphenols inhibiting molecular signaling pathways which are activated by oxidative stress, as well as the possible roles of polyphenols in inflammation-mediated chronic disorders. Such data can be helpful for the development of future antioxidant therapeutics and new anti-inflammatory drugs. PMID:27738491

  14. Oxidative stress responses in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Farr, S B; Kogoma, T

    1991-01-01

    Oxidative stress is strongly implicated in a number of diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disorders, and atherosclerosis, and its emerging as one of the most important causative agents of mutagenesis, tumorigenesis, and aging. Recent progress on the genetics and molecular biology of the cellular responses to oxidative stress, primarily in Escherichia coli and Salmonella typhimurium, is summarized. Bacteria respond to oxidative stress by invoking two distinct stress responses, the peroxide stimulon and the superoxide stimulon, depending on whether the stress is mediated by peroxides or the superoxide anion. The two stimulons each contain a set of more than 30 genes. The expression of a subset of genes in each stimulon is under the control of a positive regulatory element; these genes constitute the OxyR and SoxRS regulons. The schemes of regulation of the two regulons by their respective regulators are reviewed in detail, and the overlaps of these regulons with other stress responses such as the heat shock and SOS responses are discussed. The products of Oxy-R- and SoxRS-regulated genes, such as catalases and superoxide dismutases, are involved in the prevention of oxidative damage, whereas others, such as endonuclease IV, play a role in the repair of oxidative damage. The potential roles of these and other gene products in the defense against oxidative damage in DNA, proteins, and membranes are discussed in detail. A brief discussion of the similarities and differences between oxidative stress responses in bacteria and eukaryotic organisms concludes this review. PMID:1779927

  15. Isoprostanes and neuroprostanes as biomarkers of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Miller, Elżbieta; Morel, Agnieszka; Saso, Luciano; Saluk, Joanna

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating data shows that oxidative stress plays a crucial role in neurodegenerative disorders. The literature data indicate that in vivo or postmortem cerebrospinal fluid and brain tissue levels of F2-isoprostanes (F2-IsoPs) especially F4-neuroprotanes (F4-NPs) are significantly increased in some neurodegenerative diseases: multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. Central nervous system is the most metabolically active organ of the body characterized by high requirement for oxygen and relatively low antioxidative activity, what makes neurons and glia highly susceptible to destruction by reactive oxygen/nitrogen species and neurodegeneration. The discovery of F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as markers of lipid peroxidation caused by the free radicals has opened up new areas of investigation regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases. This review focuses on the relationship between F2-IsoPs and F4-NPs as biomarkers of oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases. We summarize the knowledge of these novel biomarkers of oxidative stress and the advantages of monitoring their formation to better define the involvement of oxidative stress in neurological diseases.

  16. Potential role of punicalagin against oxidative stress induced testicular damage

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Faiza; Tian, Hui; Li, Wenqing; Hung, Helong; Sun, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Punicalagin is isolated from pomegranate and widely used for the treatment of different diseases in Chinese traditional medicine. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of Punicalagin (purity ≥98%) on oxidative stress induced testicular damage and its effect on fertility. We detected the antioxidant potential of punicalagin in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced oxidative stress damage in testes, also tried to uncover the boosting fertility effect of Punicalagin (PU) against oxidative stress-induced infertility. Results demonstrated that 9 mg kg−1 for 7 days treatment significantly decreases LPS induced oxidative damage in testes and nitric oxide production. The administration of oxidative stress resulted in a significant reduction in testes antioxidants GSH, T-SOD, and CAT raised LPO, but treatment with punicalagin for 7 days increased antioxidant defense GSH, T-SOD, and CAT by the end of the experiment and reduced LPO level as well. PU also significantly activates Nrf2, which is involved in regulation of antioxidant defense systems. Hence, the present research categorically elucidates the protective effect of punicalagin against LPS induced oxidative stress induced perturbation in the process of spermatogenesis and significantly increased sperm health and number. Moreover, fertility success significantly decreased in LPS-injected mice compared to controls. Mice injected with LPS had fertility indices of 12.5%, while others treated with a combination of PU + LPS exhibited 75% indices. By promoting fertility and eliminating oxidative stress and inflammation, PU may be a useful nutrient for the treatment of infertility. PMID:26763544

  17. Oxidative stress and metabolic disorders: Pathogenesis and therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Rani, Vibha; Deep, Gagan; Singh, Rakesh K; Palle, Komaraiah; Yadav, Umesh C S

    2016-03-01

    Increased body weight and metabolic disorder including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular complications together constitute metabolic syndrome. The pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome involves multitude of factors. A number of studies however indicate, with some conformity, that oxidative stress along with chronic inflammatory condition pave the way for the development of metabolic diseases. Oxidative stress, a state of lost balance between the oxidative and anti-oxidative systems of the cells and tissues, results in the over production of oxidative free radicals and reactive oxygen species (ROS). Excessive ROS generated could attack the cellular proteins, lipids and nucleic acids leading to cellular dysfunction including loss of energy metabolism, altered cell signalling and cell cycle control, genetic mutations, altered cellular transport mechanisms and overall decreased biological activity, immune activation and inflammation. In addition, nutritional stress such as that caused by high fat high carbohydrate diet also promotes oxidative stress as evident by increased lipid peroxidation products, protein carbonylation, and decreased antioxidant system and reduced glutathione (GSH) levels. These changes lead to initiation of pathogenic milieu and development of several chronic diseases. Studies suggest that in obese person oxidative stress and chronic inflammation are the important underlying factors that lead to development of pathologies such as carcinogenesis, obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular diseases through altered cellular and nuclear mechanisms, including impaired DNA damage repair and cell cycle regulation. Here we discuss the aspects of metabolic disorders-induced oxidative stress in major pathological conditions and strategies for their prevention and therapy.

  18. Oxidative stress, innate immunity, and age-related macular degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Peter X.; Stiles, Travis; Douglas, Christopher; Ho, Daisy; Fan, Wei; Du, Hongjun; Xiao, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a leading cause of vision loss affecting tens of millions of elderly worldwide. Early AMD is characterized by the appearance of soft drusen, as well as pigmentary changes in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). These soft, confluent drusen can progress into two forms of advanced AMD: geographic atrophy (GA, or dry AMD) or choroidal neovascularization (CNV, or wet AMD). Both forms of AMD result in a similar clinical progression in terms of loss of central vision. The exact mechanism for developing early AMD, as well as triggers responsible for progressing to advanced stage of disease, is still largely unknown. However, significant evidence exists demonstrating a complex interplay of genetic and environmental factors as causes of AMD progression. Multiple genes and/or single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been found associated with AMD, including various genes involved in the complement pathway, lipid metabolism and extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling. Of the known genetic contributors to disease risk, the CFH Y402H and HTRA1/ARMS polymorphisms contribute to more than 50% of the genetic risk for AMD. Environmentally, oxidative stress plays a critical role in many aging diseases including cardiovascular disease, cancer, Alzheimer’s disease and AMD. Due to the exposure to sunlight and high oxygen concentration, the oxidative stress burden is higher in the eye than other tissues, which can be further complicated by additional oxidative stressors such as smoking. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating suggesting that functional abnormalities of the innate immune system incurred via high risk genotypes may be contributing to the pathogenesis of AMD by altering the inflammatory homeostasis in the eye, specifically in the handling of oxidation products. As the eye in non-pathological instances maintains a low level of inflammation despite the presence of a relative abundance of potentially inflammatory molecules, we have

  19. Early generation of nitric oxide contributes to copper tolerance through reducing oxidative stress and cell death in hulless barley roots.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yanfeng

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the specific role of nitric oxide (NO) in the early response of hulless barley roots to copper (Cu) stress. We used the fluorescent probe diaminofluorescein-FM diacetate to establish NO localization, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-special labeling and histochemical procedures for the detection of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the root apex. An early production of NO was observed in Cu-treated root tips of hulless barley, but the detection of NO levels was decreased by supplementation with a NO scavenger, 2-phenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide (c-PTIO). Application of sodium nitroprusside (a NO donor) relieved Cu-induced root inhibition, ROS accumulation and oxidative damage, while c-PTIO treatment had a synergistic effect with Cu and further enhanced ROS levels and oxidative stress. In addition, the Cu-dependent increase in activities of superoxide dismutase, peroxidase and ascorbate peroxidase were further enhanced by exogenous NO, but application of c-PTIO decreased the activities of catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in Cu-treated roots. Subsequently, cell death was observed in root tips and was identified as a type of programed cell death (PCD) by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. The addition of NO prevented the increase of cell death in root tips, whereas inhibiting NO accumulation further increased the number of cells undergoing PCD. These results revealed that NO production is an early response of hulless barley roots to Cu stress and that NO contributes to Cu tolerance in hulless barley possibly by modulating antioxidant defense, subsequently reducing oxidative stress and PCD in root tips. PMID:27294966

  20. Accumulation of stress protein 72 (HSP72) in muscle and spleen of goldfish taken into space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, T.; Tsuji, K.; Ohmura, T.; Matsumoto, H.; Wang, X.; Takahahsi, A.; Nagaoka, S.; Takabayashi, A.

    Using Western blot analysis, here, we report the levels of HSP72 in several organs from goldfish which were taken into space on the NASA space shuttle. A remarkable accumulation of HSP72 was detected in muscle and spleen of those fish taken into space as compared with controls. These results suggested that the HSP72 induction is a kind of stress response at the molecular level introduced by the space environment consisting of microgravity and/or cosmic radiation as stressors.

  1. Hydrogen peroxide produced by NADPH oxidases increases proline accumulation during salt or mannitol stress in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ben Rejeb, Kilani; Lefebvre-De Vos, Delphine; Le Disquet, Isabel; Leprince, Anne-Sophie; Bordenave, Marianne; Maldiney, Régis; Jdey, Asma; Abdelly, Chedly; Savouré, Arnould

    2015-12-01

    Many plants accumulate proline, a compatible osmolyte, in response to various environmental stresses such as water deficit and salinity. In some stress responses, plants generate hydrogen peroxide (H2 O2 ) that mediates numerous physiological and biochemical processes. The aim was to study the relationship between stress-induced proline accumulation and H2 O2 production. Using pharmacological and reverse genetic approaches in Arabidopsis thaliana, we investigated the role of NADPH oxidases, Respiratory burst oxidase homologues (Rboh), in the induction of proline accumulation was investigated in response to stress induced by either 200 mM NaCl or 400 mM mannitol. Stress from NaCl or mannitol resulted in a transient increase in H2 O2 content accompanied by accumulation of proline. Dimethylthiourea, a scavenger of H2 O2 , and diphenylene iodonium (DPI), an inhibitor of H2 O2 production by NADPH oxidase, were found to significantly inhibit proline accumulation in these stress conditions. DPI also reduced the expression level of Δ(1) -pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthetase, the key enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of proline. Similarly, less proline accumulated in knockout mutants lacking either AtRbohD or AtRbohF than in wild-type plants in response to the same stresses. Our data demonstrate that AtRbohs (A. thaliana Rbohs) contribute to H2 O2 production in response to NaCl or mannitol stress to increase proline accumulation in this plant.

  2. Association of Heat Production with FDG Accumulation by Murine Brown Adipose Tissue (BAT) After Stress

    PubMed Central

    Carter, Edward A.; Bonab, Ali A; Paul, Kasie; Yerxa, John; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Fischman, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that cold stress results in increased accumulation of 18FDG in brown adipose tissue (BAT). Although it has been assumed that this effect is associated with increased thermogenesis by BAT, direct measurements of this phenomenon have not been reported. In the current investigation we evaluated the relationship between stimulation of 18FDG accumulation in BAT by three stressors and heat production measured in vivo by thermal imaging. Male SKH-1 hairless mice were subjected to full-thickness thermal injury (30% total body surface area), cold stress (4°C for 24 hours), or cutaneous wounds. Groups of 6 animals with each treatment were fasted over night and injected with 18FDG. Sixty minutes after injection the mice were sacrificed and biodistribution was measured. Other groups of six animals subjected to the three stressors were studied by thermal imaging and the difference in temperature between BAT and adjacent tissue was recorded (ΔT). Additional groups of 6 animals were studied by both thermal imaging and 18FDG biodistribution in the same animals. Accumulation of 18FDG by BAT was significantly (p <0.0001) increased by all 3 treatments (burn ~5 fold, cold: ~15 fold, and cutaneous wound ~15 fold) whereas accumulation by adjacent white adipose tissue (WAT) was unchanged. Compared with sham control mice; ΔTs in animals exposed to all three stressors showed significant (p<0.001) increases in temperature between BAT and adjacent tissue. The difference in ΔT between stressor groups was not significant, however, there was a highly significant linear correlation (r2=0.835, p<0.0001) between the ΔT measured in BAT vs. adjacent tissue and 18FDG accumulation. These results establish, for the first time, that changes in BAT temperature determined in vivo by thermal imaging parallel increases in 18FDG accumulation. PMID:21914754

  3. Slow Replication Fork Velocity of Homologous Recombination-Defective Cells Results from Endogenous Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Therese; Ragu, Sandrine; Magdalou, Indiana; Machon, Christelle; Dardillac, Elodie; Técher, Hervé; Guitton, Jérôme; Debatisse, Michelle; Lopez, Bernard S

    2016-05-01

    Replications forks are routinely hindered by different endogenous stresses. Because homologous recombination plays a pivotal role in the reactivation of arrested replication forks, defects in homologous recombination reveal the initial endogenous stress(es). Homologous recombination-defective cells consistently exhibit a spontaneously reduced replication speed, leading to mitotic extra centrosomes. Here, we identify oxidative stress as a major endogenous source of replication speed deceleration in homologous recombination-defective cells. The treatment of homologous recombination-defective cells with the antioxidant N-acetyl-cysteine or the maintenance of the cells at low O2 levels (3%) rescues both the replication fork speed, as monitored by single-molecule analysis (molecular combing), and the associated mitotic extra centrosome frequency. Reciprocally, the exposure of wild-type cells to H2O2 reduces the replication fork speed and generates mitotic extra centrosomes. Supplying deoxynucleotide precursors to H2O2-exposed cells rescued the replication speed. Remarkably, treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine strongly expanded the nucleotide pool, accounting for the replication speed rescue. Remarkably, homologous recombination-defective cells exhibit a high level of endogenous reactive oxygen species. Consistently, homologous recombination-defective cells accumulate spontaneous γH2AX or XRCC1 foci that are abolished by treatment with N-acetyl-cysteine or maintenance at 3% O2. Finally, oxidative stress stimulated homologous recombination, which is suppressed by supplying deoxynucleotide precursors. Therefore, the cellular redox status strongly impacts genome duplication and transmission. Oxidative stress should generate replication stress through different mechanisms, including DNA damage and nucleotide pool imbalance. These data highlight the intricacy of endogenous replication and oxidative stresses, which are both evoked during tumorigenesis and senescence initiation

  4. [Exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean in response to Al toxicity stress].

    PubMed

    Shen, Hong; Yan, Xiaolong; Zheng, Shaoling; Wang, Xiurong

    2002-03-01

    Significant differences in the exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean genotypes were observed in response to Al toxicity stress by hydroponic cultural experiments. Secreted citric acid increased with increasing external concentrations of Al3+ which ranged from 0 to 50 mumol.L-1, while ranged from 50 to 80 mumol.L-1, secreted citric acid decreased with increasing external concentrations of Al3+. Among different genotypic common beans, citric acid secreted in G19842 was the largest, while Al uptake per unit dry weight in G19842 was the least. No difference in the accumulation of citric acid in leaves was found among different genotypic common beans, while the size of the content of citric acid in roots was G19842 > AFR > ZPV > G5273. The amount of citric acid exuded was smaller induced by phosphorus deficiency than that induced by Al toxicity stress. Exposure to 50 mumol.L-1 LaCl3 could not induce the exudation of citric acid, and it implied that the exudation and accumulation of citric acid in common bean was an important physiological response of resistance to Al toxicity stress.

  5. Crystal Structure of Oxidative Stress Sensor Keap1 in Complex with Selective Autophagy Substrate p62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Hirofumi

    Keap1, an adaptor protein of cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complex, represses cytoprotective transcription factor Nrf2 in an oxidative stress-dependent manner. The accumulation of selective autophagy substrate p62 also activates Nrf2 target genes, but the detailed mechanism has not been elucidated. Crystal structure of Keap1-p62 complex revealed the structural basis for the Nrf2 activation in which Keap1 is inactivated by p62. The accumulation of p62 is observed in hepatocellular carcinoma. The activation of Nrf2 target genes, including detoxifying enzymes and efflux transporters, by p62 may protect the cancer cells from anti-cancer drugs.

  6. The Role of Flavonoids on Oxidative Stress in Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Diniz, Tâmara Coimbra; Silva, Juliane Cabral; de Lima-Saraiva, Sarah Raquel Gomes; Ribeiro, Fernanda Pires Rodrigues de Almeida; Pacheco, Alessandra Gomes Marques; de Freitas, Rivelilson Mendes; Quintans-Júnior, Lucindo José; Quintans, Jullyana de Souza Siqueira; Mendes, Rosemairy Luciane; Almeida, Jackson Roberto Guedes da Silva

    2015-01-01

    Backgrounds. Oxidative stress can result from excessive free-radical production and it is likely implicated as a possible mechanism involved in the initiation and progression of epileptogenesis. Flavonoids can protect the brain from oxidative stress. In the central nervous system (CNS) several flavonoids bind to the benzodiazepine site on the GABAA-receptor resulting in anticonvulsive effects. Objective. This review provides an overview about the role of flavonoids in oxidative stress in epilepsy. The mechanism of action of flavonoids and its relation to the chemical structure is also discussed. Results/Conclusions. There is evidence that suggests that flavonoids have potential for neuroprotection in epilepsy. PMID:25653736

  7. Protein Methionine Sulfoxide Dynamics in Arabidopsis thaliana under Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Silke; Ghesquière, Bart; De Bock, Pieter-Jan; Demol, Hans; Wahni, Khadija; Willems, Patrick; Messens, Joris; Van Breusegem, Frank; Gevaert, Kris

    2015-05-01

    Reactive oxygen species such as hydrogen peroxide can modify proteins via direct oxidation of their sulfur-containing amino acids, cysteine and methionine. Methionine oxidation, studied here, is a reversible posttranslational modification that is emerging as a mechanism by which proteins perceive oxidative stress and function in redox signaling. Identification of proteins with oxidized methionines is the first prerequisite toward understanding the functional effect of methionine oxidation on proteins and the biological processes in which they are involved. Here, we describe a proteome-wide study of in vivo protein-bound methionine oxidation in plants upon oxidative stress using Arabidopsis thaliana catalase 2 knock-out plants as a model system. We identified over 500 sites of oxidation in about 400 proteins and quantified the differences in oxidation between wild-type and catalase 2 knock-out plants. We show that the activity of two plant-specific glutathione S-transferases, GSTF9 and GSTT23, is significantly reduced upon oxidation. And, by sampling over time, we mapped the dynamics of methionine oxidation and gained new insights into this complex and dynamic landscape of a part of the plant proteome that is sculpted by oxidative stress.

  8. Effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative biomarkers in Caenorhabditis elegans under oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Aan, Goon Jo; Zainudin, Mohd Shahril Aszrin; Karim, Noralisa Abdul; Ngah, Wan Zurinah Wan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study was performed to determine the effect of the tocotrienol-rich fraction on the lifespan and oxidative status of C. elegans under oxidative stress. METHOD: Lifespan was determined by counting the number of surviving nematodes daily under a dissecting microscope after treatment with hydrogen peroxide and the tocotrienol-rich fraction. The evaluated oxidative markers included lipofuscin, which was measured using a fluorescent microscope, and protein carbonyl and 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine, which were measured using commercially available kits. RESULTS: Hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress significantly decreased the mean lifespan of C. elegans, which was restored to that of the control by the tocotrienol-rich fraction when administered before or both before and after the hydrogen peroxide. The accumulation of the age marker lipofuscin, which increased with hydrogen peroxide exposure, was decreased with upon treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction (p<0.05). The level of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine significantly increased in the hydrogen peroxide-induced group relative to the control. Treatment with the tocotrienol-rich fraction before or after hydrogen peroxide induction also increased the level of 8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine relative to the control. However, neither hydrogen peroxide nor the tocotrienol-rich fraction treatment affected the protein carbonyl content of the nematodes. CONCLUSION: The tocotrienol-rich fraction restored the lifespan of oxidative stress-induced C. elegans and reduced the accumulation of lipofuscin but did not affect protein damage. In addition, DNA oxidation was increased. PMID:23778402

  9. Severe Life Stress and Oxidative Stress in the Brain: From Animal Models to Human Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, Vincent; Trabace, Luigia; Krause, Karl-Heinz

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Severe life stress (SLS), as opposed to trivial everyday stress, is defined as a serious psychosocial event with the potential of causing an impacting psychological traumatism. Recent Advances: Numerous studies have attempted to understand how the central nervous system (CNS) responds to SLS. This response includes a variety of morphological and neurochemical modifications; among them, oxidative stress is almost invariably observed. Oxidative stress is defined as disequilibrium between oxidant generation and the antioxidant response. Critical Issues: In this review, we discuss how SLS leads to oxidative stress in the CNS, and how the latter impacts pathophysiological outcomes. We also critically discuss experimental methods that measure oxidative stress in the CNS. The review covers animal models and human observations. Animal models of SLS include sleep deprivation, maternal separation, and social isolation in rodents, and the establishment of hierarchy in non-human primates. In humans, SLS, which is caused by traumatic events such as child abuse, war, and divorce, is also accompanied by oxidative stress in the CNS. Future Directions: The outcome of SLS in humans ranges from resilience, over post-traumatic stress disorder, to development of chronic mental disorders. Defining the sources of oxidative stress in SLS might in the long run provide new therapeutic avenues. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 18, 1475–1490. PMID:22746161

  10. Autophagy Induction Protects Against 7-Oxysterol-induced Cell Death via Lysosomal Pathway and Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xi-Ming; Sultana, Nargis; Siraj, Nabeel; Ward, Liam J.; Ghafouri, Bijar; Li, Wei

    2016-01-01

    7-Oxysterols are major toxic components in oxidized low-density lipoprotein and human atheroma lesions, which cause lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and cell death. Autophagy may function as a survival mechanism in this process. Here, we investigated whether 7-oxysterols mixed in an atheroma-relevant proportion induce autophagy, whether autophagy induction influences 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death, and the underlying mechanisms, by focusing on cellular lipid levels, oxidative stress, and LMP in 7-oxysterol-treated macrophages. We found that 7-oxysterols induced cellular lipid accumulation, autophagy dysfunction, and cell death in the form of both apoptosis and necrosis. Exposure to 7-oxysterols induced autophagic vacuole synthesis in the form of increased autophagy marker microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3 (LC3) and LC3-phosphatidylethanolamine conjugate (LC3-II) and autophagic vacuole formation. This led to an accumulation of p62, indicating a reduction in autophagic vacuole degradation. Importantly, autophagy induction significantly reduced 7-oxysterol-mediated cell death by diminishing LMP and oxidative stress. Moreover, autophagy induction minimized cellular lipid accumulation induced by 7-oxysterols. These findings highlight the importance of autophagy in combating cellular stress, LMP, and cell death in atherosclerosis. Therefore, activation of the autophagy pathway may be a potential therapeutic strategy for prevention of necrotic core formation in atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:26966389

  11. Inhibition of the oxidative stress response by heat stress in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Crombie, Timothy A; Tang, Lanlan; Choe, Keith P; Julian, David

    2016-07-15

    It has long been recognized that simultaneous exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress shows a synergistic interaction that reduces organismal fitness, but relatively little is known about the mechanisms underlying this interaction. We investigated the role of molecular stress responses in driving this synergistic interaction using the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans To induce oxidative stress, we used the pro-oxidant compounds acrylamide, paraquat and juglone. As expected, we found that heat stress and oxidative stress interact synergistically to reduce survival. Compared with exposure to each stressor alone, during simultaneous sublethal exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress the normal induction of key oxidative-stress response (OxSR) genes was generally inhibited, whereas the induction of key heat-shock response (HSR) genes was not. Genetically activating the SKN-1-dependent OxSR increased a marker for protein aggregation and decreased whole-worm survival during heat stress alone, with the latter being independent of HSF-1. In contrast, compared with wild-type worms, inactivating the HSR by HSF-1 knockdown, which would be expected to decrease basal heat shock protein expression, increased survival during oxidative stress alone. Taken together, these data suggest that, in C. elegans, the HSR and OxSR cannot be simultaneously activated to the same extent that each can be activated during a single stressor exposure. We conclude that the observed synergistic reduction in survival during combined exposure to heat stress and oxidative stress is due, at least in part, to inhibition of the OxSR during activation of the HSR.

  12. Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver

    PubMed Central

    Satapati, Santhosh; Kucejova, Blanka; Duarte, Joao A.G.; Fletcher, Justin A.; Reynolds, Lacy; Sunny, Nishanth E.; He, Tianteng; Nair, L. Arya; Livingston, Kenneth; Fu, Xiaorong; Merritt, Matthew E.; Sherry, A. Dean; Malloy, Craig R.; Shelton, John M.; Lambert, Jennifer; Parks, Elizabeth J.; Corbin, Ian; Magnuson, Mark A.; Browning, Jeffrey D.; Burgess, Shawn C.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondria are critical for respiration in all tissues; however, in liver, these organelles also accommodate high-capacity anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways that are essential to gluconeogenesis and other biosynthetic activities. During nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), mitochondria also produce ROS that damage hepatocytes, trigger inflammation, and contribute to insulin resistance. Here, we provide several lines of evidence indicating that induction of biosynthesis through hepatic anaplerotic/cataplerotic pathways is energetically backed by elevated oxidative metabolism and hence contributes to oxidative stress and inflammation during NAFLD. First, in murine livers, elevation of fatty acid delivery not only induced oxidative metabolism, but also amplified anaplerosis/cataplerosis and caused a proportional rise in oxidative stress and inflammation. Second, loss of anaplerosis/cataplerosis via genetic knockdown of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase 1 (Pck1) prevented fatty acid–induced rise in oxidative flux, oxidative stress, and inflammation. Flux appeared to be regulated by redox state, energy charge, and metabolite concentration, which may also amplify antioxidant pathways. Third, preventing elevated oxidative metabolism with metformin also normalized hepatic anaplerosis/cataplerosis and reduced markers of inflammation. Finally, independent histological grades in human NAFLD biopsies were proportional to oxidative flux. Thus, hepatic oxidative stress and inflammation are associated with elevated oxidative metabolism during an obesogenic diet, and this link may be provoked by increased work through anabolic pathways. PMID:26571396

  13. Protective mechanisms of Cucumis sativus in diabetes-related modelsof oxidative stress and carbonyl stress

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Himan; Kamalinejad, Mohammad; Noubarani, Maryam; Rahmati, Mokhtar; Jafarian, Iman; Adiban, Hasan; Eskandari, Mohammad Reza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Oxidative stress and carbonyl stress have essential mediatory roles in the development of diabetes and its related complications through increasing free radicals production and impairing antioxidant defense systems. Different chemical and natural compounds have been suggested for decreasing such disorders associated with diabetes. The objectives of the present study were to investigate the protective effects of Cucumis sativus (C. sativus) fruit (cucumber) in oxidative and carbonyl stress models. These diabetes-related models with overproduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive carbonyl species (RCS) simulate conditions observed in chronic hyperglycemia. Methods: Cytotoxicity induced by cumene hydroperoxide (oxidative stress model) or glyoxal (carbonyl stress model) were measured and the protective effects of C. sativus were evaluated using freshly isolated rat hepatocytes. Results: Aqueous extract of C. sativus fruit (40 μg/mL) prevented all cytotoxicity markers in both the oxidative and carbonyl stress models including cell lysis, ROS formation, membrane lipid peroxidation, depletion of glutathione, mitochondrial membrane potential decline, lysosomal labialization, and proteolysis. The extract also protected hepatocytes from protein carbonylation induced by glyoxal. Our results indicated that C. sativus is able to prevent oxidative stress and carbonyl stress in the isolated hepatocytes. Conclusion: It can be concluded that C. sativus has protective effects in diabetes complications and can be considered a safe and suitable candidate for decreasing the oxidative stress and carbonyl stress that is typically observed in diabetes mellitus. PMID:27340622

  14. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Cédric; Spencer, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underlying the trade-off between self-maintenance and investment in reproduction, it is necessary to look at the consequences of early-life stress on oxidative status during reproduction. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to pre- and/or post-natal stress on oxidative balance during reproduction under benign or stressful environmental conditions in an avian model species, the Japanese quail. We determined total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and resistance to a free-radical attack in individual exposed to pre-natal stress, post-natal stress or both and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. TAS levels decreased over time in all females that reproduced under stressful conditions. TOS decreased between the beginning and the end of reproductive period in pre-natal control females. In all females, resistance to a free-radical attack decreased over the reproductive event but this decrease was more pronounced in females from a pre-natal stress development. Our results suggest that pre-natal stress may be associated with a higher cost of reproduction in terms of oxidative stress. These results also confirm that early-life stress can be associated with both benefits and costs depending of the life-history stage or environmental context.

  15. Reduced resistance to oxidative stress during reproduction as a cost of early-life stress.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Cédric; Spencer, Karen A

    2015-05-01

    Stress exposure during early-life development can have long-term consequences for a variety of biological functions including oxidative stress. The link between early-life stress and oxidative balance is beginning to be explored and previous studies have focused on this link in adult non-breeding or immature individuals. However, as oxidative stress is considered as the main physiological mechanism underlying the trade-off between self-maintenance and investment in reproduction, it is necessary to look at the consequences of early-life stress on oxidative status during reproduction. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to pre- and/or post-natal stress on oxidative balance during reproduction under benign or stressful environmental conditions in an avian model species, the Japanese quail. We determined total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS) and resistance to a free-radical attack in individual exposed to pre-natal stress, post-natal stress or both and in control individuals exposed to none of the stressors. TAS levels decreased over time in all females that reproduced under stressful conditions. TOS decreased between the beginning and the end of reproductive period in pre-natal control females. In all females, resistance to a free-radical attack decreased over the reproductive event but this decrease was more pronounced in females from a pre-natal stress development. Our results suggest that pre-natal stress may be associated with a higher cost of reproduction in terms of oxidative stress. These results also confirm that early-life stress can be associated with both benefits and costs depending of the life-history stage or environmental context. PMID:25542633

  16. Role of oxidative stress in carbon nanotube-generated health effects.

    PubMed

    Møller, Peter; Christophersen, Daniel Vest; Jensen, Ditte Marie; Kermanizadeh, Ali; Roursgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Hemmingsen, Jette Gjerke; Danielsen, Pernille Høgh; Cao, Yi; Jantzen, Kim; Klingberg, Henrik; Hersoug, Lars-Georg; Loft, Steffen

    2014-11-01

    The development of products containing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is a major achievement of nanotechnology, although concerns regarding risk of toxic effects linger if the hazards associated with these materials are not thoroughly investigated. Exposure to CNTs has been associated with depletion of antioxidants, increased intracellular production of reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory signaling in cultured cells with primary function in the immune system as well as epithelial, endothelial and stromal cells. Pre-treatment with antioxidants has been shown to attenuate these effects, indicating a dependency of oxidative stress on cellular responses to CNT exposure. CNT-mediated oxidative stress in cell cultures has been associated with elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products and oxidatively damaged DNA. Investigations of oxidative stress endpoints in animal studies have utilized pulmonary, gastrointestinal, intravenous and intraperitoneal exposure routes, documenting elevated levels of lipid peroxidation products and oxidatively damaged DNA nucleobases especially in the lungs and liver, which to some extent occur concomitantly with altered levels of components in the antioxidant defense system (glutathione, superoxide dismutase or catalase). CNTs are biopersistent high aspect ratio materials, and some are rigid with lengths that lead to frustrated phagocytosis and pleural accumulation. There is accumulating evidence showing that pulmonary exposure to CNTs is associated with fibrosis and neoplastic changes in the lungs, and cardiovascular disease. As oxidative stress and inflammation responses are implicated in the development of these diseases, converging lines of evidence indicate that exposure to CNTs is associated with increased risk of cardiopulmonary diseases through generation of a pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant milieu in the lungs.

  17. Evaluation of parameters of oxidative stress after in vitro exposure to FMCW- and CDMA-modulated radiofrequency radiation fields.

    PubMed

    Hook, Graham J; Spitz, Douglas R; Sim, Julia E; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Baty, Jack D; Moros, Eduardo G; Roti Roti, Joseph L

    2004-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine whether radiofrequency (RF) radiation is capable of inducing oxidative stress or affecting the response to oxidative stress in cultured mammalian cells. The two types of RF radiation investigated were frequency-modulated continuous-wave with a carrier frequency of 835.62 MHz (FMCW) and code division multiple access centered on 847.74 MHz (CDMA). To evaluate the effect of RF radiation on oxidative stress, J774.16 mouse macrophage cells were stimulated with gamma-interferon (IFN) and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prior to exposure. Cell cultures were exposed for 20-22 h to a specific absorption rate of 0.8 W/kg at a temperature of 37.0 +/- 0.3 degrees C. Oxidative stress was evaluated by measuring oxidant levels, antioxidant levels, oxidative damage and nitric oxide production. Oxidation of thiols was measured by monitoring the accumulation of glutathione disulfide (GSSG). Cellular antioxidant defenses were evaluated by measuring superoxide dismutase activity (CuZnSOD and MnSOD) as well as catalase and glutathione peroxidase activity. The trypan blue dye exclusion assay was used to measure any changes in viability. The results of these studies indicated that FMCW- and CDMA-modulated RF radiation did not alter parameters indicative of oxidative stress in J774.16 cells. FMCW- and CDMA-modulated fields did not alter the level of intracellular oxidants, accumulation of GSSG or induction of antioxidant defenses in IFN/LPS-stimulated cells. Consistent with the lack of an effect on oxidative stress parameters, no change in toxicity was observed in J774.16 cells after either optimal (with or without inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase) or suboptimal stimulation. PMID:15624304

  18. Oxidative stress induces senescence in human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Brandl, Anita; Meyer, Matthias; Bechmann, Volker; Nerlich, Michael; Angele, Peter

    2011-07-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) contribute to tissue repair in vivo and form an attractive cell source for tissue engineering. Their regenerative potential is impaired by cellular senescence. The effects of oxidative stress on MSCs are still unknown. Our studies were to investigate into the proliferation potential, cytological features and the telomere linked stress response system of MSCs, subject to acute or prolonged oxidant challenge with hydrogen peroxide. Telomere length was measured using the telomere restriction fragment assay, gene expression was determined by rtPCR. Sub-lethal doses of oxidative stress reduced proliferation rates and induced senescent-morphological features and senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase positivity. Prolonged low dose treatment with hydrogen peroxide had no effects on cell proliferation or morphology. Sub-lethal and prolonged low doses of oxidative stress considerably accelerated telomere attrition. Following acute oxidant insult p21 was up-regulated prior to returning to initial levels. TRF1 was significantly reduced, TRF2 showed a slight up-regulation. SIRT1 and XRCC5 were up-regulated after oxidant insult and expression levels increased in aging cells. Compared to fibroblasts and chondrocytes, MSCs showed an increased tolerance to oxidative stress regarding proliferation, telomere biology and gene expression with an impaired stress tolerance in aged cells.

  19. Proline accumulation in lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf.) due to heavy metal stress.

    PubMed

    Handique, G K; Handique, A K

    2009-03-01

    Toxic heavy metals viz. lead, mercury and cadmium induced differential accumulation of proline in lemongrass (Cymbopogon flexuosus Stapf.) grown in soil amended with 50, 100, 200, 350 and 500 mg kg(-1) of the metals have been studied. Proline accumulation was found to be metal specific, organ specific and linear dose dependant. Further, proline accumulation following short term exposure (two months after transplantation) was higher than long term exposure (nine months after transplantation). Proline accumulation following short term exposure was 2.032 to 3.839 micro moles g(-1) for cadmium (50-200 mg kg(-1)); the corresponding range for mercury was 1.968 to 5.670 micro moles g(-1) and 0.830 to 4.567 micro moles g(-1) for lead (50-500 mg kg(-1) for mercury and lead). Proline accumulation was consistently higher in young tender leaf than old leaf, irrespective of the metal or duration of exposure. For cadmium treatment proline level was 2.032 to 3.839 micro moles g(-1) for young leaves while the corresponding value for old leaf was 1.728 to 2.396 micro moles g(-1) following short term exposure. The same trend was observed for the other two metals and duration of exposure. For control set proline accumulation in root was 0.425 micro moles g(-1) as against 0.805 and 0.533 micro moles g(-1) in young and old leaves respectively indicating that proline accumulation in root are lower than leaves, under both normal and stressed condition.

  20. A Novel Stress-Induced Sugarcane Gene Confers Tolerance to Drought, Salt and Oxidative Stress in Transgenic Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Begcy, Kevin; Mariano, Eduardo D.; Gentile, Agustina; Lembke, Carolina G.; Zingaretti, Sonia Marli; Souza, Glaucia M.; Menossi, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    Background Drought is a major abiotic stress that affects crop productivity worldwide. Sugarcane can withstand periods of water scarcity during the final stage of culm maturation, during which sucrose accumulation occurs. Meanwhile, prolonged periods of drought can cause severe plant losses. Methodology/Principal Findings In a previous study, we evaluated the transcriptome of drought-stressed plants to better understand sugarcane responses to drought. Among the up-regulated genes was Scdr1 (sugarcane drought-responsive 1). The aim of the research reported here was to characterize this gene. Scdr1 encodes a putative protein containing 248 amino acids with a large number of proline (19%) and cysteine (13%) residues. Phylogenetic analysis showed that ScDR1is in a clade with homologs from other monocotyledonous plants, separate from those of dicotyledonous plants. The expression of Scdr1 in different varieties of sugarcane plants has not shown a clear association with drought tolerance. Conclusions/Significance The overexpression of Scdr1 in transgenic tobacco plants increased their tolerance to drought, salinity and oxidative stress, as demonstrated by increased photosynthesis, water content, biomass, germination rate, chlorophyll content and reduced accumulation of ROS. Physiological parameters, such as transpiration rate (E), net photosynthesis (A), stomatal conductance (gs) and internal leaf CO2 concentration, were less affected by abiotic stresses in transgenic Scdr1 plants compared with wild-type plants. Overall, our results indicated that Scdr1 conferred tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses, highlighting the potential of this gene for biotechnological applications. PMID:22984543

  1. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Izevskaya, Vera L.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2013-01-01

    The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA) was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA). Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2) that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments. PMID:23533696

  2. Relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid can suppress radiation-induced cellular senescence in mammalian fibroblast cells.

    PubMed

    Kobashigawa, Shinko; Kashino, Genro; Mori, Hiromu; Watanabe, Masami

    2015-03-01

    Ionizing radiation-induced cellular senescence is thought to be caused by nuclear DNA damage that cannot be repaired. However, here we found that radiation induces delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress after irradiation. We investigated whether the relief of delayed oxidative stress by ascorbic acid would suppress the radiation-induced cellular senescence in Syrian golden hamster embryo (SHE) cells. We observed that the level of oxidative stress was drastically increased soon after irradiation, then declined to the level in non-irradiated cells, and increased again with a peak on day 3 after irradiation. We found that the inductions of cellular senescence after X-irradiation were reduced along with suppression of the delayed induction of oxidative stress by treatment with ascorbic acid, but not when oxidative stress occurred immediately after irradiation. Moreover, treatment of ascorbic acid inhibited p53 accumulation at 3 days after irradiation. Our data suggested a delayed increase of intracellular oxidative stress levels plays an important role in the process of radiation-induced cellular senescence by p53 accumulation.

  3. Salinity Stress Is Beneficial to the Accumulation of Chlorogenic Acids in Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.)

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Kun; Cui, Mingxing; Zhao, Shijie; Chen, Xiaobing; Tang, Xiaoli

    2016-01-01

    Honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica Thunb.) is a traditional medicinal plant in China that is particularly rich in chlorogenic acids, which are phenolic compounds with various medicinal properties. This study aimed to examine the effects of salinity stress on accumulation of chlorogenic acids in honeysuckle, through hydroponic experiments and field trials, and to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects. NaCl stress stimulated the transcription of genes encoding key enzymes in the synthesis of chlorogenic acids in leaves; accordingly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids in leaves were significantly increased under NaCl stress, as was antioxidant activity. Specifically, the total concentration of leaf chlorogenic acids was increased by 145.74 and 50.34% after 30 days of 150 and 300 mM NaCl stress, respectively. Similarly, the concentrations of chlorogenic acids were higher in the leaves of plants in saline, compared with non-saline, plots, with increases in total concentrations of chlorogenic acids of 56.05 and 105.29% in October 2014 and 2015, respectively. Despite leaf biomass reduction, absolute amounts of chlorogenic acids per plant and phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) activity were significantly increased by soil salinity, confirming that the accumulation of chlorogenic acids in leaves was a result of stimulation of their synthesis under salinity stress. Soil salinity also led to elevated chlorogenic acid concentrations in honeysuckle flower buds, with significant increases in total chlorogenic acids concentration of 22.42 and 25.14% in May 2014 and 2015, respectively. Consistent with biomass reduction, the absolute amounts of chlorogenic acid per plant declined in flower buds of plants exposed to elevated soil salinity, with no significant change in PAL activity. Thus, salinity-induced chlorogenic acid accumulation in flower buds depended on an amplification effect of growth reduction. In conclusion, salinity stress improved the medicinal quality of

  4. Salivary Nitric Oxide, a Biomarker for Stress and Anxiety?

    PubMed Central

    Al-Smadi, Ahmed Mohammad; Ashour, Ala Fawzi; Al-Awaida, Wajdy

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate if salivary nitrate correlates to the daily psychological stress and anxiety in a group of human subjects. Methods The convenient sample recruitment method was employed; data from seventy three subjects were analyzed. The Perceived Stress Scale (PSS) and Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale (HAM-A) inventories were used to determine stress and anxiety scores respectively. Salivary nitric oxide was measured through nitrate (NOx) levels using the Griess reaction method. Results Although stress and anxiety were correlated. No significant correlation exists between salivary nitrate and daily psychological stress and anxiety in the study's participants. Conclusion While all previous studies focused NOx levels in acute stress models. This is the first study to investigate the correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Although stress and anxiety were correlated, there is no correlation between salivary nitrates and daily psychological stress and anxiety. Further studies are required to investigate this correlation using other biological samples such as plasma. PMID:27247597

  5. Oxidative stress in juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Welker, T.L.; Congleton, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    Juvenile chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), were held in 8-11??C freshwater, starved for 3 days and subjected to a low-water stressor to determine the relationship between the general stress response and oxidative stress. Lipid peroxidation (LPO) levels (lipid hydroperoxides) were measured in kidney, liver and brain samples taken at the beginning of the experiment (0-h unstressed controls) and at 6, 24 and 48 h after application of a continuous low-water stressor. Tissue samples were also taken at 48 h from fish that had not been exposed to the stressor (48-h unstressed controls). Exposure to the low-water stressor affected LPO in kidney and brain tissues. In kidney, LPO decreased 6 h after imposition of the stressor; similar but less pronounced decreases also occurred in the liver and brain. At 48 h, LPO increased (in comparison with 6-h stressed tissues) in the kidney and brain. In comparison with 48-h unstressed controls, LPO levels were higher in the kidney and brain of stressed fish. Although preliminary, results suggest that stress can cause oxidative tissue damage in juvenile chinook salmon. Measures of oxidative stress have shown similar responses to stress in mammals; however, further research is needed to determine the extent of the stress-oxidative stress relationship and the underlying physiological mechanisms in fish.

  6. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy.

    PubMed

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  7. HCV-Induced Oxidative Stress: Battlefield-Winning Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rebbani, Khadija; Tsukiyama-Kohara, Kyoko

    2016-01-01

    About 150 million people worldwide are chronically infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV). The persistence of the infection is controlled by several mechanisms including the induction of oxidative stress. HCV relies on this strategy to redirect lipid metabolism machinery and escape immune response. The 3β-hydroxysterol Δ24-reductase (DHCR24) is one of the newly discovered host markers of oxidative stress. This protein, as HCV-induced oxidative stress responsive protein, may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of HCV chronic infection and associated liver diseases, when aberrantly expressed. The sustained expression of DHCR24 in response to HCV-induced oxidative stress results in suppression of nuclear p53 activity by blocking its acetylation and increasing its interaction with MDM2 in the cytoplasm leading to its degradation, which may induce hepatocarcinogenesis. PMID:27293514

  8. The Role of Oxidative Stress in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Geon Ha; Kim, Jieun E.; Rhie, Sandy Jeong

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is induced by an imbalanced redox states, involving either excessive generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) or dysfunction of the antioxidant system. The brain is one of organs especially vulnerable to the effects of ROS because of its high oxygen demand and its abundance of peroxidation-susceptible lipid cells. Previous studies have demonstrated that oxidative stress plays a central role in a common pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease. Antioxidant therapy has been suggested for the prevention and treatment of neurodegenerative diseases, although the results with regard to their efficacy of treating neurodegenerative disease have been inconsistent. In this review, we will discuss the role of oxidative stress in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases and in vivo measurement of an index of damage by oxidative stress. Moreover, the present knowledge on antioxidant in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and future directions will be outlined. PMID:26713080

  9. OXIDATIVE STRESS STATUS IN HUMANS WITH METABOLIC SYNDROME

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Each component of the constellation of Metabolic Syndrome signs - dyslipidemia, hyperglycemia, hypertension, and obesity - has been associated, though not unequivocally, with an elevation of oxidative stress. Moreover, reductions in these conditions appear generally associated with attenuation of b...

  10. Futile cycling increases sensitivity toward oxidative stress in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Adolfsen, Kristin J.; Brynildsen, Mark P.

    2015-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are toxic molecules utilized by the immune system to combat invading pathogens. Recent evidence suggests that inefficiencies in ATP production or usage can lead to increased endogenous ROS production and sensitivity to oxidative stress in bacteria. With this as inspiration, and knowledge that ATP is required for a number of DNA repair mechanisms, we hypothesized that futile cycling would be an effective way to increase sensitivity to oxidative stress. We developed a mixed integer linear optimization framework to identify experimentally-tractable futile cycles, and confirmed metabolic modeling predictions that futile cycling depresses growth rate, and increases both O2 consumption and ROS production per biomass generated. Further, intracellular ATP was decreased and sensitivity to oxidative stress increased in all actively cycling strains compared to their catalytically inactive controls. This research establishes a fundamental connection between ATP metabolism, endogenous ROS production, and tolerance toward oxidative stress in bacteria. PMID:25732623

  11. Modeling electron competition among nitrogen oxides reduction and N2O accumulation in denitrification.

    PubMed

    Pan, Yuting; Ni, Bing-Jie; Yuan, Zhiguo

    2013-10-01

    Competition for electrons among different steps of denitrification has previously been shown to occur, and to play an important role in the accumulation and emission of N2O in wastewater treatment. However, this electron competition is not recognized in the current denitrification models, limiting their ability to predict N2O accumulation during denitrification. In this work, a new denitrification model is developed for wastewater treatment processes. It describes electron competition among the four steps of denitrification, through modeling the carbon oxidation and nitrogen reduction processes separately, in contrast to the existing models that directly couple these two types of processes. Electron carriers are introduced to link carbon oxidation, which donates electrons to carriers, and nitrogen oxides reduction, which receives electrons from these carriers. The relative ability of each denitrification step to compete for electrons is modeled through the use of different affinity constants with reduced carriers. Model calibration and validation results demonstrate that the developed model is able to reasonably describe the nitrate, nitrite, and N2O reduction rates of a methanol-utilizing denitrifying culture under various carbon and nitrogen oxides supplying conditions. The model proposed, while subject to further validation, is expected to enhance our ability to predict N2O accumulation in denitrification.

  12. Roles of Edc3 in the oxidative stress response and CaMCA1-encoded metacaspase expression in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jong-Hwan; Kim, Jinmi

    2014-11-01

    The Edc3 protein is an enhancer of mRNA decapping, and acts as a scaffold protein for the mRNA granules that are known as processing bodies in yeast. In the pathogenic yeast Candida albicans, various stresses, such as glucose depletion, oxidative stress, and filamentation defects, induce the accumulation of processing bodies. Here, we report that the edc3/edc3 deletion strain showed increased resistance to various stresses, including hydrogen peroxide, acetic acid, and high temperature. Oxidative stress is known to induce the intracellular accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptotic cell death in C. albicans. We found that the ROS level was lower in edc3/edc3 cells than in wild-type cells following oxidative stress. We also observed that expression of the metacaspase gene CaMCA1 was decreased in edc3/edc3 cells. Overexpression of CaMCA1 suppressed the decreased accumulation of ROS and the increased resistance to hydrogen peroxide in edc3/edc3 cells. The catalase Cat1 and the superoxide dismutase Sod1 were upregulated in edc3/edc3 cells as compared with wild-type cells. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that EDC3 plays a critical role in the expression of CaMCA1 and the oxidative stress response in C. albicans. PMID:25158786

  13. Resveratrol-loaded Nanoparticles Induce Antioxidant Activity against Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Eun-Young; Ha, Ho-Kyung; Jo, Chan-Mi; Lee, Won-Jae; Lee, Sung Sill; Kim, Jin Wook

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol acts as a free radical scavenger and a potent antioxidant in the inhibition of numerous reactive oxygen species (ROS). The function of resveratrol and resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles in protecting human lung cancer cells (A549) against hydrogen peroxide was investigated in this study. The 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS) assay was performed to evaluate the antioxidant properties. Resveratrol had substantially high antioxidant capacity (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity value) compared to trolox and vitamin E since the concentration of resveratrol was more than 50 μM. Nanoparticles prepared from β-lactoglobulin (β-lg) were successfully developed. The β-lg nanoparticle showed 60 to 146 nm diameter in size with negatively charged surface. Non-cytotoxicity was observed in Caco-2 cells treated with β-lg nanoparticles. Fluorescein isothiocynate-conjugated β-lg nanoparticles were identified into the cell membrane of Caco-2 cells, indicating that nanoparticles can be used as a delivery system. Hydrogen peroxide caused accumulation of ROS in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Resveratrol-loaded nanoparticles restored H2O2-induced ROS levels by induction of cellular uptake of resveratrol in A549 cells. Furthermore, resveratrol activated nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-Kelch ECH associating protein 1 (Nrf2-Keap1) signaling in A549 cells, thereby accumulation of Nrf2 abundance, as demonstrated by western blotting approach. Overall, these results may have implications for improvement of oxidative stress in treatment with nanoparticles as a biodegradable and non-toxic delivery carrier of bioactive compounds. PMID:26732454

  14. Overexpression of protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase C regulates oxidative stress in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Pattanayak, Gopal K; Tripathy, Baishnab C

    2011-01-01

    Light absorbed by colored intermediates of chlorophyll biosynthesis is not utilized in photosynthesis; instead, it is transferred to molecular oxygen, generating singlet oxygen ((1)O(2)). As there is no enzymatic detoxification mechanism available in plants to destroy (1)O(2), its generation should be minimized. We manipulated the concentration of a major chlorophyll biosynthetic intermediate i.e., protochlorophyllide in Arabidopsis by overexpressing the light-inducible protochlorophyllide oxidoreductase C (PORC) that effectively phototransforms endogenous protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide leading to minimal accumulation of the photosensitizer protochlorophyllide in light-grown plants. In PORC overexpressing (PORCx) plants exposed to high-light, the (1)O(2) generation and consequent malonedialdehyde production was minimal and the maximum quantum efficiency of photosystem II remained unaffected demonstrating that their photosynthetic apparatus and cellular organization were intact. Further, PORCx plants treated with 5-aminolevulinicacid when exposed to light, photo-converted over-accumulated protochlorophyllide to chlorophyllide, reduced the generation of (1)O(2) and malonedialdehyde production and reduced plasma membrane damage. So PORCx plants survived and bolted whereas, the 5-aminolevulinicacid-treated wild-type plants perished. Thus, overexpression of PORC could be biotechnologically exploited in crop plants for tolerance to (1)O(2)-induced oxidative stress, paving the use of 5-aminolevulinicacid as a selective commercial light-activated biodegradable herbicide. Reduced protochlorophyllide content in PORCx plants released the protochlorophyllide-mediated feed-back inhibition of 5-aminolevulinicacid biosynthesis that resulted in higher 5-aminolevulinicacid production. Increase of 5-aminolevulinicacid synthesis upregulated the gene and protein expression of several downstream chlorophyll biosynthetic enzymes elucidating a regulatory net work of expression of

  15. Developmental ethanol exposure leads to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Logan-Garbisch, Theresa; Bortolazzo, Anthony; Luu, Peter; Ford, Audrey; Do, David; Khodabakhshi, Payam; French, Rachael L

    2014-11-11

    Ethanol exposure during development causes an array of developmental abnormalities, both physiological and behavioral. In mammals, these abnormalities are collectively known as fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model of FASD and have previously shown that developmental ethanol exposure in flies leads to reduced expression of insulin-like peptides (dILPs) and their receptor. In this work, we link that observation to dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and lipid accumulation. Further, we show that developmental ethanol exposure in Drosophila causes oxidative stress, that this stress is a primary cause of the developmental lethality and delay associated with ethanol exposure, and, finally, that one of the mechanisms by which ethanol increases oxidative stress is through abnormal fatty acid metabolism. These data suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ethanol causes the symptoms associated with FASD.

  16. Developmental Ethanol Exposure Leads to Dysregulation of Lipid Metabolism and Oxidative Stress in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Logan-Garbisch, Theresa; Bortolazzo, Anthony; Luu, Peter; Ford, Audrey; Do, David; Khodabakhshi, Payam; French, Rachael L.

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during development causes an array of developmental abnormalities, both physiological and behavioral. In mammals, these abnormalities are collectively known as fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model of FASD and have previously shown that developmental ethanol exposure in flies leads to reduced expression of insulin-like peptides (dILPs) and their receptor. In this work, we link that observation to dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and lipid accumulation. Further, we show that developmental ethanol exposure in Drosophila causes oxidative stress, that this stress is a primary cause of the developmental lethality and delay associated with ethanol exposure, and, finally, that one of the mechanisms by which ethanol increases oxidative stress is through abnormal fatty acid metabolism. These data suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ethanol causes the symptoms associated with FASD. PMID:25387828

  17. Developmental ethanol exposure leads to dysregulation of lipid metabolism and oxidative stress in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Logan-Garbisch, Theresa; Bortolazzo, Anthony; Luu, Peter; Ford, Audrey; Do, David; Khodabakhshi, Payam; French, Rachael L

    2014-01-01

    Ethanol exposure during development causes an array of developmental abnormalities, both physiological and behavioral. In mammals, these abnormalities are collectively known as fetal alcohol effects (FAE) or fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). We have established a Drosophila melanogaster model of FASD and have previously shown that developmental ethanol exposure in flies leads to reduced expression of insulin-like peptides (dILPs) and their receptor. In this work, we link that observation to dysregulation of fatty acid metabolism and lipid accumulation. Further, we show that developmental ethanol exposure in Drosophila causes oxidative stress, that this stress is a primary cause of the developmental lethality and delay associated with ethanol exposure, and, finally, that one of the mechanisms by which ethanol increases oxidative stress is through abnormal fatty acid metabolism. These data suggest a previously uncharacterized mechanism by which ethanol causes the symptoms associated with FASD. PMID:25387828

  18. Hypoxia-Induced Iron Accumulation in Oligodendrocytes Mediates Apoptosis by Eliciting Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress.

    PubMed

    Rathnasamy, Gurugirijha; Murugan, Madhuvika; Ling, Eng-Ang; Kaur, Charanjit

    2016-09-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the role of increased iron accumulation in oligodendrocytes and its role in their apoptosis in the periventricular white matter damage (PWMD) following a hypoxic injury to the neonatal brain. In response to hypoxia, in the PWM, there was increased expression of proteins involved in iron acquisition, such as iron regulatory proteins (IRP1, IRP2) and transferrin receptor in oligodendrocytes. Consistent with this, following a hypoxic exposure, there was increased accumulation of iron in primary cultured oligodendrocytes. The increased concentration of iron within hypoxic oligodendrocytes was found to elicit ryanodine receptor (RyR) expression, and the expression of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers such as binding-immunoglobulin protein (BiP) and inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE)-1α. Associated with ER stress, there was reduced adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels within hypoxic oligodendrocytes. However, treatment with deferoxamine reduced the increased expression of RyR, BiP, and IRE-1α and increased ATP levels in hypoxic oligodendrocytes. Parallel to ER stress there was enhanced reactive oxygen species production within mitochondria of hypoxic oligodendrocytes, which was attenuated when these cells were treated with deferoxamine. At the ultrastructural level, hypoxic oligodendrocytes frequently showed dilated ER and disrupted mitochondria, which became less evident in those treated with deferoxamine. Associated with these subcellular changes, the apoptosis of hypoxic oligodendrocytes was evident with an increase in p53 and caspase-3 expression, which was attenuated when these cells were treated with deferoxamine. Thus, the present study emphasizes that the excess iron accumulated within oligodendrocytes in hypoxic PWM could result in their death by eliciting ER stress and mitochondrial disruption.

  19. Introduction to Oxidative Stress in Biomedical and Biological Research

    PubMed Central

    Breitenbach, Michael; Eckl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress is now a well-researched area with thousands of new articles appearing every year. We want to give the reader here an overview of the topics in biomedical and basic oxidative stress research which are covered by the authors of this thematic issue. We also want to give the newcomer a short introduction into some of the basic concepts, definitions and analytical procedures used in this field. PMID:26117854

  20. Oxidative stress-induced assembly of PML nuclear bodies controls sumoylation of partner proteins.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Umut; Ferhi, Omar; Jeanne, Marion; Benhenda, Shirine; Berthier, Caroline; Jollivet, Florence; Niwa-Kawakita, Michiko; Faklaris, Orestis; Setterblad, Niclas; de Thé, Hugues; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2014-03-17

    The promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein organizes PML nuclear bodies (NBs), which are stress-responsive domains where many partner proteins accumulate. Here, we clarify the basis for NB formation and identify stress-induced partner sumoylation as the primary NB function. NB nucleation does not rely primarily on intermolecular interactions between the PML SUMO-interacting motif (SIM) and SUMO, but instead results from oxidation-mediated PML multimerization. Oxidized PML spherical meshes recruit UBC9, which enhances PML sumoylation, allow partner recruitment through SIM interactions, and ultimately enhance partner sumoylation. Intermolecular SUMO-SIM interactions then enforce partner sequestration within the NB inner core. Accordingly, oxidative stress enhances NB formation and global sumoylation in vivo. Some NB-associated sumoylated partners also become polyubiquitinated by RNF4, precipitating their proteasomal degradation. As several partners are protein-modifying enzymes, NBs could act as sensors that facilitate and confer oxidative stress sensitivity not only to sumoylation but also to other post-translational modifications, thereby explaining alterations of stress response upon PML or NB loss.

  1. Oxidative stress and antioxidant systems in Guava (Psidium guajava L.) fruits during ripening.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Koushik; Malhotra, Sarla P; Jain, Veena; Singh, Randhir

    2009-10-01

    Two varieties of guava viz., L-49 and Hisar Safeda differing in their shelf lives were analyzed for various components of oxidative stress and of enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidative system at different stages of fruit ripening. Indices of oxidative stress viz., lipoxygenase activity, malondialdehyde value and H2O2 content increased throughout during ripening in both the varieties. The extent of oxidative stress was more pronounced in Hisar Safeda (shelf life 3-4 days) than in L-49 (shelf life 7-8 days). Except for superoxide dismutase, activities of all other antioxidative enzymes viz., catalase, peroxidase, ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase increased up to color turning stage and decreased thereafter. Superoxide dismutase activity, however, increased upto ripe stage followed by a decline. Contents of ascorbic acid and glutathione (total, oxidized and reduced) were found to be the maximum at turning and mature stage, respectively. It is inferred that ripening of guava fruit is accompanied by a progressive increase in oxidative/peroxidative stress which induces antioxidant system but not until later stages of ripening. Over-accumulation of ROS due to dysfunctioning of ROS scavenging system at later stages of fruit ripening appears to be responsible for loss of tissue structure as observed in ripened and over-ripened fruits.

  2. Mitochondrial oxidant stress in locus coeruleus is regulated by activity and nitric oxide synthase

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez–Padilla, J.; Guzman, J.N.; Ilijic, E.; Kondapalli, J.; Galtieri, D.J.; Yang, B.; Schieber, S.; Oertel, W.; Wokosin, D.; Schumacker, P. T.; Surmeier, D. J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Loss of noradrenergic locus coeruleus (LC) neurons is a prominent feature of aging–related neurodegenerative diseases, like Parkinson’s disease (PD). The basis of this vulnerability is not understood. To explore possible physiological determinants, LC neurons were studied using electrophysiological and optical approaches in ex vivo mouse brain slices. These studies revealed that autonomous activity in LC neurons was accompanied by oscillations in dendritic Ca2+ concentration attributable to opening of L–type Ca2+ channels. This oscillation elevated mitochondrial oxidant stress and was attenuated by inhibition of nitric oxide synthase. The relationship between activity and stress was malleable, as arousal and carbon dioxide, each increased the spike rate, but differentially affected mitochondrial oxidant stress. Oxidant stress also was increased in an animal model of PD. Thus, our results point to activity–dependent Ca2+ entry and a resulting mitochondrial oxidant stress as factors contributing to the vulnerability of LC neurons. PMID:24816140

  3. Interseismic stress accumulation at the locked zone of Nankai Trough seismogenic fault off Kii Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, M.; Tobin, H. J.

    2011-12-01

    Since 2007, we accomplished drilling, coring and downhole measurements at 13 sites across the Nankai accretionary complex off Kii peninsula using D/V Chikyu. Although the deepest hole is well above the seismogenic fault zone, we found that the stress regime is quite variable across the accretionary prism, and their mechanism is still in discussion. An important source for such stress variation is the tectonic loading. In order to assess how much stress can possibly be accumulated around the locked zone during one seismic cycle, we conducted a simple 2D plain-strain steady-state elastic model using the finite-element method. We fixed the geometry of plate interface and prohibited a horizontal displacement at one side (above the plate interface) 200km landward from the trench. Along the plate interface except the locked zone, we allowed free slip only along the fault. The locked zone is defined at 30-100 km landward of the trench, and is assumed as 100% locked (no differential movement). The movement of downgoing lithosphere is given at the landward side boundary 200 km landward of the trench. Since we deal with the total stress accumulation within one seismic cycle, a displacement of 5 m was given as a slab pull. Young's modulus in the Kumano forearc basin (1 km thick) is set as 4 GPa taken from sonic log data at Site C0009, whereas that in the underlying domain is set at 50 GPa which would be too high for the accretionary sediment. In that case, estimated stress would be lower than provided below. Most of the tectonic stress due to 5m of plate convergence is concentrated near the downdip edge of the locked zone. The principal compressional and shear stress on the fault is larger than 5 MPa and 2 MPa, respectively. They roughly agree with the stress drop during the M8 events. These stresses along the fault, however, gradually decrease seaward to zero level. Tectonic compressional stress near the updip edge is much smaller than near downdip. At Site C0002, it is

  4. Impact of oxidative stress on exercising skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Steinbacher, Peter; Eckl, Peter

    2015-04-10

    It is well established that muscle contractions during exercise lead to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in skeletal muscle. These highly reactive molecules have many deleterious effects, such as a reduction of force generation and increased muscle atrophy. Since the discovery of exercise-induced oxidative stress several decades ago, evidence has accumulated that ROS produced during exercise also have positive effects by influencing cellular processes that lead to increased expression of antioxidants. These molecules are particularly elevated in regularly exercising muscle to prevent the negative effects of ROS by neutralizing the free radicals. In addition, ROS also seem to be involved in the exercise-induced adaptation of the muscle phenotype. This review provides an overview of the evidences to date on the effects of ROS in exercising muscle. These aspects include the sources of ROS, their positive and negative cellular effects, the role of antioxidants, and the present evidence on ROS-dependent adaptations of muscle cells in response to physical exercise.

  5. Brain susceptibility to oxidative stress in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Luisa M; Stazzoni, Gemma; Ramenghi, Luca; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) occurs at birth in all newborns as a consequence of the hyperoxic challenge due to the transition from the hypoxic intrauterine environment to extrauterine life. Free radical (FRs) sources such as inflammation, hyperoxia, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion, neutrophil and macrophage activation, glutamate and free iron release, all increases the OS during the perinatal period. Newborns, and particularly preterm infants, have reduced antioxidant defences and are not able to counteract the harmful effects of FRs. Energy metabolism is central to life because cells cannot exist without an adequate supply of ATP. Due to its growth, the mammalian brain can be considered as a steady-state system in which ATP production matches ATP utilisation. The developing brain is particularly sensitive to any disturbances in energy generation, and even a short-term interruption can lead to long-lasting and irreversible damage. Whenever energy failure develops, brain damage can occur. Accumulating evidence indicates that OS is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases, such as intraventricular haemorrhage, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and epilepsy. PMID:23968388

  6. Brain susceptibility to oxidative stress in the perinatal period.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Serafina; Tataranno, Luisa M; Stazzoni, Gemma; Ramenghi, Luca; Buonocore, Giuseppe

    2015-11-01

    Oxidative stress (OS) occurs at birth in all newborns as a consequence of the hyperoxic challenge due to the transition from the hypoxic intrauterine environment to extrauterine life. Free radical (FRs) sources such as inflammation, hyperoxia, hypoxia, ischaemia-reperfusion, neutrophil and macrophage activation, glutamate and free iron release, all increases the OS during the perinatal period. Newborns, and particularly preterm infants, have reduced antioxidant defences and are not able to counteract the harmful effects of FRs. Energy metabolism is central to life because cells cannot exist without an adequate supply of ATP. Due to its growth, the mammalian brain can be considered as a steady-state system in which ATP production matches ATP utilisation. The developing brain is particularly sensitive to any disturbances in energy generation, and even a short-term interruption can lead to long-lasting and irreversible damage. Whenever energy failure develops, brain damage can occur. Accumulating evidence indicates that OS is implicated in the pathogenesis of many neurological diseases, such as intraventricular haemorrhage, hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy and epilepsy.

  7. Siglec receptors impact mammalian lifespan by modulating oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Schwarz, Flavio; Pearce, Oliver M T; Wang, Xiaoxia; Samraj, Annie N; Läubli, Heinz; Garcia, Javier O; Lin, Hongqiao; Fu, Xiaoming; Garcia-Bingman, Andrea; Secrest, Patrick; Romanoski, Casey E; Heyser, Charles; Glass, Christopher K; Hazen, Stanley L; Varki, Nissi; Varki, Ajit; Gagneux, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Aging is a multifactorial process that includes the lifelong accumulation of molecular damage, leading to age-related frailty, disability and disease, and eventually death. In this study, we report evidence of a significant correlation between the number of genes encoding the immunomodulatory CD33-related sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like receptors (CD33rSiglecs) and maximum lifespan in mammals. In keeping with this, we show that mice lacking Siglec-E, the main member of the CD33rSiglec family, exhibit reduced survival. Removal of Siglec-E causes the development of exaggerated signs of aging at the molecular, structural, and cognitive level. We found that accelerated aging was related both to an unbalanced ROS metabolism, and to a secondary impairment in detoxification of reactive molecules, ultimately leading to increased damage to cellular DNA, proteins, and lipids. Taken together, our data suggest that CD33rSiglecs co-evolved in mammals to achieve a better management of oxidative stress during inflammation, which in turn reduces molecular damage and extends lifespan. PMID:25846707

  8. Mycotoxin-Containing Diet Causes Oxidative Stress in the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yan-Jun; Zhao, Yong-Yan; Xiong, Bo; Cui, Xiang-Shun; Kim, Nam-Hyung; Xu, Yin-Xue; Sun, Shao-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Mycotoxins which mainly consist of Aflatoxin (AF), Zearalenone (ZEN) and Deoxynivalenol (DON) are commonly found in many food commodities. Although each component has been shown to cause liver toxicity and oxidative stress in several species, there is no evidence regarding the effect of naturally contained multiple mycotoxins on tissue toxicity and oxidative stress in vivo. In the present study, mycotoxins-contaminated maize (AF 597 µg/kg, ZEN 729 µg/kg, DON 3.1 mg/kg maize) was incorporated into the diet at three different doses (0, 5 and 20%) to feed the mice, and blood and tissue samples were collected to examine the oxidative stress related indexes. The results showed that the indexes of liver, kidney and spleen were all increased and the liver and kidney morphologies changed in the mycotoxin-treated mice. Also, the treatment resulted in the elevated glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity and malondialdehyde (MDA) level in the serum and liver, indicating the presence of the oxidative stress. Moreover, the decrease of catalase (CAT) activity in the serum, liver and kidney as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity in the liver and kidney tissue further confirmed the occurrence of oxidative stress. In conclusion, our data indicate that the naturally contained mycotoxins are toxic in vivo and able to induce the oxidant stress in the mouse. PMID:23555961

  9. The role of oxidative stress in nickel and chromate genotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Costa, Max; Salnikow, Konstantin; Sutherland, Jessica E; Broday, Limor; Peng, Wu; Zhang, Qunwei; Kluz, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    Some general principles regarding oxidative stress and molecular responses to toxic metals are presented in this manuscript. The remainder of the manuscript, however, will focus on the role of oxidative stress in particulate nickel-induced genetic damage and mutations. The phagocytosis of particulate nickel compounds and the dissolution of the particles inside the cell and the resulting oxidative stress produced in the nucleus is a key component of the nickel carcinogenic mechanism. The crosslinking of amino acids to DNA by nickel that does not involve direct participation of nickel in a ternary complex but nickel-induced oxidative stress will be discussed as well. The selective ability of particulate nickel compounds to silence the expression of genes located near heterochromatin and the effect of vitamin E on the genotoxicity and mutations induced by particulate and soluble nickel compounds will also be discussed. Particulate nickel compounds have been shown to produce more oxidative stress than water-soluble nickel compounds. In addition to nickel, the role of oxidative stress in chromate-induced genotoxicity will also be discussed with particular attention directed to the effects of vitamin E on mutations and chromosomal aberrations inducedby chromate.

  10. Sensing pulmonary oxidative stress by lung vagal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Clark, Thomas E.; Undem, Bradley J.

    2011-01-01

    Oxidative stress in the bronchopulmonary airways can occur through a variety of inflammatory mechanisms and also following the inhalation of environmental pollutants. Oxidative stress causes cellular dysfunction and thus mammals (including humans) have developed mechanisms for detecting oxidative stress, such that defensive behavior and defensive biological mechanisms can be induced to lessen its potential damage. Vagal sensory nerves innervating the airways play a critical role in the detection of the microenvironment in the airways. Oxidative stress and associated compounds activate unmyelinated bronchopulmonary C-fibers, initiating action potentials in these nerves that conduct centrally to evoke unpleasant sensations (e.g. urge to cough, dyspnea, chest-tightness) and to stimulate/modulate reflexes (e.g. cough, bronchoconstriction, respiratory rate, inspiratory drive). This review will summarize the published evidence regarding the mechanisms by which oxidative stress, reactive oxygen species, environmental pollutants and lipid products of peroxidation activate bronchopulmonary C-fibers. Evidence suggests a key role for transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1), although transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) and purinergic P2X channels may also play a role. Knowledge of these pathways greatly aids our understanding of the role of oxidative stress in health and disease and represents novel therapeutic targets for diseases of the airways. PMID:21600314

  11. Bridges between mitochondrial oxidative stress, ER stress and mTOR signaling in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Yang, Xin; Zhang, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    Pancreatic β cell dysfunction, i.e., failure to provide insulin in concentrations sufficient to control blood sugar, is central to the etiology of all types of diabetes. Current evidence implicates mitochondrial oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in pancreatic β cell loss and impaired insulin secretion. Oxidative and ER stress are interconnected so that misfolded proteins induce reactive oxygen species (ROS) production; likewise, oxidative stress disturbs the ER redox state thereby disrupting correct disulfide bond formation and proper protein folding. mTOR signaling regulates many metabolic processes including protein synthesis, cell growth, survival and proliferation. Oxidative stress inhibits mTORC1, which is considered an important suppressor of mitochondrial oxidative stress in β cells, and ultimately, controls cell survival. The interplay between ER stress and mTORC1 is complicated, since the unfolded protein response (UPR) activation can occur upstream or downstream of mTORC1. Persistent activation of mTORC1 initiates protein synthesis and UPR activation, while in the later phase induces ER stress. Chronic activation of ER stress inhibits Akt/mTORC1 pathway, while under particular settings, acute activation of UPR activates Akt-mTOR signaling. Thus, modulating mitochondrial oxidative stress and ER stress via mTOR signaling may be an approach that will effectively suppress obesity- or glucolipotoxicity-induced metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). In this review, we focus on the regulations between mTOR signaling and mitochondrial oxidative or ER stress in pancreatic β cells.

  12. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes.

  13. Ethylene Inhibits Root Elongation during Alkaline Stress through AUXIN1 and Associated Changes in Auxin Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Xu, Heng-Hao; Liu, Wen-Cheng; Zhang, Xiao-Wei; Lu, Ying-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Soil alkalinity causes major reductions in yield and quality of crops worldwide. The plant root is the first organ sensing soil alkalinity, which results in shorter primary roots. However, the mechanism underlying alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation remains to be further elucidated. Here, we report that alkaline conditions inhibit primary root elongation of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) seedlings by reducing cell division potential in the meristem zones and that ethylene signaling affects this process. The ethylene perception antagonist silver (Ag(+)) alleviated the inhibition of root elongation by alkaline stress. Moreover, the ethylene signaling mutants ethylene response1-3 (etr1-3), ethylene insensitive2 (ein2), and ein3-1 showed less reduction in root length under alkaline conditions, indicating a reduced sensitivity to alkalinity. Ethylene biosynthesis also was found to play a role in alkaline stress-mediated root inhibition; the ethylene overproducer1-1 mutant, which overproduces ethylene because of increased stability of 1-AMINOCYCLOPROPANE-1-CARBOXYLIC ACID SYNTHASE5, was hypersensitive to alkaline stress. In addition, the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor cobalt (Co(2+)) suppressed alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. We further found that alkaline stress caused an increase in auxin levels by promoting expression of auxin biosynthesis-related genes, but the increase in auxin levels was reduced in the roots of the etr1-3 and ein3-1 mutants and in Ag(+)/Co(2+)-treated wild-type plants. Additional genetic and physiological data showed that AUXIN1 (AUX1) was involved in alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root elongation. Taken together, our results reveal that ethylene modulates alkaline stress-mediated inhibition of root growth by increasing auxin accumulation by stimulating the expression of AUX1 and auxin biosynthesis-related genes. PMID:26109425

  14. Toxicity Induced by a Metal Mixture (Cd, Pb and Zn) in the Yeast Pichia kudriavzevii: The Role of Oxidative Stress.

    PubMed

    Mesquita, Vanessa A; Silva, Cristina F; Soares, Eduardo V

    2016-05-01

    The present work aims to contribute for the elucidation of the role of oxidative stress in the toxicity associated with the exposure of Pichia kudriavzevii to multi-metals (Cd, Pb and Zn). Cells of the non-conventional yeast P. kudriavzevii exposed for 6 h to the action of multi-metals accumulated intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), evaluated through the oxidation of the probe 2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. A progressive loss of membrane integrity (monitored using propidium iodide) was observed in multi-metal-treated cells. The triggering of intracellular ROS accumulation preceded the loss of membrane integrity. These results suggest that the disruption of membrane integrity can be attributed to the oxidative stress. The exposure of yeast cells to single metal showed that, under the concentrations tested, Pb was the metal responsible for the induction of the oxidative stress. Yeast cells coexposed to an antioxidant (ascorbic acid) and multi-metals did not accumulate intracellular ROS, but loss proliferation capacity. Together, the data obtained indicated that intracellular ROS accumulation contributed to metal toxicity, namely for the disruption of membrane integrity of the yeast P. kudriavzevii. It was proposed that Pb toxicity (the metal responsible for the toxic symptoms under the conditions tested) result from the combination of an ionic mechanism and the intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:26781618

  15. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor apocynin induces nitric oxide synthesis via oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Riganti, Chiara

    2008-05-01

    We have recently shown that apocynin elicits an oxidative stress in N11 mouse glial cells and other cell types. Here we report that apocynin increased the accumulation of nitrite, the stable derivative of nitric oxide (NO), in the extracellular medium of N11 cell cultures, and the NO synthase (NOS) activity in cell lysates. The increased synthesis of NO was associated with increased expression of inducible NOS (iNOS) mRNA, increased nuclear translocation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor NF-{kappa}B and decreased intracellular level of its inhibitor IkB{alpha}. These effects, accompanied by increased production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, were very similar to those observed after incubation with bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and were inhibited by catalase. These results suggest that apocynin, similarly to LPS, induces increased NO synthesis by eliciting a generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which in turn causes NF-{kappa}B activation and increased expression of iNOS. Therefore, the increased bioavailability of NO reported in the literature after in vivo or in vitro treatments with apocynin might depend, at least partly, on the drug-elicited induction of iNOS, and not only on the inhibition of NADPH oxidase and the subsequent decreased scavenging of NO by oxidase-derived ROS, as it is often supposed.

  16. Age-induced hair greying - the multiple effects of oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Seiberg, M

    2013-12-01

    An obvious sign of ageing is hair greying, or the loss of pigment production and deposition within the hair shafts. Numerous mechanisms, acting at different levels and follicular locations, contribute to hair greying, ranging from melanocyte stem cells defects to follicular melanocyte death. One key issue that is in common to these processes is oxidative damage. At the hair follicle stem cells niche, oxidative stress, accelerated by B-cell lymphoma 2 gene (BCL-2) depletion, leads to selective apoptosis and diminution of melanocyte stem cells, reducing the repopulation of newly formed anagen follicles. Melanotic bulbar melanocytes express high levels of BCL-2 to enable survival from melanogenesis- and ultraviolet A (UVA)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) attacks. With ageing, the bulbar melanocyte expression of anti-oxidant proteins such as BCL-2, and possibly TRP-2, is reduced, and the dedicated enzymatic anti-oxidant defence system throughout the follicle weakens, resulting in enhanced oxidative stress. A marked reduction in catalase expression and activity results in millimolar accumulation of hydrogen peroxide, contributing to bulbar melanocyte malfunction and death. Interestingly, amelanotic melanocytes at the outer root sheath (ORS) are somewhat less affected by these processes and survive for longer time even within the white, ageing hair follicles. Better understanding of the overtime susceptibility of melanocytes to oxidative stress at the different follicular locations might yield clues to possible therapies for the prevention and reversal of hair greying.

  17. 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine: Link to gene expression, aging and defense against oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Radak, Zsolt; Boldogh, Istvan

    2010-01-01

    The one-electron oxidation product of guanine 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG) is an abundant lesion in genomic, mitochondrial and telomeric DNA and RNA. It is considered to be a marker of oxidative stress that preferentially accumulates at the 5’ end of guanine strings in the DNA helix, guanine quadruplexes and in RNA molecules. 8-oxoG has a lower oxidation potential compared to guanine, thus it is susceptible to oxidation/reduction and along with its redox products, is traditionally considered to be a major genotoxic/mutagenic DNA base lesion. It does not change the architecture of the DNA double helix and it is specifically recognized and excised by 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (OGG1) during the DNA base excision repair pathway. OGG1 null animals accumulate excess levels of 8-oxoG in their genome, while they do not have shorter lifespan, nor exhibit severe pathological symptoms including tumor formation. In fact they are increasingly resistant to inflammation. Here we address rarely considered significance of 8-oxoG such as its optimal level in the DNA and RNA in a given condition, essentiality for normal cellular physiology, evolutionary role, ability to soften the effects of oxidative stress in DNA, harmful consequences of its repair, as well as its importance in transcriptional initiation and chromatin relaxation. PMID:20483371

  18. Notch1 deficiency decreases hepatic lipid accumulation by induction of fatty acid oxidation.

    PubMed

    Song, No-Joon; Yun, Ui Jeong; Yang, Sunghee; Wu, Chunyan; Seo, Cho-Rong; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Baik, Sang-Ha; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bo Youn; Bahn, Gahee; Kim, Suji; Kwon, So-Mi; Park, Jin Su; Baek, Seung Hyun; Park, Tae Joo; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Byung-Joon; Mattson, Mark P; Lee, Sung-Joon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling pathways modulate various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and communication. Recent studies have demonstrated that Notch1 signaling also regulates hepatic glucose production and lipid synthesis. However, the effect of Notch1 signaling on hepatic lipid oxidation has not yet been directly investigated. To define the function of Notch1 signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism, wild type mice and Notch1 deficient antisense transgenic (NAS) mice were fed a high-fat diet. High-fat diet -fed NAS mice exhibited a marked reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation compared with wild type obese mice. The improved fatty liver was associated with an increased expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. However, lipogenic genes were not differentially expressed in the NAS liver, suggesting lipolytic-specific regulatory effects by Notch1 signaling. Expression of fatty acid oxidative genes and the rate of fatty acid oxidation were also increased by inhibition of Notch1 signaling in HepG2 cells. In addition, similar regulatory effects on lipid accumulation were observed in adipocytes. Taken together, these data show that inhibition of Notch1 signaling can regulate the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes and may provide therapeutic strategies in obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:26786165

  19. Notch1 deficiency decreases hepatic lipid accumulation by induction of fatty acid oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Song, No-Joon; Yun, Ui Jeong; Yang, Sunghee; Wu, Chunyan; Seo, Cho-Rong; Gwon, A-Ryeong; Baik, Sang-Ha; Choi, Yuri; Choi, Bo Youn; Bahn, Gahee; Kim, Suji; Kwon, So-Mi; Park, Jin Su; Baek, Seung Hyun; Park, Tae Joo; Yoon, Keejung; Kim, Byung-Joon; Mattson, Mark P.; Lee, Sung-Joon; Jo, Dong-Gyu; Park, Kye Won

    2016-01-01

    Notch signaling pathways modulate various cellular processes, including cell proliferation, differentiation, adhesion, and communication. Recent studies have demonstrated that Notch1 signaling also regulates hepatic glucose production and lipid synthesis. However, the effect of Notch1 signaling on hepatic lipid oxidation has not yet been directly investigated. To define the function of Notch1 signaling in hepatic lipid metabolism, wild type mice and Notch1 deficient antisense transgenic (NAS) mice were fed a high-fat diet. High-fat diet -fed NAS mice exhibited a marked reduction in hepatic triacylglycerol accumulation compared with wild type obese mice. The improved fatty liver was associated with an increased expression of hepatic genes involved in fatty acid oxidation. However, lipogenic genes were not differentially expressed in the NAS liver, suggesting lipolytic-specific regulatory effects by Notch1 signaling. Expression of fatty acid oxidative genes and the rate of fatty acid oxidation were also increased by inhibition of Notch1 signaling in HepG2 cells. In addition, similar regulatory effects on lipid accumulation were observed in adipocytes. Taken together, these data show that inhibition of Notch1 signaling can regulate the expression of fatty acid oxidation genes and may provide therapeutic strategies in obesity-induced hepatic steatosis. PMID:26786165

  20. Neuroinflammation, oxidative stress and the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Agostinho, Paula; Cunha, Rodrigo A; Oliveira, Catarina

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common neurodegenerative disorder that affects the elderly. The increase of life-expectancy is transforming AD into a major health-care problem. AD is characterized by a progressive impairment of memory and other cognitive skills leading to dementia. The major pathogenic factor associated to AD seems to be amyloid-beta peptide (Aβ) oligomers that tend to accumulate extracellularly as amyloid deposits and are associated with reactive microglia and astrocytes as well as with degeneration of neuronal processes. The involvement of microglia and astrocytes in the onset and progress of neurodegenerative process in AD is becoming increasingly recognized, albeit it is commonly accepted that neuroinflammation and oxidative stress can have both detrimental and beneficial influences on the neural tissue. However, little is known about the interplay of microglia, astrocytes and neurons in response to Aβ, especially in the early phases of AD. This review discusses current knowledge about the involvement of neuroinflammation in AD pathogenesis, focusing on phenotypic and functional responses of microglia, astrocytes and neurons in this process. The abnormal production by glia cells of pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and the complement system, as well as reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, can disrupt nerve terminals activity causing dysfunction and loss of synapses, which correlates with memory decline; these are phenomena preceding the neuronal death associated with late stages of AD. Thus, therapeutic strategies directed at controlling the activation of microglia and astrocytes and the excessive production of pro-inflammatory and pro-oxidant factors may be valuable to control neurodegeneration in dementia. PMID:20698820

  1. Redox instability, mechanical deformation, and heterogeneous damage accumulation in solid oxide fuel cell anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdeljawad, F.; Nelson, G. J.; Chiu, W. K. S.; Haataja, M.

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical integrity and damage tolerance represent two key challenges in the design of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). In particular, reduction and oxidation (redox) cycles, and the associated large transformation strains have a notable impact on the mechanical stability and failure mode of SOFC anodes. In this study, the deformation behavior under redox cycling is investigated computationally with an approach that provides a detailed, microstructurally based view of heterogeneous damage accumulation behavior within an experimentally obtained nickel/yttria stabilized zirconia SOFC anode microstructure. Simulation results underscore the critical role that the microstructure plays in the mechanical deformation behavior of and failure within such materials.

  2. CONCENTRATED AMBIENT AIR POLLUTION CREATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can produce oxidative stress (OS)-mediated damage upon impact to target cells. The initiating event of phage cell activation (i.e., the oxidative burst) is unknown, although many proximal events have been i...

  3. ELECTROSTATIC CHARGE STIMULATES OXIDATIVE STRESS IN CNS MICROGLIA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nanometer size particles carry free radical activity on their surface and can create oxidative stress (OS)-mediated inflammatory changes upon impact. The oxidative burst signals the activation of phage-lineage cells such as peripheral macrophages, Kupffer cells and CNS microgl...