Science.gov

Sample records for accumulation rate measurements

  1. Using transplants to measure accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes in forests of western Oregon

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosso, A.L.; Muir, Patricia S.; Rambo, T.

    2001-01-01

    We sought a simple and effective transplant method that could be used to measure biomass accumulation rates of epiphytic bryophytes. Trials were carried out in the Pseudotsuga menziesii-dominated forests of western Oregon. We tested multiple transplant methods over a 13-month period while comparing accumulation rates of Antitrichia curtipendula (Hedw.) Brid. and Isothecium myosuroides Brid. among an old-growth stand, a young stand, and a recent clearcut. In our study area, Antitrichia is considered to be an old-growth associate while Isothecium is a more ubiquitous species. Methods tested included containment in net bags, containment in hairnets, and directly tying mats to substrates. Three sizes of transplants were tested with both natural and inert artificial substrates. Transplants of approximately five g enclosed in plastic net bags and tied to either natural or artificial substrates worked well for our purposes. Only minor differences were found in mean accumulation rates between the old growth and young stand, though variation in accumulation rates was higher in the old growth. Neither species appeared capable of surviving in the clearcut. Antitrichia accumulated biomass 60% faster in the canopy than in the understory on average. Antitrichia also accumulated at a faster rate than Isothecium, with mean 13-month biomass increases of 11.8 and 3.7% respectively for 5 g transplants in the understory. Our results suggest that Antitrichia's association with old growth may be due more to dispersal or establishment limitations than to a decreased ability to grow in young stands.

  2. Laboratory Determination of Molybdenum Accumulation Rates as a Measure of Hypoxic Conditions

    EPA Science Inventory

    Redox sensitive metals, such as molybdenum (Mo), are enriched in reducing sediments due to authigenic fixation in anoxic interstitial waters of sediments. This study tested whether the process of fixation and accumulation of Mo in sediments could provide a geochemical indicator o...

  3. Rates and controls on N accumulation in peatlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zivkovic, T.; Wang, M.; Moore, T. R.; Loisel, J.

    2013-12-01

    Paleoecological studies on peat cores have focused mainly on carbon (C) accumulation rates, whereas nitrogen (N) accumulation rates and cycling have been largely overlooked. We use primary data from peat cores extracted from Mer Bleue bog, the Northwest Territories and eastern and western Canada to estimate long- and short-term N accumulation rates. Furthermore, we apply the mean C/N ratios from a wide range of peatland types in Ontario to estimate N accumulation rates where C accumulation rates are available. Rates of N accumulation range from 0.1 to 2.0 g m-2 yr-1. We examine the sources of N to peatlands and different peatland types (bogs, fens and swamps) depend on N from different sources. For example, ombrotrophic bogs depend on bulk atmospheric N deposition and biological N2 fixation as their only source of N. Oligo- and minerotrophic fens however receive additional N along with other nutrients from the surface and ground water. Prior to Industrial Revolution atmospheric N deposition in peatlands was minimal and likely constant (< 0.1 g m-2 yr-1). Although it is impossible to measure N2 fixation rates in the past, N accumulation rates represent an overall balance between N inputs and outputs in these ecosystems. In bogs, N outputs are small, thus N accumulation rates could be explained by N2 fixation rates that have been the main source of N for these ecosystems, and we compare N accumulation rates with current measurements of N2 fixation.

  4. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet Accumulation Rates from Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.

    2002-01-01

    An important component of NASA's Program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a mass balance investigation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The mass balance is calculated by taking the difference between the areally Integrated snow accumulation and the net ice discharge of the ice sheet. Uncertainties in this calculation Include the snow accumulation rate, which has traditionally been determined by interpolating data from ice core samples taken from isolated spots across the ice sheet. The sparse data associated with ice cores juxtaposed against the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by remote sensing , has motivated scientists to investigate relationships between accumulation rate and microwave observations as an option for obtaining spatially contiguous estimates. The objective of this PARCA continuation proposal was to complete an estimate of surface accumulation rate on the Greenland Ice Sheet derived from C-band radar backscatter data compiled in the ERS-1 SAR mosaic of data acquired during, September-November, 1992. An empirical equation, based on elevation and latitude, is used to determine the mean annual temperature. We examine the influence of accumulation rate, and mean annual temperature on C-band radar backscatter using a forward model, which incorporates snow metamorphosis and radar backscatter components. Our model is run over a range of accumulation and temperature conditions. Based on the model results, we generate a look-up table, which uniquely maps the measured radar backscatter, and mean annual temperature to accumulation rate. Our results compare favorably with in situ accumulation rate measurements falling within our study area.

  5. Accumulation rates of airborne heavy metals in wetlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Souch, C.J.; Filippelli, G.M.; Dollar, N.; Perkins, S.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2002-01-01

    Accumulation rates of heavy metals (Cd, Cr, Cu, Mn, Pb, and Zn) retained in wetland sediments in northwest Indiana-downwind of the Chicago-Gary-Hammond industrial area-are quantified to assess anthropogenic influences on atmospheric fluxes. Metal concentrations for 22 sediment cores are determined by ICP-AES after ashing and strong acid extraction. Relations between organic content and metal concentrations at depth are used to separate natural and anthropogenic sources. Accumulation rates over the lifetime of the wetlands (???4500 years) have averaged 0.2 (Cd), 1.4 (Cu), 1.7 (Cr), 13.4 (Mn), 4.8 (Pb), and 18.7 (Zn) mg m-2 y-1. Rates for the last 100 years have increased on average by factors of 6 (Cd), 8 (Cu), 10 (Mn), 15 (Pb), and 30 (Zn), remaining effectively constant for Cr. Where the wetlands have been drained, metals have been lost from the sediments, owing to changes in organic content and local hydrochemistry (exposure to acidic rainfall). Sediment-based accumulation rates at the undrained sites are higher, though generally consistent, with measured and modeled atmospheric fluxes documented by short-term studies conducted over the last three decades. The fraction of the total metals in the wetlands estimated to be of anthropogenic origin ranges from approximately 3% for Cr, up to approximately 35% for Pb, and 70% for Zn. This historic legacy of contamination must be considered in land management decisions, particularly when wetlands are drained.

  6. Strain Accumulation in Montenegro Using GPS Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glavatovic, B.; Vucic, L.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Anastasio, E.; Selvaggi, G.

    2011-12-01

    In this work we present the preliminary results of the analysis of GPS measurements collected from continuous stations belonging to networks deployed for both sceintific and societal purposes. The area is particularly interesting in relationship with the large Mw 7.1 earthquake that affected the Montenegro coastal areas in 1979 and the large uncertainties associated with recurrence times of large events and the present-day rate of strain accumulation. The dataset from the MEPOS (Montenegro), MONTEPOS (Montenegro), AGROS (Serbia) and MAKPOS (Macedonia) networks, combined with data from the RING (http://ring.gm.ingv.it) and other continuous GPS networks in the Mediterranean, Eurasian and African regions, has been analyzed using the GIPSY-OASIS II software package and the precise point positioning method [Zumberge et al., 1997]. Carrier phase ambiguities have been successfully resolved across the entire network using an algorithm based on a fixed-point theorem that closely approximates a full-network resolution [Blewitt, 2008]. Satellite orbit and clock parameters, and daily coordinate transformation parameters into ITRF2005 were provided by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL). ITRF2005 positions were transformed into an Eurasia fixed reference frame by performing daily transformations into a frame that is defined by minimizing the horizontal velocities of 30 stations across the stable part of the Eurasian continent (away from areas affected by glacial isostatic adjustments). Common mode errors for this continental scale frame are further reduced by including an additional 60 stations as far away as Iceland, Eastern Eurasia, and Africa in a daily spatial (7 parameters) filter [D'Anastasio et al., 2008]. We estimate velocities from the continuous GPS time-series using the CATS software package [Williams, 2003] while accounting for annual and semi-annual constituents, simultaneously estimating rate uncertainties given the assumption that the error model is dominated by

  7. Frequency and duty cycle modulation optimization in minimizing thermal accumulation effect in Z-scan measurement with high-repetition-rate laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahnan Zainal Abidin, Mohd; Noor, Ahmad Shukri Muhammad; Rashid, Suraya Abdul; Adzir Mahdi, Mohd

    2014-11-01

    In this study, we demonstrate the optimization of the chopper frequency and duty cycle in a Z-scan measurement with a 250 MHz high-repetition-rate (HRR) femtosecond laser to minimize the thermal lensing effect due to cumulative heating of the sample. The result shows that such minimization can be achieved by keeping the modulated exposure time on the sample shorter than the thermal diffusivity decay time tc. The minimum chopper frequency fmin is predicted by relating the duty cycle factor F with tc, while maintaining stable peak and valley transmittances, i.e., ΔTp and ΔTv, respectively. Furthermore, a lower fmin is obtained by taking a stable range of the peak-valley difference ΔTpv into consideration. The optimization allows for the low operational modulation frequency of Z-scan measurement with reduced thermal influence, thus enabling simple management of the thermal lensing effect.

  8. Metabolic rate measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koester, K.; Crosier, W.

    1980-01-01

    The Metabolic Rate Measurement System (MRMS) is an uncomplicated and accurate apparatus for measuring oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production of a test subject. From this one can determine the subject's metabolic rate for a variety of conditions, such as resting or light exercise. MRMS utilizes an LSI/11-03 microcomputer to monitor and control the experimental apparatus.

  9. Detailed scour measurements around a debris accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mueller, David S.; Parola, Arthur C.

    1998-01-01

    Detailed scour measurements were made at Farm-Market 2004 over the Brazos River near Lake Jackson, Tex. during flooding in October 1994. Woody debris accumulations on bents 6, 7, and 8 obstructed flow through the bridge, causing scour of the streambed. Measurements at the site included three-dimensional velocities, channel bathymetry, water-surface elevations, water-surface slope, and discharge. Channel geometry upstream from the bridge caused approach conditions to be nonuniform.

  10. Measuring zebrafish turning rate.

    PubMed

    Mwaffo, Violet; Butail, Sachit; di Bernardo, Mario; Porfiri, Maurizio

    2015-06-01

    Zebrafish is becoming a popular animal model in preclinical research, and zebrafish turning rate has been proposed for the analysis of activity in several domains. The turning rate is often estimated from the trajectory of the fish centroid that is output by commercial or custom-made target tracking software run on overhead videos of fish swimming. However, the accuracy of such indirect methods with respect to the turning rate associated with changes in heading during zebrafish locomotion is largely untested. Here, we compare two indirect methods for the turning rate estimation using the centroid velocity or position data, with full shape tracking for three different video sampling rates. We use tracking data from the overhead video recorded at 60, 30, and 15 frames per second of zebrafish swimming in a shallow water tank. Statistical comparisons of absolute turning rate across methods and sampling rates indicate that, while indirect methods are indistinguishable from full shape tracking, the video sampling rate significantly influences the turning rate measurement. The results of this study can aid in the selection of the video capture frame rate, an experimental design parameter in zebrafish behavioral experiments where activity is an important measure.

  11. Determining Greenland Ice Sheet Accumulation Rates from Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jezek, Kenneth C.

    2001-01-01

    An important component of NASA's Program for Arctic Regional Climate Assessment (PARCA) is a mass balance investigation of the Greenland Ice Sheet. The mass balance is calculated by taking the difference between the snow accumulation and the ice discharge of the ice sheet. Uncertainties in this calculation include the snow accumulation rate, which has traditionally been determined by interpolating data from ice core samples taken throughout the ice sheet. The sparse data associated with ice cores, coupled with the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by remote sensing, have motivated scientists to investigate relationships between accumulation rate and microwave observations.

  12. Accumulation rates from central North Greenland during the past 700 year

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karlsson, Nanna B.; Eisen, Olaf; Nielsen, Lisbeth T.; Kipfstuhl, Sepp; Freitag, Johannes; Paden, John D.; Dahl-Jensen, Dorthe; Winter, Anna; Wilhelms, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A key variable when interpreting the evolution and mass loss from polar ice sheets is the input from the surface mass balance. While ice core records contain information on past accumulation rates, they always only provide information for a single location. Here, we present spatially distributed accumulation rates from central northern Greenland, specifically the area between the NEEM (North Greenland Eemian Drilling) and NGRIP (North Greenland Ice Core Project) ice core drill sites. The accumulation rates have been reconstructed using ice-penetrating radar, firn core measurements and inverse methods, and we are able to retrieve both spatial and temporal changes in the accumulation over an area spanning 300 km by 300 km. We investigate the stability of the accumulation pattern over the past several hundred years, and we address the question of how well the measured accumulation rates at the ice core sites capture the regional variations in accumulation. We find that while the accumulation rates at NEEM have been stable for the past 700 years, the NGRIP site has experienced fluctuations in accumulation rate. We interpret this as an indication of shifts in the dominating weather pattern over the ice divide in central North Greenland.

  13. Emission rate measuring device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luckat, S.

    1980-09-01

    The development and application of an emission rate measuring device for gaseous components is explored. The device contains absorption fluid from a supply container that moistens a cylindrical paper sleeve. A newer model is provided with a direct current motor requiring less electricity than an older model. The hose pump is modified to avoid changing it and the filter sleeve is fastened more securely to the distributor head. Application of the measuring devices is discussed, particularly at the Cologne Cathedral, where damage to the stone is observed.

  14. Accumulation rates in Northwest Greenland from continuous GPR profiling along the Greenland Inland Traverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawley, R. L.; Courville, Z.; Kehrl, L. M.; Lutz, E.; Osterberg, E. C.; Overly, T. B.; Wong, G. J.

    2012-12-01

    Snow accumulation is one of the fundamental parameters governing the mass balance of the Greenland Ice Sheet. While many point measurements of accumulation exist from shallow and deep ice cores, there are few spatially extensive and continuous records of accumulation in Greenland, particularly in the northwest quadrant. In April and May 2011, the Greenland Inland Traverse traveled via tractor train from Thule Air Base in northwest Greenland to Summit Station, at the center of the ice sheet. The science team on the traverse collected both point and profile measurements along the route. Kinematic GPS and 400 MHz GPR profiles provide geolocated subsurface stratigraphy. Density measurements from snowpits and shallow cores on the profile allow us to determine the true depth of radar reflecting horizons, commonly interpreted to be isochrons. We use three ice cores collected at the beginning, the end, and roughly the middle of the route to date horizons. We traced strong reflecting horizons along the entire route. From the combination of dated, traced horizons, density measurements, and position measurements, we determine accumulation rates continuously along the traverse route. We find our traverse route begins in a high-accumulation area, and accumulation decreases as we cross to the east side of the summit ridge. Accumulation then climbs again as we approach summit (directly on the summit ridge). We compare our accumulation rates with previous studies, both measurements (traverse and point measurements) and models.

  15. Holocene and recent sediment accumulation rates in southern Lake Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; King, J.W.; Jones, Glenn A.; Reynolds, R.L.; Bothner, Michael H.

    2000-01-01

    Rates of sediment accumulation in Lake Michigan are a key component of its geologic history and provide important data related to societal concerns such as shoreline erosion and the fate of anthropogenic pollutants. Previous attempts to reconstruct Holocene rates of sediment accumulation in Lake Michigan, as well as in the other Laurentian Great Lakes, have been bedeviled by the effect of refractory terrestrial material on radiocarbon ages from total organic carbon samples of lake sediments. AMS radiocarbon ages on small samples of biogenic carbonate (ostracodes and mollusks) in Lake Michigan provide accurate Holocene ages. The present bicarbonate reservoir effect is estimated from shells of mollusks collected live before atmospheric nuclear testing to be 250 yr. From paired samples of biogenic carbonate and terrestrial macrofossils, the past reservoir effect is thought to be less than 500 yr. The radiocarbon ages indicate a distinct decrease in sediment accumulation rates throughout the southern basin of Lake Michigan at about 5 ka, about the time when lake level stabilized at the Nipissing level after rising rapidly for several thousand years. Average rates of sediment accumulation for the historic period (the last 150 yr) can be estimated from radioisotopes (210Pb and 137Cs), pollen stratigraphy, and changes in sediment properties associated with human activity. Multiple methods are necessary because at any given site, problems arise in the assumptions or applicability of one or more methods. In general, the mass accumulation calculations suggest that sediments were deposited 4 to 11 times faster in the historic period than before human settlement. The character of the sediment did not change in a dramatic way, but sediment magnetic properties suggest shifts in the sources of sediment. The data suggest that some of the changes in sources and (or) character of the sediment occurred just before human settlement and were probably related to climatic changes

  16. Mass accumulation rates in Asia during the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, François; Gaudemer, Yves; Tapponnier, Paul; Klein, Michel

    1999-05-01

    This work establishes estimates of mass accumulation rates in 18 mostly offshore sedimentary basins in Asia since the beginning of the Cenozoic, ~ 66 Ma. The estimates were derived from isopach maps, cross-sections and drill holes or stratigraphic columns assuming regional similarity of the strata. Average solid phase volumes and accumulation rates were calculated for nine epochs approximately corresponding to geological periods: Palaeocene ( ~ 66-58 Ma), Eocene ( ~ 58-37 Ma), Oligocene( ~ 37-30 and 30-24 Ma), Miocene ( ~ 24-17, 17-11 and 11-5 Ma), Pliocene ( ~ 5-2 Ma) and Quaternary ( ~ 2-0 Ma). These rates shed new light on the geological history of Asia since the onset of the collision of India with Asia ( ~ 50 Ma). The overall average accumulation rates curve for Asian sedimentary basins since the beginning of the Tertiary shows an exponential form with slow accumulation rates (less than 0.5 x 10^6 km^3 Myr^- 1) until the beginning of the Oligocene, more than 15 Myr after the onset of the collision. From the Oligocene onwards rates increase quickly in an exponential manner, reaching their maximum values in the Quaternary (more than 1.5 x 10^6 km^3 Myr^- 1). From these observations we suggest that extrusion and crustal shortening are complementary processes that have been successively dominant throughout the India-Eurasia collision history. At smaller scales one may distinguish between independent histories at the subcontinental and basin scales. This permits a comparison of the relative importance of tectonic and climatic erosion processes affecting the different mountain belts of Asia during the Cenozoic.

  17. Radon exhalation rates from building materials using electret ion chamber radon monitors in accumulators.

    PubMed

    Kotrappa, Payasada; Stieff, Frederick

    2009-08-01

    An electret ion chamber (EIC) radon monitor in a sealed accumulator measures the integrated average radon concentration at the end of the accumulation duration. Theoretical equations have been derived to relate such radon concentrations (Bq m(-3) ) to the radon emanation rate (Bq d(-1)) from building materials enclosed in the accumulator. As an illustration, a 4-L sealable glass jar has been used as an accumulator to calculate the radon emanation rate from different granite samples. The radon emanation rate was converted into radon flux (Bq mm(-2) d(-1)) by dividing the emanation rate by surface area of the sample. Fluxes measured on typical, commercially available granites ranged from 20-30 Bq m(-2) d(-1). These results are similar to the results reported in the literature. The lower limit of detection for a 2-d measurement works out to be 7 Bq m(-2) d(-1). Equations derived can also be used for other sealable accumulators and other integrating detectors, such as alpha track detectors.

  18. Death rates reflect accumulating brain damage in arthropods

    PubMed Central

    Fonseca, Duane B; Brancato, Carolina L; Prior, Andrew E; Shelton, Peter M.J; Sheehy, Matt R.J

    2005-01-01

    We present the results of the first quantitative, whole-lifespan study of the relationship between age-specific neurolipofuscin concentration and natural mortality rate in any organism. In a convenient laboratory animal, the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, we find an unusual delayed-onset neurolipofuscin accumulation pattern that is highly correlated with exponentially accelerating age-specific Gompertz–Makeham death rates in both males (r=0.93, p=0.0064) and females (r=0.97, p=0.0052). We then test the conservation of this association by aggregating the locust results with available population-specific data for a range of other terrestrial, freshwater, marine, tropical and temperate arthropods whose longevities span three orders of magnitude. This synthesis shows that the strong association between neurolipofuscin deposition and natural mortality is a phylogenetically and environmentally widespread phenomenon (r=0.96, p<0.0001). These results highlight neurolipofuscin as a unique and outstanding integral biomarker of ageing. They also offer compelling evidence for the proposal that, in vital organs like the brain, either the accumulation of toxic garbage in the form of lipofuscin itself, or the particular molecular reactions underlying lipofuscinogenesis, including free-radical damage, are the primary events in senescence. PMID:16191601

  19. Rate of accumulation of reproductive isolation by chromosome rearrangements

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, J.B.

    1981-09-01

    The role of chromosome rearrangements as agents for rapid speciation has recently gained considerable support among evolutionary biologists, especially for the stasipatric model in which effective isolation is accomplished by fixation of a few strongly underdominant rearrangements. This support is, however, by no means universal, with critics citing the low probability of fixation of strongly underdominant rearrangements as a major problem of the stasipatric model. Population genetic considerations of the substitution rate of underdominant rearrangements in a finite population were examined by Lande, but as an estimator of long term effective deme size, rather than as a speciation model. The rate of accumulation of postzygotic isolation is analyzed for three models of underdominant rearrangements: strict underdominance; underdominance with the rearrangement homozygote being at a selective advantage; and underdominance with meiotic drive. It will be shown that reproductive isolation accumulates most rapidly in very small populations, but that strong homozygote advantage or drive can allow for fairly rapid speciation under certain conditions in large populations. Contrary to the stasipatric model, isolation usually proceeds most rapidly by fixation of a large number of weakly underdominant rearrangements even when moderate amounts of drive or homozygote advantage are allowed. Stasipatric speciation requires either the frequent occurrence of meiotically driven rearrangements or very small population sizes to operate in reasonable times.

  20. Death rates reflect accumulating brain damage in arthropods.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, Duane B; Brancato, Carolina L; Prior, Andrew E; Shelton, Peter M J; Sheehy, Matt R J

    2005-09-22

    We present the results of the first quantitative, whole-lifespan study of the relationship between age-specific neurolipofuscin concentration and natural mortality rate in any organism. In a convenient laboratory animal, the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria, we find an unusual delayed-onset neurolipofuscin accumulation pattern that is highly correlated with exponentially accelerating age-specific Gompertz-Makeham death rates in both males (r=0.93, p=0.0064) and females (r=0.97, p=0.0052). We then test the conservation of this association by aggregating the locust results with available population-specific data for a range of other terrestrial, freshwater, marine, tropical and temperate arthropods whose longevities span three orders of magnitude. This synthesis shows that the strong association between neurolipofuscin deposition and natural mortality is a phylogenetically and environmentally widespread phenomenon (r=0.96, p < 0.0001). These results highlight neurolipofuscin as a unique and outstanding integral biomarker of ageing. They also offer compelling evidence for the proposal that, in vital organs like the brain, either the accumulation of toxic garbage in the form of lipofuscin itself, or the particular molecular reactions underlying lipofuscinogenesis, including free-radical damage, are the primary events in senescence.

  1. A flight experiment to determine GPS photochemical contamination accumulation rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tribble, A. C.; Haffner, J. W.

    1990-01-01

    It was recently suggested that photochemically deposited contamination, originating from volatiles outgassed by a spacecraft, may be responsible for the anomalous degradation in power seen on the GPS Block 1 vehicles. In an attempt to confirm, or deny, the photochemical deposition rates predicted, a study was undertaken to design a flight experiment to be incorporated on the GPS vehicles currently in production. The objective was to develop an inexpensive, light weight instrument package that would give information on the contamination levels within a few months of launch. Three types of apparatus were studied, Quartz Crystal Microbalances, (QCM's), modified solar cells, and calorimeters. A calorimeter was selected due primarily to its impact on the production schedule of the GPS vehicles. An analysis of the sensitivity of the final design is compared to the predicted contamination accumulation rates in order to determine how long after launch it will take the experiment to show the effects of photochemical contamination.

  2. Correlation of thrombosis growth rate to pathological wall shear rate during platelet accumulation.

    PubMed

    Bark, David L; Para, Andrea N; Ku, David N

    2012-10-01

    Local hemodynamics may strongly influence atherothrombosis, which can lead to acute myocardial infarction and stroke. The relationship between hemodynamics and thrombosis during platelet accumulation was studied through an in vitro flow system consisting of a stenosis. Specifically, wall shear rates (WSR) ranging from 0 to 100,000 s(-1) were ascertained through computations and compared with thrombus growth rates found by image analysis for over 5,000 individual observation points per experiment. A positive correlation (P < 0.0001) was found between thrombus accumulation rates and WSR up to 6,000 s(-1), with a decrease in growth rates at WSR >6,000 s(-1) (P < 0.0001). Furthermore, growth rates at pathological shear rates were found to be two to four times greater than for physiological arterial shear rates below 400 s(-1). Platelets did not accumulate for the first minute of perfusion. The initial lag time, before discernible thrombus growth could be found, diminished with shear (P < 0.0001). These studies show the quantitative increase in thrombus growth rates with very high shear rates in stenoses onto a collagen substrate. PMID:22539078

  3. Radiocarbon dating, chronologic framework, and changes in accumulation rates of holocene estuarine sediments from Chesapeake Bay

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Colman, Steven M.; Baucom, P.C.; Bratton, J.F.; Cronin, T. M.; McGeehin, J.P.; Willard, D.; Zimmerman, A.R.; Vogt, P.R.

    2002-01-01

    Rapidly accumulating Holocene sediments in estuaries commonly are difficult to sample and date. In Chesapeake Bay, we obtained sediment cores as much as 20 m in length and used numerous radiocarbon ages measured by accelarator mass spectrometry methods to provide the first detailed chronologies of Holocene sediment accumulation in the bay. Carbon in these sediments is a complex mixture of materials from a variety of sources. Analyses of different components of the sediments show that total organic carbon ages are largely unreliable, because much of the carbon (including coal) has been transported to the bay from upstream sources and is older than sediments in which it was deposited. Mollusk shells (clams, oysters) and foraminifera appear to give reliable results, although reworking and burrowing are potential problems. Analyses of museum specimens collected alive before atmospheric nuclear testing suggest that the standard reservoir correction for marine samples is appropriate for middle to lower Chesapeake Bay. The biogenic carbonate radiocarbon ages are compatible with 210 Pb and 137 Cs data and pollen stratigraphy from the same sites. Post-settlement changes in sediment transport and accumulation is an important environmental issue in many estuaries, including the Chesapeake. Our data show that large variations in sediment mass accumulation rates occur among sites. At shallow water sites, local factors seem to control changes in accumulation rates with time. Our two relatively deep-water sites in the axial channel of the bay have different long-term average accumulation rates, but the history of sediment accumulation at these sites appears to reflect overall conditions in the bay. Mass accumulation rates at the two deep-water sites rapidly increased by about fourfold coincident with widespread land clearance for agriculture in the Chesapeake watershed.

  4. Measuring Social Capital Accumulation in Rural Development

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teilmann, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    Using a theoretical framework, the study proposes an index that can measure the social capital of local action group (LAG) projects. The index is founded on four indicators: number of ties, bridging social capital, recognition, and diversity, which are aggregated into one social capital index. The index has been tested in LAG-Djursland, Denmark,…

  5. Atmospheric Pb and Ti accumulation rates from Sphagnum moss: dependence upon plant productivity.

    PubMed

    Kempter, H; Krachler, M; Shotyk, W

    2010-07-15

    The accumulation rates of atmospheric Pb and Ti were obtained using the production rates of Sphagnum mosses collected in four ombrotrophic bogs from two regions of southern Germany: Upper Bavaria (Oberbayern, OB) and the Northern Black Forest (Nordschwarzwald, NBF). Surfaces of Sphagnum carpets were marked with plastic mesh and one year later the production of plant matter was harvested. Metal concentrations were determined in acid digests using sector field ICP-MS employing well established analytical procedures. Up to 12 samples (40 x 40 cm) were collected per site, and 6-10 sites were investigated per bog. Variations within a given sampling site were in the range 2.3-4x for Pb concentrations, 1.8-2.5x for Ti concentrations, 3-8.3x for Pb/Ti, 5.6-7.8x for Pb accumulation rates, and 2.3-6.4x for Ti accumulation rates. However, the median values of these parameters for the sites (6-10 per bog) were quite consistent. The mosses from the bogs in NBF exhibited significantly greater productivity (187-202 g m(-2) a(-1)) compared to the OB peat bogs (71-91 g m(-2) a(-1)), and these differences had a pronounced effect on the Pb and Ti accumulation rates. Highly productive mosses showed no indication of a "dilution effect" of Pb or Ti concentrations, suggesting that more productive plants were simply able to accumulate more particles from the air. The median rates of net Pb accumulation by the mosses are in excellent agreement with the fluxes obtained by direct atmospheric measurements at nearby monitoring stations in both regions (EMEP and MAPESI data). PMID:20545344

  6. Patterns and rates of organic carbon accumulation in recent pelagic and hemipelagic marine environments

    SciTech Connect

    Cwienk, D.; Leinen, M.S.; Arthur, M.A.

    1987-05-01

    Maps were constructed for the global distribution of percent organic carbon, sedimentation rates, bulk sediment accumulation rates, and organic carbon accumulation rates (OCARs), exclusive of the continental shelves, on the basis of both published and some new data from sediment cores. The OCAR data base uses only cores in which stratigraphic resolution is sufficient to define a mean sedimentation rate for the last 12,000 years and from which bulk density measurements are available or can be calculated using established relationships to carbonate content. Data coverage was adequate for much of the Pacific Ocean basin but was somewhat sparse for the Atlantic, Indian, and Southern oceans. Nonetheless, basic patterns of organic carbon accumulation can be observed from the maps. As expected, the OCARs are highest in the equatorial Pacific, where surface-water productivity is highest, and low under the central gyre regions where surface organic carbon flux and total sediment flux are both low. Higher OCARs also occur in more rapidly accumulating sediments near the continental margins, partly as a function of the enhanced preservation of labile carbon that results from higher sedimentation rates and, in some cases, from higher productivity in surface water masses or increased flux of terrigenous organic matter. The patterns of OCAR are similar, in general, to patterns of accumulation of biogenic opal, thereby reinforcing the link between biological productivity and OCARs. An analysis of the global impact of pelagic-hemipelagic OCARs, using this data base, suggests that no more than 0.21 x 10/sup 14/ gOC/year accumulate over the deep-sea floor at present - only about 16% of the estimated global annual organic carbon burial. However, the deep-sea organic carbon sink may have been more important in the past.

  7. Rates and environmental controls of aeolian dust accumulation, Athabasca River Valley, Canadian Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugenholtz, Chris H.; Wolfe, Stephen A.

    2010-09-01

    Despite an abundance of sedimentary archives of mineral dust (i.e. loess) accumulations from cold, humid environments, the absence of contemporary process investigations limits paleoenvironmental interpretations in these settings. Dust accumulations measured at Jasper Lake, a seasonally-filled reach of the glacially-fed Athabasca River in the Canadian Rocky Mountains, are some of the highest contemporary rates recorded to date. High deposition rates, including a maximum of 27,632 kg ha -1 month -1, occur during river low-flow periods, but even the lowest deposition rates, occurring during bankfull periods, exceed other contemporary rates of deposition. High rates of dust deposition may be attributed to geomorphic and climatic controls affecting sediment supply, availability and transport, and biologic factors affecting accumulation. Localized confinement of the Jasper River by tributary river alluvial fans has caused channel expansion upstream, and formation of the shallow depositional basin known as Jasper Lake. This localized sedimentary basin, coupled with large seasonal water level fluctuations and suitably high wind speeds, favors seasonal dust production. In addition, a dense source-proximal coniferous forest stand encourages high dust accumulation, via increased aerodynamic roughness and airflow deceleration. The forest stand also appears to act as an efficient dust filter, with the interception and storage of dust by the forest canopy playing a significant role with regards to secondary fallout and sediment accumulation. Overall, these results provide new insights on the environmental controls of dust entrainment and accumulation in cold, humid settings, and help clarify controls on the formation of Holocene river-sourced loess deposits.

  8. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, N L; Das, A J; Condit, R; Russo, S E; Baker, P J; Beckman, N G; Coomes, D A; Lines, E R; Morris, W K; Rüger, N; Alvarez, E; Blundo, C; Bunyavejchewin, S; Chuyong, G; Davies, S J; Duque, A; Ewango, C N; Flores, O; Franklin, J F; Grau, H R; Hao, Z; Harmon, M E; Hubbell, S P; Kenfack, D; Lin, Y; Makana, J-R; Malizia, A; Malizia, L R; Pabst, R J; Pongpattananurak, N; Su, S-H; Sun, I-F; Tan, S; Thomas, D; van Mantgem, P J; Wang, X; Wiser, S K; Zavala, M A

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  9. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephenson, N. L.; Das, A. J.; Condit, R.; Russo, S. E.; Baker, P. J.; Beckman, N. G.; Coomes, D. A.; Lines, E. R.; Morris, W. K.; Rüger, N.; Álvarez, E.; Blundo, C.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Chuyong, G.; Davies, S. J.; Duque, Á.; Ewango, C. N.; Flores, O.; Franklin, J. F.; Grau, H. R.; Hao, Z.; Harmon, M. E.; Hubbell, S. P.; Kenfack, D.; Lin, Y.; Makana, J.-R.; Malizia, A.; Malizia, L. R.; Pabst, R. J.; Pongpattananurak, N.; Su, S.-H.; Sun, I.-F.; Tan, S.; Thomas, D.; van Mantgem, P. J.; Wang, X.; Wiser, S. K.; Zavala, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  10. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size.

    PubMed

    Stephenson, N L; Das, A J; Condit, R; Russo, S E; Baker, P J; Beckman, N G; Coomes, D A; Lines, E R; Morris, W K; Rüger, N; Alvarez, E; Blundo, C; Bunyavejchewin, S; Chuyong, G; Davies, S J; Duque, A; Ewango, C N; Flores, O; Franklin, J F; Grau, H R; Hao, Z; Harmon, M E; Hubbell, S P; Kenfack, D; Lin, Y; Makana, J-R; Malizia, A; Malizia, L R; Pabst, R J; Pongpattananurak, N; Su, S-H; Sun, I-F; Tan, S; Thomas, D; van Mantgem, P J; Wang, X; Wiser, S K; Zavala, M A

    2014-03-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle--particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage--increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree's total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to undertand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence. PMID:24429523

  11. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stephenson, N.L.; Das, A.J.; Condit, R.; Russo, S.E.; Baker, P.J.; Beckman, N.G.; Coomes, D.A.; Lines, E.R.; Morris, W.K.; Rüger, N.; Álvarez, E.; Blundo, C.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Chuyong, G.; Davies, S.J.; Duque, Á.; Ewango, C.N.; Flores, O.; Franklin, J.F.; Grau, H.R.; Hao, Z.; Harmon, M.E.; Hubbell, S.P.; Kenfack, D.; Lin, Y.; Makana, J.-R.; Malizia, A.; Malizia, L.R.; Pabst, R.J.; Pongpattananurak, N.; Su, S.-H.; Sun, I-F.; Tan, S.; Thomas, D.; van Mantgem, P.J.; Wang, X.; Wiser, S.K.; Zavala, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle—particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage—increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree’s total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to understand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  12. Sensor for Injection Rate Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Marcic, Milan

    2006-01-01

    A vast majority of the medium and high speed Diesel engines are equipped with multi-hole injection nozzles nowadays. Inaccuracies in workmanship and changing hydraulic conditions in the nozzles result in differences in injection rates between individual injection nozzle holes. The new deformational measuring method described in the paper allows injection rate measurement in each injection nozzle hole. The differences in injection rates lead to uneven thermal loads of Diesel engine combustion chambers. All today known measuring method, such as Bosch and Zeuch give accurate results of the injection rate in diesel single-hole nozzles. With multihole nozzles they tell us nothing about possible differences in injection rates between individual holes of the nozzle. At deformational measuring method, the criterion of the injected fuel is expressed by the deformation of membrane occurring due to the collision of the pressure wave against the membrane. The pressure wave is generated by the injection of the fuel into the measuring space. For each hole of the nozzle the measuring device must have a measuring space of its own into which fuel is injected as well as its measuring membrane and its own fuel outlet. During measurements procedure the measuring space must be filled with fuel to maintain an overpressure of 5 kPa. Fuel escaping from the measuring device is conducted into the graduated cylinders for measuring the volumetric flow through each hole of the nozzle.The membrane deformation is assessed by strain gauges. They are glued to the membrane and forming the full Wheatstone's bridge. We devoted special attention to the membrane shape and temperature compensation of the strain gauges.

  13. An integral method to estimate the moment accumulation rate on the Creeping Section of the San Andreas Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David T.; Smith-Konter, Bridget

    2015-10-01

    Moment accumulation rate (also referred to as moment deficit rate) is a fundamental quantity for evaluating seismic hazard. The conventional approach for evaluating moment accumulation rate of creeping faults is to invert for the slip distribution from geodetic measurements, although even with perfect data these slip-rate inversions are non-unique. In this study, we show that the slip-rate versus depth inversion is not needed because moment accumulation rate can be estimated directly from surface geodetic data. We propose an integral approach that uses dense geodetic observations from Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) and the Global Positioning System (GPS) to constrain the moment accumulation rate. The moment accumulation rate is related to the integral of the product of the along-strike velocity and the distance from the fault. We demonstrate our methods by studying the Creeping Section of the San Andreas fault observed by GPS and radar interferometry onboard the ERS and ALOS satellites. Along-strike variation of the moment accumulation rate is derived in order to investigate the degree of partial locking of the Creeping Section. The central Creeping Segment has a moment accumulation rate of 0.25-3.1 × 1015 Nm yr-1 km-1. The upper and lower bounds of the moment accumulation rates are derived based on the statistics of the noise. Our best-fitting model indicates that the central portion of the Creeping Section is accumulating seismic moment at rates that are about 5 per cent to 23 per cent of the fully locked Carrizo segment that will eventually be released seismically. A cumulative moment budget calculation with the historical earthquake catalogue (M > 5.5) since 1857 shows that the net moment deficit at present is equivalent to a Mw 6.3 earthquake.

  14. Comparison of Current and Historical Rates of Ecosystem Carbon Accumulation in a Northern Alberta Peatland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Syed, K. H.; Flanagan, L. B.; Carlson, P. J.; Glenn, A. J.; Ponton, S.

    2005-12-01

    As part of Fluxnet-Canada, we have been investigating the environmental controls on net ecosystem carbon dioxide exchange using the eddy covariance technique in a moderately rich (treed) fen in northern Alberta, Canada. In addition, integrated CO2 fluxes were compared to carbon stock measurements and rates of peat accumulation. The total ecosystem carbon stock was 52,669 g C m-2 with the vast majority (52,129) accumulated in peat over a 2 meter depth. The basal age for the peat was 2210 ± 50 years before present. The above-ground carbon stock in the two tree species was 226 g C m-2. The oldest Picea mariana trees were aged at 135 years, and they showed a rapid increase in basal area increment starting about 65 years ago that peaked at rates of 2 cm2 yr-1 about 40 years ago. The Larix laricina trees became established approximately 45 years ago and currently have a basal area increment of 3 to 4 cm2 yr-1, much higher than the current rates (0.5 cm2 yr-1) observed for Picea mariana. The rates of peat accumulation were determined on 210Pb-dated cores. Over the last 70 years the peat gained an average of 113 ± 12 g C m-2 yr-1. This was similar to net ecosystem production measured by eddy covariance (95 and 210 g C m-2 yr-1) over the last two years. Variation in annual net ecosystem production was associated with shifts in weather and growing season length. Current and recent historical rates of carbon accumulation were quite consistent despite significant variation in tree species growth and successional changes in this peatland over the last 70 years.

  15. Accumulation rates of biogenous silica and terrigenous detritus in late Miocene-early Pliocene Santa Maria basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Ramiriz, P.C.

    1988-03-01

    The upper-Miocene-lower Pliocene laminated to massive diatomaceous strata of the Santa Maria basin encompass portions of the Monterey and overlying conformable to nonconformable Sisquoc Formations and record the continued accumulation of admixed siliceous (mostly diatoms) and terrigenous (silt and clay) components in a Neogene borderland basin. Lithologies, which vary from diatomite to diatomaceous mudstone, are the result of fluctuations in slope-accumulating silica and terrigenous debris. Bulk accumulation rates, as well as silica and terrigenous component accumulation rates, were calculated for four measured sections using accurate stratal thicknesses, absolute ages, rock compositions, and bulk densities. Bulk accumulation rates range from less than 20 to greater than 70 mg/cm/sup 2//year and are comparable to bulk accumulation rates in the present-day Santa Barbara basin and Gulf o f California. Silica accumulation rates (20-30 mg/cm/sup 2//year) suggest that sedimentation took place beneath productive waters and they exceed those encountered in other high-productivity oceanic areas, such as the Bering Sea and Peruvian coastal waters. Relatively high terrigenous accumulation rates (18-35 mg/cm/sup 2//year) reflect the dilution of these high-productivity waters by continentally derived detritus. Comparison of calculated accumulation rates with rates determined for similarly aged strata of the Santa Barbara basin reveals that silica and terrigenous debris were accumulating at higher rates within the Santa Maria basin. These differences are due to the complex interplay of tectonics and oceanographics and to the proximity of the basins relative to the strandline.

  16. A comparison of recent, short-, and long-term carbon accumulation rates for a vegetation gradient in central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manies, K.; Harden, J. W.; Turetsky, M.; Fuller, C.

    2013-12-01

    Information regarding historical rates of carbon (C) accumulation will aid scientists in understanding how climate change may affect biogeochemical cycles in the future. We examined rates of C accumulation for the following three time periods: the last two thousand years (long-term rates), the last 30 years (short-term rates), and the last several years (recent rates). We compared C accumulation rates among these time periods for five different ecosystems found along a ~300-m transect within the Bonanza Creek Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) site. These sites were dominated by black spruce, low shrubs, tussock grass, Carex sp., or brown moss. The black spruce and shrub site are the only ecosystems currently underlain by permafrost. Three soil cores were taken at each site and analyzed for C content. In order to gain a robust understanding of C accumulation rates at each site, 14C measurements and 210Pb chronologies were also obtained, and flux measurements were taken at each site. 14C dates were acquired for the basal horizon of one profile for each ecosystem type, providing estimations of C accumulation rates since organic matter began to form. 210Pb chronologies for each soil profile allowed us to estimate C accumulation rates for the last several decades. Finally, CO2 flux measurements were taken at each site from May - September for five years (2007 - 2011), capturing recent C losses and gains. Although short-term C accumulation rates were lowest in the black spruce ecosystem, rates among ecosystems were not significantly different, due to large variability among soil profiles within each site (coefficient of variations of up to 50%). The long-term C accumulation rate at the black spruce site corresponds well to values measured in an adjacent black spruce forest using eddy covariance. The brown moss site had the highest long-term rates of C accumulation among the five ecosystems. Short-term C accumulation rates were always higher than long-term rates (40

  17. Synthesis of passive microwave and radar altimeter data for estimating accumulation rates of polar snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Curt H.

    1993-01-01

    In this paper, we compare dry-snow extinction coefficients derived from radar altimeter data with brightness temperature data from passive microwave measurements over a portion of the East Antarctic plateau. The comparison between the extinction coefficients and the brightness temperatures shows a strong negative correlation, where the correlation coefficients ranged from -0.87 to -0.95. The extinction coefficient of the dry polar snow decreases with increasing surface elevation, while the average brightness temperature increases with surface elevation. Our analysis shows that the observed trends are related to geographic variations in scattering coefficient of snow, which in turn are controlled by variations in surface temperature and snow accumulation rate. By combining information present in the extinction coefficient and brightness temperature data sets, we develop a model that can be used to obtain quantitative estimates of the accumulation rate of dry polar snow.

  18. Soil carbon stocks and their rates of accumulation and loss in a boreal forest landscape

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rapalee, G.; Trumbore, S.E.; Davidson, E.A.; Harden, J.W.; Veldhuis, H.

    1998-01-01

    Boreal forests and wetlands are thought to be significant carbon sinks, and they could become net C sources as the Earth warms. Most of the C of boreal forest ecosystems is stored in the moss layer and in the soil. The objective of this study was to estimate soil C stocks (including moss layers) and rates of accumulation and loss for a 733 km2 area of the BOReal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study site in northern Manitoba, using data from smaller-scale intensive field studies. A simple process-based model developed from measurements of soil C inventories and radiocarbon was used to relate soil C storage and dynamics to soil drainage and forest stand age. Soil C stocks covary with soil drainage class, with the largest C stocks occurring in poorly drained sites. Estimated rates of soil C accumulation or loss are sensitive to the estimated decomposition constants for the large pool of deep soil C, and improved understanding of deep soil C decomposition is needed. While the upper moss layers regrow and accumulate C after fires, the deep C dynamics vary across the landscape, from a small net sink to a significant source. Estimated net soil C accumulation, averaged for the entire 733 km2 area, was 20 g C m-2 yr-1 (28 g C m-2 yr-1 accumulation in surface mosses offset by 8 g C m-2 yr-1 lost from deep C pools) in a year with no fire. Most of the C accumulated in poorly and very poorly drained soils (peatlands and wetlands). Burning of the moss layer in only 1% of uplands would offset the C stored in the remaining 99% of the area. Significant interannual variability in C storage is expected because of the irregular occurrence of fire in space and time. The effects of climate change and management on fire frequency and on decomposition of immense deep soil C stocks are key to understanding future C budgets in boreal forests.

  19. Rate of production, dissolution and accumulation of biogenic solids in the ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arrhenius, G.

    1988-01-01

    The equatorial current system, by its response to global circulation changes, provides a unique recording mechanism for long range climatic oscillations. A permanent record of the changes in rate of upwelling and organic production is generated in the equatorial deep sea sediments, particularly by such biogenic components which are unaffected by secondary dissolution. In order to determine the rates of accumulation of various sedimentary components, a reliable differential measurement of age of the strata must be obtained. Various approaches to this problem are reviewed, and sources of error discussed. Secondary dissolution of calcium carbonate introduces a substantial and variable difference between the dissolution-modified, and hence a priori unknown, rate of deposition on one hand and the rate of accumulation, derivable from the observed concentration, on the other. The cause and magnitude of these variations are of importance, particularly since some current dating schemes are based on assumed constancy in the rate of accumulation of this and, in some cases, also all other sedimentary components. The concepts used in rate evaluation are discussed with emphasis on the difference between the state of dissolution, an observable property of the sediment, and the rate of dissolution, a parameter that requires deduction of the carbonate fraction dissolved, and of the time differential. As a most likely cause of the enhanced state of dissolution of the interglacial carbonate sediments is proposed the lowered rates of biogenic production and deposition, which cause longer exposure of the carbonate microfossils to corrosion in the bioturbated surface layer of the sediment. Historical perspective is included in the discussion in view of the dedication of the Symposium to Hans Pettersson, the leader of the Swedish Deep Sea Expedition 1947-1948, an undertaking that opened a new era in deep sea research and planetary dynamics.

  20. Dual physiological rate measurement instrument

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Tommy G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    The object of the invention is to provide an instrument for converting a physiological pulse rate into a corresponding linear output voltage. The instrument which accurately measures the rate of an unknown rectangular pulse wave over an extended range of values comprises a phase-locked loop including a phase comparator, a filtering network, and a voltage-controlled oscillator, arranged in cascade. The phase comparator has a first input responsive to the pulse wave and a second input responsive to the output signal of the voltage-controlled oscillator. The comparator provides a signal dependent on the difference in phase and frequency between the signals appearing on the first and second inputs. A high-input impedance amplifier accepts an output from the filtering network and provides an amplified output DC signal to a utilization device for providing a measurement of the rate of the pulse wave.

  1. Organic Carbon, Nitrogen and Phosphorus Accumulation Rates in the Soils of the Everglades Mangrove Ecotone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smoak, J. M.; Breithaupt, J. L.; Sanders, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    One of the fundamental questions with regard to coastal ecotones relates to their role in the transformation, transport and storage of biogeochemically important constituents and how that role may be altered by climate change. Coastal wetlands provide a range of valuable ecosystem services including sequestering organic carbon (OC) and nutrients in their soils at rates greater than terrestrial ecosystems on a per area basis. As such the Everglades mangrove ecotone, the largest contiguous mangrove forest in North America, is a biogeochemical "hotspot" at the interface of freshwater marsh and the Gulf of Mexico. Over the last one hundred years this region has been impacted by a reduction in freshwater flow and a sea-level rise (SLR) of 2.3 mm/yr which combined to cause a landward shift in the ecotone. This creates an ideal setting to examine climate induced alterations in the mangrove-ecotone biogeochemical cycle. The ability of the Everglades mangrove forest to keep pace with SLR depends largely on the rate of organic matter accumulation as that accumulation is a key contributor to accretion. However, the basic threat from SLR can be exacerbated in some areas by accelerating organic matter mineralization due to increasing salinity. The increase in salinity supplies sulfate which functions as a terminal electron acceptor that soil microbes can utilize to enhance mineralization in the brackish ecotone regions of coastal wetlands. To investigate these processes, we measured mangrove forest soil accretion, OC, N and P accumulation rates over the most recent 10, 50 and 100 year periods (via 210Pb dating) from the Gulf of Mexico to the upper freshwater reaches of the mangrove forest within Everglades National Park. Lower organic carbon accumulation rates compared to the rest of the system were found in the ecotone region most susceptible to enhanced organic matter mineralization.

  2. Accumulation rates of Th-230, Pa-231, and some transition metals on the Bermuda Rise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bacon, M.P.; Rosholt, J.N.

    1982-01-01

    Measurements of 238U, 234U, 230Th, 232Th, 231Pa, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn were made on 23 samples from core GPC-5, a 29-m giant piston core from a water depth of 4583 m on the northeastern Bermuda Rise (33??41.2???N, 57??36.9???W). This area is characterized by rapid deposition of sediment transported by abyssal currents. Unsupported 230Th and 231Pa are present throughout the core but, because of large variations in the sedimentation rate, show marked departures from exponential decay with depth. The trend with depth of the 231Paex 230Thex ratio is consistent with the average accumulation rate of 36 cm/1000 y reported earlier on the basis of radiocarbon dating and CaCO3 stratigraphy. When expressed on a carbonate-free basis, concentrations of Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, 230Thex, and 231Paex all show cyclic variations positively correlated with those of CaCO3. The correlations can be explained by a model in which all of these constituents, including CaCO3, are supplied to the sediments from the water column at a constant rate. Concentration variations are controlled mainly by varying inputs of terrigenous detritus, with low inputs occurring during interglacials and high inputs during glacials. Relationships between the metal and 230Thex concentrations permit estimates of the rates at which the metals are removed to the sediment by scavenging from the water column. The results, in ??g/cm2-1000 y, are: 4300 ?? 1100 for Mn, 46 ?? 16 for Ni and 76 ?? 26 for Cu. These rates are somewhat larger than ocean-wide averages estimated by other methods, and the absolute rate of 230Th accumulation in GPC-5 averages about nine times higher than production in the overlying water column. This part of the Bermuda Rise and similar bottom-current deposits may act as important accumulators of elements scavenged from seawater. ?? 1982.

  3. Calibrating a long-term meteoric 10Be accumulation rate in soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reusser, Lucas; Graly, Joseph; Bierman, Paul; Rood, Dylan

    2010-10-01

    Using 13 samples collected from a 4.1 meter profile in a well-dated and stable New Zealand fluvial terrace, we present the first long-term accumulation rate for meteoric 10Be in soil (1.68 to 1.72 × 106 at/(cm2·yr)) integrated over the past ˜18 ka. Site-specific accumulation data, such as these, are prerequisite to the application of meteoric 10Be in surface process studies. Our data begin the process of calibrating long-term meteoric 10Be delivery rates across latitude and precipitation gradients. Our integrated rate is lower than contemporary meteoric 10Be fluxes measured in New Zealand rainfall, suggesting that long-term average precipitation, dust flux, or both, at this site were less than modern values. With accurately calibrated long-term delivery rates, such as this, meteoric 10Be will be a powerful tool for studying rates of landscape change in environments where other cosmogenic nuclides, such as in situ 10Be, cannot be used.

  4. Sediment mixing and accumulation rate effects on radionuclide depth profiles in Hudson estuary sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Peng, T.H.; Bopp, R.F.; Trier, R.M.

    1981-11-01

    Measured anthropogenic radionuclide profiles in sediment cores from the Hudson River estuary were compared with profiles computed by using known input histories of radionuclides to the estuary and mixing coefficients which decreased exponentially with depth in the sediment. Observed /sup 134/Cs sediment depth profiles were used in the mixing rate computation because reactor releases were the only significant source for this nuclide, whereas the inputs of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239,240/Pu to the estuary were complicated by runoff or erosion in upstream areas, in addition to direct fallout from precipitation. Our estimates for the rates of surface sediment mixing in the low salinity reach of the estuary range from 0.25 to 1 cm/sup 2//yr, or less. In some areas of the harbor adjacent to New York City, where fine-particle accumulation rates are generally 3 cm/yr, and often as high as 10 to 20 cm/yr, sediment mixing rates as high as 10 cm/sup 2//yr would have little effect on radionuclide peak distributions. Consequently, anthropogenic radionuclide maximum activities in subsurface sediments of the Hudson appear to be useful as time-stratigraphic reference levels, which can be correlated with periods of maximum radionuclide inputs for estimating rates and patterns of sediment accumulation. 10 figures.

  5. Sediment mixing and accumulation rate effects on radionuclide depth profiles in Hudson estuary sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, C.R.; Simpson, H.J.; Peng, T.; Bopp, R.F.; Trier, R.M.

    1981-11-20

    Measured anthropogenic radionuclide profiles in sediment cores from the Hudson River estuary were compared with profiles computed by using known input histories of radionuclides to the estuary and mixing coefficients which decreased exponentially with depth in the sediment. Observed /sup 134/Cs sediment depth profiles were used in the mixing rate computation because reactor releases were the only significant source for this nuclide, whereas the inputs of /sup 137/Cs and /sup 239.240/Pu to the estuary were complicated by runoff or erosion in upstream areas, in addition to direct fallout from precipitation. Our estimates for the rates of surface sediment mixing in the low salinity reach of the estuary range from 0.25 to 1 cm/sup 2//yr, or less. In some areas of the harbor adjacent to New York City, were fine-particle accumulation rates are generally >3 cm/yr, and often as high as 10 to 20 cm/yr, sediment mixing rates as high as 10 cm/sup 2//yr would have little effect on radionuclide peak distributions. Consequently, anthropogenic radionuclide maximum activities in subsurface sediments of the Hudson appear to be useful as time-stratigraphic reference levels, which can be correlated with periods of maximum radionuclide inputs for estimating rates and patterns of sediment accumulation.

  6. Winter Insulation By Snow Accumulation in a Subarctic Treeline Ecosystem Increases Summer Carbon Cycling Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T.; Subke, J. A.; Wookey, P. A.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of snow accumulation on soil carbon and nutrient cycling is attracting substantial attention from researchers. We know that deeper snow accumulation caused by high stature vegetation increases winter microbial activity and therefore carbon and nitrogen flux rates. However, until now the effect of snow accumulation, by buffering winter soil temperature, on subsequent summer soil processes, has scarcely been considered. We carried out an experiment at an alpine treeline in subarctic Sweden in which soil monoliths, contained within PVC collars, were transplanted between forest (deep winter snow) and tundra heath (shallow winter snow). We measured soil CO2efflux over two growing seasons and quantified soil microbial biomass after the second winter. We showed that respiration rates of transplanted forest soil were significantly reduced compared with control collars (remaining in the forest) as a consequence of colder, but more variable, winter temperatures. We hypothesised that microbial biomass would be reduced in transplanted forests soils but found there was no difference compared to control. We therefore further hypothesised that the similarly sized microbial pool in the control is assembled differently to the transplant. We believe that the warmer winters in forests foster more active consortia of decomposer microbes as a result of different abiotic selection pressures. Using an ecosystem scale experimental approach, we have identified a mechanism that influences summer carbon cycling rates based solely on the amount of snow that accumulates the previous winter. We conclude that modification of snow depth as a consequence of changes in vegetation structure is an important mechanism influencing soil C stocks in ecosystems where snow persists for a major fraction of the year.

  7. Annual Greenland accumulation rates (2009-2012) from airborne snow radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Alexander, Patrick M.; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Panzer, Ben; Paden, John D.; Forster, Richard R.; Das, Indrani; McConnell, Joesph R.; Tedesco, Marco; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2016-08-01

    Contemporary climate warming over the Arctic is accelerating mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through increasing surface melt, emphasizing the need to closely monitor its surface mass balance in order to improve sea-level rise predictions. Snow accumulation is the largest component of the ice sheet's surface mass balance, but in situ observations thereof are inherently sparse and models are difficult to evaluate at large scales. Here, we quantify recent Greenland accumulation rates using ultra-wideband (2-6.5 GHz) airborne snow radar data collected as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge between 2009 and 2012. We use a semiautomated method to trace the observed radiostratigraphy and then derive annual net accumulation rates for 2009-2012. The uncertainty in these radar-derived accumulation rates is on average 14 %. A comparison of the radar-derived accumulation rates and contemporaneous ice cores shows that snow radar captures both the annual and long-term mean accumulation rate accurately. A comparison with outputs from a regional climate model (MAR) shows that this model matches radar-derived accumulation rates in the ice sheet interior but produces higher values over southeastern Greenland. Our results demonstrate that snow radar can efficiently and accurately map patterns of snow accumulation across an ice sheet and that it is valuable for evaluating the accuracy of surface mass balance models.

  8. Annual Greenland Accumulation Rates (2009-2012) from Airborne Snow Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, Lora S.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Alexander, Patrick M.; MacGregor, Joseph A.; Fettweis, Xavier; Panzer, Ben; Paden, John D.; Forster, Richard R.; Das, Indrani; McConnell, Joseph R.; Tedesco, Marco; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Contemporary climate warming over the Arctic is accelerating mass loss from the Greenland Ice Sheet through increasing surface melt, emphasizing the need to closely monitor its surface mass balance in order to improve sea-level rise predictions. Snow accumulation is the largest component of the ice sheet's surface mass balance, but in situ observations thereof are inherently sparse and models are difficult to evaluate at large scales. Here, we quantify recent Greenland accumulation rates using ultra-wideband (2-6.5 gigahertz) airborne snow radar data collected as part of NASA's Operation IceBridge between 2009 and 2012. We use a semi-automated method to trace the observed radiostratigraphy and then derive annual net accumulation rates for 2009-2012. The uncertainty in these radar-derived accumulation rates is on average 14 percent. A comparison of the radarderived accumulation rates and contemporaneous ice cores shows that snow radar captures both the annual and longterm mean accumulation rate accurately. A comparison with outputs from a regional climate model (MAR - Modele Atmospherique Regional for Greenland and vicinity) shows that this model matches radar-derived accumulation rates in the ice sheet interior but produces higher values over southeastern Greenland. Our results demonstrate that snow radar can efficiently and accurately map patterns of snow accumulation across an ice sheet and that it is valuable for evaluating the accuracy of surface mass balance models.

  9. Spatial variation in rates of carbon and nitrogen accumulation in a boreal bog

    SciTech Connect

    Ohlson, M.; Oekland, R.H.

    1998-12-01

    Although previous studies hint at the occurrence of substantial spatial variation in the accumulation rates of C and N in bogs, the extent to which rates may vary on high-resolution spatial and temporal scales is not known. A main reason for the lack of knowledge is that it is problematic to determine the precise age of peat at a given depth. The authors determined rates of carbon and nitrogen accumulation in the uppermost decimeters of a bog ecosystem using the pine method, which enables accurate dating of surface peat layers. They combined accumulation data with numerical and geostatistical analyses of the recent vegetation to establish the relationship between bog vegetation and rate of peat accumulation. Use of a laser technique for spatial positioning of 151 age-determined peat cores within a 20 x 20 m plot made it possible to give the first tine-scaled account of spatial and temporal variation in rates of mass, carbon, and nitrogen accumulation during the last century. Rates of C and N accumulation were highly variable at all spatial scales studied. For example, after {approximately}125 yr of peat growth, C and N accumulation varied by factors of five and four, respectively, from 25 to 125 g/dm{sup 2} for C, and from 0.7 to 2.6 g/dm{sup 2} for N. It takes 40 yr of peat accumulation before significant amounts of C are lost through decay. Hummocks built up by Sphagnum fuscum and S. rubellum were able to maintain average rates of C accumulation that exceed 2 g{center_dot}dm{sup {minus}2}{center_dot} yr{sup {minus}1} during 50 yr of growth. The authors argue that data on spatial variation in rates of C accumulation are necessary to understand the role of boreal peatlands in the greenhouse effect and global climate.

  10. Greenland Ice Sheet Annually-resolved Accumulation Rates (1958-2007), a Spatially Calibrated Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, E. W.; Forster, R. R.; Box, J. W.; Smith, L. C.; Bromwich, D. H.

    2008-12-01

    The Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) has responded dramatically to recent temperature increases, making it an important contributor to sea level rise. Accurate predictions of Greenland's future contribution to sea level will require a scrupulous understanding of the GIS system and refining our understanding of accumulation is a critical step towards this goal. The most accurate existing estimates of Greenland accumulation rates are multi-year averages; existing annual estimates contain poorly quantified uncertainties. This project developed a superior Greenland accumulation dataset that is spatially comprehensive, has annual resolution, is calibrated to field observations and contains sound uncertainty estimates. Accumulation output from a 1958- 2007 run of the Fifth Generation Mesoscale Model modified for polar climates (PMM5) was calibrated against 133 firn cores and coastal meteorological stations. PMM5 accumulation rate estimates contained spatially dependent systematic biases that were modeled and removed using spatial interpolation of zonally derived regressions. The calibrated accumulation dataset contains residual uncertainties exhibiting a strong spatial pattern that was modeled to estimate ice-sheet wide uncertainty. No significant 1958-2007 trends in Greenland accumulation are evident. Average annual accumulation rate is estimated at 0.339m.w.e. or 593km3 with an RMSE uncertainty of +/-83 km3 or +/-14%. The accumulation dataset will be made publicly available.

  11. Comparison of elemental accumulation rates between ferromanganese deposits and sediments in the South Pacific Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kraemer, T.; Schornick, J.C.

    1974-01-01

    Rates of accumulation of Fe and Mn, as well as Cu, Ni, Co, Pb, Zn, Hg, U and Th have been determined for five ferromanganese deposits from four localities in the South Pacific Ocean. Manganese is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate roughly equivalent to that found to be accumulating in sediments in the same area. Iron shows a deficiency in accumulation in nodules and crusts with respect to sediments, especially near the continents, but also in the central and south-central Pacific. Copper is accumulating in nodules and crusts at a rate one order of magnitude less than the surrounding sediments. This is interpreted as meaning that most of the Mn is supplied as an authigenic phase to both sediments and nodules while Fe is supplied mostly by ferromanganese micro-nodules and by detrital and adsorbed components of sediments; and Cu is enriched in sediments relative to nodules and crusts most probably through biological activity. ?? 1974.

  12. Carbon and Nitrogen Accumulation Rates in Salt Marshes in Oregon, USA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Two important ecosystem services of wetlands are carbon sequestration and filtration of nutrients and particulates. We quantified the carbon and nitrogen accumulation rates in salt marshes at 135 plots distributed across eight estuaries located in Oregon, USA. Net carbon and ...

  13. A True Eddy Accumulation - Eddy Covariance hybrid for measurements of turbulent trace gas fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siebicke, Lukas

    2016-04-01

    Eddy covariance (EC) is state-of-the-art in directly and continuously measuring turbulent fluxes of carbon dioxide and water vapor. However, low signal-to-noise ratios, high flow rates and missing or complex gas analyzers limit it's application to few scalars. True eddy accumulation, based on conditional sampling ideas by Desjardins in 1972, requires no fast response analyzers and is therefore potentially applicable to a wider range of scalars. Recently we showed possibly the first successful implementation of True Eddy Accumulation (TEA) measuring net ecosystem exchange of carbon dioxide of a grassland. However, most accumulation systems share the complexity of having to store discrete air samples in physical containers representing entire flux averaging intervals. The current study investigates merging principles of eddy accumulation and eddy covariance, which we here refer to as "true eddy accumulation in transient mode" (TEA-TM). This direct flux method TEA-TM combines true eddy accumulation with continuous sampling. The TEA-TM setup is simpler than discrete accumulation methods while avoiding the need for fast response gas analyzers and high flow rates required for EC. We implemented the proposed TEA-TM method and measured fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and water vapor (H2O) above a mixed beech forest at the Hainich Fluxnet and ICOS site, Germany, using a G2301 laser spectrometer (Picarro Inc., USA). We further simulated a TEA-TM sampling system using measured high frequency CO2 time series from an open-path gas analyzer. We operated TEA-TM side-by-side with open-, enclosed- and closed-path EC flux systems for CO2, H2O and CH4 (LI-7500, LI-7200, LI-6262, LI-7700, Licor, USA, and FGGA LGR, USA). First results show that TEA-TM CO2 fluxes were similar to EC fluxes. Remaining differences were similar to those between the three eddy covariance setups (open-, enclosed- and closed-path gas analyzers). Measured TEA-TM CO2 fluxes from our physical

  14. Topographic control and accumulation rate of some Holocene coral reefs: south Florida and Dry Tortugas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shinn, E.A.; Hudson, J.H.; Halley, R.B.; Lidz, B.H.; Taylor, D.L.

    1977-01-01

    Core drilling and examination of underwater excavation on 6 reef sites in south Florida and Dry Tortugas revealed that underlying topography is the major factor controlling reef morphology. Carbon-14 dating on coral recovered from cores enables calculation of accumulation rates. Accumulation rates were found to range from 0.38 m/1000 years in thin Holocene reefs to as much as 4.85 m/1000 years in thicker buildups. Cementation and alteration of corals were found to be more pronounced in areas of low buildup rates than in areas of rapid accumulation rates. Acropora palmata, generally considered the major reef builder in Florida, was found to be absent in most reefs drilled. At Dry Tortugas, the more than 13-meter thick Holocene reef did not contain A. palmata. The principal reef builders in this outer reef are the same as those which built the Pleistocene Key Largo formation, long considered to be fossilized patch reef complex.

  15. Purification and partial kinetic and physical characterization of two NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase isoenzymes and their protein precursors, and measurement of the patterns of accumulation and rates of degradation of their nonidentical subunits in synchronized cells of Chlorella cultured in different concentrations of ammonia

    SciTech Connect

    Bascomb, N.F.

    1986-01-01

    Two ammonium-inducible, chloroplast-localized, NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenases were purified from Chlorella sorokiniana. They were homopolymers of either alpha or beta subunits with molecular weights of 55,500 and 53,000, respectively. These isoenzymes were separated by their differential binding to the substrate affinity column. Peptide mapping of purified alpha and beta subunits showed them to have a high degree of sequence homology. By use of SDS slab-gel electrophoresis and a Western blot/immunodetection procedure, patterns of accumulation of alpha and beta subunits (in their holoenzyme) were measured in cells cultured in media, containing different concentrations of ammonia. Pulse-chase experiments with (/sup 35/S)sulfate were performed to measured the rates of degradation of the two isoenzymes. When the culture medium contained 2 mM ammonia or lower, cells accumulated only the alpha holoenzyme. Above 2 mM ammonia, cells contained both enzymes; however, their patterns of accumulation and rates of degradation were very different. The physiological role of alpha and beta holoenzymes appears to be ammonia assimilation at low and high external ammonia concentrations, respectively. From in vitro-translation studies with total cellular poly(A)/sup +/RNA, isolated from cells engaged in synthesis of alpha or beta holoenzymes or both, it was concluded that alpha and beta subunits have protein precursor(s) or identical molecular weight (M/sub r/ = 58,500). When the putative protein-precursor(s) were incubated in vitro, with cell-free extracts from Chlorella cells, they were processed to proteins the size of alpha and beta subunits.

  16. Impact Of Particle Agglomeration On Accumulation Rates In The Glass Discharge Riser Of HLW Melter

    SciTech Connect

    Kruger, A. A.; Rodriguez, C. A.; Matyas, J.; Owen, A. T.; Jansik, D. P.; Lang, J. B.

    2012-11-12

    The major factor limiting waste loading in continuous high-level radioactive waste (HLW) melters is an accumulation of particles in the glass discharge riser during a frequent and periodic idling of more than 20 days. An excessive accumulation can produce robust layers a few centimeters thick, which may clog the riser, preventing molten glass from being poured into canisters. Since the accumulation rate is driven by the size of particles we investigated with x-ray microtomography, scanning electron microscopy, and image analysis the impact of spinel forming components, noble metals, and alumina on the size, concentration, and spatial distribution of particles, and on the accumulation rate. Increased concentrations of Fe and Ni in the baseline glass resulted in the formation of large agglomerates that grew over the time to an average size of ~185+-155 {mu}m, and produced >3 mm thick layer after 120 h at 850 deg C. The noble metals decreased the particle size, and therefore significantly slowed down the accumulation rate. Addition of alumina resulted in the formation of a network of spinel dendrites which prevented accumulation of particles into compact layers.

  17. Verification of International Space Station Component Leak Rates by Helium Accumulation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Underwood, Steve D.; Smith, Sherry L.

    2003-01-01

    Discovery of leakage on several International Space Station U.S. Laboratory Module ammonia system quick disconnects (QDs) led to the need for a process to quantify total leakage without removing the QDs from the system. An innovative solution was proposed allowing quantitative leak rate measurement at ambient external pressure without QD removal. The method utilizes a helium mass spectrometer configured in the detector probe mode to determine helium leak rates inside a containment hood installed on the test component. The method was validated through extensive developmental testing. Test results showed the method was viable, accurate and repeatable for a wide range of leak rates. The accumulation method has been accepted by NASA and is currently being used by Boeing Huntsville, Boeing Kennedy Space Center and Boeing Johnson Space Center to test welds and valves and will be used by Alenia to test the Cupola. The method has been used in place of more expensive vacuum chamber testing which requires removing the test component from the system.

  18. Evaluation of C accumulation rates, as determined by 137Cs and 210Pb, for a vegetation gradient in central Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manies, K.; Harden, J. W.; Fuller, C. C.; Turetsky, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    Boreal ecosystems comprise a large portion of the world's soil carbon (C) in large part because the rate of biomass production is greater than the rate of decomposition. To aid in our understanding in the C balance of these systems we need to determine soil C accumulation rates in different ecosystems. Here we use 137Cs and 210Pb chronologies to examine the C accumulation rates of a natural vegetation gradient found within the Bonanza Creek LTER of central Alaska. Five ecosystems, located along a ~300-m transect, were dominated by black spruce, low shrubs, tussock grass, Carex sp., or brown moss. Only the black spruce and shrub site are underlain by permafrost. Three soil cores were taken from each site and analyzed for C content. Depth profiles were also measured for 137Cs and 210Pb, dating the soil horizons, allowing us to estimate C accumulation rates. Average unsupported 210Pb inventories (dpm/cm^2) for each ecosystem type were similar. However, unsupported 210Pb activity was found in the mineral soil horizons for the tussock grass site, suggesting that Pb may be mobile in this system. Estimated dates of formation for each horizon, calculated using both the Constant Flux: Constant Sedimentation (CF:CS) and Constant Rate of Supply (CRS) methods, were usually within +/- 5 years for the past 50 years, but deviated more for older, deeper horizons, likely due to uncertainty in defining the unsupported 210Pb inventory. Recent C accumulation rates varied among ecosystem type, with the black spruce sites having the lowest rate of C accumulation and the other ecosystems (not including the tussock grass site) having approximately the same C accumulation rates. Variability within each ecosystem type, however, was high. The short-term accumulation rates found for these ecosystems (44 - 100 gC/m^2/yr) are within the range of values found in some northern studies (i.e., 40-117 gC/m^2/yr; Turunen et. al, 2004), but higher than those reported by others (i.e., 20-30 gC/m^2/yr

  19. Incorporation of radiometric tracers in peat and implications for estimating accumulation rates.

    PubMed

    Hansson, Sophia V; Kaste, James M; Olid, Carolina; Bindler, Richard

    2014-09-15

    Accurate dating of peat accumulation is essential for quantitatively reconstructing past changes in atmospheric metal deposition and carbon burial. By analyzing fallout radionuclides (210)Pb, (137)Cs, (241)Am, and (7)Be, and total Pb and Hg in 5 cores from two Swedish peatlands we addressed the consequence of estimating accumulation rates due to downwashing of atmospherically supplied elements within peat. The detection of (7)Be down to 18-20 cm for some cores, and the broad vertical distribution of (241)Am without a well-defined peak, suggest some downward transport by percolating rainwater and smearing of atmospherically deposited elements in the uppermost peat layers. Application of the CRS age-depth model leads to unrealistic peat mass accumulation rates (400-600 g m(-2) yr(-1)), and inaccurate estimates of past Pb and Hg deposition rates and trends, based on comparisons to deposition monitoring data (forest moss biomonitoring and wet deposition). After applying a newly proposed IP-CRS model that assumes a potential downward transport of (210)Pb through the uppermost peat layers, recent peat accumulation rates (200-300 g m(-2) yr(-1)) comparable to published values were obtained. Furthermore, the rates and temporal trends in Pb and Hg accumulation correspond more closely to monitoring data, although some off-set is still evident. We suggest that downwashing can be successfully traced using (7)Be, and if this information is incorporated into age-depth models, better calibration of peat records with monitoring data and better quantitative estimates of peat accumulation and past deposition are possible, although more work is needed to characterize how downwashing may vary between seasons or years.

  20. High Rates of Species Accumulation in Animals with Bioluminescent Courtship Displays.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Emily A; Oakley, Todd H

    2016-07-25

    One of the great mysteries of evolutionary biology is why closely related lineages accumulate species at different rates. Theory predicts that populations undergoing strong sexual selection will more quickly differentiate because of increased potential for genetic isolation [1-6]. Whether or not these population genetic processes translate to more species at macroevolutionary scales remains contentious [7]. Here we show that lineages with bioluminescent courtship, almost certainly a sexually selected trait, have more species and faster rates of species accumulation than their non-luminous relatives. In each of ten distantly related animal lineages from insects, crustaceans, annelid worms, and fishes, we find more species in lineages with bioluminescent courtship compared to their sister groups. Furthermore, we find under a Yule model that lineages with bioluminescent courtship displays have significantly higher rates of species accumulation compared to a larger clade that includes them plus non-luminous relatives. In contrast, we do not find more species or higher rates in lineages that use bioluminescence for defense, a function presumably not under sexual selection. These results document an association between the origin of bioluminescent courtship and increased accumulation of species, supporting theory predicting sexual selection increases rates of speciation at macroevolutionary scales to influence global patterns of biodiversity. PMID:27345160

  1. T1 Relaxation Rate (R1) Indicates Nonlinear Mn Accumulation in Brain Tissue of Welders With Low-Level Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eun-Young; Flynn, Michael R.; Du, Guangwei; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Fry, Rebecca; Herring, Amy H.; Van Buren, Eric; Van Buren, Scott; Smeester, Lisa; Kong, Lan; Yang, Qing; Mailman, Richard B.; Huang, Xuemei

    2015-01-01

    Although the essential element manganese (Mn) is neurotoxic at high doses, the effects of lower exposure are unclear. MRI T1-weighted (TIW) imaging has been used to estimate brain Mn exposure via the pallidal index (PI), defined as the T1W intensity ratio in the globus pallidus (GP) versus frontal white matter (FWM). PI may not, however, be sensitive to Mn in GP because Mn also may accumulate in FWM. This study explored: (1) whether T1 relaxation rate (R1) could quantify brain Mn accumulation more sensitively; and (2) the dose-response relationship between estimated Mn exposure and T1 relaxation rate (R1). Thirty-five active welders and 30 controls were studied. Occupational questionnaires were used to estimate hours welding in the past 90 days (HrsW) and lifetime measures of Mn exposure. T1W imaging and T1-measurement were utilized to generate PI and R1 values in brain regions of interest (ROIs). PI did not show a significant association with any measure of Mn and/or welding-related exposure. Conversely, in several ROIs, R1 showed a nonlinear relationship to HrsW, with R1 signal increasing only after a critical exposure was reached. The GP had the greatest rate of Mn accumulation. Welders with higher exposure showed significantly higher R1 compared either with controls or with welders with lower exposure. Our data are additional evidence that Mn accumulation can be assessed more sensitively by R1 than by PI. Moreover, the nonlinear relationship between welding exposure and Mn brain accumulation should be considered in future studies and policies. PMID:25953701

  2. Greenland annual accumulation along the EGIG line, 1959-2004, from ASIRAS airborne radar and neutron-probe density measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overly, Thomas B.; Hawley, Robert L.; Helm, Veit; Morris, Elizabeth M.; Chaudhary, Rohan N.

    2016-08-01

    We report annual snow accumulation rates from 1959 to 2004 along a 250 km segment of the Expéditions Glaciologiques Internationales au Groenland (EGIG) line across central Greenland using Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) radar layers and high resolution neutron-probe (NP) density profiles. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation rates are not statistically different (95 % confidence interval) from in situ EGIG accumulation measurements from 1985 to 2004. ASIRAS-NP-derived accumulation increases by 20 % below 3000 m elevation, and increases by 13 % above 3000 m elevation for the period 1995 to 2004 compared to 1985 to 1994. Three Regional Climate Models (PolarMM5, RACMO2.3, MAR) underestimate snow accumulation below 3000 m by 16-20 % compared to ASIRAS-NP from 1985 to 2004. We test radar-derived accumulation rates sensitivity to density using modeled density profiles in place of NP densities. ASIRAS radar layers combined with Herron and Langway (1980) model density profiles (ASIRAS-HL) produce accumulation rates within 3.5 % of ASIRAS-NP estimates in the dry snow region. We suggest using Herron and Langway (1980) density profiles to calibrate radar layers detected in dry snow regions of ice sheets lacking detailed in situ density measurements, such as those observed by the Operation IceBridge campaign.

  3. Nutritive Value and Herbage Accumulation Rates of Pasture Sown to Grass, Legume, and Chicory

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Planting pastures to mixtures of forages may benefit herbage production; however, wide fluctuations in botanical composition could cause unstable nutritive value. A grazing study was conducted to examine how forage mixture complexity influenced nutritive value and accumulation rate during spring, su...

  4. Tracing nitrogen accumulation in decaying wood and examining its impact on wood decomposition rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rinne, Katja T.; Rajala, Tiina; Peltoniemi, Krista; Chen, Janet; Smolander, Aino; Mäkipää, Raisa

    2016-04-01

    Decomposition of dead wood, which is controlled primarily by fungi is important for ecosystem carbon cycle and has potentially a significant role in nitrogen fixation via diazotrophs. Nitrogen content has been found to increase with advancing wood decay in several studies; however, the importance of this increase to decay rate and the sources of external nitrogen remain unclear. Improved knowledge of the temporal dynamics of wood decomposition rate and nitrogen accumulation in wood as well as the drivers of the two processes would be important for carbon and nitrogen models dealing with ecosystem responses to climate change. To tackle these questions we applied several analytical methods on Norway spruce logs from Lapinjärvi, Finland. We incubated wood samples (density classes from I to V, n=49) in different temperatures (from 8.5oC to 41oC, n=7). After a common seven day pre-incubation period at 14.5oC, the bottles were incubated six days in their designated temperature prior to CO2 flux measurements with GC to determine the decomposition rate. N2 fixation was measured with acetylene reduction assay after further 48 hour incubation. In addition, fungal DNA, (MiSeq Illumina) δ15N and N% composition of wood for samples incubated at 14.5oC were determined. Radiocarbon method was applied to obtain age distribution for the density classes. The asymbiotic N2 fixation rate was clearly dependent on the stage of wood decay and increased from stage I to stage IV but was substantially reduced in stage V. CO2 production was highest in the intermediate decay stage (classes II-IV). Both N2 fixation and CO2 production were highly temperature sensitive having optima in temperature 25oC and 31oC, respectively. We calculated the variation of annual levels of respiration and N2 fixation per hectare for the study site, and used the latter data together with the 14C results to determine the amount of N2 accumulated in wood in time. The proportion of total nitrogen in wood

  5. Hydroacoustic and spatial analysis of sediment fluxes and accumulation rates in two Virginia reservoirs, USA.

    PubMed

    Clark, E V; Odhiambo, B K; Yoon, S; Pilati, L

    2015-06-01

    Watershed sediment fluxes and reservoir sediment accumulation rates were analyzed in two contrasting reservoir systems in central and western Virginia. Lake Pelham, located in the Piedmont geologic province, is a human-impacted reservoir with a watershed dominated by agricultural, residential and industrial land uses. Conversely, Lake Moomaw has a largely undeveloped watershed characterized by very steep slopes and forested land use located in the Valley and Ridge province. The Revised Universal Soil Loss Equation (RUSLE) and sediment delivery ratios (SDRs) were used to estimate soil losses in the two watersheds. Bathymetric and sediment accumulation surveys of the two reservoirs were also conducted using a multi-frequency hydroacoustic surveying system. The RUSLE/SDR erosion model estimates 2150 kg ha(-1) year(-1) for Lake Pelham and 2720 kg ha(-1) year(-1) for Lake Moomaw, a 410 and 13 % increase from assumed pristine (100 % forested) land use for the respective basins. Mean sediment accumulation rates of 1.51 and 0.60 cm year(-1) were estimated from the hydroacoustic survey of Lake Pelham and Lake Moomaw, respectively. Overall, Lake Moomaw has relatively low sediment accumulation rates; however, the reservoir is vulnerable to increases in sediment fluxes with further human development due to the steep slopes and highly erodible colluvial soils that characterize the basin. Higher erosion and sediment accumulation rates in Lake Pelham are most likely reflecting the impact of human development on sedimentation processes, where the loss of vegetal buffers and increase in impervious surfaces exacerbates both the surficial soil losses as well as intrinsic stream sediment production leading to the current annual reservoir capacity loss of 0.4 %.

  6. Project Hotspot: Linear accumulation rates of late Cenozoic basalt at Kimama, Idaho, and implications for crustal strain and subsidence rates of the central Snake River Plain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, D. W.; Potter, K. E.; Shervais, J. W.; Champion, D. E.; Duncan, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    Project Hotspot's Kimama drill hole on the Snake River Plain, Idaho recovered a 1912 m thick section of basalt core that ranges in age from ~700 ka to at least 6.14 Ma, based on five 40Ar/39Ar analyses and twenty paleomagnetic age assignments. Fifty-four flow groups comprising 510 individual flows were defined, yielding an average recurrence interval of ~11,400 years between flows. Age-depth analysis indicate that, over thicknesses >150 m and age spans >500 k.y., accumulation rates were constant at 30 m/100 k.y. The existence and persistence of this linear accumulation rate for greater than 5 m.y. documents an external tectonic control on eruption dynamics. One conceptual model relates accumulation rates to horizontal crustal strain, such that far-field extension rate controls the periodicity of dikes that feed basalt flows. In this model, each of the 54 flow groups would have a deep-seated, relatively wide (1-10m) dike that branches upward into a network of narrow (10-100 cm) dikes feeding individual lava flows. Assuming an east-west lateral lava flow extent of up to 50 km, the Kimama data record a steady-state crustal strain rate of 10-9 to 10-10 y-1. This rate is comparable to modern, decadal strain rates measured with GPS in the adjacent Basin & Range province, but exceeds decadal strain rates of zero measured in the eastern Snake River Plain. Linear accumulation rates also provide insight into basalt subsidence history. In this model, the middle-upper crust subsides due to the added weight of lava flows, the added weight of mid-crustal sills/dikes, and thermal contraction in the wake of the Yellowstone hot spot. Isostatic compensation would occur in the (nearly) molten lower crust. Assuming constant surface elevation and a basalt density of 2.6 g/cm3, the lava flow weight would account for 87% of the burial through time, yielding a steady-state "tectonic" subsidence rate of 4 m/100 k.y. attributed to the driving forces of mid-crustal injection and/or thermal

  7. Decadal sediment accumulation rates on the floodplain of the Strickland River, Papua New Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, K. M.; Watson, E.; Aalto, R.; Lauer, J. W.; Bera, M. T.; Marshall, A.; Taylor, M.; Apte, S. C.; Dietrich, W. E.

    2006-12-01

    Rate of aggradation and infilling of accommodation space along lowland channels in response to post-glacial sea level rise should depend on sediment supply. The Strickland and Fly Rivers join at just 6 m above sea level, and the Strickland has historically carried about 7 times the sediment load and twice the river discharge as the Fly. Here we test the hypothesis that the lowland Strickland River floodplain should now have a lower sediment trap efficiency (due to more fully developed floodplains) than the middle Fly River, which currently losses about 40% of its load to the floodplain annually. We use mine-derived elevated Pb and Ag in floodplain core samples to determine the rates of sedimentation across the lower Strickland floodplain. Field sampling campaigns were conducted in 1997 and 2003, collecting shallow (less than 1 m) core samples at 5 relatively straight reaches up to 2 km from channel banks (in 1997 and 2003) and from 3 strongly curved sections, as well as from other sites of interest (2003). Various observations indicate that the concentration of particulate metals in overbank floods varies with stage, drought-flood cycles, and through the life of the mine. Sediment accumulation declines across the floodplain from the channel bank with an average rate of about 1.4 cm/yr over the first 1 km. Some sedimentation farther out did occur but is not well defined by our data. Overbank deposition is about 13% of the total load. Sedimentation rate per unit area is perhaps 10 times that measured on the Fly, but lateral migration on the Strickland is sufficiently high (average 5 m/yr) that overbank deposits are returned to the channel, significantly reducing potential net deposition to the floodplain. We conclude that the Strickland, which is nearly 10 times steeper than the Fly, and has much higher overbank deposition rates, nonetheless has less net deposition than the Fly because of the more vigorous lateral migration (which apparently results from the higher

  8. The distribution of the heavy metal accumulation rate in the biomass of three Daphnia species

    SciTech Connect

    Gajula, V.K.; Hovorka, J.; Stuchlik, E.

    1995-12-31

    The difference in the accumulation rate of a mixture of heavy metals in aquatic organisms is of considerable interest because of its importance in the prediction of the effect of pollutants in aquatic systems. In this study the authors are making an effort to evaluate the accumulation patterns of pollutants in aquatic organisms by establishing a relation between the level of an accumulated mixture of heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Pb, As, Hg) in individuals of Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulicaria and Daphnia galeata and its dry weight with respect to the form of heavy metals in the aquatic environment. One age group of Daphnia species (10 day old) were exposed to 5 ppb, 10 ppb and 20 ppb of the mixture of heavy metals for 24 hours in three different experiments. In the first experiment the mixture of heavy metals was present exclusively in labelled algae (Scendesmus actus), in the second in an aquatic medium with non labelled algae, and in the third experiment the mixture of heavy metals was dissolved in the aquatic medium only without the addition of algae. The concentration of the heavy metal mixture in individuals of D.magna; D.pulicaria and D.galeata was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. Results were statistically evaluated and the rate of accumulation and influence of various heavy metals in the biomass of three Daphnia species is discussed.

  9. A high-frequency response relaxed eddy accumulation flux measurement system for sampling short-lived biogenic volatile organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnts, Robert R.; Mowry, Fred L.; Hampton, Gary A.

    2013-05-01

    second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m-2 hr-1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozone removal procedure to allow for the measurement of highly reactive species such as β-caryophyllene and polar terpenoids such as linalool. A two-component internal standard continuously added to the accumulators was used to correct for switching-induced volumetric errors and as a check on VOC losses exceeding accumulator tube adsorption limits. In addition, the internal standards were used to demonstrate that accumulators quickly return to target flow rates at segregation valve switching frequencies up to at least 0.8 Hz. The system was able to measure daytime hourly fluxes of individual biogenic VOC including oxygenated terpenoids, monoterpenes, and sesquiterpenes.

  10. Trawling-induced alterations of deep-sea sediment accumulation rates during the Anthropocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Paradis, S.; Masque, P.; Martin, J.; Juan, X.; Palanques, A.

    2015-12-01

    Commercial bottom trawling causes direct physical disturbance of the marine sedimentary environments by scraping and ploughing the seabed, generating periodic resuspension of surface sediments. However, the quantification of the sediment that is removed by trawling and exported across the continental margin remains largely unaddressed, and the preservation of the signal of such impacts in the geological record have been mostly overlooked. The analysis of sediment cores collected along the Catalan margin (NW Mediterranean) has allowed evaluating the contribution of this anthropogenic activity to the present-day sediment dynamics. Sediment cores at intensively trawled sites are characterized by over-consolidated sediments with lower 210Pb surface concentrations and inventories that indicate widespread erosion of recent sedimentary deposits. In turn, combined 210Pb and 137Cs chronologies indicate a significant increase of sediment accumulation rates within submarine canyon environments since the 1970s, coincidently with a strong impulse in the industrialization of the trawling fleets of this region. Two sampling sites that exhibited high sediment accumulation rates (0.6-0.7 cm/y) were reoccupied 1-2 decades after the first studies and revealed a second and even larger increase of sediment accumulation rates (>2 cm/y) occurring at the beginning of the XXI century. This recent change has been attributed to a preferential displacement of the trawling fleet towards fishing grounds surrounding submarine canyons and, also, to technical improvements in trawling vessels, presumably related to financial subsidies provided to the fishing sector. The alteration of sediment accumulation rates described in this continental margin may occur in many regions of the World's oceans given the wide geographical distribution of this human activity, and therefore, it could represent a potential marker of the Anthropocene in deep-sea environments.

  11. Balancing sample accumulation and DNA degradation rates to optimize noninvasive genetic sampling of sympatric carnivores.

    PubMed

    Lonsinger, Robert C; Gese, Eric M; Dempsey, Steven J; Kluever, Bryan M; Johnson, Timothy R; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling, or noninvasive DNA sampling (NDS), can be an effective monitoring approach for elusive, wide-ranging species at low densities. However, few studies have attempted to maximize sampling efficiency. We present a model for combining sample accumulation and DNA degradation to identify the most efficient (i.e. minimal cost per successful sample) NDS temporal design for capture-recapture analyses. We use scat accumulation and faecal DNA degradation rates for two sympatric carnivores, kit fox (Vulpes macrotis) and coyote (Canis latrans) across two seasons (summer and winter) in Utah, USA, to demonstrate implementation of this approach. We estimated scat accumulation rates by clearing and surveying transects for scats. We evaluated mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) DNA amplification success for faecal DNA samples under natural field conditions for 20 fresh scats/species/season from <1-112 days. Mean accumulation rates were nearly three times greater for coyotes (0.076 scats/km/day) than foxes (0.029 scats/km/day) across seasons. Across species and seasons, mtDNA amplification success was ≥95% through day 21. Fox nDNA amplification success was ≥70% through day 21 across seasons. Coyote nDNA success was ≥70% through day 21 in winter, but declined to <50% by day 7 in summer. We identified a common temporal sampling frame of approximately 14 days that allowed species to be monitored simultaneously, further reducing time, survey effort and costs. Our results suggest that when conducting repeated surveys for capture-recapture analyses, overall cost-efficiency for NDS may be improved with a temporal design that balances field and laboratory costs along with deposition and degradation rates.

  12. Balancing sample accumulation and DNA degradation rates to optimize noninvasive genetic sampling of sympatric carnivores.

    PubMed

    Lonsinger, Robert C; Gese, Eric M; Dempsey, Steven J; Kluever, Bryan M; Johnson, Timothy R; Waits, Lisette P

    2015-07-01

    Noninvasive genetic sampling, or noninvasive DNA sampling (NDS), can be an effective monitoring approach for elusive, wide-ranging species at low densities. However, few studies have attempted to maximize sampling efficiency. We present a model for combining sample accumulation and DNA degradation to identify the most efficient (i.e. minimal cost per successful sample) NDS temporal design for capture-recapture analyses. We use scat accumulation and faecal DNA degradation rates for two sympatric carnivores, kit fox (Vulpes macrotis) and coyote (Canis latrans) across two seasons (summer and winter) in Utah, USA, to demonstrate implementation of this approach. We estimated scat accumulation rates by clearing and surveying transects for scats. We evaluated mitochondrial (mtDNA) and nuclear (nDNA) DNA amplification success for faecal DNA samples under natural field conditions for 20 fresh scats/species/season from <1-112 days. Mean accumulation rates were nearly three times greater for coyotes (0.076 scats/km/day) than foxes (0.029 scats/km/day) across seasons. Across species and seasons, mtDNA amplification success was ≥95% through day 21. Fox nDNA amplification success was ≥70% through day 21 across seasons. Coyote nDNA success was ≥70% through day 21 in winter, but declined to <50% by day 7 in summer. We identified a common temporal sampling frame of approximately 14 days that allowed species to be monitored simultaneously, further reducing time, survey effort and costs. Our results suggest that when conducting repeated surveys for capture-recapture analyses, overall cost-efficiency for NDS may be improved with a temporal design that balances field and laboratory costs along with deposition and degradation rates. PMID:25454561

  13. The amount and accumulation rate of plastic debris on marshes and beaches on the Georgia coast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Richard F; Sanders, Dorothea P

    2015-02-15

    The amount and accumulation rate of plastic debris at 20 sites along the Georgia coast were prepared using data reported by a number of volunteer organizations. The amount of plastic debris at highly visited barrier island beaches and estuarine marshes ranged from 300 to >1000 kg. Relatively large amount of plastics (180-500 kg) were found on less visited barrier island beaches, i.e. Blackbeard, Ossabaw and Cumberland Islands. A follow up monthly or quarterly collection study was carried out on two of the sites, a barrier beach and estuarine marsh, to determine accumulation rate in 8000 m(2) areas. Accumulation rates ranged from 0.18 to 1.28 kg/30 days-8000 m(2) on the barrier island beach and from 0.6 to 1.61 kg/30 days-8000 m(2) at the estuarine marsh site. The major type of plastics, e.g. bottles, food wrappers, plastic fragments, was highly variable at different seasons and sites. The authors recommend consideration of a standardization in reporting plastic debris, with respect to quantitation of debris and sample area.

  14. Accumulation rate and mixing of shelf sediments in the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lewis, R.C.; Coale, K.H.; Edwards, B.D.; Marot, M.; Douglas, J.N.; Burton, E.J.

    2002-01-01

    The distribution of excess 210Pb in 31 sediment cores was used to determine modern (last 100 yr) mass accumulation rates and the depth of sediment mixing on the continental shelf between Pacifica and Monterey, California, USA. Apparent mass accumulation rates average 0.27 g cm-2 yr-1 and range from 0.42 g cm-2 yr-1 to 0.12 g cm-2 yr-1. Accumulation rates were highest at mid-shelf water depths (60-100 m) adjacent to major rivers and near the head of the Ascension submarine canyon. Cores from water depths of less than 65 m had low, uniform 210Pb activity profiles and sandy textures. The uppermost 5-13 cm of 15 cores had uniform 210Pb activity profiles above a region of steadily decreasing 210Pb activity. This phenomenon was attributed to sediment mixing. The thickness of this upper layer of uniform 210Pb activity decreased southward from 13 cm, west of Pacifica, to less than 5 cm, near Monterey Canyon. This southward decrease may be attributed to shallower bioturbation in the southern study area. Integrated excess 210Pb activities were generally higher where sedimentation rates were high. They were also higher with increasing distance from major rivers. Thus, sedimentation rate alone does not explain the distribution of integrated excess 210Pb in this study area. Excess 210Pb in the seafloor is controlled by other factors such as sediment texture, the atmospheric deposition rate of 210Pb, and the residence time of sediment particles in the water column. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. The forest floor characteristics and C accumulation rate of black spruce forests across a climate gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. G.; Schuur, E. A. G.

    2014-12-01

    In the North American boreal forest, black spruce forests accumulate a C pool in the FF that is often greater than the vegetation C pool. In addition, the FF's insulating properties help maintain colder soil temperatures and inhibit the microbial decomposition of 'deep' soil C. To estimate how climate change might alter the FF of black spruce forests, we examined the C accumulation rate and characteristics (percent wood, fine roots, moss, and needles; and bulk density) of the FF for three stands in four climatic regions of Alaska. Mean annual temperature ranged from -2.9 °C to 2.3 °C and precipitation from 263 mm to 716 mm and the two climatic variables correlated with one another. Both climatic factors were unrelated with the total C stored in the FF or its rate of C accumulation, despite trees growing faster with warmer and wetter average conditions. Although FF mass was similar across regions, its thickness decreased with temperature and precipitation, reflecting a significant increase in bulk density. The change in bulk density could have been from a shift in constituents because the warmer and wetter regions accumulated more wood and less fine root material. The shift between these two constituents may have also been the reason that the FF mass remained unchanged across the climate gradient because wood has a decomposition rate that is ~10% of fine roots. Although these results suggest that there will be little change in FF mass under warmer and wetter conditions, the increase in FF bulk density will amplify the warming of the mineral soil because of the increase in FF thermal conductivity.

  16. Carbon accumulation rate of peatland in the High Arctic, Svalbard: Implications for carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsubo, Takayuki; Uchida, Masaki; Sasaki, Akiko; Kondo, Miyuki; Yoshitake, Shinpei; Kanda, Hiroshi

    2015-06-01

    Moss tundra that accumulates a thick peat layer is one of the most important ecosystems in the High Arctic, Svalbard. The importance of this ecosystem for carbon sequestration was estimated from the apparent rates of carbon accumulation based on the 14C age and amount of peat in the active layer. The study site at Stuphallet, Brøgger Peninsula, northwestern Svalbard was covered with a thick peat layer dominated by moss species such as Calliergon richardsonii, Paludella squarrosa, Tomenthypnum nitens, and Warnstorfia exannulata. The average thickness of the active layer (brown moss and peat) was approximately 28 cm in 1 August 2011. The calibrated (cal) age of peat from the bottom of the active layer (20-30 cm below the peatland surface) ranged from 81 to 701 cal yr BP (median value of 2σ range). Based on the total carbon (4.5-9.2 kg C m-2), the apparent rate of carbon accumulation in the active layer was 9.0-19.2 (g C m-2 yr-1), which is similar to or greater than the net ecosystem production or net primary production reported for other vegetation types in this area. Our data suggest that moss tundra plays an important role in carbon sequestration in this area.

  17. Glass dissolution rate measurement and calculation revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fournier, Maxime; Ull, Aurélien; Nicoleau, Elodie; Inagaki, Yaohiro; Odorico, Michaël; Frugier, Pierre; Gin, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Aqueous dissolution rate measurements of nuclear glasses are a key step in the long-term behavior study of such waste forms. These rates are routinely normalized to the glass surface area in contact with solution, and experiments are very often carried out using crushed materials. Various methods have been implemented to determine the surface area of such glass powders, leading to differing values, with the notion of the reactive surface area of crushed glass remaining vague. In this study, around forty initial dissolution rate measurements were conducted following static and flow rate (SPFT, MCFT) measurement protocols at 90 °C, pH 10. The international reference glass (ISG), in the forms of powders with different particle sizes and polished monoliths, and soda-lime glass beads were examined. Although crushed glass grains clearly cannot be assimilated with spheres, it is when using the samples geometric surface (Sgeo) that the rates measured on powders are closest to those found for monoliths. Overestimation of the reactive surface when using the BET model (SBET) may be due to small physical features at the atomic scale-contributing to BET surface area but not to AFM surface area. Such features are very small compared with the thickness of water ingress in glass (a few hundred nanometers) and should not be considered in rate calculations. With a SBET/Sgeo ratio of 2.5 ± 0.2 for ISG powders, it is shown here that rates measured on powders and normalized to Sgeo should be divided by 1.3 and rates normalized to SBET should be multiplied by 1.9 in order to be compared with rates measured on a monolith. The use of glass beads indicates that the geometric surface gives a good estimation of glass reactive surface if sample geometry can be precisely described. Although data clearly shows the repeatability of measurements, results must be given with a high uncertainty of approximately ±25%.

  18. Spatial and temporal variability of snow chemical composition and accumulation rate at Talos Dome site (East Antarctica).

    PubMed

    Caiazzo, Laura; Becagli, Silvia; Frosini, Daniele; Giardi, Fabio; Severi, Mirko; Traversi, Rita; Udisti, Roberto

    2016-04-15

    Five snow pits and five firn cores were sampled during the 2003-2004 Italian Antarctic Campaign at Talos Dome (East Antarctica), where a deep ice core (TALDICE, TALos Dome Ice CorE, 1650m depth) was drilled in 2005-2008 and analyzed for ionic content. Particular attention is spent in applying decontamination procedures to the firn cores, as core sections were stored for approximately 10years before analysis. By considering the snow pit samples to be unperturbed, the comparison with firn core samples from the same location shows that ammonium, nitrate and MSA are affected by storage post-depositional losses. All the other measured ions are confirmed to be irreversibly deposited in the snow layer. The removal of the most external layers (few centimeters) from the firn core sections is proved to be an effective decontamination procedure. High-resolution profiles of seasonal markers (nitrate, sulfate and MSA) allow a reliable stratigraphic dating and a seasonal characterization of the samples. The calculated mean accumulation-rate values range from 70 to 85mmw.e.year(-1), in the period 2003-1973 with small differences between two sectors: 70-74mmw.e.year(-1) in the NNE sector (spanning 2003-1996years) and 81-92mmw.e.year(-1) in the SSW sector (spanning 2003-1980years). This evidence is interpreted as a coupled effect of wind-driven redistribution processes in accumulation/ablation areas. Statistical treatment applied to the concentration values of the snow pits and firn cores samples collected in different points reveals a larger temporal variability than spatial one both in terms of concentration of chemical markers and annual accumulation. The low spatial variability of the accumulation rate and chemical composition measured in the five sites demonstrates that the TALDICE ice core paleo-environmental and paleo-climatic stratigraphies can be considered as reliably representative for the Talos Dome area.

  19. Systems Level Regulation of Rhythmic Growth Rate and Biomass Accumulation in Grasses

    SciTech Connect

    Kay, Steve A.

    2013-05-02

    Several breakthroughs have been recently made in our understanding of plant growth and biomass accumulation. It was found that plant growth is rhythmically controlled throughout the day by the circadian clock through a complex interplay of light and phytohormone signaling pathways. While plants such as the C4 energy crop sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) and possibly the C3 grass (Brachypodium distachyon) also exhibit daily rhythms in growth rate, the molecular details of its regulation remain to be explored. A better understanding of diurnally regulated growth behavior in grasses may lead to species-specific mechanisms highly relevant to future strategies to optimize energy crop biomass yield. Here we propose to devise a systems approach to identify, in parallel, regulatory hubs associated with rhythmic growth in C3 and C4 plants. We propose to use rhythmicity in daily growth patterns to drive the discovery of regulatory network modules controlling biomass accumulation.

  20. LATE CENOZOIC INCREASE IN ACCUMULATION RATES OF TERRESTRIAL SEDIMENT: How Might Climate Change Have Affected Erosion Rates?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molnar, Peter

    2004-05-01

    Accumulation rates of terrestrial sediment have increased in the past few million years both on and adjacent to continents, although not everywhere. Apparently, erosion has increased in elevated terrain regardless of when last tectonically active or what the present-day climate. In many regions, sediment coarsened abruptly in late Pliocene time. Sparser data suggest increased sedimentation rates at 15 Ma, approximately when oxygen isotopes in benthic foraminifera imply high-latitude cooling. If climate change effected accelerated erosion, understanding how it did so remains the challenge. Some obvious candidates, such as lowered sea level leading to erosion of continental shelves or increased glaciation, account for increased sedimentation in some, but not all, areas. Perhaps stable climates that varied slowly allowed geomorphic processes to maintain a state of equilibrium with little erosion until 34 Ma, when large oscillations in climate with periods of 20,00040,000 years developed and denied the landscape the chance to reach equilibrium.

  1. Glucose phosphorylation is not rate limiting for accumulation of glycogen from glucose in perfused livers from fasted rats

    SciTech Connect

    Youn, J.H.; Ader, M.; Bergman, R.N.

    1989-01-05

    Incorporation of Glc and Fru into glycogen was measured in perfused livers from 24-h fasted rats using (6-3H)Glc and (U-14C)Fru. For the initial 20 min, livers were perfused with low Glc (2 mM) to deplete hepatic glycogen and were perfused for the following 30 min with various combinations of Glc and Fru. With constant Fru (2 mM), increasing perfusate Glc increased the relative contribution of Glc carbons to glycogen (7.2 +/- 0.4, 34.9 +/- 2.8, and 59.1 +/- 2.7% at 2, 10, and 20 mM Glc, respectively; n = 5 for each). During perfusion with substrate levels seen during refeeding (10 mM Glc, 1.8 mumol/g/min gluconeogenic flux from 2 mM Fru), Fru provided 54.7 +/- 2.7% of the carbons for glycogen, while Glc provided only 34.9 +/- 2.8%, consistent with in vivo estimations. However, the estimated rate of Glc phosphorylation was at least 1.10 +/- 0.11 mumol/g/min, which exceeded by at least 4-fold the glycogen accumulation rate (0.28 +/- 0.04 mumol of glucose/g/min). The total rate of glucose 6-phosphate supply via Glc phosphorylation and gluconeogenesis (2.9 mumol/g/min) exceeded reported in vivo rates of glycogen accumulation during refeeding. Thus, in perfused livers of 24-h fasted rats there is an apparent redundancy in glucose 6-phosphate supply. These results suggest that the rate-limiting step for hepatic glycogen accumulation during refeeding is located between glucose 6-phosphate and glycogen, rather than at the step of Glc phosphorylation or in the gluconeogenic pathway.

  2. USE OF RELAXED EDDY ACCUMULATION TO MEASURE BIOSPHERE-ATMOSPHERE EXCHANGE OF ISOPRENE AND OTHER BIOLOGICAL TRACE GASES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The micrometeorological flux measurement technique known as relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) holds promise as a powerful new tool for ecologists. The more popular eddy covariance (eddy correlation) technique requires the use of sensors that can respond at fast rates (10 Hz), and t...

  3. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, Ruth; Bar-Itzhack, Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1998-01-01

    In most spacecraft (SC) there is a need to know the SC angular rate. Precise angular rate is required for attitude determination, and a coarse rate is needed for attitude control damping. Classically, angular rate information is obtained from gyro measurements. These days, there is a tendency to build smaller, lighter and cheaper SC, therefore the inclination now is to do away with gyros and use other means and methods to determine the angular rate. The latter is also needed even in gyro equipped satellites when performing high rate maneuvers whose angular-rate is out of range of the on board gyros or in case of gyro failure. There are several ways to obtain the angular rate in a gyro-less SC. When the attitude is known, one can differentiate the attitude in whatever parameters it is given and use the kinematics equation that connects the derivative of the attitude with the satellite angular-rate and compute the latter. Since SC usually utilize vector measurements for attitude determination, the differentiation of the attitude introduces a considerable noise component in the computed angular-rate vector.

  4. [Dynamics simulation on plant growth, N accumulation and utilization of processing tomato at different N fertilization rates].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Ma, Fu-Yu; Diao, Ming; Fan, Huam; Cui, Jing; Jia, Biao; He, Hai-Bing; Liu, Qi

    2014-04-01

    Three field experiments were conducted to simulate the dynamics of aboveground biomass, N accumulation and utilization of drip-irrigated processing tomatoes at different N fertilization rates (0, 75, 150, 300, 450, or 600 kg x hm(-2)). The results showed that Logistic models best described the changes in aboveground biomass, N accumulation, and utilization of accumulated N efficiency with the physiological development time (PDT). Rapid accumulation of N began about 4-6 d (PDT) earlier than the rapid accumulation of aboveground biomass. The momentary utilization rate of N (NMUR) increased after emergence, reached a single peak, and then decreased. The N accumulation, aboveground biomass and yield were highest in the 300 kg x hm(-2) treatment. The quadratic model indicated that application rate of 349 to 382 kg N x hm(-2) was optimum for drip-irrigated processing tomatoes in northern Xinjiang. PMID:25011297

  5. Unprecedented last-glacial mass accumulation rates determined by luminescence dating of loess from western Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, H.M.; Muhs, D.R.; Wintle, A.G.; Duller, G.A.T.; Bettis, E. Arthur

    2003-01-01

    A high-resolution chronology for Peoria (last glacial period) Loess from three sites in Nebraska, midcontinental North America, is determined by applying optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating to 35-50 ??m quartz. At Bignell Hill, Nebraska, an OSL age of 25,000 yr near the contact of Peoria Loess with the underlying Gilman Canyon Formation shows that dust accumulation occurred early during the last glacial maximum (LGM), whereas at Devil's Den and Eustis, Nebraska, basal OSL ages are significantly younger (18,000 and 21,000 yr, respectively). At all three localities, dust accumulation ended at some time after 14,000 yr ago. Mass accumulation rates (MARs) for western Nebraska, calculated using the OSL ages, are extremely high from 18,000 to 14,000 yr-much higher than those calculated for any other pre-Holocene location worldwide. These unprecedented MARs coincide with the timing of a mismatch between paleoenvironmental evidence from central North America, and the paleoclimate simulations from atmospheric global circulation models (AGCMs). We infer that the high atmospheric dust loading implied by these MARs may have played an important role, through radiative forcing, in maintaining a colder-than-present climate over central North America for several thousand years after summer insolation exceeded present-day values. ?? 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  6. Waste tank ventilation rates measured with a tracer gas method

    SciTech Connect

    Huckaby, J.L.; Evans, J.C.; Sklarew, D.S.; Mitroshkov, A.V.

    1998-08-01

    Passive ventilation with the atmosphere is used to prevent accumulation of waste gases and vapors in the headspaces of 132 of the 177 high-level radioactive waste Tanks at the Hanford Site in Southeastern Washington State. Measurements of the passive ventilation rates are needed for the resolution of two key safety issues associated with the rates of flammable gas production and accumulation and the rates at which organic salt-nitrate salt mixtures dry out. Direct measurement of passive ventilation rates using mass flow meters is not feasible because ventilation occurs va multiple pathways to the atmosphere (i.e., via the filtered breather riser and unsealed tank risers and pits), as well as via underground connections to other tanks, junction boxes, and inactive ventilation systems. The tracer gas method discussed in this report provides a direct measurement of the rate at which gases are removed by ventilation and an indirect measurement of the ventilation rate. The tracer gas behaves as a surrogate of the waste-generated gases, but it is only diminished via ventilation, whereas the waste gases are continuously released by the waste and may be subject to depletion mechanisms other than ventilation. The fiscal year 1998 tracer studies provide new evidence that significant exchange of air occurs between tanks via the underground cascade pipes. Most of the single-shell waste tanks are connected via 7.6-cm diameter cascade pipes to one or two adjacent tanks. Tracer gas studies of the Tank U-102/U-103 system indicated that the ventilation occurring via the cascade line could be a significant fraction of the total ventilation. In this two-tank cascade, air evidently flowed from Tank U-103 to Tank U-102 for a time and then was observed to flow from Tank U-102 to Tank U-103.

  7. Distributions and accumulation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northern Gulf of Mexico sediments.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Puspa L; Maiti, Kanchan; Overton, Edward B; Rosenheim, Brad E; Marx, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Sediment samples collected from shelf, slope and interior basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico during 2011-2013, 1-3 years after the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, were utilized to characterize PAH pollution history, in this region. Results indicate that the concentrations of surface ΣPAH43 and their accumulation rates vary between 44 and 160 ng g(-1) and 6-55 ng cm(-2) y(-1), respectively. ΣPAH43 concentration profiles, accumulation rates and Δ(14)C values are significantly altered only for the sediments in the immediate vicinity of the DWH wellhead. This shows that the impact of DWH oil input on deep-sea sediments was generally limited to the area close to the spill site. Further, the PAHs source diagnostic analyses suggest a noticeable change in PAHs composition from higher to lower molecular weight dominance which reflects a change in source of PAHs in the past three years, back to the background composition. Results indicate low to moderate levels of PAH pollution in this region at present, which are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic communities. PMID:26895564

  8. Field studies using the oyster Crassostrea virginica to determine mercury accumulation and depuration rates

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, S.J.; Presley, B.J.; Powell, E.N. ); Taylor, R.J. )

    1993-09-01

    Mercury as an environmental hazard, especially with regard to human health, has been of concern since the Minamata disaster. From 1966 to 1970 a chlor-alkali plant in Point Comfort, Texas released mercury-enriched wastewater (up to 29.9 kgHg/day) into Lavaca Bay (TWQB 1977). Since 1970 the Texas Department of Health (TDH) has periodically closed and then re-opened portions of Lavaca Bay to the harvesting of crabs and finfish based on their levels (<>0.5 ppm Hg wet weight) of mercury. A 1988 closure remains in effect as of this writing. Mercury contamination in Lavaca Bay organisms thus continues to be a problem 22 years after the chlor-alkali plant ceased releasing mercury into the bay. The goal of the following research was to better understand the behavior of mercury in Lavaca Bay. Oysters have been widely used as indicator species in metal pollution studies. Most such programs have focused on the concentrations of metals in oysters from different geographic areas. This study, however, investigated the rate and amount of mercury a [open quotes]clean[close quotes] oyster would accumulate when transplanted to a contaminated estuary and the rate of mercury depuration by contaminated oysters placed in a clean environment. The oysters were additionally analyzed for Ba, Cu, Fe, P, and Zn to test for the possible involvement of these metals in mercury accumulation and depuration. 17 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Measuring star formation rates in blue galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallagher, John S., III; Hunter, Deidre A.

    1987-01-01

    The problems associated with measurements of star formation rates in galaxies are briefly reviewed, and specific models are presented for determinations of current star formation rates from H alpha and Far Infrared (FIR) luminosities. The models are applied to a sample of optically blue irregular galaxies, and the results are discussed in terms of star forming histories. It appears likely that typical irregular galaxies are forming stars at nearly constant rates, although a few examples of systems with enhanced star forming activity are found among HII regions and luminous irregular galaxies.

  10. Measuring Degradation Rates Without Irradiance Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pulver, S.; Cormode, D.; Cronin, A.; Jordan, D.; Kurtz, S.; Smith, R.

    2011-02-01

    A method to report PV system degradation rates without using irradiance data is demonstrated. First, a set of relative degradation rates are determined by comparing daily AC final yields from a group of PV systems relative to the average final yield of all the PV systems. Then, the difference between relative and absolute degradation rates is found from a statistical analysis. This approach is verified by comparing to methods that utilize irradiance data. This approach is significant because PV systems are often deployed without irradiance sensors, so the analysis method described here may enable measurements of degradation using data that were previously thought to be unsuitable for degradation studies.

  11. Heart rate detection from plantar bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    González Landaeta, R; Casas, O; Pallàs-Areny, R

    2006-01-01

    The heart rate is a basic health indicator, useful in both clinical measurements and home health care. Current home care systems often require the attachment of electrodes or other sensors to the body, which can be cumbersome to the patient. Moreover, some measurements are sensitive to movement artifacts, are not user-friendly and require a specialized supervision. In this paper, a novel technique for heart rate measurement for a standing subject is proposed, which is based on plantar bioimpedance measurements, such as those performed by some bathroom weighting scales for body composition analysis. Because of the low level of heart-related impedance variations, the measurement system has a gain of 1400. We have implemented a fully differential AC amplifier with a common-mode rejection ratio (CMRR) of 105 dB at 10 kHz. Coherent demodulation based on synchronous sampling yields a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 55 dB. The system has a sensitivity of 1.9 V/Omega. The technique has been demonstrated on 18 volunteers, whose bioimpedance signal and ECG were simultaneously measured to validate the results. The average cross-correlation coefficient between the heart rates determined from these two signals was 0.998 (std. dev. 0.001). PMID:17946677

  12. Time and Rate Measures in Choice Transitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cerutti, D. T.; Staddon, J. E. R.

    2004-01-01

    Three experiments with pigeons studied the relation between time and rate measures of behavior under conditions of changing preference. Experiment 1 studied a concurrent chain schedule with random-interval initial links and fixed-interval terminal links; Experiment 2 studied a multiple chained random-interval fixed-interval schedule; and…

  13. Complex Wind-Induced Variations of Surface Snow Accumulation Rates over East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, I.; Scambos, T. A.; Koenig, L.; van den Broeke, M.; Lenaerts, J.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate quantification of surface snow-accumulation over Antarctica is important for mass balance estimates and climate studies based on ice core records. Using airborne radar, lidar and thresholds of surface slope, modeled surface mass balance (SMB) and wind fields, we have predicted continent-wide distribution of wind-scour zones over Antarctica. These zones are located over relatively steep ice surfaces formed by ice flow over bedrock topography. Near-surface winds accelerate over these steeper slopes and erode and sublimate the snow. This results in numerous localized regions (typically ≤ 200 km2) with reduced or negative surface accumulation. Although small zones of re-deposition occur at the base of the steeper slope areas, the redeposited mass is small relative to the ablation loss. Total losses from wind-scour and wind-glaze areas amounts to tens of gigatons annually. Near the coast, winds often blow significant amounts of surface snow from these zones into the ocean. Large uncertainties remain in SMB estimates over East Antarctica as climate models do not adequately represent the small-scale physical processes that lead to mass loss or redistribution over the wind-scour zones. In this study, we also use Operation IceBridge's snow radar data to provide evidence for a gradual ablation of ~16-18 m of firn (~200 years of accumulation) from wind-scour zones over the upper Recovery Ice Stream catchment. The maximum ablation rates observed in this region are ~ -54 kg m-2 a-1 (-54 mm water equivalent a-1). Our airborne radio echo-sounding analysis show snow redeposition downslope of the wind-scour zones is <10% of the cumulative mass loss. Our study shows that the local mass loss is dominated by sublimation to water vapor rather than wind-transport of snow.

  14. Flow rate measurement in aggressive conductive fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovikova, Nataliia; Kolesnikov, Yuri; Karcher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Two non-contact experimental methods of flow rate measurements for aggressive conductive liquids are described. The techniques are based on electromagnetic forces and Faraday's law: Lorentz force is induced inside moving conductive liquid under influence of variable magnetic field of permanent magnets. They are mounted along a liquid metal channel or (in case of the second method) inserted into rotated metal wheels. The force acts in the opposite of fluids' velocity direction and hence it is possible to measure reaction force of it that takes place according to Newton's law on magnetic field source - permanent magnets. And by knowing the force, which linearly depends on velocity, one can calculate mean flow rate of liquid. In addition experimental "dry" calibration and its results are described for one of the measurements' techniques.

  15. Rates of post-fire vegetation recovery and fuel accumulation as a function of burn severity and time-since-burn in four western U.S. ecosystems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetation recovery and fuel accumulation rates following wildfire are useful measures of ecosystem resilience, yet few studies have quantified these variables over 10 years post-fire. Conventional wisdom is that recovery time to pre-fire condition will be slower as a function of burn severity, as i...

  16. On the Effect of Ramp Rate in Damage Accumulation of the CPV Die-Attach: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Bosco, N. S.; Silverman, T. J.; Kurtz, S. R.

    2012-06-01

    It is commonly understood that thermal cycling at high temperature ramp rates may activate unrepresentative failure mechanisms. Increasing the temperature ramp rate of thermal cycling, however, could dramatically reduce the test time required to achieve an equivalent amount of thermal fatigue damage, thereby reducing overall test time. Therefore, the effect of temperature ramp rate on physical damage in the CPV die-attach is investigated. Finite Element Model (FEM) simulations of thermal fatigue and thermal cycling experiments are made to determine if the amount of damage calculated results in a corresponding amount of physical damage measured to the die-attach for a variety of fast temperature ramp rates. Preliminary experimental results are in good agreement with simulations and reinforce the potential of increasing temperature ramp rates. Characterization of the microstructure and resulting fatigue crack in the die-attach suggest a similar failure mechanism across all ramp rates tested.

  17. Recent peat accumulation rates in minerotrophic peatlands of the Bay James region, Eastern Canada, inferred by 210Pb and 137Cs radiometric techniques.

    PubMed

    Ali, Adam A; Ghaleb, Bassam; Garneau, Michelle; Asnong, Hans; Loisel, Julie

    2008-10-01

    (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques are used to characterise recent peat accumulation rates of two minerotrophic peatlands located in the La Grande Rivière hydrological watershed, in the James Bay region (Canada). Several cores were collected during the summer 2005 in different parts of the two selected peatlands. These minerotrophic patterned peatlands are presently affected by erosion processes, expressed by progressive mechanical destruction of their pools borders. This erosion process is related to a water table rise induced by a regional increase of humidity since the last century. The main objective of the present paper is to (1) evaluate if (210)Pb and (137)Cs dating techniques can be applied to build accurate chronologies in these environments and (2) detect changes in the peat accumulation rates in regard to this amplification of humidity. In both sites, unsupported (210)Pb shows an exponential decreasing according to the depth. Chronologies inferred from (210)Pb allow to reconstruct peat accumulation rates since ca. 1855 AD. The (137)Cs data displayed evident mobility and diffusion, preventing the establishment of any sustained chronology based on these measurements. In the two sites, peat accumulation rates inferred from (210)Pb chronologies fluctuate between 0.005 and 0.038 g cm(-2) yr(-1). As a result, the rise of the water table during the last decade has not yet affected peat accumulation rates.

  18. Global Positioning System measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California - 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1992-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 =/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 =/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  19. GPS measurements of strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley, California: 1986-1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Shawn; Reilinger, Robert

    1989-01-01

    The Global Positioning System (GPS) data collected in southern California from 1986 to 1989 indicate considerable strain accumulation across the Imperial Valley. Displacements are computed at 29 stations in and near the valley from 1986 to 1988, and at 11 sites from 1988 to 1989. The earlier measurements indicate 5.9 +/- 1.0 cm/yr right-lateral differential velocity across the valley, although the data are heavily influenced by the 1987 Superstition Hills earthquake sequence. Some measurements, especially the east-trending displacements, are suspects for large errors. The 1988 to 1989 GPS displacements are best modeled by 5.2 +/- 0.9 cm/yr of valley crossing deformation, but rates calculated from conventional geodetic measurements (3.4 to 4.3 cm/yr) fit the data nearly as well. There is evidence from GPS and Very Long Base Interferometry (VLBI) observations that the present slip rate along the southern San Andreas fault is smaller than the long-term geologic estimate, suggesting a lower earthquake potential than is currently assumed. Correspondingly, a higher earthquake potential is indicated for the San Jacinto fault. The Imperial Valley GPS sites form part of a 183 station network in southern California and northern Baja California, which spans a cross-section of the North American-Pacific plate boundary.

  20. A molecular assessment of phylogenetic relationships and lineage accumulation rates within the family Salamandridae (Amphibia, Caudata).

    PubMed

    Weisrock, David W; Papenfuss, Theodore J; Macey, J Robert; Litvinchuk, Spartak N; Polymeni, Rosa; Ugurtas, Ismail H; Zhao, Ermi; Jowkar, Houman; Larson, Allan

    2006-11-01

    We examine phylogenetic relationships among salamanders of the family Salamandridae using approximately 2700 bases of new mtDNA sequence data (the tRNALeu, ND1, tRNAIle, tRNAGln, tRNAMet, ND2, tRNATrp, tRNAAla, tRNAAsn, tRNACys, tRNATyr, and COI genes and the origin for light-strand replication) collected from 96 individuals representing 61 of the 66 recognized salamandrid species and outgroups. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony and Bayesian analysis are performed on the new data alone and combined with previously reported sequences from other parts of the mitochondrial genome. The basal phylogenetic split is a polytomy of lineages ancestral to (1) the Italian newt Salamandrina terdigitata, (2) a strongly supported clade comprising the "true" salamanders (genera Chioglossa, Mertensiella, Lyciasalamandra, and Salamandra), and (3) a strongly supported clade comprising all newts except S. terdigitata. Strongly supported clades within the true salamanders include monophyly of each genus and grouping Chioglossa and Mertensiella as the sister taxon to a clade comprising Lyciasalamandra and Salamandra. Among newts, genera Echinotriton, Pleurodeles, and Tylototriton form a strongly supported clade whose sister taxon comprises the genera Calotriton, Cynops, Euproctus, Neurergus, Notophthalmus, Pachytriton, Paramesotriton, Taricha, and Triturus. Our results strongly support monophyly of all polytypic newt genera except Paramesotriton and Triturus, which appear paraphyletic, and Calotriton, for which only one of the two species is sampled. Other well-supported clades within newts include (1) Asian genera Cynops, Pachytriton, and Paramesotriton, (2) North American genera Notophthalmus and Taricha, (3) the Triturus vulgaris species group, and (4) the Triturus cristatus species group; some additional groupings appear strong in Bayesian but not parsimony analyses. Rates of lineage accumulation through time are evaluated using this nearly comprehensive sampling of

  1. Wireless Measurement of Rotation and Displacement Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Stanley E.; Taylor, Bryant D.

    2007-01-01

    A magnetic field response sensor is designed to measure displacement or rotation rate without a physical connection to a power source, microprocessor, data acquisition equipment, or electrical circuitry. The sensor works with the magnetic field response recorder, which was described in Magnetic-Field-Response Measurement-Acquisition System, NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 30, No. 6 (June 2006), page 28. These sensors are wirelessly powered and interrogated, and the measurement acquisition system and sensors are extremely lightweight.The response recorder uses oscillating magnetic fields to power the sensors. Once powered, the sensors respond with their own magnetic field. For displacement/ rotation measurements, the response recorder uses the sensor s response amplitude, which is dependent on the distance from the antenna. The recorder s antenna orientation and position are kept fixed, and the sampling period is constant.

  2. Comparisons of 210Pb and pollen methods for determining rates of estuarine sediment accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brush, G.S.; Martin, E.A.; DeFries, R.S.; Rice, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Comparisons of sedimentation rates obtained by 210Pb and pollen analyses of 1-m cores collected throughout the Potomac Estuary show good agreement in the majority of cores that can be analyzed by both methods. Most of the discrepancy between the methods can be explained by the analytical precision of the 210Pb method and by the exactness with which time horizons can be identified and dated for the pollen method. X-radiographs of the cores and the distinctness of the pollen horizons preclude significant displacement by reworking and/or mixing of sediments. Differences between the methods are greatest where uncertainties exist in assigning a rate by one or both methods (i.e., 210Pb trends and/or "possible" horizon assignments). Both methods show the same relative rates, with greater sediment accumulation more common in the upper and middle estuary and less toward the mouth. The results indicate that geochronologic studies of estuarine sediments should be preceded by careful observation of sedimentary structures, preferably by X-radiography, to evaluate the extent of mixing of the sediments. Time horizons, whether paleontologic or isotopic, are generally blurred where mixing has occurred, precluding precise identification. Whenever possible, two methods should be used for dating sediments because a rate, albeit erroneous, can be obtained isotopically in sediments that are mixed; accurate sedimentation rates are also difficult to determine where the time boundary is a zone rather than a horizon, where the historical record does not provide a precise date for the pollen horizon, or where scouring has removed some of the sediment above a dated pollen horizon. ?? 1982.

  3. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dannert, David A.; Horne, Roland N.

    1993-01-01

    One of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether for gas/oil, gas/water, or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. The goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter.

  4. Ultrasonic rate measurement of multiphase flow

    SciTech Connect

    Dannert, D.A.; Horne, R.N.

    1993-01-01

    On of the most important tools in production logging and well testing is the downhole flowmeter. Unfortunately, existing tools are inaccurate outside of an idealized single phase flow, regime. Spinner tools are inaccurate at extremely high or low, flow rates and when the flow rate is variable. Radioactive tracer tools have similar inaccuracies and are extremely sensitive to the flow regime. Both tools completely fail in the presence of multiphase flow, whether gas/ oil, gas/water or fluid/solid. Downhole flowmetering is important for locating producing zones and thief zones and monitoring production and injection rates. The effects of stimulation can also be determined. This goal of this project is the investigation of accurate downhole flowmetering techniques for all single phase flow regimes and multiphase flows. The measurement method investigated in this report is the use of ultrasound. There are two ways to use ultrasound for fluid velocity measurement. The first method, examined in Chapter 2, is the contrapropagation, or transit-time, method which compares travel times with and against fluid flow. Chapter 3 details the second method which measures the Doppler frequency shift of a reflected sound wave in the moving fluid. Both of these technologies need to be incorporated in order to build a true multiphase flowmeter. Chapter 4 describes the proposed downhole multiphase flowmeter. It has many advantages besides the ones previously mentioned and is in full in that chapter.

  5. Measurements of mutation rates in B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Wabl, M; Jäck, H M; Meyer, J; Beck-Engeser, G; von Borstel, R C; Steinberg, C M

    1987-04-01

    It is established that somatic mutation is an important source of antibody diversity in vivo. It is also established that Igh-V gene segments are hypermutable in vitro. This is not a completely satisfactory situation. While there is no reason to believe that Igh-V genes are not hypermutable in vivo as well, direct experimental evidence is lacking. Perhaps experiments with transgenic mice will soon fill this gap. It is not so clear how much higher than normal the rate of hypermutation is. As far as we are aware, there are no direct measurements of mutation rates per base pair per cell generation in mammals, certainly not for lymphocyte cell lines. For a variety of reasons, it is difficult to measure very low mutation rates. The general consensus is that the normal rate should be somewhere between 10(-10) and 10(-12) mutations per base pair per cell generation. Therefore, an experiment designed to directly determine a rate using the compartmentalization test would involve hundreds of cultures, each containing at least 10(9) cells. It is not a trivial problem to find one or a few mutants among so many cells. It is simple to study mutation to resistance to a drug, for example, ouabain or azaguanine, but, as we discussed, there are technical and conceptual pitfalls. The vast excess of dead cells influences the growth of a few mutant cells, particularly in lymphocyte cell lines. Even if this problem could be solved, the mutation rate so obtained would be "per gene(s)" and not "per base pair". The problems associated with cytotoxic agents can be avoided by immunofluorescence methods in conjunction with selective cloning or cell sorting. Using these techniques, we have carried out extensive experiments to determine whether the immunoglobulin mutator system acts, at least partially, on genetic elements other than those in or near the heavy chain variable region gene segment. For an opal termination codon in a heavy chain constant region gene segment, the rate of reversion

  6. Whole genome sequencing of mutation accumulation lines reveals a low mutation rate in the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Saxer, Gerda; Havlak, Paul; Fox, Sara A; Quance, Michael A; Gupta, Sharu; Fofanov, Yuriy; Strassmann, Joan E; Queller, David C

    2012-01-01

    Spontaneous mutations play a central role in evolution. Despite their importance, mutation rates are some of the most elusive parameters to measure in evolutionary biology. The combination of mutation accumulation (MA) experiments and whole-genome sequencing now makes it possible to estimate mutation rates by directly observing new mutations at the molecular level across the whole genome. We performed an MA experiment with the social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum and sequenced the genomes of three randomly chosen lines using high-throughput sequencing to estimate the spontaneous mutation rate in this model organism. The mitochondrial mutation rate of 6.76×10(-9), with a Poisson confidence interval of 4.1×10(-9) - 9.5×10(-9), per nucleotide per generation is slightly lower than estimates for other taxa. The mutation rate estimate for the nuclear DNA of 2.9×10(-11), with a Poisson confidence interval ranging from 7.4×10(-13) to 1.6×10(-10), is the lowest reported for any eukaryote. These results are consistent with low microsatellite mutation rates previously observed in D. discoideum and low levels of genetic variation observed in wild D. discoideum populations. In addition, D. discoideum has been shown to be quite resistant to DNA damage, which suggests an efficient DNA-repair mechanism that could be an adaptation to life in soil and frequent exposure to intracellular and extracellular mutagenic compounds. The social aspect of the life cycle of D. discoideum and a large portion of the genome under relaxed selection during vegetative growth could also select for a low mutation rate. This hypothesis is supported by a significantly lower mutation rate per cell division in multicellular eukaryotes compared with unicellular eukaryotes. PMID:23056439

  7. Compact Instruments Measure Helium-Leak Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Stephen; Immer, Christopher

    2003-01-01

    Compact, lightweight instruments have been developed for measuring small flows of helium and/or detecting helium leaks in solenoid valves when the valves are nominally closed. These instruments do not impede the flows when the valves are nominally open. They can be integrated into newly fabricated valves or retrofitted to previously fabricated valves. Each instrument includes an upstream and a downstream thermistor separated by a heater, plus associated analog and digital heater-control, signal- conditioning, and data-processing circuits. The thermistors and heater are off-the-shelf surface mount components mounted on a circuit board in the flow path. The operation of the instrument is based on a well-established thermal mass-flow-measurement technique: Convection by the flow that one seeks to measure gives rise to transfer of heat from the heater to the downstream thermistor. The temperature difference measured by the thermistors is directly related to the rate of flow. The calibration curve from temperature gradient to helium flow is closely approximated via fifth-order polynomial. A microprocessor that is part of the electronic circuitry implements the calibration curve to compute the flow rate from the thermistor readings.

  8. Measurements of undoped accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Kevin; Borselli, Mathew; Holabird, Kevin; Milosavljevic, Ivan; Schmitz, Adele; Deelman, Peter; Huang, Biqin; Sokolich, Marko; Warren, Leslie; Hazard, Thomas; Kiselev, Andrey; Ross, Richard; Gyure, Mark; Hunter, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    We report transport measurements of undoped single-well accumulation-mode SiGe quantum dot devices with an integrated dot charge sensor. The device is designed so that individual forward-biased circular gates have dominant control of dot charge occupancy, and separate intervening gates have dominant control of tunnel rates and exchange coupling. We have demonstrated controlled loading of the first electron in single and double quantum dots. We used magneto-spectroscopy to measure singlet-triplet splittings in our quantum dots: values are typically ˜0.1 meV. Tunnel rates of single electrons to the baths can be controlled from less than 1 Hz to greater than 10 MHz. We are able to control the (0,2) to (1,1) coupling in a double quantum dot from under-coupled (tc < kT˜ 5μeV) to over-coupled (tc ˜ 0.1 meV) with a bias control of one exchange gate. Sponsored by the United States Department of Defense. Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited. The views expressed are those of the author and do not reflect the official policy or position of the Department of Defense or the U.S. Government.

  9. Constraints on the Recent Rate of Lunar Regolith Accumulation from Diviner Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Hayne, P. O.; Bandfield, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.

    2012-01-01

    Many large craters on the lunar nearside show radar CPR signatures consistent with the presence of blocky ejecta blankets, to distances pre dicted to be covered by continuous ejecta. However, most of these sur faces show limited enhancements in both derived rock abundance and rock-free regolith temperatures calculated from Diviner nighttime infrar ed observations. This indicates that the surface rocks are covered by a layer of thermally insulating regolith material. By matching the results of one-dimensional thermal models to Diviner nighttime temperat ures, we have constrained the thermophysical properties of the upper regolith, and the thickness of regolith overlying proximal ejecta. We find that for all of the regions surveyed (all in the nearside highla nds), the nighttime cooling curves are best fit by a density profile that varies exponentially with depth, consistent with a linear mixture of rocks and regolith fines, with increasing rock content with depth . Our results show significant spatial variations in the density e-folding depth, H, among young crater ejecta regions, indicating differen ces in the thickness of accumulated regolith. However, away from youn g craters, the average regional "equilibrium" value of H (Heq) is remarkably consistent, and is on the order of 5 cm. As expected, near-rim ejecta associated with young craters show lower values of H, indicating a high rock content in the shallow subsurface; for older craters, the average value of H approaches the regional value of Heq. Calculat ed H values for young craters show a clear correlation with published ages, providing the first observational constraint on the recent rate of lunar regolith accumulation. In addition, this result may help to resolve the apparent discrepancy between ages calculated from small crater counts on melt ponds versus counts on continuous ejecta (e.g., King crater; Ashley et al., 2011, LPSC 42, abstract 2437). This method could, in principle, be extended to other

  10. Solids flow rate measurement in dense slurries

    SciTech Connect

    Porges, K.G.; Doss, E.D.

    1993-09-01

    Accurate and rapid flow rate measurement of solids in dense slurries remains an unsolved technical problem, with important industrial applications in chemical processing plants and long-distance solids conveyance. In a hostile two-phase medium, such a measurement calls for two independent parameter determinations, both by non-intrusive means. Typically, dense slurries tend to flow in laminar, non-Newtonian mode, eliminating most conventional means that usually rely on calibration (which becomes more difficult and costly for high pressure and temperature media). These issues are reviewed, and specific solutions are recommended in this report. Detailed calculations that lead to improved measuring device designs are presented for both bulk density and average velocity measurements. Cross-correlation, chosen here for the latter task, has long been too inaccurate for practical applications. The cause and the cure of this deficiency are discussed using theory-supported modeling. Fluid Mechanics are used to develop the velocity profiles of laminar non-Newtonian flow in a rectangular duct. This geometry uniquely allows the design of highly accurate `capacitive` devices and also lends itself to gamma transmission densitometry on an absolute basis. An absolute readout, though of less accuracy, is also available from a capacitive densitometer and a pair of capacitive sensors yields signals suitable for cross-correlation velocity measurement.

  11. Measuring induction times and crystal nucleation rates.

    PubMed

    Brandel, Clément; ter Horst, Joop H

    2015-01-01

    A large variation is observed in induction times measured under equal conditions in 1 ml solutions. Ruling out experimental errors, this variation originates from the nucleation process. The induction time distribution is explained by the stochastic nature of nucleation if the number of nuclei formed is approaching 1 per vial. Accurate heterogeneous crystal nucleation rates were determined from the induction time distributions on a 1 ml scale for racemic diprophylline in two solvents. The difference in nucleation behaviour in the two solvents originates from the energy barrier for nucleation, which is much higher in the solvent in which induction times are much longer. In addition the pre-exponential factor for the crystal nucleation rate in both solvents is rather low compared to predictions using Classical Nucleation Theory. Unfortunately, concentration and surface characteristics of the effective heterogeneous particles are not known which clouds a further molecular interpretation.

  12. Forest dynamics and tip-up pools drive pulses of high carbon accumulation rates in a tropical peat dome in Borneo (Southeast Asia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dommain, René; Cobb, Alexander R.; Joosten, Hans; Glaser, Paul H.; Chua, Amy F. L.; Gandois, Laure; Kai, Fuu-Ming; Noren, Anders; Salim, Kamariah A.; Su'ut, N. Salihah H.; Harvey, Charles F.

    2015-04-01

    Peatlands of Southeast Asia store large pools of carbon but the mechanisms of peat accumulation in tropical forests remain to be resolved. Patch dynamics and forest disturbance have seldom been considered as drivers that can amplify or dampen rates of peat accumulation. Here we used a modified piston corer, noninvasive geophysical measurements, and geochemical and paleobotanical techniques to establish the effect of tree fall on carbon accumulation rates in a peat swamp forest dominated by Shorea albida in Brunei (Borneo). Carbon initially accumulated in a mangrove forest at over 300 g C m-2 yr-1 but declined to less than 50 g C m-2 yr-1 with the establishment of a peat swamp forest. A rapid accumulation pulse of 720-960 g C m-2 yr-1 occurred around 1080 years ago as a tip-up pool infilled. Tip-up pools are common in the peatlands of northwest Borneo where windthrow and lightning strikes produce tree falls at a rate of 4 trees ha-1 every decade. A simulation model indicates that tip-up pools, which are formed across the entire forested peat dome, produce local discontinuities in the peat deposit, when peat is removed to create a pool that is rapidly filled with younger material. The resulting discontinuities in peat age at the base and sides of pool deposits obscure linkages between carbon accumulation rates and climate and require new approaches for paleoenvironmental reconstructions. Our results suggest that carbon accumulation in tropical peat swamps may be based on fundamentally different peat-forming processes than those of northern peatlands.

  13. Recent Carbon Accumulation Rates in Ombrotrophic Peatlands on the North Shore of the Gulf of the St. Lawrence, Quebec, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanderson, N. K.; Charman, D.; Garneau, M.; Hartley, I. P.

    2013-12-01

    In Eastern Canada, permafrost reached its southernmost extent for the Holocene during the Little Ice Age. Recent warming and degradation along the southern limit of the discontinuous permafrost zone is altering the microtopography, hydrology and carbon cycling in ombrotrophic peatlands; this trend is projected to continue. However, the understanding of multi-decadal and centennial scale change in peatlands is limited. This study aims to quantify changes in carbon accumulation rates for the last millennium in ombrotrophic peatlands from three regions along the North Shore of the Gulf of the St Lawrence, Canada. In each region, three peatlands were cored and 3-4 microforms were sampled per peatland. This replication allows changes in accumulation rates to be examined on two scales: 1) between regions along a N-S climatic gradient, and 2) within peatlands in the same region along a microtopography gradient. Recent carbon accumulation rates for last 150-200 years were calculated with lead-210 dates. Some initial estimates are also available for the last millennium using radiocarbon dates. Carbon accumulation rates were higher for all sites in the southernmost region, with sphagnum hummocks having the recent highest accumulation rates overall. In more northern peatlands, rates were found to differ between microforms, and between sites. This variability may be due to local differences in wind exposure and winter snow cover between sites. A high-resolution (0.5 cm) multi-proxy analysis using testate amoebae and plant macrofossils will be performed around key periods of accumulation change to evaluate peatland sensitivity and carbon accumulation to hydrological change.

  14. Impacts of timber harvesting on historic sediment accumulation rates in the Coos Bay estuary, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathabane, N.; Roering, J. J.

    2014-12-01

    The expansion and development of human infrastructure along the coastline of the Pacific Northwest has profound consequences for the habitability and general ecological health of coastal ecosystems. Coos County, one of the most economically critical regions of the Oregon Coast, experienced vigorous timber harvest activity in the aftermath of WWII that declined in the last several decades. This period of extractive land use may have drastically altered the sediment supply in the major catchments of the Coos and Millicoma Rivers and lead to variations in sediment flux into the Coos Bay estuary. Accurate sediment flux histories are critical data for deciphering the relative importance of climate and land use factors such as logging and road construction on sediment production. Reduction of root reinforcement following timber harvest increases the likelihood of shallow landsliding and debris flows. In addition, forest roads increase sediment production due to overland flow and entrainment of fine sediments on hydrologically connected roads. Although these processes have been documented in small watersheds, their compounded effect on estuaries and coastal settings has not been well documented. We use Pb-210 activities derived from sediment cores taken at various locations in the Coos Bay estuary to establish temporal variations in sediment accumulation rates (SARs). Our cores will also be analyzed to assess dissolved oxygen and other proxies for ecosystem functioning. By correlating these SARs with quantitative metrics for timber extraction rate such as board feet per year and qualitative evaluations from historical photos, we propose to document the cumulative effect of historic forest practices. The temporal resolution provided by this technique should allow us to link changes in estuarine sedimentation to changes in land use as well as climatic triggers such as storms. The conclusions of this study will add valuable information regarding the ultimate impact of

  15. A closer look at the Neogene erosion and accumulation rate increase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J.; von Blanckenburg, F.

    2008-12-01

    Glacial erosion and Quaternary cold-stage warm-stage climate cycling have been cited as mechanisms to explain observations of increased Neogene marine sedimentation rates. Quantification of long-term glacial erosion rates from cosmogenic radionuclides from large areas mostly covered by cold-based ice during the Quaternary show very low erosion rates over several glacial cycles. In addition, isotope ratio proxies of dissolved metals in seawater, measured in chemical ocean sediments, lack clear evidence for an increase in terrigenous denudation. In particular, the stable isotope 9Be, derived from continental erosion, shows no change in its ratio to meteoric cosmogenic nuclide 10Be, derived from rain over the past 10 My. Radiogenic Pb and Nd isotopes, mainly show a change in the style of denudation from more chemical to more physical processes in the Quaternary. These data are at odds with a suggested increase in marine sedimentation rates during the late Cenozoic. In order to resolve this contradiction we have scrutinized these sedimentation rate calculations from ocean cores to identify whether they might show only apparent increases in the Neogene sections. Potential explanations are that in some cases, measured sediment thicknesses for different time intervals lack corrections for sediment compaction. Compaction of the lower portions of the cores drastically increases the apparent thickness of the more recent (Quaternary) sediment. In addition, sedimentation rates often only appear higher for recent sections in cores due to an artifact of an averaging timescale that decreases up-core. Such an averaging time scale decrease arises from better chronological resolution in recent times (Sadler et al., 1999). Cannibalization of older sediment might add to this effect. Together, these data question a clear, global-scale Quaternary climate-erosion connection that would be unique in Earth's history.

  16. Constraints on the recent rate of lunar regolith accumulation from Diviner observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghent, R. R.; Hayne, P. O.; Bandfield, J. L.; Campbell, B. A.; Carter, L. M.; Allen, C.; Paige, D. A.

    2012-12-01

    Many large craters on the lunar nearside show radar CPR signatures consistent with the presence of blocky ejecta blankets, to distances predicted to be covered by continuous ejecta. However, most of these surfaces show limited enhancements in both derived rock abundance and rock-free regolith temperatures calculated from Diviner nighttime infrared observations. This indicates that the surface rocks are covered by a layer of thermally insulating regolith material. By matching the results of one-dimensional thermal models to Diviner nighttime temperatures, we have constrained the thermophysical properties of the upper regolith, and the thickness of regolith overlying proximal ejecta. We find that for all of the regions surveyed (all in the nearside highlands), the nighttime cooling curves are best fit by a density profile that varies exponentially with depth, consistent with a linear mixture of rocks and regolith fines, with increasing rock content with depth. Our results show significant spatial variations in the density e-folding depth, H, among young crater ejecta regions, indicating differences in the thickness of accumulated regolith. However, away from young craters, the average regional "equilibrium" value of H (Heq) is remarkably consistent, and is on the order of 5 cm. As expected, near-rim ejecta associated with young craters show lower values of H, indicating a high rock content in the shallow subsurface; for older craters, the average value of H approaches the regional value of Heq. Calculated H values for young craters (Giordano Bruno, Moore F, Byrgius A, Necho, Tycho, Jackson, King, and Copernicus) show a clear correlation with published ages, providing the first observational constraint on the recent rate of lunar regolith accumulation. In addition, this result may help to resolve the apparent discrepancy between ages calculated from small crater counts on melt ponds versus counts on continuous ejecta (e.g., King crater; Ashley et al., 2011, LPSC 42

  17. Radionuclide measurement of differential glomerular filtration rate

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.A.; Stone, W.J.; Grove, R.B.; Plunkett, J.M.; Kadir, S.; Patton, J.A.; Bowen, R.D.

    1981-01-01

    The authors sought to determine whether radionuclides could provide a reasonable estimate of differential renal function in five normal dogs and six dogs with unilateral segmental renal infarction. Glomerular filtration rate (GFR) of each kidney was measured by the standard technique using constant infusions of 99mTc-DTPA, iothalamate, and creatinine following ureteral catheterization. These results were correlated with total GFR estimated by bolus injection of 99mTc-DTPA and analysis of the plasma 99mTc-DTPA disappearance curve obtained by blood sampling. Differential GFR was then calculated by multiplying the total GFR from double exponential analysis of this curve (DTPA2) by each of three measures of differential function. These include the percent differential uptake of 99mTc-DTPA and 99mTc-DMSA in the posterior projection as well as the geometric mean of 99mTc-DMSA uptake. There were good correlations between differential GFR calculated from iothalamate clearances obtained at ureteral catheterization and all noninvasive methods involving radionuclides and DTPA2 (r = 0.85 - 0.99). Single exponential analysis of the 99mTc-DTPA plasma disappearance curve was less satisfactory. The authors suggest that measurement of total and differential GFR calculated from plasma clearance of 99mTc-DTPA and external counting may be a useful method with potential clinical applications.

  18. Belowground carbon balance and carbon accumulation rate in the successional series of monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zhou, G.; Liu, S.; Tang, X.; Ouyang, X.; Zhang, Dongxiao; Liu, J.; Yan, J.; Zhou, C.; Luo, Y.; Guan, L.; Liu, Yajing

    2006-01-01

    The balance, accumulation rate and temporal dynamics of belowground carbon in the successional series of monsoon evergreen broadleaved forest are obtained in this paper, based on long-term observations to the soil organic matter, input and standing biomass of litter and coarse woody debris, and dissolved organic carbon carried in the hydrological process of subtropical climax forest ecosystem - monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest, and its two successional forests of natural restoration - coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest and Pinus massoniana forest, as well as data of root biomass obtained once every five years and respiration measurement of soil, litter and coarse woody debris respiration for 1 year. The major results include: the belowground carbon pools of monsoon evergreen broad-leaved forest, coniferous and broad-leaved mixed forest, and Pinus massoniana forest are 23191 ?? 2538 g ?? m-2, 16889 ?? 1936 g ?? m-2 and 12680 ?? 1854 g ?? m-2, respectively, in 2002. Mean annual carbon accumulation rates of the three forest types during the 24a from 1978 to 2002 are 383 ?? 97 g ?? m-2 ?? a-1, 193 ?? 85 g ?? m-2 ?? a-1 and 213 ?? 86 g ?? m-2 ?? a-1, respectively. The belowground carbon pools in the three forest types keep increasing during the observation period, suggesting that belowground carbon pools are carbon sinks to the atmosphere. There are seasonal variations, namely, they are strong carbon sources from April to June, weak carbon sources from July to September; while they are strong carbon sinks from October to November, weak carbon sinks from December to March. ?? Science in China Press 2006.

  19. Sediment accumulation rates in time and space: Paleogene genetic stratigraphic sequences of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, William E.; Williams, Thomas A.

    1991-10-01

    The Paleogene fill of the northwestern Gulf of Mexico basin consists of eight genetic stratigraphic, sequences bounded by regional marine flooding surfaces. Calculation of sediment accumulation rates along dip profiles through four subbasins shows that regional changes in accumulation rate—and by inference, rate of sediment supply—of fivefold to tenfold repeatedly occurred over time spans of 1 to 3 m.y. Major sequences record episodes of high supply and accommodation-limited accumulation. Periods of declining and low supply were characterized by short-term over-accommodation and consequent transgressive flooding of the basin margin. Within sequences, depositional rates varied with position relative to the contemporaneous shelf margin, with type of depositional system, and between subbasins. Normal patterns of load-induced basin-margin subsidence and creation of accommodation space were modified by perturbation of the crustal stress regime.

  20. Measurements of the atmospheric neutron leakage rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockwood, J. A.; Ifedili, S. O.; Jenkins, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The atmospheric neutron leakage rate in the energy range from 0.01 to 10,000,000 eV has been measured as a function of latitude, altitude, and time with a neutron detector on board the Ogo 6 satellite. The latitude dependence of the neutron leakage is in reasonable agreement with that predicted by Lingenfelter (1963) and Light et al. (1973) if the neutron energy spectrum has the shape calculated by Newkirk (1963). The change in the neutron latitude dependence with the cosmic ray modulation agrees with the predictions of Lingenfelter and Light et al. For several solar proton events enhancements were observed in the neutron counting rates at lambda greater than or equal to 70 deg. Such events, however, provide an insignificant injection of protons at E less than or equal to 20 MeV into the radiation belts. An isotropic angular distribution of the neutron leakage in the energy range from 0.1 keV to 10 MeV best fits the observed altitude dependence of the neutron leakage flux.

  1. 210Pb mass accumulation rates in the depositional area of the Magra River (Mediterranean Sea, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delbono, I.; Barsanti, M.; Schirone, A.; Conte, F.; Delfanti, R.

    2016-08-01

    Nine sediment cores were collected between 2009 and 2012 in the inner continental shelf (Mediterranean Sea, Italy) mainly influenced by the Magra River, at water depths ranging from 11 to 64 m. Mass Accumulation Rates (MARs) were calculated through 210Pb analysed by Gamma spectrometry. Three different dating models (single and two-layer CF-CS, CRS) were applied to clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles and 137Cs was used to validate the 210Pb geochronology. The maximum MAR values (>2 g cm-2 yr-1) were found in the region adjacent to the Magra River mouth and outside the Gulf of La Spezia (0.9±0.1 g cm-2 yr-1 at St. 3-C6 and 4-C4). Results from 137Cs/210Pbxs ratios calculated in Surface Mixed Layers (SMLs) evidenced the coastal boundaries of the Magra River depositional area, which is very limited towards south. Differently, in the north-west sector, fine sediments are generally driven by the Ligurian Current and move towards north-west: at the deepest and most distant station from the River mouth, the MAR value is the lowest one in the study area. Few major Magra River floods occurred during the sediment core sampling period. By using the short-lived radioisotope 7Be as a tracer of river floods, a clear 7Be signature of 2009 flood is present at St. 1-SA1C. Finally, by analyzing the clay normalised 210Pbxs profiles, a decrease of its activity dating the years 1999 and 2000 is observed in four cores, corresponding to two major Magra River floods occurring in those years.

  2. Geographic variability in organic carbon stock and accumulation rate in sediments of East and Southeast Asian seagrass meadows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyajima, Toshihiro; Hori, Masakazu; Hamaguchi, Masami; Shimabukuro, Hiromori; Adachi, Hiroshi; Yamano, Hiroya; Nakaoka, Masahiro

    2015-04-01

    Organic carbon (OC) stored in the sediments of seagrass meadows has been considered a globally significant OC reservoir. However, the sparsity and regional bias of studies on long-term OC accumulation in coastal sediments have limited reliable estimation of the capacity of seagrass meadows as a global OC sink. We evaluated the amount and accumulation rate of OC in sediment of seagrass meadows and adjacent areas in East and Southeast Asia. In temperate sites, the average OC concentration in the top 30 cm of sediment was higher in seagrass meadows (780-1080 mmol g-1) than in sediments without seagrass cover (52-430 mmol g-1). The average OC in the top 30 cm of subtropical and tropical seagrass meadow sediments ranged from 140 to 440 mmol g-1. Carbon isotope mass balancing suggested that the contribution of seagrass-derived carbon to OC stored in sediments was often relatively minor (temperate: 10-40%; subtropical: 35-82%; tropical: 4-34%) and correlated to the habitat type, being particularly low in estuarine habitats. Stock of OC in the top meter of sediment of all the studied meadows ranged from 38 to 120 Mg ha-1. The sediment accumulation rates were estimated by radiocarbon dating of six selected cores (0.32-1.34 mm yr-1). The long-term OC accumulation rates calculated from the sediment accumulation rate and the top 30 cm average OC concentration for the seagrass meadows (24-101 kg ha-1 yr-1) were considerably lower than the OC accumulation rates previously reported for Mediterranean Posidonia oceanica meadows (580 kg ha-1 yr-1 on average). Current estimates for the global carbon sink capacity of seagrass meadows, which rely largely on Mediterranean studies, may be considerable overestimations.

  3. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  4. 40 CFR 86.098-26 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements. 86.098-26 Section 86.098-26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... ENGINES General Provisions for Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty...

  5. Marine debris accumulation in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands: an examination of rates and processes.

    PubMed

    Dameron, Oliver J; Parke, Michael; Albins, Mark A; Brainard, Russell

    2007-04-01

    Large amounts of derelict fishing gear accumulate and cause damage to shallow coral reefs of the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands (NWHI). To facilitate maintenance of reefs cleaned during 1996-2005 removal efforts, we identify likely high-density debris areas by assessing reef characteristics (depth, benthic habitat type, and energy regime) that influence sub-regional debris accumulation. Previously cleaned backreef and lagoonal reefs at two NWHI locations were resurveyed for accumulated debris using two survey methods. Accumulated debris densities and weights were found to be greater in lagoonal reef areas. Sample weight-based debris densities are extrapolated to similar habitats throughout the NWHI using a spatial 'net habitat' dataset created by generalizing IKONOS satellite derivatives for depth and habitat classification. Prediction accuracy for this dataset is tested using historical debris point data. Annual NWHI debris accumulation is estimated to be 52.0 metric tonnes. For planning purposes, individual NWHI atolls/reefs are allotted a proportion of this total. PMID:17217968

  6. Recent rates of carbon accumulation in montane fens ofYosemite National Park, California, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith; Fuller, Christopher C.; Orlando, James; Moore, Peggy E.

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about recent rates of carbon storage in montane peatlands, particularly in the western United States. Here we report on recent rates of carbon accumulation (past 50 to 100 years) in montane groundwater-fed peatlands (fens) of Yosemite National Park in central California, U.S.A. Peat cores were collected at three sites ranging in elevation from 2070 to 2500 m. Core sections were analyzed for bulk density, % organic carbon, and 210Pb activities for dating purposes. Organic carbon densities ranged from 0.026 to 0.065 g C cm-3. Mean vertical accretion rates estimated using210Pb over the 50-year period from ∼1960 to 2011 and the 100-year period from ∼1910 to 2011 were 0.28 (standard deviation = ±0.09) and 0.18 (±-0.04) cm yr-1, respectively. Mean carbon accumulation rates over the 50- and 100-year periods were 95.4 (±25.4) and 74.7 (±17.2) g C m-2 yr-1, respectively. Such rates are similar to recent rates of carbon accumulation in rich fens in western Canada, but more studies are needed to definitively establish both the similarities and differences in peat formation between boreal and temperate montane fens.

  7. Instrumentation of broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance for measuring thermal conductivity accumulation functions.

    PubMed

    Regner, K T; Majumdar, S; Malen, J A

    2013-06-01

    This paper describes the instrumentation for broadband frequency domain thermoreflectance (BB-FDTR), a novel, continuous wave laser technique for measuring the thermal conductivity accumulation function. The thermal conductivity accumulation function describes cumulative contributions to the bulk thermal conductivity of a material from energy carriers with different mean free paths. It can be used to map reductions in thermal conductivity in nano-devices, which arise when the dimensions of the device are commensurate to the mean free path of energy carriers. BB-FDTR uses high frequency surface temperature modulation to generate non-diffusive phonon transport realized through a reduction in the perceived thermal conductivity. By controlling the modulation frequency it is possible to reconstruct the thermal conductivity accumulation function. A unique heterodyning technique is used to down-convert the signal, therein improving our signal to noise ratio and enabling results over a broader range of modulation frequencies (200 kHz-200 MHz) and hence mean free paths.

  8. Measurement and Interpretation of High Strain Rates Near Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hager, B. H.; Herring, T. A.; Bragin, V. D.; Zubovicz, A. V.; Molnar, P.; Hamburger, M. A.

    2001-12-01

    In 1996, scientists at the IVTRAN Poligon began frequent measurement of a 25-site GPS network around Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan. Most of the marks in this network are concentrated near the range front and are measured in campaigns ~6 times/year . Two continuously operating sites spanning the Chu basin to the north and south of Bishkek anchor the network. Outcrop is sparse within the network and most of the campaign sites are mounted on boulders in alluvium. The frequent measurements and dense spacing of the network allow us to judge the stability of the marks, which appears to be, in general, surprisingly good. The geodetic velocity field is dominated by north-south convergence of 3 mm/yr across the network. Most of the convergence occurs over a distance of about 10 km at the southern edge of the basin, resulting in a strain rate of ~0.3 microstrain/yr. This strain rate is high - comparable to that across the San Andreas fault in southern California. Interpretation of this high strain rate in terms of a conventional model using a dislocation in a uniform elastic halfspace would require a shallow locking depth, leading to an inference of relatively low moment release from the earthquakes expected to release the accumulated strain. An alternative explanation is that the strain concentration near the range front results not from a shallow locking depth but from the low elastic modulus of the sediments in the basin. If this model is correct, the rupture area, moment release, and seismic hazard are greater. The network is located just to the west of the surface rupture of the 1911 M ~8 Chon Kemin earthquake, which demonstrated that major earthquakes do occur in this region.

  9. Character, paleoenvironment, rate of accumulation, and evidence for seismic triggering of Holocene turbidites, Canada Abyssal Plain, Arctic Ocean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, A.; Phillips, R.L.; Mullen, M.W.; Starratt, S.W.; Jones, Glenn A.; Naidu, A.S.; Finney, B.P.

    1996-01-01

    Four box cores and one piston core show that Holocene sedimentation on the southern Canada Abyssal Plain for the last 8010??120 yr has consisted of a continuing rain of pelagic organic and ice-rafted elastic sediment with a net accumulation rate during the late Holocene of ???10 mm/1000 yr, and episodically emplaced turbidites 1-5 m thick deposited at intervals of 830 to 3450 yr (average 2000 yr). The average net accumulation rate of the mixed sequence of turbidites and thin pelagite interbeds in the cores is about 1.2 m/1000 yr. Physiography suggests that the turbidites originated on the Mackenzie Delta or its clinoform, and ??13C values of -27 to - 25??? in the turbidites are compatible with a provenance on a delta. Extant displaced neritic and lower slope to basin plain calcareous benthic foraminifers coexist in the turbidite units. Their joint occurence indicates that the turbidites originated on the modern continental shelf and entrained sediment from the slope and rise enroute to their final resting place on the Canada Abyssal Plain. The presence of Middle Pleistocene diatoms in the turbidites suggests, in addition, that the turbidites may have originated in shallow submarine slides beneath the upper slope or outer shelf. Small but consistent differences in organic carbon content and ??13C values between the turbidite units suggest that they did not share an identical provenance, which is at least compatible with an origin in slope failures. The primary provenance of the ice-rafted component of the pelagic beds was the glaciated terrane of northwestern Canada; and the provenance of the turbidite units was Pleistocene and Holocene sedimentary deposits on the outer continental shelf and upper slope of the Mackenzie Delta. Largely local derivation of the sediment of the Canada Abyssal Plain indicates that sediment accumulation rates in the Arctic Ocean are valid only for regions with similar depositional sources and processes, and that these rates cannot be

  10. [Estimating of decadal accumulation rates of heavy metals in surface rice soils in the Tai Lake region of China].

    PubMed

    Li, Lianqing; Pan, Genxing; Zhang, Pingjiu; Cheng, Jiemin; Zhu, Qiuhua; Qiu, Duosheng

    2002-05-01

    Estimation of decadal accumulation of some heavy metals in surface rice soils from the Tai Lake region, southern Jiangsu Province, China was made by means of calculating the monitoring data and/or analysis data of the archived soil samples. For the last decade, the estimated annual accumulation rate for Cu or Zn, Pb and Cd was 0.3-1 mg.(kg.a)-1, 0.2-1 mg.(kg.a)-1 and 0.3-3 micrograms.(kg.a)-1 respectively, the apparent pollution loading was, therefore, respectively 0.5-1 kg.(hm2.a)-1, 0.5-1.0 kg.(hm2.a)-1, 0.5-3.0 kg.(hm2.a)-1 [symbol: see text] 0.8-10 x 10(-3) kg.(hm2.a)-1. The accumulation rate for the content of available form was shown to be greater than that of total content. The non-point source pollution marked bigger contribution to the total annual loading for the Pb and Cd than the other source pollutions, while the Cd loading was prominently higher than those reported in Europe. These results may indicate that the food safety in this region may be constrained by the soil pollution of these heavy metals at high accumulation rates.

  11. Three hen strains fed photoisomerized trans,trans CLA-rich soy oil exhibit different yolk accumulation rates and source-specific isomer deposition.

    PubMed

    Shinn, Sara E; Gilley, Alex D; Proctor, Andrew; Anthony, Nicholas B

    2015-04-01

    Most CLA chicken feeding trials used cis,trans (c,t) and trans,cis (t,c) CLA isomers to produce CLA-rich eggs, while reports of trans,trans (t,t) CLA enrichment in egg yolks are limited. The CLA yolk fatty acid profile changes and the 10-12 days of feeding needed for maximum CLA are well documented, but there is no information describing CLA accumulation during initial feed administration. In addition, no information on CLA accumulation rates in different hen strains is available. The aim of this study was to determine a mathematical model that described yolk CLA accumulation and depletion in three hen strains by using t,t CLA-rich soybean oil produced by photoisomerization. Diets of 30-week Leghorns, broilers, and jungle fowl were supplemented with 15% CLA-rich soy oil for 16 days, and eggs were collected for 32 days. Yolk fatty acid profiles were measured by GC-FID. CLA accumulation and depletion was modeled by both quadratic and piecewise regression analysis. A strong quadratic model was proposed, but it was not as effective as piecewise regression in describing CLA accumulation and depletion. Broiler hen eggs contained the greatest concentration of CLA at 3.2 mol/100 g egg yolk, then jungle fowl at 2.9 mol CLA, and Leghorns at 2.3 mol CLA. The t,t CLA isomer levels remained at 55% of total yolk CLA during CLA feeding. However, t-10,c-12 (t,c) CLA concentration increased slightly during CLA accumulation and was significantly greater than c-9,t-11 CLA. Jungle fowl had the smallest increase in yolk saturated fat with CLA yolk accumulation.

  12. Carbon and sediment accumulation in the Everglades (USA) during the past 4000 years: rates, drivers, and sources of error

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glaser, Paul H.; Volin, John C.; Givnish, Thomas J.; Hansen, Barbara C. S.; Stricker, Craig A.

    2012-01-01

    Tropical and sub-tropical wetlands are considered to be globally important sources for greenhouse gases but their capacity to store carbon is presumably limited by warm soil temperatures and high rates of decomposition. Unfortunately, these assumptions can be difficult to test across long timescales because the chronology, cumulative mass, and completeness of a sedimentary profile are often difficult to establish. We therefore made a detailed analysis of a core from the principal drainage outlet of the Everglades of South Florida, to assess these problems and determine the factors that could govern carbon accumulation in this large sub-tropical wetland. Accelerator mass spectroscopy dating provided direct evidence for both hard-water and open-system sources of dating errors, whereas cumulative mass varied depending upon the type of method used. Radiocarbon dates of gastropod shells, nevertheless, seemed to provide a reliable chronology for this core once the hard-water error was quantified and subtracted. Long-term accumulation rates were then calculated to be 12.1 g m-2 yr-1 for carbon, which is less than half the average rate reported for northern and tropical peatlands. Moreover, accumulation rates remained slow and relatively steady for both organic and inorganic strata, and the slow rate of sediment accretion ( 0.2 mm yr-1) tracked the correspondingly slow rise in sea level (0.35 mm yr-1 ) reported for South Florida over the past 4000 years. These results suggest that sea level and the local geologic setting may impose long-term constraints on rates of sediment and carbon accumulation in the Everglades and other wetlands.

  13. Spatial Measurements of Perfusion, Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Liposomes Accumulation in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Shawn; Mirmilshteyn, Daniel; Zheng, Jinzi; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A

    2016-08-18

    The heterogeneous intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes is a critical determinant of their efficacy. Both the chaotic tumor microcirculation and elevated IFP are linked to the heterogeneous intra-tumoral distribution of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems such as liposomes. In the present study, the relationship between tumor microcirculation, elevated IFP, and accumulation of nanoparticles was investigated through in vivo experimentation. This was accomplished by evaluation of the tumor microcirculation using dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and measurement of tumor IFP using a novel image-guided robotic needle placement system connected to the micro-CT scanner. The intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes was determined by CT image-based assessment of a nanoparticle liposomal formulation that stably encapsulate the contrast agent iohexol (CT-liposomes). CT imaging allowed for co-localization of the spatial distribution of tumor hemodynamics, IFP and CT-liposome accumulation in an individual subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. Measurements led to the discovery that perfusion and plasma volume fraction are strong mediators of the intra-tumoral distribution of liposomes. Furthermore, the results suggest that IFP plays an indirect role in mediating liposome distribution through modulating blood flow.

  14. Measurement of accumulation of semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots by pimephales promelas.

    PubMed

    Leigh, Kenton L; Bouldin, Jennifer L; Buchanan, Roger A

    2012-01-01

    As the production and use of nanomaterials increases, it is important to understand their environmental and biological fate. Because their unmatched chemical, physical, and optical properties make them useful in a wide variety of applications including biomedical imaging, photo-voltaics, and light emitting diodes, the use of semiconductor nanocrystals such as quantum dots (QDs) is increasing rapidly. Although QDs hold great potential in a wide variety of industrial and consumer applications, the environmental implications of these particles is largely unexplored. The nanocrystal core of many types of QDs contains the toxic metal cadmium (Cd), so possible release of Cd from the QD core is cause for concern. Because many types of QDs are miscible in water, QD interactions with aquatic organisms and their environment require more attention. In the present study we used fluorometry to measure time and dose dependent uptake, accumulation, and post-exposure clearance of accumulated QDs in the gut tract by the aquatic vertebrate Pimephales promelas. By using fluorometry, we were able to measure accumulated QD concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first reported attempt to quantify accumulated QDs in an organism and is an important step in understanding the interactions among QDs in aquatic organisms and environments. PMID:22942867

  15. Spatial Measurements of Perfusion, Interstitial Fluid Pressure and Liposomes Accumulation in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Shawn; Mirmilshteyn, Daniel; Zheng, Jinzi; Allen, Christine; Jaffray, David A

    2016-01-01

    The heterogeneous intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes is a critical determinant of their efficacy. Both the chaotic tumor microcirculation and elevated IFP are linked to the heterogeneous intra-tumoral distribution of nanotechnology-based drug delivery systems such as liposomes. In the present study, the relationship between tumor microcirculation, elevated IFP, and accumulation of nanoparticles was investigated through in vivo experimentation. This was accomplished by evaluation of the tumor microcirculation using dynamic contrast enhanced computed tomography (DCE-CT) and measurement of tumor IFP using a novel image-guided robotic needle placement system connected to the micro-CT scanner. The intra-tumoral accumulation of liposomes was determined by CT image-based assessment of a nanoparticle liposomal formulation that stably encapsulate the contrast agent iohexol (CT-liposomes). CT imaging allowed for co-localization of the spatial distribution of tumor hemodynamics, IFP and CT-liposome accumulation in an individual subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of breast cancer. Measurements led to the discovery that perfusion and plasma volume fraction are strong mediators of the intra-tumoral distribution of liposomes. Furthermore, the results suggest that IFP plays an indirect role in mediating liposome distribution through modulating blood flow. PMID:27583578

  16. Flow rate measuring devices for gas flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonfig, K. W.

    1985-07-01

    Flowrate measuring devices are described: volume meter with fixed or mobile walls; turbine meter; throttling procedure; ultrasonic and Doppler methods; vortex method; rotary flowmeter; and swinging body flow measuring procedure. Flowrate can also be measured from the force exerted on bodies immersed in a fluid or based on thermodynamical principles. The characteristics and operating envelope of each device/method are given.

  17. Constraining mass accumulation rates across the Cretaceous-Paleogene boundary clay layer using extraterrestrial helium-3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giron, M.; Sepulveda, J.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Alegret, L.; Summons, R. E.

    2012-12-01

    The extended duration of the negative δ13C excursion observed in marine carbonates spanning the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction event has lead to two main hypothesized post-extinction models ("Strangelove" and "Living Ocean";[1, 2]) for the status of marine primary productivity and the global carbon cycle. However, these models are largely inconsistent with recent paleontological and geochemical evidence suggesting heterogeneous changes in marine productivity and carbon export [3, 4]. While the analysis of lipid biomarkers in the cosmopolitan boundary clay layer allows us to assess changes in primary production by non-calcifying organisms in the immediate aftermath of the mass extinction [4], our poor understanding of the deposition of the clay layer precludes a more detailed reconstruction of short-term variations in marine ecosystem resilience. Here, we present data on extraterrestrial 3He derived from interplanetary dust particles used as a constant flux proxy to constrain fluctuations in mass accumulation rates (MARs) [5] and the duration of the boundary clay deposition in three classic and expanded K-Pg boundary sections: El Kef (Tunisia), Caravaca (Spain), and Kulstirenden (Denmark). Our results from different depositional environments indicate average durations for the sedimentation of the clay layer that are comparable (~10 kyr) to other localities [5], thus confirming its globally brief deposition. Early Paleogene MARs vary among locations when compared to background Late Cretaceous values and do not strictly follow carbonate content as traditionally assumed, thus suggesting variable depositional conditions at different locations. Changes in sediment MARs across the K-Pg will be used to calculate MARs of algal- and bacterial-derived biomarkers, as well as benthic foraminifera, in order to assess the timing and global nature of the recovery of marine primary production and carbon export. 1. Hsu, K.J., He, Q., Mckenzie, J.A., Weissert, H

  18. Measurement of the accumulation of water ice on optical components in cryogenic vacuum environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, Trevor M.; Montgomery Smith, L.; Collins, Frank G.; Labello, Jesse M.; Rogers, James P.; Lowry, Heard S.; Crider, Dustin H.

    2012-11-01

    Standard vacuum practices mitigate the presence of water vapor and contamination inside cryogenic vacuum chambers. However, anomalies can occur in the facility that can cause the accumulation of amorphous water ice on optics and test articles. Under certain conditions, the amorphous ice on optical components shatters, which leads to a reduction in signal or failure of the component. An experiment was performed to study and measure the deposition of water (H2O) ice on optical surfaces under high-vacuum cryogenic conditions. Water was introduced into a cryogenic vacuum chamber, via a hydrated molecular sieve zeolite, through an effusion cell and impinged upon a quartz-crystal microbalance (QCM) and first-surface gold-plated mirror. A laser and photodiode setup, external to the vacuum chamber, monitored the multiple-beam interference reflectance of the ice-mirror configuration while the QCM measured the mass deposition. Data indicates that water ice, under these conditions, accumulates as a thin film on optical surfaces to thicknesses over 45 microns and can be detected and measured by nonintrusive optical methods which are based upon multiple-beam interference phenomena. The QCM validated the interference measurements. This experiment established proof-of-concept for a miniature system for monitoring ice accumulation within the chamber.

  19. Measurements of Protein Crystal Face Growth Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorti, S.

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystal growth rates will be determined for several hyperthermophile proteins.; The growth rates will be assessed using available theoretical models, including kinetic roughening.; If/when kinetic roughening supersaturations are established, determinations of protein crystal quality over a range of supersaturations will also be assessed.; The results of our ground based effort may well address the existence of a correlation between fundamental growth mechanisms and protein crystal quality.

  20. The accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface - The view from Roosevelt County, New Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolensky, Michael E.; Wells, Gordon L.; Rendell, Helen M.

    1990-01-01

    The discovery of 154 meteorite fragments within an 11-sq km area of wind-excavated basins in Roosevelt County, New Mexico, permits a new calculation of the accumulation rate of meteorite falls at the earth's surface. Thermoluminescence dating of the coversand unit comprising the prime recovery surface suggests the maximum terrestrial age of the meteorites to be about 16.0 ka. The 68 meteorite fragments subjected to petrological analyses represent a minimum of 49 individual falls. Collection bias has largely excluded carbonaceous chondrites and achondrites, requiring the accumulation rate derived from the recovered samples to be increased by a factor of 1.25. Terrestrial weathering destroying ordinary chondrites can be modeled as a first-order decay process with an estimated half-life of 3.5 + or - 1.9 ka on the semiarid American High Plains. Having accounted for the age of the recovery surface, area of field searches, pairing of finds, collection bias and weathering half-life, an accumulation rate of 940 falls/a per 10 to the 6th sq km is calculated for falls greater than 10 g total mass. This figure exceeds the best-constrained previous estimate by more than an order of magnitude. One possible reason for this disparity may be the extraordinary length of the fall record preserved in the surficial geology of Roosevelt County. The high accumulation rate determined for the past 16 ka may point to the existence of periods when the meteorite fall rate was significantly greater than at present.

  1. Biogenic silica fluxes and accumulation rates in the Gulf of California

    SciTech Connect

    Thunell, R.C.; Pride, C.J.; Tappa, E. ); Muller-Karger, F.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Gulf of California, though small in size, plays an important role in the global silica cycle. The seasonal pattern of biogenic silica flux in the gulf is closely related to that of phytoplankton biomass levels and is controlled by changes in weather and hydrographic conditions. The highest opal fluxes ([approximately] 0.35 g[center dot]m[sup [minus]2][center dot]d[sup [minus]1]) occur during winter and spring, and they are comparable to those measured in some of the most productive ecosystems of the world. Approximately 15%-25% of the biogenic silica produced in surface waters is preserved in gulf sediments, a figure significantly higher than the average global ocean preservation rate. However, the flux of opal at 500 m water depth is less than 25% of that being produced at the surface, suggesting that most of the recycling of biogenic silica in the Gulf of California occurs in the upper water column. 28 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao )

    1996-01-01

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  3. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao

    1996-12-31

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil & gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  4. Automated Speech Rate Measurement in Dysarthria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Heidi; Dekens, Tomas; Van Nuffelen, Gwen; Latacz, Lukas; Verhelst, Werner; De Bodt, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, a new algorithm for automated determination of speech rate (SR) in dysarthric speech is evaluated. We investigated how reliably the algorithm calculates the SR of dysarthric speech samples when compared with calculation performed by speech-language pathologists. Method: The new algorithm was trained and tested using Dutch…

  5. Thermal boundary conductance accumulation and interfacial phonon transmission: Measurements and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheaito, Ramez; Gaskins, John T.; Caplan, Matthew E.; Donovan, Brian F.; Foley, Brian M.; Giri, Ashutosh; Duda, John C.; Szwejkowski, Chester J.; Constantin, Costel; Brown-Shaklee, Harlan J.; Ihlefeld, Jon F.; Hopkins, Patrick E.

    2015-01-01

    The advances in phonon spectroscopy in homogeneous solids have unveiled extremely useful physics regarding the contribution of phonon energies and mean-free paths to the thermal transport in solids. However, as material systems decrease to length scales less than the phonon mean-free paths, thermal transport can become much more impacted by scattering and transmission across interfaces between two materials than the intrinsic relaxation in the homogeneous solid. To elucidate the fundamental interactions driving this thermally limiting interfacial phonon scattering process, we analytically derive and experimentally measure a thermal boundary conductance accumulation function. We develop a semiclassical theory to calculate the thermal boundary conductance accumulation function across interfaces using the diffuse mismatch model, and validate this derivation by measuring the interface conductance between eight different metals on native oxide/silicon substrates and four different metals on sapphire substrates. Measurements were performed at room temperature using time-domain thermoreflectance and represent the first-reported values for interface conductance across several metal/native oxide/silicon and metal/sapphire interfaces. The various metal films provide a variable bandwidth of phonons incident on the metal/substrate interface. This method of varying phonons' cutoff frequency in the film while keeping the same substrate allows us to mimic the accumulation of thermal boundary conductance and thus provides a direct method to experimentally validate our theory. We show that the accumulation function can be written as the product of a weighted average of the interfacial phonon transmission function and the accumulation of the temperature derivative of the phonon flux incident on the interface; this provides the framework to extract an average, spectrally dependent phonon transmissivity from a series of thermal boundary conductance measurements. Our approach provides

  6. Complementary system for long term measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mazur, J.; Kozak, K.

    2014-02-15

    A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up made it possible to perform 4–6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions.

  7. Complementary system for long term measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil.

    PubMed

    Mazur, J; Kozak, K

    2014-02-01

    A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up made it possible to perform 4-6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions. PMID:24593340

  8. Complementary system for long term measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazur, J.; Kozak, K.

    2014-02-01

    A special set-up for continuous measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil is presented. It was constructed at Laboratory of Radiometric Expertise, Institute of Nuclear Physics Polish Academy of Sciences (IFJ PAN), Krakow, Poland. Radon exhalation rate was determined using the AlphaGUARD PQ2000 PRO (Genitron) radon monitor together with a special accumulation container which was put on the soil surface during the measurement. A special automatic device was built and used to raise and lower back onto the ground the accumulation container. The time of raising and putting down the container was controlled by an electronic timer. This set-up made it possible to perform 4-6 automatic measurements a day. Besides, some additional soil and meteorological parameters were continuously monitored. In this way, the diurnal and seasonal variability of radon exhalation rate from soil can be studied as well as its dependence on soil properties and meteorological conditions.

  9. Modern Measurements of Uranium Decay Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons-Moss, T.; Faye, S. A.; Williams, R. W.; Wang, T. F.; Renne, P. R.; Mundil, R.; Harrison, M.; Bandong, B. B.; Moody, K.; Knight, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    It has been widely recognized that accurate and precise decay constants (λ) are critical to geochronology as highlighted by the EARTHTIME initiative, particularly the calibration benchmarks λ235U and λ238U. [1] Alpha counting experiments in 1971[2] measured λ235U and λ238U with ~0.1% precision, but have never been independently validated. We are embarking on new direct measurements of λ235U, λ238U, λ234Th, and λ234U using independent approaches for each nuclide. For the measurement of λ235U, highly enriched 235U samples will be chemically purified and analyzed for U concentration and isotopic composition by multi-collector inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (MC-ICP-MS). Thin films will be electrodeposited from these solutions and the α activity will be measured in an α-γ coincidence counting apparatus, which allows reduced uncertainty in counting efficiency while achieving adequate counting statistics. For λ238U measurement we will measure ingrowth of 234Th in chemically purified, isotopically enriched 238U solutions, by quantitatively separating the Th and allowing complete decay to 234U. All of the measurements will be done using MC-ICP-MS aiming at 0.05% precision. This approach is expected to result in values of λ238U with less than 0.1% uncertainty, if combined with improved λ234Th measements. These will be achieved using direct decay measurements with an E-∆E charged particle telescope in coincidence with a gamma detector. This system allows measurement of 234Th β-decay and simultaneous detection and identification of α particles emitted by the 234U daughter, thus observing λ234U at the same time. The high-precision λ234U obtained by the direct activity measurements can independently verify the commonly used values obtained by indirect methods.[3] An overarching goal of the project is to ensure the quality of results including metrological traceability in order to facilitate implementation across diverse disciplines. [1] T

  10. Feed rate measuring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, J.L.; Wiczer, J.J.

    1995-12-05

    A system and method are provided for establishing the feed rate of a workpiece along a feed path with respect to a machine device. First and second sensors each having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece are positioned above, and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece along a feed path. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of each sensor and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of the contour of the workpiece. First and second image signals representative of the contour of the workpiece along the feed path are developed by an image processor. The time delay between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals are then used to determine the feed rate based upon the separation of the first and second sensors and the amount of time between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals. 18 figs.

  11. Feed rate measuring method and system

    DOEpatents

    Novak, James L.; Wiczer, James J.

    1995-01-01

    A system and method are provided for establishing the feed rate of a workpiece along a feed path with respect to a machine device. First and second sensors each having first and second sensing electrodes which are electrically isolated from the workpiece are positioned above, and in proximity to the desired surfaces of the workpiece along a feed path. An electric field is developed between the first and second sensing electrodes of each sensor and capacitance signals are developed which are indicative of the contour of the workpiece. First and second image signals representative of the contour of the workpiece along the feed path are developed by an image processor. The time delay between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals are then used to determine the feed rate based upon the separation of the first and second sensors and the amount of time between corresponding portions of the first and second image signals.

  12. Net ecosystem production: A comprehensive measure of net carbon accumulation by ecosystems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Randerson, J.T.; Chapin, F. S.; Harden, J.W.; Neff, J.C.; Harmon, M.E.

    2002-01-01

    The conceptual framework used by ecologists and biogeochemists must allow for accurate and clearly defined comparisons of carbon fluxes made with disparate techniques across a spectrum of temporal and spatial scales. Consistent with usage over the past four decades, we define "net ecosystem production" (NEP) as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems. Past use of this term has been ambiguous, because it has been used conceptually as a measure of carbon accumulation by ecosystems, but it has often been calculated considering only the balance between gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration. This calculation ignores other carbon fluxes from ecosystems (e.g., leaching of dissolved carbon and losses associated with disturbance). To avoid conceptual ambiguities, we argue that NEP be defined, as in the past, as the net carbon accumulation by ecosystems and that it explicitly incorporate all the carbon fluxes from an ecosystem, including autotrophic respiration, heterotrophic respiration, losses associated with disturbance, dissolved and particulate carbon losses, volatile organic compound emissions, and lateral transfers among ecosystems. Net biome productivity (NBP), which has been proposed to account for carbon loss during episodic disturbance, is equivalent to NEP at regional or global scales. The multi-scale conceptual framework we describe provides continuity between flux measurements made at the scale of soil profiles and chambers, forest inventories, eddy covariance towers, aircraft, and inversions of remote atmospheric flask samples, allowing a direct comparison of NEP estimates made at all temporal and spatial scales.

  13. Slip-rates along the Chaman fault: Implication for transient strain accumulation and strain partitioning along the western Indian plate margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ul-Hadi, Shams; Khan, Shuhab D.; Owen, Lewis A.; Khan, Abdul S.; Hedrick, Kathryn A.; Caffee, Marc W.

    2013-11-01

    The Chaman fault in Western Pakistan marks the western collision boundary between the Indian and Eurasian plates and connects the Makran subduction zone to the Himalayan convergence zone. Geomorphic-scale slip-rates along an active strand of the Chaman fault are added to the sporadic data set of this poorly investigated transform system. Field investigations coupled with high-resolution GeoEye-1 satellite data of an alluvial fan surface (Bostankaul alluvial fan) show ~ 1150 m left-lateral offset by the fault since the formation of the alluvial fan surface. A weighted mean 10Be exposure age of 34.8 ± 3 kyr for the Bostankaul alluvial surface yields a slip-rate of 33.3 ± 3.0 mm/yr. This rate agrees with the geologically defined slip-rates along the Chaman fault, but is approximately twice as large as that inferred from the decade-long global positioning system measurements of 18 ± 1 mm/yr. The contrast in geomorphic and geodetic slip-rates along the Chaman fault, like other major intra-continental strike-slip faults, has two major implications: 1) the geodetic rates might represent a period of reduced displacement as compared to the averaged Late Pleistocene rate because of transient variations in rates of elastic strain accumulation; or 2) strain partitioning within the plate boundary zone. While strain partitioning could be the reason of slip-rate variations within the western Indian plate boundary zone, transient strain accumulation could explain contrasting slip-rates along the Chaman fault at this stage in its poorly understood seismic cycle.

  14. On eddy accumulation with limited conditional sampling to measure air-surface exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Wesely, M.L.; Hart, R.L.

    1994-01-01

    An analysis of turbulence data collected at a height of 12.3 m above grasslands was carried out to illustrate some of the limitations and possible improvements in methods to compute vertical fluxes of trace substances by the eddy accumulation technique with conditional sampling. The empirical coefficient used in the technique has a slight dependence on atmospheric stability, which can be minimized by using a threshold vertical velocity equal to approximately 0.75{sigma}{sub w}, below which chemical sampling is suspended. This protocol results in a smaller chemical sample but increases the differences in concentrations by approximately 70%. For effective conditional sampling when mass is being accumulated in a trap or reservoir, the time of sampling during updrafts versus downdrafts should be measured and used to adjust estimates of the mean concentrations.

  15. Measurement of radon/thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in granite areas in Japan.

    PubMed

    Prasad, G; Ishikawa, T; Hosoda, M; Sahoo, S K; Kavasi, N; Sorimachi, A; Tokonami, S; Uchida, S

    2012-11-01

    Radon and thoron exhalation rates and gamma-ray dose rate in different places in Hiroshima Prefecture were measured. Exhalation rates were measured using an accumulation chamber method. The radon exhalation rate was found to vary from 3 to 37 mBq m(-2) s(-1), while the thoron exhalation rate ranged from 40 to 3330 mBq m(-2) s(-1). The highest radon exhalation rate (37 mBq m(-2) s(-1)) and gamma-ray dose rate (92 nGy h(-1)) were found in the same city (Kure City). In Kure City, indoor radon and thoron concentrations were previously measured at nine selected houses using a radon-thoron discriminative detector (Raduet). The indoor radon concentrations varied from 16 to 78 Bq m(-3), which was higher than the average value in Japan (15.5 Bq m(-3)). The indoor thoron concentration ranged from ND (not detected: below a detection limit of approximately 10 Bq m(-3)) to 314 Bq m(-3). The results suggest that radon exhalation rate from the ground is an influential factor for indoor radon concentration.

  16. Measurement of snow interception and canopy effects on snow accumulation and melt in a mountainous maritime climate, Oregon, United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storck, Pascal; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.; Bolton, Susan M.

    2002-11-01

    The results of a 3 year field study to observe the processes controlling snow interception by forest canopies and under canopy snow accumulation and ablation in mountain maritime climates are reported. The field study was further intended to provide data to develop and test models of forest canopy effects on beneath-canopy snowpack accumulation and melt and the plot and stand scales. Weighing lysimeters, cut-tree experiments, and manual snow surveys were deployed at a site in the Umpqua National Forest, Oregon (elevation 1200 m). A unique design for a weighing lysimeter was employed that allowed continuous measurements of snowpack evolution beneath a forest canopy to be taken at a scale unaffected by variability in canopy throughfall. Continuous observations of snowpack evolution in large clearings were made coincidentally with the canopy measurements. Large differences in snow accumulation and ablation were observed at sites beneath the forest canopy and in large clearings. These differences were not well described by simple relationships between the sites. Over the study period, approximately 60% of snowfall was intercepted by the canopy (up to a maximum of about 40 mm water equivalent). Instantaneous sublimation rates exceeded 0.5 mm per hour for short periods. However, apparent average sublimation from the intercepted snow was less than 1 mm per day and totaled approximately 100 mm per winter season. Approximately 72 and 28% of the remaining intercepted snow was removed as meltwater drip and large snow masses, respectively. Observed differences in snow interception rate and maximum snow interception capacity between Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii), white fir (Abies concolor), ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), and lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) were minimal.

  17. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products, measured as skin autofluorescence, in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; de Vries, Aiko P J; Lutgers, Helen L; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Huisman, Roel M; van Son, Willem J; de Jong, Paul E; Smit, Andries J

    2005-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate during renal failure and dialysis. Kidney transplantation is thought to reverse this accumulation by restoring renal function. Using a noninvasive and validated autofluorescence reader, we evaluated AGE levels in 285 transplant recipients (mean age, 52 years; range, 41 to 60 years), 32 dialysis patients (mean age, 56 years; range, 43 to 65 years), and 231 normal control subjects (mean age, 51 years; range, 40 to 65 years). Measurements in transplant recipients were performed for a mean of 73 months (range, 32 to 143 months) after transplantation. Dialysis patients were on dialysis therapy for a mean of 42 months (range, 17 to 107 months). Fluorescence was significantly increased in dialysis patients compared with normal control subjects (2.8 vs. 2.0 arbitrary units [a.u.], P < .0001). Although fluorescence levels were significantly decreased in transplant recipients compared with dialysis patients (2.5 vs. 2.8 a.u., P < .0001), fluorescence in transplant recipients was higher than in controls (2.5 vs. 2.0 a.u., P < .0001). In transplant recipients, fluorescence correlated positively with the duration of dialysis prior to transplantation (R = 0.21, P < .0001), and negatively with creatinine clearance (R = -0.34, P < .0001). No correlation was found between time after transplantation and fluorescence in transplant recipients (R = -0.10, P = .10). Fluorescence in dialysis patients was positively correlated with duration of dialysis (R = 0.36, P = .042). Our results, like those of others, suggest that kidney transplantation does not fully correct increased AGE levels found in dialysis patients. The increased AGE levels in kidney transplant recipients cannot be explained by the differences in renal function alone. The availability of a simple, noninvasive method (AGE-Reader) to measure AGE accumulation may be used to monitor AGE accumulation in a clinical setting as well as in a study setting.

  18. Accumulation of advanced glycation end products, measured as skin autofluorescence, in renal disease.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Jasper W L; de Vries, Aiko P J; Lutgers, Helen L; Meerwaldt, Robbert; Huisman, Roel M; van Son, Willem J; de Jong, Paul E; Smit, Andries J

    2005-06-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate during renal failure and dialysis. Kidney transplantation is thought to reverse this accumulation by restoring renal function. Using a noninvasive and validated autofluorescence reader, we evaluated AGE levels in 285 transplant recipients (mean age, 52 years; range, 41 to 60 years), 32 dialysis patients (mean age, 56 years; range, 43 to 65 years), and 231 normal control subjects (mean age, 51 years; range, 40 to 65 years). Measurements in transplant recipients were performed for a mean of 73 months (range, 32 to 143 months) after transplantation. Dialysis patients were on dialysis therapy for a mean of 42 months (range, 17 to 107 months). Fluorescence was significantly increased in dialysis patients compared with normal control subjects (2.8 vs. 2.0 arbitrary units [a.u.], P < .0001). Although fluorescence levels were significantly decreased in transplant recipients compared with dialysis patients (2.5 vs. 2.8 a.u., P < .0001), fluorescence in transplant recipients was higher than in controls (2.5 vs. 2.0 a.u., P < .0001). In transplant recipients, fluorescence correlated positively with the duration of dialysis prior to transplantation (R = 0.21, P < .0001), and negatively with creatinine clearance (R = -0.34, P < .0001). No correlation was found between time after transplantation and fluorescence in transplant recipients (R = -0.10, P = .10). Fluorescence in dialysis patients was positively correlated with duration of dialysis (R = 0.36, P = .042). Our results, like those of others, suggest that kidney transplantation does not fully correct increased AGE levels found in dialysis patients. The increased AGE levels in kidney transplant recipients cannot be explained by the differences in renal function alone. The availability of a simple, noninvasive method (AGE-Reader) to measure AGE accumulation may be used to monitor AGE accumulation in a clinical setting as well as in a study setting. PMID:16037252

  19. Measuring Transpiration to Regulate Winter Irrigation Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Samuelson, Lisa

    2006-11-08

    Periodic transpiration (monthly sums) in a young loblolly pine plantation between ages 3 and 6 was measured using thermal dissipation probes. Fertilization and fertilization with irrigation were better than irrigation alone in increasing transpiration of young loblolly pines during winter months, apparently because of increased leaf area in fertilized trees. Irrigation alone did not significantly increase transpiration compared with the non-fertilized and non-irrigated control plots.

  20. Rates of elementary reactions - Measurement and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, F.

    1985-01-01

    Techniques used for characterizing elementary chemical reaction kinetics are explored. Flash- or laser-photolysis (FP) involves producing reactive species on the psec time scale and monitoring the changes spectroscopically. In the discharge flow (DF) method, reactive species are produced continuously in a flow of an inert gas containing the reactants. FP avoids surface and transport effects, while DF allows several reactions to be studied in different regions of one flow. Transport and surface boundary layer models are defined for DF calculations and sample calculations are carried out to illustrate the difficulties inherent in theoretically defining the rate constants for elementary reactions. Applications of the models thus far derived in atmospheric science and combustion studies are discussed.

  1. The impact of EDTA on the rate of accumulation and root/shoot partitioning of cadmium in mature dwarf sunflowers.

    PubMed

    Meighan, Michelle M; Fenus, Taressa; Karey, Emma; MacNeil, Joseph

    2011-06-01

    In addition to increasing the mobility of metal ions in the soil solution, chelating agents such as EDTA have been reported to alter both the total metal accumulated by plants and its distribution within the plant structures. Here, mature Mini-Sun Hybrid dwarf sunflowers exposed to 300 μM Cd(2+) in hydroponic solution had initial translocation rates of at least 0.12 mmol kg(-1)h(-1) and reached leaf saturation levels within a day when a 3-fold molar excess of EDTA was used. EDTA also promoted cadmium transfer from roots to the shoots. A threefold excess of EDTA increased the translocation factor (TF) 100-fold, resulting in cadmium levels in the leaves of 580 μg g(-1) and extracting 1400 μg plant(-1). When plants were exposed to dissolved cadmium without EDTA, the vast majority of the metal remained bound to the exterior of the root. The initial accumulation could be successfully modeled with a standard biosorption pseudo second-order kinetic equation. Initial accumulation rates ranged from 0.0359 to 0.262 mg g(-1)min(-1). The cadmium binding could be cycled, and did not show evidence of saturation under the experimental conditions employed, suggesting it might be a viable biosorbant for aqueous cadmium.

  2. Net accumulation rates derived from ice core stable isotope records of Pío XI glacier, Southern Patagonia Icefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwikowski, M.; Schläppi, M.; Santibañez, P.; Rivera, A.; Casassa, G.

    2012-12-01

    Pío XI, the largest glacier of the Southern Patagonia Icefield, reached its neoglacial maximum extent in 1994 and is one of the few glaciers in that area which is not retreating. In view of the recent warming it is important to understand glacier responses to climate changes. Due to its remoteness and the harsh conditions in Patagonia, no systematic mass balance studies have been performed. In this study we derived net accumulation rates for the period 2000 to 2006 from a 50 m (33.2 4 m weq) ice core collected in the accumulation area of Pío XI (2600 m a.s.l., 49°16´40´´ S, 73°21´14´´ W). Borehole temperatures indicate near temperate ice, but the average melt percent is only 16% ± 14%. Records of stable isotopes are well preserved and were used for identification of annual layers. Net accumulation rates range from 3.4 to 7.1 water equivalent (m weq) with an average of 5.8 m weq, comparable to precipitation amounts at the Chilean coast, but not as high as expected for the Icefield. Ice core stable isotope data correlate well with upper air temperatures and may be used as temperature proxy.

  3. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  4. Strain accumulation in the Shumagin Islands: Results of initial GPS measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine M.; Lisowski, Michael

    1994-01-01

    Deformation in the Shumagin seismic gap has been monitored with repeated trilateration (EDM) in the 1980-1987 interval and with the Global Positioning System (GPS) in the 1987-1991 interval. The geodetic network extends for 100-km across the Shumagin Islands to the Alaska Peninsula. Results from the GPS surveys are consistent with those previously reported for the EDM surveys: we failed to detect significant strain accumulation in the N30 deg W direction of plate convergence. Using the method of simultaneous reduction for position and strain rates, we found the average rate of extension in the direction of plate convergence to be -25 +/- 25 nanostrain/yr (nstrain/yr) during the 1987-1991 interval of GPS surveys compared with -20 +/- 15 nstrain/yr during the 1981-1987 interval of complete EDM surveys. We found a marginally significant -26 +/- 12 nstrain/yr extension rate in the 1981-1991 interval covered by the combined EDM and GPS surveys. Strain rates are higher, but not significantly so, in the part of the network closest to the trench. Spatial variation in the deformation is observed in the 1980-1991 average station velocities, where three of the four stations closest to the trench have an arcward velocity of a few mm/yr. The observed strain rates are an order of magnitude lower than the -200 nstrain/yr rate predicted by dislocation models.

  5. Geologic ages and accumulation rates of basalt-flow groups and sedimentary interbeds in selected wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, S.R.; Liszewski, M.J.; Cecil, L.D.

    1997-01-01

    Geologic ages and accumulation rates, estimated from regressions, were used to evaluate measured ages and interpreted stratigraphic and structural relations of basalt and sediment in the unsaturated zone and the Snake River Plain aquifer at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) in eastern Idaho. Geologic ages and accumulation rates were estimated from standard linear regressions of 21 mean potassium-argon (K-Ar) ages, selected mean paleomagnetic ages, and cumulative depths of a composite stratigraphic section composed of complete intervals of basalt and sediment that were deposited in areas of past maximum subsidence. Accumulation rates also were estimated from regressions of stratigraphic intervals in three wells in and adjacent to an area of interpreted uplift at and near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) and the Test Reactor Area (TRA) to allow a comparison of rates in areas of past uplift and subsidence. Estimated geologic ages range from about 200 thousand to 1.8 million years before present and are reasonable approximations for the interval of basalt and sediment above the effective base of the aquifer, based on reported uncertainties of corresponding measured ages. Estimated ages between 200 and 800 thousand years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all 15 K-Ar ages used in regressions and two out of three -argon ({sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar) ages of duplicate argon samples. Two sets of estimated ages between 800 thousand and 1.8 million years are within the range of reported uncertainties for all seven K-Ar ages used in regressions, which include one shared age of about 800 thousand years. Two sets of ages were estimated for this interval because K-Ar ages make up two populations that agree with previous and revised ages of three paleomagnetic subchrons. The youngest set of ages is consistent with a K-Ar age from the effective base of the aquifer that agrees with previous ages of the Olduvai Normal-Polarity Subchron.

  6. Analysis of fullerene-C60 and kinetic measurements for its accumulation and depuration in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Tervonen, Kukka; Waissi, Greta; Petersen, Elijah J; Akkanen, Jarkko; Kukkonen, Jussi V K

    2010-05-01

    A simple method for analyzing masses of water suspended fullerenes (nC60) in Daphnia magna by extracting to toluene and measuring by ultraviolet-vis spectrophotometry was developed. This method was used to assess bioaccumulation and depuration rates by daphnia after nC60 exposure in artificial freshwater. Accumulation was rapid during the first few hours, and based on accumulation modeling, 90% of the steady-state concentration was reached in 21 h. After exposure for 24 h to a 2 mg/L fullerene solution, the daphnia accumulated 4.5+/-0.7 g/kg wet weight, or 0.45% of the organism wet mass. Daphnids exposed to 2 mg/L fullerenes for 24 h eliminated 46 and 74% of the accumulated fullerenes after depuration in clean water for 24 and 48 h, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the majority of the fullerenes present in the gut of daphnids were large agglomerates. The significant fullerene uptake and relatively slow depuration suggest that D. magna may play a role as a carrier of fullerene from one trophic level to another. Additionally, D. magna may impact the fate of suspended fullerene particles in aquatic ecosystems by their ability to pack fullerene agglomerates into larger particles than were found in the exposure water, and then excrete agglomerates that are not stable in water, causing them to settle out of solution. This process decreases fullerene exposure to other aquatic organisms in the water column but may increase exposure to benthic organisms in the sediment.

  7. Rates of plant succession, carbon and nitrogen accumulation in small-scale tundra chronosequences; an implication for climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, M.; Klaminder, J.

    2011-12-01

    The rate in which plants are able to colonize and build up soil organic carbon (SOC) and nitrogen (N) in soil are crucial in understanding the effect of environmental changes on high latitude ecosystems via plant community. In this presentation we present high-spatial-resolution data of plant colonization and SOC and N accumulation rates occurring on frost boils that are common in many periglacial landscapes. The diameters of each frost boil ranges from 1 to 3 meters. The distribution of plant community across a frost boil can be identified as a gradient of ongoing primary succession. The primary succession is initiated in the centre of the frost boil every time up-frozen soil is deposited on top of the surface. A subsequent lateral mass-movement of newly deposited soil from the centre of the frost boil towards the rim over time causes the surface soil and plant community to become progressively "older" from the centre towards the rim of the frost boil. In the presented work we constrain the age of the soil surface as a function of distance from the centre of the frost boil towards the rim by using lichenometry dating. With this investigation, we achieve soil age gradients (chronosequences) ranging from approximately from 0 to 300 years for meters-scale. We present data from northern Sweden where we have utilized this small-scale variation in soil age to understand how the accumulation rate of SOC and N varies over time in the upper 10 cm of the arctic soil and how the accumulation rates is affected by other ecosystem properties such as temperature, plant diversity, dominant plant functional groups and litter quality. Our key conclusions is that reduced soil frost actions, which is likely to accompany the predicted warming of the Scandinavian arctic, are likely to accelerate the colonization rate of vegetation that will enhance the accumulation of SOC and N. However, one likely side effect of this colonization into previously frost-disturbed system is the decline

  8. Accumulation Rates in the Dry Snow Zone of the Greenland Ice Sheet Inferred from L-band InSAR Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, A. C.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet contains about 2.9 million km3 of ice and would raise global sea levels by about 7.1 m if it melted completely. Two unusually large iceberg calving events at Petermann Glacier in the past several years, along with the unusually large extent of ice sheet melt this summer point to the relevance of understanding the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet. In this study, we use data from the PALSAR instrument aboard the ALOS satellite to form L-band (23-centimeter carrier wavelength) InSAR images of the dry snow zone of the Greenland ice sheet. We form geocoded differential interferograms, using the ice sheet elevation model produced by Howat et.al. [1]. By applying phase and radiometric calibration, we can examine interferograms formed between any pair of transmit and receive polarization channels. In co-polarized interferograms, the InSAR correlation ranges from about 0.35 at the summit (38.7 deg W, 73.0 deg N) where accumulation is about 20 cm w.e./yr to about 0.70 at the north-eastern part of the dry snow zone (35.1 deg W, 77.1 deg N), where accumulation is about 11.7 cm w.e./yr. Cross-polarized interferograms show similar geographic variation with overall lower correlation. We compare our InSAR data with in-situ measurements published by Bales et.al. [2]. We examine the applicability of dense-medium radiative transfer electromagnetic scattering models for estimating accumulation rates from L-band InSAR data. The large number and broad coverage of ALOS scenes acquired between 2007 and 2009 with good InSAR coherence at 46-day repeat times and 21.5 degree incidence angles gives us the opportunity to examine the empirical relationship between in-situ accumulation rate observations and the polarimetric InSAR correlation and radar brightness at this particular imaging geometry. This helps us quantify the accuracy of accumulation rates estimated from InSAR data. In some regions, 46-day interferograms acquired in the winters of several consecutive

  9. Sediment accumulation rates in Conowingo Reservoir as determined by man-made and natural radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    McLean, R.I.; Domotor, S.L. ); Summers, J.K.; Wilson, H. ); Olsen, C.R.; Larsen, I.L. )

    1991-05-01

    The Susquehanna River is the major contributor to sediment loadings in the Chesapeake Bay. Because many environmental contaminants are associated with suspended particulates, the degree of particle retention within the reservoirs of the lower Susquehanna River is an important consideration in evaluating contaminant loadings to the Chesapeake Bay. Profiles of weapons-test Cs-137, nuclear power plant-related Cs-134 and Cs-137, and naturally-derived Pb-210 were used to estimate rates of sediment accretion in the Conowingo Reservoir,an impoundmment of the Susquehanna River along the Maryland-Pennsylvania border. Net accretion rates ranged from about 2 cm yr{sup {minus}1} downstream of a nuclear power plant cooling discharge to a high of about 7 cm yr{sup {minus}1} at the mount of an incoming creek. Slight, but consistent, increases in the annual rate of accretion since the creation of the reservoir in 1928 are apparent. The current net average annual sediment load retained by the reservoir is estimated to be 0.4 {times} 10{sup 6} to 1.5 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tons yr{sup {minus}1}. The retained sediment load represents about 8-23% of the long-time average sediment input to the reservoir.

  10. Determination of lake sediment accumulation rates in an agricultural watershed using lead-210 and cesium-137

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Quantifying the impact of erosion control practices in watersheds remains a difficult problem. It is rare for the application of management practices to be followed by measurements that can indicate the effectiveness of practices. The expense and time associated with erosion monitoring, along with...

  11. A novel method for measurement of crystal growth rate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Do Yeon; Yang, Dae Ryook

    2013-06-01

    A new method for measurement of crystal growth rate is proposed, in an attempt to make the measuring of growth rate more convenient than the existing methods. In this newly proposed method, the point of nucleation under a constant cooling rate condition was measured as changing the amount of seeds. The growth kinetics parameters were then estimated using the experimental data to match the points of nucleation. Experiments were performed with potash alum in the water system and growth kinetic parameters were estimated. Compared with existing results, the proposed method showed tolerable discrepancy in the growth kinetic parameters. The proposed method can be an alternative technique for measurement of growth rate.

  12. Mass balance re-analysis of Findelengletscher, Switzerland; benefits of extensive snow accumulation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sold, Leo; Huss, Matthias; Machguth, Horst; Joerg, Philip; Leysinger Vieli, Gwendolyn; Linsbauer, Andreas; Salzmann, Nadine; Zemp, Michael; Hoelzle, Martin

    2016-02-01

    A re-analysis is presented here of a 10-year mass balance series at Findelengletscher, a temperate mountain glacier in Switzerland. Calculating glacier-wide mass balance from the set of glaciological point balance observations using conventional approaches, such as the profile or contour method, resulted in significant deviations from the reference value given by the geodetic mass change over a five-year period. This is attributed to the sparsity of observations at high elevations and to the inability of the evaluation schemes to adequately estimate accumulation in unmeasured areas. However, measurements of winter mass balance were available for large parts of the study period from snow probings and density pits. Complementary surveys by helicopter-borne ground-penetrating radar (GPR) were conducted in three consecutive years. The complete set of seasonal observations was assimilated using a distributed mass balance model. This model-based extrapolation revealed a substantial mass loss at Findelengletscher of -0.43m w.e. a^-1 between 2004 and 2014, while the loss was less pronounced for its former tributary, Adlergletscher (-0.30m w.e. a^-1). For both glaciers, the resulting time series were within the uncertainty bounds of the geodetic mass change. We show that the model benefited strongly from the ability to integrate seasonal observations. If no winter mass balance measurements were available and snow cover was represented by a linear precipitation gradient, the geodetic mass balance was not matched. If winter balance measurements by snow probings and snow density pits were taken into account, the model performance was substantially improved but still showed a significant bias relative to the geodetic mass change. Thus the excellent agreement of the model-based extrapolation with the geodetic mass change was owed to an adequate representation of winter accumulation distribution by means of extensive GPR measurements.

  13. Comparison of annual accumulation rates derived from in situ and ground penetrating radar methods across Alaskan glaciers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGrath, D.; Gusmeroli, A.; Oneel, S.; Sass, L. C.; Arendt, A. A.; Wolken, G. J.; Kienholz, C.; McNeil, C.

    2013-12-01

    Constraining annual snowfall accumulation in mountain glacier environments is essential for determining the annual mass balance of individual glaciers and predicting seasonal meltwater runoff to river and marine ecosystems. However, large spatial and elevation gradients, coupled with sparse point measurements preclude accurate quantification of this variable using traditional methods. Here, we report on an extensive field campaign conducted in March-May 2013 on key benchmark glaciers in Alaska, including Taku Glacier near Juneau, Scott Glacier near Cordova, both Eklutna and Wolverine Glacier near Anchorage and Gulkana Glacier in the interior Alaska Range. Over 50 km of 500 MHz common-offset ground penetrating radar (GPR) surveys were collected on each glacier, with an emphasis on capturing spatial variability in the accumulation zone. Frequent in situ observations were collected for comparison with the GPR, including probe depths, snow pits and shallow firn cores (~8 m). We report on spatial and elevation gradients across this suite of glaciers and across numerous climatic zones and discuss differences between GPR and in situ derived annual accumulation estimates. This comparison is an essential first step in order to effectively evaluate regional atmospheric re-analysis products.

  14. Effect of self-alkalization on nitrite accumulation in a high-rate denitrification system: Performance, microflora and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Li, Chen-Xu; Cai, Chao-Yang; Abbas, Ghulam; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The self-alkalization of denitrifying automatic circulation (DAC) reactor resulted in a large increase of pH up to 9.20 and caused a tremendous accumulation of nitrite up to 451.1 ± 49.0 mgN L(-1) at nitrate loading rate (NLR) from 35 kgN m(-3) d(-1) to 55 kgN m(-3) d(-1). The nitrite accumulation was greatly relieved even at the same NLR once the pH was maintained at 7.6 ± 0.2 in the system. Enzymatic assays indicated that the long-term bacterial exposure to high pH significantly inhibited the activity of copper type nitrite reductase (NirK) rather than the cytochrome cd1 type nitrite reductase (NirS). The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the dominant denitrifying bacteria shifted from the NirS-containing Thauear sp. 27 to the NirK-containing Hyphomicrobium nitrativorans strain NL23 during the self-alkalization. The significant nitrite accumulation in the high-rate denitrification system could be therefore, due to the inhibition of Cu-containing NirK by high pH from the self-alkalization. The results suggest that the NirK-containing H. nitrativorans strain NL23 could be an ideal functional bacterium for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, i.e. denitritation, which could be combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) to develop a new process for nitrogen removal from wastewater. PMID:26595097

  15. Effect of self-alkalization on nitrite accumulation in a high-rate denitrification system: Performance, microflora and enzymatic activities.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Shan, Xiao-Yu; Wang, Zhi-Yao; Lin, Xiao-Yu; Li, Chen-Xu; Cai, Chao-Yang; Abbas, Ghulam; Zhang, Meng; Shen, Li-Dong; Hu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhao, He-Ping; Zheng, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The self-alkalization of denitrifying automatic circulation (DAC) reactor resulted in a large increase of pH up to 9.20 and caused a tremendous accumulation of nitrite up to 451.1 ± 49.0 mgN L(-1) at nitrate loading rate (NLR) from 35 kgN m(-3) d(-1) to 55 kgN m(-3) d(-1). The nitrite accumulation was greatly relieved even at the same NLR once the pH was maintained at 7.6 ± 0.2 in the system. Enzymatic assays indicated that the long-term bacterial exposure to high pH significantly inhibited the activity of copper type nitrite reductase (NirK) rather than the cytochrome cd1 type nitrite reductase (NirS). The terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis revealed that the dominant denitrifying bacteria shifted from the NirS-containing Thauear sp. 27 to the NirK-containing Hyphomicrobium nitrativorans strain NL23 during the self-alkalization. The significant nitrite accumulation in the high-rate denitrification system could be therefore, due to the inhibition of Cu-containing NirK by high pH from the self-alkalization. The results suggest that the NirK-containing H. nitrativorans strain NL23 could be an ideal functional bacterium for the conversion of nitrate to nitrite, i.e. denitritation, which could be combined with anaerobic ammonium oxidation (Anammox) to develop a new process for nitrogen removal from wastewater.

  16. Rate of denitrification and the accumulation of intermediates in a denitrifying bioreactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsignault, D. R.; Gursky, H.; Kellogg, E. M.; Matilsky, T.; Murray, S.; Schreier, E.; Tananbaum, H.; Giacconi, R.; Brinkman, A. C.

    2012-12-01

    Denitrifying bioreactors (DNBRs) are an emerging mechanism to mitigate the impact of excess reactive nitrogen by harnessing the activity of ubiquitous denitrifying soil microbes. DNBRs fundamentally consist of an organic carbon energy source sufficiently saturated to develop anaerobic conditions and support heterotrophic reduction of nitrate to dinitrogen. Although recent research has well established achievable nitrate removal in DNBRs upwards of 90%, few studies experimentally determine the fate of nitrogen in these systems. This study differentiates between denitrification to inert nitrogen gas, which permanently removes reactive nitrogen from an enriched ecosystem, and transformation of nitrate to another bioavailable form (such as N2O or NOX, powerful greenhouse gases). Previous research has failed to make this distinction and as both are perceived as a reduction in nitrate concentration at the outlet, the utility of DNBRs in reducing downstream reactive nitrogen has not been sufficiently established. In order to quantify the rate of nitrate removal and the products produced, dissolved gas samples are collected from the DNBR with passive diffusion gas samplers while the influent and effluent nitrate concentration and chemical oxygen demand are monitored in real time with spectrometer probes. Nitrate removal is compared with the denitrification rate and the ratio of dinitrogen to nitrous oxide is reported. Denitrification is quantified from the proportion of nitrogen gas products produced from the nitrate pool, indicated by the negative congruence of the regression of 15N enrichment in the nitrate pool and temporal depletion in the gaseous products. The proportion of nitrous oxide to dinitrogen is examined with respect to saturation and redox potential. This research informs the interpretation of previous studies as well as advises the focus of long-term system level monitoring that will provide further information on the design and application of DNBRs to

  17. Measurement of seedling growth rate by machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, M. Scott; Stanwood, Phillip C.

    1993-05-01

    Seed vigor and germination tests have traditionally been used to determine deterioration of seed samples. Vigor tests describe the seed potential to emerge and produce a mature crop under certain field conditions and one measure is seedling growth rate. A machine vision system was developed to measure root growth rate over the entire germination period. The machine vision measurement technique was compared to the manual growth rate technique. The vision system provided similar growth rate measurements as compared to the manual growth rate technique. The average error between the system and a manual measurement was -0.13 for the lettuce test and -0.07 for the sorghum test. This technique also provided an accurate representation of the growth rate as well as percent germination.

  18. Variations in heavy metal accumulation, growth and yield of rice plants grown at different sewage sludge amendment rates.

    PubMed

    Singh, R P; Agrawal, M

    2010-05-01

    Use of sewage sludge in agriculture is an alternative disposal technique for this waste. The present field study was conducted to assess the suitability of sewage sludge amendment in soil for rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. Pusa sugandha 3) by evaluating the heavy metal accumulation, growth, biomass and yield responses of plants grown at 0, 3, 4.5, 6, 9, 12 kgm(-2) sewage sludge amendment (SSA) rate. Sewage sludge amendment modified the physico-chemical properties of soil, thus increasing the availability of heavy metals in soil and consequently with higher accumulation in plant parts. Root length decreased, whereas shoot length, number of leaves, leaf area and total biomass increased significantly when grown under various SSA rates. Yield of rice increased by 60%, 111%, 125%, 134% and 137% at 3, 4.5, 6, 9 and 12 kgm(-2) SSA, respectively, as compared to those grown in unamended soil. Sewage sludge amendment rates above 4.5 kgm(-2) though increased the yield of rice, but caused risk of food chain contamination as concentrations of Ni and Cd in rice grains were found to be above the Indian safe limits (1.5 mgkg(-1)) of human consumption above 4.5 kgm(-2) SSA and of Pb (2.5 mgkg(-1)) above 6 kgm(-2) SSA. Since aboveground parts of the rice also showed higher concentration than the permissible levels of Ni, Cd and Pb at 4.5 kgm(-2) SSA rate, it cannot be used as fodder. The rice husk may be used as bioresource for energy production. Efforts should be made to treat the effluents from small scale industries before discharge into the sewerage system.

  19. The Weathering of Antarctic Meteorites: Climatic Controls on Weathering Rates and Implications for Meteorite Accumulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoit, P. H.; Akridge, J. M. C.; Sears, D. W. G.; Bland, P. A.

    1995-01-01

    Weathering of meteorites includes a variety of chemical and mineralogical changes, including conversion of metal to iron oxides, or rust. Other changes include the devitrification of glass, especially in fusion crust. On a longer time scale, major minerals such as olivine, pyroxene, and feldspar are partially or wholly converted to various phyllosilicates. The degree of weathering of meteorite finds is often noted using a qualitative system based on visual inspection of hand specimens. Several quantitative weathering classification systems have been proposed or are currently under development. Wlotzka has proposed a classification system based on mineralogical changes observed in polished sections and Mossbauer properties of meteorite powders have also been used. In the current paper, we discuss induced thermoluminescence (TL) as an indicator of degree of weathering of individual meteorites. The quantitative measures of weathering, including induced TL, suffer from one major flaw, namely that their results only apply to small portions of the meteorite.

  20. Device accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Branum, L. W.

    1966-01-01

    Free-floating piston in a vertical column accurately measures and records low gas-flow rates. The system may be calibrated, using an adjustable flow-rate gas supply, a low pressure gage, and a sequence recorder. From the calibration rates, a nomograph may be made for easy reduction. Temperature correction may be added for further accuracy.

  1. Disjunct eddy accumulation flux measurements of individual VOCs from an urban environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velasco, Erik; Pressley, Shelley; Grivicke, Rasa; Allwine, Eugene; Jobson, B. Tom; Westberg, Hal; Molina, Luisa T.; Lamb, Brian

    2010-05-01

    As part of the MILAGRO-2006 study a flux tower was deployed at urban Mexico City to measure turbulent fluxes of trace gases. Fluxes of individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were measured using a disjunct eddy accumulation (DEA) sampler with ionization detector/gas chromatography (GC-FID) analysis. The DEA method partitions the air into two reservoirs based on the magnitude and direction of the vertical wind speed. The VOCs concentrations in both reservoirs are analyzed and used to determine the fluxes with the vertical wind velocities. Although this method is not as precise as other micrometeorological techniques, such as the eddy covariance method, it provides the ability to directly measure the fluxes of an extended number of individual species using off-line sensors without relying on similarity scaling or empirical parameters. According to our knowledge these measurements constitute the first time that the DEA method was applied in an urban environment. A comparison of the DEA fluxes of selected aromatic and olefinic species measured in parallel by the more accurate eddy covariance and disjunct eddy covariance techniques coupled with fast-response analytical sensors evidenced a flux under-prediction by the DEA method. However, this under-prediction was consistent and constant for the species compared, allowing an analysis of the DEA fluxes in terms of relative magnitudes and ratios. It was found that fluxes of alkane species were the dominant VOCs fluxes, which is consistent with ambient concentration measurements and the local emissions inventory. Among the top 20 mean VOCs fluxes measured during daytime, 11 corresponded to alkanes, followed by 5 aromatics, 2 olefins, 1 alkyne and 1 oxygenated.

  2. Measured rates of sedimentation: What exactly are we estimating, and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipper, John C.

    2016-06-01

    Data on rates of sedimentation are essential in studies of sedimentation systems. These data are obtained in three main study contexts: (1) the study of sedimentation systems that are active today, (2) the source-to-sink study of sedimentation systems that no longer are active, and (3) the study of the relationship between accumulation rate and measurement timespan. The aim of this paper is to question the meaning of measured rates of sedimentation, and their interpretability, particularly in these three contexts. Individual measurements of rate of sedimentation must always be interpreted with care. Firstly, there are different definitions, for instance with different statistical support or measurement dimension; values that are defined differently cannot be compared directly. Secondly, appropriate sampling schemes must have been used for the measurement; this minimises sampling bias. Thirdly, the inherent limitations of the data sources must be taken into account. Rates of sedimentation can usually be measured successfully in active sedimentation systems. The same is not true for systems that are no longer active; these can only be studied using the stratigraphic successions left behind. Rates of erosion can never be measured successfully in stratigraphic successions. Rate of sedimentation is essentially a ratio - an amount of sedimentation per length of time - therefore the obvious strategy to use in determining it is first to measure the amount and the time independently, then to combine the values. The amount can be measured in terms of thickness or volume or mass per unit area. The duration of the time interval can be preset using quasi-continuous measurement techniques or site reoccupation, or it can be identified from interval-specific sedimentary structures, or it can be measured using dated horizons. An alternative strategy is to use a surrogate measurement variable. Rates of erosion in ancient systems are usually measured in this way, using cosmogenic

  3. Measured rates of sedimentation: What exactly are we estimating, and why?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tipper, John C.

    2016-06-01

    Data on rates of sedimentation are essential in studies of sedimentation systems. These data are obtained in three main study contexts: (1) the study of sedimentation systems that are active today, (2) the source-to-sink study of sedimentation systems that no longer are active, and (3) the study of the relationship between accumulation rate and measurement timespan. The aim of this paper is to question the meaning of measured rates of sedimentation, and their interpretability, particularly in these three contexts. Individual measurements of rate of sedimentation must always be interpreted with care. Firstly, there are different definitions, for instance with different statistical support or measurement dimension; values that are defined differently cannot be compared directly. Secondly, appropriate sampling schemes must have been used for the measurement; this minimises sampling bias. Thirdly, the inherent limitations of the data sources must be taken into account. Rates of sedimentation can usually be measured successfully in active sedimentation systems. The same is not true for systems that are no longer active; these can only be studied using the stratigraphic successions left behind. Rates of erosion can never be measured successfully in stratigraphic successions. Rate of sedimentation is essentially a ratio - an amount of sedimentation per length of time - therefore the obvious strategy to use in determining it is first to measure the amount and the time independently, then to combine the values. The amount can be measured in terms of thickness or volume or mass per unit area. The duration of the time interval can be preset using quasi-continuous measurement techniques or site reoccupation, or it can be identified from interval-specific sedimentary structures, or it can be measured using dated horizons. An alternative strategy is to use a surrogate measurement variable. Rates of erosion in ancient systems are usually measured in this way, using cosmogenic

  4. Shallow Sediment Trace Metal Concentrations and Short-Term Accumulation Rates in the Neponset River Estuary, Massachusetts, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spencer, J. R.; Zhu, J.; Olsen, C. R.

    2010-12-01

    The Neponset River estuary is a small estuary that drains into the Boston Harbor on the east coast of the United States. It is also a highly urbanized estuary and has a long history of urban development over 450 years. In July 2006, six sediment cores were collected in the Neponset River estuary to examine particle dynamics and sediment accumulation via radionuclide (Beryllium-7) dating, and to determine sediment metal concentrations (As, Cu, Pb, and Zn) via ED-XRF measurements. Measured sediment Be-7 profiles indicate various sedimentation environments, where sediment accumulation, resuspension or redeposition is likely to occur. High metal concentrations were often corresponding to high Be-7 inventories in sediment cores. Possible sources of trace metal contaminants in the water column include: storm water run-off, Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs), a well-documented industrial pollution event that occurred upstream in the early to mid twentieth century, and the resuspension of sediment. Existing and future data will provide baseline information for quantifying the effects of the proposed and pending environmental restoration project, which includes the removal of the Baker Dam. The combined pre- and post-Dam removal data may then be used in cost-benefit analyses for other similar estuarine restoration projects.

  5. Measurement of tracheal mucous transport rate in the horse

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, R.; Hampe, D.W.

    1983-06-01

    Tracheal mucous transport rates were measured in 12 nonanesthetized horses after an intratracheal injection of 99mtechnetium-sulfur colloid. The transport rate of the subsequent bolus of radioactivity was determined, using a portable scaler rate meter fitted with a high-energy gamma-scintillation probe. A gamma-scintillation camera was used to verify bolus form and movement in 1 horse. The mean tracheal mucous transport rate was 1.66 +/- 0.24 cm/min.

  6. Biomass Accumulation Rates of Amazonian Secondary Forest and Biomass of Old-Growth Forests from Landsat Time Series and GLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, E.; Lefsky, M. A.; Roberts, D.

    2009-12-01

    We estimate the age of humid lowland tropical forests in Rondônia, Brazil, from a somewhat densely spaced time series of Landsat images (1975-2003) with an automated procedure, the Threshold Age Mapping Algorithm (TAMA), first described here. We then estimate a landscape-level rate of aboveground woody biomass accumulation of secondary forest by combining forest age mapping with biomass estimates from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Though highly variable, the estimated average biomass accumulation rate of 8.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 agrees well with ground-based studies for young secondary forests in the region. In isolating the lowland forests, we map land cover and general types of old-growth forests with decision tree classification of Landsat imagery and elevation data. We then estimate aboveground live biomass for seven classes of old-growth forest. TAMA is simple, fast, and self-calibrating. By not using between-date band or index differences or trends, it requires neither image normalization nor atmospheric correction. In addition, it uses an approach to map forest cover for the self-calibrations that is novel to forest mapping with satellite imagery; it maps humid secondary forest that is difficult to distinguish from old-growth forest in single-date imagery; it does not assume that forest age equals time since disturbance; and it incorporates Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) imagery. Variations on the work that we present here can be applied to other forested landscapes. Applications that use image time series will be helped by the free distribution of coregistered Landsat imagery, which began in December 2008, and of the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite (ICESat) Vegetation Product, which simplifies the use of GLAS data. Finally, we demonstrate here for the first time how the optical imagery of fine spatial resolution that is viewable on Google Earth provides a new source of reference data for remote sensing applications related to land cover

  7. Measuring radon exhalation rate in two cycles avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage.

    PubMed

    Tan, Yanliang; Xiao, Detao

    2013-10-01

    This paper will present a simple method for measuring the radon exhalation rate from the medium surface in two cycles and also avoiding the effects of back-diffusion and chamber leakage. The method is based on a combination of the "accumulation chamber" technique and a radon monitor. The radon monitor performs the measurement of the radon concentration inside the accumulation chamber, and then the radon exhalation rate can be obtained by simple calculation. For reducing the systematic error and the statistical uncertainty, too short of total measurement time is not appropriate, and the first cycle time should be about 70 % of the total measurement. The radon exhalation rate from the medium surface obtained through this method is in good agreement with the reference value. This simple method can be applied to develop and improve the instruments for measuring radon exhalation rate.

  8. Accumulation of Cd by the marine sponge Halichondria panicea pallas: Effects upon filtration rate and its relevance for biomonitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Olesen, T.M.E.; Weeks, J.M. )

    1994-05-01

    The marine demosponge Halichondria panicea Pallas, is a cosmopolitan species occurring in coastal waters with varied conditions of light, current, salinity and turbidity. H. panicea has a leuconoid structure and is composed of siliceous spicules and spongin fibers. Sponges are important members of many shallow water marine benthic communities, but comparatively little is known of their trace metal biology. Sponge architecture is constructed around a system of water canals and the physiology of the sponge is largely dependent on the currents of water flowing through their bodies. The volume of water pumped by a sponge is remarkable, ca. 100-1200 ml h[sup [minus]1] g[sup [minus]1]. This large volume of water passing through the body of a sponge means that most cells are in direct contact with the external medium. Many sponges are able to accumulate trace metals and are highly tolerant of such pollutants. This has led to the proposal that a [open quotes]sponge watch[close quotes] program be initiated supplementary to the existing [open quotes]mussel watch[close quotes] program. In view of the large volume of water passing through the bodies of sponges such as H. panicea, the suitability of this species as a biomonitoring organism was further investigated. This study describes the accumulation strategy of the demosponge H. panicea exposed to dissolved cadmium (Cd) and the effect of Cd upon sponge filtration rate.

  9. [Effects of nitrogen application rate on soil nitrate nitrogen accumulation under vegetable-paddy rice rotation system].

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Zhang, Ming-Qing; Kong, Qing-Bo; Yao, Bao-Quan

    2013-12-01

    A 2-year field experiment of mustard-cabbage-early rice rotation was conducted to investigate the effects of nitrogen application on yield and accumulation of nitrate nitrogen in the soil. The results showed that the applications of 150 kg N x hm(-2) for mustard and cabbage respectively and 90 kg N x hm(-2) for early rice were the best economic application mode, which could increase the net profit by 0.2%-75.6% compared with other application modes. Nitrogen application rates were positively correlated with NO3(-)-N concentration in the soil and in the percolating water. The vegetable-paddy rice rotation decreased the surplus of nitrogen in the soil. The average soil NO3(-)-N concentration was 29.7 mg x kg(-1) under the rotation of mustard-cabbage-early rice, which was only 84.4% of that under the continuous cropping of mustard-cabbage. The average NO3(-)-N concentration in the percolating water under mustard-cabbage-early rice rotation was little different from that in basal soil. Therefore, with the optimum nitrogen application mode, the vegetable-paddy rice rotation could gain the best economic benefit while significantly decrease the accumulation of nitrate nitrogen in the soil to effectively control non-point source pollution of nitrogen from vegetable fields.

  10. Dual Mode NOx Sensor: Measuring Both the Accumulated Amount and Instantaneous Level at Low Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Groß, Andrea; Beulertz, Gregor; Marr, Isabella; Kubinski, David J.; Visser, Jaco H.; Moos, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    The accumulating-type (or integrating-type) NOx sensor principle offers two operation modes to measure low levels of NOx: The direct signal gives the total amount dosed over a time interval and its derivative the instantaneous concentration. With a linear sensor response, no baseline drift, and both response times and recovery times in the range of the gas exchange time of the test bench (5 to 7 s), the integrating sensor is well suited to reliably detect low levels of NOx. Experimental results are presented demonstrating the sensor’s integrating properties for the total amount detection and its sensitivity to both NO and to NO2. We also show the correlation between the derivative of the sensor signal and the known gas concentration. The long-term detection of NOx in the sub-ppm range (e.g., for air quality measurements) is discussed. Additionally, a self-adaption of the measurement range taking advantage of the temperature dependency of the sensitivity is addressed. PMID:22736980

  11. Gas flow meter and method for measuring gas flow rate

    DOEpatents

    Robertson, Eric P.

    2006-08-01

    A gas flow rate meter includes an upstream line and two chambers having substantially equal, fixed volumes. An adjustable valve may direct the gas flow through the upstream line to either of the two chambers. A pressure monitoring device may be configured to prompt valve adjustments, directing the gas flow to an alternate chamber each time a pre-set pressure in the upstream line is reached. A method of measuring the gas flow rate measures the time required for the pressure in the upstream line to reach the pre-set pressure. The volume of the chamber and upstream line are known and fixed, thus the time required for the increase in pressure may be used to determine the flow rate of the gas. Another method of measuring the gas flow rate uses two pressure measurements of a fixed volume, taken at different times, to determine the flow rate of the gas.

  12. Hydrohalite in cold sea ice: Laboratory observations of single crystals, surface accumulations, and migration rates under a temperature gradient, with application to “Snowball Earth”

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Light, Bonnie; Brandt, Richard E.; Warren, Stephen G.

    2009-07-01

    When NaCl precipitates out of a saturated solution, it forms anhydrous crystals of halite at temperatures above +0.11°C, but at temperatures below this threshold it instead precipitates as the dihydrate "hydrohalite," NaCl · 2H2O. When sea ice is cooled, hydrohalite begins to precipitate within brine inclusions at about -23°C. In this work, hydrohalite crystals are examined in laboratory experiments: their formation, their shape, and their response to warming and desiccation. Sublimation of a sea ice surface at low temperature leaves a lag deposit of hydrohalite, which has the character of a fine powder. The precipitation of hydrohalite in brine inclusions raises the albedo of sea ice, and the subsequent formation of a surface accumulation further raises the albedo. Although these processes have limited climatic importance on the modern Earth, they would have been important in determining the surface types present in regions of net sublimation on the tropical ocean in the cold phase of a Snowball Earth event. However, brine inclusions in sea ice migrate downward to warmer ice, so whether salt can accumulate on the surface depends on the relative rates of sublimation and migration. The migration rates are measured in a laboratory experiment at temperatures from -2°C to -32°C; the migration appears to be too slow to prevent formation of a salt crust on Snowball Earth.

  13. 29 CFR 530.202 - Piece rates-work measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Piece rates-work measurement. 530.202 Section 530.202 Labor... Piece rates—work measurement. (a) No certificate will be issued pursuant to § 530.101 of subpart B to an... different types of items produced using stop watch time studies or other work measurement...

  14. 29 CFR 530.202 - Piece rates-work measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Piece rates-work measurement. 530.202 Section 530.202 Labor... Piece rates—work measurement. (a) No certificate will be issued pursuant to § 530.101 of subpart B to an... different types of items produced using stop watch time studies or other work measurement...

  15. 29 CFR 530.202 - Piece rates-work measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Piece rates-work measurement. 530.202 Section 530.202 Labor... Piece rates—work measurement. (a) No certificate will be issued pursuant to § 530.101 of subpart B to an... different types of items produced using stop watch time studies or other work measurement...

  16. 29 CFR 530.202 - Piece rates-work measurement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Piece rates-work measurement. 530.202 Section 530.202 Labor... Piece rates—work measurement. (a) No certificate will be issued pursuant to § 530.101 of subpart B to an... different types of items produced using stop watch time studies or other work measurement...

  17. Drinking water boosts food intake rate, body mass increase and fat accumulation in migratory blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla).

    PubMed

    Tsurim, Ido; Sapir, Nir; Belmaker, Jonathan; Shanni, Itai; Izhaki, Ido; Wojciechowski, Michał S; Karasov, William H; Pinshow, Berry

    2008-05-01

    Fat accumulation by blackcaps (Sylvia atricapilla) is a prerequisite for successful migratory flight in the autumn and has recently been determined to be constrained by availability of drinking water. Birds staging in a fruit-rich Pistacia atlantica plantation that had access to water increased their body mass and fat reserves both faster and to a greater extent than birds deprived of water. We conducted a series of laboratory experiments on birds captured during the autumn migration period in which we tested the hypotheses that drinking water increases food use by easing limitations on the birds' dietary choices and, consequently, feeding and food processing rates, and that the availability of drinking water leads to improved digestion and, therefore, to higher apparent metabolizable energy. Blackcaps were trapped in autumn in the Northern Negev Desert, Israel and transferred to individual cages in the laboratory. Birds were provided with P. atlantica fruit and mealworms, and had either free access to water (controls) or were water-deprived. In experiment 1, in which mealworm availability was restricted, water-deprived birds had a fourfold lower fruit and energy intake rates and, consequently, gained less fat and total mass than control birds. Water availability did not affect food metabolizability. In experiment 2, in which mealworms were provided ad libitum, water availability influenced the birds' diet: water-restricted birds ate more mealworms, while control birds consumed mainly P. atlantica fruit. Further, in experiment 2, fat and mass gain did not differ between the two treatment groups. We conclude that water availability may have important consequences for fat accumulation in migrating birds while they fatten at stopover sites, especially when water-rich food is scarce. Restricted water availability may also impede the blackcap's dietary shift from insectivory to frugivory, a shift probably necessary for successful pre-migratory fattening.

  18. Ground-based measurements of spatial and temporal variability of snow accumulation in East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eisen, Olaf; Frezzotti, Massimo; Genthon, Christophe; Isaksson, Elisabeth; Magand, Olivier; van den Broeke, Michiel R.; Dixon, Daniel A.; Ekaykin, Alexey; Holmlund, Per; Kameda, Takao; KarlöF, Lars; Kaspari, Susan; Lipenkov, Vladimir Y.; Oerter, Hans; Takahashi, Shuhei; Vaughan, David G.

    2008-06-01

    The East Antarctic Ice Sheet is the largest, highest, coldest, driest, and windiest ice sheet on Earth. Understanding of the surface mass balance (SMB) of Antarctica is necessary to determine the present state of the ice sheet, to make predictions of its potential contribution to sea level rise, and to determine its past history for paleoclimatic reconstructions. However, SMB values are poorly known because of logistic constraints in extreme polar environments, and they represent one of the biggest challenges of Antarctic science. Snow accumulation is the most important parameter for the SMB of ice sheets. SMB varies on a number of scales, from small-scale features (sastrugi) to ice-sheet-scale SMB patterns determined mainly by temperature, elevation, distance from the coast, and wind-driven processes. In situ measurements of SMB are performed at single points by stakes, ultrasonic sounders, snow pits, and firn and ice cores and laterally by continuous measurements using ground-penetrating radar. SMB for large regions can only be achieved practically by using remote sensing and/or numerical climate modeling. However, these techniques rely on ground truthing to improve the resolution and accuracy. The separation of spatial and temporal variations of SMB in transient regimes is necessary for accurate interpretation of ice core records. In this review we provide an overview of the various measurement techniques, related difficulties, and limitations of data interpretation; describe spatial characteristics of East Antarctic SMB and issues related to the spatial and temporal representativity of measurements; and provide recommendations on how to perform in situ measurements.

  19. Long-term phenological trends, species accumulation rates, aphid traits and climate: five decades of change in migrating aphids.

    PubMed

    Bell, James R; Alderson, Lynda; Izera, Daniela; Kruger, Tracey; Parker, Sue; Pickup, Jon; Shortall, Chris R; Taylor, Mark S; Verrier, Paul; Harrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain these using life-history traits. We then highlight emerging pests using accumulation patterns. Linear and nonlinear mixed-effect models estimated the average rate of change per annum and effects of climate on annual counts, first and last flights and length of flight season since 1965. Two climate drivers were used: the accumulated day degrees above 16 °C (ADD16) indicated the potential for migration during the aphid season; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) signalled the severity of the winter before migration took place. All 55 species studied had earlier first flight trends at rate of β = -0·611 ± SE 0·015 days year(-1). Of these species, 49% had earlier last flights, but the average species effect appeared relatively stationary (β = -0·010 ± SE 0·022 days year(-1)). Most species (85%) showed increasing duration of their flight season (β = 0·336 ± SE 0·026 days year(-1)), even though only 54% increased their log annual count (β = 0·002 ± SE <0·001 year(-1)). The ADD16 and NAO were shown to drive patterns in aphid phenology in a spatiotemporal context. Early in the year when the first aphids were migrating, the effect of the winter NAO was highly significant. Further into the year, ADD16 was a strong predictor. Latitude had a near linear effect on first flights, whereas longitude produced a generally less-clear effect on all responses. Aphids that are anholocyclic (permanently parthenogenetic) or are monoecious (non

  20. Long-term phenological trends, species accumulation rates, aphid traits and climate: five decades of change in migrating aphids

    PubMed Central

    Bell, James R; Alderson, Lynda; Izera, Daniela; Kruger, Tracey; Parker, Sue; Pickup, Jon; Shortall, Chris R; Taylor, Mark S; Verrier, Paul; Harrington, Richard

    2015-01-01

    1. Aphids represent a significant challenge to food production. The Rothamsted Insect Survey (RIS) runs a network of 12·2-m suction-traps throughout the year to collect migrating aphids. In 2014, the RIS celebrated its 50th anniversary. This paper marks that achievement with an extensive spatiotemporal analysis and the provision of the first British annotated checklist of aphids since 1964. 2. Our main aim was to elucidate mechanisms that advance aphid phenology under climate change and explain these using life-history traits. We then highlight emerging pests using accumulation patterns. 3. Linear and nonlinear mixed-effect models estimated the average rate of change per annum and effects of climate on annual counts, first and last flights and length of flight season since 1965. Two climate drivers were used: the accumulated day degrees above 16 °C (ADD16) indicated the potential for migration during the aphid season; the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) signalled the severity of the winter before migration took place. 4. All 55 species studied had earlier first flight trends at rate of β = −0·611 ± SE 0·015 days year−1. Of these species, 49% had earlier last flights, but the average species effect appeared relatively stationary (β = −0·010 ± SE 0·022 days year−1). Most species (85%) showed increasing duration of their flight season (β = 0·336 ± SE 0·026 days year−1), even though only 54% increased their log annual count (β = 0·002 ± SE <0·001 year−1). 5. The ADD16 and NAO were shown to drive patterns in aphid phenology in a spatiotemporal context. Early in the year when the first aphids were migrating, the effect of the winter NAO was highly significant. Further into the year, ADD16 was a strong predictor. Latitude had a near linear effect on first flights, whereas longitude produced a generally less-clear effect on all responses. Aphids that are anholocyclic (permanently parthenogenetic) or are monoecious (non-host-alternating) were

  1. Discharge rate measurements in a canal using radiotracer methods.

    PubMed

    Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Biswal, Jayashree; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K

    2016-06-01

    Discharge rates of water were measured in a canal using radiotracer methods with an objective to validate the efficacy of Concrete Volute Pumps (CVPs) installed at various pumping stations along the canal. Pulse velocity and dilution methods were applied to measure the discharge rates using Iodine-131 as a radiotracer. The discharge rate measured in one of the sections of the canal using the pulse velocity method was found to be 22.5m(3)/s, whereas the discharge rates measured using the dilution method in four different sections of the canal varied from 20.27 to 20.62m(3)/s with single CVP in operation. The standard error in discharge rate measurements using dilution method ranged from ±1.1 to ±1.8%. The experimentally measured values of the discharge rate were in good agreement with the design value of the discharge rate (20m(3)/s) thus validating the performance of the CVPs used in the canal. PMID:27016711

  2. Discharge rate measurements in a canal using radiotracer methods.

    PubMed

    Pant, H J; Goswami, Sunil; Biswal, Jayashree; Samantray, J S; Sharma, V K

    2016-06-01

    Discharge rates of water were measured in a canal using radiotracer methods with an objective to validate the efficacy of Concrete Volute Pumps (CVPs) installed at various pumping stations along the canal. Pulse velocity and dilution methods were applied to measure the discharge rates using Iodine-131 as a radiotracer. The discharge rate measured in one of the sections of the canal using the pulse velocity method was found to be 22.5m(3)/s, whereas the discharge rates measured using the dilution method in four different sections of the canal varied from 20.27 to 20.62m(3)/s with single CVP in operation. The standard error in discharge rate measurements using dilution method ranged from ±1.1 to ±1.8%. The experimentally measured values of the discharge rate were in good agreement with the design value of the discharge rate (20m(3)/s) thus validating the performance of the CVPs used in the canal.

  3. Remote measurement of cognitive stress via heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    McDuff, Daniel; Gontarek, Sarah; Picard, Rosalind

    2014-01-01

    Remote detection of cognitive load has many powerful applications, such as measuring stress in the workplace. Cognitive tasks have an impact on breathing and heart rate variability (HRV). We show that changes in physiological parameters during cognitive stress can be captured remotely (at a distance of 3m) using a digital camera. A study (n=10) was conducted with participants at rest and under cognitive stress. A novel five band digital camera was used to capture videos of the face of the participant. Significantly higher normalized low frequency HRV components and breathing rates were measured in the stress condition when compared to the rest condition. Heart rates were not significantly different between the two conditions. We built a person-independent classifier to predict cognitive stress based on the remotely detected physiological parameters (heart rate, breathing rate and heart rate variability). The accuracy of the model was 85% (35% greater than chance). PMID:25570611

  4. Confidence bands for measured economically optimal nitrogen rates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    While numerous researchers have computed economically optimal N rate (EONR) values from measured yield – N rate data, nearly all have neglected to compute or estimate the statistical reliability of these EONR values. In this study, a simple method for computing EONR and its confidence bands is descr...

  5. Processes and rates of sediment and wood accumulation in headwater streams of the Oregon Coast Range, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    May, Christine L.; Gresswell, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    Channels that have been scoured to bedrock by debris flows provide unique opportunities to calculate the rate of sediment and wood accumulation in low-order streams, to understand the temporal succession of channel morphology following disturbance, and to make inferences about processes associated with input and transport of sediment. Dendrochronology was used to estimate the time since the previous debris flow and the time since the last stand-replacement fire in unlogged basins in the central Coast Range of Oregon. Debris flow activity increased 42 per cent above the background rate in the decades immediately following the last wildfire. Changes in wood and sediment storage were quantified for 13 streams that ranged from 4 to 144 years since the previous debris flow. The volume of wood and sediment in the channel, and the length of channel with exposed bedrock, were strongly correlated with the time since the previous debris flow. Wood increased the storage capacity of the channel and trapped the majority of the sediment in these steep headwater streams. In the absence of wood, channels that have been scoured to bedrock by a debris flow may lack the capacity to store sediment and could persist in a bedrock state for an extended period of time. With an adequate supply of wood, low-order channels have the potential of storing large volumes of sediment in the interval between debris flows and can function as one of the dominant storage reservoirs for sediment in mountainous terrain.

  6. Passive flux sampler for measurement of formaldehyde emission rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shinohara, Naohide; Fujii, Minoru; Yamasaki, Akihiro; Yanagisawa, Yukio

    A new passive flux sampler (PFS) was developed to measure emission rates of formaldehyde and to determine emission sources in indoor environments. The sampler consisted of a glass Petri dish containing a 2,4-dinitrophenyl hydrazine (DNPH)-impregnated sheet. At the start of sampling, the PFS was placed with the open face of the dish on each of the indoor materials under investigation, such as flooring, walls, doors, closets, desks, beds, etc. Formaldehyde emitted from a source material diffused through the inside of the PFS and was adsorbed onto the DNPH sheet. The formaldehyde emission rates could be determined from the quantities adsorbed. The lower determination limits were 9.2 and 2.3 μg m -2 h -1 for 2- and 8-h sampling periods. The recovery rate and the precision of the PFS were 82.9% and 8.26%, respectively. The emission rates measured by PFS were in good agreement with the emission rates measured by the chamber method ( R2=0.963). This shows that it is possible to take measurements of the formaldehyde emission rates from sources in a room and to compare them. In addition, the sampler can be used to elucidate the emission characteristics of a source by carrying out emission measurements with different air-layer thicknesses inside the PFS and at different temperatures. The dependency of the emission rate on the thickness of the air layer inside the PFS indicated whether the internal mass transfer inside the source material or the diffusion in the gas-phase boundary layer controlled the formaldehyde emission rate from a material. In addition, as a pilot study, the formaldehyde emission rates were measured, and the largest emission source of formaldehyde could be identified from among several suspected materials in a model house by using the PFS.

  7. 40 CFR 86.1726-99 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lowest state-of-charge at the beginning of the test cycle. At no time throughout mileage accumulation... to this subpart: (1) For Otto-cycle and diesel vehicles and battery assisted combustion engine vehicles that use Otto-cycle or diesel engines: (i) Prior to initiation of mileage accumulation in...

  8. Estimating Rain Rates from Tipping-Bucket Rain Gauge Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Jianxin; Fisher, Brad L.; Wolff, David B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the cubic spline based operational system for the generation of the TRMM one-minute rain rate product 2A-56 from Tipping Bucket (TB) gauge measurements. Methodological issues associated with applying the cubic spline to the TB gauge rain rate estimation are closely examined. A simulated TB gauge from a Joss-Waldvogel (JW) disdrometer is employed to evaluate effects of time scales and rain event definitions on errors of the rain rate estimation. The comparison between rain rates measured from the JW disdrometer and those estimated from the simulated TB gauge shows good overall agreement; however, the TB gauge suffers sampling problems, resulting in errors in the rain rate estimation. These errors are very sensitive to the time scale of rain rates. One-minute rain rates suffer substantial errors, especially at low rain rates. When one minute rain rates are averaged to 4-7 minute or longer time scales, the errors dramatically reduce. The rain event duration is very sensitive to the event definition but the event rain total is rather insensitive, provided that the events with less than 1 millimeter rain totals are excluded. Estimated lower rain rates are sensitive to the event definition whereas the higher rates are not. The median relative absolute errors are about 22% and 32% for 1-minute TB rain rates higher and lower than 3 mm per hour, respectively. These errors decrease to 5% and 14% when TB rain rates are used at 7-minute scale. The radar reflectivity-rainrate (Ze-R) distributions drawn from large amount of 7-minute TB rain rates and radar reflectivity data are mostly insensitive to the event definition.

  9. Calibration of Observational Measurement of Rate of Responding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mudford, Oliver C.; Zeleny, Jason R.; Fisher, Wayne W.; Klum, Molly E.; Owen, Todd M.

    2011-01-01

    The quality of measurement systems used in almost all natural sciences other than behavior analysis is usually evaluated through calibration study rather than relying on interobserver agreement. We demonstrated some of the basic features of calibration using observer-measured rates of free-operant responding from 10 scripted 10-min calibration…

  10. Pictorial versus Verbal Rating Scales in Music Preference Measurement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeBlanc, Albert; Jin, Young Chang; Simpson, Charles S.; Stamou, Lelouda; McCrary, Jan

    1998-01-01

    Compares pictorial and verbal rating scales as measures of music preference opinions. Examines internal consistency and test-retest reliability of each type of scale, the overall preference scores generated through the use of each to measure preference for the same music stimuli, and student preferences for each type after using them. (DSK)

  11. Platelet Activation Due to Hemodynamic Shear Stresses: Damage Accumulation Model and Comparison to In Vitro Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Nobili, Matteo; Sheriff, Jawaad; Morbiducci, Umberto; Redaelli, Alberto; Bluestein, Danny

    2009-01-01

    The need to optimize the thrombogenic performance of blood recirculating cardiovascular devices, e.g., prosthetic heart valves (PHV) and ventricular assist devices (VAD), is accentuated by the fact that most of them require lifelong anticoagulation therapy that does not eliminate the risk of thromboembolic complications. The formation of thromboemboli in the flow field of these devices is potentiated by contact with foreign surfaces and regional flow phenomena that stimulate blood clotting, especially platelets. With the lack of appropriate methodology, device manufacturers do not specifically optimize for thrombogenic performance. Such optimization can be facilitated by formulating a robust numerical methodology with predictive capabilities of flow-induced platelet activation. In this study, a phenomenological model for platelet cumulative damage, identified by means of genetic algorithms (GAs), was correlated with in vitro experiments conducted in a Hemodynamic Shearing Device (HSD). Platelets were uniformly exposed to flow shear representing the lower end of the stress levels encountered in devices, and platelet activity state (PAS) was measured in response to six dynamic shear stress waveforms representing repeated passages through a device, and correlated to the predictions of the damage accumulation model. Experimental results demonstrated an increase in PAS with a decrease in “relaxation” time between pulses. The model predictions were in very good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:18204318

  12. Interseismic strain accumulation in south central Chile from GPS measurements, 1996-1999

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruegg, J. C.; Campos, J.; Madariaga, R.; Kausel, E.; de Chabalier, J. B.; Armijo, R.; Dimitrov, D.; Georgiev, I.; Barrientos, S.

    2002-06-01

    Two campaigns of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements were carried out in the Concepción-Constitución area of Chile in 1996 and 1999. It is very likely that this area is a mature seismic gap, since no subduction earthquake has occurred there since 1835. In 1996, 32 sites were occupied in the range 35°S-37°S, between the Pacific coast of Chile and the Andes near the Chile-Argentina border. In 1999, the network was extended by the installation of 9 new points in the Arauco region whereas 13 points among the 1996 stations were reoccupied. The analysis of this campaign data set, together with the data recorded at eight continuous GPS sites (mostly IGS stations) in South America and surrounding regions, indicates a velocity of about 40 +/- 10 mm/yr in the direction N80-90°S for the coastal sites with respect to stable cratonic South America. This velocity decreases to about 20-25 mm/yr towards the Andes. We interpret this result as reflecting interseismic strain accumulation above the Nazca-South America subduction zone, due to a locked thrust zone extending down to about 60 km depth.

  13. Modern rates of glacial sediment accumulation along a 15° S-N transect in fjords from the Antarctic Peninsula to southern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boldt, Katherine V.; Nittrouer, Charles A.; Hallet, Bernard; Koppes, Michele N.; Forrest, Brittany K.; Wellner, Julia S.; Anderson, John B.

    2013-12-01

    of glacial erosion in temperate climates rank among the highest worldwide, and the sedimentary products of such erosion record climatic and tectonic signals in many glaciated settings, as well as temporal changes in glacier behavior. Glacial sediment yields are expected to decrease with increasing latitude because decreased temperature and meltwater production reduce glacial sliding, erosion, and sediment transfer; however, this expectation lacks a solid supportive database. Herein we present modern 210Pb-derived sediment accumulation rates on decadal to century time scales for 12 fjords spanning 15° of latitude from the Antarctic Peninsula to southern Chile and interpret the results in light of glacimarine sediment accumulation worldwide. 210Pb records from the Antarctic Peninsula show surprisingly steady sediment accumulation throughout the past century at rates of 1-7 mm yr-1, despite rapid warming and glacial retreat. Cores from the South Shetland Islands reveal accelerated sediment accumulation over the past few decades, likely due to changes in the thermal state of the glaciers in this region, which straddles the boundary between subpolar and temperate conditions. In Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, sediment accumulates faster (11-24 mm yr-1), and previously collected seismic profiles show that rates reach meters per year close to the glacier termini. This increase in sediment accumulation rates with decreasing latitude reflects the gradient from subpolar to temperate climates and is consistent with glacial erosion being much faster in the temperate climate of southern Chile than in the polar climate of the Antarctic Peninsula.

  14. Measuring Outdoor Air Intake Rates into Existing Building

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William; Sullivan, Douglas; Cohen, Sebastian; Han, Hwataik

    2009-04-16

    Practical and accurate technologies are needed for continuously measuring and controlling outdoor air (OA) intake rates in commercial building heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. This project evaluated two new measurement approaches. Laboratory experiments determined that OA flow rates were measurable with errors generally less than 10 percent using electronic air velocity probes installed between OA intake louver blades or at the outlet face of louvers. High accuracy was maintained with OA flow rates as low as 15 percent of the maximum for the louvers. Thus, with this measurement approach HVAC systems do not need separate OA intakes for minimum OA supply. System calibration parameters are required for each unique combination of louver type and velocity sensor location but calibrations are not necessary for each system installation. The research also determined that the accuracy of measuring OA flow rates with velocity probes located in the duct downstream of the intake louver was not improved by installing honeycomb airflow straighteners upstream of the probes. Errors varied with type of upstream louver, were as high as 100 percent, and were often greater than 25 percent. In conclusion, use of electronic air velocity probes between the blades of OA intake louvers or at the outlet face of louvers is a highly promising means of accurately measuring rates of OA flow into HVAC systems. The use of electronic velocity probes downstream of airflow straighteners is less promising, at least with the relatively small OA HVAC inlet systems employed in this research.

  15. Measuring and Modeling Snow Accumulation, Movement, and Ablation in Colorado Shrublands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiemstra, C. A.; Liston, G. E.; Strack, J. E.; Elder, K.

    2004-12-01

    Basin shrublands, featuring Artemisia tridentata and Sarcobatus vermiculatus shrubs accompanied by various graminoids, are widespread constituents of intermountain western U.S. landscapes. These shrublands are characterized by spatially heterogeneous winter snow covers interrupted by transient melting periods. The spatial heterogeneity of snow in shrubland landscapes is determined by interactions among topography, wind, net radiation, and vegetation structure (shrub vs. graminoid canopy dominants). Transient melting periods are typically produced by intermittent warm and dry phases where snow melts over much of the landscape, especially in wind-scoured grassy areas where snow depths are relatively shallow. Because snow is an important factor in the annual water and energy budgets of shrublands, it is important to quantify and understand snow accumulation, movement, and ablation processes in these landscapes. We employed snow depth observations and a snow evolution modeling system (SnowModel) to quantify and simulate snow depths in North Park, an intermountain basin in Colorado. Observations and simulations focused on a 0.25 km2 study area centered on a 34 m tall meteorological tower deployed for the FLuxes Over Snow Surfaces (FLOSS) project (http://www.atd.ucar.edu/rtf/projects/floss/). Snow observations were measured along a series of transects, extending 400-600 m upwind of the tower, every 10 days from late December 2002 to late March 2003. The transects were designed to capture snow characteristics within shrub and graminoid cover types. Further, observations were used to parameterize and validate SnowModel. Hourly model simulations were performed from 1 October 2002 to 1 April 2003 using topographic, meteorological, and vegetation distribution data for the domain. Observed and modeled snow characteristics are described. Over 30,000 snow depth observations were collected during the field season. Snow cover in graminoid-dominated areas was shallow, less variable

  16. Fractal and complexity measures of heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Perkiömäki, Juha S; Mäkikallio, Timo H; Huikuri, Heikki V

    2005-01-01

    Heart rate variability has been analyzed conventionally with time and frequency domain methods, which measure the overall magnitude of RR interval fluctuations around its mean value or the magnitude of fluctuations in some predetermined frequencies. Analysis of heart rate dynamics by methods based on chaos theory and nonlinear system theory has gained recent interest. This interest is based on observations suggesting that the mechanisms involved in cardiovascular regulation likely interact with each other in a nonlinear way. Furthermore, recent observational studies suggest that some indexes describing nonlinear heart rate dynamics, such as fractal scaling exponents, may provide more powerful prognostic information than the traditional heart rate variability indexes. In particular, the short-term fractal scaling exponent measured by the detrended fluctuation analysis method has predicted fatal cardiovascular events in various populations. Approximate entropy, a nonlinear index of heart rate dynamics, that describes the complexity of RR interval behavior, has provided information on the vulnerability to atrial fibrillation. Many other nonlinear indexes, e.g., Lyapunov exponent and correlation dimensions, also give information on the characteristics of heart rate dynamics, but their clinical utility is not well established. Although concepts of chaos theory, fractal mathematics, and complexity measures of heart rate behavior in relation to cardiovascular physiology or various cardiovascular events are still far away from clinical medicine, they are a fruitful area for future research to expand our knowledge concerning the behavior of cardiovascular oscillations in normal healthy conditions as well as in disease states.

  17. Accuracy of real time radiography burning rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaniyi, Bisola

    The design of a solid propellant rocket motor requires the determination of a propellant's burning-rate and its dependency upon environmental parameters. The requirement that the burning-rate be physically measured, establishes the need for methods and equipment to obtain such data. A literature review reveals that no measurement has provided the desired burning rate accuracy. In the current study, flash x-ray modeling and digitized film-density data were employed to predict motor-port area to length ratio. The pre-fired port-areas and base burning rate were within 2.5% and 1.2% of their known values, respectively. To verify the accuracy of the method, a continuous x-ray and a solid propellant rocket motor model (Plexiglas cylinder) were used. The solid propellant motor model was translated laterally through a real-time radiography system at different speeds simulating different burning rates. X-ray images were captured and the burning-rate was then determined. The measured burning rate was within 1.65% of the known values.

  18. Lava effusion rate definition and measurement--A review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calvari, Sonia; Dehn, Jonathan; Harris, A.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of effusion rate is a primary objective for studies that model lava flow and magma system dynamics, as well as for monitoring efforts during on-going eruptions. However, its exact definition remains a source of confusion, and problems occur when comparing volume flux values that are averaged over different time periods or spatial scales, or measured using different approaches. Thus our aims are to: (1) define effusion rate terminology; and (2) assess the various measurement methods and their results. We first distinguish between instantaneous effusion rate, and time-averaged discharge rate. Eruption rate is next defined as the total volume of lava emplaced since the beginning of the eruption divided by the time since the eruption began. The ultimate extension of this is mean output rate, this being the final volume of erupted lava divided by total eruption duration. Whether these values are total values, i.e. the flux feeding all flow units across the entire flow field, or local, i.e. the flux feeding a single active unit within a flow field across which many units are active, also needs to be specified. No approach is without its problems, and all can have large error (up to ∼50%). However, good agreement between diverse approaches shows that reliable estimates can be made if each approach is applied carefully and takes into account the caveats we detail here. There are three important factors to consider and state when measuring, giving or using an effusion rate. First, the time-period over which the value was averaged; second, whether the measurement applies to the entire active flow field, or a single lava flow within that field; and third, the measurement technique and its accompanying assumptions.

  19. Angular-Rate Estimation using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  20. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Star Tracker Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I.; Deutschmann, Julie K.; Harman, Richard R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared, one that uses differentiated quatemion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quatemion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear rate dependent part of the rotational dynamics equation of a rigid body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself This decomposition, which is not unique, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft dynamics model as a linear one and, consequently, the application of a Pseudo-Linear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the Kalman gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to propagate and update the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the elaborate rotational dynamics by a simple first order Markov model is also examined. In this paper a special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quatemion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results of these tests are presented.

  1. Classifying work rate from heart rate measurements using an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Kolus, Ahmet; Imbeau, Daniel; Dubé, Philippe-Antoine; Dubeau, Denise

    2016-05-01

    In a new approach based on adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), field heart rate (HR) measurements were used to classify work rate into four categories: very light, light, moderate, and heavy. Inter-participant variability (physiological and physical differences) was considered. Twenty-eight participants performed Meyer and Flenghi's step-test and a maximal treadmill test, during which heart rate and oxygen consumption (VO2) were measured. Results indicated that heart rate monitoring (HR, HRmax, and HRrest) and body weight are significant variables for classifying work rate. The ANFIS classifier showed superior sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy compared to current practice using established work rate categories based on percent heart rate reserve (%HRR). The ANFIS classifier showed an overall 29.6% difference in classification accuracy and a good balance between sensitivity (90.7%) and specificity (95.2%) on average. With its ease of implementation and variable measurement, the ANFIS classifier shows potential for widespread use by practitioners for work rate assessment. PMID:26851475

  2. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    DOE PAGES

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for amore » single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.« less

  3. Parametric study of injection rates with solenoid injectors in an injection quantity and rate measuring device

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Stephen; Miles, Paul C.

    2015-03-31

    A Moehwald HDA (HDA is a German acronym: Hydraulischer Druckanstieg: hydraulic pressure increase) injection quantity and rate measuring unit is used to investigate injection rates obtained with a fast-acting, preproduction diesel solenoid injector. Experimental parametric variations are performed to determine their impact on measured injection rate traces. A pilot–main injection strategy is investigated for various dwell times; these preproduction injectors can operate with very short dwell times with distinct pilot and main injection events. Dwell influences the main injection rate shape. Furthermore, a comparison between a diesel-like fuel and a gasoline-like fuel shows that injection rates are comparable for a single injection but dramatically different for multiple injections with short dwells.

  4. High Pressure Burn Rate Measurements on an Ammonium Perchlorate Propellant

    SciTech Connect

    Glascoe, E A; Tan, N

    2010-04-21

    High pressure deflagration rate measurements of a unique ammonium perchlorate (AP) based propellant are required to design the base burn motor for a Raytheon weapon system. The results of these deflagration rate measurements will be key in assessing safety and performance of the system. In particular, the system may experience transient pressures on the order of 100's of MPa (10's kPSI). Previous studies on similar AP based materials demonstrate that low pressure (e.g. P < 10 MPa or 1500 PSI) burn rates can be quite different than the elevated pressure deflagration rate measurements (see References and HPP results discussed herein), hence elevated pressure measurements are necessary in order understand the deflagration behavior under relevant conditions. Previous work on explosives have shown that at 100's of MPa some explosives will transition from a laminar burn mechanism to a convective burn mechanism in a process termed deconsolidative burning. The resulting burn rates that are orders-of-magnitude faster than the laminar burn rates. Materials that transition to the deconsolidative-convective burn mechanism at elevated pressures have been shown to be considerably more violent in confined heating experiments (i.e. cook-off scenarios). The mechanisms of propellant and explosive deflagration are extremely complex and include both chemical, and mechanical processes, hence predicting the behavior and rate of a novel material or formulation is difficult if not impossible. In this work, the AP/HTPB based material, TAL-1503 (B-2049), was burned in a constant volume apparatus in argon up to 300 MPa (ca. 44 kPSI). The burn rate and pressure were measured in-situ and used to calculate a pressure dependent burn rate. In general, the material appears to burn in a laminar fashion at these elevated pressures. The experiment was reproduced multiple times and the burn rate law using the best data is B = (0.6 {+-} 0.1) x P{sup (1.05{+-}0.02)} where B is the burn rate in mm/s and

  5. A dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation system for long-term measurement of mercury flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterwalder, S.; Fritsche, J.; Alewell, C.; Schmutz, M.; Nilsson, M. B.; Jocher, G.; Sommar, J.; Rinne, J.; Bishop, K.

    2016-02-01

    The fate of anthropogenic emissions of mercury (Hg) to the atmosphere is influenced by the exchange of elemental Hg with the earth surface. This exchange holds the key to a better understanding of Hg cycling from local to global scales, which has been difficult to quantify. To advance research about land-atmosphere Hg interactions, we developed a dual-inlet, single detector relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) system. REA is an established technique for measuring turbulent fluxes of trace gases and aerosol particles in the atmospheric surface layer. Accurate determination of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM) fluxes has proven difficult due to technical challenges presented by extremely small concentration differences (typically < 0.5 ng m-3) between updrafts and downdrafts. We present an advanced REA design that uses two inlets and two pairs of gold cartridges for continuous monitoring of GEM fluxes. This setup reduces the major uncertainty created by the sequential sampling in many previous designs. Additionally, the instrument is equipped with a GEM reference gas generator that monitors drift and recovery rates. These innovations facilitate continuous, autonomous measurement of GEM flux. To demonstrate the system performance, we present results from field campaigns in two contrasting environments: an urban setting with a heterogeneous fetch and a boreal peatland during snowmelt. The observed average emission rates were 15 and 3 ng m-2 h-1, respectively. We believe that this dual-inlet, single detector approach is a significant improvement of the REA system for ultra-trace gases and can help to advance our understanding of long-term land-atmosphere GEM exchange.

  6. Particle sorting during sediment redistribution processes and the effect on 230Th-normalized mass accumulation rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcantonio, Franco; Lyle, Mitchell; Ibrahim, Rami

    2014-08-01

    The 230Th method of determining mass accumulation rates (MARs) assumes that little to no fractionation occurs during sediment redistribution processes at the seafloor. We examine 230Th inventories in radiocarbon-dated multicore sediments from paired winnowed and focused sites at Cocos and Carnegie Ridges, Panama Basin. Radiocarbon-derived sand MARs, which likely represent the vertical rain of particles poorly transported by bottom currents, are similar at each of the paired sites but are different using 230Th normalization. 230Th-normalized MARs are about 60% lower at focused sites and likely underestimate vertical MARs, while the reverse is true for winnowed sites. We hypothesize that size fractionation occurs most frequently at lower current velocities, resulting in the coarse fraction being left behind and primarily the fine 230Th-rich grains being transported downslope. 230Th-normalization works well for recording fine-grained (detrital and opal), but not coarse-grained (carbonate), fluxes in regions that have undergone sediment redistribution.

  7. Implications of Bishop Tuff zircon U-Pb ages for rates of zircon growth and magma accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reid, M. R.; Schmitt, A. K.

    2012-12-01

    Rates of geologic processes obtained from natural studies rely on accurate geochronologic information. An important benchmark in geochronology as well as a valuable source of insights into the evolution of voluminous explosive eruptions is the >600 km3 Bishop Tuff (BT). A recently determined weighted mean 206Pb/238U date of 767.1±0.9 ka for a BT zircon population [1] is indistinguishable from the recalibrated 40Ar/39Ar sanidine date of 767.4±2.2 ka [2], potentially providing a key intercalibration point between astronomical and radio-isotopic dating approaches. Consequences of these results are linear zircon growth rates of >1×10-14 cm/sec and magma accumulation rates of >200 km3/ka. In contrast, spatially selective SIMS U-Pb dating of BT zircons yielded mean pre-eruption ages of 850 ka [3], a difference that raises questions about the validity of intercalibration between U-Pb and K-Ar dating methods and the history of magma accumulation. We obtained new SIMS analyses of the BT zircons using more spatially and analytically sensitive methods and verifying our accuracy against the TIMS dated Quaternary zircon 61.308A (2.488±0.002 Ma). Analyses were performed on zircon rims and on oriented cross-sections exposed during optical interferometry-calibrated serial sectioning removing the outermost ~31 μm. Sputtering by a 100 nA ion beam versus the normally employed 10-12 nA beam resulted in enhanced radiogenic Pb yields and analytical uncertainties for Quaternary zircon approaching the U-Pb age reproducibility of the primary zircon standard (~1-2 % for AS3). Ages obtained at ~31 μm depth (representing <5% of crystal growth in most cases) average 892±26ka (MSWD=0.29), corroborating previous evidence for residence times of several tens of ka. Rim ages average 781±22 ka (MSWD=0.61), overlapping Ar/Ar determinations of eruption age and corroborating the importance of near-eruption aged zircon growth. Our results confirm the presence of BT zircon domains that predate

  8. Interseismic strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault measured using InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, R. J.; Parsons, B. E.; Wright, T. J.

    2010-12-01

    The North Anatolian Fault (NAF) is a major feature of Middle Eastern tectonics, facilitating the westwards 'escape' of the Anatolian block away from the Arabia-Eurasia continental collision. In order to understand the role that the NAF plays in regional tectonics it is important to accurately determine the slip rate across the fault. Many slip rate estimates for the NAF have been made over Quaternary and longer time-scales but few geodetic estimates currently exist, especially in eastern Turkey. Here we construct satellite radar interferograms using Envisat ASAR data to measure ground displacements around the NAF and hence estimate the slip rate across it. We make use of SAR data from two satellite tracks, one ascending and one descending, that overlap across the NAF, providing a check on the assumption of horizontal fault-parallel motion that has previously been used in interseismic modelling of the fault. We mitigate the effects of atmospheric errors by constructing multiple interferograms over the fault and summing them, effectively creating a longer timespan interferogram and improving the signal-to-noise ratio. We empirically correct for orbital errors by flattening the radar swaths on the Anatolian Plateau, an area with little expected deformation. Our measurements of rates of displacement are consistent with an interseismic model for the NAF where deformation occurs at depth on a narrow shear zone below a layer in which the fault is locked. We jointly invert data from both satellite tracks to solve for best fitting model parameters, estimating both the slip rate and the depth to which the fault is locked. Our best-fitting model gives a slip rate of 23 mm/yr and a locking depth of 19 km, which is in agreement with a previous estimate made from a single track of ERS SAR data (Wright et al., 2001, GRL 28, 2117-2120), and with existing GPS data. We also construct a velocity field using a combination of InSAR and GPS data for eastern Turkey.

  9. Modern sediment characteristics and accumulation rates from the delta front to prodelta of the Yellow River (Huanghe)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liangyong; Liu, Jian; Saito, Yoshiki; Gao, Maosheng; Diao, Shaobo; Qiu, Jiandong; Pei, Shaofeng

    2016-08-01

    Since 1976, the main channel of the Yellow River (Huanghe) has been on the east side of the delta complex, and the river has prograded a broad new delta lobe in Laizhou Bay of the Bohai Sea. In 2012, extensive bathymetric and high-resolution seismic profiles were conducted and sediment cores were collected off the new delta lobe. This study examined delta sedimentation and morphology along a profile across the modern subaqueous Yellow River delta and into Laizhou Bay, by analyzing sediment radionuclides (137Cs, 210Pb and 7Be), sedimentary structure, grain-size composition, organic carbon content, and morphological changes between 1976 and 2012. The change in the bathymetric profile, longitudinal to the river's course, reveals subaqueous delta progradation during this period. The subbottom boundary between the new delta lobe sediment and the older seafloor sediment (before the 1976 course shift) was identified in terms of lithology and radionuclide distributions, and recognized as a downlap surface in the seismic record. The accumulation rate of the new delta lobe sediment is estimated to be 5-18.6 cm year-1 on the delta front slope, 2 cm year-1 at the toe of the slope, and 1-2 cm year-1 in the shelf areas of Laizhou Bay. Sediment facies also change offshore, from alternations of gray and brown sediment in the proximal area to gray bioturbated fine sediment in the distal area. Based on 7Be distribution, the shorter-term deposition rate was at least 20 cm year-1 in the delta front.

  10. SECONDARY ELECTRON EMISSION MEASUREMENTS FOR TIN COATING ON THE STAINLESS STEEL OF SNS ACCUMULATOR RING VACUUM CHAMBER.

    SciTech Connect

    HE,P.HSEUH,H.C.TODD,R.J.ET AL.

    2004-07-05

    BNL is responsible for the design and construction of the US Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) accumulator ring. Titanium Nitride (TiN) coating on the stainless steel vacuum chamber of the SNS accumulator ring is needed to reduce the secondary electron yield (SEY) and the undesirable resonant multiplication of electrons. The total SEY of TiN coated stainless steel material has been measured after coating samples were exposed to air and after electron and ion bombardment. We report here about TiN coating system setup at BNL and SEY measurements results at CERN, SLAC and KEK. We also present some simulation results of SNS accumulator ring electron-cloud effects using different SEY values.

  11. Direct measurement of spin accumulation in the Cu layer due to spin currents from Co

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukreja, Roopali

    Spin transport is the key for reading or writing bits in spintronic devices by utilizing the Giant Magnetoresistance effect or the spin transfer torque effect. Spin currents have also been shown to play important role in the ultrafast manipulation of magnetization via all optical switching. Hence, detailed understanding of spin currents from ferromagnet to non-magnets is a crucial step in development of spintronic devices. However, directly observing these spin currents is extremely challenging due to magnetic moment injected into non-magnet being very small, less than 1/10000 of a regular ferromagnet. In this talk, I will present our recent measurements on the spin currents from a thin film Co ferromagnet into non-magnetic Cu metal in a nanopillar device. We have developed an extremely sensitive spectro-microscopy detection method based on element specific x-ray magnetic circular dichroism where current pulses driving the spin currents into the Cu layer are synchronized with the synchrotron x-ray photons. The sensitivity of this `lock-in' technique has allowed us to detect the extremely small transient Cu magnetization. We observe two spin currents induced effects in the Cu layer. The first effect is the transiently induced magnetization which occurs in bulk of the Cu layer due to spin accumulation and has a magnitude of 0.00003 μB per atom. The second effect occurs at the Co/Cu interface where we observe a 10% increase or 0.004 μB per atom for the hybridized Cu atoms due to spin torque-alignment.

  12. Interseismic strain accumulation in seismic gap of south central Chile from GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudloff, A.; Vigny, C.; Ruegg, J. C.; Campos, J.

    2003-04-01

    Three campaigns of Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements were carried out in the Concepcion-Constitucion seismic gap in South Central Chile in 1996, 1999, and 2002. We observed a network of about 40 sites, made of 2 east-west transects roughly perpendicular to the trench ranging from the coastal area to the Argentina border and 1 north-south profile along the coast. Data sets were processed with MIT's GAMIT/GLOBK package. Horizontal velocities have formal uncertainties around 1 to 2 mm/yr in average. Vertical velocities are also determined and have uncertainties around 2 to 5 mm/yr. We find that the convergence between Nazca and South-America plates better matches the pole previously estimated by (Larson et al, 1997) than the Nuvel-1A estimate. Our estimate predicts a convergence of 72 mm/yr at N70 to be compared with Nuvel-1A 80 mm/yr at N79. With respect to stable South America, horizontal velocities decrease from 35 mm/yr on the coast to 14 mm/yr in the Cordillera. Vertical velocities help constraint lithospheric flecture. Partionning of the slightly oblique convergence will be investigated. The gradient of convergent parallel velocities reflects aseismic elastic loading on a zone of about 400 km width. Interestingly enough, this gradient exhibit a linear pattern, marginally compatible with the expected arctangent shape. 70 mm/yr of motion accumulated since the last big event in this area (1835 Earthquake described by Darwin) represent more than 10 m of displacement. Therefore, this area is probably mature for a next large earthquake, the magnitude of which could reach 8.5.

  13. Low Velocity Difference Thermal Shear Layer Mixing Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bush, Robert H.; Culver, Harry C. M.; Weissbein, Dave; Georgiadis, Nicholas J.

    2013-01-01

    Current CFD modeling techniques are known to do a poor job of predicting the mixing rate and persistence of slot film flow in co-annular flowing ducts with relatively small velocity differences but large thermal gradients. A co-annular test was devised to empirically determine the mixing rate of slot film flow in a constant area circular duct (D approx. 1ft, L approx. 10ft). The axial rate of wall heat-up is a sensitive measure of the mixing rate of the two flows. The inflow conditions were varied to simulate a variety of conditions characteristic of moderate by-pass ratio engines. A series of air temperature measurements near the duct wall provided a straightforward means to measure the axial temperature distribution and thus infer the mixing rate. This data provides a characterization of the slot film mixing rates encountered in typical jet engine environments. The experimental geometry and entrance conditions, along with the sensitivity of the results as the entrance conditions vary, make this a good test for turbulence models in a regime important to modern air-breathing propulsion research and development.

  14. Measurements of neutron dose rates with a balloon in Japan.

    PubMed

    Nagaoka, K; Hiraide, I; Sato, K; Yamagami, T; Nakamura, T; Yabutani, T

    2007-01-01

    Measurements of cosmic-ray neutron dose rates with a balloon in Sanriku, Japan (geographic location: 39 degrees N, 142 degrees E; corresponding geomagnetic latitude: 30 degrees N) were conducted at an altitude from 0.2 to 25 km on 25-26 August 2004 when solar activity was at an average level. Neutron dose rates given as ambient dose equivalent rates (H(10)) were measured with high-sensitive neutron dose equivalent counters and electronic silicon personal dosimeters (EPDs). The neutron dose rates increased with increasing altitude, but they were saturated around 15-20 km and decreased with increasing altitude beyond 20 km. The neutron ambient dose equivalent rate was 1.5 microSv/h(- 1) at 20 km. Measured values were corrected for the deviation of the energy response of the dose equivalent counter from the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent conversion coefficient, and the corrected values were very close to the calculated values with EPCARD. On the other hand, neutron measurements by the EPDs gave about 10 times overestimation because of the high sensitivity to cosmic-ray protons.

  15. Effects of frame rate and image resolution on pulse rate measured using multiple camera imaging photoplethysmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackford, Ethan B.; Estepp, Justin R.

    2015-03-01

    Non-contact, imaging photoplethysmography uses cameras to facilitate measurements including pulse rate, pulse rate variability, respiration rate, and blood perfusion by measuring characteristic changes in light absorption at the skin's surface resulting from changes in blood volume in the superficial microvasculature. Several factors may affect the accuracy of the physiological measurement including imager frame rate, resolution, compression, lighting conditions, image background, participant skin tone, and participant motion. Before this method can gain wider use outside basic research settings, its constraints and capabilities must be well understood. Recently, we presented a novel approach utilizing a synchronized, nine-camera, semicircular array backed by measurement of an electrocardiogram and fingertip reflectance photoplethysmogram. Twenty-five individuals participated in six, five-minute, controlled head motion artifact trials in front of a black and dynamic color backdrop. Increasing the input channel space for blind source separation using the camera array was effective in mitigating error from head motion artifact. Herein we present the effects of lower frame rates at 60 and 30 (reduced from 120) frames per second and reduced image resolution at 329x246 pixels (one-quarter of the original 658x492 pixel resolution) using bilinear and zero-order downsampling. This is the first time these factors have been examined for a multiple imager array and align well with previous findings utilizing a single imager. Examining windowed pulse rates, there is little observable difference in mean absolute error or error distributions resulting from reduced frame rates or image resolution, thus lowering requirements for systems measuring pulse rate over sufficient length time windows.

  16. Non-contact Laser-based Human Respiration Rate Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scalise, L.; Marchionni, P.; Ercoli, I.

    2011-08-01

    At present the majority of the instrumentation, used in clinical environments, to measure human respiration rate are based on invasive and contact devices. The gold standard instrument is considered the spirometer which is largely used; it needs a direct contact and requires a collaboration by the patient. Laser Doppler Vibrometer (LDVi) is an optical, non-contact measurement system for the assessment of a surface velocity and displacement. LDVi has already been used for the measurement of the cardiac activity and for the measurement of the chest-wall displacements. The aims of this work are to select the best measurement point on the thoracic surface for LDVi monitoring of the respiration rate (RR) and to compare measured data with the RR valued provided by the spirometer. The measurement system is composed by a LDV system and a data acquisition board installed on a PC. Tests were made on 10 different point of the thorax for each patient. Patients population was composed by 33 subjects (17 male and 16 female). The optimal measurement point was chosen considering the maximum peak-to-peak value of the displacement measured by LDV. Before extracting RR we have used a special wavelet decomposition for better selection of the expiration peaks. A standard spirometer was used for the validation of the data. From tests it results that the optimal measurement point, namely is located on the inferior part of the thoracic region (left, front side). From our tests we have obtained a close correlation between the RR values measured by the spirometer and those measured by the proposed method: a difference of 14±211 ms on the RR value is reported for the entire population of 33 subjects. Our method allows a no-contact measurement of lungs activity (respiration period), reducing the electric and biological risks. Moreover it allows to measure in critical environment like in RMN or in burned skin where is difficult or impossible to apply electrodes.

  17. Measurement of diffusion coefficients from solution rates of bubbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krieger, I. M.

    1979-01-01

    The rate of solution of a stationary bubble is limited by the diffusion of dissolved gas molecules away from the bubble surface. Diffusion coefficients computed from measured rates of solution give mean values higher than accepted literature values, with standard errors as high as 10% for a single observation. Better accuracy is achieved with sparingly soluble gases, small bubbles, and highly viscous liquids. Accuracy correlates with the Grashof number, indicating that free convection is the major source of error. Accuracy should, therefore, be greatly increased in a gravity-free environment. The fact that the bubble will need no support is an additional important advantage of Spacelab for this measurement.

  18. Dissolution rate measurements for resist processing in supercritical carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Victor Q.; Weibel, Gina L.; Rao, Nagesh G.; Ober, Christopher K.

    2002-07-01

    A dissolution rate monitor (DRM) was successfully constructed to study the behavior of thin photoresist films undergoing the dissolution process in supercritical carbon dioxide (SCCO2). The DRM is based on the principles of interferometry but requires special modifications to the processing vessel to allow for the passage of transmitted and reflected He-Ne laser light. Dissolution rates obtained agree well with independent profilometric measurements of film thickness loss. We found that for block and random copolymers of THPMA-F7MA, dissolution rates vary with film thickness, slowing down considerably towards the silicon surface. This behavior was also observed in TBMA-F7MA random copolymers.

  19. Flow Rate Measurements Using Flow-Induced Pipe Vibration

    SciTech Connect

    R. P. Evans; Jonathan D. Blotter; Alan G. Stephens

    2004-03-01

    This paper focuses on the possibility of a non-intrusive, low cost, flow rate measurement technique. The technique is based on signal noise from an accelerometer attached to the surface of the pipe. The signal noise is defined as the standard deviation of the frequency averaged time series signal. Experimental results are presented that indicate a nearly quadratic relationship between the signal noise and mass flow rate in the pipe. It is also shown that the signal noise - flow rate relationship is dependant on the pipe material and diameter.

  20. Angular-Rate Estimation Using Delayed Quaternion Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azor, R.; Bar-Itzhack, I. Y.; Harman, R. R.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents algorithms for estimating the angular-rate vector of satellites using quaternion measurements. Two approaches are compared one that uses differentiated quaternion measurements to yield coarse rate measurements, which are then fed into two different estimators. In the other approach the raw quaternion measurements themselves are fed directly into the two estimators. The two estimators rely on the ability to decompose the non-linear part of the rotas rotational dynamics equation of a body into a product of an angular-rate dependent matrix and the angular-rate vector itself. This non unique decomposition, enables the treatment of the nonlinear spacecraft (SC) dynamics model as a linear one and, thus, the application of a PseudoLinear Kalman Filter (PSELIKA). It also enables the application of a special Kalman filter which is based on the use of the solution of the State Dependent Algebraic Riccati Equation (SDARE) in order to compute the gain matrix and thus eliminates the need to compute recursively the filter covariance matrix. The replacement of the rotational dynamics by a simple Markov model is also examined. In this paper special consideration is given to the problem of delayed quaternion measurements. Two solutions to this problem are suggested and tested. Real Rossi X-Ray Timing Explorer (RXTE) data is used to test these algorithms, and results are presented.

  1. Magnetic Implosion for Novel Strength Measurements at High Strain Rates

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.; Preston, D.L.; Bartsch, R.R.; Bowers, R.L.; Holtkamp, D.; Wright, B.L.

    1998-10-19

    Recently Lee and Preston have proposed to use magnetic implosions as a new method for measuring material strength in a regime of large strains and high strain rates inaccessible to previously established techniques. By its shockless nature, this method avoids the intrinsic difficulties associated with an earlier approach using high explosives. The authors illustrate how the stress-strain relation for an imploding liner can be obtained by measuring the velocity and temperature history of its inner surface. They discuss the physical requirements that lead us to a composite liner design applicable to different test materials, and also compare the code-simulated prediction with the measured data for the high strain-rate experiments conducted recently at LANL. Finally, they present a novel diagnostic scheme that will enable us to remove the background in the pyrometric measurement through data reduction.

  2. VOC flux measurements using a novel Relaxed Eddy Accumulation GC-FID system in urban Houston, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, C.; Schade, G.; Boedeker, I.

    2008-12-01

    Houston experiences higher ozone production rates than most other major cities in the US, which is related to high anthropogenic VOC emissions from both area/mobile sources (car traffic) and a large number of petrochemical facilities. The EPA forecasts that Houston is likely to still violate the new 8-h NAAQS in 2020. To monitor neighborhood scale pollutant fluxes, we established a tall flux tower installation a few kilometers north of downtown Houston. We measure energy and trace gas fluxes, including VOCs from both anthropogenic and biogenic emission sources in the urban surface layer using eddy covariance and related techniques. Here, we describe a Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) system combined with a dual-channel GC-FID used for VOC flux measurements, including first results. Ambient air is sampled at approximately 15 L min-1 through a 9.5 mm OD PFA line from 60 m above ground next to a sonic anemometer. Subsamples of this air stream are extracted through an ozone scrubber and pushed into two Teflon bag reservoirs, from which they are transferred to the GC pre-concentration units consisting of carbon-based adsorption traps encapsulated in heater blocks for thermal desorption. We discuss the performance of our system and selected measurement results from the 2008 spring and summer seasons in Houston. We present diurnal variations of the fluxes of the traffic tracers benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes (BTEX) during different study periods. Typical BTEX fluxes ranged from -0.36 to 3.10 mg m-2 h-1 for benzene, and -0.47 to 5.04 mg m-2 h-1 for toluene, and exhibited diurnal cycles with two dominant peaks related to rush-hour traffic. A footprint analysis overlaid onto a geographic information system (GIS) will be presented to reveal the dominant emission sources and patterns in the study area.

  3. A High Frequency Response Relaxed Eddy Accumulation Flux Measurement System for Sampling Short-Lived Biogenic Volatile Organic Compounds

    EPA Science Inventory

    A second-generation relaxed eddy accumulation system was built and tested with the capability to measure vertical biogenic volatile organic compound (VOC) fluxes at levels as low as 10 µg C m−2 hr−1. The system features a continuous, integrated gas-phase ozo...

  4. Mauna Loa lava accumulation rates at the Hilo drill site: Formation of lava deltas during a period of declining overall volcanic growth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lipman, P.W.; Moore, J.G.

    1996-01-01

    Accumulation rates for lava flows erupted from Mauna Loa, as sampled in the uppermost 280 m of the Hilo drill hole, vary widely for short time intervals (several thousand years), but overall are broadly similar to those documented elsewhere on this volcano since 100 ka. Thickness variations and accumulation rates for Mauna Loa lavas at the Hilo drill site have been strongly affected by local paleotopography, including funneling and ponding between Mauna Kea and Kilauea. In addition, gentle submerged slopes of Mauna Kea in Hilo Bay have permitted large shoreline displacements by Mauna Loa flows. Ages of eruptive intervals have been determined from published isotopic data and from eustatic sea level curves modified to include the isostatic subsidence of the island of Hawaii at 2.2-2.6 mm/yr. Prior to 10 ka, rates of Mauna Loa lava accumulation at the drill site varied from 0.6 to 4.3 mm/yr for dateable intervals, with an overall rate of 1.8 mm/yr. Major eruptive pulses at about 1.3 and 10 ka, each probably representing a single long-lived eruption based on lack of weathering between flow units, increase the overall accumulation rate to 2.4 mm/yr. The higher rate since 10 ka reflects construction of thick near-shoreline lava deltas as postglacial sea levels rose rapidly. Large lava deltas form only along coastal segments where initially subaerial slopes have been submerged by the combined effects of eustatic sea level rise, isostatic subsidence, or spreading of volcano flanks. Overall accumulation of 239 m of lava at the drill site since 100-120 ka closely balances submergence of the Hilo area, suggesting that processes of coastal lava deposition have been modulated by rise in sea level. The Hilo accumulation rate is slightly higher than average rates of 1-2 mm/yr determined elsewhere along the Mauna Loa coast, based on rates of shoreline coverage and dated sea cliff and fault scarp exposures. Low rates of coastal lava accumulation since 100 ka, near or below the rate

  5. Linking the Annual Variation of Snow Radar-derived Accumulation in West Antarctica to Long-term Automatic Weather Station Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, B.; Braaten, D. A.; Gogineni, P.; Paden, J. D.; Leuschen, C.; Purdon, K.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the snow accumulation rate on polar ice sheets is important in assessing mass balance and ice sheet contribution to sea level rise. Measuring annual accumulation on a regional scale and extending back in time several decades has been accomplished using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Snow Radar on the NASA DC-8 that is part of NASA's Ice-Bridge project. The Snow Radar detects and maps near-surface internal layers in polar firn, operating from 2- 6 GHz and providing a depth resolution of ~4 cm. During November 2011, Snow Radar data were obtained for large areas of West Antarctica, including a flight segment that passed within ~70 km of Byrd Station (80°S, 119°W). Byrd Station has a very long automatic weather station (AWS) record, extending from present to 1980, with 3 relatively brief gaps in the record. The AWS data for Byrd Station were obtained from the Antarctic Meteorological Research Center (AMRC) at the University of Wisconsin. The L1B Snow Radar data products, available from the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC), were analyzed using layer picking software to obtain the depth of reflectors in the firn that are detected by the radar. These reflectors correspond to annual markers in the firn, and allow annual accumulation to be determined. Using the distance between the reflectors and available density profiles from ice cores, water equivalent accumulation for each annual layer back to 1980 is obtained. We are analyzing spatial variations of accumulation along flight lines, as well as variations in the time series of annual accumulation. We are also analyzing links between annual accumulation and surface weather observations from the Byrd Station AWS. Our analyses of surface weather observations have focused on annual temperature, atmospheric pressure and wind extremes (e.g. 5th and 95th percentiles) and links to annual snow accumulation. We are also examining satellite-derived sea ice extent records for the

  6. Heart rate measurement based on face video sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fang; Zhou, Qin-Wu; Wu, Peng; Chen, Xing; Yang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Hong-jian

    2015-03-01

    This paper proposes a new non-contact heart rate measurement method based on photoplethysmography (PPG) theory. With this method we can measure heart rate remotely with a camera and ambient light. We collected video sequences of subjects, and detected remote PPG signals through video sequences. Remote PPG signals were analyzed with two methods, Blind Source Separation Technology (BSST) and Cross Spectral Power Technology (CSPT). BSST is a commonly used method, and CSPT is used for the first time in the study of remote PPG signals in this paper. Both of the methods can acquire heart rate, but compared with BSST, CSPT has clearer physical meaning, and the computational complexity of CSPT is lower than that of BSST. Our work shows that heart rates detected by CSPT method have good consistency with the heart rates measured by a finger clip oximeter. With good accuracy and low computational complexity, the CSPT method has a good prospect for the application in the field of home medical devices and mobile health devices.

  7. Variation of Accumulation Rates Over the Last Eight Centuries on the East Antarctic Plateau Derived from Volcanic Signals in Ice Cores

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anschuetz, H.; Sinisalo, A.; Isaksson, E.; McConnell, J. R.; Hamran, S.-E.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Pasteris, D.; Neumann, T. A.; Winther, J.-G.

    2011-01-01

    Volcanic signatures in ice-core records provide an excellent means to date the cores and obtain information about accumulation rates. From several ice cores it is thus possible to extract a spatio-temporal accumulation pattern. We show records of electrical conductivity and sulfur from firn cores from the Norwegian-USA scientific traverse during the International Polar Year 2007-2009 (IPY) through East Antarctica. Major volcanic eruptions are identified and used to assess century-scale accumulation changes. The largest changes seem to occur in the most recent decades with accumulation over the period 1963- 2007/08 being up to 25 % different from the long-term record. There is no clear overall trend, some sites show an increase in accumulation over the period 1963 to present while others show a decrease. Almost all of the sites above 3200 m above sea level (asl) suggest a decrease. These sites also show a significantly lower accumulation value than large-scale assessments both for the period 1963 to present and for the long-term mean at the respective drill sites. The spatial accumulation distribution is influenced mainly by elevation and distance to the ocean (continentality), as expected. Ground-penetrating radar data around the drill sites show a spatial variability within 10-20 % over several tens of kilometers, indicating that our drill sites are well representative for the area around them. Our results are important for large-scale assessments of Antarctic mass balance and model validation.

  8. [Effects of nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density on cotton boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation in extremely early maturing cotton region of Northeast China].

    PubMed

    Wang, Zi-Sheng; Wu, Xiao-Dong; Gao, Xiang-Bin; Xu, Min; Shen, Dan; Jin, Lu-Lu; Zhou, Zhi-Guo

    2012-02-01

    Taking cotton cultivars Liaomian 19 and NuCoTN 33B as test materials, a field experiment was conducted to study the effects of nitrogen fertilization rate (0, 240 and 480 kg x hm(-2)) and planting density (75000, 97500 and 120000 plants x hm(-2)) on the boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation in the extremely early maturing cotton region of Northeast China. With the growth and development of cotton, the biomass and nitrogen accumulation of cotton boll, cotton seed, and cotton fiber varied in 'S' shape. Both nitrogen fertilization rate and planting density had significant effects on the dynamic characteristics of boll biomass and nitrogen accumulation, and on the fiber yield and quality. In treatment 240 kg x hm(-2) and 97500 plants x hm(-2), the biomass of single boll, cotton seed and cotton fiber was the maximum, the starting time and ending time of the rapid accumulation period of the biomass and nitrogen were earlier but the duration of the accumulation was shorter, the rapid accumulation speed of the biomass was the maximum, and the distribution indices of the biomass and nitrogen were the lowest in boll shell but the highest in cotton seed and cotton fiber.

  9. Building Fluent Performance: Measuring Response Rate and Multiplying Response Opportunities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Carl

    2010-01-01

    Precision teaching emerged from O.R. Lindsley's pristine application of Skinner's natural science of behavior, with a focus on response rate measurement and free operant procedures. When applied with human learners in instructional settings, these first principles led to a series of developments framed in this paper as four kinds of ceilings that…

  10. A Simple Device to Measure Root Growth Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rauser, Wilfried E.; Horton, Roger F.

    1975-01-01

    Describes construction and use of a simple auxanometer which students can use to accurately measure root growth rates of intact seedlings. Typical time course data are presented for the effect of ethylene and indole acetic acid on pea root growth. (Author/BR)

  11. Measuring respiration rates in marine fish larvae: challenges and advances.

    PubMed

    Peck, M A; Moyano, M

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic costs can be extremely high in marine fish larvae and gaining reliable estimates of the effects of intrinsic and extrinsic factors on those costs is important to understand environmental constraints on early growth and survival. This review provides an historical perspective of measurements of larval marine fish respiration (O2 consumption) including the methods (Winkler, manometric, polarographic, paramagnetic and optodes) and systems (closed system to intermittent-flow) used. This study compares and systematically reviews the results (metabolic rates, ontogenetic changes and taxonomic differences) obtained from 59 studies examining 53 species from 30 families. Standard (anaesthetized or darkness), routine and active respiration rates were reported in 14, 94 and 8% of the studies and much more work has been performed on larvae of temperate (88%) compared with tropical (9%) and polar (3%) species. More than 35% of the studies have been published since 2000 owing to both advances in oxygen sensors and the growing emphasis on understanding physiological effects of environmental change. Common protocols are needed to facilitate cross-taxa comparisons such as the effect of temperature (Q10 : 1·47-3·47), body mass (slope of allometric changes in O2 consumption rate from 0·5 to 1·3) and activity level on metabolic costs as measured via respiration rate. A set of recommendations is provided that will make it easier for researchers to design measurement systems, to judge the reliability of measurements and to make inter-comparisons among studies and species.

  12. An improved method of measuring heart rate using a webcam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Ouyang, Jianfei; Yan, Yonggang

    2014-09-01

    Measuring heart rate traditionally requires special equipment and physical contact with the subject. Reliable non-contact and low-cost measurements are highly desirable for convenient and comfortable physiological self-assessment. Previous work has shown that consumer-grade cameras can provide useful signals for remote heart rate measurements. In this paper a simple and robust method of measuring the heart rate using low-cost webcam is proposed. Blood volume pulse is extracted by proper Region of Interest (ROI) and color channel selection from image sequences of human faces without complex computation. Heart rate is subsequently quantified by spectrum analysis. The method is successfully applied under natural lighting conditions. Results of experiments show that it takes less time, is much simpler, and has similar accuracy to the previously published and widely used method of Independent Component Analysis (ICA). Benefitting from non-contact, convenience, and low-costs, it provides great promise for popularization of home healthcare and can further be applied to biomedical research.

  13. Digital heart rate measurement based on Atmega16L

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoqing; Feng, Lishuang; Wang, Jiqiang

    2008-02-01

    The photoelectric heart rate meter reported in this paper picks up heart rate signals with a photoelectric cell, converts them into standard TTL pulse signal, and sends them into the input capture interface of a single-chip computer Atmega16L. Its input capture register can capture the Timer/Counter value at a given external (edge triggered) event on the input capture pin (ICP1) of T/C1. The counter number is sent into T/C1's input capture register ICR1 after the voltage of the input capture pin ICP1 jumped according to the program setting. The single-chip computer catches the input pulse signal as some numerical values of Timer/Counter (T/C1) and works out a single heart rate cycle and displays by three seven segment tubes, which are the peripheral equipments of the single-chip computer. ICCAVR integrated compiler is applied to assemble and compile the software programs of the heart rate meter. After the programs compiled successfully, a HEX file is produced and downloaded into the single chip computer by software SLISP. This photoelectric heart rate meter can measure the people heart rate efficiently with measurement range of 10-200 times per minute, precision of +/- 1%, low cost and reliable performance.

  14. Measuring Femtosecond Collisional Ionization Rates in Solid-Density Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinko, Sam; Ciricosta, Orlando; Hollebon, Patrick; Preston, Thomas; Wark, Justin; Burian, Tomas; Chalupsky, Jaromir; Vozda, Vojtech; Dakovski, Georgi; Minitti, Michael; Zastrau, Ulf

    2015-11-01

    The rate at which atoms and ions within a plasma are further ionized by collisions with free electrons is a fundamental parameter that dictates the dynamics of plasma systems at intermediate and high densities. While collisional ionization rates are well known experimentally in a few dilute systems, similar measurements for non-ideal plasmas at densities approaching or exceeding those of solids remain elusive. Here we illustrate a spectroscopic method capable of measuring rates of collisional ionization dynamics in solid-density plasmas by clocking them to Auger recombination processes. We have recently employed this technique on the LCLS X-ray free-electron laser at SLAC and will present the first experimental results for optically-thin, solid-density magnesium plasmas at peak temperatures exceeding 200 eV.

  15. Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

    1997-10-31

    We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

  16. Simultaneous measurement of breathing rate and heart rate using a microbend multimode fiber optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhihao; Lau, Doreen; Teo, Ju Teng; Ng, Soon Huat; Yang, Xiufeng; Kei, Pin Lin

    2014-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate the feasibility of using a highly sensitive microbend multimode fiber optic sensor for simultaneous measurement of breathing rate (BR) and heart rate (HR). The sensing system consists of a transceiver, microbend multimode fiber, and a computer. The transceiver is comprised of an optical transmitter, an optical receiver, and circuits for data communication with the computer via Bluetooth. Comparative experiments conducted between the sensor and predicate commercial physiologic devices showed an accuracy of ±2 bpm for both BR and HR measurement. Our preliminary study of simultaneous measurement of BR and HR in a clinical trial conducted on 11 healthy subjects during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) also showed very good agreement with measurements obtained from conventional MR-compatible devices.

  17. Contact-free heart rate measurement using multiple video data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Pang-Chan; Lee, Kual-Zheng; Tsai, Luo-Wei

    2013-10-01

    In this paper, we propose a contact-free heart rate measurement method by analyzing sequential images of multiple video data. In the proposed method, skin-like pixels are firstly detected from multiple video data for extracting the color features. These color features are synchronized and analyzed by independent component analysis. A representative component is finally selected among these independent component candidates to measure the HR, which achieves under 2% deviation on average compared with a pulse oximeter in the controllable environment. The advantages of the proposed method include: 1) it uses low cost and high accessibility camera device; 2) it eases users' discomfort by utilizing contact-free measurement; and 3) it achieves the low error rate and the high stability by integrating multiple video data.

  18. Influence of the rate of ethanol production and accumulation on the viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in "rapid fermentation".

    PubMed

    Nagodawithana, T W; Steinkraus, K H

    1976-02-01

    Whereas "rapid fermentation" of diluted clover honey (25 degrees Brix) fortified with yeast nutrients using 8 X 10(8) brewers' yeast cells per ml resulted in an ethanol content of 9.5% (wt/vol; 12% vol/vol) in 3 h at 30 C, death rate of the yeast cells during this period was essentially logarithmic. Whereas 6 h was required to reach the same ethanol content at 15 C, the yeast cells retained their viability. Using a lower cell population (6 X 10(7) cells/ml), a level at which the fermentation was no longer "rapid," the yeast cells also retained their viability at 30 C. Ethanol added to the medium was much less lethal than the same or less quantities of ethanol produced by the cell in "rapid fermentation." It was considered possible that ethanol was produced so rapidly at 30 C that it could not diffuse out of the cell as rapidly as it was formed. The hypothesis was postulated that ethanol accumulating in the cell was contributing to the high death rate at 30 C. It was found that the intracellular ethanol concentration reached a level of approximately 2 X 10(11) ethanol molecules/cell in the first 30 min of fermentation at 30 C. At 15 C, with the same cell count, intracellular ethanol concentration reached a level of approximately 4 X 10(10) ethanol molecules/cell and viability remained high. Also, at 30 C with a lower cell population (6 X 10(7) cells/ml), under which conditions fermentation was no longer "rapid," intracellular ethanol concentration reached a similar level (4 X 10(10) molecules ethanol/cell) and the cells retained their viability. Alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) lost its activity in brewers' yeast under conditions of "rapid fermentation" at 30 C but retained its activity in cells under similar conditions at 15 C. ADH activity was also retained in fermentations at 30 C with cell populations of 6 X 10(7)/ml. It would appear that an intracellular level of about 5 X 10(10) ethanol molecules/cell is normal and that this level does not damage either cell

  19. 40 CFR 86.004-26 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENGINES General Provisions for Emission Regulations for 1977 and Later Model Year New Light-Duty Vehicles, Light-Duty Trucks and Heavy-Duty Engines, and for 1985 and Later Model Year New Gasoline Fueled, Natural... to heavy-duty engines. (2) Two types of service accumulation are applicable to heavy-duty engines,...

  20. MAVEN Measurements of the Ion Escape Rate from Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brain, Dave; Dong, Yaxue; Fortier, Kier; Fang, Xiaohua; McFadden, James; Halekas, Jasper; Connerney, Jack; Eparvier, Frank; Dong, Chuanfei; Bougher, Stephen; Ma, Yingjuan; Modolo, Ronan; Lillis, Rob; Luhmann, Janet; Curry, Shannon; Seki, Kanako; Jakosky, Bruce

    2015-04-01

    The loss of atmospheric particles (neutral atoms, neutral molecules, ions) to space is thought to have played a role in the evolution of Martian climate over the past ~4 billion years. Due to the lack of a global magnetic field on Mars, the solar wind has direct access to the upper layers of the Martian atmosphere, and can drive non-thermal escape of charged particles (ions) from the atmosphere. Two spacecraft (Phobos 2 and Mars Express) have previously measured escaping ions at Mars. The recently arrived MAVEN spacecraft is equipped with instruments to measure escaping ions with high time cadence and high energy and mass resolution, as well as instruments to provide contextual information about what controls the variation in escape rates. We report on the total escape rate of heavy planetary ions from the Martian atmosphere measured by MAVEN. Heavy ions are identified in data from the SupraThermal And Thermal Ion Composition (STATIC) instrument. Rudimentary estimates of ion escape rate are obtained by summing the measured ion fluxes over a surface downstream from Mars with respect to the solar wind flow. This estimate can then be refined to account for the limited field of view of the instrument (investigation of measured particle distributions) and the limited spatial coverage of the spacecraft orbit trajectory. Variability in measured escape rates can also be grouped according to upstream conditions and the orientation of Mars (and its crustal magnetic fields) with respect to the solar wind. Important upstream drivers include the solar Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) flux, solar wind pressure, and the interplanetary magnetic field strength and direction. These drivers are measured directly by MAVEN's EUV, SWIA, and MAG instruments. We will provide an initial estimate of ion escape rates based on the first several months of MAVEN data. We will then report on progress to refine these estimates to correct for instrument field of view and spacecraft coverage effects, as

  1. Dissolution rate measurements of TiN in Ti-6242

    SciTech Connect

    Bewlay, B.P.; Gigliotti, M.F.X.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes measurements of the dissolution rate of nitrided Ti sponge and monolithic TiN rod in molten Ti-6242. The dissolution rate is described in terms of an interface recession rate that was 2.2 {micro}m/s for a Ti-6242 temperature of 1,725 C and dissolution times between 1 and 100 min. Similar dissolution rates were measured for nitrided sponge and monolithic rod. This report also descries the microstructural and chemical interdiffusion phenomena that occur during dissolution of solid {delta}TiN in molten Ti-6242. There is a N-containing solid {alpha}Ti layer and a N-solidified {beta}Ti layer between the solid {delta}TiN and liquid Ti-6242 during dissolution. Microprobe measurements indicate that diffusion of Al, Zr, Sn and Mo into {delta}TiN did not occur. Steep N concentration profiles were observed in the {alpha}Ti layer. Al, Zr, Sn and Mo were observed in the N-solidified {beta}Ti layer contained <1% N. Similar microstructural and interdiffusional behaviors were observed during dissolution of nitrided sponge and monolithic {delta}TiN rod in molten Ti-6242.

  2. Measuring the Rate of Lava Effusion by InSAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadge, G.

    2004-06-01

    The rate at which lava emerges from a volcano is a fundamental property of the dynamics of the eruption. Intensive field measurements can capture this. However, for many, often cloud-covered, volcanoes with long-lived eruptions, spaceborne InSAR provides a potentially useful source of information. Repeated DEM creation at intervals allows the changing thickness of the lava flow field to be measured and incremental changes to calculate the volumetric lava flux rate. ERS data from (i) an andesitic lava dome eruption at Soufri re Hills, Montserrat , and (ii) a basaltic andesite lava flow-field at Arenal volcano, Costa Rica illustrate the method. There are two main limitations. Firstly, flowing or otherwise thermo- mechanically unstable surfaces that are active between interferogram pair acquisitions leads to decorrelation. This effect is particularly difficult on lava domes where the surface is extremely dynamic. Compound lava flow-fields are more tractable. Secondly, very slight motions on flows that have "stopped" can be confused with topography in repeat-pass interferograms. The InSAR-measured rate of lava effusion at Arenal fits well with rates calculated by other methods over the last 30 years. Radar systems best suited to this task should be L-band, have short orbit repeat intervals and moderate perpendicular baselines.

  3. PRECEDENTS FOR AUTHORIZATION OF CONTENTS USING DOSE RATE MEASUREMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Abramczyk, G.; Bellamy, S.; Nathan, S.; Loftin, B.

    2012-06-05

    For the transportation of Radioactive Material (RAM) packages, the requirements for the maximum allowed dose rate at the package surface and in its vicinity are given in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Section 71.47. The regulations are based on the acceptable dose rates to which the public, workers, and the environment may be exposed. As such, the regulations specify dose rates, rather than quantity of radioactive isotopes and require monitoring to confirm the requirements are met. 10CFR71.47 requires that each package of radioactive materials offered for transportation must be designed and prepared for shipment so that under conditions normally incident to transportation the radiation level does not exceed 2 mSv/h (200 mrem/h) at any point on the external Surface of the package, and the transport index does not exceed 10. Before shipment, the dose rate of the package is determined by measurement, ensuring that it conforms to the regulatory limits, regardless of any analyses. This is the requirement for all certified packagings. This paper discusses the requirements for establishing the dose rates when shipping RAM packages and the precedents for meeting these requirements by measurement.

  4. Estimation of hydrocarbon biodegradation rates in gasoline-contaminated sediment from measured respiration rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baker, R.J.; Baehr, A.L.; Lahvis, M.A.

    2000-01-01

    An open microcosm method for quantifying microbial respiration and estimating biodegradation rates of hydrocarbons in gasoline-contaminated sediment samples has been developed and validated. Stainless-steel bioreactors are filled with soil or sediment samples, and the vapor-phase composition (concentrations of oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), carbon dioxide (CO2), and selected hydrocarbons) is monitored over time. Replacement gas is added as the vapor sample is taken, and selection of the replacement gas composition facilitates real-time decision-making regarding environmental conditions within the bioreactor. This capability allows for maintenance of field conditions over time, which is not possible in closed microcosms. Reaction rates of CO2 and O2 are calculated from the vapor-phase composition time series. Rates of hydrocarbon biodegradation are either measured directly from the hydrocarbon mass balance, or estimated from CO2 and O2 reaction rates and assumed reaction stoichiometries. Open microcosm experiments using sediments spiked with toluene and p-xylene were conducted to validate the stoichiometric assumptions. Respiration rates calculated from O2 consumption and from CO2 production provide estimates of toluene and p- xylene degradation rates within about ??50% of measured values when complete mineralization stoichiometry is assumed. Measured values ranged from 851.1 to 965.1 g m-3 year-1 for toluene, and 407.2-942.3 g m-3 year-1 for p- xylene. Contaminated sediment samples from a gasoline-spill site were used in a second set of microcosm experiments. Here, reaction rates of O2 and CO2 were measured and used to estimate hydrocarbon respiration rates. Total hydrocarbon reaction rates ranged from 49.0 g m-3 year-1 in uncontaminated (background) to 1040.4 g m-3 year-1 for highly contaminated sediment, based on CO2 production data. These rate estimates were similar to those obtained independently from in situ CO2 vertical gradient and flux determinations at the

  5. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate.

    PubMed

    Camilli, Richard; Di Iorio, Daniela; Bowen, Andrew; Reddy, Christopher M; Techet, Alexandra H; Yoerger, Dana R; Whitcomb, Louis L; Seewald, Jeffrey S; Sylva, Sean P; Fenwick, Judith

    2012-12-11

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and acoustic Doppler sonar operating onboard a remotely operated vehicle for noncontact measurement of flow cross-section and velocity from the well's two leak sites. Over 2,500 sonar cross-sections and over 85,000 Doppler velocity measurements were recorded during the acquisition process. These data were then applied to turbulent jet and plume flow models to account for entrained water and calculate a combined hydrocarbon flow rate from the two leak sites at seafloor conditions. Based on the chemical composition of end-member samples collected from within the well, this bulk volumetric rate was then normalized to account for contributions from gases and condensates at initial leak source conditions. Results from this investigation indicate that on May 31, 2010, the well's oil flow rate was approximately 0.10 ± 0.017 m(3) s(-1) at seafloor conditions, or approximately 85 ± 15 kg s(-1) (7.4 ± 1.3 Gg d(-1)), equivalent to approximately 57,000 ± 9,800 barrels of oil per day at surface conditions. End-member chemical composition indicates that this oil release rate was accompanied by approximately an additional 24 ± 4.2 kg s(-1) (2.1 ± 0.37 Gg d(-1)) of natural gas (methane through pentanes), yielding a total hydrocarbon release rate of 110 ± 19 kg s(-1) (9.5 ± 1.6 Gg d(-1)).

  6. Directly Measured Heating Rates of a Tropical Subvisible Cirrus Cloud

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bucholtz, Anthongy; Hlavka, Dennis L.; McGill, Matthew J.; Schmidt, K. Sebastian; Pilewskie, Peter; Davis, Sean M.; Reid, Elizabeth A.; Walker, Annette L.

    2010-01-01

    We present the first direct measurements of the infrared and solar heating rates of a tropical subvisible cirrus (SVC) cloud sampled off the east coast of Nicaragua on 25 July 2007 by the NASA ER-2 aircraft during the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling Experiment (TC4). On this day a persistent thin cirrus layer, with mostly clear skies underneath, was detected in real time by the cloud lidar on the ER-2, and the aircraft was directed to profile down through the SVC. Measurements of the net broadband infrared irradiance and spectrally integrated solar irradiance above, below, and through the SVC are used to determine the infrared and solar heating rates of the cloud. The lidar measurements show that the variable SVC layer was located between approximately 13 and 15 km. Its midvisible optical depth varied from 0.01 to 0.10 with a mean of 0.034 +/- 0.033. Its depolarization ratio was approximately 0.4, indicative of ice clouds. From the divergence of the measured net irradiances the infrared heating rate of the SVC was determined to be approximately 2.50 - 3.24 K/d and the solar heating rate was found to be negligible. These values are consistent with previous indirect observations of other SVC and with model-generated heating rates of SVC with similar optical depths. This study illustrates the utility and potential of the profiling sampling strategy employed here. A more fully instrumented high-altitude aircraft that also included in situ cloud and aerosol probes would provide a comprehensive data set for characterizing both the radiative and microphysical properties of these ubiquitous tropical clouds

  7. Deriving Time Series of Ice-Sheet Accumulation Variations from Altimeter Measurements of Surface-Elevation Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwally, H. J.; Li, J.

    2014-12-01

    Information on ice-sheet surface accumulation, A(t), is needed for studies of mass balance, polar climate variability, ice-sheet evolution, and dynamics. This paper describes a new method for deriving time series of A(t) variations, δA(t), on a monthly basis from continuous altimeter measurements. Changes in ice-sheet thickness and surface elevation are driven by a combination of δA(t), changes in the rates of firn compaction, and the rates of dynamic ice thickening or thinning (dHd/dt). Relevant time scales range from monthly fluctuations in δA(t) and surface temperature, Ts(t), to decadal to millennial scales of dynamic changes in ice flow. Our concept is based on the widely differing time-scales of principal processes, e.g. T> 5 years for dynamic changes and t = year/12 for δA(t) so that T >> t. An important aspect is our use of a baseline of ICESat-1 and ERS-1/ERS-2 altimeter measurements to obtain the multi-year (e.g. 5 to 17 years) dHd/dt of the Antarctic and Greenland ice sheets. We calculate changes in surface elevations caused by variations in the rate of firn compaction driven by both δA(t) and Ts(t) to adjust the altimeter-observed height changes, dH/dt, in order to derive dHd/dt over time periods of ≥ 5 years. Although monthly values of both δA(t) and Ts(t) are used, the derived dHd/dt is dependent only on the average change in δA(t) over the period and not on the higher-frequency monthly δA(t). On a monthly basis, the total accumulation-driven height change, dHaCA/dt, is a sum of the direct-height change, dHa/dt, and the change in firn compaction, dCA/dt, both caused by δA(t). dHa/dt is equal to δA(t)/ρs, where ρs is relative density of surface snow (typically 0.3) and δA(t) is w.e. Model simulations of dHaCA/dt driven by monthly δA(t) from ERA-interim re-analyses show that altimeter-observable dHaCA/dt and the desired dHa/dt = δA(t)/ρs are closely related. The relationship is better at colder locations such as the South Pole (Tm

  8. Measurement of CPAS Main Parachute Rate of Descent

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, Eric S.

    2011-01-01

    The Crew Exploration Vehicle Parachute Assembly System (CPAS) is being designed to land the Orion Crew Module (CM) at a safe rate of descent at splashdown. Flight test performance must be measured to a high degree of accuracy to ensure this requirement is met with the most efficient design possible. Although the design includes three CPAS Main parachutes, the requirement is that the system must not exceed 33 ft/s under two Main parachutes, should one of the Main parachutes fail. Therefore, several tests were conducted with clusters of two Mains. All of the steady-state rate of descent data are normalized to standard sea level conditions and checked against the limit. As the Orion design gains weight, the system is approaching this limit to within measurement precision. Parachute "breathing," cluster interactions, and atmospheric anomalies can cause the rate of descent to vary widely and lead to challenges in characterizing parachute terminal performance. An early test had contradictory rate of descent results from optical trajectory and Differential Global Positioning Systems (DGPS). A thorough analysis of the data sources and error propagation was conducted to determine the uncertainty in the trajectory. It was discovered that the Time Space Position Information (TSPI) from the optical tracking provided accurate position data. However, the velocity from TPSI must be computed via numerical differentiation, which is prone to large error. DGPS obtains position through pseudo-range calculations from multiple satellites and velocity through Doppler shift of the carrier frequency. Because the velocity from DGPS is a direct measurement, it is more accurate than TSPI velocity. To remedy the situation, a commercial off-the-shelf product that combines GPS and an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) was purchased to significantly improve rate of descent measurements. This had the added benefit of solving GPS dropouts during aircraft extraction. Statistical probability

  9. MEASURING THE EVOLUTIONARY RATE OF COOLING OF ZZ Ceti

    SciTech Connect

    Mukadam, Anjum S.; Fraser, Oliver; Riecken, T. S.; Kronberg, M. E.; Bischoff-Kim, Agnes; Corsico, A. H.; Montgomery, M. H.; Winget, D. E.; Hermes, J. J.; Winget, K. I.; Falcon, Ross E.; Reaves, D.; Kepler, S. O.; Romero, A. D.; Chandler, D. W.; Kuehne, J. W.; Sullivan, D. J.; Von Hippel, T.; Mullally, F.; Shipman, H.; and others

    2013-07-01

    We have finally measured the evolutionary rate of cooling of the pulsating hydrogen atmosphere (DA) white dwarf ZZ Ceti (Ross 548), as reflected by the drift rate of the 213.13260694 s period. Using 41 yr of time-series photometry from 1970 November to 2012 January, we determine the rate of change of this period with time to be dP/dt = (5.2 {+-} 1.4) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} employing the O - C method and (5.45 {+-} 0.79) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} using a direct nonlinear least squares fit to the entire lightcurve. We adopt the dP/dt obtained from the nonlinear least squares program as our final determination, but augment the corresponding uncertainty to a more realistic value, ultimately arriving at the measurement of dP/dt = (5.5 {+-} 1.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. After correcting for proper motion, the evolutionary rate of cooling of ZZ Ceti is computed to be (3.3 {+-} 1.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1}. This value is consistent within uncertainties with the measurement of (4.19 {+-} 0.73) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} s s{sup -1} for another similar pulsating DA white dwarf, G 117-B15A. Measuring the cooling rate of ZZ Ceti helps us refine our stellar structure and evolutionary models, as cooling depends mainly on the core composition and stellar mass. Calibrating white dwarf cooling curves with this measurement will reduce the theoretical uncertainties involved in white dwarf cosmochronometry. Should the 213.13 s period be trapped in the hydrogen envelope, then our determination of its drift rate compared to the expected evolutionary rate suggests an additional source of stellar cooling. Attributing the excess cooling to the emission of axions imposes a constraint on the mass of the hypothetical axion particle.

  10. The Mass Accretion Rate of Galaxy Clusters: A Measurable Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Boni, C.; Serra, A. L.; Diaferio, A.; Giocoli, C.; Baldi, M.

    2016-02-01

    We explore the possibility of measuring the mass accretion rate (MAR) of galaxy clusters from their mass profiles beyond the virial radius R200. We derive the accretion rate from the mass of a spherical shell whose inner radius is 2R200, whose thickness changes with redshift, and whose infall velocity is assumed to be equal to the mean infall velocity of the spherical shells of dark matter halos extracted from N-body simulations. This approximation is rather crude in hierarchical clustering scenarios where both smooth accretion and aggregation of smaller dark matter halos contribute to the mass accretion of clusters. Nevertheless, in the redshift range z = [0, 2], our prescription returns an average MAR within 20%-40% of the average rate derived from the merger trees of dark matter halos extracted from N-body simulations. The MAR of galaxy clusters has been the topic of numerous detailed numerical and theoretical investigations, but so far it has remained inaccessible to measurements in the real universe. Since the measurement of the mass profile of clusters beyond their virial radius can be performed with the caustic technique applied to dense redshift surveys of the cluster outer regions, our result suggests that measuring the mean MAR of a sample of galaxy clusters is actually feasible. We thus provide a new potential observational test of the cosmological and structure formation models.

  11. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements and the properties of critical clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wyslouzil, Barbara E.; Strey, Reinhard; Wölk, Judith; Wilemski, Gerald; Kim, Yoojeong

    2009-10-06

    By combining a range of experimental techniques, quantitative nucleation rate measurements can now be made over {approx} 20 orders of magnitude. These rates can be used to directly test the predictions of nucleation theories or scaling laws. They can also provide direct information regarding the properties of the critical clusters - the first fragments of the new phase that are in unstable equilibrium with the supersaturated mother phase. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of vapor phase nucleation with a special focus on integrating the results from supersonic nozzle and nucleation pulse chamber studies.

  12. Open charcoal chamber method for mass measurements of radon exhalation rate from soil surface.

    PubMed

    Tsapalov, Andrey; Kovler, Konstantin; Miklyaev, Peter

    2016-08-01

    Radon exhalation rate from the soil surface can serve as an important criterion in the evaluation of radon hazard of the land. Recently published international standard ISO 11665-7 (2012) is based on the accumulation of radon gas in a closed container. At the same time since 1998 in Russia, as a part of engineering and environmental studies for the construction, radon flux measurements are made using an open charcoal chamber for a sampling duration of 3-5 h. This method has a well-defined metrological justification and was tested in both favorable and unfavorable conditions. The article describes the characteristics of the method, as well as the means of sampling and measurement of the activity of radon absorbed. The results of the metrological study suggest that regardless of the sampling conditions (weather, the mechanism and rate of radon transport in the soil, soil properties and conditions), uncertainty of method does not exceed 20%, while the combined standard uncertainty of radon exhalation rate measured from the soil surface does not exceed 30%. The results of the daily measurements of radon exhalation rate from the soil surface at the experimental site during one year are reported. PMID:27132250

  13. Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, T. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Hoffmann, A. A.; Detmers, R. G.; Rücker, G.; French, N. H. F.; Archibald, S.; Carvalho, J. A., Jr.; Cook, G. D.; de Groot, W. J.; Hély, C.; Kasischke, E. S.; Kloster, S.; McCarty, J. L.; Pettinari, M. L.; Savadogo, P.; Alvarado, E. C.; Boschetti, L.; Manuri, S.; Meyer, C. P.; Siegert, F.; Trollope, L. A.; Trollope, W. S. W.

    2014-06-01

    Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. These fuel consumption (FC) rates depend on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can be combined with estimates of area burned to assess emissions. While burned area can be detected from space and estimates are becoming more reliable due to improved algorithms and sensors, FC rates are either modeled or taken selectively from the literature. We compiled the peer-reviewed literature on FC rates for various biomes and fuel categories to better understand FC rates and variability, and to provide a~database that can be used to constrain biogeochemical models with fire modules. We compiled in total 76 studies covering 10 biomes including savanna (15 studies, average FC of 4.6 t DM (dry matter) ha-1), tropical forest (n = 19, FC = 126), temperate forest (n = 11, FC = 93), boreal forest (n = 16, FC = 39), pasture (n = 6, FC = 28), crop residue (n = 4, FC = 6.5), chaparral (n = 2, FC = 32), tropical peatland (n = 4, FC = 314), boreal peatland (n = 2, FC = 42), and tundra (n = 1, FC = 40). Within biomes the regional variability in the number of measurements was sometimes large, with e.g. only 3 measurement locations in boreal Russia and 35 sites in North America. Substantial regional differences were found within the defined biomes: for example FC rates of temperate pine forests in the USA were 38% higher than Australian forests dominated by eucalypt trees. Besides showing the differences between biomes, FC estimates were also grouped into different fuel classes. Our results highlight the large variability in FC rates, not only between biomes but also within biomes and fuel classes. This implies that care should be taken with using averaged values, and our comparison with FC rates from GFED3 indicates that also modeling studies have difficulty in representing the dynamics governing FC.

  14. Seasonal variation of meteorological variables and recent surface ablation / accumulation rates on Davies Dome and Whisky Glacier, James Ross Island, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Láska, K.; Nývlt, D.; Engel, Z.; Budík, L.

    2012-04-01

    In this study, surface mass balance data of two glaciers on James Ross Island, Antarctica, and its spatial and temporal variations are evaluated using snow ablation stakes, ground-penetrating radar, and dGPS measurements. The investigated glaciers are located on the Ulu Peninsula, northern part of James Ross Island. Davies Dome is an ice dome, which originates on the surface of a flat volcanic mesa at elevations >400 m a.s.l. and terminates with a single 700 m wide outlet in the Whisky Bay. Davies Dome has an area of ~6.5 km2 and lies in the altitude range of 0-514 m a.s.l. Whisky Glacier is a cold-based land-terminating valley glacier surrounded by an extensive moraine ridges made of debris-covered ice. The glacier has an area of ~2.4 km2 and lies in the altitude range of 215-520 m a.s.l. Within several summer austral summers, extensive field programme were carried out on both glaciers including the operation of two automatic weather stations, field mapping and mass balance measurements. Each station was equipped with albedometer CM7B (Kipp-Zonen, Netherlands), air temperature and humidity sensor EMS33 (EMS, Czech Republic), propeller anemometer 05103 (Young, USA), and snow depth sensors (Judd, USA). In the period 2009-2011, high seasonal and interdiurnal variability of incoming solar radiation and near-surface air temperature was found as a result of changes in the circulation patterns and synoptic-scale weather systems moving in the Circumpolar Trough. High ablation and accumulation rates were recorded mainly in the spring and summer seasons (October-February), while negligible changes were found in winter (May-September). The effects of positive degree-day temperatures on the surface ablation rates were examined using a linear regression model. In this approach, near-surface air temperature maps on the glacier surfaces were derived from digital elevation model according to actual temperature lapse rates. Mass balance investigations started in 2006 on Davies

  15. Prediction of Growth Rate at Different Light Levels from Measured Photosynthesis and Respiration Rates

    PubMed Central

    McCree, K. J.; Troughton, J. H.

    1966-01-01

    Light integrators with a linear response are not suitable for measuring the light climates of plants because plants are not linear integrators. It should be possible to make a quantitative allowance for this nonlinearity by using the CO2 uptake curve of the plant. To test this, we have subjected white clover plants to different levels of constant light, comparing the rate of increase of total dry matter with the net rate of uptake of CO2 per day. Temperature, humidity, daylength and nutrient supply were kept constant. The growth rate calculated from CO2 uptake agreed well with the observed rate over the light levels tested (3.7-88 w·m−2, 0.4-0.7 micron: 1 w·m−2 = 103 erg · sec−1 cm−2). All plants put on weight over the few days of the experiment, even those placed at light levels below their compensation point. The plants adapted their respiration rates to be a constant proportion of their growth rates. Most of the adaptation occurred within 24 hours of the light change. The adaptation of respiration has implications for models of light/growth relations in plant communities, almost all of which assume that respiration is proportional to leaf area and independent of growth rate or light level. The only model which does not is that of de Wit, and this gave good agreement with our results. PMID:16656288

  16. Precision measurements of positronium decay rate and energy level

    SciTech Connect

    Asai, S.; Kataoka, Y.; Kobayashi, T.; Namba, T.; Suehara, T.; Akimoto, G.; Ishida, A.; Hashimoto, M. M.; Saito, H.; Idehara, T.; Yoshida, M.

    2008-08-08

    Positronium is an ideal system for the research of the bound state QED. New precise measurement of orthopositronium decay rate has been performed with an accuracy of 150 ppm, and the result combined with the last three is 7.0401{+-}0.0007 {mu}s{sup -1}. It is the first result to validate the 2nd order correction. The Hyper Fine Splitting of positronium is sensitive to the higher order corrections of the QED prediction and also to the new physics beyond Standard Model via the quantum oscillation into virtual photon. The discrepancy of 3.5{sigma} is found recently between the measured values and the QED prediction (O({alpha}{sup 3})). It might be due to the contribution of the new physics or the systematic problems in the previous measurements: (non-thermalized Ps and non-uniformity of the magnetic field). We propose new methods to measure HFS precisely without the these uncertainties.

  17. Heating rate controller for thermally stimulated conductivity and thermoluminescence measurements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, E. G.; Littlejohn, M. A.; Oakley, E. M.; Hutchby , J. A.

    1972-01-01

    A temperature controller is described which enables the temperature of a sample mounted on a cold finger to be varied linearly with time. Heating rates between 0.5 and 10 K/min can be achieved for temperatures between 90 and 300 K. Provision for terminating the sample heating at any temperature between these extremes is available. The temperature can be held at the terminating temperature or be reduced to the starting temperature in a matter of minutes. The controller has been used for thermally stimulated conductivity measurements and should be useful for thermoluminescence measurements as well.

  18. Measurement of Disintegration Rates and Absolute {gamma}-ray Intensities

    SciTech Connect

    DeVries, Daniel J.; Griffin, Henry C.

    2006-03-13

    The majority of practical radioactive materials decay by modes that include {gamma}-ray emission. For questions of 'how much' or 'how pure', one must know the absolute intensities of the major radiations. We are using liquid scintillation counting (LSC) to measurements of disintegration rates, coupled with {gamma}-ray spectroscopy to measure absolute {gamma}-ray emission probabilities. Described is a study of the 227Th chain yielding absolute {gamma}-ray intensities with {approx}0.5% accuracy and information on LSC efficiencies.

  19. Miniature electron bombardment evaporation source: evaporation rate measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nehasil, V.; Mašek, K.; Moreau, O.; Matolín, V.

    1997-03-01

    Miniature electron beam evaporation sources which operate on the principle of vaporization of source material, in the form of a tip, by electron bombardment are produced by several companies specialised in UHV equipment. These sources are used primarily for materials that are normally difficult to deposit due to their high evaporation temperature. They are appropriate for special applications, like heteroepitaxial thin films growth that require very low and well controlled deposition rate. We propose a simple and easily applicable method of evaporation rate control. The method is based on the measurement of ion current produced by electron bombardment of evaporated atoms. In order to be able to determine the ion current - evaporation flux calibration curves we measured the absolute values of evaporation flux by means of Bayard-Alpert ion gauge.

  20. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements in supersaturated water vapor.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Smolík, Jirí

    2008-11-01

    The rate of homogeneous nucleation in supersaturated vapors of water was studied experimentally using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber. Helium was used as a carrier gas. Our study covers a range of nucleation rates from 3x10(-1) to 3x10(2) cm(-3) s(-1) at four isotherms: 290, 300, 310, and 320 K. The molecular content of critical clusters was estimated from the slopes of experimental data. The measured isothermal dependencies of nucleation rate of water on saturation ratio were compared with the prediction of the classical theory of homogeneous nucleation, the empirical prediction of Wolk et al. [J. Chem. Phys. 117, 10 (2002)], the scaled model of Hale [Phys. Rev. A 33, 4156 (1986)], and the former nucleation onset data. PMID:19045352

  1. Reaction Rate Measurements at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bredeweg, T. A.; Bounds, J. A.; Brooks, G. H., Jr.; Favorite, J. A.; Goda, J. M.; Hayes, D. K.; Jackman, K. R.; Little, R. C.; Macinnes, M. R.; Myers, W. L.; Oldham, W. J.; Rundberg, R. S.; Sanchez, R. G.; Schake, A. R.; White, M. C.; Wilkerson, C. W., Jr.

    2014-09-01

    With the resumption of regular operations of the Los Alamos Critical Assemblies at the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC), located at the Nevada National Security Site, we have embarked upon a series of campaigns to restore the capability to perform integral reaction rate and fission product yield measurements using historical radiochemical methods. This talk will present an overview of the current and future experimental plans, including results from our experimental campaigns on the Comet/Zeus and Flattop assemblies.

  2. Calibration of observational measurement of rate of responding.

    PubMed

    Mudford, Oliver C; Zeleny, Jason R; Fisher, Wayne W; Klum, Molly E; Owen, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    The quality of measurement systems used in almost all natural sciences other than behavior analysis is usually evaluated through calibration study rather than relying on interobserver agreement. We demonstrated some of the basic features of calibration using observer-measured rates of free-operant responding from 10 scripted 10-min calibration samples on video. Five novice and 5 experienced observers recorded (on laptop computers) response samples with a priori determined response rates ranging from 0 to 8 responses per minute. Observer records were then compared with these predetermined reference values using linear regression and related graphical depiction. Results indicated that all of the observers recorded rates that were accurate to within ±0.4 responses per minute and 5 were accurate to within ±0.1 responses per minute, indicating that continuous recording of responding on computers can be highly accurate and precise. Additional research is recommended to investigate conditions that affect the quality of direct observational measurement of behavior. PMID:21941386

  3. CALIBRATION OF OBSERVATIONAL MEASUREMENT OF RATE OF RESPONDING

    PubMed Central

    Mudford, Oliver C; Zeleny, Jason R; Fisher, Wayne W; Klum, Molly E; Owen, Todd M

    2011-01-01

    The quality of measurement systems used in almost all natural sciences other than behavior analysis is usually evaluated through calibration study rather than relying on interobserver agreement. We demonstrated some of the basic features of calibration using observer-measured rates of free-operant responding from 10 scripted 10-min calibration samples on video. Five novice and 5 experienced observers recorded (on laptop computers) response samples with a priori determined response rates ranging from 0 to 8 responses per minute. Observer records were then compared with these predetermined reference values using linear regression and related graphical depiction. Results indicated that all of the observers recorded rates that were accurate to within ±0.4 responses per minute and 5 were accurate to within ±0.1 responses per minute, indicating that continuous recording of responding on computers can be highly accurate and precise. Additional research is recommended to investigate conditions that affect the quality of direct observational measurement of behavior. PMID:21941386

  4. Corrosion rate measurements of steel in carbonated concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Saito, H.; Miyata, Y.; Takazawa, H.; Takai, K.; Yamauchi, G.

    1995-12-01

    The polarization resistance of steel bars in concrete after exposure to several environments, as measured by the potential step method, was compared to the actual mass losses of the bars. Each test sample consist of two steel bars embedded in concrete blocks, which were carbonated and exposed to one of several environments, outdoors, indoors, underground, in tunnel, or in water, for one year. Electrochemical measurements of these samples by using the potential step method were carried out at least once a week. The polarization resistance data thus obtained were changed into corrosion currents and mass losses. These calculated mass losses were compared with the actual mass losses of the rods. In some cases, such as indoors, outdoors or in tunnel, the corrosion rate of steel is determined by the amount of water in the concrete. In other cases, such as underground or in water, the oxygen supply determines the corrosion rate. This work demonstrate that in former condition, the potential step method can be use to measure the corrosion rate of steel easily and quickly.

  5. Simultaneous measurement of bacterial flagellar rotation rate and swimming speed.

    PubMed Central

    Magariyama, Y; Sugiyama, S; Muramoto, K; Kawagishi, I; Imae, Y; Kudo, S

    1995-01-01

    Swimming speeds and flagellar rotation rates of individual free-swimming Vibrio alginolyticus cells were measured simultaneously by laser dark-field microscopy at 25, 30, and 35 degrees C. A roughly linear relation between swimming speed and flagellar rotation rate was observed. The ratio of swimming speed to flagellar rotation rate was 0.113 microns, which indicated that a cell progressed by 7% of pitch of flagellar helix during one flagellar rotation. At each temperature, however, swimming speed had a tendency to saturate at high flagellar rotation rate. That is, the cell with a faster-rotating flagellum did not always swim faster. To analyze the bacterial motion, we proposed a model in which the torque characteristics of the flagellar motor were considered. The model could be analytically solved, and it qualitatively explained the experimental results. The discrepancy between the experimental and the calculated ratios of swimming speed to flagellar rotation rate was about 20%. The apparent saturation in swimming speed was considered to be caused by shorter flagella that rotated faster but produced less propelling force. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 4 PMID:8580359

  6. Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl accumulation in unstable landforms 2. Simulations and measurements on eroding moraines

    SciTech Connect

    Zreda, M.G.; Phillips, F.M.; Elmore, D.

    1994-11-01

    Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl ages of boulders from late Pleistocene moraines in Bishop Creek, Sierra Nevada, California, provided valuable details about {sup 36}Cl surface exposure dating and the nature of post depositional processes that modify glacial landforms. The natural variability of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages among morainal boulders is due to soil erosion and gradual exposure of boulders at the surface. Two mechanisms are responsible for the resulting distributions of the apparent {sup 36}Cl ages. Variability of the initial burial depth among boulders and variability in the chemical composition of boulders from the same depth both result in different {sup 36}Cl ages due to the dependence of the depth production profile on the boulder chemistry. The authors measured cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl in boulders from a late Pleistocene moraine. The distribution of the calculated apparent ages allowed them to calculate the true age of 85 kyr and the erosion rate of 570 g cm{sup -2}. These results are in excellent agreement with independently estimated values of 87 kyr and 600 g cm{sup -2} for the age and erosion depth, respectively. These results indicate that the model satisfactorily simulates effects of erosion processes and can thus aid in surface exposure dating of eroding landforms.

  7. A 9000 year perspective on carbon accumulation rates under changing hydro-climate and vegetation conditions in a mountain peatland, northern Carpathians, Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feurdean, Angelica; Panait, Andrei; Gałka, Mariusz; Diaconu, Andrei; Hutchinson, Simon; Mulch, Andreas; Tantau, Ioan; Hickler, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    Peatlands, in particular ombrogenous bogs, which entirely depend on water from precipitation, are sensitive to changes in the balance between precipitation and evapotranspiration; and therefore highly suitable for hydro-climatological reconstruction. Peatlands also represent a large carbon pool in the terrestrial biosphere. However, little is known about the C sequestration processes in mountain peatlands under various competing drivers of change (climate, vegetation, fire). We applied a multi-proxy approach (bulk density, loss on ignition, total organic carbon, testate amoebae, δ13C in Sphagnum, plant macrofossils, pollen and charcoal) to a peat sequence from a mountain ombrogenous bog (Tǎul Muced) to explore how changes in hydro-climate conditions, peat plant composition and fire have affected long-term physical peat properties and the rate of carbon accumulation over the last 9000 years. Carbon accumulation at this site ranged from 7 to 105 g C cm2 yr1 (mean 23 ± 14 g C cm2 yr_1). We found that high moisture availability (P-E) as inferred from testate amoebae and δ13C values in Sphagnum increased the carbon sink capacity of peatland. The strength of the relationship between the rate of carbon accumulation and climate appears particularly evident over the last millennium when high C accumulation rates correlated with the warm and wet conditions of the Medieval Climate Anomaly and lower C accumulation rates with the dry conditions of the Little Ice Age. We also found a significant positive correlation between the rate of C accumulation and changes in vegetation; rates were lowest (17 g C cm2 yr_1), during periods of mixed Sphagnum (primarily S. magellanicum and S. angustifolium) and vascular plant (Cyperaceae, Eriophorum vaginatum) growth and increased (31 g C cm2 yr_1) during the accumulation of Sphagnum peat, regardless the dominant Sphagnum species. We did not find indication of peatland fire during the investigated interval. Our study represents one of the

  8. Shear rates measurements in natural shear zones using quartz piezometers.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutonnet, Emmanuelle; Hervé Leloup, Philippe

    2010-05-01

    Whether deformation within the deep continental crust is fundamentally concentrated in narrow shear zones or distributed in wide zones stays a major controversy of the earth sciences. This is in part because direct measurements of ductile strain or strain rate are difficult, especially when deformation is intense as it is the case in ductile shear zones. Paleo-shear stress can be evaluated by using paleo-piezometers that link shear stress to the size of recrystallized minerals. Such piezometers are calibrated by microphysical models or experimental studies. Indirect measurements of strain rate in natural rocks can be achieved using shear stress, an estimation of the temperature of deformation, and assuming a flow law. However, such estimates have rarely been validated by independent constraints. By comparing shear rates calculated from paleopiezometry, and measured in situ in the same outcrop we determined the more appropriate paleopiezometer and power flow law in order to generalize the method to other outcrops. Within the Ailao - Red River shear zone (ASSR, SE Asia) paleo strain rates during the Miocene left-lateral shear are estimated between 1*10-13 s-1 and 2*10-13 s-1 from tectonic considerations. At site C1, by combining dating of syntectonic dykes and measurements of their deformation, the strain rate is calculated between 3 and 4*10-14 s-1 between 29 to 22 Ma, (Sassier et al., JGR, 2009). Quartz ribbons of sample YY33 from the same outcrop show continuous dynamic recrystallisation (DRX) mechanisms, characterized by subgrain rotation nucleation, and growth by grain boundary migration (Shimitzu et al. JSG, 2008). This dislocation creep regime is compatible with the microphysical models of Twiss (Pure Ammp. Geoph., 1977) and Shimitzu (JSG, 2008) and the experimental piezometer of Stipp and Tullis (GRL, 2003). The measured quartz grain size range between 10 and 960 μm, while the mean recrystallized grain size is 112.2 ± 1.5μm. The associated paleostress is

  9. Measurements of Aperture Averaging on Bit-Error-Rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.; Andrews, Larry C.; Phillips, Ronald L.; Nelson, Richard A.; Ferrell, Bobby A.; Borbath, Michael R.; Galus, Darren J.; Chin, Peter G.; Harris, William G.; Marin, Jose A.; Burdge, Geoffrey L.; Wayne, David; Pescatore, Robert

    2005-01-01

    We report on measurements made at the Shuttle Landing Facility (SLF) runway at Kennedy Space Center of receiver aperture averaging effects on a propagating optical Gaussian beam wave over a propagation path of 1,000 in. A commercially available instrument with both transmit and receive apertures was used to transmit a modulated laser beam operating at 1550 nm through a transmit aperture of 2.54 cm. An identical model of the same instrument was used as a receiver with a single aperture that was varied in size up to 20 cm to measure the effect of receiver aperture averaging on Bit Error Rate. Simultaneous measurements were also made with a scintillometer instrument and local weather station instruments to characterize atmospheric conditions along the propagation path during the experiments.

  10. Constrained independent component analysis approach to nonobtrusive pulse rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsouri, Gill R.; Kyal, Survi; Dianat, Sohail; Mestha, Lalit K.

    2012-07-01

    Nonobtrusive pulse rate measurement using a webcam is considered. We demonstrate how state-of-the-art algorithms based on independent component analysis suffer from a sorting problem which hinders their performance, and propose a novel algorithm based on constrained independent component analysis to improve performance. We present how the proposed algorithm extracts a photoplethysmography signal and resolves the sorting problem. In addition, we perform a comparative study between the proposed algorithm and state-of-the-art algorithms over 45 video streams using a finger probe oxymeter for reference measurements. The proposed algorithm provides improved accuracy: the root mean square error is decreased from 20.6 and 9.5 beats per minute (bpm) for existing algorithms to 3.5 bpm for the proposed algorithm. An error of 3.5 bpm is within the inaccuracy expected from the reference measurements. This implies that the proposed algorithm provided performance of equal accuracy to the finger probe oximeter.

  11. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored.

  12. Temperature-fluctuation-sensitive accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in low-coherence interferometry in characterizing arrayed waveguide gratings.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Changyun; Wei, Bing; Yang, Longzhi; Wang, Gencheng; Wang, Yuehai; Jiang, Xiaoqing; Li, Yubo; Yang, Jianyi

    2015-09-20

    We investigate the accumulative effect of the phase measurement errors in characterizing optical multipath components by low-coherence interferometry. The accumulative effect is caused by the fluctuation of the environment temperature, which leads to the variation of the refractive index of the device under test. The resulting phase measurement errors accumulate with the increasing of the phase difference between the two interferometer arms. Our experiments were carried out to demonstrate that the accumulative effect is still obvious even though the thermo-optical coefficient of the device under test is quite small. Shortening the measurement time to reduce the fluctuation of the environment temperature can effectively restrain the accumulative effect. The experiments show that when the scanning speed increases to 4.8 mm/s, the slope of the phase measurement errors decreases to 5.52×10(-8), which means the accumulative effect can be ignored. PMID:26406502

  13. Elucidating effects of atmospheric deposition and peat decomposition processes on mercury accumulation rates in a northern Minnesota peatland over last 10,000 cal years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nater, E. A.; Furman, O.; Toner, B. M.; Sebestyen, S. D.; Tfaily, M. M.; Chanton, J.; Fissore, C.; McFarlane, K. J.; Hanson, P. J.; Iversen, C. M.; Kolka, R. K.

    2014-12-01

    Climate change has the potential to affect mercury (Hg), sulfur (S) and carbon (C) stores and cycling in northern peatland ecosystems (NPEs). SPRUCE (Spruce and Peatland Responses Under Climate and Environmental change) is an interdisciplinary study of the effects of elevated temperature and CO2 enrichment on NPEs. Peat cores (0-3.0 m) were collected from 16 large plots located on the S1 peatland (an ombrotrophic bog treed with Picea mariana and Larix laricina) in August, 2012 for baseline characterization before the experiment begins. Peat samples were analyzed at depth increments for total Hg, bulk density, humification indices, and elemental composition. Net Hg accumulation rates over the last 10,000 years were derived from Hg concentrations and peat accumulation rates based on peat depth chronology established using 14C and 13C dating of peat cores. Historic Hg deposition rates are being modeled from pre-industrial deposition rates in S1 scaled by regional lake sediment records. Effects of peatland processes and factors (hydrology, decomposition, redox chemistry, vegetative changes, microtopography) on the biogeochemistry of Hg, S, and other elements are being assessed by comparing observed elemental depth profiles with accumulation profiles predicted solely from atmospheric deposition. We are using principal component analyses and cluster analyses to elucidate relationships between humification indices, peat physical properties, and inorganic and organic geochemistry data to interpret the main processes controlling net Hg accumulation and elemental concentrations in surface and subsurface peat layers. These findings are critical to predicting how climate change will affect future accumulation of Hg as well as existing Hg stores in NPE, and for providing reference baselines for SPRUCE future investigations.

  14. High-rate measurement-device-independent quantum cryptography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pirandola, Stefano; Ottaviani, Carlo; Spedalieri, Gaetana; Weedbrook, Christian; Braunstein, Samuel L.; Lloyd, Seth; Gehring, Tobias; Jacobsen, Christian S.; Andersen, Ulrik L.

    2015-06-01

    Quantum cryptography achieves a formidable task—the remote distribution of secret keys by exploiting the fundamental laws of physics. Quantum cryptography is now headed towards solving the practical problem of constructing scalable and secure quantum networks. A significant step in this direction has been the introduction of measurement-device independence, where the secret key between two parties is established by the measurement of an untrusted relay. Unfortunately, although qubit-implemented protocols can reach long distances, their key rates are typically very low, unsuitable for the demands of a metropolitan network. Here we show, theoretically and experimentally, that a solution can come from the use of continuous-variable systems. We design a coherent-state network protocol able to achieve remarkably high key rates at metropolitan distances, in fact three orders of magnitude higher than those currently achieved. Our protocol could be employed to build high-rate quantum networks where devices securely connect to nearby access points or proxy servers.

  15. Combining Disparate Measures of Metabolic Rate During Simulated Spacewalks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, Alan H.; Kuznetz, Larry; Nguyen, Dan

    2009-01-01

    Scientists from NASA's Extravehicular Activities (EVA) Physiology Systems and Performance Project help design space suits for future missions, during which astronauts are expected to perform EVA activities on the Lunar or Martian surface. During an EVA, an astronaut s integrated metabolic rate is used to predict how much longer the activity can continue and still provide a safe margin of remaining consumables. For EVAs in the Apollo era, NASA physicians monitored live data feeds of heart rate, O2 consumption, and liquid cooled garment (LCG) temperatures, which were subjectively combined or compared to produce an estimate of metabolic rate. But these multiple data feeds sometimes provided conflicting estimates of metabolic rate, making real-time calculations of remaining time difficult for physician/monitors. Currently, designs planned for the Constellation Program EVAs utilize an automated, but largely heuristic methodology for incorporating the above three measurements, plus an additional one - CO2 production, ignoring data that appears in conflict; however a more rigorous model-based approach is desirable. In this study, we show how principal axis factor analysis, in combination with OLS regression and LOWESS smoothing can be used to estimate metabolic rate as a data-driven weighted average of heart rate, O2 consumption, LCG temperature data, and CO2 production. Preliminary results suggest less sensitivity to occasional spikes in observed data feeds, and reasonable within-subject reproducibility when applied to subsequent tasks. These methods do not require physician monitoring and as such can be automated in the electronic components of future space suits. With additional validation, our models show promise for increasing astronaut safety, while reducing the need for and potential errors associated with human monitoring of multiple systems.

  16. Predominant anthropogenic sources and rates of atmospheric mercury accumulation in southern Ontario recorded by peat cores from three bogs: comparison with natural "background" values (past 8000 years).

    PubMed

    Givelet, Nicolas; Roos-Barraclough, Fiona; Shotyk, William

    2003-12-01

    Peat cores from three bogs in southern Ontario provide a complete, quantitative record of net rates of atmospheric Hg accumulation since pre-industrial times. For comparison with modern values, a peat core extending back 8000 years was used to quantify the natural variations in Hg fluxes for this region, and their dependence on climatic change and land use history. The net mercury accumulation rates were separated into "natural" and "excess" components by comparing the Hg/Br ratios of modern samples with the long-term, pre-anthropogenic average Hg/Br. The average background mercury accumulation rate during the pre-anthropogenic period (from 5700 years BC to 1470 AD) was 1.4 +/- 1.0 microg m(-2) per year (n = 197). The beginning of Hg contamination from anthropogenic sources dates from AD 1475 at the Luther Bog, corresponding to biomass burning for agricultural activities by Native North Americans. During the late 17th and 18th centuries, deposition of anthropogenic Hg was at least equal to that of Hg from natural sources. Anthropogenic inputs of Hg to the bogs have dominated continuously since the beginning of the 19th century. The maximum Hg accumulation rates decrease in the order Sifton Bog, in the City of London, Ontario (141 microg Hg m(-2) per year), Luther Bog in an agricultural region (89 microg Hg m(-2) per year), and Spruce Bog which is in a comparatively remote, forested region (54 microg Hg m(-2) per year). Accurate age dating of recent peat samples using the bomb pulse curve of 14C shows that the maximum rate of atmospheric Hg accumulation occurred during AD 1956 and 1959 at all sites. In these (modern) samples, the Hg concentration profiles resemble those of Pb, an element which is known to be immobile in peat bogs. The correlation between these two metals, together with sulfur, suggests that the predominant anthropogenic source of Hg (and Pb) was coal burning. While Hg accumulation rates have gone into strong decline since the late 1950's, Hg

  17. Measuring the Rates of Spontaneous Mutation From Deep and Large-Scale Polymorphism Data

    PubMed Central

    Messer, Philipp W.

    2009-01-01

    The rates and patterns of spontaneous mutation are fundamental parameters of molecular evolution. Current methodology either tries to measure such rates and patterns directly in mutation-accumulation experiments or tries to infer them indirectly from levels of divergence or polymorphism. While experimental approaches are constrained by the low rate at which new mutations occur, indirect approaches suffer from their underlying assumption that mutations are effectively neutral. Here I present a maximum-likelihood approach to estimate mutation rates from large-scale polymorphism data. It is demonstrated that the method is not sensitive to demography and the distribution of selection coefficients among mutations when applied to mutations at sufficiently low population frequencies. With the many large-scale sequencing projects currently underway, for instance, the 1000 genomes project in humans, plenty of the required low-frequency polymorphism data will shortly become available. My method will allow for an accurate and unbiased inference of mutation rates and patterns from such data sets at high spatial resolution. I discuss how the assessment of several long-standing problems of evolutionary biology would benefit from the availability of accurate mutation rate estimates. PMID:19528323

  18. Variations in the accumulation, localization and rate of metabolization of selenium in mature Zea mays plants supplied with selenite or selenate.

    PubMed

    Longchamp, Mélanie; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Biron, Philippe; Bariac, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Quantification of selenium bioavailability from foods is a key challenge following the discovery of the antioxidant role of this micronutrient in human health. This study presents the uptake, accumulation and rate of metabolization in mature Zea mays plants grown in hydroponic solution supplemented with selenate or selenite. Selenium content was lower in plants supplemented with selenate and accumulated mainly in the leaves compared with selenite-treated plants where the selenium was retained in the roots. Selenite-treated grains accumulated more selenium. Selenate was metabolized less than selenite in whole plants, but in grains selenium was present exclusively as organic selenium compounds. For humans, the bioavailability of organic selenium was evaluated at 90% compared with only 50% for inorganic forms. Our results show that the potential for selenium bioavailability is increased with selenite treatment. PMID:25842318

  19. Variations in the accumulation, localization and rate of metabolization of selenium in mature Zea mays plants supplied with selenite or selenate.

    PubMed

    Longchamp, Mélanie; Castrec-Rouelle, Maryse; Biron, Philippe; Bariac, Thierry

    2015-09-01

    Quantification of selenium bioavailability from foods is a key challenge following the discovery of the antioxidant role of this micronutrient in human health. This study presents the uptake, accumulation and rate of metabolization in mature Zea mays plants grown in hydroponic solution supplemented with selenate or selenite. Selenium content was lower in plants supplemented with selenate and accumulated mainly in the leaves compared with selenite-treated plants where the selenium was retained in the roots. Selenite-treated grains accumulated more selenium. Selenate was metabolized less than selenite in whole plants, but in grains selenium was present exclusively as organic selenium compounds. For humans, the bioavailability of organic selenium was evaluated at 90% compared with only 50% for inorganic forms. Our results show that the potential for selenium bioavailability is increased with selenite treatment.

  20. High frame rate measurements of semiconductor pixel detector readout IC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szczygiel, R.; Grybos, P.; Maj, P.

    2012-07-01

    We report on high count rate and high frame rate measurements of a prototype IC named FPDR90, designed for readouts of hybrid pixel semiconductor detectors used for X-ray imaging applications. The FPDR90 is constructed in 90 nm CMOS technology and has dimensions of 4 mm×4 mm. Its main part is a matrix of 40×32 pixels with 100 μm×100 μm pixel size. The chip works in the single photon counting mode with two discriminators and two 16-bit ripple counters per pixel. The count rate per pixel depends on the effective CSA feedback resistance and can be set up to 6 Mcps. The FPDR90 can operate in the continuous readout mode, with zero dead time. Due to the architecture of digital blocks in pixel, one can select the number of bits read out from each counter from 1 to 16. Because in the FPDR90 prototype only one data output is available, the frame rate is 9 kfps and 72 kfps for 16 bits and 1 bit readout, respectively (with nominal clock frequency of 200 MHz).

  1. Remote measurements of heart and respiration rates for telemedicine.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang; Li, Meng; Qian, Yi; Tsien, Joe Z

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research.

  2. The stratigraphic filter and bias in measurement of geologic rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumer, R.; Jerolmack, D.; McElroy, B.

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and deposition rates estimated from the stratigraphic record frequently exhibit a power-law dependence on measurement interval. This dependence can result from a power-law distribution of stratigraphic hiatuses. By representing the stratigraphic filter as a stochastic process called a reverse ascending ladder, we describe a likely origin of power-law hiatuses, and thus, rate scaling. While power-law hiatuses in certain environments can be a direct result of power-law periods of stasis (no deposition or erosion), they are more generally the result of randomness in surface fluctuations irrespective of mean subsidence or uplift. Autocorrelation in fluctuations can make hiatuses more or less heavy-tailed, but still exhibit power-law characteristics. In addition we show that by passing stratigraphic data backward through the filter, certain statistics of surface kinematics from their formative environments can be inferred. Copyright ?? 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  3. The stratigraphic filter and bias in measurement of geologic rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumer, Rina; Jerolmack, Douglas; McElroy, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    Erosion and deposition rates estimated from the stratigraphic record frequently exhibit a power-law dependence on measurement interval. This dependence can result from a power-law distribution of stratigraphic hiatuses. By representing the stratigraphic filter as a stochastic process called a reverse ascending ladder, we describe a likely origin of power-law hiatuses, and thus, rate scaling. While power-law hiatuses in certain environments can be a direct result of power-law periods of stasis (no deposition or erosion), they are more generally the result of randomness in surface fluctuations irrespective of mean subsidence or uplift. Autocorrelation in fluctuations can make hiatuses more or less heavy-tailed, but still exhibit power-law characteristics. In addition we show that by passing stratigraphic data backward through the filter, certain statistics of surface kinematics from their formative environments can be inferred.

  4. Remote Measurements of Heart and Respiration Rates for Telemedicine

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Yi; Tsien, Joe Z.

    2013-01-01

    Non-contact and low-cost measurements of heart and respiration rates are highly desirable for telemedicine. Here, we describe a novel technique to extract blood volume pulse and respiratory wave from a single channel images captured by a video camera for both day and night conditions. The principle of our technique is to uncover the temporal dynamics of heart beat and breathing rate through delay-coordinate transformation and independent component analysis-based deconstruction of the single channel images. Our method further achieves robust elimination of false positives via applying ratio-variation probability distributions filtering approaches. Moreover, it enables a much needed low-cost means for preventing sudden infant death syndrome in new born infants and detecting stroke and heart attack in elderly population in home environments. This noncontact-based method can also be applied to a variety of animal model organisms for biomedical research. PMID:24115996

  5. Isolation of Arabidopsis nuclei and measurement of gene transcription rates using nuclear run-on assays.

    PubMed

    Folta, Kevin M; Kaufman, Lon S

    2006-01-01

    Isolation of transcriptionally active nuclei from plant tissues is a fundamental first step in many plant molecular biology protocols. Enriched nuclear fractions may be used in "run-on" assays to measure the rate of transcription for any given gene, adding additional resolution to assays of steady-state transcript accumulation such as RNA-gel blots, RT-PCR or microarrays. The protocols presented here streamline, adapt and optimize existing methods for use in Arabidopsis thaliana. Plant materials are ground in hexylene glycol-based buffers and highly enriched nuclear fractions are obtained using Percoll density gradients. Standard and small-scale protocols are presented, along with a tested method for nuclear run-on assays. The entire process may be completed within 3 days. This capability complements the immense body of steady-state transcript measurements and indirectly identifies instances where message turnover may have a critical and/or primary role in regulating gene expression levels.

  6. Viscometer for low frequency, low shear rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berg, R. F.; Moldover, M. R.

    1986-01-01

    A computer-controlled torsion-oscillator viscometer with low 0.5 Hz frequency and very low 0.05/s shear rate is designed to precisely study shear-sensitive fluids such as microemulsions, gels, polymer solutions and melts, colloidal solutions undergoing coagulation, and liquid mixtures near critical points. The viscosities are obtained from measurements of the logarithmic decrement of an underdriven oscillator. The viscometer is found to have a resolution of 0.2 percent when used with liquid samples and a resolution of 0.4 percent when used with a dense gaseous sample. The design is compatible with submillikelvin temperature control.

  7. Seabed measurements of modern corrosion rates on the Florida escarpment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paull, C.K.; Commeau, R.F.; Curray, Joseph R.; Neumann, A.C.

    1991-01-01

    A mooring containing diverse carbonate and anhydrite substrates was exposed to bottom waters for 9 months at the base of the Florida Escarpment to determine the influence of dissolution on the development of this continental margin. Weight loss was measured on all samples. Etching, pitting, and loss of the original framework components were observed on substrates with known characteristics. Extrapolations of modern dissolution rates predict only about 1.6 meters of corrosion per million years. However, more rapid anhydrite dissolution, up to 1 km per million years, would cause exposed anhydrite beds to undercut and destabilize intercalated limestones. ?? 1991 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  8. Prospects for DNA methods to measure human heritable mutation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Mendelsohn, M.L.

    1985-06-14

    A workshop cosponsored by ICPEMC and the US Department of Energy was held in Alta, Utah, December 9-13, 1984 to examine the extent to which DNA-oriented methods might provide new approaches to the important but intractable problem of measuring mutation rates in control and exposed human populations. The workshop identified and analyzed six DNA methods for detection of human heritable mutation, including several created at the meeting, and concluded that none of the methods combine sufficient feasibility and efficiency to be recommended for general application. 8 refs.

  9. OSL-based lateral progradation and aeolian sediment accumulation rates for the Apalachicola Barrier Island Complex, North Gulf of Mexico, Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rink, W. J.; López, G. I.

    2010-11-01

    Vertical sediment cores in five separate beach ridge complexes along the north-east Gulf of Mexico Coast were recovered and dated using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) dating of quartz: these are located on Cape San Blas (CSB), Little St. George Island (LSGI), Richardson's Hammock (RH), St. Joseph Peninsula (SJP) and Saint Vincent Island (SVI). All of these landforms are coastal barrier systems situated along a 100 km stretch of the Florida Panhandle, U.S.A. Two samples were collected for dating from each core. Ridge accumulation rates (RAR) associated with lateral progradation were calculated from the dated samples. We also determined average sediment accumulation rates (ASAR) for two intervals within each sediment core. All OSL ages within the sediment cores were found to be in stratigraphic order or in a few cases statistically indistinguishable. Moreover, all dated ridges were found to be in correct temporal sequence based on their geomorphic positions. Rapidly accreted sequences were found to be backed by St. Joseph Bay in the western region of the study area. More slowly accreted sequences were associated with the more eastern stretches of the study area backed by St. Vincent Sound and Apalachicola Bay. Our ASAR results are in accord with an Australian study of modern dune accumulation. Perhaps our most important finding is that in the barrier island environments of this north-eastern Gulf Coast region, aeolian sedimentation continues well after full vegetative cover develops and stranding of landward ridges takes place. This confirms our similar earlier observation on SVI (López and Rink, 2008). We find that up to approximately one order of magnitude lower sedimentation rates occur after an initial period of more rapid aeolian accumulation for the vertical intervals studied in foredune ridges. Lateral progradation rates of ridge sequences were highly variable within the study area, ranging from 92 to 848 m/100 years, but we did find agreement

  10. Optical refractive synchronization: bit error rate analysis and measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, James R.

    1999-11-01

    The direction of this paper is to describe the analytical tools and measurement techniques used at SilkRoad to evaluate the optical and electrical signals used in Optical Refractive Synchronization for transporting SONET signals across the transmission fiber. Fundamentally, the direction of this paper is to provide an outline of how SilkRoad, Inc., transports a multiplicity of SONET signals across a distance of fiber > 100 Km without amplification or regeneration of the optical signal, i.e., one laser over one fiber. Test and measurement data are presented to reflect how the SilkRoad technique of Optical Refractive Synchronization is employed to provide a zero bit error rate for transmission of multiple OC-12 and OC-48 SONET signals that are sent over a fiber optical cable which is > 100Km. The recovery and transformation modules are described for the modification and transportation of these SONET signals.

  11. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice.

    PubMed

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-08-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10(-9) (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10(-9)-6.5 × 10(-9)) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population.

  12. Germline mutation rates and the long-term phenotypic effects of mutation accumulation in wild-type laboratory mice and mutator mice

    PubMed Central

    Uchimura, Arikuni; Higuchi, Mayumi; Minakuchi, Yohei; Ohno, Mizuki; Toyoda, Atsushi; Fujiyama, Asao; Miura, Ikuo; Wakana, Shigeharu; Nishino, Jo; Yagi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The germline mutation rate is an important parameter that affects the amount of genetic variation and the rate of evolution. However, neither the rate of germline mutations in laboratory mice nor the biological significance of the mutation rate in mammalian populations is clear. Here we studied genome-wide mutation rates and the long-term effects of mutation accumulation on phenotype in more than 20 generations of wild-type C57BL/6 mice and mutator mice, which have high DNA replication error rates. We estimated the base-substitution mutation rate to be 5.4 × 10−9 (95% confidence interval = 4.6 × 10−9–6.5 × 10−9) per nucleotide per generation in C57BL/6 laboratory mice, about half the rate reported in humans. The mutation rate in mutator mice was 17 times that in wild-type mice. Abnormal phenotypes were 4.1-fold more frequent in the mutator lines than in the wild-type lines. After several generations, the mutator mice reproduced at substantially lower rates than the controls, exhibiting low pregnancy rates, lower survival rates, and smaller litter sizes, and many of the breeding lines died out. These results provide fundamental information about mouse genetics and reveal the impact of germline mutation rates on phenotypes in a mammalian population. PMID:26129709

  13. Dynamic flux chamber measurements of hydrogen sulfide emission rate from a quiescent surface--A computational evaluation.

    PubMed

    Prata, Ademir A; Santos, Jane M; Beghi, Sandra P; Fernandes, Isabella F; Vom Marttens, Lya L C; Pereira Neto, Leovegildo I; Martins, Ramon S; Reis, Neyval C; Stuetz, Richard M

    2016-03-01

    Enclosure devices have been studied and used for research purposes and practical applications in order to measure the emission rate of odorous pollutants from quiescent liquid surfaces to atmosphere. However, important questions remain about the interference of these measuring devices on the actual emission rate. The main concern regarding the use of a flux chamber is the fact that odorous compounds can accumulate into the chamber and yield gas-phase concentration increase inside the equipment, which causes a reduction of the emission rate during the measurement and thus gives an inaccurate local emission rate. Furthermore, the fluid flow inside the chamber does not reproduce the atmospheric boundary layer flow. This study applied the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) technique in order to investigate the influence of the fluid flow features inside a flux chamber on the measured hydrogen sulfide emission rate at quiescent liquid surfaces. The flux chamber design and operational conditions are those supported by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA). The results show that the US EPA flux chamber presents a fairly well mixed air phase. However, a trend to stagnation and hydrogen sulfide accumulation near chamber walls was detected in the computational simulation, which also indicated that the positioning of the sampling tube in relation to the inlet orifices may lead to deviations in the measurement results. CFD results showed that the wall shear and concentration gradients spatially vary at the gas-liquid interface, and friction velocity inside the chamber does not match typical values of atmospheric flow. PMID:26741548

  14. Measurement of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares

    SciTech Connect

    Van Velzen, Sjoert

    2014-09-01

    We report an observational estimate of the rate of stellar tidal disruption flares (TDFs) in inactive galaxies based on a successful search for these events among transients in galaxies using archival Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) multi-epoch imaging data (Stripe 82). This search yielded 186 nuclear flares in galaxies, 2 of which are excellent TDF candidates. Because of the systematic nature of the search, the very large number of galaxies, the long time of observation, and the fact that non-TDFs were excluded without resorting to assumptions about TDF characteristics, this study provides an unparalleled opportunity to measure the TDF rate. To compute the rate of optical stellar tidal disruption events, we simulate our entire pipeline to obtain the efficiency of detection. The rate depends on the light curves of TDFs, which are presently still poorly constrained. Using only the observed part of the SDSS light curves gives a model-independent upper limit to the optical TDF rate, N-dot <2×10{sup −4} yr{sup −1} galaxy{sup −1} (90% CL), under the assumption that the SDSS TDFs are representative examples. We develop three empirical models of the light curves based on the two SDSS light curves and two more recent and better-sampled Pan-STARRS TDF light curves, leading to our best estimate of the rate: N-dot {sub TDF}=(1.5--2.0){sub −1.3}{sup +2.7}×10{sup −5} yr{sup −1} galaxy{sup −1}. We explore the modeling uncertainties by considering two theoretically motivated light curve models, as well as two different relationships between black hole mass and galaxy luminosity, and two different treatments of the cutoff in the visibility of TDFs at large M {sub BH}. From this we conclude that these sources of uncertainty are not significantly larger than the statistical ones. Our results are applicable for galaxies hosting black holes with mass in the range of a few 10{sup 6}-10{sup 8} M {sub ☉}, and translates to a volumetric TDF rate of (4-8) × 10{sup –8

  15. Measurement and relevance of maximum metabolic rate in fishes.

    PubMed

    Norin, T; Clark, T D

    2016-01-01

    Maximum (aerobic) metabolic rate (MMR) is defined here as the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2max ) that a fish can achieve at a given temperature under any ecologically relevant circumstance. Different techniques exist for eliciting MMR of fishes, of which swim-flume respirometry (critical swimming speed tests and burst-swimming protocols) and exhaustive chases are the most common. Available data suggest that the most suitable method for eliciting MMR varies with species and ecotype, and depends on the propensity of the fish to sustain swimming for extended durations as well as its capacity to simultaneously exercise and digest food. MMR varies substantially (>10 fold) between species with different lifestyles (i.e. interspecific variation), and to a lesser extent (measuring this trait has spread across disciplines in attempts to predict effects of climate change on fish populations. Here, various techniques used to elicit and measure MMR in different fish species with contrasting lifestyles are outlined and the relevance of MMR to the ecology, fitness and climate change resilience of fishes is discussed.

  16. Homogeneous nucleation rate measurements in supersaturated water vapor II.

    PubMed

    Brus, David; Zdímal, Vladimír; Uchtmann, Hermann

    2009-08-21

    The homogeneous nucleation of water was studied experimentally in this work using a thermal diffusion cloud chamber; droplets were counted by the photomultiplier method and helium was used as a carrier gas. The nucleation rates range from 3x10(-2) to 3x10(1) cm(-3) s(-1) and six isotherms from 295 to 320 K with step of 5 K are measured. The experimental setup and obtained data are mutually compared to our previous publication [Brus et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 174501 (2008)], where the droplets were counted using digital photography and image processing. The molecular content of the critical clusters was estimated from the slopes of experimental data. The measured isothermal dependencies of the nucleation rate of water on the saturation ratio were compared with previously published data of others, several theoretical predictions, and the former nucleation onset data. The aim of the present investigation was to show for the first time that nucleation results can be quantitatively reproduced with two different experimental setups operated in different ways. PMID:19708751

  17. Snowfall Rate Retrieval using NPP ATMS Passive Microwave Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meng, Huan; Ferraro, Ralph; Kongoli, Cezar; Wang, Nai-Yu; Dong, Jun; Zavodsky, Bradley; Yan, Banghua; Zhao, Limin

    2014-01-01

    Passive microwave measurements at certain high frequencies are sensitive to the scattering effect of snow particles and can be utilized to retrieve snowfall properties. Some of the microwave sensors with snowfall sensitive channels are Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU), Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) and Advance Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS). ATMS is the follow-on sensor to AMSU and MHS. Currently, an AMSU and MHS based land snowfall rate (SFR) product is running operationally at NOAA/NESDIS. Based on the AMSU/MHS SFR, an ATMS SFR algorithm has been developed recently. The algorithm performs retrieval in three steps: snowfall detection, retrieval of cloud properties, and estimation of snow particle terminal velocity and snowfall rate. The snowfall detection component utilizes principal component analysis and a logistic regression model. The model employs a combination of temperature and water vapor sounding channels to detect the scattering signal from falling snow and derive the probability of snowfall (Kongoli et al., 2014). In addition, a set of NWP model based filters is also employed to improve the accuracy of snowfall detection. Cloud properties are retrieved using an inversion method with an iteration algorithm and a two-stream radiative transfer model (Yan et al., 2008). A method developed by Heymsfield and Westbrook (2010) is adopted to calculate snow particle terminal velocity. Finally, snowfall rate is computed by numerically solving a complex integral. The ATMS SFR product is validated against radar and gauge snowfall data and shows that the ATMS algorithm outperforms the AMSU/MHS SFR.

  18. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate. PMID:26233381

  19. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements.

    PubMed

    Ware, M J; Bergeson, S D; Ellsworth, J E; Groesbeck, M; Hansen, J E; Pace, D; Peatross, J

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of (22)Na, (36)Cl, (54)Mn, (60)Co, (90)Sr, (133)Ba, (137)Cs, (152)Eu, and (154)Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  20. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, M. J.; Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-01

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of 22Na, 36Cl, 54Mn, 60Co, 90Sr, 133Ba, 137Cs, 152Eu, and 154Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  1. Instrument for precision long-term β-decay rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Ware, M. J. Bergeson, S. D.; Ellsworth, J. E.; Groesbeck, M.; Hansen, J. E.; Pace, D.; Peatross, J.

    2015-07-15

    We describe an experimental setup for making precision measurements of relative β-decay rates of {sup 22}Na, {sup 36}Cl, {sup 54}Mn, {sup 60}Co, {sup 90}Sr, {sup 133}Ba, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 152}Eu, and {sup 154}Eu. The radioactive samples are mounted in two automated sample changers that sequentially position the samples with high spatial precision in front of sets of detectors. The set of detectors for one sample changer consists of four Geiger-Müller (GM) tubes and the other set of detectors consists of two NaI scintillators. The statistical uncertainty in the count rate is few times 0.01% per day for the GM detectors and about 0.01% per hour on the NaI detectors. The sample changers, detectors, and associated electronics are housed in a sealed chamber held at constant absolute pressure, humidity, and temperature to isolate the experiment from environmental variations. The apparatus is designed to accumulate statistics over many years in a regulated environment to test recent claims of small annual variations in the decay rates. We demonstrate that absent this environmental regulation, uncontrolled natural atmospheric pressure variations at our location would imprint an annual signal of 0.1% on the Geiger-Müller count rate. However, neither natural pressure variations nor plausible indoor room temperature variations cause a discernible influence on our NaI scintillator detector count rate.

  2. Sediment accumulation rates and high-resolution stratigraphy of recent fluvial suspension deposits in various fluvial settings, Morava River catchment area, Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláček, Jan; Bábek, Ondřej; Kielar, Ondřej

    2016-02-01

    We present a comprehensive study concerning sedimentary processes in fluvial sediment traps within the Morava River catchment area (Czech Republic) involving three dammed reservoirs, four meanders and oxbow lakes, and several natural floodplain sites. The objective of the study was to determine sediment accumulation rates (SAR), estimate erosion rates, calculating these using a combination of the 137Cs method and historical data. Another purpose of this study was to provide insight into changing erosion and accumulation rates over the last century. Extensive water course modifications were carried out in the Morava River catchment area during the twentieth century, which likely affected sedimentation rates along the river course. Other multiproxy stratigraphic methods (X-ray densitometry, magnetic susceptibility, and visible-light reflectance spectrometry) were applied to obtain additional information about sediment infill. Sediment stratigraphy revealed distinct distal-to-proximal patterns, especially in reservoirs. Granulometrically, silts and sandy silts prevailed in sediments. Oxbow lakes and meanders contained larger amounts of clay and organic matter, which is the main difference between them and reservoirs. Pronounced 137Cs peaks were recorded in all studied cores (maximum 377 Bq·kg- 1), thus indicating Chernobyl fallout from 1986 or older events. Calculated sediment accumulation rates were lowest in distal parts of reservoirs (0.13-0.58 cm/y) and floodplains (0.45-0.88 cm/y), moderately high rates were found in proximal parts of reservoirs and oxbow lakes (2.27-4.4 cm/y), and the highest rates in some oxbow lakes located near the river (6-8 cm/y). The frequency of the inundation still can be high in some natural areas as in the Litovelské Pomoraví protected area, whereas the decreasing frequency of the inundation in other modified parts can contribute to a lower sedimentation rate. The local effects such as difference between SARs in oxbow lakes and

  3. Attitude/attitude-rate estimation from GPS differential phase measurements using integrated-rate parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oshman, Yaakov; Markley, Landis

    1998-01-01

    A sequential filtering algorithm is presented for attitude and attitude-rate estimation from Global Positioning System (GPS) differential carrier phase measurements. A third-order, minimal-parameter method for solving the attitude matrix kinematic equation is used to parameterize the filter's state, which renders the resulting estimator computationally efficient. Borrowing from tracking theory concepts, the angular acceleration is modeled as an exponentially autocorrelated stochastic process, thus avoiding the use of the uncertain spacecraft dynamic model. The new formulation facilitates the use of aiding vector observations in a unified filtering algorithm, which can enhance the method's robustness and accuracy. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the performance of the method.

  4. Increasing sediment accumulation rates in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon axis and their relationship with bottom trawling activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puig, P.; Martín, J.; Masqué, P.; Palanques, A.

    2015-10-01

    Previous studies conducted in La Fonera (Palamós) submarine canyon (NW Mediterranean) found that trawling activities along the canyon flanks cause resuspension and transport of sediments toward the canyon axis. 210Pb chronology supported by 137Cs dating applied to a sediment core collected at 1750 m in 2002 suggested a doubling of the sediment accumulation rate since the 1970s, coincident with the rapid industrialization of the local trawling fleet. The same canyon area has been revisited a decade later, and new data are consistent with a sedimentary regime shift during the 1970s and also suggest that the accumulation rate during the last decade could be greater than expected, approaching ~2.4 cm yr-1 (compared to ~0.25 cm yr-1 pre-1970s). These results support the hypothesis that commercial bottom trawling can substantially affect sediment dynamics and budgets on continental margins, eventually initiating the formation of anthropogenic depocenters in submarine canyon environments.

  5. Measurement of Carbon Dioxide Accumulation and Physiological Function in the Launch and Entry and Advanced Crew Escape Suits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bishop, Phillip; Greenisen, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    The Launch and Entry Suit (LES) and Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES) are worn by astronauts for launch and entry. Previous work by Waligora, et al., 1992, Waligora and Gilbert, 1992, and Dalrymple 1996, have found that carbon dioxide (CO2) accumulation in the LES/ACES helmet may be problematic. CO2 accumulation is important because high inspired levels of CO2 reduce physical function and pose a safety hazard (e.g. levels of CO2 accumulation of 3.6% in the Extravehicular Mobility Unit are sufficient to terminate Extra Vehicular Activities). My task was to design a suitable test protocol for determining the important physiological aspects of LES/ACES use. Three basic issues arose. First was the determination of the astronaut's CO2 inspiration during visor-down use at rest and during walking at 3.5 mph. A sub-issue was the impact of a pneumotach on CO2 since it has been previously observed that when the Aerosport pneumotach was used, performance seemed improved, which might be attributable to a lowered respiration rate when using the pneumotach. The second issue was the energy costs of waLking in the LES/ACES with various G-suit inflation levels, since G-suit inflation increases metabolic costs and metabolic costs influence the C02 production in the LES/ACES helmet. Since G-suit inflation improves orthostatic tolerance after space flight, but likely increases the energy costs of walking, the balance between G-suit inflation and C02 accumulation is an important safety consideration. The third issue which arose from pilot work was the substantial reduction in physical function after a 10 min visor-down period prior to walk.

  6. Computing the rates of measurement-induced quantum jumps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Michel; Bernard, Denis; Tilloy, Antoine

    2015-06-01

    Small quantum systems can now be continuously monitored experimentally which allows for the reconstruction of quantum trajectories. A peculiar feature of these trajectories is the emergence of jumps between the eigenstates of the observable which is measured. Using the stochastic master equation (SME) formalism for continuous quantum measurements, we show that the density matrix of a system indeed shows a jumpy behaviour when it is subjected to a tight measurement (even if the noise in the SME is Gaussian). We are able to compute the jump rates analytically for any system evolution, i.e. any Lindbladian, and we illustrate how our general recipe can be applied to two simple examples. We then discuss the mathematical, foundational and practical applications of our results. The analysis we present is based on a study of the strong noise limit of a class of stochastic differential equations (the SME) and as such the method may be applicable to other physical situations in which a strong noise limit plays a role.

  7. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  8. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen. PMID:27532007

  9. How Integrated Management Strategies Promote Protein Quality of Cotton Embryos: High Levels of Soil Available N, N Assimilation and Protein Accumulation Rate.

    PubMed

    Yang, HongKun; Meng, YaLi; Chen, BingLin; Zhang, XingYue; Wang, YouHua; Zhao, WenQing; Zhou, ZhiGuo

    2016-01-01

    Cottonseed is widely used as a source of ruminant feed and for industrial purposes. Therefore, there is a tremendous need to improve the nutritional value of cotton embryos. In this study, a conventional management (CM) and two integrated cotton management strategies (IMS1, IMS2) were performed at two soil fertility levels to study the relationships among soil N, N assimilation, embryonic protein accumulation and protein quality. The levels of proteins, essential amino acids, and semi-essential amino acids, especially those of glutamate, lysine, and methionine, were higher in IMS1 and IMS2 embryos than in CM embryos. These changes were significantly positively correlated with the soil-available N content, glutamine synthetase activity and peak value of protein accumulation rate and were negatively correlated with the free amino acid level. These results illustrated that integrated management strategies, especially the rates and timing of N application, raise the level of soil available N, which is beneficial for N assimilation in developing cotton embryos. The protein content was limited by the rate of protein accumulation rather than by the free amino acid content. The combination of target yield fertilization, a growth-driven N application schedule, a high plant density and the seedling raising with bio-organic fertilizer can substantially improve protein quality in cotton embryos, especially at a soil with low soil organic matter and total nitrogen.

  10. Measurement of outgassing rate for GTAW welded SS304 materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukhari, Mohsin; Mukherjee, Samiran; Panchal, Paresh; Gangradey, Ranjana; Shukla, Ajit Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Outgassing plays an important role to achieve Ultra High Vacuum (UHV) and to maintaining the required vacuum level of the vessel. For a large size machines like Tokamak, accelerators, space simulation chambers, outgassing from the structural materials and their welding sections need to be checked during the design. Hence studies were carried out for the measurement of outgassing rate for the Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) welded SS304 materials at OutGassing Measurement System (OGMS) at IPR Extension Lab. The system consists of two chambers, pumping chamber and sample chamber, made up of 304 grades Stainless Steel pre-air baked at 400 °C. The pumping chamber connected to a turbo molecular pump having pumping speed 240 l/s, backed by a rotary vacuum pump having pumping speed 5m3/hour. Pumping chamber and sample chamber connected through a 100 CF flange having a circular aperture of 5.2 mm diameter. The conductance of aperture is 2.47 l/s. Bare SS304 sample & GTAW welded SS304 samples are prepared with 100mmX50mmX5mm and 95mmX55mmX5mm dimensions respectively. The base outgassing rate of the blank system is 2.34×10-11 mbar l/s-cm2. The calculated outgassing rate is 3.66×10-10 & 4.37×10-10 mbar l/s-cm2 for bare sample & welded sample. From the partial pressure analysis it has been found that hydrogen and nitrogen are in the partial level of 3.35×10-9 & 2.36×10-9 for bare sample and 3.14×10-9 mbar & 2.33×10-9 mbar for welded sample. It has been observed that, the GTAW doesn't have major effect on outgassing rate and one can use welded joint for designing a large vessel welding sections.

  11. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehead, C. A.; Cannon, B. D.; Wacker, J. F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure Kr-85 concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce Kr-85 to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p(sub 6) state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the Kr-85 isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p(sub 8) energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 x 10(exp 5)/sec have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of g reater than 10(exp 6). The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by Kr-85. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2-3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  12. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure {sup 85}Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce {sup 85}Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p{sub 6} state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the {sup 85}Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p{sub 8} energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 {times} 10{sup 5} sec{sup {minus}1} have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10{sup 6}. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by {sup 85}Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  13. Excitation rate and background measurements during LIF studies on krypton

    SciTech Connect

    Whitehead, C.A.; Cannon, B.D.; Wacker, J.F.

    1993-04-01

    The Krypton Isotope Laser Analysis (KILA) method is being developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to measure [sup 85]Kr concentrations in small air samples. The technique uses high-resolution lasers to excite individual isotopes of krypton specifically to induce [sup 85]Kr to fluorescence for detection by optical means. Production of krypton metastables via two-photon excitation to the 2p[sub 6] state has been shown to be 0.15% efficient in 0.13 mTorr of krypton--sufficiently high to demonstrate overall feasibility of the KILA method. Since this goal was met, focus has been directed toward development of a working vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) fluorescence detection system and toward understanding the VUV background. This report describes the progress made in these two areas. The second step of the KILA process is to optically pump all except the [sup 85]Kr isotopes from the metastable state back to the ground state using laser-induced fluorescence (LIF). The rate of this process and the VUV background afterward will determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the KILA approach. De-excitation of the metastable population was accomplished via one-photon absorption of a continuous-wave (c-w) laser to the 2p[sub 8] energy level. Non-isotopically selective de-excitation rates as high as 5 [times] 10[sup 5] sec[sup [minus]1] have been measured, yielding a signal-to-background ratio of >10[sup 6]. The lifetime of the metastables is 1.2 msec in 200 mTorr of neon--much longer than the time required to de-excite krypton metastables and to detect fluorescence produced by [sup 85]Kr. After attaining these high de-excitation rates, a gated VUV detection system was built with a dynamic range large enough to measure a small background following de-excitation of large metastable populations. Future experiments will focus on reducing the background level by another 2--3 orders of magnitude and perfecting the isotopically selective de-excitation technique with known samples.

  14. The "Lung": a software-controlled air accumulator for quasi-continuous multi-point measurement of agricultural greenhouse gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, R. J.; Bromley, A. M.; Harvey, M. J.; Moss, R. C.; Pattey, E.; Dow, D.

    2011-10-01

    We describe the design and testing of a flexible bag ("Lung") accumulator attached to a gas chromatographic (GC) analyzer capable of measuring surface-atmosphere greenhouse gas exchange fluxes in a wide range of environmental/agricultural settings. In the design presented here, the Lung can collect up to three gas samples concurrently, each accumulated into a Tedlar bag over a period of 20 min or longer. Toggling collection between 2 sets of 3 bags enables quasi-continuous collection with sequential analysis and discarding of sample residues. The Lung thus provides a flexible "front end" collection system for interfacing to a GC or alternative analyzer and has been used in 2 main types of application. Firstly, it has been applied to micrometeorological assessment of paddock-scale N2O fluxes, discussed here. Secondly, it has been used for the automation of concurrent emission assessment from three sheep housed in metabolic crates with gas tracer addition and sampling multiplexed to a single GC. The Lung allows the same GC equipment used in laboratory discrete sample analysis to be deployed for continuous field measurement. Continuity of measurement enables spatially-averaged N2O fluxes in particular to be determined with greater accuracy, given the highly heterogeneous and episodic nature of N2O emissions. We present a detailed evaluation of the micrometeorological flux estimation alongside an independent tuneable diode laser system, reporting excellent agreement between flux estimates based on downwind vertical concentration differences. Whilst the current design is based around triplet bag sets, the basic design could be scaled up to a larger number of inlets or bags and less frequent analysis (longer accumulation times) where a greater number of sampling points are required.

  15. Measured differences in snow accumulation and melt among clearcut, juvenile, and mature forests in southern British Columbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, R. D.; Spittlehouse, D. L.; Golding, D. L.

    2005-01-01

    Quantification of the relationships between snow and forest cover, including its removal through logging, insects or disease and its regrowth, is a prerequisite to assessing the effects of forestry practices on streamflow from montane and boreal forest watersheds. Over a 3 year period, a juvenile and a juvenile-thinned lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta Dougl.) stand, a mature mixed Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii Parry), subalpine fir (Abies lasiocarpa (Hook.) Nutt) and lodgepole pine stand, and a clearcut were intensively surveyed to quantify differences in snow water equivalent (SWE). Daily snowmelt, weather conditions, and the energy balance were measured during the first year of this study. The 1 April SWE was 32% and 14% less under the mature and juvenile forests respectively than in the clearcut. No significant differences in peak SWE were measured between the juvenile and juvenile-thinned stands. Continuous snowmelt lysimeter measurements showed that snowmelt began earlier, accumulated more rapidly, and disappeared 2 to 4 days earlier in the juvenile-thinned stand than in either the unthinned juvenile stand or the clearcut. When the snowpack had disappeared from the clearcut and juvenile stands, 30% of the SWE on 1 April remained in the mature forest. The results not only show that snow accumulation and melt differ significantly between clearcut, juvenile, and mature stands, but also that snowmelt patterns vary among juvenile stands with distinct structural differences. This is due to the difference in the energy balances, dominated by radiant heat fluxes, of the four sites. Copyright

  16. Measurement of sulfur dioxide reaction rates in wintertime orographic clouds

    SciTech Connect

    Snider, J.R.

    1989-01-01

    Releases of SO2 into the wintertime orographic clouds at Elk Mountain in southeastern Wyoming were utilized to accelerate the rate of SO2 oxidation to cloud-water dissolved sulfate (SO4(-2)). Background SO2 mixing ratios were 0.6 parts-per-billion by volume (ppbv) and were consistent with the remote location of the experimental site and with supplemental cloud water, snow, and aerosol composition measurements. Background mixing ratios of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the organohydroperoxides, expressed as methyl hydroperoxide (MHP), were 0.15 and 0.17 ppbv, respectively. The concentration of H2O2 in cloud water, obtained as rime, was also monitored. Analysis of these findings suggests that both reactive loss of H2O2 and volatilization during riming are mechanisms for H2O2 loss. The pseudo first-order SO2 depletion rates varied between 2 and 72 percent /hr (x=32 plus or minus 22 percent/hr, n=10). Observed depletions of H2O2 (x=0.030 ppbv) were consistent with observed yields of SO4(-2) (x=0.027 ppbv) and with model predictions. Observed depletions of MHP were not significantly different from 0.0 ppbv. This observation is both consistent with the much smaller solubility of MHP, compared with H2O2, and with the results of 16 model simulations. Reactions between dissolved SO2 and O3, between SO2 and O2, and between SO2 and HCHO were calculated to contribute less than 40 percent to the total amount of SO4(-2). These reactions were inferred to be inhibited by the low pH (less than 5) of the Elk Mountain cloud water. It is concluded that H2O2 is the dominant SO2 oxidant in these clouds, and that the laboratory measurements form an adequate basis for predicting the rate of in-cloud oxidation of SO2 by H2O2.

  17. Gamma radiation measurements and dose rates in commercially-used natural tiling rocks (granites).

    PubMed

    Tzortzis, Michalis; Tsertos, Haralabos; Christofides, Stelios; Christodoulides, George

    2003-01-01

    The gamma radiation in samples of a variety of natural tiling rocks (granites) imported in Cyprus for use in the building industry was measured, employing high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy. The rock samples were pulverised, sealed in 1-l plastic Marinelli beakers, and measured in the laboratory with an accumulating time between 10 and 14 h each. From the measured gamma-ray spectra, activity concentrations were determined for (232)Th (range from 1 to 906 Bq kg(-1)), (238)U (from 1 to 588 Bq kg(-1)) and (40)K (from 50 to 1606 Bq kg(-1)). The total absorbed dose rates in air calculated from the concentrations of the three radionuclides ranged from 7 to 1209 nGy h(-1) for full utilization of the materials, from 4 to 605 nGy h(-1) for half utilization and from 2 to 302 nGy h(-1) for one quarter utilization. The total effective dose rates per person indoors were determined to be between 0.02 and 2.97 mSv y(-1) for half utilization of the materials. Applying dose criteria recently recommended by the EU for superficial materials, 25 of the samples meet the exemption dose limit of 0.3 mSv y(-1), two of them meet the upper dose limit of 1 mSv y(-1) and only one clearly exceeds this limit.

  18. Under-canopy snow accumulation and ablation measured with airborne scanning LiDAR altimetry and in-situ instrumental measurements, southern Sierra Nevada, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.; Musselman, K. N.; Molotch, N. P.

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of canopy on snow accumulation and melt in a mountain forest using paired snow on and snow off scanning LiDAR altimetry, synoptic measurement campaigns and in-situ time series data of snow depth, SWE, and radiation collected from the Kaweah River watershed, Sierra Nevada, California. Our analysis of forest cover classified by dominant species and 1 m2 grided mean under canopy snow accumulation calculated from airborne scanning LiDAR, demonstrate distinct relationships between forest class and under-canopy snow depth. The five forest types were selected from carefully prepared 1 m vegetation classifications and named for their dominant tree species, Giant Sequoia, Jeffrey Pine, White Fir, Red Fir, Sierra Lodgepole, Western White Pine, and Foxtail Pine. Sufficient LiDAR returns for calculating mean snow depth per m2 were available for 31 - 44% of the canopy covered area and demonstrate a reduction in snow depth of 12 - 24% from adjacent open areas. The coefficient of variation in snow depth under canopies ranged from 0.2 - 0.42 and generally decreased as elevation increased. Our analysis of snow density snows no statistical significance between snow under canopies and in the open at higher elevations with a weak significance for snow under canopies at lower elevations. Incident radiation measurements made at 15 minute intervals under forest canopies show an input of up to 150 w/m2 of thermal radiation from vegetation to the snow surface on forest plots. Snow accumulated on the mid to high elevation forested slopes of the Sierra Nevada represents the majority of winter snow storage. However snow estimates in forested environments demonstrate a high level of uncertainty due to the limited number of in-situ observations and the inability of most remote sensing platforms to retrieve reflectance under dense vegetation. Snow under forest canopies is strongly mediated by forest cover and decoupled from the processes that dictate accumulation

  19. 40 CFR 86.1726-99 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... tested in accordance with the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET; 40 CFR part 600, subpart B). The... ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Provisions for the Voluntary National Low Emission Vehicle Program for Light... measurements. The provisions of § 86.096-26 and subsequent model year provisions apply to this subpart,...

  20. 40 CFR 86.1726-99 - Mileage and service accumulation; emission measurements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... tested in accordance with the federal Highway Fuel Economy Test (HWFET; 40 CFR part 600, subpart B). The... ENGINES (CONTINUED) General Provisions for the Voluntary National Low Emission Vehicle Program for Light... measurements. The provisions of § 86.096-26 and subsequent model year provisions apply to this subpart,...

  1. Inferential consequences of modeling rather than measuring snow accumulation in studies of animal ecology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, Faul C.; Klaver, Robert W.; Brennan, Angela; Creel, Scott; Beckmann, Jon P.; Higgs, Megan D.; Scurlock, Brandon M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. It is increasingly common for studies of animal ecology to use model-based predictions of environmental variables as explanatory or predictor variables, even though model prediction uncertainty is typically unknown. To demonstrate the potential for misleading inferences when model predictions with error are used in place of direct measurements, we compared snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth as predicted by the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) to field measurements of SWE and snow depth. We examined locations on elk (Cervus canadensis) winter ranges in western Wyoming, because modeled data such as SNODAS output are often used for inferences on elk ecology. Overall, SNODAS predictions tended to overestimate field measurements, prediction uncertainty was high, and the difference between SNODAS predictions and field measurements was greater in snow shadows for both snow variables compared to non-snow shadow areas. We used a simple simulation of snow effects on the probability of an elk being killed by a predator to show that, if SNODAS prediction uncertainty was ignored, we might have mistakenly concluded that SWE was not an important factor in where elk were killed in predatory attacks during the winter. In this simulation, we were interested in the effects of snow at finer scales (2) than the resolution of SNODAS. If bias were to decrease when SNODAS predictions are averaged over coarser scales, SNODAS would be applicable to population-level ecology studies. In our study, however, averaging predictions over moderate to broad spatial scales (9–2200 km2) did not reduce the differences between SNODAS predictions and field measurements. This study highlights the need to carefully evaluate two issues when using model output as an explanatory variable in subsequent analysis: (1) the model’s resolution relative to the scale of the ecological question of interest and (2) the implications of prediction uncertainty on inferences when using model

  2. Inferential consequences of modeling rather than measuring snow accumulation in studies of animal ecology.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Angela; Cross, Paul C; Higgs, Megan; Beckmann, Jon P; Klaver, Robert W; Scurlock, Brandon M; Creel, Scott

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly common for studies of animal ecology to use model-based predictions of environmental variables as explanatory or predictor variables, even though model prediction uncertainty is typically unknown. To demonstrate the potential for misleading inferences when model predictions with error are used in place of direct measurements, we compared snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth as predicted by the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) to field measurements of SWE and snow depth. We examined locations on elk (Cervus canadensis) winter ranges in western Wyoming, because modeled data such as SNODAS output are often used for inferences on elk ecology. Overall, SNODAS predictions tended to overestimate field measurements, prediction uncertainty was high, and the difference between SNODAS predictions and field measurements was greater in snow shadows for both snow variables compared to non-snow shadow areas. We used a simple simulation of snow effects on the probability of an elk being killed by a predator to show that, if SNODAS prediction uncertainty was ignored, we might have mistakenly concluded that SWE was not an important factor in where elk were killed in predatory attacks during the winter. In this simulation, we were interested in the effects of snow at finer scales (< 1 km2) than the resolution of SNODAS. If bias were to decrease when SNODAS predictions are averaged over coarser scales, SNODAS would be applicable to population-level ecology studies. In our study, however, averaging predictions over moderate to broad spatial scales (9-2200 km2) did not reduce the differences between SNODAS predictions and field measurements. This study highlights the need to carefully evaluate two issues when using model output as an explanatory variable in subsequent analysis: (1) the model's resolution relative to the scale of the ecological question of interest and (2) the implications of prediction uncertainty on inferences when using model predictions

  3. Inferential consequences of modeling rather than measuring snow accumulation in studies of animal ecology.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Angela; Cross, Paul C; Higgs, Megan; Beckmann, Jon P; Klaver, Robert W; Scurlock, Brandon M; Creel, Scott

    2013-04-01

    It is increasingly common for studies of animal ecology to use model-based predictions of environmental variables as explanatory or predictor variables, even though model prediction uncertainty is typically unknown. To demonstrate the potential for misleading inferences when model predictions with error are used in place of direct measurements, we compared snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow depth as predicted by the Snow Data Assimilation System (SNODAS) to field measurements of SWE and snow depth. We examined locations on elk (Cervus canadensis) winter ranges in western Wyoming, because modeled data such as SNODAS output are often used for inferences on elk ecology. Overall, SNODAS predictions tended to overestimate field measurements, prediction uncertainty was high, and the difference between SNODAS predictions and field measurements was greater in snow shadows for both snow variables compared to non-snow shadow areas. We used a simple simulation of snow effects on the probability of an elk being killed by a predator to show that, if SNODAS prediction uncertainty was ignored, we might have mistakenly concluded that SWE was not an important factor in where elk were killed in predatory attacks during the winter. In this simulation, we were interested in the effects of snow at finer scales (< 1 km2) than the resolution of SNODAS. If bias were to decrease when SNODAS predictions are averaged over coarser scales, SNODAS would be applicable to population-level ecology studies. In our study, however, averaging predictions over moderate to broad spatial scales (9-2200 km2) did not reduce the differences between SNODAS predictions and field measurements. This study highlights the need to carefully evaluate two issues when using model output as an explanatory variable in subsequent analysis: (1) the model's resolution relative to the scale of the ecological question of interest and (2) the implications of prediction uncertainty on inferences when using model predictions

  4. Rotation Rate of Saturn's Magnetosphere using CAPS Plasma Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E.; Cooper, J.; Hartle, R.; Simpson, D.; Johnson, R.; Thomsen, M.; Arridge, C.

    2011-01-01

    We present the present status of an investigation of the rotation rate of Saturn's magnetosphere using a 3D velocity moment technique being developed at Goddard which is similar to the 2D version used by Sittler et al. for SOI and similar to that used by Thomsen et al.. This technique allows one to nearly cover the full energy range of the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) IMS from 1 V . E/Q < 50 kV. Since our technique maps the observations into a local inertial frame, it does work during roll maneuvers. We make comparisons with the bi-Maxwellian fitting technique developed by Wilson et al. and the similar velocity moment technique by Thomsen et al. . We concentrate our analysis when ion composition data is available, which is used to weight the non-compositional data, referred to as singles data, to separate H+, H2+ and water group ions (W+) from each other. The chosen periods have high enough telemetry rates (4 kbps or higher) so that coincidence ion data, similar to that used by Sittler et al. for SOI is available. The ion data set is especially valuable for measuring flow velocities for protons, which are more difficult to derive using singles data within the inner magnetosphere, where the signal is dominated by heavy ions (i.e., proton peak merges with W+ peak as low energy shoulder). Our technique uses a flux function, which is zero in the proper plasma flow frame, to estimate fluid parameter uncertainties. The comparisons investigate the experimental errors and potential for systematic errors in the analyses, including ours. The rolls provide the best data set when it comes to getting 4PI coverage of the plasma but are more susceptible to time aliasing effects. In the future we will then make comparisons with magnetic field observations, Saturn ionosphere conductivities as presently known and the field aligned currents necessary for the planet to enforce corotation of the rotating plasma.

  5. Low rate of Sinabung deformation inferred by GPS measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kriswati, Estu; Kuncoro, Henri; Meilano, Irwan

    2015-04-01

    A series of Sinabung volcano eruption occurred on August 27, 2010 for the first time after dormain probably several hundred years, continued until September 7, 2010. Ash plumes from the new eruption at Sinabung volcano reached at least 8 km above sea level. In September 15th, 2013, a new phase of Sinabung volcano eruption forces peoples surrounding the volcano to evacuate homes. The eruption is still continuing, ash plume are reaching 10 kilometer above summit. The eruptions also generate pyroclastic flows and lahars. A month before the eruption, seismicity of Sinabung volcano increased especially increased on number of deep volcanic earthquakes. GPS have been installed in 4 stations in the slope of Sinabung volcano in the distance of 2 - 8 km from summit. GPS data is recorded continuously and analyzed automatically to obtain the baseline between two points in Sinabung network. In this paper, GAMIT/GLOBK software is using to get the coordinates and baseline solutions precisely. Time-series show some periods of increased volcanic activity with low rate of deformation since August 2012. Rapid deformation occur after June 2013, the horizontal displacement is ranged 8 - 11.3 mm in the period of 2013 June - October. After first eruption on September 15 the inflation still continuing. Linear strain at a triangulation of GPS stations in the slope of Sinabung volcano during the period show an inflation in summit area.Long period of deformation measurement show inflation due to magmatic process beneath summit. Since no other significant precursor to the eruption, the information is important for early warning especially for volcanic activity with low rate deformation like Sinabung volcano.

  6. Leaf senescence in rice due to magnesium deficiency mediated defect in transpiration rate before sugar accumulation and chlorosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Ohmae, Yoshimi; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2013-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an essential macronutrient supporting various functions, including photosynthesis. However, the specific physiological responses to Mg deficiency remain elusive. In this study, 2-week-old rice seedlings (Oryza sativa. cv. Nipponbare) with three expanded leaves (L2-L4) were transferred to Mg-free nutrient solution for 8 days. In the absence of Mg, on day 8, L5 and L6 were completely developed, while L7 just emerged. We also studied several mineral deficiencies to identify specific responses to Mg deficiency. Each leaf was analyzed in terms of chlorophyll, starch, anthocyanin and carbohydrate metabolites, and only absence of Mg was found to cause irreversible senescence of L5. Resupply of Mg at various time points confirmed that the borderline of L5 death was between days 6 and 7 of Mg deficiency treatment. Decrease in chlorophyll concentration and starch accumulation occurred simultaneously in L5 and L6 blades on day 8. However, nutrient transport drastically decreased in L5 as early as day 6. These data suggest that the predominant response to Mg deficiency is a defect in transpiration flow. Furthermore, changes in myo-inositol and citrate concentrations were detected only in L5 when transpiration decreased, suggesting that they may constitute new biological markers of Mg deficiency.

  7. Leaf senescence in rice due to magnesium deficiency mediated defect in transpiration rate before sugar accumulation and chlorosis.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Natsuko I; Saito, Takayuki; Iwata, Naoko; Ohmae, Yoshimi; Iwata, Ren; Tanoi, Keitaro; Nakanishi, Tomoko M

    2013-08-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is an essential macronutrient supporting various functions, including photosynthesis. However, the specific physiological responses to Mg deficiency remain elusive. In this study, 2-week-old rice seedlings (Oryza sativa. cv. Nipponbare) with three expanded leaves (L2-L4) were transferred to Mg-free nutrient solution for 8 days. In the absence of Mg, on day 8, L5 and L6 were completely developed, while L7 just emerged. We also studied several mineral deficiencies to identify specific responses to Mg deficiency. Each leaf was analyzed in terms of chlorophyll, starch, anthocyanin and carbohydrate metabolites, and only absence of Mg was found to cause irreversible senescence of L5. Resupply of Mg at various time points confirmed that the borderline of L5 death was between days 6 and 7 of Mg deficiency treatment. Decrease in chlorophyll concentration and starch accumulation occurred simultaneously in L5 and L6 blades on day 8. However, nutrient transport drastically decreased in L5 as early as day 6. These data suggest that the predominant response to Mg deficiency is a defect in transpiration flow. Furthermore, changes in myo-inositol and citrate concentrations were detected only in L5 when transpiration decreased, suggesting that they may constitute new biological markers of Mg deficiency. PMID:23176135

  8. Reference Materials for Reactor Neutron Fluence Rate and Temperature Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingelbrecht, C.

    2003-06-01

    Certified reference materials are distributed by the European Commission through the BCR® programme (over 500 CRMs) including a series of activation and fission monitor materials originally proposed by the Euratom Working Group on Reactor Dosimetry. The current range (18 CRMs) includes materials to cover the complete energy spectrum, and suitable for different irradiation times. Fission monitors are 238UO2 or 237NpO2 in the form of microspheres. Activation monitors are high purity metals (Ni, Cu, Al, Fe, Nb, Rh, or Ti), certified for interfering trace impurities, or dilute aluminium-based alloys. Reference materials newly certified are IRMM-530R A1-0.1%Au, replacing the exhausted IRMM-530 material, used as comparator for k0- standardisation, and three new Al-Co alloys (0.01, 0.1 and 1.0%Co). Others in the process of certification are A1-0.1%Ag and A1-2%Sc for thermal and epithermal fluence rate measurements and two uranium-doped glass materials intended for dosimetry by the fission-track technique. Various alloy compositions have been prepared for use as melt-wire temperature monitors with melting points ranging from 198 to 327ºC.

  9. Vascular wall shear rate measurement using coded excitation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsou, Jean K.; Liu, Jie; Insana, Michael F.

    2005-04-01

    Wall shear rate (WSR) is the derivative of blood velocity with respect to vessel radius at the endothelial surface. The product of WSR and blood viscosity is the wall shear stress (WSS) that must remain relatively high to maintain normal endothelial cell function, arterial health and prevent plaque formation. Accurate WSR estimation requires the lowest possible variance and bias for blood velocity estimates near the wall. This situation is achieved for conditions where the echo signal-to-noise ratio (eSNR) and spatial resolution for velocity are high. We transmitted coded pulses, i.e., those with time-bandwidth product greater than 1, to increase eSNR from weak blood scatter without increasing instantaneous power or reducing spatial resolution. This paper is a summary of WSR measurements from a flow phantom where a variety of acoustic pulses were transmitted: frequencymodulated (FM) codes and phase-modulated (PM) codes were compared with uncoded broadband and narrow band pulse transmissions. Both simulation and experimental results show that coded-pulse excitation increases accuracy and precision in WSR estimation when compared to standard pulsing techniques. Additionally, PM codes can reduce WSR errors more than FM codes for equal pulse energy. This reduction in WSR error could greatly extend the application of ultrasound in the study of cardiovascular disease.

  10. Proton Transfer Rate Coefficient Measurements of Selected Volatile Organic Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooke, G.; Popović, S.; Vušković, L.

    2002-05-01

    We have developed an apparatus based on the selected ion flow tube (SIFT)footnote D. Smith and N.G. Adams, Ads. At. Mol. Phys. 24, 1 (1987). that allows the study of proton transfer between various positive ions and volatile organic molecules. Reactions in the flow tube occur at pressures of approximately 300 mTorr, eliminating the requirement of thermal beam production. The proton donor molecule H_3O^+ has been produced using several types of electrical discharges in water vapor, such as a capacitively coupled RF discharge and a DC hollow cathode discharge. Presently we are developing an Asmussen-type microwave cavity discharge using the components of a standard microwave oven that has the advantages of simple design and operation, as well as low cost. We will be presenting the results of the microwave cavity ion source to produce H_3O^+, and compare it to the other studied sources. In addition, we will be presenting a preliminary measurement of the proton transfer rate coefficient in the reaction of H_3O^+ with acetone and methanol.

  11. Effects of feeding and organism loading rate on PCB accumulation by Lumbriculus variegatus in sediment bioaccumulation testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sediment bioaccumulation test methods published by USEPA and ASTM in 2000 specify that the Lumbriculus variegatus, a freshwater oligochaete, should not be fed during the 28-day exposure and recommends an organism loading rate of total organic carbon in sediment to organism dry we...

  12. The null hypothesis: steady rates of erosion, weathering and sediment accumulation during Late Cenozoic mountain uplift and glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willenbring, J. K.; Jerolmack, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    At the largest time and space scales, the pace of erosion and chemical weathering is determined by tectonic uplift rates. Deviations from this equilibrium condition arise from the transient response of landscape denudation to climatic and tectonic perturbations, and may be long lived. We posit that the constraint of mass balance, however, makes it unlikely that such disequilibrium persists at the global scale over millions of years, as has been proposed for late Cenozoic erosion. To support this contention, we synthesize existing data for weathering fluxes, global sedimentation rates, sediment yields and tectonic motions. The records show a remarkable constancy in the pace of Earth-surface evolution over the last 10 million years. These findings provide strong support for the null hypothesis; that global rates of landscape change have remained constant over the last ten million years, despite global climate change and massive mountain building events. Two important implications are: (1) global climate change may not change global denudation rates, because the nature and sign of landscape responses are varied; and (2) tectonic and climatic perturbations are accommodated in the long term by changes in landscape form. This work undermines the hypothesis that increased weathering due to late Cenozoic mountain building or climate change was the primary agent for a decrease in global temperatures.

  13. Measurement and accumulation of electric charge on a single dielectric particle trapped in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Haesung; LeBrun, Thomas W.

    2016-03-01

    Normally occurring charges on small particles provide a means to control the motion of the particles. Using a piezoelectric transducer to launch microparticles into a trap, we can vary particle-surface interactions to transfer charge to the particle via contact electrification. This allows more detailed studies of contact electrification itself as well generation of higher charge states for precision measurements of force or nonlinear dynamics using electric field modulation. In practice, particles may be repeatedly landed on the substrate and relaunched during loading. This leads to charge transfer so that the net charge on the polystyrene (PS) particle becomes sufficient to allow electrostatic forcing to drive ballistic motion over a range of displacement two orders of magnitude greater than thermal fluctuations. An increase in charge from 1000 to 3000 electrons is demonstrated and the induced motion of the trapped particle is accurately described using simple classical mechanics in phase space.

  14. Individual laboratory-measured discount rates predict field behavior

    PubMed Central

    Chabris, Christopher F.; Laibson, David; Morris, Carrie L.; Schuldt, Jonathon P.; Taubinsky, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    We estimate discount rates of 555 subjects using a laboratory task and find that these individual discount rates predict inter-individual variation in field behaviors (e.g., exercise, BMI, smoking). The correlation between the discount rate and each field behavior is small: none exceeds 0.28 and many are near 0. However, the discount rate has at least as much predictive power as any variable in our dataset (e.g., sex, age, education). The correlation between the discount rate and field behavior rises when field behaviors are aggregated: these correlations range from 0.09-0.38. We present a model that explains why specific intertemporal choice behaviors are only weakly correlated with discount rates, even though discount rates robustly predict aggregates of intertemporal decisions. PMID:19412359

  15. Imaging System For Measuring Macromolecule Crystal Growth Rates in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corder, Eric L.; Briscoe, Jeri

    2004-01-01

    In order to determine how macromolecule crystal quality improvement in microgravity is related to crystal growth characteristics, a team of scientists and engineers at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center (MSFC) developed flight hardware capable of measuring the crystal growth rates of a population of crystals growing under the same conditions. As crystal growth rate is defined as the change or delta in a defined dimension or length (L) of crystal over time, the hardware was named Delta-L. Delta-L consists of three sub assemblies: a fluid unit including a temperature-controlled growth cell, an imaging unit, and a control unit (consisting of a Data Acquisition and Control Unit (DACU), and a thermal control unit). Delta-L will be used in connection with the Glovebox Integrated Microgravity Isolation Technology (g-LIMIT) inside the Microgravity Science Glovebox (MSG), onboard the International Space Station. This paper will describe the Delta-L imaging system. The Delta-L imaging system was designed to locate, resolve, and capture images of up to 10 individual crystals ranging in size from 10 to 500 microns with a point-to-point accuracy of +/- 2.0 microns within a quartz growth cell observation area of 20 mm x 10 mm x 1 mm. The optical imaging system is comprised of a video microscope camera mounted on computer controlled translation stages. The 3-axis translation stages and control units provide crewmembers the ability to search throughout the growth cell observation area for crystals forming in size of approximately 10 microns. Once the crewmember has selected ten crystals of interest, the growth of these crystals is tracked until the size reaches approximately 500 microns. In order to resolve these crystals an optical system with a magnification of 10X was designed. A black and white NTSC camera was utilized with a 20X microscope objective and a 0.5X custom designed relay lens with an inline light to meet the magnification requirement. The design allows a 500 pm

  16. Geomorphic Evolution and Slip rate Measurements of the Noushki Segment , Chaman Fault Zone, Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abubakar, Y.; Khan, S. D.; Owen, L. A.; Khan, A.

    2012-12-01

    The Nushki segment of the Chaman fault system is unique in its nature as it records both the imprints of oblique convergence along the western Indian Plate boundary as well as the deformation along the Makran subduction zone. The left-lateral Chaman transform zone has evolved from a subduction zone along the Arabian-Eurasian collision complex to a strike-slip fault system since the collision of the Indian Plate with the Eurasia. The geodetically and geologically constrained displacement rates along the Chaman fault varies from about 18 mm/yr to about 35 mm/yr respectively throughout its total length of ~ 860 km. Two major hypothesis has been proposed by workers for these variations; i) Variations in rates of elastic strain accumulation along the plate boundary and, ii) strain partitioning along the plate boundary. Morphotectonic analysis is a very useful tool in investigations of spatial variations in tectonic activities both regionally and locally. This work uses morphotectonic analysis to investigate the degree of variations in active tectonic deformation, which can be directly related to elastic strain accumulation and other kinematics in the western boundary of the plate margin. Geomorphic mapping was carried out using remotely sensed data. ASTER and RADAR data were used in establishing Quaternary stratigraphy and measurement of geomorphic indices such as stream length gradient index, valley floor width to height ratio and, river/stream longitudinal profile within the study area. High resolution satellite images (e.g., IKONOS imagery) and 30m ASTER DEMs were employed to measure displacement recorded by landforms along individual strands of the fault. Results from geomorphic analysis shows three distinct levels of tectonic deformation. Areas showing high levels of tectonic deformation are characterized by displaced fan surfaces, deflected streams and beheaded streams. Terrestrial Cosmogenic nuclide surface exposure dating of the displaced landforms is being

  17. Urban rivers as conveyors of hydrocarbons to sediments of estuarine areas: source characterization, flow rates and mass accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mauad, Cristiane R; Wagener, Angela de L R; Massone, Carlos G; Aniceto, Mayara da S; Lazzari, Letícia; Carreira, Renato S; Farias, Cássia de O

    2015-02-15

    Aliphatic (n-C12-n-C40, unresolved complex mixture, resolved peaks) and aromatic hydrocarbons (46 PAH) were investigated in suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled over eleven months in six of the major rivers and two channels of the Guanabara Bay Basin. PAH flow rates of the most contaminated rivers, the contribution to the PAH sediment load of the receiving bay, and the main sources of hydrocarbons were determined. PAH (38) ranged from 28 ng L(-1) to 11,514 ng L(-1). Hydrocarbon typology and statistical evaluation demonstrated contribution of distinct sources in different regions and allowed quantification of these contributions. Total flow rate for the five major rivers amounts to 3 t year(-1) and responds for 30% of the total PAH annual input into the northern area of the Guanabara Bay. For the first time PAH mass deposited in the bay sediments has been estimated and shall serve as base for decision making and source abatement.

  18. Testing time-predictable earthquake recurrence by direct measurement of strain accumulation and release.

    PubMed

    Murray, Jessica; Segall, Paul

    2002-09-19

    Probabilistic estimates of earthquake hazard use various models for the temporal distribution of earthquakes, including the 'time-predictable' recurrence model formulated by Shimazaki and Nakata (which incorporates the concept of elastic rebound described as early as 1910 by H. F. Reid). This model states that an earthquake occurs when the fault recovers the stress relieved in the most recent earthquake. Unlike time-independent models (for example, Poisson probability), the time-predictable model is thought to encompass some of the physics behind the earthquake cycle, in that earthquake probability increases with time. The time-predictable model is therefore often preferred when adequate data are available, and it is incorporated in hazard predictions for many earthquake-prone regions, including northern California, southern California, New Zealand and Japan. Here we show that the model fails in what should be an ideal locale for its application -- Parkfield, California. We estimate rigorous bounds on the predicted recurrence time of the magnitude approximately 6 1966 Parkfield earthquake through inversion of geodetic measurements and we show that, according to the time-predictable model, another earthquake should have occurred by 1987. The model's poor performance in a relatively simple tectonic setting does not bode well for its successful application to the many areas of the world characterized by complex fault interactions.

  19. Improvement of the operation rate of medical temperature measuring devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotra, O.; Boyko, O.; Zyska, T.

    2014-08-01

    A method of reducing measuring time of temperature measurements of biological objects based on preheating the resistance temperature detector (RTD) up to the temperature close to the temperature to be measured, is proposed. It has been found that at the same measuring time, the preheating allows to decrease the measurement error by a factor of 5 to 45 over the temperature range of 35-41°С. The measurement time is reduced by 1.6-4 times over this range, keeping the same value of the measurement error.

  20. Estimation of the rate of volcanism on Venus from reaction rate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fegley, Bruce, Jr.; Prinn, Ronald G.

    1989-01-01

    Laboratory rate data for the reaction between SO2 and calcite to form anhydrite are presented. If this reaction rate represents the SO2 reaction rate on Venus, then all SO2 in the Venusian atmosphere will disappear in 1.9 Myr unless volcanism replenishes the lost SO2. The required volcanism rate, which depends on the sulfur content of the erupted material, is in the range 0.4-11 cu km of magma erupted per year. The Venus surface composition at the Venera 13, 14, and Vega 2 landing sites implies a volcanism rate of about 1 cu km/yr. This geochemically estimated rate can be used to determine if either (or neither) of two discordant geophysically estimated rates is correct. It also suggests that Venus may be less volcanically active than the earth.

  1. Urban rivers as conveyors of hydrocarbons to sediments of estuarine areas: source characterization, flow rates and mass accumulation.

    PubMed

    Mauad, Cristiane R; Wagener, Angela de L R; Massone, Carlos G; Aniceto, Mayara da S; Lazzari, Letícia; Carreira, Renato S; Farias, Cássia de O

    2015-02-15

    Aliphatic (n-C12-n-C40, unresolved complex mixture, resolved peaks) and aromatic hydrocarbons (46 PAH) were investigated in suspended particulate matter (SPM) sampled over eleven months in six of the major rivers and two channels of the Guanabara Bay Basin. PAH flow rates of the most contaminated rivers, the contribution to the PAH sediment load of the receiving bay, and the main sources of hydrocarbons were determined. PAH (38) ranged from 28 ng L(-1) to 11,514 ng L(-1). Hydrocarbon typology and statistical evaluation demonstrated contribution of distinct sources in different regions and allowed quantification of these contributions. Total flow rate for the five major rivers amounts to 3 t year(-1) and responds for 30% of the total PAH annual input into the northern area of the Guanabara Bay. For the first time PAH mass deposited in the bay sediments has been estimated and shall serve as base for decision making and source abatement. PMID:25434473

  2. New Paleoclimate Records from the Russian Far East: Carbon Accumulation Rates and Ecological Change Over the Last 13,000 Years from Western and Central Kamchatka

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bochicchio, C. J.; Loisel, J.; Yu, Z.; Beilman, D.; Dirksen, V.; Dirksen, O.; Nichols, J. E.

    2014-12-01

    The Kamchatka peninsula lies along the confluence of the Pacific Ocean, and the Bering and Okhotsk Seas (OS). Its location is ideal to record shifts in regional ocean and atmospheric circulation and contains vast stores of carbon-rich peatlands, yet paleoclimate records from this area are scarce. This research aims to provide new paleo-proxy records that document carbon dynamics, precipitation, and temperature over the Holocene. We focus on site C4 (54.02 N, 156.13 E) located 18 km from OS coast at 91 m elevation and draw comparisons with site C1 (54.91 N, 156.60 E) which is 62 km from the coast at 256 m elevation, both in the Western Lowland (WL) region. Cores C1 and C4 are 450 and 375 cm in length, respectively. C4 and C1 were analyzed for organic matter (OM) content; while C4 received additional δ-deuterium (δD), plant macrofossil, and fossil pollen analysis. Both cores cover the last 13,000 years from the Western Lowlands (WL); prior to this study no such records existed from the WL or the eastern OS coastline. Chronologies are based on radiocarbon dating of fine fraction bulk peat and Sphagnum plant macrofossils. At both sites, peat accumulation began 11 ka (1 ka = 1000 calibrated years before present), is continuous to the surface, interlayered with tephra, and overlays a clay unit with 20% OM. OM density measured at 1 cm intervals show similar means of 0.1 g cm-3 over the last 11 ka and, despite the close proximity of the sites (103 km), they show two opposing OM trends: Period 1) From 5.8 to 3.5 ka, C1 OM density decreased ~0.10 to 0.06 g cm-3 while C4 increased from ~0.10 to 0.19 g cm-3, and Period 2) from 3.5 to 0.9 ka, C1 OM density increased to ~0.18 g cm-3 while C4 decreased to ~0.11 cm-3. Peat carbon accumulation rate (PCAR) is similar for both periods in C1 and C4 at 20.1 and 14.1 g m-2 yr-1, respectively. Prior to 5.8 ka PCAR in C1 and C4 is ~30 g m-2 yr-1 in the early Holocene, decreasing to 19 g m-2 yr-1 in the Mid- Late Holocene. C4 shows large

  3. Denudation rates determined from the accumulation of in situ-produced 10Be in the luquillo experimental forest, Puerto Rico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Erik Thorson; Stallard, Robert F.; Larsen, Matthew C.; Raisbeck, Grant M.; Yiou, Francoise

    1995-01-01

    We present a simple method for estimation of long-term mean denudation rates using in situ-produced cosmogenic 10Be in fluvial sediments. Procedures are discussed to account for the effects of soil bioturbation, mass wasting and attenuation of cosmic rays by biomass and by local topography. Our analyses of 10Be in quartz from bedrock outcrops, soils, mass-wasting sites and riverine sediment from the Icacos River basin in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, Puerto Rico, are used to characterize denudation for major landform elements in that basin. The 10Be concentration of a discharge-weighted average of size classes of river sediment corresponds to a long-term average denudation of ≈ 43 m Ma −1, consistent with mass balance results. 

  4. Rotation Rate of Saturn's Magnetosphere using CAPS Plasma Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sittler, E.; Cooper, J.; Simpson, D.; Paterson, W.

    2012-01-01

    We present the present status of an investigation of the rotation rate of Saturn 's magnetosphere using a 3D velocity moment technique being developed at Goddard which is similar to the 2D version used by Sittler et al. (2005) [1] for SOI and similar to that used by Thomsen et al. (2010). This technique allows one to nearly cover the full energy range of the CAPS IMS from 1 V less than or equal to E/Q less than 50 kV. Since our technique maps the observations into a local inertial frame, it does work during roll manoeuvres. We have made comparisons with Wilson et al. (2008) [2] (2005-358 and 2005-284) who performs a bi-Maxwellian fit to the ion singles data and our results are nearly identical. We will also make comparisons with results by Thomsen et al. (2010) [3]. Our analysis uses ion composition data to weight the non-compositional data, referred to as singles data, to separate H+, H2+ and water group ions (W+) from each other. The ion data set is especially valuable for measuring flow velocities for protons, which are more difficult to derive using singles data within the inner magnetosphere, where the signal is dominated by heavy ions (i.e., proton peak merges with W+ peak as low energy shoulder). Our technique uses a flux function, which is zero in the proper plasma flow frame, to estimate fluid parameter uncertainties. The comparisons investigate the experimental errors and potential for systematic errors in the analyses, including ours. The rolls provide the best data set when it comes to getting 4PI coverage of the plasma but are more susceptible to time aliasing effects. Since our analysis is a velocity moments technique it will work within the inner magnetosphere where pickup ions are important and velocity distributions are non-Maxwellian. So, we will present results inside Enceladus' L shell and determine if mass loading is important. In the future we plan to make comparisons with magnetic field observations, use Saturn ionosphere conductivities as

  5. Adaptation of a speciation sampling cartridge for measuring ammonia flux from cattle feedlots using relaxed eddy accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baum, K. A.; Ham, J. M.

    Improved measurements of ammonia losses from cattle feedlots are needed to quantify the national NH 3 emissions inventory and evaluate management techniques for reducing emissions. Speciation cartridges composed of glass honeycomb denuders and filter packs were adapted to measure gaseous NH 3 and aerosol NH 4+ fluxes using relaxed eddy accumulation (REA). Laboratory testing showed that a cartridge equipped with four honeycomb denuders had a total capture capacity of 1800 μg of NH 3. In the field, a pair of cartridges was deployed adjacent to a sonic anemometer and an open-path gas analyzer on a mobile tower. High-speed valves were attached to the inlets of the cartridges and controlled by a datalogger so that up- and down-moving eddies were independently sampled based on direction of the vertical wind speed and a user-defined deadband. Air flowed continuously through the cartridges even when not sampling by means of a recirculating air handling system. Eddy covariance measurement of CO 2 and H 2O, as measured by the sonic and open-path gas analyzer, were used to determine the relaxation factor needed to compute REA-based fluxes. The REA system was field tested at the Beef Research Unit at Kansas State University in the summer and fall of 2007. Daytime NH 3 emissions ranged between 68 and 127 μg m -2 s -1; fluxes tended to follow a diurnal pattern correlated with latent heat flux. Daily fluxes of NH 3 were between 2.5 and 4.7 g m -2 d -1 and on average represented 38% of fed nitrogen. Aerosol NH 4+ fluxes were negligible compared with NH 3 emissions. An REA system designed around the high-capacity speciation cartridges can be used to measure NH 3 fluxes from cattle feedlots and other strong sources. The system could be adapted to measure fluxes of other gases and aerosols.

  6. Examination of sludge accumulation rates and sludge characteristics for a decentralized community wastewater treatment systems with individual primary clarifier tanks located in Wardsville (Ontario, Canada).

    PubMed

    Lossing, Heather; Champagne, Pascale; McLellan, P James

    2010-01-01

    In conventional septic systems, settling and partial treatment via anaerobic digestion occurs in the septic tank. One of the byproducts of solids separation in the septic tank is a semi-liquid material known as septage, which must be periodically pumped out. Septage includes the liquid portion within the tank, as well as the sludge that settles at the bottom of the tank and the scum that floats to the surface of the liquid layer. A number of factors can influence septage characteristics, as well as the sludge and scum accumulation rates within the tank. This paper presents the results of a 2007 field sampling study conducted in Wardsville (Ontario, Canada). The field study examined 29 individual residential two-chamber septic tanks in a community serviced by a decentralized wastewater treatment system in operation for approximately 7 years without septage removal. The field investigation provided a comprehensive data set that allowed for statistical analysis of the data to assess the more critical factors influencing solids accumulation rates within each of the clarifier chambers. With this data, a number of predictive models were developed using water usage data for each residence as an explanatory variable.

  7. Myotubes from Severely Obese Type 2 Diabetic Subjects Accumulate Less Lipids and Show Higher Lipolytic Rate than Myotubes from Severely Obese Non-Diabetic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Bakke, Siril S.; Kase, Eili T.; Moro, Cedric; Stensrud, Camilla; Damlien, Lisbeth; Ludahl, Marianne O.; Sandbu, Rune; Solheim, Brita Marie; Rustan, Arild C.; Hjelmesæth, Jøran; Thoresen, G. Hege; Aas, Vigdis

    2015-01-01

    About 80% of patients with type 2 diabetes are classified as overweight. However, only about 1/3 of severely obese subjects have type 2 diabetes. This indicates that several severely obese individuals may possess certain characteristics that protect them against type 2 diabetes. We therefore hypothesized that this apparent paradox could be related to fundamental differences in skeletal muscle lipid handling. Energy metabolism and metabolic flexibility were examined in human myotubes derived from severely obese subjects without (BMI 44±7 kg/m2) and with type 2 diabetes (BMI 43±6 kg/m2). Lower insulin sensitivity was observed in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes. Lipolysis rate was higher, and oleic acid accumulation, triacylglycerol content, and fatty acid adaptability were lower in myotubes from severely obese subjects with type 2 diabetes compared to severely obese non-diabetic subjects. There were no differences in lipid distribution and mRNA and protein expression of the lipases HSL and ATGL, the lipase cofactor CGI-58, or the lipid droplet proteins PLIN2 and PLIN3. Glucose and oleic acid oxidation were also similar in cells from the two groups. In conclusion, myotubes established from severely obese donors with established type 2 diabetes had lower ability for lipid accumulation and higher lipolysis rate than myotubes from severely obese donors without diabetes. This indicates that a difference in intramyocellular lipid turnover might be fundamental in evolving type 2 diabetes. PMID:25790476

  8. The Measurement of Self-Rated Depression: A Multidimensional Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolon, Kevin; Barling, Julian

    1980-01-01

    Investigates the capacity of the Zung Self-Rating Depression Scale for providing specific multidimensional descriptors of depressive behavior. Ideational, physiological and behavioral depression factors were evident in data from 96 normal, white university student volunteers. (Author/RH)

  9. Iron/potassium perchlorate pellet burn rate measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Reed, J.W.; Walters, R.R.

    1995-01-25

    A burn rate test having several advantages for low gas-producing pyrotechnic compacts has been developed. The technique involves use of a high speed video motion analysis system that allows immediate turnaround and produces all required data for rate computation on magnetic tape and becomes immediately available on the display screen. The test technique provides a quick method for material qualification along with data for improved reliability and function. Burn rate data has been obtained for both UPI and Eagle Pitcher Iron/Potassium Perchlorate blends. The data obtained for the UPI blends cover a range of composition, pellet density, and ambient (before ignition) pellet temperature. Burn rate data for the E-P blends were extended to include surface conditions or particle size as a variable parameter.

  10. A comparison of winter mercury accumulation at forested and no-canopy sites measured with different snow sampling techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, S.J.; Johnson, K.B.; Weathers, K.C.; Loftin, C.S.; Fernandez, I.J.; Kahl, J.S.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.

    2008-01-01

    Atmospheric mercury (Hg) is delivered to ecosystems via rain, snow, cloud/fog, and dry deposition. The importance of snow, especially snow that has passed through the forest canopy (throughfall), in delivering Hg to terrestrial ecosystems has received little attention in the literature. The snowpack is a dynamic system that links atmospheric deposition and ecosystem cycling through deposition and emission of deposited Hg. To examine the magnitude of Hg delivery via snowfall, and to illuminate processes affecting Hg flux to catchments during winter (cold season), Hg in snow in no-canopy areas and under forest canopies measured with four collection methods were compared: (1) Hg in wet precipitation as measured by the Mercury Deposition Network (MDN) for the site in Acadia National Park, Maine, USA, (2) event throughfall (collected after snowfall cessation for accumulations of >8 cm), (3) season-long throughfall collected using the same apparatus for event sampling but deployed for the entire cold season, and (4) snowpack sampling. Estimates (mean ?? SE) of Hg deposition using these methods during the 91-day cold season in 2004-2005 at conifer sites showed that season-long throughfall Hg flux (1.80 ??g/m2) < snowpack Hg (2.38 ?? 0.68 ??g/m2) < event throughfall flux (5.63 ?? 0.38 ??g/m2). Mercury deposition at the MDN site (0.91 ??g/m2) was similar to that measured at other no-canopy sites in the area using the other methods, but was 3.4 times less than was measured under conifer canopies using the event sampling regime. This indicates that snow accumulated under the forest canopy received Hg from the overstory or exhibited less re-emission of Hg deposited in snow relative to open areas. The soil surface of field-scale plots were sprayed with a natural rain water sample that contained an Hg tracer (202Hg) just prior to the first snowfall to explore whether some snowpack Hg might be explained from soil emissions. The appearance of the 202Hg tracer in the snowpack (0

  11. Seasonal variations of decay rate measurement data and their interpretation.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Heinrich

    2016-08-01

    Measurement data of long-lived radionuclides, for example, (85)Kr, (90)Sr, (108m)Ag, (133)Ba, (152)Eu, (154)Eu and (226)Ra, and particularly the relative residuals of fitted raw data from current measurements of ionization chambers for half-life determination show small periodic seasonal variations with amplitudes of about 0.15%. The interpretation of these fluctuations is a matter of controversy whether the observed effect is produced by some interaction with the radionuclides themselves or is an artifact of the measuring chain. At the origin of such a discussion there is the exponential decay law of radioactive substances used for data fitting, one of the fundamentals of nuclear physics. Some groups of physicists use statistical methods and analyze correlations with various parameters of the measurement data and, for example, the Earth-Sun distance, as a basis of interpretation. In this article, data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and published earlier are the subject of a correlation analysis using the corresponding time series of data with varying measurement conditions. An overview of these measurement conditions producing instrument instabilities is given and causality relations are discussed. The resulting correlation coefficients for various series of the same radionuclide using similar measurement conditions are in the order of 0.7, which indicates a high correlation, and for series of the same radionuclide using different measurement conditions and changes of the measuring chain of the order of -0.2 or even lower, which indicates an anti-correlation. These results provide strong arguments that the observed seasonal variations are caused by the measuring chain and, in particular, by the type of measuring electronics used.

  12. Seasonal variations of decay rate measurement data and their interpretation.

    PubMed

    Schrader, Heinrich

    2016-08-01

    Measurement data of long-lived radionuclides, for example, (85)Kr, (90)Sr, (108m)Ag, (133)Ba, (152)Eu, (154)Eu and (226)Ra, and particularly the relative residuals of fitted raw data from current measurements of ionization chambers for half-life determination show small periodic seasonal variations with amplitudes of about 0.15%. The interpretation of these fluctuations is a matter of controversy whether the observed effect is produced by some interaction with the radionuclides themselves or is an artifact of the measuring chain. At the origin of such a discussion there is the exponential decay law of radioactive substances used for data fitting, one of the fundamentals of nuclear physics. Some groups of physicists use statistical methods and analyze correlations with various parameters of the measurement data and, for example, the Earth-Sun distance, as a basis of interpretation. In this article, data measured at the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt and published earlier are the subject of a correlation analysis using the corresponding time series of data with varying measurement conditions. An overview of these measurement conditions producing instrument instabilities is given and causality relations are discussed. The resulting correlation coefficients for various series of the same radionuclide using similar measurement conditions are in the order of 0.7, which indicates a high correlation, and for series of the same radionuclide using different measurement conditions and changes of the measuring chain of the order of -0.2 or even lower, which indicates an anti-correlation. These results provide strong arguments that the observed seasonal variations are caused by the measuring chain and, in particular, by the type of measuring electronics used. PMID:27258217

  13. A Comparison of GHG Flux Measurements by Relaxed Eddy Accumulation and Eddy Covariance Methods Using FTIR and QCL Analyzers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermeulen, A. T.; Laborde, M.; Hensen, A.; van den Bulk, P.; Famulari, D.; Griffith, D. W.; Nemitz, E.

    2013-12-01

    In this presentation results obtained with a novel system for Relaxed Eddy Accumulation (REA) measurements using an Ecotech Spectronus FTIR analyzer (Griffth et al, 2012) will be compared to eddy covariance fluxes using an Aerodyne QCL and a Licor 6262 NDIR analyzer. The REA FTIR system can be easily combined with other standard (e.g. NDIR) analyzers suited for eddy covariance measurements to allow for scaling of the obtained up/down concentration differences with the directly measured fluxes. Furthermore the FTIR system allows for on-line simultaneous high precision concentration measurement of a large number of different gases and even isotope composition, next to the measurement of CO2, CH4 and N2O mixing ratios. The final design goal for the REA FTIR system is an attractive fully automated, low maintenance system for long-term monitoring of Greenhouse Gas fluxes at the hourly time scale and a spatial scale of about 1 km2. During a campaign of four weeks in June 2013 (in the framework of the InGOS EU project) at a grazed grassland site at Easter Bush, Scotland (UK), simultaneous surface flux measurements of N2O and additionally CO2 and CH4 have been performed using our systems and a number of setups from other groups.. Weather conditions during the campaign were excellent and after the application of fertilizer at the field and some rainfall the increased emission of N2O was detected clearly by all systems. Both the eddy covariance and REA methods performed well during the campaign and the measured fluxes compare satisfactorily. In general the resulting fluxes from the FTIR system are lower then the QCL based results. Reasons for these deviations will be discussed together with implications of the results for the design of future REA measurements using the FTIR system. Griffith, D.W.T., N.M. Deutscher, C.G.R. Caldow, G. Kettlewell, M. Riggenbach and S. Hammer, A Fourier transform infrared trace gas analyser for atmospheric applications. Atmospheric Measurement

  14. The Lima-Peru seismic gap: a study of inter-seismic strain accumulation from a decade of GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norabuena, E. O.; Pollitz, F. F.; Dixon, T. H.

    2013-05-01

    The Peruvian subduction zone between the Mendaña Fracture zone and Arica, northern Chile, has been source of large megathrust earthquakes since historical to present times, The two last major events affecting the southern segment corresponds to Arequipa 2001 (Mw 8.3) and Pisco 2007 (Mw 8.1). A noteworthy event is the Lima 1746 earthquake with an assigned magnitude of Mw 8.5 and which is assumed to have broken several km of the seismogenic zone off Lima. The great shock was followed by a devastating tsunami that destroyed the main port of Callao, killing about 99 percent of its population. This extreme event was followed by quiescence of a few hundred years until the XX century when the Lima subduction zone was broken again by the earthquakes of May 1940 (Mw 8.0), October 1966 (Mw 8.0) and Lima 1974 (Mw 8.0). The broken areas overlap partially with the estimated area of the 1746 earthquake and put the region in a state of seismic gap representing a major hazard for Lima city - Peru's capital and its about 9 million of inhabitants. Our study reports the interseismic strain accumulation derived from a decade of GPS measurement at 11 geodetic monuments including one measurement in an island 80 km offshore and models variations of coupling along the plate interface.

  15. Field comparison of an eddy accumulation and an aerodynamic-gradient system for measuring pesticide volatilization fluxes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Majewski, M.; Desjardina, R.; Rochette, P.; Pattey, E.; Selber, J.; Glotfelty, D.

    1993-01-01

    The field experiment reported here applied the relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) technique to the measurement of triallate (TA) and trifluralin (TF) volatilization from fallow soil. A critical analysis of the REA system used in this experiment is done, and the fluxes are compared to those obtained by the aerodynamic-gradient (AG) technique. The measured cumulative volatilization losses, corrected for the effective upwind source area (footprint), for the AG system were higher than with the REA system. The differences between the methods over the first 5 days of the experiment were 27 and 13% for TA and TF, respectively. A mass balance based on the amount of parent compounds volatilized from soil during the first 5 days of the experiment showed a 110 and 70% and a 79 and 61% accountability for triallate and trifluralin by the AG and REA methods, respectively. These results also show that the non-footprint-corrected AG flux values underestimated the volatilization flux by approximately 16%. The footprint correction model used in this experiment does not presently have the capability of accounting for changes in atmospheric stability. However, these values still provide an indication of the most likely upwind area affecting the evaporative flux estimations. The soil half-lives for triallate and trifluralin were 9.8 and 7.0 days, respectively. ?? 1992 American Chemical Society.

  16. Estimating accumulation rates and physical properties of sediment behind a dam: Englebright Lake, Yuba River, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, N.P.; Rubin, D.M.; Alpers, C.N.; Childs, J. R.; Curtis, J.A.; Flint, L.E.; Wright, S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Studies of reservoir sedimentation are vital to understanding scientific and management issues related to watershed sediment budgets, depositional processes, reservoir operations, and dam decommissioning. Here we quantify the mass, organic content, and grain-size distribution of a reservoir deposit in northern California by two methods of extrapolating measurements of sediment physical properties from cores to the entire volume of impounded material. Englebright Dam, completed in 1940, is located on the Yuba River in the Sierra Nevada foothills. A research program is underway to assess the feasibility of introducing wild anadromous fish species to the river upstream of the dam. Possible management scenarios include removing or lowering the dam, which could cause downstream transport of stored sediment. In 2001 the volume of sediments deposited behind Englebright Dam occupied 25.5% of the original reservoir capacity. The physical properties of this deposit were calculated using data from a coring campaign that sampled the entire reservoir sediment thickness (6–32 m) at six locations in the downstream ∼3/4 of the reservoir. As a result, the sediment in the downstream part of the reservoir is well characterized, but in the coarse, upstream part of the reservoir, only surficial sediments were sampled, so calculations there are more uncertain. Extrapolation from one-dimensional vertical sections of sediment sampled in cores to entire three-dimensional volumes of the reservoir deposit is accomplished via two methods, using assumptions of variable and constant layer thickness. Overall, the two extrapolation methods yield nearly identical estimates of the mass of the reservoir deposit of ∼26 × 106 metric tons (t) of material, of which 64.7–68.5% is sand and gravel. Over the 61 year reservoir history this corresponds to a maximum basin-wide sediment yield of ∼340 t/km2/yr, assuming no contribution from upstream parts of the watershed impounded by other dams. The

  17. Accumulation of bone strontium measured by in vivo XRF in rats supplemented with strontium citrate and strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Chettle, David R; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Druchok, Cheryl; Webber, Colin E; Adachi, Jonathan D; Beattie, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Strontium ranelate is an approved pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in Europe and Australia, but not in Canada or the United States. Strontium citrate, an alternative strontium salt, however, is available for purchase over-the-counter as a nutritional supplement. The effects of strontium citrate on bone are largely unknown. The study's objectives were 1) to quantify bone strontium accumulation in female Sprague Dawley rats administered strontium citrate (N=7) and compare these levels to rats administered strontium ranelate (N=6) and vehicle (N=6) over 8 weeks, and 2) to verify an in vivo X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) system for measurement of bone strontium in the rat. Daily doses of strontium citrate and strontium ranelate were determined with the intention to achieve equivalent amounts of elemental strontium. However, post-hoc analyses of each strontium compound conducted using energy dispersive spectrometry microanalysis revealed a higher elemental strontium concentration in strontium citrate than strontium ranelate. Bone strontium levels were measured at baseline and 8 weeks follow-up using a unique in vivo XRF technique previously used in humans. XRF measurements were validated against ex vivo measurements of bone strontium using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Weight gain in rats in all three groups was equivalent over the study duration. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare bone strontium levels amongst the three groups. Bone strontium levels in rats administered strontium citrate were significantly greater (p<0.05) than rats administered strontium ranelate and vehicle. ANCOVA analyses were performed with Sr dose as a covariate to account for differences in strontium dosing. The ANCOVA revealed differences in bone strontium levels between the strontium groups were not significant, but that bone strontium levels were still very significantly greater than vehicle.

  18. Accumulation of bone strontium measured by in vivo XRF in rats supplemented with strontium citrate and strontium ranelate.

    PubMed

    Wohl, Gregory R; Chettle, David R; Pejović-Milić, Ana; Druchok, Cheryl; Webber, Colin E; Adachi, Jonathan D; Beattie, Karen A

    2013-01-01

    Strontium ranelate is an approved pharmacotherapy for osteoporosis in Europe and Australia, but not in Canada or the United States. Strontium citrate, an alternative strontium salt, however, is available for purchase over-the-counter as a nutritional supplement. The effects of strontium citrate on bone are largely unknown. The study's objectives were 1) to quantify bone strontium accumulation in female Sprague Dawley rats administered strontium citrate (N=7) and compare these levels to rats administered strontium ranelate (N=6) and vehicle (N=6) over 8 weeks, and 2) to verify an in vivo X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy (XRF) system for measurement of bone strontium in the rat. Daily doses of strontium citrate and strontium ranelate were determined with the intention to achieve equivalent amounts of elemental strontium. However, post-hoc analyses of each strontium compound conducted using energy dispersive spectrometry microanalysis revealed a higher elemental strontium concentration in strontium citrate than strontium ranelate. Bone strontium levels were measured at baseline and 8 weeks follow-up using a unique in vivo XRF technique previously used in humans. XRF measurements were validated against ex vivo measurements of bone strontium using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Weight gain in rats in all three groups was equivalent over the study duration. A two-way ANOVA was conducted to compare bone strontium levels amongst the three groups. Bone strontium levels in rats administered strontium citrate were significantly greater (p<0.05) than rats administered strontium ranelate and vehicle. ANCOVA analyses were performed with Sr dose as a covariate to account for differences in strontium dosing. The ANCOVA revealed differences in bone strontium levels between the strontium groups were not significant, but that bone strontium levels were still very significantly greater than vehicle. PMID:22995463

  19. Reaction rates of graphite with ozone measured by etch decoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hennig, G. R.; Montet, G. L.

    1968-01-01

    Etch-decoration technique of detecting vacancies in graphite has been used to determine the reaction rates of graphite with ozone in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the layer planes. It consists essentially of peeling single atom layers off graphite crystals without affecting the remainder of the crystal.

  20. Monoterpene emission rate measurements from a Monterey pine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juuti, Soile; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger

    1990-05-01

    The monoterpenes emitted from a Monterey pine (Pinus radiata) were investigated using a dynamic flow-through enclosure technique. The monoterpenes identified and quantified were α- and β-pinene, d-limonene + β-phellandrene, myrcene, camphene and Δ3-carene, with α- and β-pinene accounting for over 80% of the total monoterpene emissions. The monoterpene emission rate increased with temperature, in good agreement with previous data for other coniferous species. The absence of added CO2 to the synthetic air flow stream, exposure to elevated levels (300-500 ppb mixing ratio) of O3 for 3-4 hours, and increased air movement within the enclosure had no observable effect on the monoterpene emission rate at a given temperature. In contrast, "rough handling" of the pine during the sampling protocol resulted in increases in the monoterpene emission rate by factors of 10-50. These results will be useful to those designing enclosure sampling protocols for the determination of the emission rates of biogenic organic compounds from vegetation.

  1. Measuring the growth rate of structure around cosmic voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawken, A. J.; Michelett, D.; Granett, B.; Iovino, A.; Guzzo, L.

    2016-10-01

    Using an algorithm based on searching for empty spheres we identified 245 voids in the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey (VIPERS). We show how by modelling the anisotropic void-galaxy cross correlation function we can probe the growth rate of structure.

  2. Monoterpene emission rate measurements from a Monterey pine

    SciTech Connect

    Juuti, S. ); Arey, J.; Atkinson, R. )

    1990-05-20

    The monoterpenes emitted from a Monterey pine (pinus radiata) were investigated using a dynamic flow-through enclosure technique. The monoterpenes identified and quantified were {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene, d-limonene + {beta} phellandrene, myrcene, camphene and {Delta}{sup 3}-carene, with {alpha}- and {beta}-pinene accounting for over 80% of the total monoterpene emissions. The monoterpene emission rate increased with temperature, in good agreement with previous data for other coniferous species. The absence of added CO{sub 2} to the synthetic air flow stream, exposure to elevated levels (300-500 ppb mixing ratio) of O{sub 3} for 3-4 hours, and increased air movement within the enclosure, had no observable effect on the monoterpene emission rate at a given temperature. In contrast, rough handling of the pine during the sampling protocol resulted in increases in the monoterpene emission rate by factors of 10-50. These results will be useful to those designing enclosure sampling protocols for the determination of the emission rates of biogenic organic compounds from vegetation.

  3. Theoretical and Applied Implications of Precisely Measuring Learning Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Christopher H.

    2008-01-01

    Nist and Joseph (2008) have confirmed earlier research showing that adding and interspersing a large number of time-consuming learning trials targeting known items (e.g., incremental rehearsal (IR) or interspersal) retards student learning rates. In addition, their current study has confirmed earlier research that adding and interspersing known…

  4. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  5. Glaciation in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands: Ice accumulation, distribution, flow rates, basal melting, and top-down melting rates and patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fastook, James L.; Head, James W.

    2015-02-01

    Geological evidence for extensive non-polar ice deposits of Amazonian age indicates that the current cold and dry climate of Mars has persisted for several billion years. The geological record and climate history of the Noachian, the earliest period of Mars history, is less certain, but abundant evidence for fluvial channels (valley networks) and lacustrine environments (open-basin lakes) has been interpreted to represent warm and wet conditions, including rainfall and runoff. Alternatively, recent atmospheric modeling results predict a "cold and icy" Late Noachian Mars in which moderate atmospheric pressure accompanied by a full water cycle produce an atmosphere where temperature declines with elevation following an adiabatic lapse rate, in contrast to the current situation on Mars, where temperature is almost completely determined by latitude. These results are formulated in the Late Noachian Icy Highlands (LNIH) model, in which these cold and icy conditions lead to the preferential deposition of snow and ice at high elevations, such as the southern uplands. What is the fate of this snow and ice and the nature of glaciation in such an environment? What are the prospects of melting of these deposits contributing to the observed fluvial and lacustrine deposits? To address these questions, we report on a glacial flow-modeling analysis using a Mars-adapted ice sheet model with LNIH climate conditions. The total surface/near-surface water inventory is poorly known for the Late Noachian, so we explore the LNIH model in a "supply-limited" scenario for a range of available water abundances and a range of Late Noachian geothermal fluxes. Our results predict that the Late Noachian icy highlands (above an equilibrium line altitude of approximately +1 km) were characterized by extensive ice sheets of the order of hundreds of meters thick. Due to extremely cold conditions, the ice-flow velocities in general were very low, less than a few mm/yr, and the regional ice

  6. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, Jesse D.; Temi, Pasquale; Rank, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short times. Many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extintion is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in the active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micron emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and a half after the explosion. Since dust extintion is much less at 6.63 pm than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the NiII line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micron using ISOCAM to search for the NiII emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any NiII line emission brighter than a 5sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled to the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a NiII with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a NiII line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  7. Direct Measurement of the Supernova Rate in Starburst Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bregman, J. D.; Temi, P.; Rank, D.

    2000-01-01

    Supernovae play a key role in the dynamics, structure, and chemical evolution of galaxies. The massive stars that end their lives as supernovae live for short enough times that many are still associated with dusty star formation regions when they explode, making them difficult to observe at visible wavelengths. In active star forming regions (galactic nuclei and starburst regions), dust extinction is especially severe. Thus, determining the supernova rate in active star forming regions of galaxies, where the supernova rate can be one or two orders of magnitude higher than the average, has proven to be difficult. From observations of SN1987A, we know that the [NiII] 6.63 micrometer emission line was the strongest line in the infrared spectrum for a period of a year and half after th explosion. Since dust extinction is much less at 6.63 micrometers than at visible wavelengths (A(sub 6.63)/A(sub V) = 0.025), the [NiII] line can be used as a sensitive probe for the detection of recent supernovae. We have observed a sample of starburst galaxies at 6.63 micrometers using ISOCAM to search for the [NiII] emission line characteristic of recent supernovae. We did not detect any [NiII] line emission brighter than a 5-sigma limit of 5 mJy. We can set upper limits to the supernova rate in our sample, scaled ot the rate in M82, of less than 0.3 per year at the 90% confidence level using Bayesian methods. Assuming that a supernova would have a [NiII] line with the same luminosity as observed in SN1987A, we find less than 0.09 and 0.15 per year at the 50% and 67% confidence levels. These rates are somewhat less if a more normal type II supernovae has a [NiII] line luminosity greater than the line in SN1987A.

  8. Ozone Production and Loss Rate Measurements in the Middle Stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jucks, Kenneth W.; Johnson, David G.; Chance, K. V.; Traub, Wesley A.; Salawitch, R. J.; Stachnik, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    The first simultaneous measurements of HO(x), NO(x), and Cl(x) radicals in the middle stratosphere show that NO(x) catalytic cycles dominate loss of ozone (O3) for altitudes between 24 and 38 km; Cl(x) catalytic cycles are measured to be less effective than previously expected; and there is no 'ozone deficit' in the photochemically dominated altitude range from 31 and 38 km, contrary to some previous theoretical studies.

  9. Dynamic PET Measures of Tau Accumulation in Cognitively Normal Older Adults and Alzheimer’s Disease Patients Measured Using [18F] THK-5351

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Suzanne L.; Okamura, Nobuyuki; Furukawa, Katsutoshi; Ishiki, Aiko; Furumoto, Shozo; Tashiro, Manabu; Yanai, Kazuhiko; Arai, Hiroyuki; Kudo, Yukitsuka; Harada, Ryuichi; Tomita, Naoki; Hiraoka, Kotaro; Watanuki, Shoichi; Jagust, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Background [18F]THK5351, a recently-developed positron emission tomography (PET) tracer for measuring tau neurofibrillary tangle accumulation, may help researchers examine aging, disease, and tau pathology in living human brains. We examined THK5351 tracer pharmacokinetics to define an optimal acquisition time for static late images. Methods Primary measurements were calculation of regional values of distribution volume ratios (DVR) and standardized uptake value ratios (SUVR) in 6 healthy older control and 10 Alzheimer’s disease (AD) participants. We examined associations between DVR and SUVR, searching for a 20 min SUVR time window that was stable and comparable to DVR. We additionally examined diagnostic group differences in this 20 min SUVR. Results In healthy controls, [18F]THK5351 uptake was low, with increased temporal relative to frontal binding. In AD, regional uptake was substantially higher than in healthy controls, with temporal exceeding frontal binding. Retention in cerebellar gray matter, which was used as the reference region, was low compared to other regions. Both DVR and SUVR values showed minimal change over time after 40 min. SUVR 20–40, 30–50, and 40–60 min were most consistently correlated with DVR; SUVR 40–60 min, the most stable time window, was used in further analyses. Significant (AD > healthy control) group differences existed in temporoparietal regions, with marginal medial temporal differences. We found high basal ganglia SUVR 40–60 min signal, with no group differences. Conclusions We examined THK5351, a new PET tracer for measuring tau accumulation, and compared multiple analysis methods for quantifying regional tracer uptake. SUVR 40–60 min performed optimally when examining 20 min SUVR windows, and appears to be a practical method for quantifying relative regional tracer retention. The results of this study offer clinical potential, given the usefulness of THK5351-PET as a biomarker of tau pathology in aging and

  10. Outcome Rating Scale and Session Rating Scale in Psychological Practice: Clinical Utility of Ultra-Brief Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Alistair; Hemsley, Samantha

    2009-01-01

    The validity and reliability of the Outcome Rating Scale (ORS) and the Session Rating Scale (SRS) were evaluated against existing longer measures, including the Outcome Questionnaire-45, Working Alliance Inventory, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale-21, Quality of Life Scale, Rosenberg Self-Esteem Scale and General Self-efficacy Scale. The measures…

  11. In vivo measurements for high dose rate brachytherapy with optically stimulated luminescent dosimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Renu; Jursinic, Paul A.

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To show the feasibility of clinical implementation of OSLDs for high dose-rate (HDR) in vivo dosimetry for gynecological and breast patients. To discuss how the OSLDs were characterized for an Ir-192 source, taking into account low gamma energy and high dose gradients. To describe differences caused by the dose calculation formalism of treatment planning systems.Methods: OSLD irradiations were made using the GammaMedplus iX Ir-192 HDR, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA. BrachyVision versions 8.9 and 10.0, Varian Medical Systems, Milpitas, CA, were used for calculations. Version 8.9 used the TG-43 algorithm and version 10.0 used the Acuros algorithm. The OSLDs (InLight Nanodots) were characterized for Ir-192. Various phantoms were created to assess calculated and measured doses and the angular dependence and self-absorption of the Nanodots. Following successful phantom measurements, patient measurements for gynecological patients and breast cancer patients were made and compared to calculated doses.Results: The OSLD sensitivity to Ir-192 compared to 6 MV is between 1.10 and 1.25, is unique to each detector, and changes with accumulated dose. The measured doses were compared to those predicted by the treatment planning system and found to be in agreement for the gynecological patients to within measurement uncertainty. The range of differences between the measured and Acuros calculated doses was -10%-14%. For the breast patients, there was a discrepancy of -4.4% to +6.5% between the measured and calculated doses at the skin surface when the Acuros algorithm was used. These differences were within experimental uncertainty due to (random) error in the location of the detector with respect to the treatment catheter.Conclusions: OSLDs can be successfully used for HDR in vivo dosimetry. However, for the measurements to be meaningful one must account for the angular dependence, volume-averaging, and the greater sensitivity to Ir-192 gamma rays than to 6 MV x

  12. Four-year measurement of methane flux over a temperate forest with a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakabe, A.; Kosugi, Y.; Ueyama, M.; Hamotani, K.; Takahashi, K.; Iwata, H.; Itoh, M.

    2013-12-01

    Forests are generally assumed to be an atmospheric methane (CH4) sink (Le Mer and Roger, 2001). However, under Asian monsoon climate, forests are subject to wide spatiotemporal range in soil water status, where forest soils often became water-saturated condition heterogeneously. In such warm and humid conditions, forests may act as a CH4 source and/or sink with considerable spatiotemporal variations. Micrometeorological methods such as eddy covariance (EC) method continuously measure spatially-representative flux at a canopy scale without artificial disturbance. In this study, we measured CH4 fluxes over a temperate forest during four-year period using a CH4 analyzer based on tunable diode laser spectroscopy detection with a relaxed eddy accumulation (REA) method (Hamotani et al., 1996, 2001). We revealed the amplitude and seasonal variations of canopy-scale CH4 fluxes. The REA method is the attractive alternative to the EC method to measure trace-gas flux because it allows the use of analyzers with an optimal integration time. We also conducted continuous chamber measurements on forest floor to reveal spatial variations in soil CH4 fluxes and its controlling processes. The observations were made in an evergreen coniferous forest in central Japan. The site has a warm temperate monsoon climate with wet summer. Some wetlands were located in riparian zones along streams within the flux footprint area. For the REA method, the sonic anemometer (SAT-550, Kaijo) was mounted on top of the 29-m-tall tower and air was sampled from just below the sonic anemometer to reservoirs according to the direction of vertical wind velocity (w). After accumulating air for 30 minutes, the air in the reservoirs was pulled into a CO2/H2O gas analyzer (LI-840, Li-Cor) and a CH4 analyzer (FMA-200, Los Gatos Research). Before entering the analyzers, the sampled air was dried using a gas dryer (PD-50 T-48; Perma Pure Inc.). The REA flux is obtained from the difference in the mean concentrations

  13. Measured Aptitudes vs Self-Rating in Identifying Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    City Coll. of San Francisco, CA.

    Since 1972, guidance counselors at the City College of San Francisco have been using a computerized system called the Computer Assisted Occupational Survey (CAOS) to help students make career choices. CAOS uses a battery of aptitude tests to measure verbal and numerical abilities, spatial visualization, clerical perception, and general learning…

  14. Variance in Broad Reading Accounted for by Measures of Reading Speed Embedded within Maze and Comprehension Rate Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Andrea D.; Skinner, Christopher H.; Wilhoit, Brian; Ciancio, Dennis; Morrow, Jennifer A.

    2012-01-01

    Maze and reading comprehension rate measures are calculated by using measures of reading speed and measures of accuracy (i.e., correctly selected words or answers). In sixth- and seventh-grade samples, we found that the measures of reading speed embedded within our Maze measures accounted for 50% and 39% of broad reading score (BRS) variance,…

  15. Biomass accumulation rates of Amazonian secondary forest and biomass of old-growth forests from Landsat time series and the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helmer, Eileen H.; Lefsky, Michael A.; Roberts, Dar A.

    2009-01-01

    We estimate the age of humid lowland tropical forests in Rondônia, Brazil, from a somewhat densely spaced time series of Landsat images (1975-2003) with an automated procedure, the Threshold Age Mapping Algorithm (TAMA), first described here. We then estimate a landscape-level rate of aboveground woody biomass accumulation of secondary forest by combining forest age mapping with biomass estimates from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS). Though highly variable, the estimated average biomass accumulation rate of 8.4 Mg ha-1 yr-1 agrees well with ground-based studies for young secondary forests in the region. In isolating the lowland forests, we map land cover and general types of old-growth forests with decision tree classification of Landsat imagery and elevation data. We then estimate aboveground live biomass for seven classes of old-growth forest. TAMA is simple, fast, and self-calibrating. By not using between-date band or index differences or trends, it requires neither image normalization nor atmospheric correction. In addition, it uses an approach to map forest cover for the self-calibrations that is novel to forest mapping with satellite imagery; it maps humid secondary forest that is difficult to distinguish from old-growth forest in single-date imagery; it does not assume that forest age equals time since disturbance; and it incorporates Landsat Multispectral Scanner imagery. Variations on the work that we present here can be applied to other forested landscapes. Applications that use image time series will be helped by the free distribution of coregistered Landsat imagery, which began in December 2008, and of the Ice Cloud and land Elevation Satellite Vegetation Product, which simplifies the use of GLAS data. Finally, we demonstrate here for the first time how the optical imagery of fine spatial resolution that is viewable on Google Earth provides a new source of reference data for remote sensing applications related to land cover.

  16. Performance assessment of a commonly used "accumulation and wash-off" model from long-term continuous road runoff turbidity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jérémie; Bonhomme, Céline; Al Ali, Saja; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2015-07-01

    The suitability of a commonly used accumulation and wash-off model for continuous modelling of urban runoff contamination was evaluated based on 11-month turbidity and flow-rate records from an urban street. Calibration and uncertainty analysis were performed using a Markov Chain Monte-Carlo sampling method for both suspended solids loads (discharge rates) and concentration modelling. Selected models failed at replicating suspended solids concentration over the complete monitoring period. The studied dataset indeed suggests that the accumulation process is rather unpredictable and cannot be satisfactorily represented with usual accumulation models unless short periods are considered. Regarding suspended solid loads modelling, noticeably better performance was achieved, but similar results could as well be obtained with much simpler constant concentration models. Unless providing very accurate estimates of concentrations in runoff, accounting for their temporal variability during rain events may therefore not always be necessary for pollutant loads modelling, as loads are in fact mostly explained by runoff volumes.

  17. Performance assessment of a commonly used "accumulation and wash-off" model from long-term continuous road runoff turbidity measurements.

    PubMed

    Sage, Jérémie; Bonhomme, Céline; Al Ali, Saja; Gromaire, Marie-Christine

    2015-07-01

    The suitability of a commonly used accumulation and wash-off model for continuous modelling of urban runoff contamination was evaluated based on 11-month turbidity and flow-rate records from an urban street. Calibration and uncertainty analysis were performed using a Markov Chain Monte-Carlo sampling method for both suspended solids loads (discharge rates) and concentration modelling. Selected models failed at replicating suspended solids concentration over the complete monitoring period. The studied dataset indeed suggests that the accumulation process is rather unpredictable and cannot be satisfactorily represented with usual accumulation models unless short periods are considered. Regarding suspended solid loads modelling, noticeably better performance was achieved, but similar results could as well be obtained with much simpler constant concentration models. Unless providing very accurate estimates of concentrations in runoff, accounting for their temporal variability during rain events may therefore not always be necessary for pollutant loads modelling, as loads are in fact mostly explained by runoff volumes. PMID:25909578

  18. Biogeochemical cycling in an organic-rich coastal marine basin. 9. Sources and accumulation rates of vascular plant-derived organic material

    SciTech Connect

    Haddad, R.I.; Martens, C.S. )

    1987-11-01

    The sources, degradation and burial of vascular plant debris deposited over the past several decades in the lagoonal sediments of Cape Lookout Bight, North Carolina, are quantified using alkaline cupric oxide lignin oxidation product (LOP) analysis. Non-woody angiosperms, accounting for 92 {plus minus} 32% of the recognizable sedimentary vascular plant debris, are calculated to contribute 23 {plus minus} 17% of the total organic carbon buried over the past decade. When combined with a previously established sedimentary organic carbon budget for this site a vascular plant derived carbon burial rate of 26 {plus minus}20 mole C m{sup {minus}2} yr{sup {minus}1} is calculated for this same time interval. The refractory nature and invariant depth distributions of the lignin oxidation products (LOP), when coupled with evidence for constant degradation rates of metabolizable materials, indicate that sediment accumulation at this site has been a steady state process with respect to source and burial of organic carbon since its conversion from an inner-continental shelf to a lagoonal environment during the late 1960's. Thus systematic down-core decreases in labile organic matter result from early diagenetic processes rather than input rate variations.

  19. Long-term measurement of terpenoid flux above a Larix kaempferi forest using a relaxed eddy accumulation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochizuki, Tomoki; Tani, Akira; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Saigusa, Nobuko; Ueyama, Masahito

    2014-02-01

    Terpenoids emitted from forests contribute to the formation of secondary organic aerosols and affect the carbon budgets of forest ecosystems. To investigate seasonal variation in terpenoid flux involved in the aerosol formation and carbon budget, we measured the terpenoid flux of a Larix kaempferi forest between May 2011 and May 2012 by using a relaxed eddy accumulation method. Isoprene was emitted from a fern plant species Dryopteris crassirhizoma on the forest floor and monoterpenes from the L. kaempferi. α-Pinene was the dominant compound, but seasonal variation of the monoterpene composition was observed. High isoprene and monoterpene fluxes were observed in July and August. The total monoterpene flux was dependent on temperature, but several unusual high positive fluxes were observed after rain fall events. We found a good correlation between total monoterpene flux and volumetric soil water content (r = 0.88), and used this correlation to estimate monoterpene flux after rain events and calculate annual terpenoid emissions. Annual carbon emission in the form of total monoterpenes plus isoprene was determined to be 0.93% of the net ecosystem exchange. If we do not consider the effect of rain fall, carbon emissions may be underestimated by about 50%. Our results suggest that moisture conditions in the forest soil is a key factor controlling the monoterpene emissions from the forest ecosystem.

  20. The “accumulation effect” of positrons in the stack of foils, detected by measurements of the positron implantation profile

    SciTech Connect

    Dryzek, Jerzy; Siemek, Krzysztof

    2013-12-14

    The profiles of positrons implanted from the radioactive source {sup 22}Na into a stack of foils and plates are the subject of our experimental and theoretical studies. The measurements were performed using the depth scanning of positron implantation profile method, and the theoretical calculations using the phenomenological multi-scattering model (MSM). Several stacks consisting of silver, gold and aluminum foils, and titanium and germanium plates were investigated. We notice that the MSM describes well the experimental profiles; however when the stack consisting of silver and gold foils, the backscattering and linear absorption coefficients differ significantly from those reported in the literature. We suggest the energy dependency of the backscattering coefficient for silver and gold. In the stacks which comprise titanium and germanium plates, there were observed the features, which indicate the presence of the “accumulation effect” in the experimental implantation profile. This effect was previously detected in implantation profiles in Monte Carlo simulations using the GEANT4 tool kit, and it consists in higher localization of positrons close the interface. We suppose that this effect can be essential for positron annihilation in any heterogeneous materials.

  1. Measurement of local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography: validation with L-(/sup 3/H)valine

    SciTech Connect

    Dwyer, B.E.; Donatoni, P.; Wasterlain, C.G.

    1982-12-01

    Following the injection of 4-day old rats with 150 mM L-(3,4-/sup 3/H)valine (10 mumol/g, IP) the incorporation of /sup 3/H into protein was linear 2 hours. Valine specific activity in the brain acid-soluble fraction was constant between 30 and 120 min after injection with a mean value of 82.3% of the injectate. Significant amounts of tritated metabolites accumulated in the brain acid-soluble fraction (41.4% of radioactivity at 120 min) but do not prove an impediment to measuring rates of protein synthesis. The rate of protein synthesis in cerebral cortex of the 4-day old rat was measured by quantitative autoradiography using (/sup 3/H)valine and /sup 3/H-sensitive film. The measured rate shows excellent agreement with that found previously using L-(1-/sup 14/C)valine. Our results suggest that (/sup 3/H)valine can be a useful precursor to measure local rates of brain protein synthesis by quantitative autoradiography.

  2. A New Method for Flow Rate Measurement in Millimeter-Scale Pipes

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Haifeng; Gao, Xuemin; Wang, Baoliang; Huang, Zhiyao; Li, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Combining the Capacitively Coupled Contactless Conductivity Detection (C4D) technique and the principle of cross correlation flow measurement, a new method for flow rate measurement in millimeter-scale pipes was proposed. The research work included two parts. First, a new five-electrode C4D sensor was developed. Second, with two conductivity signals obtained by the developed sensor, the flow rate measurement was implemented by using the principle of cross correlation flow measurement. The experimental results showed that the proposed flow rate measurement method was effective, the developed five-electrode C4D sensor was successful, and the measurement accuracy was satisfactory. In five millimeter-scale pipes with different inner diameters of 0.5, 0.8, 1.8, 3.0 and 3.9 mm respectively, the maximum relative difference of the flow rate measurement between the reference flow rate and the measured flow rate was less than 5%. PMID:23353139

  3. Radiation measuring apparatus employing variable rate pulse sampling control

    SciTech Connect

    Kakegawa, M.; Kumano, N.; Nohara, N.; Tanaka, E.; Tomitani, T.

    1980-01-29

    A scintillation type radiation-measuring apparatus comprising a radiation-detecting scintillator is described. A scintillation given off from the scintillator is converted into current by a photomultiplier tube. A current amplifier generates a plurality of pulses each proportional to the intensity of said converted current. The pulses have the width clipped by a clipped pulse generating circuit. The clipped form of the pulses is delayed by a delay circuit and integrated by an integrator; the wave height value of the outputs from the integrator is sampled by a sampling circuit to provide a sampled output. Means are provided to supply instructions to start and reset the operation of the integrator and to commence the operation of the sampling circuit in accordance with the interval between successively detected current pulses.

  4. Late Quaternary sediment-accumulation rates within the inner basins of the California Continental Borderland in support of geologic hazard evaluation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, W.R.; McGann, M.; Sliter, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    An evaluation of the geologic hazards of the inner California Borderland requires determination of the timing for faulting and mass-movement episodes during the Holocene. Our effort focused on basin slopes and turbidite systems on the basin floors for the area between Santa Barbara and San Diego, California. Dating condensed sections on slopes adjacent to fault zones provides better control on fault history where high-resolution, seismic-reflection data can be used to correlate sediment between the core site and the fault zones. This study reports and interprets 147 radiocarbon dates from 43 U.S. Geological Survey piston cores as well as 11 dates from Ocean Drilling Program Site 1015 on the floor of Santa Monica Basin. One hundred nineteen dates from 39 of the piston cores have not previously been published. Core locations were selected for hazard evaluation, but despite the nonuniform distribution of sample locations, the dates obtained for the late Quaternary deposits are useful for documenting changes in sediment-accumulation rates during the past 30 ka. Cores from basins receiving substantial sediment from rivers, i.e., Santa Monica Basin and the Gulf of Santa Catalina, show a decrease in sediment supply during the middle Holocene, but during the late Holocene after sea level had reached the current highstand condition, rates then increased partly in response to an increase in El Ni??o-Southern Oscillation events during the past 3.5 ka. ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  5. Measurements of Heart Rate and Accelerometry to Determine the Physical Activity Level in Boys Playing Paintball

    PubMed Central

    JARVI, MICHELLE; BROWN, GREGORY A; SHAW, BRANDON S.; SHAW, INA

    2013-01-01

    Paintball is a popular recreational sport played by 3.655 million Americans and may be sufficient physical activity to promote health. Paintball has been played as an organized sport since the 1980’s and is essentially a game of tag, except instead of touching an opponent by hand opponents are tagged by shooting them with a paintball that leaves a mark indicating who has been eliminated. A previous evaluation of paintball as physical activity had 13 subjects undergo a VO2max test to develop a heart rate (HR) /oxygen consumption relationship, and it was observed that heart rates during paintball were 68–73% of the measured maximal HR. The present study used accelerometry and HR monitors to evaluate the quantity and intensity of physical activity in boys playing paintball. Eleven boys (12.7 ± 1.0 y, 51.5 ± 11.3 kg, 161.8 ± 10.1 cm) engaged in a VO2max test to develop a HR/oxygen consumption correlation. On a separate day the boys played 7 games of outdoor paintball while wearing a HR monitor and accelerometer. The boys played paintball for 11.5 ± 6.2 minutes/game for a total of 80.6 ± 10.0 minutes of game play. Average HR during paintball play was 129.6 ± 6.6 beats/min, representing 39.9 ± 12.9% VO2max. Based on accelerometry, the boys accumulated 63.2 ± 15.6 minutes of moderate intensity activity and 2.6 ± 2.8 minutes of vigorous activity during paintball. These data suggest that playing paintball may be considered as physical activity that is > 3 METs, and thus health promoting. PMID:27182396

  6. Biomass burning fuel consumption rates: a field measurement database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Leeuwen, T. T.; van der Werf, G. R.; Hoffmann, A. A.; Detmers, R. G.; Rücker, G.; French, N. H. F.; Archibald, S.; Carvalho, J. A., Jr.; Cook, G. D.; de Groot, W. J.; Hély, C.; Kasischke, E. S.; Kloster, S.; McCarty, J. L.; Pettinari, M. L.; Savadogo, P.; Alvarado, E. C.; Boschetti, L.; Manuri, S.; Meyer, C. P.; Siegert, F.; Trollope, L. A.; Trollope, W. S. W.

    2014-12-01

    Landscape fires show large variability in the amount of biomass or fuel consumed per unit area burned. Fuel consumption (FC) depends on the biomass available to burn and the fraction of the biomass that is actually combusted, and can be combined with estimates of area burned to assess emissions. While burned area can be detected from space and estimates are becoming more reliable due to improved algorithms and sensors, FC is usually modeled or taken selectively from the literature. We compiled the peer-reviewed literature on FC for various biomes and fuel categories to understand FC and its variability better, and to provide a database that can be used to constrain biogeochemical models with fire modules. We compiled in total 77 studies covering 11 biomes including savanna (15 studies, average FC of 4.6 t DM (dry matter) ha-1 with a standard deviation of 2.2), tropical forest (n = 19, FC = 126 ± 77), temperate forest (n = 12, FC = 58 ± 72), boreal forest (n = 16, FC = 35 ± 24), pasture (n = 4, FC = 28 ± 9.3), shifting cultivation (n = 2, FC = 23, with a range of 4.0-43), crop residue (n = 4, FC = 6.5 ± 9.0), chaparral (n = 3, FC = 27 ± 19), tropical peatland (n = 4, FC = 314 ± 196), boreal peatland (n = 2, FC = 42 [42-43]), and tundra (n = 1, FC = 40). Within biomes the regional variability in the number of measurements was sometimes large, with e.g. only three measurement locations in boreal Russia and 35 sites in North America. Substantial regional differences in FC were found within the defined biomes: for example, FC of temperate pine forests in the USA was 37% lower than Australian forests dominated by eucalypt trees. Besides showing the differences between biomes, FC estimates were also grouped into different fuel classes. Our results highlight the large variability in FC, not only between biomes but also within biomes and fuel classes. This implies that substantial uncertainties are associated with using biome-averaged values to represent FC for whole

  7. Accretion rate of cosmic spherules measured at the South Pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Susan; Lever, James H.; Harvey, Ralph P.

    1998-04-01

    Micrometeorites are terrestrially collected, extraterrestrial particles smaller than about 1mm, which account for most of the mass being accreted to the Earth,. Compared with meteorites, micrometeorites more completely represent the Earth-crossing meteoroid complex, and should include fragments of asteroids, comets, Mars and our Moon, as well as pre-solar and interstellar grains,. Previous measurements of the flux of micrometeoroids that survive to the Earth's surface have large uncertainties owing to the destruction of particles by weathering, inefficiencies in magnetic collection or separation techniques, low particle counts,, poor age constraint,, or highly variable concentrating processes,. Here we describe an attempt to circumvent these problems through the collection of thousands of well preserved and dated micrometeorites from the bottom of the South Pole water well, which supplies drinking water for the Scott-Amundsen station. Using this collection, we have determined precise estimates of the flux and mass distribution for 50-700-µm cosmic spherules (melted micrometeorites). Allowing for the expected abundance of unmelted micrometeorites in the samples, our results indicate that about 90% of the incoming mass of submillimetre particles evaporates during atmospheric entry. Our data indicate the loss of glass-rich and small stony spherules from deep-sea deposits,, and they provide constraints for models describing the survival probability of micrometeoroids,.

  8. Reaction rate constants of H-abstraction by OH from large ketones: measurements and site-specific rate rules.

    PubMed

    Badra, Jihad; Elwardany, Ahmed E; Farooq, Aamir

    2014-06-28

    Reaction rate constants of the reaction of four large ketones with hydroxyl (OH) are investigated behind reflected shock waves using OH laser absorption. The studied ketones are isomers of hexanone and include 2-hexanone, 3-hexanone, 3-methyl-2-pentanone, and 4-methl-2-pentanone. Rate constants are measured under pseudo-first-order kinetics at temperatures ranging from 866 K to 1375 K and pressures near 1.5 atm. The reported high-temperature rate constant measurements are the first direct measurements for these ketones under combustion-relevant conditions. The effects of the position of the carbonyl group (C=O) and methyl (CH3) branching on the overall rate constant with OH are examined. Using previously published data, rate constant expressions covering, low-to-high temperatures, are developed for acetone, 2-butanone, 3-pentanone, and the hexanone isomers studied here. These Arrhenius expressions are used to devise rate rules for H-abstraction from various sites. Specifically, the current scheme is applied with good success to H-abstraction by OH from a series of n-ketones. Finally, general expressions for primary and secondary site-specific H-abstraction by OH from ketones are proposed as follows (the subscript numbers indicate the number of carbon atoms bonded to the next-nearest-neighbor carbon atom, the subscript CO indicates that the abstraction is from a site next to the carbonyl group (C=O), and the prime is used to differentiate different neighboring environments of a methylene group):

  9. Measurement of interseismic strain accumulation in the Southern Andes (25°-35°S) using Envisat SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducret, G.; Doin, M. P.; Grandin, R.; Socquet, A.; Vigny, C.; Métois, M.; Béjar-Pizzaro, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Chilean subduction zone is one of the most active in the world. The Nazca plate subducts under the South America plate with a velocity around 7 cm/year. Along-strike and along-dip variations of interseismic coupling suggest that the subduction interface is divided into segments. Rupture of one or several consecutive segments may produce earthquakes of magnitude greater than 8.0. However, the definition of the segmentation in the particular case of the Chilean subduction and its relation to earthquake nucleation in general is a debated topic. We focus on an area extending over 1000 km in latitude, located between Taltal (~25°S) and Constitution (~35°S), which has been accumulating tectonic strain since the mid-20th century. Three main earthquakes occurred in the last decade around the boundaries of this segment : the 1995 Antogagasta (M=8.1) and the 2007 Tocopilla (M=7.7) earthquakes to the North and the 2010 Maule (M=8.8) earthquake to the South. A few seismic swarms occurred in recent years : the episode of Valparaiso (~33°S) in 1985, the Puntaqui (~30°S) crisis in 1997, and the swarms in the Copiapo (~27°S) region in 1973 and 2006. The 25-35°S part of the subduction zone experiences since 38 years a background seismicity (given by USGS catalog), that is mainly located along the plate interface and less frequently within the overriding plate. The seismicity rate is varying from South to North with a maximum seismicity located around La Serena area (~30°S). There, the coupling distribution is constrained by an important GPS dataset that indicate a lower coupling (less than 60%) compared with areas further North and South. Similarly, GPS data suggest that the Copiapo area also corresponds to a local minimum of coupling. However the GPS network is too sparse further North to constrain coupling variations between 28° and 25°S. We use InSAR (Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar) to provide additional insights on interseismic strain accumulation and the

  10. Predicting the extent of metabolism using in vitro permeability rate measurements and in silico permeability rate predictions

    PubMed Central

    Hosey, Chelsea M; Benet, Leslie Z

    2015-01-01

    The Biopharmaceutics Drug Disposition Classification System (BDDCS) can be utilized to predict drug disposition, including interactions with other drugs and transporter or metabolizing enzyme effects based on the extent of metabolism and solubility of a drug. However, defining the extent of metabolism relies upon clinical data. Drugs exhibiting high passive intestinal permeability rates are extensively metabolized. Therefore, we aimed to determine if in vitro measures of permeability rate or in silico permeability rate predictions could predict the extent of metabolism, to determine a reference compound representing the permeability rate above which compounds would be expected to be extensively metabolized, and to predict the major route of elimination of compounds in a two-tier approach utilizing permeability rate and a previously published model predicting the major route of elimination of parent drug. Twenty-two in vitro permeability rate measurement data sets in Caco-2 and MDCK cell lines and PAMPA were collected from the literature, while in silico permeability rate predictions were calculated using ADMET Predictor™ or VolSurf+. The potential for permeability rate to differentiate between extensively and poorly metabolized compounds was analyzed with receiver operating characteristic curves. Compounds that yielded the highest sensitivity-specificity average were selected as permeability rate reference standards. The major route of elimination of poorly permeable drugs was predicted by our previously published model and the accuracies and predictive values were calculated. The areas under the receiver operating curves were >0.90 for in vitro measures of permeability rate and >0.80 for the VolSurf+ model of permeability rate, indicating they were able to predict the extent of metabolism of compounds. Labetalol and zidovudine predicted greater than 80% of extensively metabolized drugs correctly and greater than 80% of poorly metabolized drugs correctly in Caco

  11. Oxygen consumption rate v. rate of energy utilization of fishes: a comparison and brief history of the two measurements.

    PubMed

    Nelson, J A

    2016-01-01

    Accounting for energy use by fishes has been taking place for over 200 years. The original, and continuing gold standard for measuring energy use in terrestrial animals, is to account for the waste heat produced by all reactions of metabolism, a process referred to as direct calorimetry. Direct calorimetry is not easy or convenient in terrestrial animals and is extremely difficult in aquatic animals. Thus, the original and most subsequent measurements of metabolic activity in fishes have been measured via indirect calorimetry. Indirect calorimetry takes advantage of the fact that oxygen is consumed and carbon dioxide is produced during the catabolic conversion of foodstuffs or energy reserves to useful ATP energy. As measuring [CO2 ] in water is more challenging than measuring [O2 ], most indirect calorimetric studies on fishes have used the rate of O2 consumption. To relate measurements of O2 consumption back to actual energy usage requires knowledge of the substrate being oxidized. Many contemporary studies of O2 consumption by fishes do not attempt to relate this measurement back to actual energy usage. Thus, the rate of oxygen consumption (M˙O2 ) has become a measurement in its own right that is not necessarily synonymous with metabolic rate. Because all extant fishes are obligate aerobes (many fishes engage in substantial net anaerobiosis, but all require oxygen to complete their life cycle), this discrepancy does not appear to be of great concern to the fish biology community, and reports of fish oxygen consumption, without being related to energy, have proliferated. Unfortunately, under some circumstances, these measures can be quite different from one another. A review of the methodological history of the two measurements and a look towards the future are included.

  12. Calibration of a fugitive emission rate measurement of an area source.

    PubMed

    Wong, Colin L Y; Ramkellawan, Jeffrey

    2013-11-01

    A major challenge to measuring fugitive emission rates from large area sources, such as landfills or tailings ponds, has been the establishment of the accuracy of such methods, or of a particular measurement. When such measurements are carried out, they are invariably associated with a relatively high degree of uncertainty. The Airborne Matter Mapping (AMM) method is a new method of measuring fugitive emission rates that can be applied to large area sources. The method was applied to the measurement of methane emissions from a landfill to assess the potential accuracy of the method, and the measurement process was calibrated to increase confidence in the measured value. First, a measured rate of methane from a gas cylinder was released from near the center of the landfill and the AMM method was applied to measure the methane flow rate across a measurement surface. Then, the AMM method was performed a second time along the same measurement surface without the intentional release of methane. The difference of the flow rates across the measurement surface were then compared with the measured rate of methane released from the gas cylinder. The relatively small difference of -5.7% between the flow rates, relative to the methane release rate from the gas cylinder provides confidence in the accuracy of this AMM method measurement. An adjustment to the AMM method analysis was made such that the difference between the flow rates was negligible, which resulted in a calibrated measurement of the methane emission rate from the landfill of 0.87 g/sec.

  13. Carbon accumulation in a permafrost polygon peatland: steady long-term rates in spite of shifts between dry and wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Couwenberg, John

    2015-02-01

    Ice-wedge polygon peatlands contain a substantial part of the carbon stored in permafrost soils. However, little is known about their long-term carbon accumulation rates (CAR) in relation to shifts in vegetation and climate. We collected four peat profiles from one single polygon in NE Yakutia and cut them into contiguous 0.5 cm slices. Pollen density interpolation between AMS (14)C dated levels provided the time span contained in each of the sample slices, which--in combination with the volumetric carbon content--allowed for the reconstruction of CAR over decadal and centennial timescales. Vegetation representing dry palaeo-ridges and wet depressions was reconstructed with detailed micro- and macrofossil analysis. We found repeated shifts between wet and dry conditions during the past millennium. Dry ridges with associated permafrost growth originated during phases of (relatively) warm summer temperature and collapsed during relatively cold phases, illustrating the important role of vegetation and peat as intermediaries between ambient air temperature and the permafrost. The average long-term CAR across the four profiles was 10.6 ± 5.5 g C m(-2) yr(-1). Time-weighted mean CAR did not differ significantly between wet depression and dry ridge/hummock phases (10.6 ± 5.2 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 10.3 ± 5.7 g C m(-2) yr(-1), respectively). Although we observed increased CAR in relation to warm shifts, we also found changes in the opposite direction and the highest CAR actually occurred during the Little Ice Age. In fact, CAR rather seems to be governed by strong internal feedback mechanisms and has roughly remained stable on centennial time scales. The absence of significant differences in CAR between dry ridge and wet depression phases suggests that recent warming and associated expansion of shrubs will not affect long-term rates of carbon burial in ice-wedge polygon peatlands.

  14. Carbon accumulation in a permafrost polygon peatland: steady long-term rates in spite of shifts between dry and wet conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yang; Couwenberg, John

    2015-02-01

    Ice-wedge polygon peatlands contain a substantial part of the carbon stored in permafrost soils. However, little is known about their long-term carbon accumulation rates (CAR) in relation to shifts in vegetation and climate. We collected four peat profiles from one single polygon in NE Yakutia and cut them into contiguous 0.5 cm slices. Pollen density interpolation between AMS (14)C dated levels provided the time span contained in each of the sample slices, which--in combination with the volumetric carbon content--allowed for the reconstruction of CAR over decadal and centennial timescales. Vegetation representing dry palaeo-ridges and wet depressions was reconstructed with detailed micro- and macrofossil analysis. We found repeated shifts between wet and dry conditions during the past millennium. Dry ridges with associated permafrost growth originated during phases of (relatively) warm summer temperature and collapsed during relatively cold phases, illustrating the important role of vegetation and peat as intermediaries between ambient air temperature and the permafrost. The average long-term CAR across the four profiles was 10.6 ± 5.5 g C m(-2) yr(-1). Time-weighted mean CAR did not differ significantly between wet depression and dry ridge/hummock phases (10.6 ± 5.2 g C m(-2) yr(-1) and 10.3 ± 5.7 g C m(-2) yr(-1), respectively). Although we observed increased CAR in relation to warm shifts, we also found changes in the opposite direction and the highest CAR actually occurred during the Little Ice Age. In fact, CAR rather seems to be governed by strong internal feedback mechanisms and has roughly remained stable on centennial time scales. The absence of significant differences in CAR between dry ridge and wet depression phases suggests that recent warming and associated expansion of shrubs will not affect long-term rates of carbon burial in ice-wedge polygon peatlands. PMID:25230297

  15. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ON TRACK FOR MEASURING THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    rate with an estimate of how much matter is in space. The younger age values from each team assume the Universe is at a critical density where it contains just enough matter to expand indefinitely. The higher age estimates are calculated based on a low density of matter in space. (See 'Science Background' for more information on the expanding Universe.) 'A point of great interest is whether the age of the Universe arrived at this way is really older than the independently derived ages of the oldest stars,' said Saha, an investigator on both Hubble teams. 'The numbers lean on the side that the stellar ages are a little lower, or that the hypothesis that we live in a critical density universe needs to be questioned,' said Saha. 'As further results accumulate over the next few years, we hope to tighten the constraints on these issues.' THE OBSERVATIONS The Key Project team is midway along in their three-year program to derive the expansion rate of the Universe based on precise distance measurements to galaxies. They have now measured Cepheid distances to a dozen galaxies, and are about halfway through their overall program. The Key Project team also presented a preliminary estimate of the distance to the Fornax cluster of galaxies. The estimate was obtained through the detection and measurement with the Hubble Space Telescope of pulsating stars known as Cepheid variables found in the Fornax cluster. The Fornax cluster is measured to be approximately as far away as the Virgo cluster of galaxies -- about 60 million light-years. The Key Project team member who led this effort, Caltech astronomer Barry Madore said, 'This cluster allows us to make independent estimates of the expansion rate of the Universe using a number of different techniques. All of these methods are now in excellent agreement. With Fornax we are now at turning point in this field.' The team is measuring Cepheid distances to the Virgo and Fornax clusters of galaxies as a complementary test. Their strategy

  16. Growth rate measurements of lysozyme crystals under microgravity conditions by laser interferometry.

    PubMed

    Yoshizaki, Izumi; Tsukamoto, Katsuo; Yamazaki, Tomoya; Murayama, Kenta; Oshi, Kentaro; Fukuyama, Seijiro; Shimaoka, Taro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Tachibana, Masaru

    2013-10-01

    The growth rate vs. supersaturation of a lysozyme crystal was successfully measured in situ together with the crystal surface observation and the concentration measurements onboard the International Space Station. A Michelson-type interferometer and a Mach-Zehnder interferometer were, respectively, employed for real-time growth rate measurements and concentration field measurements. The hardware development, sample preparation, operation, and analysis methods are described.

  17. Landscape scale measures of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) bioenergetic growth rate potential in Lake Michigan and comparison with angler catch rates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, T.O.; Rutherford, E.S.; Brines, Shannon J.; Geddes, C.A.; Mason, D.M.; Schwab, D.J.; Fleischer, G.W.

    2004-01-01

    The relative quality of a habitat can influence fish consumption, growth, mortality, and production. In order to quantify habitat quality, several authors have combined bioenergetic and foraging models to generate spatially explicit estimates of fish growth rate potential (GRP). However, the capacity of GRP to reflect the spatial distributions of fishes over large areas has not been fully evaluated. We generated landscape scale estimates of steelhead (Oncorhynchus mykiss) GRP throughout Lake Michigan for 1994-1996, and used these estimates to test the hypotheses that GRP is a good predictor of spatial patterns of steelhead catch rates. We used surface temperatures (measured with AVHRR satellite imagery) and acoustically measured steelhead prey densities (alewife, Alosa pseudoharengus) as inputs for the GRP model. Our analyses demonstrate that potential steelhead growth rates in Lake Michigan are highly variable in both space and time. Steelhead GRP tended to increase with latitude, and mean GRP was much higher during September 1995, compared to 1994 and 1996. In addition, our study suggests that landscape scale measures of GRP are not good predictors of steelhead catch rates throughout Lake Michigan, but may provide an index of interannual variation in system-wide habitat quality.

  18. Recent increases in sediment and nutrient accumulation in Bear Lake, Utah/Idaho, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smoak, J.M.; Swarzenski, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    This study examines historical changes in sediment and nutrient accumulation rates in Bear Lake along the northeastern Utah/Idaho border, USA. Two sediment cores were dated by measuring excess 210Pb activities and applying the constant rate of supply (CRS) dating model. Historical rates of bulk sediment accumulation were calculated based on the ages within the sediment cores. Bulk sediment accumulation rates increased throughout the last 100 years. According to the CRS model, bulk sediment accumulation rates were <25mg cm-2 year-1 prior to 1935. Between 1935 and 1980, bulk sediment accumulation rates increased to approximately 40mg cm -2 year-1. This increase in sediment accumulation probably resulted from the re-connection of Bear River to Bear Lake. Bulk sediment accumulation rates accelerated again after 1980. Accumulation rates of total phosphorus (TP), total nitrogen (TN), total inorganic carbon (TIC), and total organic carbon (TOC) were calculated by multiplying bulk sediment accumulation rates times the concentrations of these nutrients in the sediment. Accumulation rates of TP, TN, TIC, and TOC increased as a consequence of increased bulk sediment accumulation rates after the re-connection of Bear River with Bear Lake.

  19. [The change in efficiency of protective measures for reduction of 137Cs accumulation by agricultural plants in various periods after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Aleksakhin, R M; Muzalevskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of 137Cs transfer factors to plants and the effects of protective measures on this radionuclide accumulation in the agricultural production is estimated on the example of the south-western regions of Bryansk District. Three periods in decreasing the 137Cs content in plants during 20 years after the Chernobyl accident are identified. The contribution of radionuclide decay, natural biogeochemical processes and protective measures aimed at reduction of the 137Cs accumulation in agricultural plants during various periods after radioactive fallout is shown. Maximum permissible levels of 137Cs contamination of cultivated lands, where crop products meeting current standards may be obtained, at different scopes of protective measures on radioactive-contaminated territories are forecasted. Periods after radioactive fallout, when crop and forage products meeting radiological standards are obtained, are assessed. PMID:21520624

  20. [The change in efficiency of protective measures for reduction of 137Cs accumulation by agricultural plants in various periods after the Chernobyl accident].

    PubMed

    Panov, A V; Aleksakhin, R M; Muzalevskaia, A A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamics of 137Cs transfer factors to plants and the effects of protective measures on this radionuclide accumulation in the agricultural production is estimated on the example of the south-western regions of Bryansk District. Three periods in decreasing the 137Cs content in plants during 20 years after the Chernobyl accident are identified. The contribution of radionuclide decay, natural biogeochemical processes and protective measures aimed at reduction of the 137Cs accumulation in agricultural plants during various periods after radioactive fallout is shown. Maximum permissible levels of 137Cs contamination of cultivated lands, where crop products meeting current standards may be obtained, at different scopes of protective measures on radioactive-contaminated territories are forecasted. Periods after radioactive fallout, when crop and forage products meeting radiological standards are obtained, are assessed.

  1. Simultaneous determination of 222Rn and 220Rn exhalation rates from building materials used in Central Italy with accumulation chambers and a continuous solid state alpha detector: influence of particle size, humidity and precursors concentration.

    PubMed

    Tuccimei, P; Moroni, M; Norcia, D

    2006-02-01

    A method to determine simultaneously the rates of 222Rn and 220Rn released from building materials quarried in Central Italy is presented. The method makes use of a continuous monitor equipped with a solid state alpha detector, in-line connected to a small accumulation chamber. The effects of chamber leakage and back diffusion on 222Rn free exhalation rate is evaluated. The influence of available exhalation surface, humidity content and precursors concentration on radon and thoron exhalation rates is investigated.

  2. Calorimeter measures high nuclear heating rates and their gradients across a reactor test hole

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burwell, D.; Coombe, J. R.; Mc Bride, J.

    1970-01-01

    Pedestal-type calorimeter measures gamma-ray heating rates from 0.5 to 7.0 watts per gram of aluminum. Nuclear heating rate is a function of cylinder temperature change, measured by four chromel-alumel thermocouples attached to the calorimeter, and known thermoconductivity of the tested material.

  3. Smartphone applications (apps) for heart rate measurement in children: comparison with electrocardiography monitor.

    PubMed

    Ho, Chi-Lin; Fu, Yun-Ching; Lin, Ming-Chih; Chan, Sheng-Ching; Hwang, Betau; Jan, Sheng-Ling

    2014-04-01

    Heart rate (HR) measurement is essential for children with abnormal heart beats. The purpose of this study was to determine whether HR measurement by smartphone applications (apps) could be a feasible alternative to an electrocardiography (ECG) monitor. A total of 40 children, median age of 4.3 years, were studied. Using four free smartphone apps, pulse rates were measured at the finger (or toe) and earlobe, and compared with baseline HRs measured by ECG monitors. Significant correlations between measured pulse rates and baseline HRs were found. Both correlation and accuracy rate were higher in the earlobe group than the finger/toe group. When HR was <120 beats per min (bpm), the accuracy rates were not different between the two different measuring sites for each app (median of 65 vs 76%). The accuracy rates in the finger/toe group were significantly lower than those in the earlobe group for all apps when HR was ≥ 120 bpm (27 vs 65%). There were differences among apps in their abilities to measure pulse rates. Taking children's pulse rate from the earlobe would be more accurate, especially for tachycardia. However, we do not recommend that smartphone apps should not be used for routine medical use or used as the sole form of HR measurement because the results of their accuracy are not good enough.

  4. Patient-Rated Alliance as a Measure of Therapist Performance in Two Clinical Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Imel, Zac E.; Hubbard, Rebecca A.; Rutter, Carolyn M.; Simon, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The ability to form a strong therapeutic alliance is considered a foundational skill across psychotherapies. Patient-rated measures of the alliance are now being used to make judgments about a therapist's tendency to build alliances with their patients. However, whether a patient-rated alliance measure provides a useful index of a…

  5. Stretch-rate relationships for turbulent premixed combustion LES subgrid models measured using temporally resolved diagnostics

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, Adam M.; Driscoll, James F.

    2010-07-15

    Temporally resolved measurements of turbulence-flame interaction were used to experimentally determine relationships for the strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate exerted on a premixed flame surface. These relationships include a series of transfer functions that are analogous to, but not equal to, stretch-efficiency functions. The measurements were obtained by applying high-repetition-rate particle image velocimetry in a turbulent slot Bunsen flame and were able to resolve the range of turbulent scales that cause flame surface straining and wrinkling. Fluid control masses were tracked in a Lagrangian manner as they interacted with the flame surface. From each interaction, the spatially and temporally filtered subgrid strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate were measured. By analyzing the statistics of thousands of turbulence-flame interactions, relationships for the strain-rate and curvature stretch-rate were determined that are appropriate for Large Eddy Simulation. It was found that the strain-rate exerted on the flame during these interactions was better correlated with the strength of the subgrid fluid-dynamic strain-rate field than with previously used characteristic strain-rates. Furthermore, stretch-efficiency functions developed from simplified vortex-flame interactions significantly over-predict the measurements. Hence, the proposed relationship relates the strain-rate on the flame to the filtered subgrid fluid-dynamic strain-rate field during real turbulence-flame interactions using an empirically determined Strain-Rate Transfer function. It was found that the curvature stretch-rate did not locally balance the strain-rate as has been proposed in previous models. A geometric relationship was found to exist between the subgrid flame surface wrinkling factor and subgrid curvature stretch-rate, which could be expressed using an empirically determined wrinkling factor transfer function. Curve fits to the measured relationships are provided that could be

  6. Measurement Quality of the Chinese Early Childhood Program Rating Scale: An Investigation Using Multivariate Generalizability Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Dezhi; Hu, Bi Ying; Fan, Xitao; Li, Kejian

    2014-01-01

    Adapted from the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale-Revised, the Chinese Early Childhood Program Rating Scale (CECPRS) is a culturally comparable measure for assessing the quality of early childhood education and care programs in the Chinese cultural/social contexts. In this study, 176 kindergarten classrooms were rated with CECPRS on eight…

  7. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Z.; Falkowski, P.

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants is revealed. The phytoplankton or higher plants are illuminated with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes. 14 figs.

  8. Fast repetition rate (FRR) fluorometer and method for measuring fluorescence and photosynthetic parameters

    DOEpatents

    Kolber, Zbigniew; Falkowski, Paul

    1995-06-20

    A fast repetition rate fluorometer device and method for measuring in vivo fluorescence of phytoplankton or higher plants chlorophyll and photosynthetic parameters of phytoplankton or higher plants by illuminating the phytoplankton or higher plants with a series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes effective to bring about and measure resultant changes in fluorescence yield of their Photosystem II. The series of fast repetition rate excitation flashes has a predetermined energy per flash and a rate greater than 10,000 Hz. Also, disclosed is a flasher circuit for producing the series of fast repetition rate flashes.

  9. HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE ON TRACK FOR MEASURING THE EXPANSION RATE OF THE UNIVERSE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    rate with an estimate of how much matter is in space. The younger age values from each team assume the Universe is at a critical density where it contains just enough matter to expand indefinitely. The higher age estimates are calculated based on a low density of matter in space. (See 'Science Background' for more information on the expanding Universe.) 'A point of great interest is whether the age of the Universe arrived at this way is really older than the independently derived ages of the oldest stars,' said Saha, an investigator on both Hubble teams. 'The numbers lean on the side that the stellar ages are a little lower, or that the hypothesis that we live in a critical density universe needs to be questioned,' said Saha. 'As further results accumulate over the next few years, we hope to tighten the constraints on these issues.' THE OBSERVATIONS The Key Project team is midway along in their three-year program to derive the expansion rate of the Universe based on precise distance measurements to galaxies. They have now measured Cepheid distances to a dozen galaxies, and are about halfway through their overall program. The Key Project team also presented a preliminary estimate of the distance to the Fornax cluster of galaxies. The estimate was obtained through the detection and measurement with the Hubble Space Telescope of pulsating stars known as Cepheid variables found in the Fornax cluster. The Fornax cluster is measured to be approximately as far away as the Virgo cluster of galaxies -- about 60 million light-years. The Key Project team member who led this effort, Caltech astronomer Barry Madore said, 'This cluster allows us to make independent estimates of the expansion rate of the Universe using a number of different techniques. All of these methods are now in excellent agreement. With Fornax we are now at turning point in this field.' The team is measuring Cepheid distances to the Virgo and Fornax clusters of galaxies as a complementary test. Their strategy

  10. A Protocol for Improved Measurement of Arterial Flow Rate in Preclinical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, D. A.; Thomson, A. J. W.; Hadoke, P. W. F.; Anderson, T.; Moran, C. M.; Gray, G. A.; Hoskins, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a protocol for the measurement of blood flow rate in small animals and to compare flow rate measurements against measurements made using a transit time flowmeter. Materials and Methods: Measurements were made in rat and mice using a Visualsonics Vevo 770 scanner. The flow rate in carotid and femoral arteries was calculated from the time-average maximum velocity and vessel diameter. A correction factor was applied to correct for the overestimation of velocity arising from geometric spectral broadening. Invasive flow rate measurements were made using a Transonics system. Results: Measurements were achieved in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. Image quality in the mouse femoral artery was too poor to obtain diameter measurements. The applied correction factor in practice was 0.71–0.77. The diameter varied by 6–18% during the cardiac cycle. There was no overall difference in the flow rate measured using ultrasound and using transit-time flowmeters. The flow rates were comparable with those previously reported in the literature. There was wide variation in flow rates in the same artery in individual animals. Transit-time measurements were associated with changes of a factor of 10 during the typical 40 min measurement period, associated with probe movement, vessel spasm, vessel kinking and other effects. Conclusion: A protocol for the measurement of flow rate in arteries in small animals has been described and successfully used in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. The availability of a noninvasive procedure for flow rate measurement avoids the problems with changes in flow associated with an invasive procedure. PMID:27689153

  11. A Protocol for Improved Measurement of Arterial Flow Rate in Preclinical Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Kenwright, D. A.; Thomson, A. J. W.; Hadoke, P. W. F.; Anderson, T.; Moran, C. M.; Gray, G. A.; Hoskins, P. R.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To describe a protocol for the measurement of blood flow rate in small animals and to compare flow rate measurements against measurements made using a transit time flowmeter. Materials and Methods: Measurements were made in rat and mice using a Visualsonics Vevo 770 scanner. The flow rate in carotid and femoral arteries was calculated from the time-average maximum velocity and vessel diameter. A correction factor was applied to correct for the overestimation of velocity arising from geometric spectral broadening. Invasive flow rate measurements were made using a Transonics system. Results: Measurements were achieved in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. Image quality in the mouse femoral artery was too poor to obtain diameter measurements. The applied correction factor in practice was 0.71–0.77. The diameter varied by 6–18% during the cardiac cycle. There was no overall difference in the flow rate measured using ultrasound and using transit-time flowmeters. The flow rates were comparable with those previously reported in the literature. There was wide variation in flow rates in the same artery in individual animals. Transit-time measurements were associated with changes of a factor of 10 during the typical 40 min measurement period, associated with probe movement, vessel spasm, vessel kinking and other effects. Conclusion: A protocol for the measurement of flow rate in arteries in small animals has been described and successfully used in rat carotid and femoral arteries and in mouse carotid arteries. The availability of a noninvasive procedure for flow rate measurement avoids the problems with changes in flow associated with an invasive procedure.

  12. Rate of heat release measurements with the Swedish box test (Nordtest NT fire 004)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmstedt, G. S.

    A method in which tendency to fire spread and smoke development is determined by gas temperature and smoke intensity measurements in relation to time was examined. The conventional measurement of exhaust gas temperature was tested against a measurement of the rate of heat release, using oxygen consumption calorimetry. Fourteen wall surfaces, including noncombustible materials of different thermal properties, wall linings and wood were used. Slow burning material shows good correlation between temperature measurement and rate of heat release. Fast burning material, however, consumes all the available oxygen and the temperature measurement becomes a measure of the thermal properties of the material.

  13. Measurement of tectonic surface uplift rate in a young collisional mountain belt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, L.D.; Silver, E.A.; Anderson, R. Scott; Smith, R.; Ingle, J.C.; Kling, S.A.; Haig, D.; Small, E.; Galewsky, J.; Sliter, W.

    1997-01-01

    Measurement of the rate of tectonically driven surface uplift is crucial to a complete understanding of mountain building dynamics. The lack of a suitable rock record typically prevents determination of this quantity, but the unusual geology of Papua New Guinea's Finisterre mountains makes measurement of this rate possible. The tectonic surface uplift rate at the Finisterre range is 0.8-2.1 mm yr-1, approximately that expected to arise from crustal thickening.

  14. Measurements of Transverse Beam Diffusion Rates in the Fermilab Tevatron Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, G.; Annala, G.; Johnson, T.R.; Still, D.A.; Valishev, A.; /Fermilab

    2011-08-01

    The transverse beam diffusion rate vs. particle oscillation amplitude was measured in the Tevatron using collimator scans. All collimator jaws except one were retracted. As the jaw of interest was moved in small steps, the local shower rates were recorded as a function of time. By using a diffusion model, the time evolution of losses could be related to the diffusion rate at the collimator position. Preliminary results of these measurements are presented.

  15. Alternate measures of replacement rates for social security benefits and retirement income.

    PubMed

    Biggs, Andrew G; Springstead, Glenn R

    2008-01-01

    Discussions of retirement planning and Social Security policy often focus on replacement rates, which represent retirement income or Social Security benefits relative to preretirement earnings. Replacement rates are a rule of thumb designed to simplify the process of smoothing consumption over individuals' lifetimes. Despite their widespread use, however, there is no common means of measuring replacement rates. Various measures of preretirement earnings mean that the denominators used in replacement rate calculations are often inconsistent and can lead to confusion. Whether a given replacement rate represents an adequate retirement income depends on whether the denominator in the replacement rate calculation is an appropriate measure of preretirement earnings. This article illustrates replacement rates using four measures of preretirement earnings: final earnings; the constant income payable from the present value (PV) of lifetime earnings (PV payment); the wage-indexed average of all earnings prior to claiming Social Security benefits; and the inflation-adjusted average of all earnings prior to claiming Social Security benefits (consumer price index (CPI) average). The article then measures replacement rates against a sample of the Social Security beneficiary population using the Social Security Administration's Modeling Income in the Near Term (MINT) microsimulation model. Replacement rates are shown based on Social Security benefits alone, to indicate the adequacy of the current benefit structure, as well as on total retirement income including defined benefit pensions and financial assets, to indicate total preparedness for retirement. The results show that replacement rates can vary considerably based on the definition of preretirement earnings used and whether replacement rates are measured on an individual or a shared basis. For current new retirees, replacement rates based on all sources of retirement income seem strong by most measures and are projected to

  16. A record of barite accumulation rate for marine export productivity changes in the tropical Indian Ocean during the Mid-Pliocene--Early-Pleistocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Liping; Ma, Zhongwu; Ding, Xuan

    2016-04-01

    One of the most interesting features in the marine oxygen isotope records is the gradual shift towards heavier 18O from the Mid-Pliocene, which ends with the initiation of Northern Hemisphere glaciation (NHG) around 2.7 Ma. The lack of significant change in sea surface temperature in the tropical Indian Ocean as revealed in the previous studies does not rule out their possible contributions to this dramatic climate change during the Mid-Pliocene transition. Changing circulation systems in the region will control the supply of nutrients for the water masses which in turn determine the marine productivity. In the areas of high productivity, ocean export productivity may potentially provide a mechanism of CO2 draw-down into the deep ocean, through which contributing to the lowering of the global temperature. In this study, we present a record of barite accumulation rate (BAR) for DSDP Site 214 drilled on the Ninetyeast Ridge. Here we use the marine barite, which is formed during the decay of organism in the twilight zone, as a proxy for ocean export productivity. Our results show that the BAR of Site 214 varies between 0.25 and 1.25 mg/cm2/kyr during the period between 4 Ma and 2 Ma. Five intervals of increased BAR from 3.6 Ma to 2.4 Ma are identified with the most distinct peak centred around 3 Ma. The overall pattern does not follow either the oxygen isotope record for the Site or the sea surface temperature and subsurface temperature reconstructed with the Mg/Ca of foraminifera. This suggests that regional changes in ocean circulation and water masses may have played more important role than temperature in controlling the productivity change in the tropical Indian Ocean. The relative higher productivity around 3 Ma may imply a biogenetic process towards the intensification of NHGs.

  17. Relationship between RNA/DNA ratio, growth rate and accumulation of selenium in the cells of wheat leaves under the influence of minerals analcime and trepel.

    PubMed

    Martynenko, O I; Kyrylenko, T K; Zaimenko, N V; Antonyuk, M M; Stepanyugin, A V; Plodnik, D P; Hovorun, D M

    2014-01-01

    We studied specific effects of different doses of natural minerals--analcime (An) and trepel (Tr)--on the growth rate, selenium (Se) content and functional activity of the genome of wheat leaves measured by the RNA/DNA ratio. Our results show that under the influence of An and Tr, especially at low doses (25 mg/100 g sand), there is a significant increase in the content of Se, increased growth rate of leaves of wheat seedlings and decreased RNA/DNA ratio. We have found significant correlations between studied parameters. Our findings suggest that the RNA/DNA ratio can be used as a convenient, reliable indicator of the biological activity of minerals An and Tr, and for quantitative express-estimation of their impact on plant organisms.

  18. Multi-wave ultrasonic Doppler method for measuring high flow-rates using staggered pulse intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muramatsu, Ei; Murakawa, Hideki; Sugimoto, Katsumi; Asano, Hitoshi; Takenaka, Nobuyuki; Furuichi, Noriyuki

    2016-02-01

    The ultrasonic pulsed Doppler method (UDM) can obtain a velocity profile along the path of an ultrasonic beam. However, the UDM measurement volume is relatively large and it is known that the measurement volume affects the measurement accuracy. In this study, the effect of the measurement volume on velocity and flow rate measurements is analytically and experimentally evaluated. The velocities measured using UDM are considered to be ensemble-averaged values over the measurement volume in order to analyze the velocity error due to the measurement volume, while the flow rates are calculated from the integration of the velocity profile across the pipe. The analytical results show that the channel width, i.e. the spatial resolution along the ultrasonic beam axis, rather than the ultrasonic beam diameter, strongly influences the flow rate measurement. To improve the accuracy of the flow rate, a novel method using a multi-wave ultrasonic transducer consisting of two piezo-electric elements with different basic frequencies is proposed to minimize the size of the measurement volume in the near-wall region of a pipe flow. The velocity profiles in the near-wall region are measured using an 8 MHz sensor with a small diameter, while those far from the transducer are measured using a hollow 2 MHz sensor in the multi-wave transducer. The applicability of the multi-wave transducer was experimentally investigated using the water flow-rate calibration facility at the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST). As a result, the errors in the flow rate were found to be below  -1%, while the multi-wave method is shown to be particularly effective for measuring higher flow rates in a large-diameter pipe.

  19. Development of a technique for the measurement of the radon exhalation rate using an activated charcoal collector.

    PubMed

    Iimoto, Takeshi; Akasaka, Yoshinori; Koike, Yuya; Kosako, Toshiso

    2008-04-01

    A simple system to evaluate the 222Rn (radon) exhalation rate from soil has been improved. A sampling cuvette of 2.1 L is placed so that it covers the targeted ground soil, and radon emanating from the soil accumulates within the cuvette for 24 h. Its internal radon concentration is measured by the combination of an activated charcoal (PICO-RAD) and a liquid scintillation counting system. This study shows variations of the conversion factor (CF: unit Bq m(-3)/cpm) of PICO-RAD. The range of CF due to temperature (10-30 degrees C) was between -21% and +69%, and this due to humidity (30-90%) was between 0% and -15%. Humidity and radon concentration in the cuvette covering soil tended to saturate in a few hours. The above information was used to correct the CF for the evaluation. The improved system shows high reliability and can be easily applied to natural environments.

  20. Absolute Density Calibration Cell for Laser Induced Fluorescence Erosion Rate Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Domonkos, Matthew T.; Stevens, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Flight qualification of ion thrusters typically requires testing on the order of 10,000 hours. Extensive knowledge of wear mechanisms and rates is necessary to establish design confidence prior to long duration tests. Consequently, real-time erosion rate measurements offer the potential both to reduce development costs and to enhance knowledge of the dependency of component wear on operating conditions. Several previous studies have used laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) to measure real-time, in situ erosion rates of ion thruster accelerator grids. Those studies provided only relative measurements of the erosion rate. In the present investigation, a molybdenum tube was resistively heated such that the evaporation rate yielded densities within the tube on the order of those expected from accelerator grid erosion. This work examines the suitability of the density cell as an absolute calibration source for LIF measurements, and the intrinsic error was evaluated.

  1. Spectral composition of a measuring signal during measurements of vibration rates of a moving body

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daynauskas, I. A. I.; Slepov, N. N.

    1973-01-01

    Cybernetics diagnostics of machines and mechanisms using the spectral approach is discussed. The problem of establishing the accuracy of determination of the spectral composition is investigated. In systems with rectilinear or rotary movement, the vibrations appear in the form of movement rate vibrations, which are equivalent to frequency modulation of the signal, in proportion to the mean movement rate of the body. The case of a harmonic signal which reproduces and analyzes the characteristics of the frequency modulated signal is discussed. Mathematical models are developed to show the relationships of the parameters.

  2. Evaluating standard airborne sound insulation measures in terms of annoyance, loudness, and audibility ratings.

    PubMed

    Park, H K; Bradley, J S

    2009-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an evaluation of the merits of standard airborne sound insulation measures with respect to subjective ratings of the annoyance and loudness of transmitted sounds. Subjects listened to speech and music sounds modified to represent transmission through 20 different walls with sound transmission class (STC) ratings from 34 to 58. A number of variations in the standard measures were also considered. These included variations in the 8-dB rule for the maximum allowed deficiency in the STC measure as well as variations in the standard 32-dB total allowed deficiency. Several spectrum adaptation terms were considered in combination with weighted sound reduction index (R(w)) values as well as modifications to the range of included frequencies in the standard rating contour. A STC measure without an 8-dB rule and an R(w) rating with a new spectrum adaptation term were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of speech sounds. R(w) ratings with one of two modified C(tr) spectrum adaptation terms were better predictors of annoyance and loudness ratings of transmitted music sounds. Although some measures were much better predictors of responses to one type of sound than were the standard STC and R(w) values, no measure was remarkably improved for predicting annoyance and loudness ratings of both music and speech sounds. PMID:19603878

  3. Measurement of Ultra Low Outgassing Rates for NLC UHV Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Kishiyama, K; Shen, S; Behne, D; Corlett, J N; Atkinson, D; Kennedy, K; Miller, T; Eriksson, L; Ross, M

    2001-06-12

    Ultra low outgassing rates would be highly advantageous in accelerators and storage rings, such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC), where an outgassing rate of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec/cm{sup 2} could eliminate the need for costly distributed pumping. Measuring such low outgassing rates at room temperature has many difficulties. However, by inspection of Fick's law, it can be seen that thermal desorption is proportional to outgassing rate. It is commonly observed that the outgas rate doubles approximately every 15 C for temperatures under 100 C. By measuring outgassing rate versus temperature and time and extrapolating back to room temperature we can measure outgassing rates that would otherwise be difficult to make. To produce a reliable measurement also requires the total surface area under study to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the area of the measurement chamber walls. To accomplish this, 27 plates of 5083 aluminum were placed in the measurement chamber. This technique will be the basis for future investigation of outgassing rates of other sample plates fabricated with different machining and cleaning techniques.

  4. Measurement of Ultra Low OutGassing Rates for NLC UHV Vacuum Chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Eriksson, Leif S.

    2002-08-12

    Ultra low outgassing rates would be highly advantageous in accelerators and storage rings, such as the Next Linear Collider (NLC), where an outgassing rate of <10{sup -12} Torr liter/sec/cm{sup 2} could eliminate the need for costly distributed pumping. Measuring such low outgassing rates at room temperature has many difficulties. However, by inspection of Fick's law, it can be seen that thermal desorption is proportional to outgassing rate. It is commonly observed that the outgas rate doubles approximately every 15 C for temperatures under 100 C. By measuring outgassing rate versus temperature and time and extrapolating back to room temperature we can measure outgassing rates that would otherwise be difficult to make. To produce a reliable measurement also requires the total surface area under study to be approximately an order of magnitude greater than the area of the measurement chamber walls. To accomplish this, 27 plates of 5083 aluminum were placed in the measurement chamber. This technique will be the basis for future investigation of outgassing rates of other sample plates fabricated with different machining and cleaning techniques.

  5. Thick target measurement of the 40Ca(alpha,gamma)44Ti reaction rate

    SciTech Connect

    Sheets, S A; Burke, J T; Scielzo, N D; Phair, L; Bleuel, D; Norman, E B; Grant, P G; Hurst, A M; Tumey, S; Brown, T A; Stoyer, M

    2009-02-06

    The thick-target yield for the {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction has been measured for E{sub beam} = 4.13, 4.54, and 5.36 MeV using both an activation measurement and online {gamma}-ray spectroscopy. The results of the two measurements agree. From the measured yield a reaction rate is deduced that is smaller than statistical model calculations. This implies a smaller {sup 44}Ti production in supernova compared to recently measured {sup 40}Ca({alpha},{gamma}){sup 44}Ti reaction rates.

  6. Determination of specific growth rate by measurement of specific rate of ribosome synthesis in growing and nongrowing cultures of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

    PubMed

    Cutter, Matthew R; Stroot, Peter G

    2008-02-01

    RT-RiboSyn measures the specific rate of ribosome synthesis in distinct microbial populations by measuring the generation rate of precursor 16S rRNA relative to that of mature 16S rRNA when precursor 16S rRNA processing is inhibited. Good agreement was demonstrated between specific rate of ribosome synthesis and specific growth rate of Acinetobacter calcoaceticus.

  7. Airborne laser scan measurements of winter snow accumulation in high alpine catchments - hydrological implications and verification by ground penetrating radar at glacier surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfricht, K.; Keuschnig, M.; Heilig, A.; Mayer, C.; Kuhn, M.

    2012-04-01

    The snow cover as storage of winter precipitation is a substantial source for runoff generation in high mountain catchments. Redistribution of solid precipitation, caused by wind and gravity, leads to a characteristic spatial distribution of snow accumulation which differs from simple model assumption of a homogenous snowpack increasing with altitude. Both, the distinct distribution of snow accumulation and the total amount of SWE stored in the snow cover, affect the magnitude and seasonality of melt water runoff. Complex relations exist between the spatial pattern of snow accumulation and the presence of glaciers and vice versa. For proper hydrological modeling in high mountain catchments, knowledge about snow cover distribution is an important requirement. To date, to evaluate modeling results, spatially insufficient point data on snow depths and SWE are usually available. On catchment scale, optical space-borne remote sensing techniques deliver areal extent of snow cover, but no snow depths and hence no volume of snow cover. Multi-temporal airborne laser scanning (ALS) is an active remote sensing method to obtain elevation changes extensively even in inaccessible alpine terrain. Before the start and at the end of accumulation season of winter 2010/2011, two airborne laser scan acquisitions were performed in the Ötztal Alps (Tirol, Austria). Differences of the respective digital elevation models were interpreted as snow depths and converted into SWE using a simple regression method between snow depths and snow density. Preferred snow accumulation areas were determined, e.g. wind sheltered depressions, the base of steep mountain walls and flat glacier surfaces. At catchment scale, solid precipitation is obviously redistributed from wind exposed mountain ridges to lower elevations, inducing characteristic elevations of maximum snow accumulation. Overall, catchment precipitation derived from snow accumulation is a valuable reference for precipitation approaches in

  8. Comparison of measured and calculated dose rates for the Castor HAW 20/28 CG.

    PubMed

    Ringleb, O; Kühl, H; Scheib, H; Rimpler, A

    2005-01-01

    In January 2003 neutron and gamma dose rate measurements at a CASTOR HAW 20/28 CG were performed by the Bundesamt für Strahlenschutz at Gorleben. First, commercial dose rate measurement devices were used, then spectral measurements with a Bonner sphere system were made to verify the results. Axial and circumferential dose rate profiles were measured near the cask surface and spectral measurements were performed for some locations. A shielding analysis of the cask was performed with the MCNP Monte Carlo Code with ENDF/B-VI cross section libraries. The cask was modelled 'as built', i.e. with its real inventory, dimensions and material densities and with the same configuration and position as in the storage facility. The average C/E-ratios are 1.3 for neutron dose rates and 1.4 for gamma dose rates. Both the measured and calculated dose rates show the same qualitative trends in the axial and circumferential direction. The spectral measurements show a variation in the spectra across the cask surface. This correlates with the variation found in the C/E-ratios. At cask midheight good agreement between the Bonner sphere system and the commercial device (LB 6411) is found with a 7% lower derived H*(10) dose rate from the Bonner sphere system. PMID:16604722

  9. "DIAGNOSTIC" PULSE FOR SINGLE-PARTICLE-LIKE BEAM POSITION MEASUREMENTS DURING ACCUMULATION/PRODUCTION MODE IN THE LOS ALAMOS PROTON STORAGE RING

    SciTech Connect

    Kolski, Jeffrey S.; Baily, Scott A.; Bjorklund, Eric A.; Bolme, Gerald O.; Hall, Michael J.; Kwon, Sung I.; Martinez, Martin P.; Prokop, Mark S.; Shelley, Fred E. Jr.; Torrez, Phillip A.

    2012-05-14

    Beam position monitors (BPMs) are the primary diagnostic in the Los Alamos Proton Storage Ring (PSR). When injecting one turn, the transversemotion is approximated as a single particle with initial betatron position and angle {rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0}. With single-turn injection, we fit the betatron tune, closed orbit (CO), and injection offset ({rvec x}{sub 0} and {rvec x}'{sub 0} at the injection point) to the turn-by-turn beam position. In production mode, we accumulate multiple turns, the transverse phase space fills after 5 injections (horizontal and vertical fractional betatron tunes {approx}0.2) resulting in no coherent betatron motion, and only the CO may be measured. The injection offset, which determines the accumulated beam size and is very sensitive to steering upstream of the ring, is not measurable in production mode. We describe our approach and ongoing efforts to measure the injection offset during production mode by injecting a 'diagnostic' pulse {approx}50 {micro}s after the accumulated beam is extracted. We also study the effects of increasing the linac RF gate length to accommodate the diagnostic pulse on the production beam position, transverse size, and loss.

  10. Can student self-ratings be compared with peer ratings? A study of measurement invariance of multisource feedback.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keng-Lin; Tsai, Shih-Li; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Ho, Ming-Jung

    2016-05-01

    Measurement invariance is a prerequisite for comparing measurement scores from different groups. In medical education, multi-source feedback (MSF) is utilized to assess core competencies, including the professionalism. However, little attention has been paid to the measurement invariance of assessment instruments; that is, whether an instrument holds the same meaning across different rater groups. To examine the measurement invariance of the National Taiwan University professionalism MSF (NTU P-MSF) in order to determine whether medical students' self-rating can be compared to their peers' rating. An eight-factor model was specified for confirmatory factor analysis to examine the construct validity of the NTU P-MSF. Cronbach's alpha was computed for the items of each domain to evaluate internal consistent reliability. The same eight-factor model was used for multi-group confirmatory factor analyses. Four hierarchical models were specified to test configural (i.e., identical factor-item relationship), metric (i.e., identical factor loadings), scalar (i.e., identical intercepts), and error variance across self-rating and peer rating groups. One hundred and twenty second-year medical students from weekly discussion groups conducted as part of a medical professionalism course agreed to use the NTU P-MSF to assess themselves or their discussion group peers. NTU P-MSF assessment scores were a good fit for the eight-factor model among self group and peer group. The Cronbach's alpha coefficients of students' NTU P-MSF scores and peers' scores ranged from 0.76 to 0.89 and 0.84 to 0.91, respectively indicating that the NTU P-MSF scores also have good internal consistent reliability between both groups. In addition, same factor structure and similar factor loadings and intercepts of NTU P-MSF scores between both groups indicate that NTU P-MSF scores had configural, metric, and scalar invariance. Thus, students' self-assessments and peer assessments can be compared in terms of

  11. Measurement and Modeling of Respiration Rate of Tomato (Cultivar Roma) for Modified Atmosphere Storage.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Palani; Moitra, Ranabir; Mukherjee, Souti

    2015-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to determine the respiration rate of tomato at 10, 20 and 30 °C using closed respiration system. Oxygen depletion and carbon dioxide accumulation in the system containing tomato was monitored. Respiration rate was found to decrease with increasing CO2 and decreasing O2 concentration. Michaelis-Menten type model based on enzyme kinetics was evaluated using experimental data generated for predicting the respiration rate. The model parameters that obtained from the respiration rate at different O2 and CO2 concentration levels were used to fit the model against the storage temperatures. The fitting was fair (R2 = 0.923 to 0.970) when the respiration rate was expressed as O2 concentation. Since inhibition constant for CO2 concentration tended towards negetive, the model was modified as a function of O2 concentration only. The modified model was fitted to the experimental data and showed good agreement (R2 = 0.998) with experimentally estimated respiration rate.

  12. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  13. Met-myoglobin formation, accumulation, degradation, and myoglobin oxygenation monitoring based on multiwavelength attenuance measurement in porcine meat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Thien; Phan, Kien Nguyen; Lee, Jee-Bum; Kim, Jae Gwan

    2016-05-01

    We propose a simple, rapid, and nondestructive method to investigate formation, accumulation, and degradation of met-myoglobin (met-Mb) and myoglobin oxygenation from the interior of porcine meat. For the experiment, color photos and attenuance spectra of porcine meat (well-bled muscle, fat, and mixed) were collected daily to perform colorimetric analysis and to obtain the differences of attenuance between 578 and 567 nm (A578-A567) and between 615 and 630 nm (A630-A615), respectively. Oxy-, deoxy-, and met-myoglobin concentration changes over storage time were also calculated using Beer-Lamberts' law with reflectance intensities at 557, 582, and 630 nm. The change of A578-A567 was well matched with the change of myoglobin oxygenation, and the change of A630-A615 corresponded well with the formation and degradation of met-Mb. In addition, attenuation differences, A578-A567 and A630-A615, were able to show the formation of met-Mb earlier than colorimetric analysis. Therefore, the attenuance differences between wavelengths can be indicators for estimating myoglobin oxygenation and met-Mb formation, accumulation, and degradation, which enable us to design a simple device to monitor myoglobin activities in porcine meat.

  14. Different subjective awareness measures demonstrate the influence of visual identification on perceptual awareness ratings.

    PubMed

    Wierzchoń, Michał; Paulewicz, Borysław; Asanowicz, Dariusz; Timmermans, Bert; Cleeremans, Axel

    2014-07-01

    We compare four subjective awareness measures in the context of a visual identification task and investigate quantitative differences in terms of scale use and correlation with task performance. We also analyse the effect of identification task decisions on subsequent subjective reports. Results show that awareness ratings strongly predict accuracy for all scale types, although the type of awareness measure may influence the reported level of perceptual awareness. Surprisingly, the overall relationship between awareness ratings and performance was weaker when participants rated their awareness before providing identification responses. Furthermore, the Perceptual Awareness Scale was most exhaustive only when used after the identification task, whereas confidence ratings were most exhaustive when used before the identification task. We conclude that the type of subjective measure applied may influence the reports on visual awareness. We also propose that identification task decisions may affect subsequent awareness ratings.

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIELD QUALITY IN SUPERCONDUCTING DIPOLES AT HIGH RAMP RATES.

    SciTech Connect

    JAIN, A.; ESCALLIER, J.; GANETIS, G.; LOUIE, W.; MARONE, A.; THOMAS, R.; WANDERER, P.

    2006-09-18

    Several recent applications of superconducting magnets require the magnets to be operated at high ramp rates and at frequencies of several Hertz. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has recently designed and built prototypes of superconducting dipole magnets that can be ramped at a fairly high rate (1 T/s or more). For accelerator applications, it is also crucial that the magnets maintain good field quality even at high ramp rates. In order to characterize the field quality of magnets at high ramp rates, a measurement system consisting of 16 printed circuit tangential coils has been developed. The coil system is held stationary while the magnet is ramped. This paper describes the techniques used for the measurements and data analysis, and presents the results of measurements at ramp rates of up to 4 T/s in a prototype dipole built at BNL for GSI.

  16. The MapCHECK Measurement Uncertainty function and its effect on planar dose pass rates.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Daniel W; Spaans, Jason D; Kumaraswamy, Lalith K; Podgorsak, Matthew B

    2016-03-08

    Our study aimed to quantify the effect of the Measurement Uncertainty function on planar dosimetry pass rates, as measured and analyzed with the Sun Nuclear Corporation MapCHECK 2 array and its associated software. This optional function is toggled in the program preferences of the software (though turned on by default upon installation), and automatically increases the dose difference tolerance defined by the user for each planar dose comparison. Dose planes from 109 static-gantry IMRT fields and 40 VMAT arcs, of varying modulation complexity, were measured at 5 cm water-equivalent depth in the MapCHECK 2 diode array, and respective calculated dose planes were exported from a commercial treatment planning system. Planar dose comparison pass rates were calculated within the Sun Nuclear Corporation analytic software using a number of calculation parameters, including Measurement Uncertainty on and off. By varying the percent difference (%Diff) criterion for similar analyses performed with Measurement Uncertainty turned off, an effective %Diff criterion was defined for each field/arc corresponding to the pass rate achieved with Measurement Uncertainty turned on. On average, the Measurement Uncertainty function increases the user-defined %Diff criterion by 0.8%-1.1% for 3%/3 mm analysis, depending on plan type and calculation technique (corresponding to an average change in pass rate of 1.0%-3.5%, and a maximum change of 8.7%). At the 2%/2 mm level, the Measurement Uncertainty function increases the user-defined %Diff criterion by 0.7%-1.2% on average, again depending on plan type and calculation technique (corresponding to an average change in pass rate of 3.5%-8.1%, and a maximum change of 14.2%). The largest increases in pass rate due to the Measurement Uncertainty function are generally seen with poorly matched planar dose comparisons, while the function has a notably smaller effect as pass rates approach 100%. The Measurement Uncertainty function, then, may

  17. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, R F; Lear, J L

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and [14C]-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the 14C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the 14C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  18. Glycolysis-induced discordance between glucose metabolic rates measured with radiolabeled fluorodeoxyglucose and glucose

    SciTech Connect

    Ackermann, R.F.; Lear, J.L. )

    1989-12-01

    We have developed an autoradiographic method for estimating the oxidative and glycolytic components of local CMRglc (LCMRglc), using sequentially administered ({sup 18}F)fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and ({sup 14}C)-6-glucose (GLC). FDG-6-phosphate accumulation is proportional to the rate of glucose phosphorylation, which occurs before the divergence of glycolytic (GMg) and oxidative (GMo) glucose metabolism and is therefore related to total cerebral glucose metabolism GMt: GMg + GMo = GMt. With oxidative metabolism, the {sup 14}C label of GLC is temporarily retained in Krebs cycle-related substrate pools. We hypothesize that with glycolytic metabolism, however, a significant fraction of the {sup 14}C label is lost from the brain via lactate production and efflux from the brain. Thus, cerebral GLC metabolite concentration may be more closely related to GMo than to GMt. If true, the glycolytic metabolic rate will be related to the difference between FDG- and GLC-derived LCMRglc. Thus far, we have studied normal awake rats, rats with limbic activation induced by kainic acid (KA), and rats visually stimulated with 16-Hz flashes. In KA-treated rats, significant discordance between FDG and GLC accumulation, which we attribute to glycolysis, occurred only in activated limbic structures. In visually stimulated rats, significant discordance occurred only in the optic tectum.

  19. Patterns of sediment accumulation in the tidal marshes of Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, M.E.; Kelley, J.T.; Belknap, D.F.

    1989-01-01

    One year's measurements of surficial sedimentation rates (1986-1987) for 26 Maine marsh sites were made over marker horizons of brick dust. Observed sediment accumulation rates, from 0 to 13 mm yr-1, were compared with marsh morphology, local relative sea-level rise rate, mean tidal range, and ice rafting activity. Marshes with four different morphologies (back-barrier, fluvial, bluff-toe, and transitional) showed distinctly different sediment accumulation rates. In general, back-barrier marshes had the highest accumulation rates and blufftoe marshes had the lowest rates, with intermediate values for transitional and fluvial marshes. No causal relationship between modern marsh sediment accumulation rate and relative sea-level rise rate (from tide gauge records) was observed. Marsh accretionary balance (sediment accumulation rate minus relative sea-level rise rate) did not correlate with mean tidal range for this meso- to macro-tidal area. Estimates of ice-rafted debris on marsh sites ranged from 0% to >100% of measured surficial sedimentation rates, indicating that ice transport of sediment may make a significant contribution to surficial sedimentation on Maine salt marshes. ?? 1989 Estuarine Research Federation.

  20. Iohexol plasma clearance for measuring glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice and research: a review. Part 2: Why to measure glomerular filtration rate with iohexol?

    PubMed Central

    Delanaye, Pierre; Melsom, Toralf; Ebert, Natalie; Bäck, Sten-Erik; Mariat, Christophe; Cavalier, Etienne; Björk, Jonas; Christensson, Anders; Nyman, Ulf; Porrini, Esteban; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Schaeffner, Elke; Soveri, Inga; Sterner, Gunnar; Eriksen, Bjørn Odvar; Gaspari, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A reliable assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of paramount importance in clinical practice as well as epidemiological and clinical research settings. It is recommended by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines in specific populations (anorectic, cirrhotic, obese, renal and non-renal transplant patients) where estimation equations are unreliable. Measured GFR is the only valuable test to confirm or confute the status of chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate the slope of renal function decay over time, to assess the suitability of living kidney donors and for dosing of potentially toxic medication with a narrow therapeutic index. Abnormally elevated GFR or hyperfiltration in patients with diabetes or obesity can be correctly diagnosed only by measuring GFR. GFR measurement contributes to assessing the true CKD prevalence rate, avoiding discrepancies due to GFR estimation with different equations. Using measured GFR, successfully accomplished in large epidemiological studies, is the only way to study the potential link between decreased renal function and cardiovascular or total mortality, being sure that this association is not due to confounders, i.e. non-GFR determinants of biomarkers. In clinical research, it has been shown that measured GFR (or measured GFR slope) as a secondary endpoint as compared with estimated GFR detected subtle treatment effects and obtained these results with a comparatively smaller sample size than trials choosing estimated GFR. Measuring GFR by iohexol has several advantages: simplicity, low cost, stability and low interlaboratory variation. Iohexol plasma clearance represents the best chance for implementing a standardized GFR measurement protocol applicable worldwide both in clinical practice and in research.

  1. Iohexol plasma clearance for measuring glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice and research: a review. Part 2: Why to measure glomerular filtration rate with iohexol?

    PubMed

    Delanaye, Pierre; Melsom, Toralf; Ebert, Natalie; Bäck, Sten-Erik; Mariat, Christophe; Cavalier, Etienne; Björk, Jonas; Christensson, Anders; Nyman, Ulf; Porrini, Esteban; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Schaeffner, Elke; Soveri, Inga; Sterner, Gunnar; Eriksen, Bjørn Odvar; Gaspari, Flavio

    2016-10-01

    A reliable assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of paramount importance in clinical practice as well as epidemiological and clinical research settings. It is recommended by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines in specific populations (anorectic, cirrhotic, obese, renal and non-renal transplant patients) where estimation equations are unreliable. Measured GFR is the only valuable test to confirm or confute the status of chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate the slope of renal function decay over time, to assess the suitability of living kidney donors and for dosing of potentially toxic medication with a narrow therapeutic index. Abnormally elevated GFR or hyperfiltration in patients with diabetes or obesity can be correctly diagnosed only by measuring GFR. GFR measurement contributes to assessing the true CKD prevalence rate, avoiding discrepancies due to GFR estimation with different equations. Using measured GFR, successfully accomplished in large epidemiological studies, is the only way to study the potential link between decreased renal function and cardiovascular or total mortality, being sure that this association is not due to confounders, i.e. non-GFR determinants of biomarkers. In clinical research, it has been shown that measured GFR (or measured GFR slope) as a secondary endpoint as compared with estimated GFR detected subtle treatment effects and obtained these results with a comparatively smaller sample size than trials choosing estimated GFR. Measuring GFR by iohexol has several advantages: simplicity, low cost, stability and low interlaboratory variation. Iohexol plasma clearance represents the best chance for implementing a standardized GFR measurement protocol applicable worldwide both in clinical practice and in research. PMID:27679716

  2. Iohexol plasma clearance for measuring glomerular filtration rate in clinical practice and research: a review. Part 2: Why to measure glomerular filtration rate with iohexol?

    PubMed Central

    Delanaye, Pierre; Melsom, Toralf; Ebert, Natalie; Bäck, Sten-Erik; Mariat, Christophe; Cavalier, Etienne; Björk, Jonas; Christensson, Anders; Nyman, Ulf; Porrini, Esteban; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Schaeffner, Elke; Soveri, Inga; Sterner, Gunnar; Eriksen, Bjørn Odvar; Gaspari, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    A reliable assessment of glomerular filtration rate (GFR) is of paramount importance in clinical practice as well as epidemiological and clinical research settings. It is recommended by Kidney Disease: Improving Global Outcomes guidelines in specific populations (anorectic, cirrhotic, obese, renal and non-renal transplant patients) where estimation equations are unreliable. Measured GFR is the only valuable test to confirm or confute the status of chronic kidney disease (CKD), to evaluate the slope of renal function decay over time, to assess the suitability of living kidney donors and for dosing of potentially toxic medication with a narrow therapeutic index. Abnormally elevated GFR or hyperfiltration in patients with diabetes or obesity can be correctly diagnosed only by measuring GFR. GFR measurement contributes to assessing the true CKD prevalence rate, avoiding discrepancies due to GFR estimation with different equations. Using measured GFR, successfully accomplished in large epidemiological studies, is the only way to study the potential link between decreased renal function and cardiovascular or total mortality, being sure that this association is not due to confounders, i.e. non-GFR determinants of biomarkers. In clinical research, it has been shown that measured GFR (or measured GFR slope) as a secondary endpoint as compared with estimated GFR detected subtle treatment effects and obtained these results with a comparatively smaller sample size than trials choosing estimated GFR. Measuring GFR by iohexol has several advantages: simplicity, low cost, stability and low interlaboratory variation. Iohexol plasma clearance represents the best chance for implementing a standardized GFR measurement protocol applicable worldwide both in clinical practice and in research. PMID:27679716

  3. Measuring the sedimentation rate in a magnetorheological fluid column via thermal conductivity monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Haibin; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Liu, Guizhen; Ma, Wentao; Wereley, Norman M.

    2016-05-01

    Measuring sedimentation rate of magnetorheological fluids (MRFs) is of great importance when designing and synthesizing MRFs for engineering applications. A method of characterizing sedimentation rate in an MRF column is proposed utilizing thermal conductivity correlated with particle concentration. A series of MRF samples composed of carbonyl iron particles suspended in silicone oil were prepared, and their concentrations (measured as volume fraction, ∅) and thermal conductivities, k, were tested. A calibration curve was developed to relate particle concentration, ∅, to thermal conductivity, k, using this set of MRF samples with known concentration. The particle concentration, ∅, in the MRF column was then monitored by measuring thermal conductivities (k) at a fixed location and using this calibration relationship. Finally, sedimentation rate in the MRF column was determined by examining how particle concentration varied with time. The sedimentation rate measured in the MRF column was validated using visual observation of mudline (boundary between the topmost clarified fluid zone and MRF below).

  4. The Power of String: Building a Conceptual Foundation for Measuring Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lucey, Linda Polhemus; Jennings, Sybillyn; Olson, Peter; Rubenfeld, Lester; Holmes, Aliya E.

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how Lego robotics, interactive multimedia, and a simple manipulative--string--can be offered to students through coordinated activities to help them build a conceptual foundation for measuring rate. (Contains 5 figures and 3 tables.)

  5. The Geodesy of the Main Saturnian Satellites from Range Rate Measurements of the Cassini Spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ducci, M.; Iess, L.; Armstrong, J. W.; Asmar, S. W.; Jacobson, R. A.; Lunine, J. I.; Racioppa, P.; Rappaport, N. J.; Stevenson, D. J.; Tortora, P.

    2012-03-01

    During Cassini's eight-year tour in the saturnian system, the gravity field of the main satellites was inferred from range rate measurements of the spacecraft. Here we present our latest results and an overview of our analysis methods.

  6. In-situ measurement of the rate of U-235 fission induced by lunar neutrons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolum, D. S.; Burnett, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The depth profile of the neutron-induced fission rate of U-235 was directly measured to a depth of 350 g/sq cm by the Apollo 17 Lunar Neutron Probe Experiment. The fission rate rises sharply from the surface to a broad maximum from 110 to 160 g/sq cm and drops off at greater depths. The shape of the theoretical depth profile of Lingenfelter et al (1972) fits the measured capture rates well at all depths. The absolute magnitude of the experimental fission rates are (11 plus or minus 17)% lower than those calculated theoretically. The excellent agreement between theory and experiment implies that conclusions drawn previously by interpreting lunar sample data with the theoretical capture rates will not require revision. In particular, lunar surface processes, rather than uncertainties in the capture rates, are required to explain the relatively low neutron fluences observed for surface soil samples compared to the fluences expected for a uniformly mixed regolith.

  7. Mental workload measurement: Event-related potentials and ratings of workload and fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biferno, M. A.

    1985-01-01

    Event-related potentials were elicited when a digitized word representing a pilot's call-sign was presented. This auditory probe was presented during 27 workload conditions in a 3x3x3 design where the following variables were manipulated: short-term load, tracking task difficulty, and time-on-task. Ratings of workload and fatigue were obtained between each trial of a 2.5-hour test. The data of each subject were analyzed individually to determine whether significant correlations existed between subjective ratings and ERP component measures. Results indicated that a significant number of subjects had positive correlations between: (1) ratings of workload and P300 amplitude, (2) ratings of workload and N400 amplitude, and (3) ratings of fatigue and P300 amplitude. These data are the first to show correlations between ratings of workload or fatigue and ERP components thereby reinforcing their validity as measures of mental workload and fatigue.

  8. Measurement of Fatty Acid Oxidation Rates in Animal Tissues and Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Frank K.; Green, Michelle F.; Koves, Timothy R.; Hirschey, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    While much oncological research has focused on metabolic shifts in glucose and amino acid oxidation, recent evidence suggests that fatty acid oxidation (FAO) may also play an important role in the metabolic reprogramming of cancer cells. Here, we present a simple method for measuring FAO rates using radiolabeled palmitate, common laboratory reagents, and standard supplies. This protocol is broadly applicable for measuring FAO rates in cultured cancer cells as well as in both malignant and nontransformed animal tissues. PMID:24862277

  9. Miniature personal uv solar dosimeter: small light-powered meter measures accumulated radiation in the ultraviolet or other selected regions. NTIS tech note

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-01

    This citation summarizes a one-page announcement of technology available for utilization. A miniature integrating light meter originally developed for use in space has many other possible applications. Small enough to be worn unobtrusively, it can measure accurately the radiation dose accumulated for a few minutes or over a period of weeks. It can measure total light or selected wave bands, such as UV or IR. The primary practical advantages of the dosimeter are its potentially low cost, small size, accuracy, and adaptability to specific wave-band measurements. Medical applications suggested include as a research tool for studies of skin cancer, vitamin D production, and jaundice and for possible use in conjuction with the treatments involving Sunlight exposure. It could be further used to measure integrated Sunlight for solar-energy design, for agriculture and meteorology, and to study and monitor the stability of materials and environmental and occupatinal lighting. The meter uses a planar-diffused silicon photovoltaic detector as a sensor and a commercially available electrochemical coulometer to measure light accumulation....FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION: Contact: Inquiries concerning nonexclusive or exclusive license for its commercial development should be addressed to the Patent Counsel, Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. Refer To LAR-12469.

  10. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  11. Measurements of file transfer rates over dedicated long-haul connections

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Nageswara S; Hinkel, Gregory Carl; Imam, Neena; Settlemyer, Bradley

    2016-01-01

    Wide-area file transfers are an integral part of several High-Performance Computing (HPC) scenarios. Dedicated network connections with high capacity, low loss rate and low competing traffic, are increasingly being provisioned over current HPC infrastructures to support such transfers. To gain insights into these file transfers, we collected transfer rate measurements for Lustre and xfs file systems between dedicated multi-core servers over emulated 10 Gbps connections with round trip times (rtt) in 0-366 ms range. Memory transfer throughput over these connections is measured using iperf, and file IO throughput on host systems is measured using xddprof. We consider two file system configurations: Lustre over IB network and xfs over SSD connected to PCI bus. Files are transferred using xdd across these connections, and the transf