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Sample records for accumulation subcellular distribution

  1. Calcium: Some aspects of subcellular accumulation and distribution in milk

    SciTech Connect

    Shappell, N.W.

    1989-01-01

    Distribution and bioavailability of {sup 47}calcium in milk labeled by extrinsic and intrinsic methods was investigated. Milk from Sprague Dawley rats was labeled by both methods, and milk from a cow was labeled by the extrinsic method. Retention of {sup 47}Ca from milks administered to young male Sprague Dawley rats was determined through whole body counting for 6 days after administration of milk. Percent of {sup 47}Ca dose retained was 72% for extrinsically labeled cow milk, 62% for extrinsically labeled rat milk, and 55% for intrinsically labeled rat milk. Samples were fractionated by ultracentrifugation and by gel exclusion chromatography. {sup 47}Calcium distributions in rat milk labeled intrinsically or extrinsically were similar. The majority of {sup 47}Ca was found in a particulate, >30,000 molecular weight fraction. The amount of milk calcium retained by rats appeared to be related to the amount of noncasein micelle-associated calcium. When administered by intraperitoneal injection into rats, {sup 45}Ca specific activity of milk peaked in 60 to 90 minutes. In vitro {sup 45}Ca accumulation was compared in Golgi apparatus and endoplasmic reticulum from liver and mammary gland of lactating Dunkin Hartley guinea pigs. In the presence of ATP, highest accumulation per unit total fraction protein was found in Golgi apparatus (mammary gland 28% of available {sup 45}Ca, liver 11%) while 8% was accumulated by endoplasmic reticulum fractions.

  2. High Accumulation and Subcellular Distribution of Thallium in Green Cabbage (Brassica Oleracea L. Var. Capitata L.).

    PubMed

    Ning, Zengping; He, Libin; Xiao, Tangfu; Márton, László

    2015-01-01

    The accumulation of thallium (Tl) in brassicaceous crops is widely known, but both the uptake extents of Tl by the individual cultivars of green cabbage and the distribution of Tl in the tissues of green cabbage are not well understood. Five commonly available cultivars of green cabbage grown in the Tl-spiked pot-culture trials were studied for the uptake extent and subcellular distribution of Tl. The results showed that all the trial cultivars mainly concentrated Tl in the leaves (101∼192 mg/kg, DW) rather than in the roots or stems, with no significant differences among cultivars (p = 0.455). Tl accumulation in the leaves revealed obvious subcellular fractionation: cell cytosol and vacuole > cell wall > cell organelles. The majority (∼ 88%) of leaf-Tl was found to be in the fraction of cytosol and vacuole, which also served as the major storage site for other major elements such as Ca and Mg. This specific subcellular fractionation of Tl appeared to enable green cabbage to avoid Tl damage to its vital organelles and to help green cabbage tolerate and detoxify Tl. This study demonstrated that all the five green cabbage cultivars show a good application potential in the phytoremediation of Tl-contaminated soils.

  3. Cadmium uptake, chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and accumulation in Echinodorus osiris Rataj.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chaolan; Zhang, Peng; Mo, Chuangrong; Yang, Weiwei; Li, Qinfeng; Pan, Liping; Lee, D K

    2013-07-01

    Phytoremediation is a technology for extracting or inactivating pollutants in soil. Echinodorus osiris (E. osiris) is a fast growing perennial wetland plant that is common in tropical and subtropical areas and has a high tolerance to cadmium (Cd). However, the absorption dynamics, subcellular distribution and accumulation of Cd by E. osiris had not been investigated. In this paper, hydroponic experiments with different levels of Cd(2+) (0, 5.0, 15.0 mg L(-1)) were carried out to determine these characteristics of E. osiris. The results indicated that the Cd absorption rate of Echinodorus osiris decreased over time, and the absorption rate within 0.5-1.0 h was faster than after 1.0 h. In a 6.0 hour time period, the rate of Cd uptake fit a quadratic polynomial curve when E. osiris was grown under the 5 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. However, the rate of Cd uptake by E. osiris fit a cubic polynomial model with the 15 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. In the roots, the ethanol-extractable Cd, water-extractable Cd, and NaCl-extractable Cd were the largest proportions of the total Cd. The HAc-extractable Cd, HCl-extractable Cd, and residual-Cd represented a larger proportion of the total Cd in the leaves which was combined with phosphate including CdHPO4, Cd3 (PO4)2, and oxalic acid. When analyzing the subcellular distribution of Cd in the plant, the soluble fraction containing Cd accounted for the largest part (69.49-88.39%) followed by the Cd bound to the cell wall (8.44-25.62%). Both the lower and the higher Cd treatments demonstrated that compartmentation by the vacuole and cell wall binding were two effective defense mechanisms of the plant. However, the vacuole became the main site for Cd accumulation in the leaves under the 15 mg L(-1) Cd treatment. E. osiris was able to accumulate high concentrations of Cd in both the roots and the leaves. The Cd concentration reached 502.97 mg kg(-1) and 2742.95 mg kg(-1) in the shoots and roots, respectively, after 27 days of cultivation. It was

  4. Intracellular accumulation, subcellular distribution, and efflux of tilmicosin in bovine mammary, blood, and lung cells.

    PubMed

    Scorneaux, B; Shryock, T R

    1999-06-01

    Tilmicosin is a semisynthetic macrolide antibiotic currently approved for veterinary use in cattle and swine to combat respiratory disease. Because the concentrations of tilmicosin are generally low in bovine serum, the interaction of tilmicosin with three types of bovine phagocytes (monocyte-macrophages, macrophages, and neutrophils from blood, lungs, and mammary gland, respectively) and mammary gland epithelial cells was evaluated to provide an understanding of potential clinical efficacy. After incubation with radiolabeled tilmicosin, uptake was determined and expressed as the ratio of the intracellular to the extracellular drug concentration. Accumulation of tilmicosin at 4 h of incubation by the alveolar macrophages (Cc/Ce 193) was 4 to 13 times more than that observed in monocyte-macrophages (Cc/Ce 43), neutrophils, (Cc/Ce 13), or mammary epithelial cells (Cc/Ce 20). Subcellular distribution showed that 70 to 80% of tilmicosin was localized in the lysosomes. Uptake in mammary gland cells was dependent on cell viability, temperature, and pH, but was not influenced by metabolic inhibitors or anaerobiosis. However, lipopolysaccharide exposure increased tilmicosin uptake by the bovine mammary macrophages and epithelial cells. When neutrophils and epithelial cells were incubated in the presence of tilmicosin and extracellular tilmicosin was then removed, 40% of the intracellular tilmicosin remained cell associated after 4 h of incubation (i.e., 60% effluxed), but only 25% remained in macrophages. These in vitro interactions of tilmicosin with bovine phagocytes and epithelial cells suggest an integral role in effecting clinical efficacy.

  5. Characterizations of bio-accumulations, subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cesium in Brassica juncea, and Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qian; Lai, Jin-long; Tao, Zong-ya; Han, Na; Wu, Guo

    2016-04-01

    We aim to investigate the tolerance and enrichment mechanism of cesium (Cs) in hyperaccumulation plants. In this study, Brassica juncea and Vicia faba were subjected to varying doses of Cs for 21 days to investigate the differences in bio-accumulations, subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cs in two cultivars by differential centrifugation, and extraction of Cs in different chemical forms, respectively. The results showed that 49.87%-61.08% of the Cs were in the leaf of B. juncea, while in V. faba, 1.58%-79.29% of the Cs was in the root. The translocation factor (TF) arrived 2.79 to 3.71 in B. juncea, while it only reached 0.26 to 0.62 in V. faba. Cs subcellular distribution of the two plants was in sequence as follows: soluble fraction > cell wall > organelles. Cs was more easily distributed to metal-sensitive fractions of V. faba. The inorganic Cs (F-ethanol), and water-soluble Cs (F-dH2O) are the main existing types of Cs in the two plants. In B. juncea, the relative content of inorganic Cs, and organic acids/CsH2PO4 (F-dH2O) were higher than that of V. faba in the stem. This suggests that Cs may induce related transporter gene expression (such as phosphate transporter, organic cation, high affinity nitrate transporter, amino acid permease, etc.) to help the transport of Cs between root to shoot. PMID:26854554

  6. Interaction of cadmium and zinc on accumulation and sub-cellular distribution in leaves of hyperaccumulator Potentilla griffithii.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Rong-Liang; Thangavel, Palaniswamy; Hu, Peng-Jie; Senthilkumar, Palaninaicker; Ying, Rong-Rong; Tang, Ye-Tao

    2011-02-28

    Potentilla griffithii Hook is a newly found hyperaccumulator plant capable of high tolerance and accumulation of Zn and Cd. We investigated the interactive effects between Cd and Zn on accumulation and vacuolar sequestration in P. griffithii. Stimulatory effect of growth was noted at 0.2 mM Cd and 1.25 and 2.5 mM Zn tested. Accumulation of Zn and Cd in roots, petioles and leaves were increased significantly with addition of these metals individually. However, the Zn supplement decreased root Cd accumulation but increased the concentration of Cd in petioles and leaves. The results from sub-cellular distribution showed that up to 94% and 70% of the total Zn and Cd in the leaves were present in the protoplasts, and more than 90% Cd and Zn in the protoplasts were localized in the vacuoles. Nearly, 88% and 85% of total Cd and Zn were extracted in the cell sap of the leaves suggesting that most of the Cd and Zn in the leaves were available in soluble form. The present results indicate that Zn supplement significantly enhanced the petiole accumulation of Cd and further vacuolar sequestration plays an important role in tolerance, detoxification and hyperaccumulation of these metals in P. griffithii. PMID:21211902

  7. Changes in chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds involved in Pb accumulation and detoxification in Athyrium wardii (Hook.).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Li, Tingxuan; Yu, Haiying; Chen, Guangdeng; Zhang, Xizhou; Zheng, Zicheng; Li, Jinxing

    2015-08-01

    Athyrium wardii is one of the dominant plant species flourishing on the Pb-Zn mine tailings in Sichuan Province, China. A greenhouse pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the chemical forms, subcellular distribution, and thiol compounds in A. wardii under different Pb treatments. The results showed that plants of the mining ecotype (ME) of A. wardii were more tolerant to Pb than those of the non-mining ecotype (NME) in spite of accumulation of higher Pb concentrations. The Pb concentrations in shoots and roots of the ME were 3.2∼8.6 times and 3.0∼24.6 times higher than those of the NME, respectively. The ME was more efficient in Pb uptake than the NME. Moreover, 27.8∼39.0% of the total Pb in ME was sodium chloride (NaCl) extractable and 38.0∼48.5% was acetic acid (HAc) extractable, whereas only a minority of total Pb was in ethanol and H2O extractable. In subcellular level, 77.4∼88.8% of total Pb was stored in the cell walls of ME and 9.0∼18.9% in soluble fractions. Increasing Pb concentrations enhanced sequestration of Pb into the cell walls and soluble fractions of ME tissues to protect organelles against Pb. Synthesis of non-protein thiols (NP-SH) and phytochelatins (PCs) in roots of ME significantly enhanced in response to Pb stress, and significant increases in glutathione (GSH) were observed in shoots of ME. Higher levels of NP-SH, GSH, and PCs were observed in roots of the ME comparing with NME, especially under high Pb treatments. The results indicated that Pb was localized mainly in cell wall and soluble fraction of ME plants with low biological activity by cell wall deposition and vacuolar compartmentalization, which might be the important adapted Pb detoxification mechanisms of ME. PMID:25913310

  8. Quantitative evaluation of berberine subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation in non-small cell lung cancer cells by UPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhong-Wen; Leung, Elaine Lai-Han; Fan, Xing-Xing; Zhou, Hua; Ma, Wen-Zhe; Liu, Liang; Xie, Ying

    2015-11-01

    Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid, has been demonstrated to be a safe anti-cancer agent with multiple effects on mitochondria. Intracellular concentration and distribution around the targeting sites are determinants of efficacy, but subcellular distribution of berberine has not been fully elucidated yet, which relies on the sensitive and robustness assay. In this study, a sensitive and robust UPLC-MS/MS method has been developed and validated with optimized extraction solvents and detection conditions. Key factors such as the purity and integrity of isolated organelle fractions, and the effects of isolation procedures on the subcellular concentration of berberine were systemically evaluated. With the developed assay, we found that the intracellular accumulations of berberine in two gefitinib resistant NSCLC cell lines H1650 and H1975 were 2-3 folds higher than that of normal epithelial cells BEAS-2B. Moreover, significantly different subcellular distribution profiles in NSCLC cancer cells from that of BEAS-2B cells with a striking increase in content in most organelles may contribute to its selective cytotoxicity to cancer cells. Furthermore, a predominant accumulation of berberine was observed for the first time in microsomal fraction for all three cell lines. Therefore, this method could be used for quantitative evaluation of subcellular distribution and cellular accumulation of berberine and for further evaluation of the concentration-effects relationship.

  9. The accumulation and subcellular distribution of arsenic and antimony in four fern plants.

    PubMed

    Feng, R; Wang, X; Wei, C; Tu, S

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, Pteris cretica 'Albo-Lineata' (PC), Pteris fauriei (PF), Humata tyermanii Moore (HT), and Pteris ensiformis Burm (PE), were selected to explore additional plant materials for the phytoremediation of As and Sb co-contamination. To some extent, the addition of As and Sb enhanced the growth of HT, PE, and PF. Conversely, the addition of As and Sb negatively affected the growth of PC and was accompanied with the accumulation of high levels of As and Sb in the roots. The highest concentration of Sb was recorded as 6405 mg kg(-1) in the roots of PC, and that for As was 337 mg kg(-1) in the rhizome of PF. To some degree, As and Sb stimulated the uptake of each other in these ferns. Arsenic was mainly stored in the cytoplasmic supernatant (CS) fraction, followed by the cell wall (CW) fraction. In contrast, Sb was mainly found in the CW fraction and, to a lesser extent, in the CS fraction, suggesting that the cell wall and cytosol play different roles in As and Sb accumulation by fern plants. This study demonstrated that these fern plants show a good application potential in the phytoremediation of As and Sb co-contaminated environments.

  10. Subcellular cadmium distribution and antioxidant enzymatic activities in the leaves of two castor (Ricinus communis L.) cultivars exhibit differences in Cd accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hanzhi; Guo, Qingjun; Yang, Junxing; Shen, Jianxiu; Chen, Tongbin; Zhu, Guangxu; Chen, Hui; Shao, Chunyan

    2015-10-01

    The aims of this study were: (1) the study of cadmium (Cd) accumulation and toxicity in different castor cultivars (Ricinus communis L.); (2) to investigate changes in antioxidant enzymatic activities and the subcellular distribution of Cd in young and old leaves from two different castor cultivars, after exposure to two different Cd concentrations, and explore the underlying mechanism of Cd detoxification focusing on antioxidant enzymes and subcellular compartmentalization. The Cd concentration, toxicity, and subcellular distribution, as well as superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and peroxidase (POD) activities were measured in Zibo-3 and Zibo-9 cultivars after exposure to two different concentrations of Cd (2mg/L and 5mg/L) for 10 days. This research revealed Cd accumulation characteristics in castor are root>stem>young leaf>old leaf. Castor tolerance was Cd dose exposure and the cultivars themselves dependent. Investigation of subcellular Cd partitioning showed that Cd accumulated mainly in the heat stable protein (HSP) and cellular debris fractions, followed by the Cd rich granule (MRG), heat denatured protein (HDP), and organelle fractions. With increasing Cd concentration in nutrient solution, the decreased detoxified fractions (BDM) and the increased Cd-sensitive fractions (MSF) in young leaves may indicate the increased Cd toxicity in castor cultivars. The BDM-Cd fractions or MSF-Cd in old leaves may be linked with Cd tolerance of different cultivars of castor. The antioxidant enzymes that govern Cd detoxification were not found to be active in leaves. Taken together, these results indicate Cd tolerance and toxicity in castor can be explained by subcellular partitioning.

  11. Subcellular distribution of potassium in striated muscles

    SciTech Connect

    Edelmann, L.

    1984-01-01

    Microanalytical experiments have been performed to answer the question whether the main cellular cation, K+, follows the water distribution in the striated muscle cell or whether K+ follows the distribution of negative fixed charges (beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of aspartic and glutamic acid residues). Subcellular localization of K and/or of the K surrogates Rb, Cs, and Tl has been investigated by the following methods: Chemical precipitation of K with tetraphenylborate. Autoradiography of alkali-metals and Tl in air-dried and frozen-hydrated preparations. TEM visualization of electron dense Cs and Tl in sections of freeze-dried and plastic embedded muscle. X-ray microanalysis of air-dried myofibrils and muscle cryosections. The experiments consistently show that K, Rb, Cs, and Tl do not follow the water distribution but are mainly accumulated in the A band, especially in the marginal regions, and at Z lines. The same sites preferentially accumulate Cs or uranyl cations when sections of freeze-dried, embedded muscle are exposed to these electron microscopic stains. It is concluded that the detected uneven distribution of K, Rb, Cs, and Tl in muscle is neither a freeze-drying artifact nor an embedding artifact and may result from a weak ion binding to the beta- and gamma-carboxyl groups of cellular proteins.

  12. Variation in cadmium accumulation among 30 cultivars and cadmium subcellular distribution in 2 selected cultivars of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Junli; Yuan, Jiangang; Yang, Zhongyi; Huang, Baifei; Zhou, Yihui; Xin, Junliang; Gong, Yulian; Yu, Hui

    2009-10-14

    To reduce the influx of cadmium (Cd), a toxic heavy metal, into the human food chain through vegetable intake, a pot experiment for the selection of a pollution-safe cultivar (PSC) of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica Forsk.) was carried out. The experiment with 30 tested cultivars revealed that the maximum differences in Cd concentration between the cultivars containing the highest and the lowest Cd were 3.0-3.9-fold under low-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 0.593 mg kg(-1)), 2.7-3.5-fold under middle-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.091 mg kg(-1)), and 2.6-2.7-fold under high-Cd treatment (soil Cd = 1.824 mg kg(-1)), large enough to define the Cd-PSCs. Concentrations of Cd in edible parts of six cultivars, cv. Daxingbaigu, Huifengqing, Qiangkunbaigu, Qiangkunqinggu, Shenniuliuye, and Xingtianqinggu, were lower than 0.2 mg kg(-1), the maximum level (ML) of Cd allowed by the Codex Alimentarius Commission (CAC) standard, even under middle-Cd treatment. Accordingly, these cultivars were treated as typical Cd-PSCs. Four cultivars, cv. Jieyangbaigeng, Xianggangdaye, Sannongbaigeng, and Taiwan 308, contained Cd in edible parts exceeding the ML even under low-Cd treatment, and they were defined as typical non-Cd-PSCs. The correlations of the Cd concentrations among the tested cultivars between the three treatments were significant at the p < 0.05 level. A conspicuous difference in Cd subcellular distribution in hydroponic plant tissues between cv. Qiangkunqinggu (a typical Cd-PSC) and cv. Taiwan 308 (a typical non-Cd-PSC) were observed. Cd absorbed by cv. Qiangkunqinggu seemed to be well-compartmentalized in root and in cell wall fragment, which may be one of the mechanisms leading to its low Cd accumulating property. The results indicated that water spinach, a leafy vegetable, could be easily polluted by soils contaminated with Cd, as 80% of the tested cultivars had exceeded the ML of Cd according to the CAC standard even under the middle-Cd treatment. Much of the evidence obtained from

  13. THE SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION OF ANTIGEN IN MACROPHAGES

    PubMed Central

    Kölsch, E.; Mitchison, N. A.

    1968-01-01

    The intracellular fate of phagocytosed antigens in cells from peritoneal exudate in CBA mice has been studied by using 126I and 131I labeled antigens. After uptake of labeled antigen, cells were homogenized and the subcellular fractions were analyzed by isopycnic centrifugation in a sucrose gradient. The uptake of heat-denatured BSA (c BSA) by these cells in vivo is 3.5 µg/mg c BSA injected/108 cells. The uptake by cells in animals which were exposed 2 days earlier to 900 r whole body irradiation is slightly lower but does not differ significantly. 90% of the phagocytosed material is degraded within 2–3 hr, the residual 10% is retained at least over an 8 hr periods. Using a pulse and chase technique, with 125I and 131I c BSA in vitro and in vivo it was shown that newly phagocytosed antigen is found mainly in a lysosomal turnover compartment of a density 1.19 g cm–3. Antigen which has been in the cells for longer was found in a denser fraction (1.26 g cm–3). In a comparison of nhrmal and X-irradiated cells it can be shown that after irradiation with 900 r less c BSA is found in this storage compartment. Binding of the antigen to the subcellular fractions, and its behavior towards several detergents has been studied. Subcellular fractions do not have the increased immunogenic capacity of antigen enclosed in living macrophages. Two synthetic polypeptide antigens, poly(D-Tyr, D-Glu, D-Ala) and poly-(L-Tyr, L-Glu) have a different subcellular distribution from c BSA, BSA, or bovine gamma globulin. Apart from also being found in the 1.26 storage compartment the polypeptide antigens are mainly located in a 1.15 compartment and only to a small extent in the 1.19 compartment. The half-life of these antigens in the cells is much longer than the half-life of the protein antigens studied. The finding of several subcellular compartments is discussed in connection with the functions possibly performed by macrophages. PMID:5682940

  14. Subcellular distribution and chemical form of cadmium in bean plants

    SciTech Connect

    Weigel, H.J.; Jaeger, H.J.

    1980-03-01

    The subcellular distribution and chemical form of Cd in bean plants grown in nutrient solutions containing Cd were investigated. Cd was accumulated mainly in roots and to a minor extent in leaves. Subcellular fractionation of Cd-containing tissues (pH 7.5) showed that more than 70% of the element was localized in the cytoplasmic fraction in roots as well as in leaves. Little Cd (8 to 14%) was bound either to the cell wall fraction or to the organelles. Gel filtration of the soluble fraction showed Cd to be associated mainly with 5000 to 10,000 molecular weight components in roots, and 700 to 5000 molecular weight components in leaves. Small amounts of Cd were found in the high molecular weight proteins (molecular weight 150,000). Only traces of Cd could be detected as a free ion. Chemical characterization of the low molecular weight components resulted in the identification of nine amino acids which were identical in roots and leaves. Cd in bean plants is assumed to be bound to peptides and/or proteins of low molecular weight.

  15. Subcellular distribution of phospholipids in different types of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Domonkos, J; Heiner, L; Vargha, M

    1975-01-01

    Subcellular distribution of choline and non-choline phosphatides has been studied in tetanic (fast-twitch) and tonic (slow-twitch) muscles of rabbits. The choline phosphatide content of the subcellular fraction including the sarcolemma was greater in the tetanic than in the tonic muscle. On the other hand, the choline phosphatide content of the mitochondria-free sarcoplasmic fraction was greater in the tonic than in the tetanic muscle. A greater amount of non-choline phosphatide was found in each subcellular fraction of the tonic muscle as compared with those of the tetanic one. There was more fatty aldehyde in the non-choline phosphatides of each subcellular fraction of the tetanic muscle, than in those of the tonic one, of this type being much smaller in the tetanic muscle. There is not such an expressed difference in the fatty aldehyde contents of choline phosphatides of the subcellular fractions between the two kinds of muscle.

  16. Subcellular distribution and translocation of radionuclides in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Gouthu, S.; Weginwar, R.; Arie, Tsutomu; Ambe, Shizuko; Ozaki, Takuo; Enomoto, Shuichi; Ambe, Fumitoshi; Yamaguchi, Isamu

    1999-09-01

    The subcellular distribution of radionuclides in Glycine max Merr. (soybean) and Cucumis sativus L. (cucumber) and translocation of plant absorbed radionuclides with growth in soybean were studied. More than 60% of cellular incorporated Rb{sup {minus}83}, Sr{sup {minus}85}, Mn{sup {minus}54}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, and Se{sup {minus}75} remained in the supernatant fraction; 55% and 20% of Cr{sup {minus}51} was bound to soybean and cucumber cell wall fractions, respectively; 70% or more of Be{sup {minus}7}, Y{sup {minus}88}, and Fe{sup {minus}59} was fixed in the chloroplast fraction; and approx. 10% of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Fe{sup {minus}59}, V{sup {minus}48}, and As were fixed in the mitochondrial fraction. Translocation of nuclides within the soybean plant at different stages of growth has been determined. Vanadium, Y{sup {minus}88}, Be{sup {minus}7}, Se{sup {minus}75}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, Cr{sup {minus}51}, and Zr{sup {minus}88} were predominantly accumulated in the root. Although the total percentage of plant uptake of Sc{sup {minus}46}, Zr{sup {minus}88}, Nb{sup {minus}95}, Sc{sup {minus}46}, and Cr{sup {minus}51} was high, because of low mobility and translocation to shoot, their accumulation in the fruit fraction was negligible. The translocation of mobile nuclides in plants was demonstrated clearly by Rb{sup {minus}83}, Zn{sup {minus}65}, and Fe{sup {minus}59}. Data on the nuclide fraction mobilized from vegetative parts into edible parts was used to assess the percentage of accumulated radionuclides in plants that may reach humans through beans.

  17. Functional platform for controlled subcellular distribution of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Serag, Maged F; Kaji, Noritada; Venturelli, Enrica; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Terasaka, Kazuyoshi; Tokeshi, Manabu; Mizukami, Hajime; Braeckmans, Kevin; Bianco, Alberto; Baba, Yoshinobu

    2011-11-22

    As nanoparticles can cross different cellular barriers and access different tissues, control of their uptake and cellular fate presents a functional approach that will be broadly applicable to nanoscale technologies in cell biology. Here we show that the trafficking of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) through various subcellular membranes of the plant cell is facilitated or inhibited by attaching a suitable functional tag and controlling medium components. This enables a unique control over the uptake and the subcellular distribution of SWCNTs and provides a key strategy to promote their cellular elimination to minimize toxicity. Our results also demonstrate that SWCNTs are involved in a carrier-mediated transport (CMT) inside cells; this is a phenomenon that scientists could use to obtain novel molecular insights into CMT, with the potential translation to advances in subcellular nanobiology.

  18. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    PubMed Central

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-01-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies. PMID:26911251

  19. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-01

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cd (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators. It could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.

  20. Subcellular distribution of zinc in Daphnia magna and implication for toxicity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Xiong; Guan, Rui

    2010-08-01

    We examined the subcellular partitioning of zinc (Zn) in Daphnia magna both under acute and chronic exposures. In the acute Zn toxicity tests, the daphnids were exposed to different Zn concentrations for 48 h or to one lethal concentration (1,000 microg/L) for different durations (time to death for up to 47 h). Significant mortality of daphnids was observed when the newly accumulated Zn concentration reached a threshold level of approximately 40 microg/g wet weight (or 320 microg/g dry wt), approximately 3.5 times higher than the background tissue concentration (92 microg/g dry wt). Chronic exposure (14 d) to Zn resulted in nonobservable effect on survivorship and growth at newly accumulated tissue concentration of over 40 microg/g wet weight. With increasing Zn acute exposure, more Zn was partitioned into the cellular debris fraction, indicating that this fraction was presumably the first targeted site of binding for Zn upon entering the animals. The importance of other subcellular fractions either decreased accordingly or remained comparable. We found that the metal-sensitive fraction (Zn distribution in the organelles and heat-denatured proteins) did not predict the acute Zn toxicity in Daphnia. During chronic exposure, however, no major change of the subcellular partitioning of Zn with increasing Zn exposure was documented. Zinc was mainly found in the organelles and heat-stable protein fractions during chronic exposure, suggesting that any subcellular repartitioning occurred primarily during acute exposure. Metallothioneins were induced upon chronic Zn exposure, but its induction evidently lagged behind the Zn accumulation. Our present study showed that the subcellular fractionation approach could not be readily used to predict the acute and chronic toxicities of Zn in Daphnia. A tissue-based Zn accumulation approach with a threshold Zn tissue concentration was better in predicting acute Zn toxicity. PMID:20821640

  1. Tissue and subcellular distribution of CLIC1

    PubMed Central

    Ulmasov, Barbara; Bruno, Jonathan; Woost, Philip G; Edwards, John C

    2007-01-01

    Background CLIC1 is a chloride channel whose cellular role remains uncertain. The distribution of CLIC1 in normal tissues is largely unknown and conflicting data have been reported regarding the cellular membrane fraction in which CLIC1 resides. Results New antisera to CLIC1 were generated and were found to be sensitive and specific for detecting this protein. These antisera were used to investigate the distribution of CLIC1 in mouse tissue sections and three cultured cell lines. We find CLIC1 is expressed in the apical domains of several simple columnar epithelia including glandular stomach, small intestine, colon, bile ducts, pancreatic ducts, airway, and the tail of the epididymis, in addition to the previously reported renal proximal tubule. CLIC1 is expressed in a non-polarized distribution in the basal epithelial cell layer of the stratified squamous epithelium of the upper gastrointesitinal tract and the basal cells of the epididymis, and is present diffusely in skeletal muscle. Distribution of CLIC1 was examined in Panc1 cells, a relatively undifferentiated, non-polarized human cell line derived from pancreatic cancer, and T84 cells, a human colon cancer cell line which can form a polarized epithelium that is capable of regulated chloride transport. Digitonin extraction was used to distinguish membrane-inserted CLIC1 from the soluble cytoplasmic form of the protein. We find that digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is primarily present in the plasma membrane of Panc1 cells. In T84 cells, we find digitonin-resistant CLIC1 is present in an intracellular compartment which is concentrated immediately below the apical plasma membrane and the extent of apical polarization is enhanced with forskolin, which activates transepithelial chloride transport and apical membrane traffic in these cells. The sub-apical CLIC1 compartment was further characterized in a well-differentiated mouse renal proximal tubule cell line. The distribution of CLIC1 was found to overlap that of

  2. Subcellular distribution of hydrolases in Naegleria fowleri.

    PubMed

    Lowrey, D M; McLaughlin, J

    1985-11-01

    The presence and particle association of various hydrolytic enzymes in Naegleria fowleri has been studied in whole cell extracts of trophozoites in an effort to establish authentic markers for surface membrane and lysosomal components. Evidence from the experiments reported here indicates that in N. fowleri a) acid proteinase, N-acetylglucosaminidase, and acid phosphatase are associated with cytoplasmic granules closely resembling lysosomes; b) 5'-nucleotidase is associated with the surface membrane, probably on the external surface; c) aspartate aminotransferase is associated with mitochondria; d) alpha-D-glucosidase and an aminopeptidase have bimodal distributions, activity being associated with both the surface membrane and lysosomal particles.

  3. Toxicity and subcellular distribution of cadmium in wheat as affected by dissolved organic acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Zhou, Dongmei

    2012-01-01

    We aim to investigate the effects of humic acid (HA) and citric acid (CA) on the toxicity and subcellular distribution of Cd in wheat. Results show that the toxicity and uptake of Cd decreased with increasing HA. The EC50 values of Cd increased from 3.36 micromol/L to 4.96 and 7.33 micromol/L at 50 and 250 mg/L HA, respectively, but decreased to 1.39 micromol/L in the presence of CA based on free ion activity model (FIAM). HA decreased the relative subcellular distribution of Cd in the heat-denatured proteins (decreased from 54% to 33%) but increased Cd in the heat-stable proteins in root (from 25% to 50%) at 7.61 micromol/L {Cd2+} (free Cd activity), which resulted in decreasing Cd toxicity. However, CA increased Cd toxicity due to the increased internalization of Cd although the relative subcellular distributions of Cd exhibited a decrease in the heat-denatured proteins and increase in the granule fraction compared to the control at high-level Cd. The FIAM could not predict the toxicity of Cd in the presence of organic acids. Alternatively, the internal Cd accumulation and subcellular Cd concentration were better to describe the toxicity of Cd to wheat.

  4. Subcellular distribution of azithromycin and clarithromycin in rat alveolar macrophages (NR8383) in vitro.

    PubMed

    Togami, Kohei; Chono, Sumio; Morimoto, Kazuhiro

    2013-01-01

    Azithromycin (AZM), a 15-membered ring macrolide antimicrobial agent, has an antibacterial spectrum that includes intracellular parasitic pathogens that survive or intracellularly multiply in alveolar macrophages (AMs). The subcellular distribution of AZM in AMs was evaluated in vitro in comparison with clarithromycin (CAM). AZM and CAM (50 µM) were applied to the NR8383 cells, used as an in vitro model of AMs, followed by incubation at 37°C or 4°C. The total amount of AZM in cells and subcellular distribution (cell fractionation) was determined after incubation. High level of AZM accumulation was observed in the NR8383 cells at 37°C, and the equilibrium intracellular to extracellular concentration ratio (I/E ratio) was approximately 680, which was remarkably higher than that of CAM (equilibrium I/E ratio=28). The intracellular accumulation of AZM and CAM was temperature dependent. In addition, AZM distributed to the granules fraction including organelles and soluble fraction including cytosol in the NR8383 cells, whereas CAM mainly distributed in soluble fraction. The amount of AZM in the granules fraction was markedly reduced in the presence of ammonium chloride for increase in intracellular pH. These results indicate that AZM is distributed in acidic compartment in AMs. This study suggests that high AZM accumulation in the NR8383 cells is due to the trapping and/or binding in acidic organelles, such as lysosomes.

  5. Imaging trace element distributions in single organelles and subcellular features

    DOE PAGES

    Kashiv, Yoav; Austin, Jotham R.; Lai, Barry; Rose, Volker; Vogt, Stefan; El-Muayed, Malek

    2016-02-25

    The distributions of chemical elements within cells are of prime importance in a wide range of basic and applied biochemical research. An example is the role of the subcellular Zn distribution in Zn homeostasis in insulin producing pancreatic beta cells and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. We combined transmission electron microscopy with micro- and nano-synchrotron X-ray fluorescence to image unequivocally for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, the natural elemental distributions, including those of trace elements, in single organelles and other subcellular features. Detected elements include Cl, K, Ca, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn and Cdmore » (which some cells were supplemented with). Cell samples were prepared by a technique that minimally affects the natural elemental concentrations and distributions, and without using fluorescent indicators.We find it could likely be applied to all cell types and provide new biochemical insights at the single organelle level not available from organelle population level studies.« less

  6. Hepatic subcellular distribution of (tritium)T-2 toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, J.G.; Watts, M.R.

    1989-01-01

    Hepatic subcellular distribution of ({sup 3}H)T-2 toxin. The subcellular distribution of T-2 mycotoxin and its metabolites was studied in isolated rat livers perfused with ({sup 3}H)T-2 toxin. After a 120-min perfusion, the distribution of radiolabel was to bile 53%, perfusate 38% and liver 7%. Livers were fractionated into mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum (smooth and rough), plasma membrane and nuclei. Plasma membrane fractions contained 38% of the radiolabel within 5 min, decreasing to <1% at the end of the 120-min perfusion. Smooth endoplasmic reticulum contained 27% of the radiolabel by 5 min and increased to 43% over the 120-min perfusion. The mitochondrial fraction contained 3% of the radiolabel by 30 min and increased to 10% after 120-min perfusion. Label in the nuclear fraction remained constant at 7% from 30 to 120 min. By 15 min, only the parent toxin was detected in the mitochondrial fraction. In the other fractions, radiolabel was associated with HT-2, 4-deacetylneosolaniol, T-2 tetraol, and glucuronide conjugates. Glucuronide conjugates accounted for radiolabel eliminated via the bile. The time course for distribution of radiolabel in liver suggested an immediate association of ({sup 3}H)T-2 with plasma membranes and a subsequent association of toxin and metabolites with endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and nuclei, the known sites of action of this toxin.

  7. Biochemical and subcellular distribution of arachidonic acid in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, Y.; Gross, R.W.; Sobel, B.E.; Saffitz, J.E. )

    1987-12-01

    Selective release of arachidonic acid from prelabeled phospholipid pools has been observed following exposure of neonatal rat cardiac myocytes to metabolic inhibitors in vitro and has been correlated temporally with the development of irreversible sarcolemmal damage. Hydrolysis of phospholipids with release of arachidonic acid may be an important mechanism in the pathogenesis of sarcolemmal damage induced by ischemia. To elucidate potential subcellular loci of arachidonic acid release in ischemic myocardium, the authors characterized the phospholipid composition of adult rat myocardial sarcolemma and delineated the biochemical and subcellular distribution of radiolabeled arachidonic acid in neonatal rat myocytes incubated with ({sup 3}H)-arachidonic acid for selected intervals. Radioactivity was located almost exclusively in mitochondria and internal cytoplasmic membranes (primarily sarcoplasmic reticulum), which collectively contained 90% of myocyte radioactivity. These results indicate that radiolabeled arachidonic acid released from prelabeled phospholipid pools on exposure of neonatal rat myocytes to oxidative inhibitors is derived from mitochondria and internal cell membranes. The diminutive labeling of the sarcolemma suggests that turnover of arachidonoyl phospholipids is slower in the sarcolemma than in other membranous organelles.

  8. Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution, and acute effects of chromium in Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes).

    PubMed

    Li, Lixia; Chen, Hongxing; Bi, Ran; Xie, Lingtian

    2015-11-01

    Chromium (Cr) is an essential element but is toxic to aquatic organisms at elevated concentrations. In the present study, adult Japanese medaka (Oryzias latipes) were exposed to a sublethal hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) concentration via dissolved and dietary exposures for 6 d. Various measurements of Cr were made: bioaccumulation in different tissues, subcellular distribution in the liver, effects on antioxidants and acetylcholinesterase (AChE), and Cr-induced lipid peroxidation. The results showed that bioaccumulation increased dramatically in all tested tissues from dissolved exposure but only significantly in the intestine from dietary treatment, implying that dissolved exposure may be predominant for Cr accumulation in medaka. Subcellular distribution revealed that Cr accumulated in the liver was mainly (46%) associated with the heat-stable protein fraction. Among the antioxidants examined, catalase (CAT) responded to dissolved Cr exposure in most tissues whereas superoxide dismutase (SOD) was less responsive. Malondialdehyde concentrations were significantly elevated in most tissues examined in the dissolved Cr-exposed fish, but were only elevated in the liver and intestine in the dietary Cr-exposed fish. The AChE activity in the brain was stimulated by 49% in the dissolved Cr-exposed fish. Reductions in condition factor and gonadosomatic index were also observed. These data help in an understanding of Cr tissue distribution and the acute effects of Cr in Japanese medaka.

  9. Comparison of subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium among four soybean cultivars at young seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Deng, Xiaojuan; Huang, Yian; Fang, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jie; Wan, Haibo; Yang, Cunyi

    2015-12-01

    The hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the Cd subcellular distribution and chemical forms in roots and shoots among four soybean seedling cultivars with two Cd treatments. HX3 and GC8, two tolerant and low-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the lowest Cd concentration in roots and high Cd concentration in shoots, while BX10 and ZH24, two sensitive and high-grain-Cd-accumulating cultivars, had the highest Cd concentration in roots and the lowest Cd concentration in shoots at young seedling stage. Furthermore, the sequence of Cd subcellular distribution in roots at two Cd levels was cell wall (53.4-75.5 %) > soluble fraction (15.8-40.4 %) > organelle fraction (2.0-14.7 %), but in shoots, was soluble fraction (39.3-74.8 %) > cell wall (16.0-52.0 %) > organelle (4.8-19.5 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentration in all subcellular fractions in roots, but HX3 and GC8 had higher Cd concentration of soluble fraction in shoots. The sequence of Cd chemical forms in roots was FNacl (64.1-79.5 %) > FHAC (3.4-21.5 %) > Fd-H2O (3.6-13.0 %) > Fethanol (1.4-21.8) > FHCl (0.3-1.6 %) > Fother (0.2-1.4 %) at two Cd levels but, in shoots, was FNacl (19.7-51.4 %) ≥ FHAC (10.2-31.4 %) ≥ Fd-H2O (8.8-28.2 %) ≥ Fethanol (8.9-38.6 %) > FHCl (0.2-9.6 %) > Fother (2.5-11.2 %). BX10 and ZH24 had higher Cd concentrations in each extracted solutions from roots, but from shoots for GC8 and HX3. Taken together, the results uncover that root cell walls and leaf vacuoles might play important roles in Cd detoxification and limiting the symplastic movement of Cd. PMID:26272289

  10. Subcellular Clearance and Accumulation of Huntington Disease Protein: A Mini-Review.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ting; Hong, Yan; Li, Xiao-Jiang; Li, Shi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant, progressive neurodegenerative disease caused by an expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) tract in the N-terminal region of mutant huntingtin (mHtt). As a result, mHtt forms aggregates that are abundant in the nuclei and processes of neuronal cells. Although the roles of mHtt aggregates are still debated, the formation of aggregates points to deficient clearance of mHtt in brain cells. Since the accumulation of mHtt is a prerequisite for its neurotoxicity, exploring the mechanisms for mHtt accumulation and clearance would advance our understanding of HD pathogenesis and help us develop treatments for HD. We know that the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy play important roles in clearing mHtt; however, how mHtt preferentially accumulates in neuronal nuclei and processes remains unclear. Studying the clearance of mHtt in neuronal cells is a challenge because neurons are morphologically and functionally polarized, which means the turnover of mHtt may be distinct in different cellular compartments. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge about the clearance and accumulation of mHtt and strategies examining mHtt clearance and accumulation in different subcellular regions. PMID:27147961

  11. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: exposure to cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-Jiao; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-01-25

    The aims of this study were to (1) evaluate the changes in the Cd tolerance of a marine diatom after exposure under different Cd concentrations for various durations and (2) to explore the potential subcellular and biochemical mechanisms underlying these changes. The 72-h toxicity, short-term Cd uptake, subcellular Cd distribution, as well as the synthesis of phytochelatins (PCs) were measured in a marine diatom Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii after exposure to a range of free Cd ion concentrations ([Cd(2+)], 0.01-84nM) for 1-15 days. Surprisingly, the diatoms did not acquire higher resistance to Cd after exposure; instead their sensitivity to Cd increased with a higher exposed [Cd(2+)] and a longer exposure period. The underlying mechanisms could be traced to the responses of Cd cellular accumulation and the intrinsic detoxification ability of the preconditioned diatoms. Generally, exposure to a higher [Cd(2+)] and for a longer period increased the Cd uptake rate, cellular accumulation, as well as the Cd concentration in metal-sensitive fraction (MSF) in these diatoms. In contrast, although PCs were induced by the environmental Cd stress (with PC(2) being the most affected), the increased intracellular Cd to PC-SH ratio implied that the PCs' detoxification ability had reduced after Cd exposure. All these responses resulted in an elevated Cd sensitivity as exposed [Cd(2+)] and duration increased. This study shows that the physiological/biochemical and kinetic responses of phytoplankton upon metal exposure deserve further investigation.

  12. Polyprenols of Aspergillus niger. Their characterization, biosynthesis and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Barr, R M; Hemming, F W

    1972-03-01

    A polyprenol complex of Aspergillus niger was shown, by using spectrometric methods, to consist of a family of exo-methylene-hexahydroprenols that contain between 18 and 24 isoprene residues per molecule. Each prenol contains two trans residues, three saturated residues (alpha, omega and psi) and an exo-methylene substituent on the carbon atom beta to the isopropyl group in each omega-residue. The ubiquinone complex consisted of 90% ubiquinone-9, 9% ubiquinone-8 and 1% ubiquinone-10. The amount of polyprenol complex present reached a maximum of 1.7mg/culture bottle after 9-10 days of growth, coincident with the maximum weight of mycelium. The amount of ergosterol (10mg/culture bottle) and ubiquinone (1mg/culture bottle) reached a peak at 8 days. By the 13th day of growth the yield of ergosterol had fallen by 20% and that of ubiquinone by 85%. A study of the incorporation of [2-(14)C]mevalonate over different time-intervals confirmed that there was a slow turnover of prenol, a more rapid turnover of ergosterol and a very rapid turnover of ubiquinone. At any one time each member of the prenol complex had essentially the same specific radioactivity as other members of the complex. A similar conclusion was made about the ubiquinone mixture. Just over half of the polyprenol present was esterified to fatty acids. Subcellular fractionation studies indicated that the unesterified prenol is associated primarily with a mitochondrial fraction, whereas the ester is more widely distributed.

  13. Apolipoprotein D subcellular distribution pattern in neuronal cells during oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Pinilla, Eva; Navarro, Ana; Ordóñez, Cristina; del Valle, Eva; Tolivia, Jorge

    2015-07-01

    Apolipoprotein D (Apo D) is a secreted glycoprotein, member of the lipocalin superfamily, with a related beneficial role in metabolism and lipid transport due to the presence of a binding pocket that allows its interaction with several lipids. Nowadays, it has been clearly demonstrated that Apo D expression is induced and its subcellular location undergoes modifications in stressful and pathological conditions that characterize aging processes and neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present work was to study in detail the effect of H2O2 on the subcellular location of Apo D, in the hippocampal cell line HT22, by structural, ultrastructural, immunocytochemical, and molecular techniques in order to characterize the Apo D distribution pattern in neurons during oxidative stress. Our results indicate that Apo D is located in the cytoplasm under physiological conditions but treatment with H2O2 induces apoptosis and causes a displacement of Apo D location to the nucleus, coinciding with DNA fragmentation. In addition, we demonstrated that Apo D tends to accumulate around the nuclear envelope in neurons and glial cells of different brain areas in some neurodegenerative diseases and during human aging, but never inside the nucleus. These data suggest that the presence of Apo D in the nucleus, which some authors related with a specific transport, is a consequence of structural and functional alterations during oxidative stress and not the result of a specific role in the regulation of nuclear processes.

  14. Functional domains and sub-cellular distribution of the Hedgehog transducing protein Smoothened in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Y; Nystedt, S; Shivdasani, A A; Strutt, H; Thomas, C; Ingham, P W

    2004-06-01

    The Hedgehog signalling pathway is deployed repeatedly during normal animal development and its inappropriate activity is associated with various tumours in human. The serpentine protein Smoothened (Smo) is essential for cells to respond to the Hedeghog (Hh) signal; oncogenic forms of Smo have been isolated from human basal cell carcinomas. Despite similarities with ligand binding G-protein coupled receptors, the molecular basis of Smo activity and its regulation remains unclear. In non-responding cells, Smo is suppressed by the activity of another multipass membrane spanning protein Ptc, which acts as the Hh receptor. In Drosophila, binding of Hh to Ptc has been shown to cause an accumulation of phosphorylated Smo protein and a concomitant stabilisation of the activated form of the Ci transcription factor. Here, we identify domains essential for Smo activity and investigate the sub-cellular distribution of the wild type protein in vivo. We find that deletion of the amino terminus and the juxtamembrane region of the carboxy terminus of the protein result in the loss of normal Smo activity. Using Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) and horseradish peroxidase fusion proteins we show that Smo accumulates in the plasma membrane of cells in which Ptc activity is abrogated by Hh but is targeted to the degradative pathway in cells where Ptc is active. We further demonstrate that Smo accumulation is likely to be a cause, rather than a consequence, of Hh signal transduction.

  15. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Impatiens walleriana in relation to its phytoextraction potential.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu

    2015-11-01

    Impatiens (Impatiens walleriana) has been shown to be a potential cadmium (Cd) hyperaccumulator, but its mechanisms in accumulation and detoxification have not been reported. Rooted cuttings of Impatiens were planted in artificially Cd-contaminated soils for 50 days with total target concentrations of 0, 10, 20, 40, 80, and 120 mg/kg. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in the different organs were analyzed after the pot experiment. Compared with the control group, various Cd treatments affected the growth exhibitions of Impatiens, but most of them were not statistically significant. The Cd accumulation of different organs increased with an increase in the soil Cd concentrations for most of the treatments, and it was in the decreasing order of root>stem>leaf. In the roots of Impatiens, Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the soluble fraction (Fs), which has a high migration capacity and will further translocate to the shoot. The Cd was mainly compartmentalized in the cell wall fraction (Fcw) in the shoots as a mechanism of tolerance. Most of the Cd in the various organs of Impatiens was mainly in the forms of pectate and protein-integrated (FNaCl), whereas a minor portion was a water soluble fraction (FW). The experimental results show that the Cd in the Fs, FW, and FNaCl in the roots of Impatiens had a high mobility and will further translocate to the shoot. They could be used to estimate the Cd accumulated in the shoots of Impatiens.

  16. The Subcellular Distribution of Small Molecules: from Pharmacokinetics to Synthetic Biology

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Nan; Tsai, Hobart Ng; Zhang, Xinyuan; Rosania, Gus R.

    2011-01-01

    The systemic pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of small molecules are determined by subcellular transport phenomena. Although approaches used to study the subcellular distribution of small molecules have gradually evolved over the past several decades, experimental analysis and prediction of cellular pharmacokinetics remains a challenge. In this article, we surveyed the progress of subcellular distribution research since the 1960s, with a focus on the advantages, disadvantages and limitations of the various experimental techniques. Critical review of the existing body of knowledge pointed to many opportunities to advance the rational design of organelle-targeted chemical agents. These opportunities include: 1) development of quantitative, nonfluorescence-based, whole cell methods and techniques to measure the subcellular distribution of chemical agents in multiple compartments; 2) exploratory experimentation with nonspecific transport probes that have not been enriched with putative, organelle-targeting features; 3) elaboration of hypothesis-driven, mechanistic and modeling-based approaches to guide experiments aimed at elucidating subcellular distribution and transport; and 4) introduction of revolutionary conceptual approaches borrowed from the field of synthetic biology combined with cutting edge experimental strategies. In our laboratory, state-of-the-art subcellular transport studies are now being aimed at understanding the formation of new intracellular membrane structures in response to drug therapy, exploring the function of drug-membrane complexes as intracellular drug depots, and synthesizing new organelles with extraordinary physical and chemical properties. PMID:21805990

  17. Subcellular potassium and sodium distribution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and vacuolar mutants.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Rito; Álvarez, María C; Gelis, Samuel; Ramos, José

    2013-09-15

    Living cells accumulate potassium (K⁺) to fulfil multiple functions. It is well documented that the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows at very different concentrations of external alkali cations and keeps high and low intracellular concentrations of K⁺ and sodium (Na⁺) respectively. However less attention has been paid to the study of the intracellular distribution of these cations. The most widely used experimental approach, plasma membrane permeabilization, produces incomplete results, since it usually considers only cytoplasm and vacuoles as compartments where the cations are present in significant amounts. By isolating and analysing the main yeast organelles, we have determined the subcellular location of K⁺ and Na⁺ in S. cerevisiae. We show that while vacuoles accumulate most of the intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, the cytosol contains relatively low amounts, which is especially relevant in the case of Na⁺. However K⁺ concentrations in the cytosol are kept rather constant during the K⁺-starvation process and we conclude that, for that purpose, vacuolar K⁺ has to be rapidly mobilized. We also show that this intracellular distribution is altered in four different mutants with impaired vacuolar physiology. Finally, we show that both in wild-type and vacuolar mutants, nuclei contain and keep a relatively constant and important percentage of total intracellular K⁺ and Na⁺, which most probably is involved in the neutralization of negative charges.

  18. Relationship between subcellular cadmium distribution in prey and cadmium trophic transfer to a predator

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Lopez, G.R.

    1996-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that exposure-related alterations in the subcellular Cd distribution in prey relate to changes in Cd absorption by a predator. Oligochaete worms, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri were exposed for 1 wk or 6 wk to 0.5 ??g Cd l-1, 47 ??g l-1, or 140 ??g Cd l-1 (including 109Cd as a tracer) and relationship between oligochaete subcellular Cd distribution and Cd absorption by a predator, the grass shrimp (Palaemonetes pugio), were determined. Concentration and duration of Cd exposure had direct effects on oligochaete subcellular Cd distribution. Changes in oligochaete subcellular Cd distribution were characterized by increases in both the amount and proportion of Cd bound to the cytosolic fraction. The induction of Cd-binding proteins (e.g., metallothioneins) were suspected to be responsible for these changes. We found 1:1 relationships between the amount and percentage of Cd in oligochaete cytosol and the amount and percentage of Cd absorbed by shrimp. These results demonstrate that only metal bound to the soluble fraction of prey is available to higher trophic levels, and that factors influencing subcellular metal distribution in prey will directly alter metal trophic transfer to predators.

  19. Characteristic subcellular distribution, in brain, heart and lung, of biperiden, trihexyphenidyl, and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate in rats.

    PubMed

    Ishizaki, J; Yokogawa, K; Nakashima, E; Ohkuma, S; Ichimura, F

    1998-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of biperiden (BP), trihexyphenidyl (TP) and (-)-quinuclidinyl benzylate (QNB) in brain, heart and lung following high dose (3.2 mg/kg) i.v. administration was investigated in rats. The subcellular distribution of BP or TP used clinically conformed with that of QNB, a typical potent central muscarinic antagonist. The concentration-time courses of the brain subcellular fractions for these drugs were of two types which decreased slowly and in parallel to the plasma concentration. The subcellular distribution in the brain and heart was dependent on the protein amount of each fraction. The percent post-nuclear fraction (P2) of the total concentration in the lung was characteristically about 3-5 times larger than that in the heart. It was elucidated that the distribution in the lung differs from that in the brain and heart, with high affinity which is not dependent on the protein amount in the P2 fraction containing lysosomes. On the other hand, at a low dose (650 ng/kg) of 3H-QNB, each fraction as a percentage of the total concentration in the brain increased in synaptic membrane and synaptic vesicles and decreased in nuclei and cytosol as compared with the high dose. These results show that although the tissue concentration-time courses of anticholinergic drugs appear to decrease simply in parallel to plasma concentration, the subcellular distribution exhibits a variety of patterns among various tissues.

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Subcellular Distribution of the SUMO Conjugation System by Confocal Microscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Mas, Abraham; Amenós, Montse; Lois, L Maria

    2016-01-01

    Different studies point to an enrichment in SUMO conjugation in the cell nucleus, although non-nuclear SUMO targets also exist. In general, the study of subcellular localization of proteins is essential for understanding their function within a cell. Fluorescence microscopy is a powerful tool for studying subcellular protein partitioning in living cells, since fluorescent proteins can be fused to proteins of interest to determine their localization. Subcellular distribution of proteins can be influenced by binding to other biomolecules and by posttranslational modifications. Sometimes these changes affect only a portion of the protein pool or have a partial effect, and a quantitative evaluation of fluorescence images is required to identify protein redistribution among subcellular compartments. In order to obtain accurate data about the relative subcellular distribution of SUMO conjugation machinery members, and to identify the molecular determinants involved in their localization, we have applied quantitative confocal microscopy imaging. In this chapter, we will describe the fluorescent protein fusions used in these experiments, and how to measure, evaluate, and compare average fluorescence intensities in cellular compartments by image-based analysis. We show the distribution of some components of the Arabidopsis SUMOylation machinery in epidermal onion cells and how they change their distribution in the presence of interacting partners or even when its activity is affected. PMID:27424751

  1. Effects of extended growth periods on subcellular distribution, chemical forms, and the translocation of cadmium in Impatiens walleriana.

    PubMed

    Lai, Hung-Yu; Cai, Ming-Cyuan

    2016-01-01

    Impatiens walleriana plants accumulate sufficiently high concentrations of cadmium (Cd) for this species to be considered a potential Cd hyperaccumulator. Rooted cuttings were grown hydroponically for 25 and 50 days in solutions spiked with various Cd concentrations. The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in different organs were analyzed, and its upward translocation was also assessed. The plants accumulated large amounts of Cd; the Cd concentration in the roots and shoots reached 120-1900 and 60-1600 mg/kg, respectively. Regardless of the growth period, the Cd accumulated in the roots was primarily compartmentalized in the soluble fraction or ethanol and deionized water extractable chemical forms with high migration abilities. Translocation to the shoots was followed by an association of Cd mainly in the cell wall or with pectate and protein. The roots' Cd showed a high migration capacity for predicting the shoots' Cd concentrations. Different exposure periods significantly affected the subcellular distribution of Cd in the stems, and thus the upward translocation.

  2. How to unveil self-quenched fluorophores and subsequently map the subcellular distribution of exogenous peptides

    PubMed Central

    Swiecicki, Jean-Marie; Thiebaut, Frédéric; Di Pisa, Margherita; Gourdin -Bertin, Simon; Tailhades, Julien; Mansuy, Christelle; Burlina, Fabienne; Chwetzoff, Serge; Trugnan, Germain; Chassaing, Gérard; Lavielle, Solange

    2016-01-01

    Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) is the most popular technique for mapping the subcellular distribution of a fluorescent molecule and is widely used to investigate the penetration properties of exogenous macromolecules, such as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), within cells. Despite the membrane-association propensity of all these CPPs, the signal of the fluorescently labeled CPPs did not colocalize with the plasma membrane. We studied the origin of this fluorescence extinction and the overall consequence on the interpretation of intracellular localizations from CLSM pictures. We demonstrated that this discrepancy originated from fluorescence self-quenching. The fluorescence was unveiled by a “dilution” protocol, i.e. by varying the ratio fluorescent/non-fluorescent CPP. This strategy allowed us to rank with confidence the subcellular distribution of several CPPs, contributing to the elucidation of the penetration mechanism. More generally, this study proposes a broadly applicable and reliable method to study the subcellular distribution of any fluorescently labeled molecules. PMID:26839211

  3. Subcellular Localization and Speciation of Nickel in Hyperaccumulator and Non-Accumulator Thlaspi Species1

    PubMed Central

    Krämer, Ute; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Prince, Roger C.; Raskin, Ilya; Salt, David E.

    2000-01-01

    The ability of Thlaspi goesingense Hálácsy to hyperaccumulate Ni appears to be governed by its extraordinary degree of Ni tolerance. However, the physiological basis of this tolerance mechanism is unknown. We have investigated the role of vacuolar compartmentalization and chelation in this Ni tolerance. A direct comparison of Ni contents of vacuoles from leaves of T. goesingense and from the non-tolerant non-accumulator Thlaspi arvense L. showed that the hyperaccumulator accumulates approximately 2-fold more Ni in the vacuole than the non-accumulator under Ni exposure conditions that were non-toxic to both species. Using x-ray absorption spectroscopy we have been able to determine the likely identity of the compounds involved in chelating Ni within the leaf tissues of the hyperaccumulator and non-accumulator. This revealed that the majority of leaf Ni in the hyperaccumulator was associated with the cell wall, with the remaining Ni being associated with citrate and His, which we interpret as being localized primarily in the vacuolar and cytoplasm, respectively. This distribution of Ni was remarkably similar to that obtained by cell fractionation, supporting the hypothesis that in the hyperaccumulator, intracellular Ni is predominantly localized in the vacuole as a Ni-organic acid complex. PMID:10759531

  4. Canine submandibular-gland hyaluronidase. Identification and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Tan, Y H; Bowness, J M

    1968-11-01

    1. Submandibular glands from four species of mammal have been shown to contain a hyaluronidase active at acid pH; glands from dog and cat had a much higher content of this enzyme than has been found in other sources. 2. Product formation from hyaluronate after 24hr. incubation was almost the same as with testicular hyaluronidase, indicating that the enzyme is an endo-poly-beta-hexosaminidase. 3. When submandibular-gland homogenates were fractionated by the scheme developed for liver by de Duve, Pressman, Gianetto, Wattiaux & Appelmans (1955), all the enzymes assayed, except cytochrome c oxidase, were found to occur partly in the soluble fraction and partly in the particulate fractions. Among the particular fractions, the highest specific activity was found in the heavy-mitochondrial fraction for cytochrome c oxidase, in the microsomal fraction for alkaline phosphatase and in the light-mitochondrial fraction for acid phosphatase, beta-N-acetylhexosaminidase and acid-active hyaluronidase. 4. Release of the enzyme activity from the sedimentable fractions occurred in 0.1% Triton X-100 or after high-speed homogenization. 5. Stimulation of dogs by pilocarpine was found to decrease the hyaluronidase content of the submandibular gland by 5% and to cause the occurrence of a corresponding amount of acid-active hyaluronidase in the submandibular saliva. 6. The results are discussed in relation to the subcellular localization of hyaluronidase. PMID:4301907

  5. Cadmium sensitivity, uptake, subcellular distribution and thiol induction in a marine diatom: Recovery from cadmium exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng-Jiao; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-01-25

    Studies in the recovery from metal stress and the tolerance development to metal exposure of aquatic organisms are important for the understanding of epidemic pollution. In this study, the responses of a marine diatom, Thalassiosira nordenskioeldii, following recovery from environmental cadmium (Cd) stress were investigated. The diatoms were exposed to different concentrations of Cd for 7 days, and were then allowed different periods of time to recover. The Cd sensitivity increased after recovery from Cd stress, followed by a gradual restoration. The extent of restoration depended on both the recovery time and the environmental Cd stress during the exposure period. A complete restoration of Cd tolerance proved to be impossible for cells pre-exposed to High-Cd. The Cd cellular burden and subcellular Cd concentration decreased to the control level within the first day of recovery, indicating that the elevated sensitivity may have been due to the accumulation of functional damage caused by Cd exposure instead of a result of physical Cd accumulation. The rapid change in phytochelatins (PC) to both the increase in and the withdrawal of environmental Cd stress made it a good quantitative bioindicator of environmental Cd contamination. However, the relationships between Cd distribution in the metal sensitive fraction (MSF-Cd) or intracellular Cd to thiol ratio (intra-Cd/PC-SH) and the relative change in the median inhibition [Cd(2+)] ([Cd(2+)]-based-IC(50), i.e., Cd sensitivity) differed for the various exposure and recovery periods tested. Our study suggests that more attention should be given to the recovery of aquatic organisms from episodic metal exposure.

  6. The distribution, abundance and subcellular localization of kinesin

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    An antiserum which binds kinesin specifically on Western blots was used to determine the distribution and abundance of chicken kinesin by correlated immunoblotting and immunolocalization. Quantitative immunoblotting showed that the abundance of kinesin varied widely in different cell and tissue types, from 0.039% of total protein in epidermal fibroblasts to 0.309% in sympathetic neurons; of the types examined, only red blood cells lacked detectable kinesin. The molar ratio of tubulin/kinesin varied over a narrower range. To analyze the intracellular distribution of kinesin, cultured fibroblasts were fractionated by sequential extraction with saponin-, Triton X-100-, and SDS-containing buffer. Quantitative blotting of the resulting cell fractions indicated that 68% of fibroblast kinesin is in soluble form, 32% is membrane- or organelle-associated, and none is detectable in cytoskeletal fractions. To visualize this distribution, cells treated by the same extraction protocol were immunofluorescently stained with antikinesin and antitubulin. Without extraction, kinesin staining was located throughout cultured neurons and fibroblasts. However, when fibroblasts were extracted with saponin or Brij 58 before fixation, subsequent staining revealed that the remaining kinesin fraction was colocalized with interphase microtubules, but not with mitotic spindles. Prefixation extraction with Triton abolished antikinesin staining. These data suggest that kinesin may play a role in tubovesicular movement but provide no evidence for a role in mitosis. PMID:2525563

  7. Accumulation and sub-cellular partitioning of metals and As in the clam Venerupis corrugata: Different strategies towards different elements.

    PubMed

    Velez, Cátia; Figueira, Etelvina; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Freitas, Rosa

    2016-08-01

    The main goal of the present study was to assess accumulation, tolerance and sub-cellular partitioning of As, Hg, Cd and Pb in Venerupis corrugata. Results showed an increase of elements accumulation in V. corrugata with the increase of exposure. However, organisms presented higher capacity to accumulate Hg, Cd and Pb (BCF ≥ 12.8) than As (BCF ≤ 2.1) and higher accumulation rate for Cd and Pb than for Hg and As. With the increase of Hg exposure concentrations clams tended to increase the amount of metal bound to metal-sensitive fractions, which may explain the mortality recorded at the highest exposure concentration. Cd sub-cellular partitioning showed that with the increase of exposure concentrations V. corrugata increased the amount of metal in the cellular debris fraction, probably bound to the cellular membranes which explain the mortality recorded at the highest concentration. Results on As partitioning demonstrated that most of the metalloid was associated with fractions in the biologically detoxified metal compartment (BDM). Since high mortality was observed in clams exposed to As our results may indicate that this strategy was not enough to prevent clams from toxic effects and mortality occurred. When exposed to Pb most of the metal was in the BDM compartment, but in this case the metal was mostly in the metal-rich granules fraction which seemed to be efficient in preventing clams from toxicity, and no mortality was recorded. Our study further revealed that As and Hg were the most available elements to be biomagnified through the food chain. PMID:27174825

  8. Arsenic species uptake and subcellular distribution in Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara as influenced by aquatic pH.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guoliang; Liu, Xingmei; Xu, Jianming; Brookes, Philip C; Wu, Jianjun

    2014-04-01

    Vallisneria natans (Lour.) Hara, a widely distributed submerged aquatic plant, is a promising species for arsenic (As) removal from contaminated water. We investigated the effects of pH on the accumulation, subcellular distribution and detoxification of As in V. natans. The results showed that the optimum pH for submerged V. natans growth is close to 7.0. The accumulation of As in the plant increased with the increase of pH (p < 0.05). This may have been due to arsenic/phosphate transporters with a higher affinity for the more highly electronegative AsO4 (3-) than for HAsO4 (2-) and H2AsO4 (-). After As(V) was accumulated by plants, more than 80 % was reduced to As(III), but As reduction decreased with increased pH. The majority of accumulated As and reduced As(III) (47 %-66 %) was found in the vacuoles. Higher As concentrations in vacuoles could be considered as an important mechanism for As detoxification in submerged plants. PMID:24420344

  9. Subcellular distribution of jacalin in Artocarpus integrifolia seed.

    PubMed

    Majumder, M; Chatterjee, B P

    1996-01-01

    Seeds of Artocarpus integrifolia (jack fruit) contain large amounts of the anti-T lectin, jacalin. The mature seeds of jack fruit were homogenized in 0.25 M sucrose and separated by differential centrifugation into four fractions, viz wall, intermediate, and microsomal pellets and soluble supernatant. The lectin activity was associated with the wall pellet collected at low speed centrifugation. The other three fractions obtained by centrifugation at gradually higher speeds contained a similar lectin but of very low specific activity. The distribution pattern of jacalin remained unchanged in the presence of EDTA and/or Triton X-100 indicating that the lectin was not membrane bound. Immunofluorescent staining of jack fruit seeds showed that jacalin was localized in the cell wall in the intracellular space, which corroborated the results of fractionation studies. The possible relevance of these results to the function of lectin in the plant cell is discussed.

  10. Immunohistochemical distribution and electron microscopic subcellular localization of the proteasome in the rat CNS.

    PubMed

    Mengual, E; Arizti, P; Rodrigo, J; Giménez-Amaya, J M; Castaño, J G

    1996-10-15

    The proteasome multicatalytic proteinase (MCP) is a 20S complex that plays a major role in nonlysosomal pathways of intracellular protein degradation. A polyclonal antibody against rat liver MCP was used to investigate the distribution of MCP in the CNS of the rat and its subcellular localization within the neurons. As expected, MCP immunoreactivity (MCP-IR) was distributed ubiquitously in the rat CNS but not homogeneously. The most intensely stained neurons were the pyramidal cortical neurons of layer 5 and the motor neurons of the ventral horn in the spinal cord, which show an intense nuclear and cytoplasmatic MCP-IR and clearly stained processes. Additionally, some populations of large neurons in the mesencephalon and brainstem also displayed a moderate MCP-IR in their perikarya. The vast majority of neurons in the remaining structures did not show a strong cytoplasmatic MCP-IR, but their nuclei displayed an intense MCP-IR. The subcellular localization also was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. MCP-IR was intense in the neuronal nuclei, and significant staining also was found in the cytoplasm, dendritic, and axonic processes (including some myelinated axons) and in synaptic boutons, as illustrated in the cerebellar cortex. The distribution of MCP in the rat CNS and its subcellular localization are discussed in relation to (1) the distribution of calpain, the other major nonlysosomal cellular protease, and (2) the possible role of MCP in the degradation of regulatory proteins and key transcription factors that are essential in many neuronal responses.

  11. Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong tolerance mechanisms to Cadmium: subcellular distribution, chemical forms and thiol pools.

    PubMed

    Weng, Bosen; Xie, Xiangyu; Weiss, Dominik J; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Yan, Chongling

    2012-11-01

    In order to explore the detoxification mechanisms adopted by mangrove under cadmium (Cd) stress, we investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd, in addition to the change of the thiol pools in Kandelia obovata (S., L.) Yong, which were cultivated in sandy culture medium treated with sequential Cd solution. We found that Cd addition caused a proportional increase of Cd in the organs of K. obovata. The investigation of subcellular distribution verified that most of the Cd was localized in the cell wall, and the lowest was in the membrane. Results showed sodium chloride and acetic acid extractable Cd fractions were dominant. The contents of non-protein thiol compounds, Glutathione and phytochelatins in K. obovata were enhanced by the increasing strength of Cd treatment. Therefore, K. obovata can be defined as Cd tolerant plant, which base on cell wall compartmentalization, as well as protein and organic acids combination.

  12. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase of kidney. Subcellular distribution and response to acid–base changes

    PubMed Central

    Flores, H.; Alleyne, G. A. O.

    1971-01-01

    1. A method for the assay of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase is presented, based on the enzymic determination of the phosphoenolpyruvate produced by the enzyme reaction. 2. The subcellular distribution of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in the kidney of several animal species resembled the distribution in the liver. 3. The rise in enzyme activity in the kidney cortex of rats made acidotic by feeding with ammonium chloride was not prevented by administration of ethionine or actinomycin. 4. The possibility is suggested that in the kidney acidosis causes activation of an inactive form of the enzyme already present. PMID:5128664

  13. Subcellular targeting of bacterial CusF enhances Cu accumulation and alters root to shoot Cu translocation in arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Pengli; Yuan, Jinhong; Deng, Xin; Ma, Mi; Zhang, Haiyan

    2014-09-01

    Copper (Cu) is an important environmental pollutant that exerts harmful effects on all living organisms when in excess. In an effort to remove this toxin in situ, a bacterial Cu-binding protein gene CusF was engineered to target CusF for secretion to the cell wall and vacuoles and for accumulation in the cytoplasm. Analysis of transgenic Arabidopsis plants showed that CusF was functionally active and that plants expressing cell wall- (CusFcw transgenic lines) or vacuole-targeted CusF (CusFvac transgenic lines) were more resistant to Cu excess than untransformed plants and plants with cytoplasmic CusF (CusFcyto transgenic lines). Under short-term (48 h) exposure to Cu excess, CusFcw transgenic lines showed up to 2-fold increased Cu accumulation in roots compared with the untransformed plants; however, CusFcyto lines and the wild-type plants had similar Cu concentrations in both roots and shoots. Under long-term (40 d) exposure to Cu excess, all transgenic lines accumulated more Cu (up to 3-fold) in roots than the untransformed plants, whereas only CusFcyto lines showed a marked increase (∼3-fold of the wild-type plants) of Cu accumulation in shoots. In addition, expression of CusF in the cytosol dramatically enhanced Cu transport from roots to shoots when compared with plants with secretory pathway-targeted CusF. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of Cu tolerance and accumulation by engineering Cu-binding proteins targetable to subcellular compartments and provide new insights into the multifaceted mechanisms of Cu partitioning between roots and shoots.

  14. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; Weber, Peter K.; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L.; Chang, Christopher J.; Merchant, Sabeeha S.

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.

  15. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    DOE PAGES

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D.; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C.; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W.; Shirasaki, Dyna I.; Loo, Joseph A.; et al

    2014-10-26

    Here we identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labelingmore » demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply.« less

  16. Sub-cellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas

    PubMed Central

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-01-01

    We identified a Cu accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulated Cu, dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but was functionally Cu-deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. NanoSIMS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) was consistent with Cu+ accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu+ became bio-available for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mis-metallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein (re)-metallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  17. Subcellular metal imaging identifies dynamic sites of Cu accumulation in Chlamydomonas.

    PubMed

    Hong-Hermesdorf, Anne; Miethke, Marcus; Gallaher, Sean D; Kropat, Janette; Dodani, Sheel C; Chan, Jefferson; Barupala, Dulmini; Domaille, Dylan W; Shirasaki, Dyna I; Loo, Joseph A; Weber, Peter K; Pett-Ridge, Jennifer; Stemmler, Timothy L; Chang, Christopher J; Merchant, Sabeeha S

    2014-12-01

    We identified a Cu-accumulating structure with a dynamic role in intracellular Cu homeostasis. During Zn limitation, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii hyperaccumulates Cu, a process dependent on the nutritional Cu sensor CRR1, but it is functionally Cu deficient. Visualization of intracellular Cu revealed major Cu accumulation sites coincident with electron-dense structures that stained positive for low pH and polyphosphate, suggesting that they are lysosome-related organelles. Nano-secondary ion MS showed colocalization of Ca and Cu, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy was consistent with Cu(+) accumulation in an ordered structure. Zn resupply restored Cu homeostasis concomitant with reduced abundance of these structures. Cu isotope labeling demonstrated that sequestered Cu(+) became bioavailable for the synthesis of plastocyanin, and transcriptome profiling indicated that mobilized Cu became visible to CRR1. Cu trafficking to intracellular accumulation sites may be a strategy for preventing protein mismetallation during Zn deficiency and enabling efficient cuproprotein metallation or remetallation upon Zn resupply. PMID:25344811

  18. Influence of metal exposure history on the bioaccumulation and subcellular distribution of aqueous cadmium in the insect Hydropsyche californica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cain, D.J.; Buchwalter, D.B.; Luoma, S.N.

    2006-01-01

    The influence of metal exposure history on rates of aqueous Cd accumulation, elimination, and subcellular distribution was examined in the aquatic insect Hydropsyche californica. Specimens were obtained from a reference site and a metal-contaminated site and returned to the laboratory where they were continuously exposed to aqueous Cd (518 ng/L, nominal) for 6 d, followed by 9 d of depuration. Rates of Cd accumulation and elimination were similar in insects from the two sites. Efflux rate constants, ke, ranged from 0.20 to 0.24/d (t1/2 ??? 3 d). Immediately following exposure, the cytosol accounted for 40% of the body burden in insects from both sites; however, 89 ?? 2% of the cytosolic Cd was associated with metallothionein-like proteins (MTLP) in insects from the contaminated site, compared to 60 ?? 0% in insects from the reference site. The concentration of Cd bound to non-MTLPs (representing potentially Cd-sensitive proteins) was significantly greater in the insects from the reference site (134 ?? 7 ng/g) than in those from the contaminated site (42 ?? 2 ng/g). At the end of the depuration period, 90% of the accumulated Cd body burden had been eliminated, and Cd concentrations in MTLPs and non-MTLPs were similar between the sites. Results suggested that differences in exposure history had no influence on the bioaccumulation of Cd, but did affect the concentrations of Cd bound to MTLP during Cd exposure in these insects. ?? 2006 SETAC.

  19. Lipase genes in Mucor circinelloides: identification, sub-cellular location, phylogenetic analysis and expression profiling during growth and lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zan, Xinyi; Tang, Xin; Chu, Linfang; Zhao, Lina; Chen, Haiqin; Chen, Yong Q; Chen, Wei; Song, Yuanda

    2016-10-01

    Lipases or triacylglycerol hydrolases are widely spread in nature and are particularly common in the microbial world. The filamentous fungus Mucor circinelloides is a potential lipase producer, as it grows well in triacylglycerol-contained culture media. So far only one lipase from M. circinelloides has been characterized, while the majority of lipases remain unknown in this fungus. In the present study, 47 potential lipase genes in M. circinelloides WJ11 and 30 potential lipase genes in M. circinelloides CBS 277.49 were identified by extensive bioinformatics analysis. An overview of these lipases is presented, including several characteristics, sub-cellular location, phylogenetic analysis and expression profiling of the lipase genes during growth and lipid accumulation. All of these proteins contained the consensus sequence for a classical lipase (GXSXG motif) and were divided into four types including α/β-hydrolase_1, α/β-hydrolase_3, class_3 and GDSL lipase (GDSL) based on gene annotations. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that class_3 family and α/β-hydrolase_3 family were the conserved lipase family in M. circinelloides. Additionally, some lipases also contained a typical acyltransferase motif of H-(X) 4-D, and these lipases may play a dual role in lipid metabolism, catalyzing both lipid hydrolysis and transacylation reactions. The differential expression of all lipase genes were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR, and the expression profiling were analyzed to predict the possible biological roles of these lipase genes in lipid metabolism in M. circinelloides. We preliminarily hypothesized that lipases may be involved in triacylglycerol degradation, phospholipid synthesis and beta-oxidation. Moreover, the results of sub-cellular localization, the presence of signal peptide and transcriptional analyses of lipase genes indicated that four lipase in WJ11 most likely belong to extracellular lipases with a signal peptide. These findings provide a platform

  20. Influence of conversion of penicillin G into a basic derivative on its accumulation and subcellular localization in cultured macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Renard, C.; Vanderhaeghe, H.J.; Claes, P.J.; Zenebergh, A.; Tulkens, P.M.

    1987-03-01

    beta-Lactam antibiotics do not accumulate in phagocytes, probably because of their acidic character. We therefore synthesized a basic derivative of penicillin G, namely, /sup 14/C-labeled N-(3-dimethylamino-propyl)benzylpenicillinamide (ABP), and studied its uptake and subcellular localization in J774 macrophages compared with that of /sup 14/C-labeled penicillin G. Whereas the intracellular concentration (Ci) of penicillin G remained lower than its extracellular concentration (Ce), ABP reached a Ci/Ce ratio of 4 to 5. Moreover, approximately 50% of intracellular ABP was found associated with lysosomes after isopycnic centrifugation of cell homogenates in isoosmotic Percoll or hyperosmotic sucrose gradients. The behavior of ABP was thus partly consistent with the model of de Duve et al., in which they described the intralysosomal accumulation of weak organic bases in lysosomes. Although ABP is microbiologically inactive, our results show that beta-lactam antibiotics can be driven into cells by appropriate modification. Further efforts therefore may be warranted in the design of active compounds or prodrugs that may prove useful in the chemotherapy of intracellular infections.

  1. Mutational analysis of PVX TGBp3 links subcellular accumulation and protein turnover

    SciTech Connect

    Ju, H.-J.; Ye, C.-M.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2008-05-25

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp3 is required for virus cell-to-cell transport, has an N-terminal transmembrane domain, and a C-terminal cytosolic domain. In the absence of virus infection TGBp3:GFP is seen in the cortical and perinuclear ER. In PVX infected cells the TGBp3:GFP fusion is also seen in the nucleoplasm indicating that events during PVX infection trigger entry into the nucleus. Mutational analysis failed to identify a nuclear targeting domain. Mutations inhibiting TGBp3 association with the ER and inhibiting virus movement did not block TGBp3:GFP in the nucleoplasm. A mutation disrupting the N-terminal transmembrane domain of TGBp3 caused the fusion to accumulate in the nucleus indicating that nuclear import is regulated by ER interactions. Tunicamycin, an ER-stress inducing chemical, caused lower levels of GFP and TGBp3:GFP to accumulate in virus infected protoplasts. MG115 and MG132 were used to demonstrate that wild-type and mutant TGBp3:GFP fusions were degraded by the 26S proteasome. These observations are consistent with an ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) pathway suggesting that PVX TGBp3, similar to aberrant ER proteins, is translocate to the cytoplasm for degradation. Nuclear accumulation of mutant and wild-type TGBp3:GFP is independent of other PVX proteins and may be another feature of an ERAD pathway.

  2. High-Resolution Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Contrasting Subcellular Distribution of Arsenic and Silicon in Rice Roots1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Katie L.; Schröder, Markus; Wu, Zhongchang; Martin, Barry G.H.; Hawes, Chris R.; McGrath, Steve P.; Hawkesford, Malcolm J.; Feng Ma, Jian; Zhao, Fang-Jie; Grovenor, Chris R.M.

    2011-01-01

    Rice (Oryza sativa) takes up arsenite mainly through the silicic acid transport pathway. Understanding the uptake and sequestration of arsenic (As) into the rice plant is important for developing strategies to reduce As concentration in rice grain. In this study, the cellular and subcellular distributions of As and silicon (Si) in rice roots were investigated using high-pressure freezing, high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry, and transmission electron microscopy. Rice plants, both the lsi2 mutant lacking the Si/arsenite efflux transporter Lsi2 and its wild-type cultivar, with or without an iron plaque, were treated with arsenate or arsenite. The formation of iron plaque on the root surface resulted in strong accumulation of As and phosphorous on the epidermis. The lsi2 mutant showed stronger As accumulation in the endodermal vacuoles, where the Lsi2 transporter is located in the plasma membranes, than the wild-type line. As also accumulated in the vacuoles of some xylem parenchyma cells and in some pericycle cells, particularly in the wild-type mature root zone. Vacuolar accumulation of As is associated with sulfur, suggesting that As may be stored as arsenite-phytochelatin complexes. Si was localized in the cell walls of the endodermal cells with little apparent effect of the Lsi2 mutation on its distribution. This study reveals the vacuolar sequestration of As in rice roots and contrasting patterns of As and Si subcellular localization, despite both being transported across the plasma membranes by the same transporters. PMID:21490163

  3. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in a dark septate endophyte (DSE), Exophiala pisciphila.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Fangdong; He, Yongmei; Li, Yuan; Li, Tao; Yang, Yun-Ya; Toor, Gurpal S; Zhao, Zhiwei

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to understand the cadmium (Cd) tolerance mechanisms by investigating the subcellular distribution, chemical forms of Cd and adsorptive groups in the mycelia of Exophiala pisciphila. We grew E. pisciphila in the liquid media with increasing Cd concentrations (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 mg L(-1)). Increased Cd in the media caused a proportional increase in the Cd uptake by E. pisciphila. Subcellular distribution indicated that 81 to 97% of Cd was associated with the cell walls. The largest amount and proportion (45-86%) of Cd was extracted with 2% acetic acid, and a concentration-dependent extraction was observed, both of which suggest that Cd-phosphate complexes were the major chemical form in E. pisciphila. A large distribution of phosphate and Cd on the mycelia surface was observed by scanning electron microscopy-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS). The precipitates associated with the mycelia were observed to contain Cd by transmission electron microscopy-energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (TEM-EDX). Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) identified that hydroxyl, amine, carboxyl, and phosphate groups were responsible for binding Cd. We conclude that Cd associated with cell walls and integrated with phosphate might be responsible for the tolerance of E. pisciphila to Cd. PMID:26165995

  4. Nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-titanium dioxide exhibit different subcellular distribution and apoptotic profile in human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Fang, Wanru; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Chia, Sing Ling; Tan, Kai Soo; Hong, Catherine Hsu Ling; Leong, David Tai

    2014-05-14

    Nanomaterials (NMs) such as titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) are widely used in food, personal care, and many household products. Due to their extensive usage, the risk of human exposure is increased and may trigger NMs specific biological outcomes as the NMs interface with the cells. However, the interaction of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA with cells, their uptake and subcellular distribution, and the cytotoxic effects are poorly understood. Herein, we characterized and examined the cellular internalization, inflammatory response and cytotoxic effects of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA using TR146 human oral buccal epithelial cells as an in vitro model. We showed both types of NMs were able to bind to the cellular membrane and passage into the cells in a dose dependent manner. Strikingly, both types of NMs exhibited distinct subcellular distribution profile with nano-HA displaying a higher preference to accumulate near the cell membrane compared to nano-TiO2. Exposure to both types of NMs caused an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and expression of inflammatory transcripts with increasing NMs concentration. Although cells treated with nano-HA induces minimal apoptosis, nano-TiO2 treated samples displayed approximately 28% early apoptosis after 24 h of NMs exposure. We further showed that nano-TiO2 mediated cell death is independent of the classical p53-Bax apoptosis pathway. Our findings provided insights into the potential cellular fates of human oral epithelial cells as they interface with industrial grade nano-HA and nano-TiO2.

  5. Nano-hydroxyapatite and nano-titanium dioxide exhibit different subcellular distribution and apoptotic profile in human oral epithelium.

    PubMed

    Tay, Chor Yong; Fang, Wanru; Setyawati, Magdiel Inggrid; Chia, Sing Ling; Tan, Kai Soo; Hong, Catherine Hsu Ling; Leong, David Tai

    2014-05-14

    Nanomaterials (NMs) such as titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) and hydroxyapatite (nano-HA) are widely used in food, personal care, and many household products. Due to their extensive usage, the risk of human exposure is increased and may trigger NMs specific biological outcomes as the NMs interface with the cells. However, the interaction of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA with cells, their uptake and subcellular distribution, and the cytotoxic effects are poorly understood. Herein, we characterized and examined the cellular internalization, inflammatory response and cytotoxic effects of nano-TiO2 and nano-HA using TR146 human oral buccal epithelial cells as an in vitro model. We showed both types of NMs were able to bind to the cellular membrane and passage into the cells in a dose dependent manner. Strikingly, both types of NMs exhibited distinct subcellular distribution profile with nano-HA displaying a higher preference to accumulate near the cell membrane compared to nano-TiO2. Exposure to both types of NMs caused an elevated reactive oxygen species (ROS) level and expression of inflammatory transcripts with increasing NMs concentration. Although cells treated with nano-HA induces minimal apoptosis, nano-TiO2 treated samples displayed approximately 28% early apoptosis after 24 h of NMs exposure. We further showed that nano-TiO2 mediated cell death is independent of the classical p53-Bax apoptosis pathway. Our findings provided insights into the potential cellular fates of human oral epithelial cells as they interface with industrial grade nano-HA and nano-TiO2. PMID:24734929

  6. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice. PMID:27450963

  7. Do arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi affect cadmium uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice?

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Luo, Na; Zhang, Li Jun; Zhao, Hai Ming; Li, Yan Wen; Cai, Quan Ying; Wong, Ming Hung; Mo, Ce Hui

    2016-11-15

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.) plants were inoculated with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) - Rhizophagus intraradices (RI) and Funneliformis mosseae (FM) and grown for 60days to ensure strong colonization. Subsequently, a short-term hydroponic experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AMF on cadmium (Cd) uptake kinetics, subcellular distribution and chemical forms in rice exposed to six Cd levels (0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.025, 0.05, 0.1mM) for three days. The results showed that the uptake kinetics of Cd fitted the Michaelis-Menten model well (R(2)>0.89). AMF significantly decreased the Cd concentrations both in shoots and roots in Cd solutions. Furthermore, the decrement of Cd concentrations by FM was significantly higher than RI treatment in roots. AMF reduced the Cd concentrations markedly in the cell wall fractions at high Cd substrate (≥0.025mM). The main subcellular fraction contributed to Cd detoxification was cell wall at low Cd substrate (<0.05mM), while vacuoles at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM). Moreover, the concentrations and proportions of Cd in inorganic and water-soluble form also reduced by AMF colonization at high Cd substrate (≥0.05mM), both in shoots and roots. This suggested that AMF could convert Cd into inactive forms which were less toxic. Therefore, AMF could enhance rice resistance to Cd through altering subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in rice.

  8. Altered accumulation and subcellular disposition of testicular cadmium in inbred mice resistant to cadmium-induced testicular necrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Chellman, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Rodent testis is one of the most sensitive mammalian tissues to the toxic effects of acutely administered Cd. However, numerous inbred mouse strains are resistant to Cd-induced testicular damage, even at lethal Cd doses; the mechanism of this resistance has not been determined. Therefore, testes of mice susceptible (129/J) or resistant (A/J) to Cd-induced damage were examined for possible differences in the accumulation and subcellular disposition of Cd. Twenty-four hours after subcutaneous injection of mice with 30 ..mu..moles CdCl/sub 2//kg, 129/J testes showed extensive interstitial hemorrhage and seminiferous tubule necrosis, while A/J testes appeared histologically normal. Testicular Cd accumulation was 5-6 times less in A/J mice than in 129/J mice at all time points examined. Chromatography of testicular cytosol on Sephadex G-75 Superfine revealed four Cd-binding peaks. Both 15 min and 6 hr after dosing, A/J testes had 14% more of the total tissue Cd bound to the 14,500 MW protein (Cd-BP III), compared to 129/J testes, Cd-BP III behaved like metallothionein during gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography. Additional mice were injected i.v. with 10 (129/J) or 45 (A/J) ..mu..moles CdCl/sub 2//kg to achieve equal testicular Cd concentrations (approx. 4 nmoles Cd/g testis). Twenty-four hours later, 129/J testes were necrotic while A/J testes showed no microscopic evidence of damage. Therefore, resistance of A/J testes to Cd is not determined solely by decreased Cd accumulation, but is associated with increased binding of testicular Cd to Cd-BP III.

  9. Differential subcellular distribution of rat brain dopamine receptors and subtype-specific redistribution induced by cocaine

    PubMed Central

    Voulalas, Pamela J.; Schetz, John; Undieh, Ashiwel S.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the subcellular distribution of dopamine D1, D2 and D5 receptor subtypes in rat frontal cortex, and examined whether psychostimulant-induced elevation of synaptic dopamine could alter the receptor distribution. Differential detergent solubilization and density gradient centrifugation were used to separate various subcellular fractions, followed by semi-quantitative determination of the relative abundance of specific receptor proteins in each fraction. D1 receptors were predominantly localized to detergent-resistant membranes, and a portion of these receptors also floated on sucrose gradients. These properties are characteristic of proteins found in lipid rafts and caveolae. D2 receptors exhibited variable distribution between cytoplasmic, detergent-soluble and detergent-resistant membrane fractions, yet were not present in buoyant membranes. Most D5 receptor immunoreactivity was distributed into the cytoplasmic fraction, failing to sediment at forces up to 300,000g, while the remainder was localized to detergent-soluble membranes in cortex. D5 receptors were undetectable in detergent-resistant fractions or raft-like subdomains. Following daily cocaine administration for seven days, a significant portion of D1 receptors translocated from detergent-resistant membranes to detergent-soluble membranes and the cytoplasmic fraction. The distributions of D5 and D2 receptor subtypes were not significantly altered by cocaine treatment. These data imply that D5 receptors are predominantly cytoplasmic, D2 receptors are diffusely distributed within the cell, whereas D1 receptors are mostly localized to lipid rafts within the rat frontal cortex. Dopamine receptor subtype localization is susceptible to modulation by pharmacological manipulations that elevate synaptic dopamine, however the functional implications of such drug-induced receptor warrant further investigation. PMID:21236347

  10. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  11. Mating changes the subcellular distribution and the functionality of estrogen receptors in the rat oviduct

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Mating changes the mode of action of 17beta-estradiol (E2) to accelerate oviductal egg transport from a nongenomic to a genomic mode, although in both pathways estrogen receptors (ER) are required. This change was designated as intracellular path shifting (IPS). Methods Herein, we examined the subcellular distribution of ESR1 and ESR2 (formerly known as ER-alpha and ER-beta) in oviductal epithelial cells of rats on day 1 of cycle (C1) or pregnancy (P1) using immunoelectron microscopy for ESR1 and ESR2. The effect of mating on intraoviductal ESR1 or ESR2 signaling was then explored comparing the expression of E2-target genes c-fos, brain creatine kinase (Ckb) and calbindin 9 kDa (s100g) in rats on C1 or P1 treated with selective agonists for ESR1 (PPT) or ESR2 (DPN). The effect of ER agonists on egg transport was also evaluated on C1 or P1 rats. Results Receptor immunoreactivity was associated with the nucleus, cytoplasm and plasma membrane of the epithelial cells. Mating affected the subcellular distribution of both receptors as well as the response to E2. In C1 and P1 rats, PPT increased Ckb while both agonists increased c-fos. DPN increased Ckb and s100g only in C1 and P1 rats, respectively. PPT accelerated egg transport in both groups and DPN accelerated egg transport only in C1 rats. Conclusion Estrogen receptors present a subcellular distribution compatible with E2 genomic and nongenomic signaling in the oviductal epithelial cells of C1 and P1 although IPS occurs independently of changes in the distribution of ESR1 and ESR2 in the oviductal epithelial cells. Mating affected intraoviductal ER-signaling and induced loss of functional involvement of ESR2 on E2-induced accelerated egg transport. These findings reveal a profound influence on the ER signaling pathways exerted by mating in the oviduct. PMID:19948032

  12. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in Phytolacca americana L.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoping; Dou, Changming; Chen, Yingxu; Chen, Xincai; Shi, Jiyan; Yu, Mingge; Xu, Jie

    2011-02-15

    Phytolacca americana L. (pokeweed) is a promising species for Cd phytoextraction with large biomass and fast growth rate. To further understand the mechanisms involved in Cd tolerance and detoxification, the present study investigated subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd in pokeweed. Subcellular fractionation of Cd-containing tissues indicated that both in root and leaves, the majority of the element was located in soluble fraction and cell walls. Meanwhile, Cd taken up by pokeweed existed in different chemical forms. Results showed that the greatest amount of Cd was found in the extraction of 80% ethanol in roots, followed by 1 M NaCl, d-H(2)O and 2% HAc, while in leaves and stems, most of the Cd was extracted by 1 M NaCl, and the subdominant amount of Cd was extracted by 80% ethanol. It could be suggested that Cd compartmentation with organo-ligands in vacuole or integrated with pectates and proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the adaptation of pokeweed to Cd stress.

  13. Unveiling the mechanism of uptake and sub-cellular distribution of cerium oxide nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Karakoti, Ajay; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been recently studied for their potent superoxide scavenging properties in both cell and animal model systems. Data from these model systems have shown that exposure of cells to CNPs results in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite these exciting findings, very little is known regarding the uptake or subcellular distribution of these nanomaterials inside cells. In this study we utilized fluorophore (carboxyfluorescein) conjugated cerium oxide NPs (CCNPs) to study the mechanism of uptake and to elucidate the subcellular localization of CNPs using a keratinocyte model system. We observed rapid uptake (within 3 h) of CCNPs that was governed by energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways. We found CCNPs co-localized with mitochondria, lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum as well as being abundant in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Given the radical scavenging properties of cerium oxide and the widespread cellular disposition we observed, CNPs likely act as cellular antioxidants in multiple compartments of the cell imparting protection against a variety of oxidant injuries. PMID:20697616

  14. Subcellular distribution of small interfering RNA: directed delivery through RNA polymerase III expression cassettes and localization by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Paul, Cynthia P

    2005-01-01

    Reduction in the expression of specific genes through small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is dependent on the colocalization of siRNAs with other components of the RNA interference (RNAi) pathways within the cell. The expression of siRNAs within cells from cassettes that are derived from genes transcribed by RNA polymerase III (pol III) and provide for selective subcellular distribution of their products can be used to direct siRNAs to the cellular pathways. Expression from the human U6 promoter, resulting in siRNA accumulation in the nucleus, is effective in reducing gene expression, whereas cytoplasmic and nucleolar localization of the siRNA when expressed from the 5S or 7 SL promoters is not effective. The distribution of siRNA within the cell is determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Although the long uninterrupted duplex of siRNA makes it difficult to detect with DNA oligonucleotide probes, labeled oligonucleotide probes with 2'-O-methyl RNA backbones provide the stability needed for a strong signal. These methods contribute to studies of the interconnected cellular RNAi pathways and are useful in adapting RNAi as a tool to determine gene function and develop RNA-based therapeutics. PMID:15644179

  15. Subcellular distribution and uptake mechanism of di-n-butyl phthalate in roots of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Lin, Qingqi; Yang, Xiuhong; Huang, Xiongfei; Wang, Shizhong; Chao, Yuanqing; Qiu, Rongliang

    2016-01-01

    Phthalate acid esters (PAEs) are of particular concern due to their potential environmental risk to human and nonhuman organisms. Although uptake of PAEs by plants has been reported by several researchers, information about the intracellular distribution and uptake mechanisms of PAEs is still lacking. In this study, a series of hydroponic experiments using intact pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata) seedlings was conducted to investigate how di-n-butyl phthalate (DnBP), one of the most frequently identified PAEs in the environment, enters and is distributed in roots. DnBP was transported into subcellular tissues rapidly in the initial uptake period (<12 h). More than 80% of DnBP was detected in the cell walls and organelles, which suggests that DnBP is primarily accumulated in these two fractions due to their high affinity to DnBP. The kinetics of DnBP uptake were fitted well with the Michaelis-Menten equation, suggesting that a carrier-mediated process was involved. The application of 2,4-dinitrophenol and sodium vanadate reduced the uptake of DnBP by 37 and 26%, respectively, while aquaporin inhibitors, silver and glycerol, had no effect on DnBP uptake. These data demonstrated that the uptake of DnBP included a carrier-mediated and energy-dependent process without the participation of aquaporins.

  16. Changes in subcellular elemental distributions accompanying the acrosome reaction in sea urchin sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Cantino, M.E.; Schackmann, R.W.; Johnson, D.E.

    1983-05-01

    Energy-dispersive x-ray microanalysis was used to analyze changes in the subcellular distributions of Na, Mg, P, S, Cl, K, and Ca associated with the acrosome reaction of sea urchin sperm. Within 5 sec after induction of the acrosome reaction, nuclear Na and mitochondrial Ca increased and nuclear and mitochondrial K decreased. Uptake of mitochondrial P was detected after several minutes, and increases in nuclear Mg were detected only after 5-10 min of incubation following induction of the reaction. The results suggest that sudden permeability changes in the sperm plasma membrane are associated with the acrosome reaction, but that complete breakdown of membrane and cell function does not occur for several minutes.

  17. Subcellular distribution of technetium-99m-N-NOEt in rat myocardium

    SciTech Connect

    Uccelli, L.; Giganti, M.; Duatti, A. ||

    1995-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the subcellular distribution of bis(N-ethoxy N-ethyl)dithiocarbamato, nitrido technetium(V) ({sup 99m}TcN-NOEt) in rat heart by differential centrifugation techniques. Extraction of the activity from homogenized rat heart tissue was also performed to assess whether myocardial retention might induce changes in the chemical identity of the complex. Anesthetized rats were intravenously injected with {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt, the heart tissue was extracted and homogenized and tissue fractions were obtained by differential centrifugation. The efficiency of organelle separation was determined by assay of each centrifugal fraction using enzyme markers. Lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), acid phosphatase (ACP), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and 5{prime}-nucleotidase (5{prime}ND) activities were assayed using standard spectrophotometric methods. Succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) activity was determined using a p-iodo-nitrotetrazolium-linked assay. Severe cell membrane and organelle disruption were induced by prolonging the homogenization time and their effect on the subcellular distribution of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt was studied. The activity from homogenized heart tissue was extracted using the Folch technique and analyzed by TLC and HPLC. Most of the {sup 99}TcN-NOEt activity was found to be associated with the hydrophobic components of the cell. No evidence of specific association of activity with the cytosolic and mitochondrial components was observed. Organelle and membrane cleavage did not cause release of activity into the cytosol. Approximately 90% of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt activity was extracted from ventricular tissue and the chemical nature of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt was not altered by uptake by myocardium. Cell membranes are the most apparent site of localization of {sup 99m}TcN-NOEt in heart tissue. 21 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Lead tolerance mechanism in Conyza canadensis: subcellular distribution, ultrastructure, antioxidative defense system, and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Luo, Jiewen; Hou, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-03-01

    We used hydroponic experiments to examine the effects of different concentrations of lead (Pb) on the performance of the Pb-tolerable plant Conyza canadensis. In these experiments, most of the Pb was accumulated in the roots; there was very little Pb accumulated in stems and leaves. C. canadensis is able to take up significant amounts of Pb whilst greatly restricting its transportation to specific parts of the aboveground biomass. High Pb concentrations inhibited plant growth, increased membrane permeability, elevated antioxidant enzyme activity in roots, and caused a significant increase in root H2O2 and malondialdehyde content. Analysis of Pb content at the subcellular level showed that most Pb was associated with the cell wall fraction, followed by the nucleus-rich fraction, and with a minority present in the mitochondrial and soluble fractions. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis of root cells revealed that the cell wall and intercellular space in C. canadensis roots are the main locations of Pb accumulation. Additionally, high Pb concentrations adversely affected the cellular structure of C. canadensis roots. The increased enzyme activity suggests that the antioxidant system may play an important role in eliminating or alleviating Pb toxicity in C. canadensis roots. However, the levels of non-protein sulfhydryl compounds, glutathione, and phytochelatin did not significantly change in either the roots or leaves under Pb-contaminated treatments. Our results provide strong evidence that cell walls restrict Pb uptake into the root and act as an important barrier protecting root cells, while demonstrating that antioxidant enzyme levels are correlated with Pb exposure. These findings demonstrate the roles played by these detoxification mechanisms in supporting Pb tolerance in C. canadensis. PMID:26733305

  19. Lead tolerance mechanism in Conyza canadensis: subcellular distribution, ultrastructure, antioxidative defense system, and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Zhou, Chuifan; Huang, Meiying; Luo, Jiewen; Hou, Xiaolong; Wu, Pengfei; Ma, Xiangqing

    2016-03-01

    We used hydroponic experiments to examine the effects of different concentrations of lead (Pb) on the performance of the Pb-tolerable plant Conyza canadensis. In these experiments, most of the Pb was accumulated in the roots; there was very little Pb accumulated in stems and leaves. C. canadensis is able to take up significant amounts of Pb whilst greatly restricting its transportation to specific parts of the aboveground biomass. High Pb concentrations inhibited plant growth, increased membrane permeability, elevated antioxidant enzyme activity in roots, and caused a significant increase in root H2O2 and malondialdehyde content. Analysis of Pb content at the subcellular level showed that most Pb was associated with the cell wall fraction, followed by the nucleus-rich fraction, and with a minority present in the mitochondrial and soluble fractions. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis of root cells revealed that the cell wall and intercellular space in C. canadensis roots are the main locations of Pb accumulation. Additionally, high Pb concentrations adversely affected the cellular structure of C. canadensis roots. The increased enzyme activity suggests that the antioxidant system may play an important role in eliminating or alleviating Pb toxicity in C. canadensis roots. However, the levels of non-protein sulfhydryl compounds, glutathione, and phytochelatin did not significantly change in either the roots or leaves under Pb-contaminated treatments. Our results provide strong evidence that cell walls restrict Pb uptake into the root and act as an important barrier protecting root cells, while demonstrating that antioxidant enzyme levels are correlated with Pb exposure. These findings demonstrate the roles played by these detoxification mechanisms in supporting Pb tolerance in C. canadensis.

  20. Immunocytochemical analysis of the subcellular distribution of ferritin in Imperata cylindrica (L.) Raeuschel, an iron hyperaccumulator plant.

    PubMed

    de la Fuente, Vicenta; Rodríguez, Nuria; Amils, Ricardo

    2012-05-01

    Ferritin is of interest at the structural and functional level not only as storage for iron, a critical element, but also as a means to prevent cell damage produced by oxidative stress. The main objective of this work was to confirm by immunocytochemistry the presence and the subcellular distribution of the ferritin detected by Mösbauer spectroscopy in Imperata cylindrica, a plant which accumulates large amounts of iron. The localization of ferritin was performed in epidermal, parenchymal and vascular tissues of shoots and leaves of I. cylindrica. The highest density of immunolabeling in shoots appeared in the intracellular space of cell tissues, near the cell walls and in the cytoplasm. In leaves, ferritin was detected in the proximity of the dense network of the middle lamella of cell walls, following a similar path to that observed in shoots. Immunolabeling was also localized in chloroplasts. The abundance of immunogold labelling in mitochondria for I. cylindrica was rather low, probably because the study dealt with tissues from old plants. These results further expand the localization of ferritin in cell components other than chloroplasts and mitochondria in plants. PMID:21764425

  1. CHARACTERIZATION OF AMINOPEPTIDASE IN THE FREE-LIVING NEMATODE PANAGRELLUS REDIVIVUS: SUBCELLULAR DISTRIBUTION AND POSSIBLE ROLE IN NEUROPEPTIDE METABOLISM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aminopeptidase was detected in homogenates of the free-living nematode Panagrellus redivivus with the aminoacyl substrate L-alanine-4-nitroanilide (Ala-4-NA). Subcellular distribution of the enzyme was unequal, with approximately 80 percent of total aminopeptidase in the soluble fraction and the rem...

  2. Subcellular distribution of folate and folate binding protein in renal proximal tubules

    SciTech Connect

    Sharkey, C.; Hjelle, J.T.; Selhub, J.

    1986-03-01

    High affinity folate binding protein (FBP) found in brush border membranes derived from renal cortices is thought to be involved in the renal conservation of folate. To examine the mechanisms of folate recovery, the subcellular distribution of FBP and /sup 3/H-folate in rabbit renal proximal tubules (PT) was examined using analytical cell fractionation techniques. Tubules contain 3.41 +/- 0.32 picomoles FBP/mg protein (X +/- S.D.; n = 5). Postnuclear supernates (PNS) of PT were layered atop Percoll-sucrose gradients, centrifuged, fractions collected and assayed for various marker enzymes and FBP. Pooled fractions from such gradients were subsequently treated with digitonin and centrifuged in a stoichiometric manner with the activity of the microvillar enzyme, alanylaminopeptidase (AAP); excess FBP distributed with more buoyant particles. Infusion of /sup 3/H-folate into rabbit kidneys followed by tubule isolation and fractionation revealed a time dependent shift in distribution of radiolabel from the AAP-rich gradient fractions to a region containing more buoyant particles; radiolevel was not associated with lysosomal markers. EM-radioautography revealed grains over intracellular vesicles. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that folate is recovered by a process involving receptor-mediated endocytosis or transcytosis.

  3. Silicon modifies root anatomy, and uptake and subcellular distribution of cadmium in young maize plants

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Landberg, Tommy; Greger, Maria; Luxová, Miroslava; Stoláriková, Miroslava; Lux, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Silicon (Si) has been shown to ameliorate the negative influence of cadmium (Cd) on plant growth and development. However, the mechanism of this phenomenon is not fully understood. Here we describe the effect of Si on growth, and uptake and subcellular distribution of Cd in maize plants in relation to the development of root tissues. Methods Young maize plants (Zea mays) were cultivated for 10 d hydroponically with 5 or 50 µm Cd and/or 5 mm Si. Growth parameters and the concentrations of Cd and Si were determined in root and shoot by atomic absorption spectrometry or inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. The development of apoplasmic barriers (Casparian bands and suberin lamellae) and vascular tissues in roots were analysed, and the influence of Si on apoplasmic and symplasmic distribution of 109Cd applied at 34 nm was investigated between root and shoot. Key Results Si stimulated the growth of young maize plants exposed to Cd and influenced the development of Casparian bands and suberin lamellae as well as vascular tissues in root. Si did not affect the distribution of apoplasmic and symplasmic Cd in maize roots, but considerably decreased symplasmic and increased apoplasmic concentration of Cd in maize shoots. Conclusions Differences in Cd uptake of roots and shoots are probably related to the development of apoplasmic barriers and maturation of vascular tissues in roots. Alleviation of Cd toxicity by Si might be attributed to enhanced binding of Cd to the apoplasmic fraction in maize shoots. PMID:22455991

  4. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-1A - Accumulation distributions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years... or accumulated income of the trust. Nor will an accumulation distribution be deemed to have been made... during minority. A distribution of income accumulated during the minority of the beneficiary is...

  5. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of thorium in Brassica juncea var. foliosa.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Sai; Kai, Hailu; Zha, Zhongyong; Fang, Zhendong; Wang, Dingna; Du, Liang; Zhang, Dong; Feng, Xiaojie; Jin, Yongdong; Xia, Chuanqin

    2016-06-01

    Brassica juncea var. foliosa (B. juncea var. foliosa) is a promising species for thorium (Th) phytoextraction due to its large biomass, fast growth rate and high tolerance toward Th. To further understand the mechanisms of Th tolerance, the present study investigated the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Th found in B. juncea var. foliosa Our results indicated that in both roots and leaves, Th contents in different parts of the cells follow the order of cell wall > membranes and soluble fraction > organelles. In particular, Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) analysis showed that Th was abundantly located in cell walls of the roots. Additionally, when plants were exposed to different concentrations of Th, we have found that Th existed in B. juncea var. foliosa with different chemical forms. Much of the Th extracted by 2% acetic acid (HAc), 1 M NaCl and HCl in roots with the percentage distribution varied from 47.2% to 62.5%, while in leaves, most of the Th was in the form of residue and the subdominant amount of Th was extracted by HCl, followed by 2% HAc. This suggested that Th compartmentation in cytosol and integration with phosphate or proteins in cell wall might be responsible for the tolerance of B. juncea var. foliosa to the stress of Th. PMID:27010411

  6. MRI investigation of subcellular water compartmentalization and gas distribution in apples.

    PubMed

    Winisdorffer, Guillaume; Musse, Maja; Quellec, Stéphane; Devaux, Marie-Françoise; Lahaye, Marc; Mariette, François

    2015-06-01

    Water status and distribution at subcellular level in whole apple fruit were evaluated by Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) measurement of the multi-exponential transverse (T2) relaxation of water protons. Apparent microporosity, also estimated by MRI, provided mapping of gas distribution in fruit tissues. Measuring for the first time the multi-exponential relaxation of water and apparent tissue microporosity in whole fruit and combining these with histological measurements provided a more reliable interpretation of the origins of variations in the transverse relaxation time (T2) and better characterization of the fruit tissue. Measurements were performed on 54 fruits from 3 different cultivars. Fruits of different sizes were selected for each cultivar to provide tissues with cells of different dimensions. Macrovision measurements were carried out on parenchymal tissue from all fruits to investigate the impact of cell size on T2 value. The results showed that the MRI transverse relaxation signal is well fitted by a tri-exponential decay curve that reflects cell compartmentalization. Variations in cell size partially explained the different T2 observed. This study highlighted the heterogeneity of apple tissues in terms of relaxation parameters, apparent microporosity and cell morphology and in relation to specific variations between fruit of different cultivars.

  7. Intracellular pH governs the subcellular distribution of hexokinase in a glioma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Miccoli, L; Oudard, S; Sureau, F; Poirson, F; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M F

    1996-01-01

    Hexokinase plays a key role in regulating cell energy metabolism. Hexokinase is mainly particulate, bound to the mitochondrial outer membrane in brain and tumour cells. We hypothesized that the intracellular pH (pH1) controls the intracellular distribution of hexokinase. Using the SNB-19 glioma cell line, pH1 variations were imposed by incubating cells in a high-K+ medium at different pH values containing specific ionophores (nigericin and valinomycin), without affecting cell viability. Subcellular fractions of cell homogenates were analysed for hexokinase activity. Imposed pH1 changes were verified microspectrofluorimetrically by using the pH1-sensitive probe SNARF-1-AM (seminaphtho-rhodafluor-1-acetoxymethyl ester). Imposition of an acidic pH1 for 30 min strongly decreased the particulate/total hexokinase ratio, from 63% in the control sample to 31%. Conversely, when a basic pH1, was imposed, the particulate/total hexokinase ratio increased to 80%. The glycolytic parameters, namely lactate/pyruvate ratio, glucose 6-phosphate and ATP levels, were measured concomitantly. Lactate/pyruvate ratio and ATP level were both markedly decreased by acidic pH1 and increased by basic pH1. Conversely, the glucose 6-phosphate level was increased by acidic pH1 and decreased by basic pH1. To demonstrate that the change of hexokinase distribution was not due to altered metabolite levels of glycolysis, a pH1 was imposed for a 5 min incubation time. Modification of the hexokinase distribution was similar to that noted after a 30 min incubation, whereas metabolite levels of glycolysis were not affected. These results provide evidence that the intracellular distribution of hexokinase is highly sensitive to variations of the pH1, and regulates hexokinase activity. PMID:8611181

  8. Acid phosphatases of the rat epididymis. II. Biochemical characteristics, subcellular distribution and histochemical localization.

    PubMed

    Nikkanen, V; Vanha-Perttula, T

    1977-01-01

    After separation of three epididymal acid phosphatases their biochemical properties were differently studied. With appropriate substrate and inhibitor selection the distribution of the enzymes in different segments as well as the subcellular fractions of the rat epididymis was also demonstrated. The same biochemical differences were also utilized in the histochemical localization of the enzymes. It was found that Enzyme I had a pH-optimum at 5.0, a molecular weight of 97 000 and Km-constant of 0.901 mM. It was highly sensitive to tartrate and fluoride and it was localized in lysosomes as well as in the epididymal spermatozoa. Enzyme II had an optimum at pH 5.7, a molecular weight of 67 000 and Km-constant of 0.806 mM. It was also inhibited by fluoride but more resistant to tartrate. Its subcellular site was also particulate, but it was also found in the epididymal fluid. Enzyme III had an optimum at pH 5.2, a molecular weight of 135 000 and Km-constant of 0.685 m. It was resistant to low concentrations of fluoride and tartrate but sensitive to heavy metal ions. The enzyme was soluble and it behaved incoherently in thermal inactivation. All enzymes revealed the highest activity in the thin middle segments of the epididymis. Histochemical naphthol substrates gave a diffuse reaction in the epididymal epithelial cells. With the lead salt methods glycerophosphates and p-nitrophenylphosphate gave somewhat different results depending on their specificity as substrates for the epididymal enzymes. Both substrates gave a strong reaction supranuclearly in the Golgi area of the chief cells. This activity was inhibited by tartrate and was most probably due to Enzyme I. The epididymal corpus and cauda showed additionally a very strong apical activity in the chief cells with p-nitrophenylphosphate. This activity was resitant to tartrate but sensitive to fluoride. It was concluded that this enzyme represents Enzyme II activity. Similar activity was also found in the dissolving

  9. Subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanfang; Wu, Jifa; Shang, Derong; Ning, Jinsong; Zhai, Yuxiu; Sheng, Xiaofeng; Ding, Haiyan

    2015-02-01

    The subcellular distribution and chemical forms of Cd were investigated in the edible seaweed, Porphyra yezoensis. The seaweed was exposed to different Cd concentrations (0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, 1.0 and 5.0mgl(-1)) for up to 96h. In both the controls (no Cd added) and treatment groups, 41.2-79.2% of Cd was localised in the cell wall, and the proportion of Cd in the cell wall increased with increasing concentrations of Cd and exposure time. In the control groups, 74.8% of Cd was extracted by 1M NaCl, followed by 2% acetic acid, HAC (18.9%). In the treatment groups, most Cd was extracted by 2% HAC. The proportion of Cd extracted by 2% HAC increased with exposure to increasing concentrations of Cd and over time. Cell wall deposition and forming of precipitates with phosphate may be a key strategy to reduce Cd toxicity in P. yezoensis.

  10. Subcellular distribution of uranium in the roots of Spirodela punctata and surface interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Xiaoqin; Dong, Faqin; Liu, Ning; Liu, Mingxue; Zhang, Dong; Kang, Wu; Sun, Shiyong; Zhang, Wei; Yang, Jie

    2015-08-01

    The subcellular distribution of uranium in roots of Spirodela punctata (duckweed) and the process of surface interaction were studied upon exposure to U (0, 5-200 mg/L) at pH 5. The concentration of uranium in each subcelluar fraction increased significantly with increasing solution U level, after 200 mg/L uranium solution treatment 120 h, the proportion of uranium concentration approximate as 8:2:1 in the cell wall organelle and cytosol fractions of roots of S. punctata. OM SEM and EDS showed after 5-200 mg/L U treatment 4-24 h, some intracellular fluid released from the root cells, after 100 mg/L U treatment 48 h, the particles including 35% Fe (wt%) and other organic matters such as EPS released from the cells, most of the uranium bound onto the root surface and contacted with phosphorus ligands and formed as nano-scales U-P lamellar crystal, similar crystal has been found in the cell wall and organelle fractions after 50 mg/L U treatment 120 h. FTIR and XPS analyses result indicates the uranium changed the band position and shapes of phosphate group, and the region of characteristic peak belongs to U(VI) and U(IV) were also observed.

  11. Changing pattern of the subcellular distribution of erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) during macrophage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Soni, Shivani; Bala, Shashi; Kumar, Ajay; Hanspal, Manjit

    2007-01-01

    Erythroblast macrophage protein (Emp) mediates the attachment of erythroid cells to macrophages and is required for normal differentiation of both cell lineages. In erythroid cells, Emp is believed to be involved in nuclear extrusion, however, its role in macrophage differentiation is unknown. Information on the changes in the expression level and subcellular distribution of Emp in differentiating macrophages is essential for understanding the function of Emp. Macrophages of varying maturity were examined by immunofluorescence microscopy and biochemical methods. Our data show that Emp is expressed in all stages of maturation, but its localization pattern changes dramatically during maturation: in immature macrophages, a substantial fraction of Emp is associated with the nuclear matrix, whereas in more mature cells, Emp is expressed largely at cell surface. Pulse-chase experiments show that nascent Emp migrates intracellularly from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane more efficiently in mature macrophages than in immature cells. Incubation of erythroid cells with macrophages in culture shows that erythroid cells attach to mature macrophages but not to immature macrophage precursors. Together, our data show that the temporal and spatial expression of Emp correlates with its role in erythroblastic island formation and suggest that Emp may be involved in multiple cellular functions.

  12. Localization and subcellular distribution of N-copine in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, T; Yaoi, T; Kuwajima, G

    1999-01-01

    N-Copine is a novel protein with two C2 domains. Its expression is brain specific and up-regulated by neuronal activity such as kainate stimulation and tetanus stimulation evoking hippocampal CA1 long-term potentiation. We examined the localization and subcellular distribution of N-copine in mouse brain. In situ hybridization analysis showed that N-copine mRNA was expressed exclusively in neurons of the hippocampus and in the main and accessory olfactory bulb, where various forms of synaptic plasticity and memory formation are known to occur. In immunohistochemical analyses, N-copine was detected mainly in the cell bodies and dendrites in the neurons, whereas presynaptic proteins such as synaptotagmin I and rab3A were detected in the regions where axons pass through. In fractionation experiments of brain homogenate, N-copine was associated with the membrane fraction in the presence of Ca2+ but not in its absence. As a GST-fusion protein with the second C2 domain of N-copine showed Ca2+-dependent binding to phosphatidylserine, this domain was considered to be responsible for the Ca2+-dependent association of N-copine with the membrane. Thus, N-copine may have a role as a Ca2+ sensor in postsynaptic events, in contrast to the known roles of "double C2 domain-containing proteins," including synaptotagmin I, in presynaptic events. PMID:9886090

  13. Btf and TRAP150 have distinct roles in regulating subcellular mRNA distribution

    PubMed Central

    Varia, Sapna; Potabathula, Divya; Deng, Zhihui; Bubulya, Athanasios; Bubulya, Paula A.

    2013-01-01

    Transcription of protein-coding genes in mammalian cells is coordinated with pre-mRNA processing as well as the assembly and nuclear export of mRNPs. Btf (BCLAF1) and TRAP150 (THRAP3) were previously reported to associate with in vitro spliced mRNPs and also as a part of the spliceosome, suggesting they are involved in pre-mRNA processing. Btf and TRAP150 are serine-arginine-rich (SR) proteins with significant sequence similarity, but the extent of their functional overlap is not yet clear. We show that both Btf and TRAP150 localize at a constitutively active β-tropomyosin (BTM) reporter minigene locus in mammalian cells. Both proteins also localize at a U2OS 2–6-3 reporter gene locus in a RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription-dependent manner. While Btf and TRAP150 showed some overlap with reporter RNA and other pre-mRNA processing factors at transcription loci, they showed the most precise overlap with the exon junction complex (EJC) protein Magoh. Since EJC components have roles in nuclear export, we examined nuclear/cytoplasmic mRNA distribution after Btf or TRAP150 knockdown. Btf depletion caused an increase of β-tropomyosin minigene reporter transcripts in the cytoplasm as well as global increase of endogenous polyadenylated RNA in the cytoplasm, while TRAP150 depletion did not. We provide evidence that Btf has functions distinct from TRAP150 in regulating the subcellular distribution of mRNAs in human cells. PMID:23778535

  14. Analysis of sublethal arsenic toxicity to Ceratophyllum demersum: subcellular distribution of arsenic and inhibition of chlorophyll biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Seema; Alfeld, Matthias; Sobotka, Roman; Andresen, Elisa; Falkenberg, Gerald; Küpper, Hendrik

    2016-01-01

    Arsenic (As) pollution is a serious concern worldwide. Recent studies under environmentally relevant conditions revealed that, in the aquatic plant Ceratophyllum demersum, pigments are the first observable target of toxicity, prior to any effect on photosynthetic parameters or to oxidative stress. Lethal toxicity was initiated by a change of As species and their distribution pattern in various tissues. Here, the localization of As was investigated at the subcellular level through X-ray fluorescence using a submicron beam and a Maia detector. Further, it was possible to obtain useful tissue structural information from the ratio of the tomogram of photon flux behind the sample to the tomogram of Compton scattering. The micro-X-ray fluorescence tomograms showed that As predominantly accumulated in the nucleus of the epidermal cells in young mature leaves exposed to sublethal 1 µM As. This suggests that As may exert toxic effects in the nucleus, for example, by interfering with nucleic acid synthesis by replacing phosphorous with As. At higher cellular concentrations, As was mainly stored in the vacuole, particularly in mature leaves. An analysis of precursors of chlorophyll and degradation metabolites revealed that the observed decrease in chlorophyll concentration was associated with hindered biosynthesis, and was not due to degradation. Coproporphyrinogen III could not be detected after exposure to only 0.5 µM As. Levels of subsequent precursors, for example, protoporphyrin IX, Mg-protoporphyrin, Mg-protoporphyrin methyl ester, and divinyl protochlorophyllide, were significantly decreased at this concentration as well, indicating that the pathway was blocked upstream of tetrapyrrole synthesis. PMID:27340233

  15. Diverse and pervasive subcellular distributions for both coding and long noncoding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wilk, Ronit; Hu, Jack; Blotsky, Dmitry; Krause, Henry M.

    2016-01-01

    In a previous analysis of 2300 mRNAs via whole-mount fluorescent in situ hybridization in cellularizing Drosophila embryos, we found that 70% of the transcripts exhibited some form of subcellular localization. To see whether this prevalence is unique to early Drosophila embryos, we examined ∼8000 transcripts over the full course of embryogenesis and ∼800 transcripts in late third instar larval tissues. The numbers and varieties of new subcellular localization patterns are both striking and revealing. In the much larger cells of the third instar larva, virtually all transcripts observed showed subcellular localization in at least one tissue. We also examined the prevalence and variety of localization mechanisms for >100 long noncoding RNAs. All of these were also found to be expressed and subcellularly localized. Thus, subcellular RNA localization appears to be the norm rather than the exception for both coding and noncoding RNAs. These results, which have been annotated and made available on a recompiled database, provide a rich and unique resource for functional gene analyses, some examples of which are provided. PMID:26944682

  16. DNA Damage Dependence on the Subcellular Distribution of Low-Energy Beta Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutaia, Claudia; Alloni, Daniele; Mariotti, Luca; Friedland, Werner; Ottolenghi, Andrea

    risk, (particularly for Tritium intake), due to the distribution of the low energy emitters at subcellular levels.

  17. Measurement of rat heart fatty acid binding protein by ELISA. Tissue distribution, developmental changes and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Crisman, T S; Claffey, K P; Saouaf, R; Hanspal, J; Brecher, P

    1987-05-01

    A class of soluble, low molecular weight proteins collectively called fatty acid binding proteins (FABP) are thought to function in the intracellular movement of fatty acids. To understand more clearly the role of FABP in cardiac metabolism, we used ELISA and immunoblotting techniques to study the distribution of heart FABP in several rat tissues, compare male and female rat heart content, quantitate developmental changes, and determine its subcellular distribution. Immunoreactive protein was found in appreciable amounts in rat heart, red skeletal muscle and kidney. Adult rat heart contained about 1.5 mg FABP/g tissue wet weight with the atrial content being approximately 50% of the ventricular concentration. No significant difference was detected between the sexes. The amount of FABP increased progressively during development from fetal to adult animals, and measureable amounts were found in 17-day-old fetal tissue. Comparisons between myoglobin and FABP showed that FABP appeared earlier than myoglobin in development, but myoglobin was more abundant than FABP at birth. Using immunoblots it was determined that rat heart FABP was localized in the cytosol with no detectable intramitochondrial material. PMID:3625779

  18. Drosophila melanogaster lipins are tissue-regulated and developmentally regulated and present specific subcellular distributions.

    PubMed

    Valente, Valeria; Maia, Rafaela Martins; Vianna, Murilo Carlos Bizam; Paçó-Larson, Maria Luisa

    2010-11-01

    Lipins constitute a novel family of Mg(2+)-dependent phosphatidate phosphatases that catalyze the dephosphorylation of phosphatidic acid to yield diacylglycerol, an important intermediate in lipid metabolism and cell signaling. Whereas a single lipin is detected in less complex organisms, in mammals there are distinct lipin isoforms and paralogs that are differentially expressed among tissues. Compatible with organism tissue complexity, we show that the single Drosophila Lpin1 ortholog (CG8709, here named DmLpin) expresses at least three isoforms (DmLpinA, DmLpinK and DmLpinJ) in a temporal and spatially regulated manner. The highest levels of lipin in the fat body, where DmLpinA and DmLpinK are expressed, correlate with the highest levels of triacylglycerol (TAG) measured in this tissue. DmLpinK is the most abundant isoform in the central nervous system, where TAG levels are significantly lower than in the fat body. In the testis, where TAG levels are even lower, DmLpinJ is the predominant isoform. Together, these data suggest that DmLpinA might be the isoform that is mainly involved in TAG production, and that DmLpinK and DmLpinJ could perform other cellular functions. In addition, we demonstrate by immunofluorescence that lipins are most strongly labeled in the perinuclear region of the fat body and ventral ganglion cells. In visceral muscles of the larval midgut and adult testis, lipins present a sarcomeric distribution. In the ovary chamber, the lipin signal is concentrated in the internal rim of the ring canal. These specific subcellular localizations of the Drosophila lipins provide the basis for future investigations on putative novel cellular functions of this protein family. PMID:20977671

  19. Subcellular distribution of peptides associated with gastric mucosal healing and neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Sarraf, C E; Alison, M R; Ansari, T W; Wright, N A

    1995-06-15

    The trefoil peptides pS2 and human spasmolytic peptide are putative growth factors, particularly associated with mucus-producing cells of the gastrointestinal tract including those of the stomach. The receptor for transforming growth factor alpha (TGF alpha) takes its name from one of its alternative ligands, epidermal growth factor, and is called the epidermal growth factor receptor. Although there is immunoreactive epidermal growth factor in the stomach, it is TGF alpha and the epidermal growth factor receptor that are abundant. Immunolabelling at electron microscope level allows for subcellular localisation of antigens; pS2 and human spasmolytic peptide co-localise to cytomembranes, including the Golgi apparatus, and thecae of surface/pit mucous cells. TGF alpha is abundant on the membranes of tubulovesicles of parietal cells and is also present in chief cells: in mucous producing cells it can be detected but not in association with mucous. The distribution of the epidermal growth factor receptor mimics that of TGF alpha but with preferential clustering on the basolateral membranes of gastric cells. The trefoil peptides are associated with healing and probably act, together with mucus, to protect the gastric mucosa and maintain a viable environment. TGF alpha, transduced via the epidermal growth factor receptor, inhibits gastric acid secretion, thus aids the trefoils in the maintenance of a gastric microenvironment conducive to healing after damage. TGF alpha, however, is also a potent mitogen; while this property plays a vital part in repairing mucosal defects, if this peptide or indeed its receptor are overexpressed, the result can be neoplasia.

  20. Dosimetric characterization of radionuclides for systemic tumor therapy: Influence of particle range, photon emission, and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Uusijaervi, Helena; Bernhardt, Peter; Ericsson, Thomas; Forssell-Aronsson, Eva

    2006-09-15

    Various radionuclides have been proposed for systemic tumor therapy. However, in most dosimetric analysis of proposed radionuclides the charged particles are taken into consideration while the potential photons are ignored. The photons will cause undesirable irradiation of normal tissue, and increase the probability of toxicity in, e.g., the bone marrow. The aim of this study was to investigate the dosimetric properties according to particle range, photon emission, and subcellular radionuclide distribution, of a selection of radionuclides used or proposed for radionuclide therapy, and to investigate the possibility of dividing radionuclides into groups according to their dosimetric properties. The absorbed dose rate to the tumors divided by the absorbed dose rate to the normal tissue (TND) was estimated for different tumor sizes in a mathematical model of the human body. The body was simulated as a 70-kg ellipsoid and the tumors as spheres of different sizes (1 ng-100 g). The radionuclides were either assumed to be uniformly distributed throughout the entire tumor and normal tissue, or located in the nucleus or the cytoplasm of the tumor cells and on the cell membrane of the normal cells. Fifty-nine radionuclides were studied together with monoenergetic electrons, positrons, and alpha particles. The tumor and normal tissue were assumed to be of water density. The activity concentration ratio between the tumor and normal tissue was assumed to be 25. The radionuclides emitting low-energy electrons combined with a low photon contribution, and the alpha emitters showed high TND values for most tumor sizes. Electrons with higher energy gave reduced TND values for small tumors, while a higher photon contribution reduced the TND values for large tumors. Radionuclides with high photon contributions showed low TND value for all tumor sizes studied. The radionuclides studied could be divided into four main groups according to their TND values: beta emitters, Auger electron

  1. Subcellular distribution of trace elements and liver histology of landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) sampled along a mercury contamination gradient.

    PubMed

    Barst, Benjamin D; Rosabal, Maikel; Campbell, Peter G C; Muir, Derek G C; Wang, Xioawa; Köck, Günter; Drevnick, Paul E

    2016-05-01

    We sampled landlocked Arctic char (Salvelinus alpinus) from four lakes (Small, 9-Mile, North, Amituk) in the Canadian High Arctic that span a gradient of mercury contamination. Metals (Hg, Se, Tl, and Fe) were measured in char tissues to determine their relationships with health indices (relative condition factor and hepatosomatic index), stable nitrogen isotope ratios, and liver histology. A subcellular partitioning procedure was employed to determine how metals were distributed between potentially sensitive and detoxified compartments of Arctic char livers from a low- and high-mercury lake (Small Lake and Amituk Lake, respectively). Differences in health indices and metal concentrations among char populations were likely related to differences in feeding ecology. Concentrations of Hg, Se, and Tl were highest in the livers of Amituk char, whereas concentrations of Fe were highest in Small and 9-Mile char. At the subcellular level we found that although Amituk char had higher concentrations of Tl in whole liver than Small Lake char, they maintained a greater proportion of this metal in detoxified fractions, suggesting an attempt at detoxification. Mercury was found mainly in potentially sensitive fractions of both Small and Amituk Lake char, indicating that Arctic char are not effectively detoxifying this metal. Histological changes in char livers, mainly in the form of melano-macrophage aggregates and hepatic fibrosis, could be linked to the concentrations and subcellular distributions of essential or non-essential metals.

  2. High Resolution Imaging of Temporal and Spatial Changes of Subcellular Ascorbate, Glutathione and H2O2 Distribution during Botrytis cinerea Infection in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Uwe K.; Polanschütz, Lisa M.; Koffler, Barbara E.; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    In order to study the mechanisms behind the infection process of the necrotrophic fungus Botrytis cinerea, the subcellular distribution of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was monitored over a time frame of 96 h post inoculation (hpi) in Arabidopsis thaliana Col-0 leaves at the inoculation site (IS) and the area around the IS which was defined as area adjacent to the inoculation site (AIS). H2O2 accumulation was correlated with changes in the compartment-specific distribution of ascorbate and glutathione and chloroplast fine structure. This study revealed that the severe breakdown of the antioxidative system, indicated by a drop in ascorbate and glutathione contents at the IS at later stages of infection correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria, cell walls, nuclei and the cytosol which resulted in the development of chlorosis and cell death, eventually visible as tissue necrosis. A steady increase of glutathione contents in most cell compartments within infected tissues (up to 600% in chloroplasts at 96 hpi) correlated with an accumulation of H2O2 in chloroplasts, mitochondria and cell walls at the AIS indicating that high glutathione levels could not prevent the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) which resulted in chlorosis. Summing up, this study reveals the intracellular sequence of events during Botrytis cinerea infection and shows that the breakdown of the antioxidative system correlated with the accumulation of H2O2 in the host cells. This resulted in the degeneration of the leaf indicated by severe changes in the number and ultrastructure of chloroplasts (e.g. decrease of chloroplast number, decrease of starch and thylakoid contents, increase of plastoglobuli size), chlorosis and necrosis of the leaves. PMID:23755284

  3. Effects of dietary salt on renal Na+ transporter subcellular distribution, abundance, and phosphorylation status.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li E; Sandberg, Monica B; Can, Argun D; Pihakaski-Maunsbach, Kaarina; McDonough, Alicia A

    2008-10-01

    During high-salt (HS) diet the kidney increases urinary Na+ and volume excretion to match intake. We recently reported that HS provokes a redistribution of distal convoluted tubule Na+-Cl- cotransporter (NCC) from apical to subapical vesicles and decreases NCC abundance. This study aimed to test the hypothesis that the other renal Na+ transporters' abundance and or subcellular distribution is decreased by HS diet. Six-week-old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a normal (NS) 0.4% NaCl diet or a HS 4% NaCl diet for 3 wk or overnight. Kidneys excised from anesthetized rats were fractionated on density gradients or analyzed by microscopy; transporters and associated regulators were detected with specific antibodies. Three-week HS doubled Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE)3 phosphorylation at serine 552 and provoked a redistribution of NHE3, dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV), myosin VI, Na+-Pi cotransporter (NaPi)-2, ANG II type 2 receptor (AT2R), aminopeptidase N (APN), Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransporter (NKCC2), epithelial Na+ channel (ENaC) beta-subunit, and Na+-K+-ATPase (NKA) alpha1- and beta1-subunits from low-density plasma membrane-enriched fractions to higher-density intracellular membrane-enriched fractions. NHE3, myosin VI, and AT2R retraction to the base of the microvilli (MV) during HS was evident by confocal microscopy. HS did not change abundance of NHE3, NKCC, or NKA alpha1- or beta1-subunits but increased ENaC-beta in high-density intracellular enriched membranes. Responses to HS were fully apparent after just 18 h. We propose that retraction of NHE3 to the base of the MV, driven by myosin VI and NHE3 phosphorylation and accompanied by redistribution of the NHE3 regulator DPPIV, contributes to a decrease in proximal tubule Na+ reabsorption during HS and that redistribution of transporters out of low-density plasma membrane-enriched fractions in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and distal nephron may also contribute to the homeostatic natriuretic response to HS diet

  4. Role of structural and functional elements of mouse methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase in its subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hwa-Young; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2005-06-01

    Oxidized forms of methionine residues in proteins can be repaired by methionine-S-sulfoxide reductase (MsrA) and methionine-R-sulfoxide reductase (MsrB). In mammals, three MsrBs are present, which are targeted to various subcellular compartments. In contrast, only a single mammalian MsrA gene is known whose products have been detected in both cytosol and mitochondria. Factors that determine the location of the protein in these compartments are not known. Here, we found that MsrA was present in cytosol, nucleus, and mitochondria in mouse cells and tissues and that the major enzyme forms detected in various compartments were generated from a single-translation product rather than by alternative translation initiation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms were processed with respect to the N-terminal signal peptide, and the distribution of the protein occurred post-translationally. Deletion of amino acids 69-108, 69-83, 84-108, or 217-233, which contained elements important for MsrA structure and function, led to exclusive mitochondrial location of MsrA, whereas a region that affected substrate binding but was not part of the overall fold had no influence on the subcellular distribution. The data suggested that proper structure-function organization of MsrA played a role in subcellular distribution of this protein in mouse cells. These findings were recapitulated by expressing various forms of mouse MsrA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting conservation of the mechanisms responsible for distribution of the mammalian enzyme among different cellular compartments. PMID:15924425

  5. Subcellular boron and fluorine distributions with SIMS ion microscopy in BNCT and cancer research

    SciTech Connect

    Subhash Chandra

    2008-05-30

    The development of a secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) based technique of Ion Microscopy in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was the main goal of this project, so that one can study the subcellular location of boron-10 atoms and their partitioning between the normal and cancerous tissue. This information is fundamental for the screening of boronated drugs appropriate for neutron capture therapy of cancer. Our studies at Cornell concentrated mainly on studies of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). The early years of the grant were dedicated to the development of cryogenic methods and correlative microscopic approaches so that a reliable subcellular analysis of boron-10 atoms can be made with SIMS. In later years SIMS was applied to animal models and human tissues of GBM for studying the efficacy of potential boronated agents in BNCT. Under this grant the SIMS program at Cornell attained a new level of excellence and collaborative SIMS studies were published with leading BNCT researchers in the U.S.

  6. Distributed and accumulated reinforcement arrangements: evaluations of efficacy and preference.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Iser G; Chase, Julie A; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A; Carreau-Webster, Abbey B; Triggs, Mandy M; Bullock, Christopher E; Jennett, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement.

  7. Distributed and accumulated reinforcement arrangements: evaluations of efficacy and preference.

    PubMed

    DeLeon, Iser G; Chase, Julie A; Frank-Crawford, Michelle A; Carreau-Webster, Abbey B; Triggs, Mandy M; Bullock, Christopher E; Jennett, Heather K

    2014-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement. PMID:24782203

  8. DISTRIBUTED AND ACCUMULATED REINFORCEMENT ARRANGEMENTS: EVALUATIONS OF EFFICACY AND PREFERENCE

    PubMed Central

    DELEON, ISER G.; CHASE, JULIE A.; FRANK-CRAWFORD, MICHELLE A.; CARREAU-WEBSTER, ABBEY B.; TRIGGS, MANDY M.; BULLOCK, CHRISTOPHER E.; JENNETT, HEATHER K.

    2015-01-01

    We assessed the efficacy of, and preference for, accumulated access to reinforcers, which allows uninterrupted engagement with the reinforcers but imposes an inherent delay required to first complete the task. Experiment 1 compared rates of task completion in 4 individuals who had been diagnosed with intellectual disabilities when reinforcement was distributed (i.e., 30-s access to the reinforcer delivered immediately after each response) and accumulated (i.e., 5-min access to the reinforcer after completion of multiple consecutive responses). Accumulated reinforcement produced response rates that equaled or exceeded rates during distributed reinforcement for 3 participants. Experiment 2 used a concurrent-chains schedule to examine preferences for each arrangement. All participants preferred delayed, accumulated access when the reinforcer was an activity. Three participants also preferred accumulated access to edible reinforcers. The collective results suggest that, despite the inherent delay, accumulated reinforcement is just as effective and is often preferred by learners over distributed reinforcement. PMID:24782203

  9. Current Gaps in the Understanding of the Subcellular Distribution of Exogenous and Endogenous Protein TorsinA

    PubMed Central

    Harata, N. Charles

    2014-01-01

    Background An in-frame deletion leading to the loss of a single glutamic acid residue in the protein torsinA (ΔE-torsinA) results in an inherited movement disorder, DYT1 dystonia. This autosomal dominant disease affects the function of the brain without causing neurodegeneration, by a mechanism that remains unknown. Methods We evaluated the literature regarding the subcellular localization of torsinA. Results Efforts to elucidate the pathophysiological basis of DYT1 dystonia have relied partly on examining the subcellular distribution of the wild-type and mutated proteins. A typical approach is to introduce the human torsinA gene (TOR1A) into host cells and overexpress the protein therein. In both neurons and non-neuronal cells, exogenous wild-type torsinA introduced in this manner has been found to localize mainly to the endoplasmic reticulum, whereas exogenous ΔE-torsinA is predominantly in the nuclear envelope or cytoplasmic inclusions. Although these outcomes are relatively consistent, findings for the localization of endogenous torsinA have been variable, leaving its physiological distribution a matter of debate. Discussion As patients’ cells do not overexpress torsinA proteins, it is important to understand why the reported distributions of the endogenous proteins are inconsistent. We propose that careful optimization of experimental methods will be critical in addressing the causes of the differences among the distributions of endogenous (non-overexpressed) vs. exogenously introduced (overexpressed) proteins. PMID:25279252

  10. 2-([sup 125]I) iodomelatonin binding sites in rat adrenals: Pharmacological characteristics and subcellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Persengiev, S.P. )

    1992-01-01

    Specific binding sites for 2-[[sup 125]I] iodomelatonin, a selective radiolabeled melatonin receptor ligand, were detected and characterized in rat adrenal membranes. Saturation studies demonstrated that 2-[[sup 125]I]iodomelatonin binds to a single class of sites with an affinity constant (Kd) of 541 pM and a total binding capacity (Bmax) of 3.23 fmol/mg protein. Competition experiments revealed that the relative order of potency of compounds tested was as follows: 6-chloromelatonin > 2-iodomelatonin > melatonin > 5-methoxytryptamine > 5-methoxytryptophol. The highest density of binding sites was found in membranes from nuclear and mitochondrial subcellular fractions.

  11. Diversity, distribution and roles of osmoprotective compounds accumulated in halophytes under abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Slama, Inès; Abdelly, Chedly; Bouchereau, Alain; Flowers, Tim; Savouré, Arnould

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims Osmolytes are low-molecular-weight organic solutes, a broad group that encompasses a variety of compounds such as amino acids, tertiary sulphonium and quaternary ammonium compounds, sugars and polyhydric alcohols. Osmolytes are accumulated in the cytoplasm of halophytic species in order to balance the osmotic potential of the Na+ and Cl− accumulated in the vacuole. The advantages of the accumulation of osmolytes are that they keep the main physiological functions of the cell active, the induction of their biosynthesis is controlled by environmental cues, and they can be synthesized at all developmental stages. In addition to their role in osmoregulation, osmolytes have crucial functions in protecting subcellular structures and in scavenging reactive oxygen species. Scope This review discusses the diversity of osmolytes among halophytes and their distribution within taxonomic groups, the intrinsic and extrinsic factors that influence their accumulation, and their role in osmoregulation and osmoprotection. Increasing the osmolyte content in plants is an interesting strategy to improve the growth and yield of crops upon exposure to salinity. Examples of transgenic plants as well as exogenous applications of some osmolytes are also discussed. Finally, the potential use of osmolytes in protein stabilization and solvation in biotechnology, including the pharmaceutical industry and medicine, are considered. PMID:25564467

  12. Subcellular distribution of the transmissible agent in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tamai, Y; Kojima, H; Ohtani, Y; Uchida, K; Taguchi, F; Kawaguchi, T; Miura, S; Tateishi, J

    1989-01-01

    To determine the intracellular localization of the Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) agent in mouse brain, cerebrum tissue of the mouse brain affected with the Fukuoka-1 strain was separated into six subcellular fractions (microsome, nerve ending, myelin, mitochondria, nucleus, and soluble fractions) by differential sucrose density gradient, and then the CJD infectivity of these fractions was examined. Serially diluted samples of each subfraction were inoculated intracerebrally into groups of BALB/c mice, and the infectivity was determined as to end point titration value, incubation period, and number of affected mice. On the basis of the protein content, the highest CJD infectivity was observed in the microsomal fraction. The nerve ending (synaptic plasma membrane) and myelin fractions were also infective. The mitochondria and nucleus fractions showed the lower infectivity. The infectivity of the soluble fraction was the lowest among the six subcellular fractions. From the findings obtained in this study two possibilities as to the intracellular localization of CJD agent were suggested: 1) the transmissible agent of CJD is closely associated with surface membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells, including their processes; 2) the CJD agent is diffusely present intracellularly, including in the surface membranes, but for manifestation of infectivity the agent needs membrane components as prerequisite factors.

  13. Non-random subcellular distribution of variant EKLF in erythroid cells

    PubMed Central

    Quadrini, Karen J.; Gruzglin, Eugenia; Bieker, James J.

    2008-01-01

    EKLF protein plays a prominent role during erythroid development as a nuclear transcription factor. Not surprisingly, exogenous EKLF quickly localizes to the nucleus. However, using two different assays we have unexpectedly found that a substantial proportion of endogenous EKLF resides in the cytoplasm at steady state in all erythroid cells examined. While EKLF localization does not appear to change during either erythroid development or terminal differentiation, we find that the protein displays subtle yet distinct biochemical and functional differences depending on which subcellular compartment it is isolated from, with PEST sequences possibly playing a role in these differences. Localization is unaffected by inhibition of CRM1 activity and the two populations are not differentiated by stability. Heterokaryon assays demonstrate that EKLF is able to shuttle out of the nucleus although its nuclear re-entry is rapid. These studies suggest there is an unexplored role for EKLF in the cytoplasm that is separate from its well-characterized nuclear function. PMID:18329016

  14. Non-random subcellular distribution of variant EKLF in erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Quadrini, Karen J.; Gruzglin, Eugenia; Bieker, James J.

    2008-04-15

    EKLF protein plays a prominent role during erythroid development as a nuclear transcription factor. Not surprisingly, exogenous EKLF quickly localizes to the nucleus. However, using two different assays we have unexpectedly found that a substantial proportion of endogenous EKLF resides in the cytoplasm at steady state in all erythroid cells examined. While EKLF localization does not appear to change during either erythroid development or terminal differentiation, we find that the protein displays subtle yet distinct biochemical and functional differences depending on which subcellular compartment it is isolated from, with PEST sequences possibly playing a role in these differences. Localization is unaffected by inhibition of CRM1 activity and the two populations are not differentiated by stability. Heterokaryon assays demonstrate that EKLF is able to shuttle out of the nucleus although its nuclear re-entry is rapid. These studies suggest there is an unexplored role for EKLF in the cytoplasm that is separate from its well-characterized nuclear function.

  15. The subcellular distribution and properties of hexokinases in the guinea-pig cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Bachelard, H S

    1967-07-01

    1. Hexokinase activities were estimated in primary subcellular fractions from guinea-pig cerebral cortex and in sucrose-density-gradient subfractions of the mitochondrial and microsomal fractions. 2. Appreciable activities were observed in mitochondrial, microsomal and soluble fractions. The activity in the mitochondrial fraction was associated with the mitochondria rather than with myelin or nerve endings and that in the microsomal fraction was associated with membrane fragments. 3. Most of the mitochondrial activity was extracted in soluble form by osmotic ;shock'. The activity of the mitochondrial extract differed from the soluble activity in kinetic properties and in electrophoretic behaviour. 4. No evidence was obtained for the presence of a high-K(m) glucokinase in the brain. 5. The results are discussed in terms of relevance to considerations of glucose utilization by the brain.

  16. Subcellular distribution of 65,000 calmodulin-binding protein (p65) and synaptophysin (p38) in adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Fournier, S; Novas, M L; Trifaró, J M

    1989-10-01

    Both neuronal and endocrine cells contain secretory vesicles that store and release neurotransmitters and peptides. Neuronal cells release their secretory material from both small synaptic vesicles and large dense-core vesicles (LDCVs), whereas endocrine cells release secretory products from LDCVs. Neuronal small synaptic vesicles are known to express three integral membrane proteins: 65,000 calmodulin-binding protein (65-CMBP) (p65), synaptophysin (p38), and SV2. A controversial question surrounding these three proteins is whether they are present in LDCV membranes of endocrine and neuronal cells. Sucrose density centrifugation of adrenal medulla was performed to study and compare the subcellular distribution of two of these small synaptic vesicle proteins (65-CMBP and synaptophysin). Subsequent immunoblotting and 125I-Protein A binding experiments performed on the fractions obtained from sucrose gradients showed that 65-CMBP was present in fractions corresponding to granule membranes and intact chromaffin granules. Similar immunoblotting and 125I-Protein A binding experiments with synaptophysin antibodies showed that this protein was also present in intact granules and granule membrane fractions. However, an additional membrane component, equilibrating near the upper portion of the sucrose gradient, also showed strong immunoreactivity with anti-synaptophysin and high 125I-Protein A binding activity. In addition, immunoblotting experiments on purified plasma and granule membranes demonstrated that 65-CMBP was a component of both membranes, whereas synaptophysin was only present in granule membranes. Thus, there appears to be a different subcellular localization between 65-CMBP and synaptophysin in the chromaffin cell.

  17. Fine and distributed subcellular retinotopy of excitatory inputs to the dendritic tree of a collision-detecting neuron.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ying; Gabbiani, Fabrizio

    2016-06-01

    Individual neurons in several sensory systems receive synaptic inputs organized according to subcellular topographic maps, yet the fine structure of this topographic organization and its relation to dendritic morphology have not been studied in detail. Subcellular topography is expected to play a role in dendritic integration, particularly when dendrites are extended and active. The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) neuron in the locust visual system is known to receive topographic excitatory inputs on part of its dendritic tree. The LGMD responds preferentially to objects approaching on a collision course and is thought to implement several interesting dendritic computations. To study the fine retinotopic mapping of visual inputs onto the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD, we designed a custom microscope allowing visual stimulation at the native sampling resolution of the locust compound eye while simultaneously performing two-photon calcium imaging on excitatory dendrites. We show that the LGMD receives a distributed, fine retinotopic projection from the eye facets and that adjacent facets activate overlapping portions of the same dendritic branches. We also demonstrate that adjacent retinal inputs most likely make independent synapses on the excitatory dendrites of the LGMD. Finally, we show that the fine topographic mapping can be studied using dynamic visual stimuli. Our results reveal the detailed structure of the dendritic input originating from individual facets on the eye and their relation to that of adjacent facets. The mapping of visual space onto the LGMD's dendrites is expected to have implications for dendritic computation. PMID:27009157

  18. Global Identification and Differential Distribution Analysis of Glycans in Subcellular Fractions of Bladder Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ganglong; Huang, Luyu; Zhang, Jiaxu; Yu, Hanjie; Li, Zheng; Guan, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Compartmentalization of cellular components and their associated biological processes is crucial for cellular function. Protein glycosylation provides a basis for diversity of protein functions. Diversity of glycan composition in animal cells remains poorly understood. We used differential centrifugation techniques to isolate four subcellular protein fractions from homogenate of metastatic bladder YTS1 cells, low grade nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer KK47 cells and normal bladder epithelia HCV29 cells: microsomal (Mic), mitochondrial (Mito), nuclear (Nuc), and cytosolic (Cyto). An integrated strategy combining lectin microarray and mass spectrometry (MS) analysis was then applied to evaluate protein glycosylation of the four fractions. Lectin microarray analysis revealed significant differences among the four fractions in terms of glycan binding to the lectins LCA, AAL, MPL, WGA and PWM in YTS1 cell, STL, Jacalin, VVA, LCA and WGA in KK47, and ConA, GNA, VVA and ACA in HCV29 cell. Among a total of 40, 32 and 15 N-glycans in four fractions of three cells detected by MS analysis, high-mannose and fucosylated structures were predominant, 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 5 N-glycans in KK47 and 7 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in all four fractions; and 10 N-glycans in YTS1, 16 N-glycans in KK47, and 3 N-glycans in HCV29 were present in only one fraction. Glycans in the latter category are considered potential markers for the corresponding organelles. The integrated strategy described here allows detailed examination of glycomes subcellular fraction with high resolution and sensitivity, and will be useful for elucidation of the functional roles of glycans and corresponding glycosylated proteins in distinct organelles. PMID:27313494

  19. Subcellular distribution of okadaic acid in the digestive gland of Mytilus galloprovincialis: first evidences of lipoprotein binding to okadaic acid.

    PubMed

    Rossignoli, Araceli E; Blanco, Juan

    2010-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of okadaic acid, the main diarrhetic shellfish poisoning (DSP) toxin, in the cells of the digestive gland of the mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis was studied. By means of differential centrifugation, ultrafiltration and extraction with methanol, it was found that most okadaic acid was stored in the cytosol. Notwithstanding only a small proportion of the total toxin was found to be in free form, being most of it bound to a soluble cellular compound with a molecular mass which ranged from 30 to 300 kDa. A series of fractionations of samples digested with a protease, a lipase, and amylase suggested that the component to which okadaic acid is bound is a high density lipoprotein. A new fractionation after digestion with a protein lipase additionally supports the previous conclusion.

  20. Microfilaments and microtubules control the shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of cortical mitochondria in characean internodal cells.

    PubMed

    Foissner, I

    2004-12-01

    The shape, motility, and subcellular distribution of mitochondria in characean internodal cells were studied by visualizing fluorescent dyes with confocal laser scanning microscopy and conducting drug-inhibitor experiments. Shape, size, number, and distribution of mitochondria varied according to the growth status and the metabolic activity within the cell. Vermiform (sausage-shaped), disc-, or amoeba-like mitochondria were present in elongating internodes, whereas very young cells and older cells that had completed growth contained short, rodlike organelles only. Mitochondria were evenly distributed and passively transported in the streaming endoplasm. In the cortex, mitochondria were sandwiched between the plasma membrane and the stationary chloroplast files and distributed in relation to the pattern of pH banding. Highest mitochondrial densities were found at the acid, photosynthetically more active regions, whereas the alkaline sites contained fewer and smaller mitochondria. In the cortex of elongating cells, small mitochondria moved slowly along microtubules or actin filaments. The shape and motility of giant mitochondria depended on the simultaneous interaction with both cytoskeletal systems. There was no microtubule-dependent motility in the cortex of nonelongating mature cells and mitochondria only occasionally travelled along actin filaments. These observations suggest that mitochondria of characean internodes possess motor proteins for microtubules and actin filaments, both of which can be used either as tracks for migration or for immobilization. The cortical cytoskeleton probably controls the spatiotemporal distribution of mitochondria within the cell and promotes their association with chloroplasts, which is necessary for exchange of metabolites during photosynthesis and detoxification.

  1. Subcellular distribution of apolipoprotein E along the lipoprotein synthetic pathway of rat liver

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, T.G.; Stockhausen, D.C.

    1986-03-01

    Apolipoprotein E (apoE) is synthesized by the liver and is secreted as a component of VLDL. To define the intracellular locations of apoE, liver from 10 nonfasted male rats were removed and subcellular organelles prepared by differential pelleting through sucrose gradients. Mass of apoE was measured by radioimmunoassay. Approximately 10% of total hepatic apoE was recovered in rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), smooth endoplasmic reticulum (SER) and Golgi fractions. Concentrations of apoE (ng/mg protein) were: homogenate, 302 +/- 59; RER, 653 +/- 251; SER, 1250 +/- 471; Golgi, 11,044 +/- 4291. Total apoE content of each reaction (..mu..g/organelle) was: homogenate (whole liver), 517 +/- 103; RER, 15 +/- 3; SER, 9 +/- 3; Golgi, 28 +/- 8. These data indicate that along the putative pathway of lipoprotein synthesis (RER->SER->Golgi), apoE concentration increases in each successive organelle and that flux of apoE is apparently most rapid through SER. Furthermore, the majority of apoE in the rat liver is apparently not directly associated with the lipoprotein synthetic pathway and may be associated with internalized lipoproteins or may be involved in non-lipoprotein related functions.

  2. Uptake and subcellular distributions of cadmium and selenium in transplanted aquatic insect larvae.

    PubMed

    Rosabal, Maikel; Ponton, Dominic E; Campbell, Peter G C; Hare, Landis

    2014-11-01

    We transplanted larvae of the phantom midge Chaoborus punctipennis from a lake having lower concentrations of Cd and Se (Lake Dasserat) to a more contaminated lake (Lake Dufault) located near a metal smelter in Rouyn-Noranda, Quebec. Transplanted individuals were held in mesh mesocosms for up to 16 days where they were fed with indigenous contaminated zooplankton. Larval Cd and Se burdens increased over time, and came to equal those measured in indigenous C. punctipennis from contaminated Lake Dufault. Larval Se burdens increased steadily, whereas those of Cd showed an initial lag phase that we explain by a change in the efficiency with which this insect assimilated Cd from its prey. We measured Cd and Se in subcellular fractions and found that larvae sequestered the majority (60%) of the incoming Cd in a detoxified fraction containing metal-binding proteins, whereas a minority of this nonessential metal was in sensitive fractions (20%). In contrast, a much higher proportion of the essential element Se (40%) was apportioned to metabolically active sensitive fractions. Larvae took up equimolar quantities of these elements over the course of the experiment. Likewise, Cd and Se concentrations in wild larvae were equimolar, which suggests that they are exposed to equimolar bioavailable concentrations of these elements in our study lakes. PMID:25268462

  3. Changes in subcellular distribution of ependymins in goldfish brain induced by learning.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, R

    1987-06-01

    Goldfish were trained for 4 h to swim with an attached polystyrene foam float and tested for retention 3 days later. Intracerebroventricular injection of anti-ependymin antisera was shown to prevent long-term memory formation of this vestibulomotor learning task, as reported previously. In further experiments, fish were killed 4-14 h after the start of training. The brains were dissected, incubated in an isoosmolar solution for collection of proteins of the brain extracellular fluid (ECF), homogenized, and fractionated by differential centrifugation. The ECF, a supernatant fraction enriched in cytoplasmic constituents (S3), and various particulate subcellular fractions were analyzed for their ependymin contents by radioimmunoassay. No statistically significant changes that might be induced by the learning were revealed in any of the particulate fractions. Steady-state concentrations of ependymins in the cytoplasm, however, increased temporarily by 39% in fish that had mastered the training task as compared with nonlearning animals (passive and active controls). In the ECF, the specific concentration of ependymins first decreased to 88% of control levels (4-5 h after the start of training), but later on, it increased to 138% (8-14 h). Apparently, ependymins present in the ECF are used during biochemical reactions of memory consolidation. The resulting decrease in extracellular ependymin concentrations might trigger their resynthesis in the cytoplasm and lead to an increased release of these glycoproteins into the ECF.

  4. Expression and Subcellular Distribution of GFP-Tagged Human Tetraspanin Proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Skaar, Karin; Korza, Henryk J; Tarry, Michael; Sekyrova, Petra; Högbom, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Tetraspanins are integral membrane proteins that function as organizers of multimolecular complexes and modulate function of associated proteins. Mammalian genomes encode approximately 30 different members of this family and remotely related eukaryotic species also contain conserved tetraspanin homologs. Tetraspanins are involved in a number of fundamental processes such as regulation of cell migration, fusion, immunity and signaling. Moreover, they are implied in numerous pathological states including mental disorders, infectious diseases or cancer. Despite the great interest in tetraspanins, the structural and biochemical basis of their activity is still largely unknown. A major bottleneck lies in the difficulty of obtaining stable and homogeneous protein samples in large quantities. Here we report expression screening of 15 members of the human tetraspanin superfamily and successful protocols for the production in S. cerevisiae of a subset of tetraspanins involved in human cancer development. We have demonstrated the subcellular localization of overexpressed tetraspanin-green fluorescent protein fusion proteins in S. cerevisiae and found that despite being mislocalized, the fusion proteins are not degraded. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins are dispersed within the endoplasmic reticulum membranes or localized in granule-like structures in yeast cells. The recombinantly produced tetraspanins can be extracted from the membrane fraction and purified with detergents or the poly (styrene-co-maleic acid) polymer technique for use in further biochemical or biophysical studies. PMID:26218426

  5. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Colonization Alters Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms of Cadmium in Medicago sativa L. and Resists Cadmium Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yanzheng

    2012-01-01

    Some plants can tolerate and even detoxify soils contaminated with heavy metals. This detoxification ability may depend on what chemical forms of metals are taken up by plants and how the plants distribute the toxins in their tissues. This, in turn, may have an important impact on phytoremediation. We investigated the impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus, Glomus intraradices, on the subcellular distribution and chemical forms of cadmium (Cd) in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) that were grown in Cd-added soils. The fungus significantly colonized alfalfa roots by day 25 after planting. Colonization of alfalfa by G. intraradices in soils contaminated with Cd ranged from 17% to 69% after 25–60 days and then decreased to 43%. The biomass of plant shoots with AM fungi showed significant 1.7-fold increases compared to no AM fungi addition under the treatment of 20 mg·kg−1 Cd. Concentrations of Cd in the shoots of alfalfa under 0.5, 5, and 20 mg·kg−1 Cd without AM fungal inoculation are 1.87, 2.92, and 2.38 times higher, respectively, than those of fungi-inoculated plants. Fungal inoculation increased Cd (37.2–80.5%) in the cell walls of roots and shoots and decreased in membranes after 80 days of incubation compared to untreated plants. The proportion of the inactive forms of Cd in roots was higher in fungi-treated plants than in controls. Furthermore, although fungi-treated plants had less overall Cd in subcellular fragments in shoots, they had more inactive Cd in shoots than did control plants. These results provide a basis for further research on plant-microbe symbioses in soils contaminated with heavy metals, which may potentially help us develop management regimes for phytoremediation. PMID:23139811

  6. The effect of selenium on the subcellular distribution of antimony to regulate the toxicity of antimony in paddy rice.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yongzhen; Wang, Ruigang; Guo, Junkang; Wu, Fengchang; Xu, Yingming; Feng, Renwei

    2015-04-01

    Selenium (Se) can alleviate the toxicity of antimony (Sb) in plants; however, the associated mechanisms have not been fully clarified. In this study, we hypothesize that Se can affect the subcellular distribution of Sb to regulate Sb toxicity. To test our hypothesis, two nested hydroponic experiments were performed by using paddy rice (Fengmeizhan). The results showed that Sb exerted toxic effects on the growth of paddy rice, and Se caused beneficial effects that were limited to the shoot growth. In general, Se and Sb mutually showed antagonistic effects on their uptake and concentrations in different subcellular fractions. However, in some cases, the stimulation effects of Sb on the Se concentration in chlorophyll (Chl) and cytosol (Cy) fractions or of Se on the Sb concentration in the cell wall fraction (Cw) were also observed in the shoots, which might suggest that Sb detoxification by Se is also related to the migration of both Se and Sb in cells. Selenium and Sb were primarily concentrated in the Cw and Cy, suggesting the important roles of these two fractions in detoxifying Se and Sb. When paddy rice was subjected to increasing Sb concentrations and a fixed Se concentration, most of the Se in the shoots was sequestered in the Cy (59.81-79.51% of total Se) and more Se was transferred into the inner cell from Cw; however, in the roots, Se was primarily concentrated in the Cw (53.28-72.10%). When paddy rice was exposed to increasing Se concentrations with a fixed Sb concentration, the Cw in both the shoots and roots might play an important role in binding Se, especially in the roots where up to 78.92% of the total Se was sequestered in the Cw.

  7. Accumulation and distribution of 137Cs in tropical plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjos, R. M.; Carvalho, C.; Mosquera, B.; Veiga, R.; Sanches, N.; Bastos, J.; Macario, K.

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation and distribution of 40K and 137Cs in several tropical plant species were studied through measurements of gamma-ray spectra, focusing on establishing the suitability of using radiocesium to trace the plant uptake of nutrients such as potassium.

  8. The Accumulation of Radioactive Contaminants in Drinking Water Distribution Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution systems has been documented and the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of particular concern because of their known health eff...

  9. Accumulation and distribution of 137Cs in tropical plants

    SciTech Connect

    Anjos, R. M.; Carvalho, C.; Mosquera, B.; Veiga, R.; Sanches, N.; Bastos, J.; Macario, K.

    2007-02-12

    The accumulation and distribution of 40K and 137Cs in several tropical plant species were studied through measurements of gamma-ray spectra, focusing on establishing the suitability of using radiocesium to trace the plant uptake of nutrients such as potassium.

  10. Cellular and subcellular distributions of delta opioid receptor activation sites in the ventral oral pontine tegmentum of the cat.

    PubMed

    Alvira-Botero, Maria Ximena; Garzón, Miguel

    2006-12-01

    The ventral division of the reticular oral pontine nucleus (vRPO) is a pontine tegmentum region critically involved in REM sleep generation. Previous reports of morphine microinjections in the cat pontine tegmentum have shown that opioid receptor activation in this region modulates REM sleep. Even though opiate administration has marked effects on sleep-wake cycle architecture, the distribution of opioid receptors in vRPO has only been partially described. Using an antiserum directed against delta opioid receptor (DOR), to which morphine binds, in the present study, we use (1) light microscopy to determine DOR cellular distribution in the rostral pontine tegmentum and (2) electron microscopy to determine DOR subcellular distribution in the cat vRPO. In the dorsal pons, DOR immunoreactivity was evenly distributed throughout the neuropil of the reticular formation and was particularly intense in the parabrachial nuclei and locus coeruleus; the ventral and central areas of the RPO and locus coeruleus complex were especially rich in DOR-labeled somata. Within the vRPO, DOR was localized mainly in the cytoplasm and on plasma membranes of medium to large dendrites (47.8% of DOR-labeled profiles), which received both symmetric and asymmetric synaptic contacts mainly from non-labeled (82% of total inputs) axon terminals. Less frequently, DOR was distributed presynaptically in axon terminals (19% of DOR-labeled profiles). Our results suggest that DOR activation in vRPO regulates REM sleep occurrence by modulating postsynaptic responses to both excitatory and inhibitory afferents. DOR activation in vRPO could have, however, an additional role in direct modulation of neurotransmitter release from axon terminals.

  11. Deposition pattern and subcellular distribution of disease-associated prion protein in cerebellar organotypic slice cultures infected with scrapie

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Hanna; Hossinger, André; Fehlinger, Andrea; Büttner, Sven; Sim, Valerie; McKenzie, Debbie; Vorberg, Ina M.

    2015-01-01

    Organotypic cerebellar slices represent a suitable model for characterizing and manipulating prion replication in complex cell environments. Organotypic slices recapitulate prion pathology and are amenable to drug testing in the absence of a blood-brain-barrier. So far, the cellular and subcellular distribution of disease-specific prion protein in organotypic slices is unclear. Here we report the simultaneous detection of disease-specific prion protein and central nervous system markers in wild-type mouse cerebellar slices infected with mouse-adapted prion strain 22L. The disease-specific prion protein distribution profile in slices closely resembles that in vivo, demonstrating granular spot like deposition predominately in the molecular and Purkinje cell layers. Double immunostaining identified abnormal prion protein in the neuropil and associated with neurons, astrocytes and microglia, but absence in Purkinje cells. The established protocol for the simultaneous immunohistochemical detection of disease-specific prion protein and cellular markers enables detailed analysis of prion replication and drug efficacy in an ex vivo model of the central nervous system. PMID:26581229

  12. Lifelong maintenance of composition, function and cellular/subcellular distribution of proteasomes in human liver.

    PubMed

    Bellavista, Elena; Martucci, Morena; Vasuri, Francesco; Santoro, Aurelia; Mishto, Michele; Kloss, Alexander; Capizzi, Elisa; Degiovanni, Alessio; Lanzarini, Catia; Remondini, Daniel; Dazzi, Alessandro; Pellegrini, Sara; Cescon, Matteo; Capri, Miriam; Salvioli, Stefano; D'Errico-Grigioni, Antonia; Dahlmann, Burkhardt; Grazi, Gian Luca; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Owing to organ shortage, livers from old donors are increasingly used for transplantation. The function and duration of such transplanted livers are apparently comparable to those from young donors, suggesting that, despite some morphological and structural age-related changes, no major functional changes do occur in liver with age. We tested this hypothesis by performing a comprehensive study on proteasomes, major cell organelles responsible for proteostasis, in liver biopsies from heart-beating donors. Oxidized and poly-ubiquitin conjugated proteins did not accumulate with age and the three major proteasome proteolytic activities were similar in livers from young and old donors. Analysis of proteasomes composition showed an age-related increased of β5i/α4 ratio, suggesting a shift toward proteasomes containing inducible subunits and a decreased content of PA28α subunit, mainly in the cytosol of hepatocytes. Thus our data suggest that, proteasomes activity is well preserved in livers from aged donors, concomitantly with subtle changes in proteasome subunit composition which might reflect the occurrence of a functional remodelling to maintain an efficient proteostasis. Gender differences are emerging and they deserve further investigations owing to the different aging trajectories between men and women. Finally, our data support the safe use of livers from old donors for transplantation.

  13. Cellular Distribution and Subcellular Localization of Molecular Components of Vesicular Transmitter Release in Horizontal Cells of Rabbit Retina

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN H.; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2010-01-01

    The mechanism underlying transmitter release from retinal horizontal cells is poorly understood. We investigated the possibility of vesicular transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells by examining the expression of synaptic proteins that participate in vesicular transmitter release at chemical synapses. Using immunocytochemistry, we evaluated the cellular and subcellular distribution of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit retina. Strong labeling for complexin I/II, proteins that regulate a late step in vesicular transmitter release, was found in both synaptic layers of the retina, and in somata of A- and B-type horizontal cells, of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)- and glycinergic amacrine cells, and of ganglion cells. Immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated the presence of complexin I/II in horizontal cell processes postsynaptic to rod and cone ribbon synapses. Syntaxin-1, a core protein of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complex known to bind to complexin, and synapsin I, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein involved in the Ca2+-dependent recruitment of synaptic vesicles for transmitter release, were also present in the horizontal cells and their processes at photoreceptor synapses. Photoreceptors and bipolar cells did not express any of these proteins at their axon terminals. The presence of complexin I/II, syntaxin-1, and synapsin I in rabbit horizontal cell processes and tips suggests that a vesicular mechanism may underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells. PMID:15912504

  14. Subcellular Distribution of Heavy Metals in Organs of Bivalve Modiolus Modiolus Living Along a Metal Contamination Gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgurskaya, Olga V.; Kavun, Victor Ya.

    2006-03-01

    Concentration and distribution of Fe, Zn, Cu, Cd, Mn, Pb, Ni among subcellular fractions (cellular membrane structures and cytosol) and Zn, Cu, Cd among cytoplasmic proteins in the kidney and digestive gland of mussel Modiolus modiolus living along a polymetallic concentration gradient were studied. It was found in the kidney of M. modiolus from contaminated sites that the Fe percent increased in the “membrane” fraction, whereas Zn, Pb, Ni and Mn percent increased in the cytosol compared to the kidney of the control mussel. Note kidney cytosol of M. modiolus from clean and contaminated sites sequestered major parts of Cu and Cd. In the digestive gland of M. modiolus from contaminated sites Fe, Zn, Cd, Mn, Ni percent increased in the “membrane” fraction, whereas Cu, Pb percent increased in the cytosol compared to digestive gland of control mussel. Gel-filtration chromatography shows kidney of M. modiolus contains increased metallothionein-like protein levels irrespective of ambient dissolved metal concentrations. It was shown that the metal detoxification system in the kidney and digestive gland of M. modiolus was efficient under extremely high ambient metal levels. However, under complex environmental contamination in the kidney of M. modiolus, the metal detoxification capacity of metallothionein-like proteins was damaged.

  15. Transmembrane topology, subcellular distribution and turnover of the gamma-aminobutyric acid/benzodizaepine receptor in chick brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Czajkowski, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed utilizing trypsinization of the GABA/BZD-R in intact cells to determine (1) the subcellular distribution of membrane-associated GABA/BZD-Rs and (2) aspects of the transmembrane topology of the BZD-R. Additionally, R07-0213, a positively charged benzodiazepine, was used to distinguish between cell surface and intracellular BZD-Rs. Following trypsin treatment of intact cells a cleaved receptor fragment of M{sub r} = 24,000 (xRF24) is generated. It remains anchored in the plasma membrane and not only retains the ability to bind ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepan reversibly and irreversibly but also retains the ability to be modulated by GABA. xRF24 is not observed following trypsinization of saponin-treated cells or cell homogenates, indicating that it has a cytoplasmic domain as well as a cell surface domain, as expected for a transmembrane fragment of the BZD-R. By utilizing ({sup 3}H)flunitrazepam as an irreversible photoaffinity label, BZD-R turnover was also investigated.

  16. Metabolism of cerebroside sulfate and subcellular distribution of its metabolites in cultured skin fibroblasts from controls, metachromatic leukodystrophy, and globoid cell leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Inui, K; Furukawa, M; Okada, S; Yabuuchi, H

    1988-02-01

    With pulse-chase study of 1-[14C]stearic acid-labeled cerebroside sulfate (14C-CS) and subsequent subcellular fractionation by Percoll gradient, the metabolism of CS and translocation of its metabolites in human skin fibroblasts from controls, metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), and globoid cell leukodystrophy (GLD) were studied. In control skin fibroblasts, CS was transported to lysosome and metabolized there to galactosylceramide (GalCer) and ceramide (Cer) within 1 h. During the chase period, radioactivity was increased at plasma membrane plus Golgi as phospholipids and no accumulation of GalCer or Cer was found in lysosome. In MLD fibroblasts, 95% of 14C-CS taken up was unhydrolyzed at 24 h-chase and accumulated at not only lysosome but also plasma membrane. In GLD fibroblasts, GalCer was accumulated throughout the subcellular fractions and more accumulated mainly at plasma membrane plus Golgi with longer pulse. This translocation of lipid from lysosome seems to have considerable function, even in lipidosis, which may result in an imbalance of the sphingolipid pattern on the cell surface and these changes might be one of causes of neuronal dysfunction in sphingolipidosis.

  17. Influence of a step-change in metal exposure (Cd, Cu, Zn) on metal accumulation and subcellular partitioning in a freshwater bivalve, Pyganodon grandis: a long-term transplantation experiment between lakes with contrasting ambient metal levels.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Sophie; Bonneris, Emmanuelle; Michaud, Annick; Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette; Campbell, Peter G C

    2013-05-15

    The objective of the present field experiment was to identify detoxification responses in the gills and digestive gland of a freshwater unionid bivalve, Pyganodon grandis, subjected to a step-change in metal exposure. Adult bivalves were transferred from a reference site (Lake Opasatica) and a metal-contaminated lake (Lake Héva) to a second contaminated lake (Lake Vaudray) in northwestern Quebec, Canada. Changes in organ metal concentrations, in the subcellular distribution of metals and in metallothionein concentrations were followed over time (t=0, 132, (400) and 860 days). At each collection time and for each bivalve, the gills and digestive gland were excised and gently homogenized; six sub-cellular fractions were separated by differential centrifugation and analyzed for their Cd, Cu and Zn content, and metallothionein was quantified independently. Metal detoxification strategies were shown to differ between target organs: in the gills, incoming metals were sequestered largely in the granules, whereas in the digestive gland the same metals primarily accumulated in the cytosol, in the metallothionein-like protein fraction. These metal-handling strategies, as employed by the metal-naïve bivalves originating in the reference lake, closely resemble those identified in free-living P. grandis chronically exposed in the metal-contaminated lake, suggesting that the ability to handle incoming metals (Cd in particular) is inherent in P. grandis and is not a trait acquired after long-term adaptation of the bivalve to metal-contaminated environments. The bivalves transplanted from both Lakes Opasatica and Héva were able to tolerate their new surroundings during the first 400 days of the transplant experiment, as indicated by the absence of mortality and the presence of gravid animals. Over the final 460 days, mortality remained low for the bivalves transplanted from the reference lake (20%) but reached 100% in the transplanted group from the contaminated lake. It would

  18. Intracellular uptake, trafficking and subcellular distribution of folate conjugated single walled carbon nanotubes within living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Bin; Yu, De-cai; Chang, Shu-quan; Chen, Da; Dai, Yao-dong; Ding, Yitao

    2008-09-01

    Herein we studied the uptake, trafficking and distribution of folate conjugated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) within living cells. SWNTs were noncovalently functionalized with chitosan and then linked with folate acid and fluorescence dye Alexa Fluor 488 (denoted FA-SWNTs). Hep G2 cells were cultured in vitro and incubated with FA-SWNTs at different levels. The FA-SWNTs exhibited a concentration-dependent uptake within Hep G2 cells, and Hep G2 cells were able to internalize FA-SWNTs via a folate receptor-mediated pathway. The distribution of nanotubes inside cells demonstrated that the FA-SWNTs only locate in the cytoplasm and not in nuclei, indicating the failure of transporting through the nuclear envelope. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) results showed the presence of FA-SWNTs in lysosomes and the discharge to extracellular space after incubation with nanotubes for 5 h. No obvious cellular death rate was observed when the concentration of nanotubes was below 50 µg ml-1. However, cells with FA-SWNT uptake showed a concentration-dependent apoptosis. These discoveries might be helpful for understanding the interaction of SWNTs and living cells.

  19. The subcellular distribution and properties of aldehyde dehydrogenases in rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Tottmar, S. O. C.; Pettersson, H.; Kiessling, K.-H.

    1973-01-01

    1. Kinetic experiments suggested the possible existence of at least two different NAD+-dependent aldehyde dehydrogenases in rat liver. Distribution studies showed that one enzyme, designated enzyme I, was exclusively localized in the mitochondria and that another enzyme, designated enzyme II, was localized in both the mitochondria and the microsomal fraction. 2. A NADP+-dependent enzyme was also found in the mitochondria and the microsomal fraction and it is suggested that this enzyme is identical with enzyme II. 3. The Km for acetaldehyde was apparently less than 10μm for enzyme I and 0.9–1.7mm for enzyme II. The Km for NAD+ was similar for both enzymes (20–30μm). The Km for NADP+ was 2–3mm and for acetaldehyde 0.5–0.7mm for the NADP+-dependent activity. 4. The NAD+-dependent enzymes show pH optima between 9 and 10. The highest activity was found in pyrophosphate buffer for both enzymes. In phosphate buffer there was a striking difference in activity between the two enzymes. Compared with the activity in pyrophosphate buffer, the activity of enzyme II was uninfluenced, whereas the activity of enzyme I was very low. 5. The results are compared with those of earlier investigations on the distribution of aldehyde dehydrogenase and with the results from purified enzymes from different sources. PMID:4149764

  20. Unique subcellular distribution of phosphorylated Plk1 (Ser137 and Thr210) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division and pPlk1(Ser137) involvement in spindle formation and REC8 cleavage.

    PubMed

    Du, Juan; Cao, Yan; Wang, Qian; Zhang, Nana; Liu, Xiaoyu; Chen, Dandan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Xu, Qunyuan; Ma, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (Plk1) is pivotal for proper mitotic progression, its targeting activity is regulated by precise subcellular positioning and phosphorylation. Here we assessed the protein expression, subcellular localization and possible functions of phosphorylated Plk1 (pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210)) in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. Western blot analysis revealed a peptide of pPlk1(Ser137) with high and stable expression from germinal vesicle (GV) until metaphase II (MII), while pPlk1(Thr210) was detected as one large single band at GV stage and 2 small bands after germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), which maintained stable up to MII. Immunofluorescence analysis showed pPlk1(Ser137) was colocalized with microtubule organizing center (MTOC) proteins, γ-tubulin and pericentrin, on spindle poles, concomitantly with persistent concentration at centromeres and dynamic aggregation between chromosome arms. Differently, pPlk1(Thr210) was persistently distributed across the whole body of chromosomes after meiotic resumption. The specific Plk1 inhibitor, BI2536, repressed pPlk1(Ser137) accumulation at MTOCs and between chromosome arms, consequently disturbed γ-tubulin and pericentrin recruiting to MTOCs, destroyed meiotic spindle formation, and delayed REC8 cleavage, therefore arresting oocytes at metaphase I (MI) with chromosome misalignment. BI2536 completely reversed the premature degradation of REC8 and precocious segregation of chromosomes induced with okadaic acid (OA), an inhibitor to protein phosphatase 2A. Additionally, the protein levels of pPlk1(Ser137) and pPlk1(Thr210), as well as the subcellular distribution of pPlk1(Thr210), were not affected by BI2536. Taken together, our results demonstrate that Plk1 activity is required for meiotic spindle assembly and REC8 cleavage, with pPlk1(Ser137) is the action executor, in mouse oocytes during meiotic division. PMID:26654596

  1. Toxicity and the fractional distribution of trace metals accumulated from contaminated sediments by the clam Scrobicularia plana exposed in the laboratory and the field.

    PubMed

    Kalman, J; Bonnail-Miguel, E; Smith, B D; Bury, N R; Rainbow, P S

    2015-02-15

    The relationship between the subcellular distribution of accumulated toxic metals into five operational fractions (subsequently combined into presumed detoxified and non-detoxified components) and toxicity in the clam Scrobicularia plana was investigated under different laboratory exposures. Clams were exposed to metal contaminated media (water and diet) and analysed for the partitioning of accumulated As, Cu and Zn into subcellular fractions. In general, metallothionein-like proteins, metal-rich granules and cellular debris in different proportions acted as main storage sites of accumulated metals in the clam soft tissues for these three metals. No significant differences were noted in the accumulation rates of As, Cu and Zn of groups of individuals with or without apparent signs of toxicity after up to 30 days of exposure to naturally contaminated sediment mixtures. There was, however, an increased proportional accumulation of Cu in the non-detoxified fraction with increased Cu accumulation rate in the clams, suggesting that the Cu uptake rate from contaminated sediments exceeded the combined rates of elimination and detoxification of Cu, with the subsequent likelihood for toxic effects in the clams.

  2. Intracellular Trafficking and Subcellular Distribution of a Large Array of HPMA Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Callahan, Jon; Kopečková, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2011-01-01

    The basic physicochemical properties that determine the distribution and fate of synthetic macromolecules in living cells were characterized using fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymers. Twelve different classes of water-soluble copolymers were created by incorporating eight different functionalized comonomers. These comonomers possessed functional groups with positive or negative charges or contained short hydrophobic peptides. The copolymers were fractionated to create parallel “ladders” consisting of 10 fractions of narrow polydispersity with molecular weights ranging from 10 to 200 kDa. The intracellular distributions were characterized for copolymer solutions microinjected into the cytoplasm of cultured ovarian carcinoma cells. Even the highest molecular weight HPMA copolymers were shown to quickly and evenly diffuse throughout the cytoplasm and remain excluded from membrane-bound organelles, regardless of composition. The exceptions were the strongly cationic copolymers, which demonstrated a pronounced localization to microtubules. For all copolymers, nuclear entry was consistent with passive transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Nuclear uptake was shown to be largely dictated by the molecular weight of the copolymers, however, detailed kinetic analyses showed that nuclear import rates were moderately, but significantly, affected by differences in comonomer composition. HPMA copolymers containing amide-terminated phenylalanine-glycine (FG) sequences, analogous to those found in the NPC channel protein, demonstrated a potential to regulate import to the nuclear compartment. Kinetic analyses showed that 15 kDa copolymers containing GGFG, but not those containing GGLFG, peptide pendant groups altered the size-exclusion characteristics of NPC-mediated nuclear import. PMID:21197960

  3. Intracellular trafficking and subcellular distribution of a large array of HPMA copolymers.

    PubMed

    Callahan, Jon; Kopečkov, Pavla; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2009-07-13

    The basic physicochemical properties that determine the distribution and fate of synthetic macromolecules in living cells were characterized using fluorescently labeled HPMA (N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide) copolymers. Twelve different classes of water-soluble copolymers were created by incorporating eight different functionalized comonomers. These comonomers possessed functional groups with positive or negative charges or contained short hydrophobic peptides. The copolymers were fractionated to create parallel "ladders" consisting of 10 fractions of narrow polydispersity with molecular weights ranging from 10 to 200 kDa. The intracellular distributions were characterized for copolymer solutions microinjected into the cytoplasm of cultured ovarian carcinoma cells. Even the highest molecular weight HPMA copolymers were shown to quickly and evenly diffuse throughout the cytoplasm and remain excluded from membrane-bound organelles, regardless of composition. The exceptions were the strongly cationic copolymers, which demonstrated a pronounced localization to microtubules. For all copolymers, nuclear entry was consistent with passive transport through the nuclear pore complex (NPC). Nuclear uptake was shown to be largely dictated by the molecular weight of the copolymers, however, detailed kinetic analyses showed that nuclear import rates were moderately, but significantly, affected by differences in comonomer composition. HPMA copolymers containing amide-terminated phenylalanine-glycine (FG) sequences, analogous to those found in the NPC channel protein, demonstrated a potential to regulate import to the nuclear compartment. Kinetic analyses showed that 15 kDa copolymers containing GGFG, but not those containing GGLFG, peptide pendant groups altered the size-exclusion characteristics of NPC-mediated nuclear import. PMID:21197960

  4. Asymmetric subcellular mRNA distribution correlates with carbonic anhydrase activity in Acetabularia acetabulum.

    PubMed

    Serikawa, K A; Porterfield, D M; Mandoli, D F

    2001-02-01

    The unicellular green macroalga Acetabularia acetabulum L. Silva is an excellent system for studying regional differentiation within a single cell. In late adults, physiologically mediated extracellular alkalinity varies along the long axis of the alga with extracellular pH more alkaline along the apical and middle regions of the stalk than at and near the rhizoid. Respiration also varies with greater respiration at and near the rhizoid than along the stalk. We hypothesized that the apical and middle regions of the stalk require greater carbonic anhydrase (CA) activity to facilitate inorganic carbon uptake for photosynthesis. Treatment of algae with the CA inhibitors acetazolamide and ethoxyzolamide decreased photosynthetic oxygen evolution along the stalk but not at the rhizoid, indicating that CA facilitates inorganic carbon uptake in the apical portions of the alga. To examine the distribution of enzymatic activity within the alga, individuals were dissected into apical, middle, and basal tissue pools and assayed for both total and external CA activity. CA activity was greatest in the apical portions. We cloned two CA genes (AaCA1 and AaCA2). Northern analysis demonstrated that both genes are expressed throughout much of the life cycle of A. acetabulum. AaCA1 mRNA first appears in early adults. AaCA2 mRNA appears in juveniles. The AaCA1 and AaCA2 mRNAs are distributed asymmetrically in late adults with highest levels of each in the apical portion of the alga. mRNA localization and enzyme activity patterns correlate for AaCA1 and AaCA2, indicating that mRNA localization is one mechanism underlying regional differentiation in A. acetabulum.

  5. Subcellular distribution of small GTP binding proteins in pancreas: Identification of small GTP binding proteins in the rough endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Nigam, S.K. )

    1990-02-01

    Subfractionation of a canine pancreatic homogenate was performed by several differential centrifugation steps, which gave rise to fractions with distinct marker profiles. Specific binding of guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-({sup 35}S)thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S)) was assayed in each fraction. Enrichment of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding was greatest in the interfacial smooth microsomal fraction, expected to contain Golgi and other smooth vesicles. There was also marked enrichment in the rough microsomal fraction. Electron microscopy and marker protein analysis revealed the rough microsomes (RMs) to be highly purified rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER). The distribution of small (low molecular weight) GTP binding proteins was examined by a ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot-overlay assay. Several apparent GTP binding proteins of molecular masses 22-25 kDa were detected in various subcellular fractions. In particular, at least two such proteins were found in the Golgi-enriched and RM fractions, suggesting that these small GTP binding proteins were localized to the Golgi and RER. To more precisely localize these proteins to the RER, native RMs and RMs stripped of ribosomes by puromycin/high salt were subjected to isopycnic centrifugation. The total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding, as well as the small GTP binding proteins detected by the ({alpha}-{sup 32}P)GTP blot overlay, distributed into fractions of high sucrose density, as did the RER marker ribophorin I. Consistent with a RER localization, when the RMS were stripped of ribosomes and subjected to isopycnic centrifugation, the total GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding and the small GTP binding proteins detected in the blot-overlay assay shifted to fractions of lighter sucrose density along with the RER marker.

  6. Quantitative immunofluorescence microscopy of subcellular GLUT4 distribution in human skeletal muscle: effects of endurance and sprint interval training

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Helen; Shaw, Christopher S.; Worthington, Philip L.; Shepherd, Sam O.; Cocks, Matthew; Wagenmakers, Anton J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Increases in insulin‐mediated glucose uptake following endurance training (ET) and sprint interval training (SIT) have in part been attributed to concomitant increases in glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) protein content in skeletal muscle. This study used an immunofluorescence microscopy method to investigate changes in subcellular GLUT4 distribution and content following ET and SIT. Percutaneous muscle biopsy samples were taken from the m. vastus lateralis of 16 sedentary males in the overnight fasted state before and after 6 weeks of ET and SIT. An antibody was fully validated and used to show large (> 1 μm) and smaller (<1 μm) GLUT4‐containing clusters. The large clusters likely represent trans‐Golgi network stores and the smaller clusters endosomal stores and GLUT4 storage vesicles (GSVs). Density of GLUT4 clusters was higher at the fibre periphery especially in perinuclear regions. A less dense punctate distribution was seen in the rest of the muscle fibre. Total GLUT4 fluorescence intensity increased in type I and type II fibres following both ET and SIT. Large GLUT4 clusters increased in number and size in both type I and type II fibres, while the smaller clusters increased in size. The greatest increases in GLUT4 fluorescence intensity occurred within the 1 μm layer immediately adjacent to the PM. The increase in peripheral localisation and protein content of GLUT4 following ET and SIT is likely to contribute to the improvements in glucose homeostasis observed after both training modes. PMID:25052490

  7. Sediment accumulation and distribution in Lake Kampeska, Watertown, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schaap, Bryan D.; Sando, Steven K.

    2002-01-01

    Lake Kampeska is a natural lake of about 5,075 acres located within the city limits of Watertown, South Dakota. The lake is important as a water supply and recreational resource. Sediment accumulation has been a concern for many years, and several studies have been conducted to learn more about the sediment, including how fast it is accumulating. This study attempted to evaluate previously estimated sediment-accumulation rates and to describe the distribution of sediment in the lake. Analysis of cesium-137 concentrations in sediment cores and changes in lake-bottom elevation over time led to the conclusion that during about the last 50 years, the sediment has been accumulating at a rate on the order of 0.01 foot per year or less. Changes in lake-bottom elevation during this time period indicate that the only significant deposition occurred in the area near the connection of Lake Kampeska to the Big Sioux River. Direct physical measurements and marine seismic surveys indicate that the flat-bottom interior part of the lake has 10 feet or more of sediment over a relatively irregular subbottom.

  8. Cdk5 promotes synaptogenesis by regulating the subcellular distribution of the MAGUK family member CASK

    PubMed Central

    Samuels, Benjamin Adam; Hsueh, Yi-Ping; Shu, Tianzhi; Liang, Haoya; Tseng, Huang-Chun; Hong, Chen-Jei; Su, Susan C; Volker, Janet; Neve, Rachael L; Yue, David T; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2007-01-01

    Synaptogenesis is a highly regulated process that underlies formation of neural circuitry. Considerable work has demonstrated the capability of some adhesion molecules, such as SynCAM and Neurexins/Neuroligins, to induce synapse formation in vitro. Furthermore, Cdk5 gain-of-function results in an increased number of synapses in vivo. To gain a better understanding of how Cdk5 might promote synaptogenesis, we investigated potential crosstalk between Cdk5 and the cascade of events mediated by synapse-inducing proteins. One protein recruited to developing terminals by SynCAM and Neurexins/Neuroligins is the MAGUK family member CASK. We found that Cdk5 phosphorylates and regulates CASK distribution to membranes. In the absence of Cdk5-dependent phosphorylation, CASK is not recruited to developing synapses and thus fails to interact with essential presynaptic components. Functional consequences include alterations in calcium influx. Mechanistically, Cdk5 regulates the interaction between CASK and liprin-α. These results provide a molecular explanation of how Cdk5 can promote synaptogenesis. PMID:18054859

  9. The role of subcellular distribution of cadmium and phytochelatins in the generation of distinct phenotypes of AtPCS1- and CePCS3-expressing tobacco.

    PubMed

    Wojas, Sylwia; Ruszczyńska, Anna; Bulska, Ewa; Clemens, Stephan; Antosiewicz, Danuta Maria

    2010-08-15

    Exposure to Cd2+ leads to activation of phytochelatin synthase (PCS) and the formation of phytochelatins (PCs) in the cytosol. Binding of Cd by PCs and the subsequent transport of PC-Cd complexes to the vacuole are essential for Cd tolerance. Attempts to improve Cd detoxification by PCS overexpression have resulted in contrasting plant phenotypes, ranging from enhanced Cd tolerance to Cd hypersensitivity. In the present paper, changes in the subcellular phytochelatin, glutathione, gamma-glutamylcysteine and cadmium vacuolar and cytosolic distribution underlying these phenotypes were examined. Cadmium and PCs levels were determined in protoplasts and vacuoles isolated from leaves of Nicotiana tabacum expressing either of two phytochelatin synthase genes, AtPCS1 and CePCS (differing in their level of Cd tolerance; being Cd hypersensitive or more Cd-tolerant as compared to wild-type plants, respectively). We showed that Cd hypersensitivity of AtPCS1-expressing tobacco results from a significant decrease in both the cytosolic and vacuolar pool of PCs, indicating a decreased cadmium detoxification capacity. By contrast, enhanced Cd tolerance of CePCS plants was accompanied by an increased cytosolic and vacuolar SH of PC/Cd ratio, suggesting more efficient Cd detoxification. Surprisingly, the substantially reduced level of PCs did not influence Cd accumulation in vacuoles of AtPCS1-transformed tobacco (relative to the wild-type), which suggests the important role of mechanisms other than PC-Cd transport in Cd translocation to the vacuole. Our data suggest that the key role of the PCs in Cd tolerance is temporary binding of Cd2+ in the cytosol, and contrary to the current view, their contribution to cadmium sequestration seems to be less important.

  10. Tissue and subcellular distribution of glucokinase in rat liver and their changes during fasting-refeeding.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Y; Miwa, I; Kamiya, M; Ogiso, S; Nonogaki, T; Aoki, S; Okuda, J

    1995-01-01

    The distribution of glucokinase in rat liver under both normal feeding and fasting-refeeding conditions was investigated immunohistochemically. Under normal feeding conditions, glucokinase immunoreactivity was observed in both nuclei and cytoplasm of parenchymal cells. The nuclei were stained intensely and evenly, whereas the cytoplasm showed weak immunoreactivity of different degrees of staining intensity depending on the location of the cells. The cytoplasm of perivenous hepatocytes was stained more intensely, though not so much more, than that of periportal hepatocytes. The cytoplasm of hepatocytes surrounding the terminal hepatic venule (THV), of hepatocytes surrounding the portal triad, and of some other hepatocytes showed a stronger immunoreactivity than that of residual hepatocytes. The nuclear immunoreactivity in hepatocytes surrounding the portal triad and in some other hepatocytes was weak or absent, and positive immunoreactivity was detected at the plasma membrane of some of these cells. After 72 h of fasting, glucokinase immunoreactivity was markedly decreased in all hepatocytes. After the start of refeeding, the cytoplasmic immunoreactivity began to increase first in the parenchymal cells surrounding the THV and extended to those in the intermediate zone followed by those in the periportal zone. In contrast, the increase in nuclear immunoreactivity started in hepatocytes situated in the intermediate zone adjacent to the perivenous zone and then extended to those in the perivenous zone followed by those in the periportal zone. Hepatocytes surrounding either THV or portal triad showed a distinctive change in immunoreactivity during the refeeding period. After 10 h of refeeding, strong immunoreactivity was observed in both the cytoplasm and the nuclei of all hepatocytes, and appreciable glucokinase immunoreactivity was detected at the plasma membrane of some hepatocytes. These findings are discussed from the standpoint of a functional role of glucokinase

  11. Subcellular Size

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, Wallace F.

    2016-01-01

    All of the same conceptual questions about size in organisms apply equally at the level of single cells. What determines the size, not only of the whole cell, but of all its parts? What ensures that subcellular components are properly proportioned relative to the whole cell? How does alteration in organelle size affect biochemical function? Answering such fundamental questions requires us to understand how the size of individual organelles and other cellular structures is determined. Knowledge of organelle biogenesis and dynamics has advanced rapidly in recent years. Does this knowledge give us enough information to formulate reasonable models for organelle size control, or are we still missing something? PMID:25957302

  12. The UL24 protein of herpes simplex virus 1 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Abdeljelil, Nawel; Rochette, Pierre-Alexandre; Pearson, Angela

    2013-09-15

    Mutations in UL24 of herpes simplex virus type 1 can lead to a syncytial phenotype. We hypothesized that UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins involved in fusion. In non-immortalized human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) we detected viral glycoproteins B (gB), gD, gH and gL present in extended blotches throughout the cytoplasm with limited nuclear membrane staining; however, in HFFs infected with a UL24-deficient virus (UL24X), staining for the viral glycoproteins appeared as long, thin streaks running across the cell. Interestingly, there was a decrease in co-localized staining of gB and gD with F-actin at late times in UL24X-infected HFFs. Treatment with chemical agents that perturbed the actin cytoskeleton hindered the formation of UL24X-induced syncytia in these cells. These data support a model whereby the UL24 syncytial phenotype results from a mislocalization of viral glycoproteins late in infection. - Highlights: • UL24 affects the sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins required for fusion. • Sub-cellular distribution of viral glycoproteins varies in cell-type dependent manner. • Drugs targeting actin microfilaments affect formation of UL24-related syncytia in HFFs.

  13. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  14. Determination of elemental distribution in green micro-algae using synchrotron radiation nano X-ray fluorescence (SR-nXRF) and electron microscopy techniques--subcellular localization and quantitative imaging of silver and cobalt uptake by Coccomyxa actinabiotis.

    PubMed

    Leonardo, T; Farhi, E; Boisson, A-M; Vial, J; Cloetens, P; Bohic, S; Rivasseau, C

    2014-02-01

    The newly discovered unicellular micro-alga Coccomyxa actinabiotis proves to be highly radio-tolerant and strongly concentrates radionuclides, as well as large amounts of toxic metals. This study helps in the understanding of the mechanisms involved in the accumulation and detoxification of silver and cobalt. Elemental distribution inside Coccomyxa actinabiotis cells was determined using synchrotron nano X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy at the ID22 nano fluorescence imaging beamline of the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The high resolution and high sensitivity of this technique enabled the assessment of elemental associations and exclusions in subcellular micro-algae compartments. A quantitative treatment of the scans was implemented to yield absolute concentrations of each endogenous and exogenous element with a spatial resolution of 100 nm and compared to the macroscopic content in cobalt and silver determined using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. The nano X-ray fluorescence imaging was complemented by transmission electron microscopy coupled to X-ray microanalysis (TEM-EDS), yielding differential silver distribution in the cell wall, cytosol, nucleus, chloroplast and mitochondria with unique resolution. The analysis of endogenous elements in control cells revealed that iron had a unique distribution; zinc, potassium, manganese, molybdenum, and phosphate had their maxima co-localized in the same area; and sulfur, copper and chlorine were almost homogeneously distributed among the whole cell. The subcellular distribution and quantification of cobalt and silver in micro-alga, assessed after controlled exposure to various concentrations, revealed that exogenous metals were mainly sequestered inside the cell rather than on mucilage or the cell wall, with preferential compartmentalization. Cobalt was homogeneously distributed outside of the chloroplast. Silver was localized in the cytosol at low concentration and in the whole cell excluding the

  15. Imaging P2X4 receptor subcellular distribution, trafficking, and regulation using P2X4-pHluorin

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ji; Chai, Hua; Ehinger, Konstantin; Egan, Terrance M.; Srinivasan, Rahul; Frick, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    P2X4 receptors are adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-gated cation channels present on the plasma membrane (PM) and also within intracellular compartments such as vesicles, vacuoles, lamellar bodies (LBs), and lysosomes. P2X4 receptors in microglia are up-regulated in epilepsy and in neuropathic pain; that is to say, their total and/or PM expression levels increase. However, the mechanisms underlying up-regulation of microglial P2X4 receptors remain unclear, in part because it has not been possible to image P2X4 receptor distribution within, or trafficking between, cellular compartments. Here, we report the generation of pH-sensitive fluorescently tagged P2X4 receptors that permit evaluations of cell surface and total receptor pools. Capitalizing on information gained from zebrafish P2X4.1 crystal structures, we designed a series of mouse P2X4 constructs in which a pH-sensitive green fluorescent protein, superecliptic pHluorin (pHluorin), was inserted into nonconserved regions located within flexible loops of the P2X4 receptor extracellular domain. One of these constructs, in which pHluorin was inserted after lysine 122 (P2X4-pHluorin123), functioned like wild-type P2X4 in terms of its peak ATP-evoked responses, macroscopic kinetics, calcium flux, current–voltage relationship, and sensitivity to ATP. P2X4-pHluorin123 also showed pH-dependent fluorescence changes, and was robustly expressed on the membrane and within intracellular compartments. P2X4-pHluorin123 identified cell surface and intracellular fractions of receptors in HEK-293 cells, hippocampal neurons, C8-B4 microglia, and alveolar type II (ATII) cells. Furthermore, it showed that the subcellular fractions of P2X4-pHluorin123 receptors were cell and compartment specific, for example, being larger in hippocampal neuron somata than in C8-B4 cell somata, and larger in C8-B4 microglial processes than in their somata. In ATII cells, P2X4-pHluorin123 showed that P2X4 receptors were secreted onto the PM when LBs

  16. Molecular cloning and subcellular distribution of the novel PDE4B4 cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase isoform.

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Malcolm; McSorley, Theresa; Olsen, Aileen E; Johnston, Lee Ann; Thomson, Neil C; Baillie, George S; Houslay, Miles D; Bolger, Graeme B

    2003-01-01

    We have isolated cDNAs encoding PDE4B4, a new cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase (PDE4) isoform with novel properties. The amino acid sequence of PDE4B4 demonstrates that it is encoded by the PDE4B gene, but that it differs from the previously isolated PDE4B1, PDE4B2 and PDE4B3 isoforms by the presence of a novel N-terminal region of 17 amino acids. PDE4B4 contains both of the upstream conserved region 1 (UCR1) and UCR2 regulatory units that are characteristic of 'long' PDE4 isoforms. RNase protection demonstrated that PDE4B4 mRNA is expressed preferentially in liver, skeletal muscle and various regions of the brain, which differs from the pattern of tissue distribution of the other known PDE4B long forms, PDE4B1 and PDE4B3. Expression of PDE4B4 cDNA in COS7 cells produced a protein of 85 kDa under denaturing conditions. Subcellular fractionation of recombinant, COS7-cell expressed PDE4B4 showed that the protein was localized within the cytosol, which was confirmed by confocal microscopic analysis of living COS7 cells transfected with a green fluorescent protein-PDE4B4 chimaera. PDE4B4 exhibited a K(m) for cAMP of 5.4 microM and a V(max), relative to that of the long PDE4B1 isoform, of 2.1. PDE4B4 was inhibited by the prototypical PDE4 inhibitor rolipram [4-[3-(cyclopentoxyl)-4-methoxyphenyl]-2-pyrrolidinone] with an IC(50) of 83 nM. Treatment of COS7 cells with forskolin, to elevate cAMP levels, produced activation of PDE4B4, which was associated with the phosphorylation of PDE4B4 on Ser-56 within UCR1. The unique tissue distribution and intracellular targeting of PDE4B4 suggests that this isoform may have a distinct functional role in regulating cAMP levels in specific cell types. PMID:12441002

  17. Arsenate Accumulation, Distribution, and Toxicity Associated with Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengting; Luo, Zhuanxi; Yan, Yameng; Wang, Zhenhong; Chi, Qiaoqiao; Yan, Changzhou; Xing, Baoshan

    2016-09-01

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (nano-TiO2) are widely used in consumer products. Nano-TiO2 dispersion could, however, interact with metals and modify their behavior and bioavailability in aquatic environments. In this study, we characterized and examined arsenate (As(V)) accumulation, distribution, and toxicity in Daphnia magna in the presence of nano-TiO2. Nano-TiO2 acts as a positive carrier, significantly facilitating D. magna's ability to uptake As(V). As nano-TiO2 concentrations increased from 2 to 20 mg-Ti/L, total As increased by a factor of 2.3 to 9.8 compared to the uptake from the dissolved phase. This is also supported by significant correlations between arsenic (As) and titanium (Ti) signal intensities at concentrations of 2.0 mg-Ti/L nano-TiO2 (R = 0.676, P < 0.01) and 20.0 mg-Ti/L nano-TiO2 (R = 0.776, P < 0.01), as determined by LA-ICP-MS. Even though As accumulation increased with increasing nano-TiO2 concentrations in D. magna, As(V) toxicity associated with nano-TiO2 exhibited a dual effect. Compared to the control, the increased As was mainly distributed in BDM (biologically detoxified metal), but Ti was mainly distributed in MSF (metal-sensitive fractions) with increasing nano-TiO2 levels. Differences in subcellular distribution demonstrated that adsorbed As(V) carried by nano-TiO2 could dissociate itself and be transported separately, which results in increased toxicity at higher nano-TiO2 concentrations. Decreased As(V) toxicity associated with lower nano-TiO2 concentrations results from unaffected As levels in MSFs (when compared to the control), where several As components continued to be adsorbed by nano-TiO2. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the potential influence of nano-TiO2 on bioavailability and toxicity of cocontaminants. PMID:27485179

  18. N-Glycan Branching Affects the Subcellular Distribution of and Inhibition of Matriptase by HAI-2/Placental Bikunin

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Hongyu; Xu, Yuan; Shiao, Frank; Huang, Nanxi; Li, Linpei; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Johnson, Michael D.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2015-01-01

    The gene product of SPINT 2, that encodes a transmembrane, Kunitz-type serine protease inhibitor independently designated as HAI-2 or placenta bikunin (PB), is involved in regulation of sodium absorption in human gastrointestinal track. Here, we show that SPINT 2 is expressed as two species of different size (30-40- versus 25-kDa) due to different N-glycans on Asn-57. The N-glycan on 25-kDa HAI-2 appears to be of the oligomannose type and that on 30-40-kDa HAI-2 to be of complex type with extensive terminal N-acetylglucosamine branching. The two different types of N-glycan differentially mask two epitopes on HAI-2 polypeptide, recognized by two different HAI-2 mAbs. The 30-40-kDa form may be mature HAI-2, and is primarily localized in vesicles/granules. The 25-kDa form is likely immature HAI-2, that remains in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in the perinuclear regions of mammary epithelial cells. The two different N-glycans could, therefore, represent different maturation stages of N-glycosylation with the 25-kDa likely a precursor of the 30-40-kDa HAI-2, with the ratio of their levels roughly similar among a variety of cells. In breast cancer cells, a significant amount of the 30-40-kDa HAI-2 can translocate to and inhibit matriptase on the cell surface, followed by shedding of the matriptase-HAI-2 complex. The 25-kDa HAI-2 appears to have also exited the ER/Golgi, being localized at the cytoplasmic face of the plasma membrane of breast cancer cells. While the 25-kDa HAI-2 was also detected at the extracellular face of plasma membrane at very low levels it appears to have no role in matriptase inhibition probably due to its paucity on the cell surface. Our study reveals that N-glycan branching regulates HAI-2 through different subcellular distribution and subsequently access to different target proteases. PMID:26171609

  19. The accumulation of radioactive contaminants in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Darren A; Sorg, Thomas; Wang, Lili; Chen, Abe

    2014-03-01

    The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution system sediment and scales has been documented, raising concerns that the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential human exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of concern because of their known health effects and because of their persistence within associated distribution system materials. The objective of this work was to measure the amount of a number of radioactive contaminants (radium, thorium, and uranium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity) in distribution solids collected from water systems in four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and Texas). The water utilities chosen had measurable levels of radium in their source waters. In addition, 19 other elements in the solids were quantified. Water systems provided solids primarily collected during routine fire hydrant flushing. Iron was the dominant element in nearly all of the solids and was followed by calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, silicon, aluminum and barium in descending order. Gross alpha and beta radiation averaged 255 and 181 pCi/g, and were as high as 1602 and 1169 pCi/g, respectively. Total radium, thorium and uranium averaged 143, 40 and 6.4 pCi/g, respectively. Radium-226 and -228 averaged 74 and 69 pCi/g, and were as high as 250 and 351 pCi/g, respectively. PMID:24275108

  20. The accumulation of radioactive contaminants in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Lytle, Darren A; Sorg, Thomas; Wang, Lili; Chen, Abe

    2014-03-01

    The accumulation of trace contaminants in drinking water distribution system sediment and scales has been documented, raising concerns that the subsequent release of the contaminants back to the water is a potential human exposure pathway. Radioactive contaminants are of concern because of their known health effects and because of their persistence within associated distribution system materials. The objective of this work was to measure the amount of a number of radioactive contaminants (radium, thorium, and uranium isotopes, and gross alpha and beta activity) in distribution solids collected from water systems in four states (Wisconsin, Illinois, Minnesota, and Texas). The water utilities chosen had measurable levels of radium in their source waters. In addition, 19 other elements in the solids were quantified. Water systems provided solids primarily collected during routine fire hydrant flushing. Iron was the dominant element in nearly all of the solids and was followed by calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, manganese, silicon, aluminum and barium in descending order. Gross alpha and beta radiation averaged 255 and 181 pCi/g, and were as high as 1602 and 1169 pCi/g, respectively. Total radium, thorium and uranium averaged 143, 40 and 6.4 pCi/g, respectively. Radium-226 and -228 averaged 74 and 69 pCi/g, and were as high as 250 and 351 pCi/g, respectively.

  1. The influence of metal speciation on the bioavailability and sub-cellular distribution of cadmium to the terrestrial isopod, Porcellio dilatatus.

    PubMed

    Calhôa, Carla Filipa; Monteiro, Marta S; Soares, Amadeu M V M; Mann, Reinier M

    2011-04-01

    Cadmium is a non-essential toxic metal that is able to bioaccumulate in both flora fauna and has the potential to biomagnify in some food chains. However, the form in which cadmium is presented to consumers can alter the bioavailability and possibly the internal distribution of assimilated Cd. Previous studies in our laboratory highlighted differences in Cd assimilation among isopods when they were provided with a plant-based food with either Cd biologically incorporated into plant tissue or superficially amended with ionic Cd(2+). Cd is known for its high affinity for sulphur ligands in cysteine residues which form the basis for metal-binding proteins such as metallothionein. This study compares Cd assimilation efficiency (AE) in Porcellio dilatatus fed with food amended with either cadmium cysteinate or cadmium nitrate in an examination of the influence of Cd speciation on metal bioavailability followed by an examination of the sub-cellular distribution using a centrifugal fractionation protocol. As hypothesized the AE of Cd among isopods fed with Cd(NO(3))(2) (64%, SE=5%) was higher than AE for isopods fed with Cd(Cys)(2) (20%, SE=3%). The sub-cellular distribution also depended on the Cd species provided. Those isopods fed Cd(Cys)(2) allocated significantly more Cd to the cell debris and organelles fractions at the expense of allocation to metal-rich granules (MRG). The significance of the difference in sub-cellular distribution with regard to toxicity is discussed. This paper demonstrates that the assimilation and internal detoxification of Cd is dependent on the chemical form of Cd presented to the isopod.

  2. Current Approaches for Improving Intratumoral Accumulation and Distribution of Nanomedicines

    PubMed Central

    Durymanov, Mikhail O; Rosenkranz, Andrey A; Sobolev, Alexander S

    2015-01-01

    The ability of nanoparticles and macromolecules to passively accumulate in solid tumors and enhance therapeutic effects in comparison with conventional anticancer agents has resulted in the development of various multifunctional nanomedicines including liposomes, polymeric micelles, and magnetic nanoparticles. Further modifications of these nanoparticles have improved their characteristics in terms of tumor selectivity, circulation time in blood, enhanced uptake by cancer cells, and sensitivity to tumor microenvironment. These “smart” systems have enabled highly effective delivery of drugs, genes, shRNA, radioisotopes, and other therapeutic molecules. However, the resulting therapeutically relevant local concentrations of anticancer agents are often insufficient to cause tumor regression and complete elimination. Poor perfusion of inner regions of solid tumors as well as vascular barrier, high interstitial fluid pressure, and dense intercellular matrix are the main intratumoral barriers that impair drug delivery and impede uniform distribution of nanomedicines throughout a tumor. Here we review existing methods and approaches for improving tumoral uptake and distribution of nano-scaled therapeutic particles and macromolecules (i.e. nanomedicines). Briefly, these strategies include tuning physicochemical characteristics of nanomedicines, modulating physiological state of tumors with physical impacts or physiologically active agents, and active delivery of nanomedicines using cellular hitchhiking. PMID:26155316

  3. MitoTimer probe reveals the impact of autophagy, fusion, and motility on subcellular distribution of young and old mitochondrial protein and on relative mitochondrial protein age.

    PubMed

    Ferree, Andrew W; Trudeau, Kyle; Zik, Eden; Benador, Ilan Y; Twig, Gilad; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Shirihai, Orian S

    2013-11-01

    To study mitochondrial protein age dynamics, we targeted a time-sensitive fluorescent protein, MitoTimer, to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial age was revealed by the integrated portions of young (green) and old (red) MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial protein age was dependent on turnover rates as pulsed synthesis, decreased import, or autophagic inhibition all increased the proportion of aged MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial fusion promotes the distribution of young mitochondrial protein across the mitochondrial network as cells lacking essential fusion genes Mfn1 and Mfn2 displayed increased heterogeneity in mitochondrial protein age. Experiments in hippocampal neurons illustrate that the distribution of older and younger mitochondrial protein within the cell is determined by subcellular spatial organization and compartmentalization of mitochondria into neurites and soma. This effect was altered by overexpression of mitochondrial transport protein, RHOT1/MIRO1. Collectively our data show that distribution of young and old protein in the mitochondrial network is dependent on turnover, fusion, and transport.

  4. Immunocytology on microwave-fixed cells reveals rapid and agonist-specific changes in subcellular accumulation patterns for cAMP or cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Barsony, J; Marx, S J

    1990-01-01

    We developed a method for cAMP and cGMP immunocytology based upon fixation by microwave irradiation. Fixation by microwave irradiation prevented three problems found with other fixation methods: nucleotide loss from cells, nucleotide diffusion within cells, and chemical modification of immunologic epitopes. Six agonists (four that stimulate adenylate cyclase and two that stimulate guanylate cyclase) produced cAMP or cGMP accumulation patterns that were agonist-specific, dose-dependent, detectable at physiologic concentrations of hormone, and time-dependent within 15 sec to 30 min. cAMP accumulation after 1 mM forskolin was greatest in the nucleus. Isoproterenol, prostaglandin E2, or calcitonin caused initial accumulation of cAMP along the plasma membrane, but later accumulation was greater in the cytoplasm. With calcitonin the later accumulation of cAMP was selectively perinuclear and along the nuclear membrane. Sodium nitroprusside stimulated cGMP accumulation diffusely throughout the cytoplasm. Atrial natriuretic peptide initiated cGMP accumulation near the plasma membrane, and cGMP accumulation moved from there into the cytoplasm. In conclusion, microwave irradiation preserved cell structure and allowed visualization of expected as well as unsuspected changes in intracellular accumulation patterns of cAMP and cGMP. Images PMID:2153973

  5. Interaction of HSP20 with a viral RdRp changes its sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern in plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Xiang, Cong-Ying; Yang, Jian; Chen, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Heng-Mu

    2015-01-01

    Small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) perform a fundamental role in protecting cells against a wide array of stresses but their biological function during viral infection remains unknown. Rice stripe virus (RSV) causes a severe disease of rice in Eastern Asia. OsHSP20 and its homologue (NbHSP20) were used as baits in yeast two-hybrid (YTH) assays to screen an RSV cDNA library and were found to interact with the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of RSV. Interactions were confirmed by pull-down and BiFC assays. Further analysis showed that the N-terminus (residues 1–296) of the RdRp was crucial for the interaction between the HSP20s and viral RdRp and responsible for the alteration of the sub-cellular localization and distribution pattern of HSP20s in protoplasts of rice and epidermal cells of Nicotiana benthamiana. This is the first report that a plant virus or a viral protein alters the expression pattern or sub-cellular distribution of sHSPs. PMID:26359114

  6. Regulation of the Regulators: Post-Translational Modifications, Subcellular, and Spatiotemporal Distribution of Plant 14-3-3 Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Rashaun S.; Swatek, Kirby N.; Thelen, Jay J.

    2016-01-01

    14-3-3 proteins bind to and modulate the activity of phosphorylated proteins that regulate a variety of metabolic processes in eukaryotes. Multiple 14-3-3 isoforms are expressed in most organisms and display redundancy in both sequence and function. Plants contain the largest number of 14-3-3 isoforms. For example, Arabidopsis thaliana contains thirteen 14-3-3 genes, each of which is expressed. Interest in the plant 14-3-3 field has swelled over the past decade, largely due to the vast number of possibilities for 14-3-3 metabolic regulation. As the field progresses, it is essential to understand these proteins' activities at both the spatiotemporal and subcellular levels. This review summarizes current knowledge of 14-3-3 proteins in plants, including 14-3-3 interactions, regulatory functions, isoform specificity, and post-translational modifications. We begin with a historical overview and structural analysis of 14-3-3 proteins, which describes the basic principles of 14-3-3 function, and then discuss interactions and regulatory effects of plant 14-3-3 proteins in specific tissues and subcellular compartments. We conclude with a summary of 14-3-3 phosphorylation and current knowledge of the functional effects of this modification in plants. PMID:27242818

  7. Ultrastructure and subcellular distribution of Cr in Iris pseudacorus L. using TEM and X-ray microanalysis.

    PubMed

    Caldelas, Cristina; Bort, Jordi; Febrero, Anna

    2012-02-01

    Chromium pollution of freshwater is hazardous for humans and other organisms, and places a limitation on the use of polluted water sources. Phytoremediation, the use of plants to remove pollutants from the environment, is a cost-effective, environmentally friendly approach for water decontamination. To improve the efficiency of the process, it is essential to increase the current knowledge about Cr accumulation in macrophytes. Plants of Iris pseudacorus L. were treated with Cr(III) at 0.75 mM for 5 weeks to investigate Cr localization by means of transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Chromium induced severe ultrastructural alterations in the rhizodermis (cell wall disorganisation, thickening, plasmolysis, and electron-dense inclusions) and rhizome parenchyma (reduced cell size, cell wall detachment, vacuolation, and opaque granules). The highest Cr contents were found in the cell walls of the cortex in the roots and in the cytoplasm and intercellular spaces of the rhizome. The Cr concentration in root tissues was in the order cortex>rhizodermis>stele, whereas in the rhizome, Cr was evenly distributed. It is proposed that root and rhizome have distinct functions in the response of I. pseudacorus to Cr. The rhizodermis limits Cr uptake by means of Si deposition and cell wall thickening. The rhizome cortex generates vacuoles and granules where Cr co-occurs with S, indicating Cr sequestration by metal-binding proteins. PMID:22009188

  8. Subcellular localization and mechanisms of nucleocytoplasmic distribution of p202, an interferon-inducible candidate for lupus susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Choubey, Divaker; Pramanik, Rocky; Xin, Hong

    2003-10-23

    Increased expression of p202 (52 kDa), an interferon (IFN)-inducible murine protein, in splenic cells (B- and T-cells) derived from female mice of the lupus-prone strains is correlated with increased susceptibility to develop systemic lupus erythematosus. However, the molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Our previous studies have indicated that, in IFN-treated fibroblasts, p202 is detected both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Moreover, in the cytoplasm, a fraction of p202 associates with a membranous organelle. Here we report that, in the cytoplasm, a fraction of p202 associated with mitochondria. Additionally, we found that the constitutive p202 is primarily detected in the cytoplasm. Remarkably, the IFN treatment of cells potentiated nuclear accumulation of p202. Our observations are consistent with the possibility that IFN signaling regulates p202 levels as well as its nucleocytoplasmic distribution. These observations will serve as a basis to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which p202 contributes to lupus susceptibility.

  9. Accumulation, distribution, and speciation of arsenic in wheat grain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fang-Jie; Stroud, Jacqueline L; Eagling, Tristan; Dunham, Sarah J; McGrath, Steve P; Shewry, Peter R

    2010-07-15

    Food can be an important source of inorganic As for human intake. Recent studies have focused on rice, while little information is available on As accumulation, distribution, and speciation in wheat, which is the second most important food grain cereal. Grain samples of 26 wheat cultivars grown in five field trials located in productive farming regions in Europe were therefore analyzed for As concentration and speciation. Grain from four trials contained low concentrations of total As (7.7 +/- 5.4 microg kg(-1)), reflecting low levels of As in the soils (1.3-11 mg kg(-1)). In contrast, at one of the trial sites the As level in the soil was greater (29 mg kg(-1)), and much higher As concentrations (69 +/- 17 microg kg(-1)) were present in the wheat grain. Milling of wheat grain into bran and white flour fraction showed the concentration of As in the bran, with a 3.8-4.7-fold higher As concentration than in the white flour. Two methods (a phosphate buffer solution and 1% HNO(3)) were used to extract As species from wholemeal, bran, and white flour of wheat, with average extraction efficiencies of 65% and 88%, respectively. Only inorganic As was found in the extracts, with no methylated As being detected. The contribution of wheat to human intake of inorganic As is small for wheat crops grown in uncontaminated soils but becomes significant for those grown in soils with elevated As. In the latter case, milling can be used to reduce the As concentration in the white flour. PMID:20578703

  10. Subcellular distribution of calcium-binding proteins and a calcium- ATPase in canine pancreas [published erratum appears in J Cell Biol 1990 Oct;111(4):1726

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Using a 45Ca blot-overlay assay, we monitored the subcellular fractionation pattern of several Ca binding proteins of apparent molecular masses 94, 61, and 59 kD. These proteins also appeared to stain blue with "Stains-All." Additionally, using a monoclonal antiserum raised against canine cardiac sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca- ATPase, we examined the subcellular distribution of a canine pancreatic 110-kD protein recognized by this antiserum. This protein had the same electrophoretic mobility as the cardiac protein against which the antiserum was raised. The three Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase cofractionated into the rough microsomal fraction (RM), previously shown to consist of highly purified RER, in a pattern highly similar to that of the RER marker, ribophorin I. To provide further evidence for an RER localization, native RM were subjected to isopycnic flotation in sucrose gradients. The Ca binding proteins and the Ca-ATPase were found in dense fractions, along with ribophorin I. When RM were stripped of ribosomes with puromycin/high salt, the Ca binding proteins and the Ca- ATPase exhibited a shift to less dense fractions, as did ribophorin I. We conclude that, in pancreas, the Ca binding proteins and Ca-ATPase we detect are localized to the RER (conceivably a subcompartment of the RER) or, possibly, a structure intimately associated with the RER. PMID:2142161

  11. A Celiac Cellular Phenotype, with Altered LPP Sub-Cellular Distribution, Is Inducible in Controls by the Toxic Gliadin Peptide P31-43

    PubMed Central

    Nanayakkara, Merlin; Kosova, Roberta; Lania, Giuliana; Sarno, Marco; Gaito, Alessandra; Galatola, Martina; Greco, Luigi; Cuomo, Marialaura; Troncone, Riccardo; Auricchio, Salvatore

    2013-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) is a frequent inflammatory intestinal disease, with a genetic background, caused by gliadin-containing food. Undigested gliadin peptides P31-43 and P57-68 induce innate and adaptive T cell-mediated immune responses, respectively. Alterations in the cell shape and actin cytoskeleton are present in celiac enterocytes, and gliadin peptides induce actin rearrangements in both the CD mucosa and cell lines. Cell shape is maintained by the actin cytoskeleton and focal adhesions, sites of membrane attachment to the extracellular matrix. The locus of the human Lipoma Preferred Partner (LPP) gene was identified as strongly associated with CD using genome-wide association studies (GWAS). The LPP protein plays an important role in focal adhesion architecture and acts as a transcription factor in the nucleus. In this study, we examined the hypothesis that a constitutive alteration of the cell shape and the cytoskeleton, involving LPP, occurs in a cell compartment far from the main inflammation site in CD fibroblasts from skin explants. We analyzed the cell shape, actin organization, focal adhesion number, focal adhesion proteins, LPP sub-cellular distribution and adhesion to fibronectin of fibroblasts obtained from CD patients on a Gluten-Free Diet (GFD) and controls, without and with treatment with A-gliadin peptide P31-43. We observed a “CD cellular phenotype” in these fibroblasts, characterized by an altered cell shape and actin organization, increased number of focal adhesions, and altered intracellular LPP protein distribution. The treatment of controls fibroblasts with gliadin peptide P31-43 mimics the CD cellular phenotype regarding the cell shape, adhesion capacity, focal adhesion number and LPP sub-cellular distribution, suggesting a close association between these alterations and CD pathogenesis. PMID:24278174

  12. Glutamine synthetase stability and subcellular distribution in astrocytes are regulated by γ-aminobutyric type B receptors.

    PubMed

    Huyghe, Deborah; Nakamura, Yasuko; Terunuma, Miho; Faideau, Mathilde; Haydon, Philip; Pangalos, Menelas N; Moss, Stephen J

    2014-10-17

    Emerging evidence suggests that functional γ-aminobutyric acid B receptors (GABABRs) are expressed by astrocytes within the mammalian brain. GABABRs are heterodimeric G-protein-coupled receptors that are composed of R1/R2 subunits. To date, they have been characterized in neurons as the principal mediators of sustained inhibitory signaling; however their roles in astrocytic physiology have been ill defined. Here we reveal that the cytoplasmic tail of the GABABR2 subunit binds directly to the astrocytic protein glutamine synthetase (GS) and that this interaction determines the subcellular localization of GS. We further demonstrate that the binding of GS to GABABR2 increases the steady state expression levels of GS in heterologous cells and in mouse primary astrocyte culture. Mechanistically this increased stability of GS in the presence of GABABR2 occurs via reduced proteasomal degradation. Collectively, our results suggest a novel role for GABABRs as regulators of GS stability. Given the critical role that GS plays in the glutamine-glutamate cycle, astrocytic GABABRs may play a critical role in supporting both inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission.

  13. Accumulated distribution of material gain at dislocation crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakin, V. I.

    2016-05-01

    A model for slowing down the tangential growth rate of an elementary step at dislocation crystal growth is proposed based on the exponential law of impurity particle distribution over adsorption energy. It is established that the statistical distribution of material gain on structurally equivalent faces obeys the Erlang law. The Erlang distribution is proposed to be used to calculate the occurrence rates of morphological combinatorial types of polyhedra, presenting real simple crystallographic forms.

  14. Subcellular distribution of ( sup 3 H)-dexamethasone mesylate binding sites in Leydig cells using electron microscope radioautography

    SciTech Connect

    Stalker, A.; Hermo, L.; Antakly, T. )

    1991-01-01

    The present view is that glucocorticoid hormones bind to their cytoplasmic receptors before reaching their nuclear target sites, which include specific DNA sequences. Although it is believed that cytoplasmic sequestration of steroid receptors and other transcription factors (such as NFKB) may regulate the overall activity of these factors, there is little information on the exact subcellular sites of steroid receptors or even of any other transcription factors. Tritiated (3H)-dexamethasone 21-mesylate (DM) is an affinity label that binds covalently to the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), thereby allowing morphological localization of the receptor at the light and electron microscope levels as well as for quantitative radioautographic (RAG) analysis. After injection of 3H-DM into the testis, a specific radioautographic signal was observed in Leydig cells, which correlated with a high level of immunocytochemically demonstrable GR in these cells at the light-microscope level. To localize the 3H-DM binding sites at the electron microscope (EM) level, the testes of 5 experimental and 3 control adrenalectomized rats were injected directly with 20 microCi 3H-DM; control rats received simultaneously a 25-fold excess of unlabeled dexamethasone; 15 min later, rats were fixed with glutaraldehyde and the tissue was processed for EM RAG analysis combined with quantitative morphometry. The radioautographs showed that the cytosol, nucleus, smooth endoplasmic reticulum (sER), and mitochondria were labeled. Since the cytosol was always adjacent to tubules of the sER, the term sER-rich cytosol was used to represent label over sER networks, which may also represent cytosol labeling due to the limited resolution of the radioautographic technique. Labeling was highest in sER-rich cytosol and mitochondria, at 53% and 31% of the total, respectively.

  15. Expression of an abscisic acid-binding single-chain antibody influences the subcellular distribution of abscisic acid and leads to developmental changes in transgenic potato plants.

    PubMed

    Strauss, M; Kauder, F; Peisker, M; Sonnewald, U; Conrad, U; Heineke, D

    2001-07-01

    Potato (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée) plants were transformed to express a single-chain variable-fragment antibody against abscisic acid (ABA), and present in the endoplasmic reticulum at to up to 0.24% of the soluble leaf protein. The resulting transgenic plants were only able to grow normally at 95% humidity and moderate light. Four-week-old plants accumulated ABA to high extent, were retarded in growth and their leaves were smaller than those of control plants. Leaf stomatal conductivity was increased due to larger stomates. The subcellular concentrations of ABA in the chloroplast, cytoplasm and vacuole, and the apoplastic space of leaves were determined. In the 4-week-old transgenic plants the concentration of ABA not bound to the antibody was identical to that of control plants and the stomates were able to close in response to lower humidity of the atmosphere. A detailed analysis of age-dependent changes in plant metabolism showed that leaves of young transformed plants developed in ABA deficiency and leaves of older plants in ABA excess. Phenotypic changes developed in ABA deficiency partly disappeared in older plants.

  16. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  17. [Effects of Different Modifier Concentrations on Lead-Zinc Tolerance, Subcellular Distribution and Chemical Forms for Four Kinds of Woody Plants].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-hua; Zhang, Fu-yun; Wu, Xiao-fu; Liang, Xi; Yuan, Si-wen

    2015-10-01

    Four kinds of lead-zinc tolerant woody plants: Nerium oleander, Koelreuteria paniculata, Paulownia and Boehmeria were used as materials to estimate their enrichment and transferable capacity of lead (Pb) and zinc (Zn) and analyze the subcellular distribution and chemical speciation of Zn and Ph in different parts of plants, under different modifier concentrations (CK group: 100% lead-zinc slag plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved one: 85% of lead-zinc slag ± 10% peat ± 5% bacterial manure plus a small amount of phosphate fertilizer, improved two: 75% lead-zinc slag ± 20% peat ± 5% bacterial manure ± a small amount of phosphate). Results showed that: (1) The content of Pb, Zn in matrix after planting four kinds of plants was lower than before, no significant difference between improved one and improved two of Nerium oleander and Boehmeria was found, but improved two was better than improved one of Paulownia, while improved one was better than improved two of Koelreuteria paniculata; Four plants had relatively low aboveground enrichment coefficient of Pb and Zn, but had a high transfer coefficient, showed that the appropriate modifier concentration was able to improve the Pb and Zn enrichment and transfer ability of plants. (2) In subcellular distribution, most of Pb and Zn were distributed in plant cell wall components and soluble components while the distribution in cell organelles such as mitochondria, chloroplasts and nucleus component were less. Compared with CK group, two improved group made soluble components of the cell walls of Pb fixation and retention of zinc role in the enhancement. (3) As for the chemical forms of Pb and Zn in plants, the main chemical forms of Pb were hydrochloric acid, sodium chloride and ethanol extractable forms, while other chemical form contents were few, the main chemical forms of Zn were different based on plant type. Compared with CK group, the proportion of the active Pb chemical form in different plant

  18. MitoTimer probe reveals the impact of autophagy, fusion, and motility on subcellular distribution of young and old mitochondrial protein and on relative mitochondrial protein age

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Andrew W; Trudeau, Kyle; Zik, Eden; Benador, Ilan Y; Twig, Gilad; Gottlieb, Roberta A; Shirihai, Orian S

    2013-01-01

    To study mitochondrial protein age dynamics, we targeted a time-sensitive fluorescent protein, MitoTimer, to the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial age was revealed by the integrated portions of young (green) and old (red) MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial protein age was dependent on turnover rates as pulsed synthesis, decreased import, or autophagic inhibition all increased the proportion of aged MitoTimer protein. Mitochondrial fusion promotes the distribution of young mitochondrial protein across the mitochondrial network as cells lacking essential fusion genes Mfn1 and Mfn2 displayed increased heterogeneity in mitochondrial protein age. Experiments in hippocampal neurons illustrate that the distribution of older and younger mitochondrial protein within the cell is determined by subcellular spatial organization and compartmentalization of mitochondria into neurites and soma. This effect was altered by overexpression of mitochondrial transport protein, RHOT1/MIRO1. Collectively our data show that distribution of young and old protein in the mitochondrial network is dependent on turnover, fusion, and transport. PMID:24149000

  19. 26 CFR 1.665(c)-1 - Accumulation distributions of certain foreign trusts; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of... 26 Internal Revenue 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Accumulation distributions of certain foreign... distributions of certain foreign trusts; in general. (a) In the case of a foreign trust created by a U.S....

  20. EFFECT OF VAPOR-PHASE BIOREACTOR OPERATION ON BIOMASS ACCUMULATION, DISTRIBUTION, AND ACTIVITY. (R826168)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Excess biomass accumulation and activity loss in vapor-phase bioreactors (VPBs) can lead to unreliable long-term operation. In this study, temporal and spatial variations in biomass accumulation, distribution and activity in VPBs treating toluene-contaminated air were monitored o...

  1. THE OCCURRENCE OF CONTAMINANT ACCUMULATION IN LEAD PIPE SCALES FROM DOMESTIC DRINKING WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants, such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps, and current monitoring practices d...

  2. Approach to distribution and accumulation of dibutyl phthalate in rats by immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Qiang; Wei, Chenxi; Wu, Yang; Li, Ke; Ding, Shumao; Yuan, Junlin; Yang, Xu; Chen, Mingqing

    2013-06-01

    Dibutyl phthalate (DBP) is mainly taken up by the general population from food intake. To estimate intake of phthalates, determining distribution and accumulation of DBP in biological materials was a critical need. In this work, we set up two novel approaches with a monoclonal antibody specific to DBP to determine the distribution and accumulation of DBP in vivo. The contents of DBP in liver, kidney, stomach and testes were detected by immunofluorescence assays and indirect competitive ELISA. This data give directly evidence that indicates the distribution and accumulation of DBP in vivo. Double-label immunofluorescence assay provides with a visual approach to determination of the distribution and accumulation of DBP. It indicated that DBP accumulated in subcutaneous tissue such as sweat gland, hair follicle. Both of immunofluorescence assay and ELISA can be used to detect the content of DBP in biological materials. Our assays showed that DBP accumulated in viscera being rich in fat, such as liver, kidney and could overcome physiological barriers to penetrate testes. The date suggested that the accumulations of DBP exposed through dermal route were less than that of oral route and most of DBP was metabolized in 2 or 3 days. PMID:23419389

  3. Biochemical properties and subcellular distribution of the BI and rbA isoforms of alpha 1A subunits of brain calcium channels

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Biochemical properties and subcellular distribution of the class A calcium channel alpha 1 subunits (alpha 1A) from rat and rabbit brain were examined using site-directed anti-peptide antibodies specific for rat rbA (anti-CNA3) and for rabbit BI (anti-NBI-1 and anti-NBI-2) isoforms of alpha 1A. In immunoblotting experiments, anti-CNA3 specifically identifies multiple alpha 1A polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 210, 190, and 160 kD, and anti-NBI-1 and anti-NBI-2 specifically recognize 190-kD alpha 1A polypeptides in rat brain membrane. In rabbit brain, anti-NBI-1 or anti-NBI-2 specifically detect alpha 1A polypeptides with apparent molecular masses of 220, 200, and 190 kD, while anti-CNA3 specifically recognizes 190-kD alpha 1A polypeptides. These polypeptides evidently represent multiple isoforms of alpha 1A present in both rat and rabbit brain. Anti-CNA3 specifically immunoprecipitates high affinity receptor sites for omega- conotoxin MVIIC (Kd approximately 100 pM), whereas anti-NBI-2 immunoprecipitates two distinct affinity receptor sites for omega- conotoxin MVIIC (Kd approximately 100 pM and approximately 1 microM). Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicate that alpha 1A subunits recognized by anti-CNA3 and anti-NBI-2 are associated with syntaxin in a stable, SDS-resistant complex and with synaptotagmin. Immunofluorescence studies reveal that calcium channels recognized by anti-NBI-2 are localized predominantly in dendrites and nerve terminals forming synapses on them, while calcium channels recognized by anti- CNA3 are localized more prominently in cell bodies and in nerve terminals. The mossy fiber terminals in hippocampus and the terminals of climbing and parallel fibers in cerebellum are differentially stained by these isoform-specific antibodies. These results indicate that both rbA and BI isoforms of alpha 1A are expressed in rat and rabbit brain and form calcium channels having alpha 1A subunits with distinct molecular mass, pharmacology

  4. Subcellular distribution of heavy metals in liver and kidney of a narwhal whale (Monodon monoceros): an evaluation for the presence of metallothionein.

    PubMed

    Wagemann, R; Hunt, R; Klaverkamp, J F

    1984-01-01

    The subcellular distribution of Zn, Cd, Cu and Hg in liver and kidney from a narwhal was determined by ultracentrifugation and gel filtration. Most of the total mercury in the liver and kidney was bound by the cellular pellet (88 and 73%, respectively). Of the total mercury, 7 and 11% was in the form of methylmercury in the liver and kidney, respectively. More than half (74%) of the total Zn and Cu in the kidney was in the cytosol and somewhat less than this was in the cytosol of the liver. Almost all of the cadmium in liver and kidney (88 and 92%, respectively) was in cytosol. Cytosolic fractions from liver and kidney were evaluated for the presence of metallothionein by analysing for Zn, Cd, Hg, Cu, Fe and--SH groups, by molecular weight estimation and by u.v. absorption spectra. Metallothionein was found in these organs in estimated concentrations similar to those present in terrestrial and other marine mammals. PMID:6149069

  5. Distribution of resveratrol and stilbene synthase in young grape plants (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon) and the effect of UV-C on its accumulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Tang, Ke; Yang, Hao-Ru; Wen, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Hui-Ling; Huang, Wei-Dong

    2010-01-01

    Current research indicated that the resveratrol was mainly accumulated in the skin of grape berry, however, little is yet known about the distribution of resveratrol, as well as the regulation mechanism at protein level and the localization of stilbene synthase (malonyl-CoA:4-coumaroyl-CoA malonyltransferase; EC 2.3.1.95; STS), a key enzyme of resveratrol biosynthesis, in young grape plants (Vitis vinifera L. cv. Cabernet Sauvignon). Resveratrol, whose constitutive level ranged from 0.2 mg kg(-1) FW to 16.5 mg kg(-1) FW, could be detected in stem, axillary bud, shoot tip, petiole, root and leaf of grape plants. Among them, stem phloems presented the most abundant of resveratrol, and the leaves presented the lowest. Interestingly, the level of STS mRNA and protein were highest in grape leaves. And the analysis of immunohistochemical showed the tissue-specific distribution of STS in different organs, presenting the similar results compared with the amount of protein. And the subcellular localization revealed that the cell wall in different tissues processed the most golden particles representing STS. Subjecting to UV-C irradiation, resveratrol and STS were both intensely stimulated in grape leaves, with the similar response pattern. Results above indicated that distribution of resveratrol and STS in grape was organ-specific and tissue-specific. And the accumulation of resveratrol induced by UV-C was regulated by transcriptional and translational level of STS.

  6. [Third World cities: points of accumulation, centers of distribution].

    PubMed

    Armstrong, W R; Mcgee, T G

    1985-01-01

    Attention was called over 3 decades ago to the very rapid growth of Third World cities and the significance of the differences between their patterns of urbanization and those of industrialized countries. Their demographic growth occurred much faster and depended much more heavily on high fertility, their economies were geared more to export of raw materials than to manufacturing and were unable to create massive numbers of jobs to absorb the growing labor force except in the unproductive tertiary sector, and it appeared unlikely that they would be able to produce entrepreneurial classes of their own. Several economic developments during the 1970s affected the world economy and the patterns of urbanization of the Third World: the decline of the principal capitalist economies and the multiple increases in the price of oil, the floating exchange rate, the considerable increase in consumer goods, and the increasing costs of labor in industrialized countries, among others, created new conditions. World economic interdependence, international control of investment and exchange, and volume and mobility of capital increased at a time of rapid economic growth in some Third World countries, especially those whose governments took an aggressive role in promoting growth and investment. Some Third World cities now seem to be developing according to a more western model, but the same cannot be said of all Third World countries, and international economic evolution appears to have led to increasing polarization between countries as well as within them. The 1 domain where a certain convergence has occurred is consumption, beginning with the privileged classes and filtering to the lower income groups. Consumption of collective and individual consumer goods, which is concentrated in the largest cities, increases dependence on imports, technology, knowledge, and usually debt. The modern productive sector and its distribution activities become implanted in the cities to such a degree

  7. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-1 - Accumulation distributions of trusts other than certain foreign trusts; in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) do not exceed the income of the trust during the taxable year, an accumulation distribution may... distribution of $5,000 computed as follows: Total distribution $20,000 Less: Income required to be distributed... income 5,000 Accumulation distribution 5,000 Example 2. Under the terms of the trust instrument,...

  8. Analysis of subcellular [57Co] cobalamin distribution in SH-SY5Y neurons and brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Ruberu, Kalani; Li, Hongyun; Garner, Brett

    2013-07-15

    Cobalamin (Cbl) utilization as a cofactor for methionine synthase and methylmalonyl-CoA mutase is dependent on the transport of Cbl through lysosomes and its subsequent delivery to the cytosol and mitochondria. We speculated that neuropathological conditions that impair lysosomal function (e.g., age-related lipofuscinosis and specific neurodegenerative diseases) might impair lysosomal Cbl transport. To address this question, an appropriate method to quantify intracellular Cbl transport in neuronal cell types and brain tissue is required. Thus, we developed methods to measure [57Co] Cbl levels in lysosomes, mitochondria and cytosol obtained from in vitro and in vivo sources. Human SH-SY5Y neurons or HT1080 fibroblasts were labeled with [57Co] Cbl and homogenized using a ball-bearing homogenizer, and the lysates were separated into 10 fractions using ultracentrifugation in an OptiPrep density gradient. Lysosomes were recovered from the top of the gradient (fractions 1-5), which were clearly separated from mitochondria (fractions 7-9) on the basis of the expression of the marker proteins, LAMP2 and VDAC1. The isolated lysosomes were intact based on their colocalization with acid phosphatase activity. The lysosomal and mitochondrial fractions were free of the cytosolic markers beta-actin and methionine synthase. The relative distribution of [57Co] Cbl in both neurons and fibroblasts was as follows: 6% in the lysosomes, 14% in the mitochondria and 80% in the cytosol. This technique was also used to fractionate organelles from mouse brain, where marker proteins were detected in the gradient at positions similar to those observed for the cell lines, and the relative distribution of [57Co] Cbl was as follows: 12% in the lysosomes, 15% in the mitochondria and 73% in the cytosol. These methods provide a useful tool for the investigation of intracellular Cbl trafficking in a neurobiological setting. PMID:23608310

  9. Subcellular Distribution of M2-muscarinic Receptors in Relation to Dopaminergic Neurons of the Rat Ventral Tegmental Area

    PubMed Central

    Garzón, Miguel; Pickel, Virginia M.

    2008-01-01

    Acetylcholine can affect cognitive functions and reward, in part, through activation of muscarinic receptors in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) to evoke changes in mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic transmission. Of the known muscarinic receptor subtypes present in the VTA, the M2 receptor (M2R) is most implicated in autoregulation, and also may play a heteroreceptor role in regulation of the output of the dopaminergic neurons. We sought to determine the functionally relevant sites for M2R activation in relation to VTA dopaminergic neurons by examining the electron microscopic immunolabeling of M2R and the dopamine transporter (DAT) in the VTA of rat brain. The M2R was localized to endomembranes in DAT-containing somatodendritic profiles, but showed a more prominent, size-dependent plasmalemmal location in non-dopaminergic dendrites. M2R also was located on the plasma membrane of morphologically heterogenous axon terminals contacting unlabeled as well as M2R or DAT-labeled dendrites. Some of these terminals formed asymmetric synapses resembling those of cholinergic terminals in the VTA. The majority, however, formed symmetric, inhibitory-type synapses, or were apposed without recognized junctions. Our results provide the first ultrastructural evidence that the M2R is expressed, but largely not available for local activation, on the plasma membrane of VTA dopaminergic neurons. Instead, the M2R in this region has a distribution suggesting more indirect regulation of mesocorticolimbic transmission through autoregulation of acetylcholine release and changes in the physiological activity or release of other, largely inhibitory transmitters. These findings could have implications for understanding the muscarinic control of cognitive and goal-directed behaviors within the VTA. PMID:16927256

  10. Concentration and subcellular distribution of trace elements in liver of small cetaceans incidentally caught along the Brazilian coast.

    PubMed

    Kunito, Takashi; Nakamura, Shinji; Ikemoto, Tokutaka; Anan, Yasumi; Kubota, Reiji; Tanabe, Shinsuke; Rosas, Fernando C W; Fillmann, Gilberto; Readman, James W

    2004-10-01

    Concentrations of trace elements (V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Cu, Zn, Ga, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Mo, Ag, Cd, Sb, Cs, Ba, T-Hg, Org-Hg, Tl and Pb) were determined in liver samples of estuarine dolphin (Sotalia guianensis; n = 20), Franciscana dolphin (Pontoporia blainvillei; n = 23), Atlantic spotted dolphin (Stenella frontalis; n = 2), common dolphin (Delphinus capensis; n = 1) and striped dolphin (Stenella coeruleoalba; n = 1) incidentally caught along the coast of Sao Paulo State and Parana State, Brazil, from 1997 to 1999. The hepatic concentrations of trace elements in the Brazilian cetaceans were comparable to the data available in literature on marine mammals from Northern Hemisphere. Concentrations of V, Se, Mo, Cd, T-Hg and Org-Hg increased with increasing age in liver of both estuarine and Franciscana dolphins. Very high concentrations of Cu (range, 262-1970 microg/g dry wt.) and Zn (range, 242-369 microg/g dry wt.) were observed in liver of sucklings of estuarine dolphin. Hepatic concentrations of V, Se, T-Hg, Org-Hg and Pb were significantly higher in estuarine dolphin, whereas Franciscana dolphin showed higher concentrations of Mn, Co, As and Rb. Ratio of Org-Hg to T-Hg in liver was significantly higher in Franciscana dolphin than estuarine dolphin, suggesting that demethylation ability of methyl Hg might be lower in liver of Franciscana than estuarine dolphins. High hepatic concentrations of Ag were found in some specimens of Franciscana dolphin (maximum, 20 microg/g dry wt.), and 17% of Franciscana showed higher concentrations of Ag than Hg. These samples with high Ag concentration also exhibited elevated hepatic Se concentration, implying that Ag might be detoxified by Se in the liver. Higher correlation coefficient between (Hg+0.5 Ag) and Se than between Hg and Se and the large distribution of Ag in non-soluble fraction in nuclear and mitochondrial fraction of the liver also suggests that Ag might be detoxified by Se via formation of Ag2Se in the liver of

  11. Subcellular Localization and Clues for the Function of the HetN Factor Influencing Heterocyst Distribution in Anabaena sp. Strain PCC 7120

    PubMed Central

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J.; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W.; Flores, Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  12. Incremental genetic perturbations to MCM2-7 expression and subcellular distribution reveal exquisite sensitivity of mice to DNA replication stress.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Chen-Hua; Wallace, Marsha D; Abratte, Christian; Southard, Teresa; Schimenti, John C

    2010-09-01

    Mutations causing replication stress can lead to genomic instability (GIN). In vitro studies have shown that drastic depletion of the MCM2-7 DNA replication licensing factors, which form the replicative helicase, can cause GIN and cell proliferation defects that are exacerbated under conditions of replication stress. To explore the effects of incrementally attenuated replication licensing in whole animals, we generated and analyzed the phenotypes of mice that were hemizygous for Mcm2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 null alleles, combinations thereof, and also in conjunction with the hypomorphic Mcm4(Chaos3) cancer susceptibility allele. Mcm4(Chaos3/Chaos3) embryonic fibroblasts have ∼40% reduction in all MCM proteins, coincident with reduced Mcm2-7 mRNA. Further genetic reductions of Mcm2, 6, or 7 in this background caused various phenotypes including synthetic lethality, growth retardation, decreased cellular proliferation, GIN, and early onset cancer. Remarkably, heterozygosity for Mcm3 rescued many of these defects. Consistent with a role in MCM nuclear export possessed by the yeast Mcm3 ortholog, the phenotypic rescues correlated with increased chromatin-bound MCMs, and also higher levels of nuclear MCM2 during S phase. The genetic, molecular and phenotypic data demonstrate that relatively minor quantitative alterations of MCM expression, homeostasis or subcellular distribution can have diverse and serious consequences upon development and confer cancer susceptibility. The results support the notion that the normally high levels of MCMs in cells are needed not only for activating the basal set of replication origins, but also "backup" origins that are recruited in times of replication stress to ensure complete replication of the genome. PMID:20838603

  13. Subcellular Distribution and Dynamics of Active Proteasome Complexes Unraveled by a Workflow Combining in Vivo Complex Cross-Linking and Quantitative Proteomics*

    PubMed Central

    Fabre, Bertrand; Lambour, Thomas; Delobel, Julien; Amalric, François; Monsarrat, Bernard; Burlet-Schiltz, Odile; Bousquet-Dubouch, Marie-Pierre

    2013-01-01

    Through protein degradation, the proteasome plays fundamental roles in different cell compartments. Although the composition of the 20S catalytic core particle (CP) has been well documented, little is known about the composition and dynamics of the regulatory complexes that play a crucial role in its activity, or about how they associate with the CP in different cell compartments, different cell lines, and in response to external stimuli. Because of difficulties performing acceptable cell fractionation while maintaining complex integrity, it has been challenging to characterize proteasome complexes by proteomic approaches. Here, we report an integrated protocol, combining a cross-linking procedure on intact cells with cell fractionation, proteasome immuno-purification, and robust label-free quantitative proteomic analysis by mass spectrometry to determine the distribution and dynamics of cellular proteasome complexes in leukemic cells. Activity profiles of proteasomes were correlated fully with the composition of protein complexes and stoichiometry. Moreover, our results suggest that, at the subcellular level, proteasome function is regulated by dynamic interactions between the 20S CP and its regulatory proteins—which modulate proteasome activity, stability, localization, or substrate uptake—rather than by profound changes in 20S CP composition. Proteasome plasticity was observed both in the 20S CP and in its network of interactions following IFNγ stimulation. The fractionation protocol also revealed specific proteolytic activities and structural features of low-abundance microsomal proteasomes from U937 and KG1a cells. These could be linked to their important roles in the endoplasmic reticulum associated degradation pathway in leukemic cells. PMID:23242550

  14. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide.

  15. Sterol liganding of OSBP-related proteins (ORPs) regulates the subcellular distribution of ORP-VAPA complexes and their impacts on organelle structure.

    PubMed

    Kentala, Henriikka; Pfisterer, Simon G; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Weber-Boyvat, Marion

    2015-07-01

    Oxysterol-binding protein (OSBP) and its homologues (ORPs) are lipid-binding/transfer proteins with affinity for oxysterols, cholesterol and glycerophospholipids. In addition to a ligand-binding domain, a majority of the ORPs carry a pleckstrin homology domain that targets organelle membranes via phosphoinositides, and a motif targeting the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) via VAMP-associated proteins (VAPs). We employed here Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation (BiFC) to systematically assess the effects of sterol manipulation of HuH7 cells on complexes of established sterol-binding ORPs with their ER receptor, VAMP-associated protein A (VAPA). Depletion of cellular cholesterol with lipoprotein-deficient medium and Mevastatin caused concentration of OSBP-VAPA complexes and Golgi complex markers at a juxtanuclear position, an effect reversed by low-density lipoprotein treatment. A similar redistribution of OSBP-VAPA but not of sterol-binding deficient mutant OSBP(ΔELSK)-VAPA, occurred upon treatment with the high-affinity ligand, 25-hydroxycholesterol (25OHC), which reduced total and free cholesterol. ORP2-VAPA complexes, which localize in untreated cells at blob-like ER structures with associated lipid droplets, were redistributed upon treatment with the ORP2 ligand 22(R)OHC to a diffuse cytoplasmic/ER pattern and the plasma membrane. Analogously, distribution of ORP4L-VAPA complexes between the plasma membrane and vimentin intermediate filament associated compartments was modified by statin or 25OHC treatment. The treatments resulted in loss of vimentin co-localization, and sterol-binding deficient ORP4L(ΔELSR)-VAPA localized predominantly to the plasma membrane. In conclusion, treatment with statin or oxysterol ligands modify the subcellular targeting of ORP-VAPA complexes, consistent with the notion that this machinery controls lipid homeostasis and signaling at organelle interfaces.

  16. Daytime restricted feeding modifies 24 h rhythmicity and subcellular distribution of liver glucocorticoid receptor and the urea cycle in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Luna-Moreno, Dalia; García-Ayala, Braulio; Díaz-Muñoz, Mauricio

    2012-12-14

    The timing system in mammals is formed by a set of peripheral biological clocks coordinated by a light-entrainable pacemaker located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus. Daytime restricted feeding (DRF) modifies the circadian control and uncouples the light-dependent physiological rhythmicity, food access becoming the principal external time cue. In these conditions, an alternative biological clock is expressed, the food-entrainable oscillator (FEO). Glucocorticoid hormones are an important part of the humoral mechanisms in the daily synchronisation of the metabolic response of peripheral oscillators by the timing system. A peak of circulating corticosterone has been reported before food access in DRF protocols. In the present study we explored in the liver the 24 h variations of: (1) the subcellular distribution of glucocorticoid receptor (GCR), (2) the activities of the corticosterone-forming and NADPH-generating enzymes (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD-1) and hexose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (H6PDH)), and, (3) parameters related with the urea cycle (circulating urea and activities of carbamoyl phosphate synthetase and ornithine transcarbamylase) elicited by DRF. The results showed that DRF promoted an increase of more than two times of the hepatic GCR, but exclusively in the cytosolic compartment, since the GCR in the nuclear fraction showed a reduction. No changes were observed in the activities of 11β-HSD-1 and H6PDH, but the rhythmicity of all of the urea cycle-related parameters was modified. It is concluded that liver glucocorticoid signalling and the urea cycle are responsive to feeding-restricted schedules and could be part of the FEO.

  17. Subcellular localization and clues for the function of the HetN factor influencing heterocyst distribution in Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Corrales-Guerrero, Laura; Mariscal, Vicente; Nürnberg, Dennis J; Elhai, Jeff; Mullineaux, Conrad W; Flores, Enrique; Herrero, Antonia

    2014-10-01

    In the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, heterocysts are formed in the absence of combined nitrogen, following a specific distribution pattern along the filament. The PatS and HetN factors contribute to the heterocyst pattern by inhibiting the formation of consecutive heterocysts. Thus, inactivation of any of these factors produces the multiple contiguous heterocyst (Mch) phenotype. Upon N stepdown, a HetN protein with its C terminus fused to a superfolder version of green fluorescent protein (sf-GFP) or to GFP-mut2 was observed, localized first throughout the whole area of differentiating cells and later specifically on the peripheries and in the polar regions of mature heterocysts, coinciding with the location of the thylakoids. Polar localization required an N-terminal stretch comprising residues 2 to 27 that may represent an unconventional signal peptide. Anabaena strains expressing a version of HetN lacking this fragment from a mutant gene placed at the native hetN locus exhibited a mild Mch phenotype. In agreement with previous results, deletion of an internal ERGSGR sequence, which is identical to the C-terminal sequence of PatS, also led to the Mch phenotype. The subcellular localization in heterocysts of fluorescence resulting from the fusion of GFP to the C terminus of HetN suggests that a full HetN protein is present in these cells. Furthermore, the full HetN protein is more conserved among cyanobacteria than the internal ERGSGR sequence. These observations suggest that HetN anchored to thylakoid membranes in heterocysts may serve a function besides that of generating a regulatory (ERGSGR) peptide. PMID:25049089

  18. Reversible Oxidation of a Conserved Methionine in the Nuclear Export Sequence Determines Subcellular Distribution and Activity of the Fungal Nitrate Regulator NirA

    PubMed Central

    Schinko, Thorsten; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Hortschansky, Peter; Dattenböck, Christoph; Muro-Pastor, María Isabel; Kungl, Andreas; Brakhage, Axel A.; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a most important soil nitrogen source, is tightly regulated in microorganisms and plants. In Aspergillus nidulans, during the transcriptional activation process of nitrate assimilatory genes, the interaction between the pathway-specific transcription factor NirA and the exportin KapK/CRM1 is disrupted, and this leads to rapid nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NirA. In this work by mass spectrometry, we found that in the absence of nitrate, when NirA is inactive and predominantly cytosolic, methionine 169 in the nuclear export sequence (NES) is oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (Metox169). This oxidation depends on FmoB, a flavin-containing monooxygenase which in vitro uses methionine and cysteine, but not glutathione, as oxidation substrates. The function of FmoB cannot be replaced by alternative Fmo proteins present in A. nidulans. Exposure of A. nidulans cells to nitrate led to rapid reduction of NirA-Metox169 to Met169; this reduction being independent from thioredoxin and classical methionine sulfoxide reductases. Replacement of Met169 by isoleucine, a sterically similar but not oxidizable residue, led to partial loss of NirA activity and insensitivity to FmoB-mediated nuclear export. In contrast, replacement of Met169 by alanine transformed the protein into a permanently nuclear and active transcription factor. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of NirA-KapK interactions and subcellular localization studies of NirA mutants lacking different parts of the protein provided evidence that Met169 oxidation leads to a change in NirA conformation. Based on these results we propose that in the presence of nitrate the activation domain is exposed, but the NES is masked by a central portion of the protein (termed nitrate responsive domain, NiRD), thus restricting active NirA molecules to the nucleus. In the absence of nitrate, Met169 in the NES is oxidized by an FmoB-dependent process leading to loss of protection by the Ni

  19. Reversible Oxidation of a Conserved Methionine in the Nuclear Export Sequence Determines Subcellular Distribution and Activity of the Fungal Nitrate Regulator NirA.

    PubMed

    Gallmetzer, Andreas; Silvestrini, Lucia; Schinko, Thorsten; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Hortschansky, Peter; Dattenböck, Christoph; Muro-Pastor, María Isabel; Kungl, Andreas; Brakhage, Axel A; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a most important soil nitrogen source, is tightly regulated in microorganisms and plants. In Aspergillus nidulans, during the transcriptional activation process of nitrate assimilatory genes, the interaction between the pathway-specific transcription factor NirA and the exportin KapK/CRM1 is disrupted, and this leads to rapid nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NirA. In this work by mass spectrometry, we found that in the absence of nitrate, when NirA is inactive and predominantly cytosolic, methionine 169 in the nuclear export sequence (NES) is oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (Metox169). This oxidation depends on FmoB, a flavin-containing monooxygenase which in vitro uses methionine and cysteine, but not glutathione, as oxidation substrates. The function of FmoB cannot be replaced by alternative Fmo proteins present in A. nidulans. Exposure of A. nidulans cells to nitrate led to rapid reduction of NirA-Metox169 to Met169; this reduction being independent from thioredoxin and classical methionine sulfoxide reductases. Replacement of Met169 by isoleucine, a sterically similar but not oxidizable residue, led to partial loss of NirA activity and insensitivity to FmoB-mediated nuclear export. In contrast, replacement of Met169 by alanine transformed the protein into a permanently nuclear and active transcription factor. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of NirA-KapK interactions and subcellular localization studies of NirA mutants lacking different parts of the protein provided evidence that Met169 oxidation leads to a change in NirA conformation. Based on these results we propose that in the presence of nitrate the activation domain is exposed, but the NES is masked by a central portion of the protein (termed nitrate responsive domain, NiRD), thus restricting active NirA molecules to the nucleus. In the absence of nitrate, Met169 in the NES is oxidized by an FmoB-dependent process leading to loss of protection by the Ni

  20. Reversible Oxidation of a Conserved Methionine in the Nuclear Export Sequence Determines Subcellular Distribution and Activity of the Fungal Nitrate Regulator NirA.

    PubMed

    Gallmetzer, Andreas; Silvestrini, Lucia; Schinko, Thorsten; Gesslbauer, Bernd; Hortschansky, Peter; Dattenböck, Christoph; Muro-Pastor, María Isabel; Kungl, Andreas; Brakhage, Axel A; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Strauss, Joseph

    2015-07-01

    The assimilation of nitrate, a most important soil nitrogen source, is tightly regulated in microorganisms and plants. In Aspergillus nidulans, during the transcriptional activation process of nitrate assimilatory genes, the interaction between the pathway-specific transcription factor NirA and the exportin KapK/CRM1 is disrupted, and this leads to rapid nuclear accumulation and transcriptional activity of NirA. In this work by mass spectrometry, we found that in the absence of nitrate, when NirA is inactive and predominantly cytosolic, methionine 169 in the nuclear export sequence (NES) is oxidized to methionine sulfoxide (Metox169). This oxidation depends on FmoB, a flavin-containing monooxygenase which in vitro uses methionine and cysteine, but not glutathione, as oxidation substrates. The function of FmoB cannot be replaced by alternative Fmo proteins present in A. nidulans. Exposure of A. nidulans cells to nitrate led to rapid reduction of NirA-Metox169 to Met169; this reduction being independent from thioredoxin and classical methionine sulfoxide reductases. Replacement of Met169 by isoleucine, a sterically similar but not oxidizable residue, led to partial loss of NirA activity and insensitivity to FmoB-mediated nuclear export. In contrast, replacement of Met169 by alanine transformed the protein into a permanently nuclear and active transcription factor. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis of NirA-KapK interactions and subcellular localization studies of NirA mutants lacking different parts of the protein provided evidence that Met169 oxidation leads to a change in NirA conformation. Based on these results we propose that in the presence of nitrate the activation domain is exposed, but the NES is masked by a central portion of the protein (termed nitrate responsive domain, NiRD), thus restricting active NirA molecules to the nucleus. In the absence of nitrate, Met169 in the NES is oxidized by an FmoB-dependent process leading to loss of protection by the Ni

  1. Regulation of gene expression and subcellular protein distribution in MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells by lysophosphatidic acid: Relevance to dendrite outgrowth.

    SciTech Connect

    Waters, Katrina M.; Jacobs, Jon M.; Gritsenko, Marina A.; Karin, Norman J.

    2011-02-26

    Osteoblastic and osteocytic cells are highly responsive to the lipid growth factor lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) but the mechanisms by which LPA alters bone cell functions are largely unknown. A major effect of LPA on osteocytic cells is the stimulation of dendrite membrane outgrowth, a process that we predicted to require changes in gene expression and protein distribution. We employed DNA microarrays for global transcriptional profiling of MLO-Y4 osteocytic cells grown for 6 and 24h in the presence or absence of LPA. We identified 932 transcripts that displayed statistically significant changes in abundance of at least 1.25-fold in response to LPA treatment. Gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that the regulated gene products were linked to diverse cellular processes, including DNA repair, response to unfolded protein, ossification, protein-RNA complex assembly, and amine biosynthesis. Gene products associated with the regulation of actin microfilament dynamics displayed the most robust expression changes, and LPA-induced dendritogenesis in vitro was blocked by the stress fiber inhibitor cytochalasin D. Mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of MLO-Y4 cells revealed significant LPA-induced changes in the abundance of 284 proteins at 6h and 844 proteins at 24h. GO analysis of the proteomic data linked the effects of LPA to cell processes that control of protein distribution and membrane outgrowth, including protein localization, protein complex assembly, Golgi vesicle transport, cytoskeleton-dependent transport, and membrane invagination/endocytosis. Dendrites were isolated from LPA-treated MLO-Y4 cells and subjected to proteomic analysis to quantitatively assess the subcellular distribution of proteins. Sets of 129 and 36 proteins were enriched in the dendrite fraction as compared to whole cells after 6h and 24h of LPA exposure, respectively. Protein markers indicated that membranous organelles were largely excluded from the dendrites. Highly represented among

  2. Micro-PIXE studies of elemental distribution in Cd-accumulating Brassica juncea L.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Thorsten; Haag-Kerwer, Angela; Maetz, Mischa; Niecke, Manfred; Povh, Bogdan; Rausch, Thomas; Schüßler, Arthur

    1999-10-01

    Brassica juncea L. is a high biomass producing crop plant, being able to accumulate Cd and other heavy metals in their roots and shoots. It is a good candidate for efficient phytoextraction of heavy metals - such as Cd - from polluted soils. PIXE and STIM analyses were applied to investigate Cd-uptake in roots and the resulting effects on the elemental distribution of Cd stressed plants. The axial distribution of trace elements as a function of distance from the root tip as well as the radial distribution within cross-sections were analysed. The results are compared with the elemental distribution in control plants.

  3. Cadmium re-distribution from pod and root zones and accumulation by peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Kairong; Song, Ningning; Zhao, Qiaoqiao; van der Zee, S E A T M

    2016-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) genotypes may differ greatly with regard to cadmium (Cd) accumulation, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. To determine the key factors that may contribute to Cd re-distribution and accumulation in peanut genotypes with different Cd accumulating patterns, a split-pot soil experiment was conducted with three common Chinese peanut cultivars (Fenghua-6, Huayu-20, and Huayu-23). The growth medium was separated into pod and root zones with varied Cd concentrations in each zone to determine the re-distribution of Cd after it is taken up via different routes. The peanut cultivars were divided into two groups based on Cd translocation efficiency as follows: (1) high internal Cd translocation efficiency cultivar (Fenghua-6) and (2) low internal Cd translocation efficiency cultivars (Huayu-20 and Huayu-23). Compared with Fenghua-6, low Cd translocation cultivars Huayu-20 and Huayu-23 showed higher biomass production, especially in stems and leaves, leading to dilution of metal concentrations. Results also showed that Cd concentration in roots increased significantly with increasing Cd concentrations in soils when Cd was applied in the root zone. However, there were no significant differences in the root Cd concentrations between different pod zone Cd treatments and the control, suggesting that root uptake, rather than pod uptake, is responsible for Cd accumulation in the roots of peanuts. Significant differences of Cd distribution were observed between pod and root zone Cd exposure treatments. The three peanut cultivars revealed higher kernel over total Cd fractions for pod than for root zone Cd exposure if only extra applied Cd was considered. This suggests that uptake through peg and pod shell might, at least partially, be responsible for the variation in Cd re-distribution and accumulation among peanut cultivars. Cd uptake by plants via two routes (i.e., via roots and via pegs and pods, respectively) and internal Cd translocation

  4. 26 CFR 54.4981A-1T - Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... accumulations are certain amounts held on the date of death of an employee or individual by qualified plans and... provided in Q&A a-9 of this section beginning in 1988 for cost-of-living increases). Certain individuals... distribution received by any person with respect to an individual as a result of the death of that...

  5. 26 CFR 54.4981A-1T - Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary). 54.4981A-1T Section 54.4981A-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES §...

  6. 26 CFR 54.4981A-1T - Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary). 54.4981A-1T Section 54.4981A-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES §...

  7. 26 CFR 54.4981A-1T - Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 17 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Tax on excess distributions and excess accumulations (temporary). 54.4981A-1T Section 54.4981A-1T Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES (CONTINUED) PENSION EXCISE TAXES §...

  8. Copper changes the yield and cadmium/zinc accumulation and cellular distribution in the cadmium/zinc hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhu; Wu, Longhua; Hu, Pengjie; Luo, Yongming; Christie, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Non-accumulated metals in mixed metal contaminated soils may affect hyperaccumulator growth and metal accumulation and thus remediation efficiency. Two hydroponics experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of copper (Cu) on cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) accumulation by the Cd/Zn hyperaccumulator Sedum plumbizincicola, Cu toxicity and plant detoxification using chemical sequential extraction of metals, sub-cellular separation, micro synchrotron radiation based X-ray fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. Compared with the control (0.31 μM Cu), 5-50 μM Cu had no significant effect on Cd/Zn accumulation, but Cu at 200 μM induced root cell plasmolysis and disordered chloroplast structure. The plants held Cu in the roots and cell walls and complexed Cu in insoluble forms as their main detoxification mechanisms. Exposure to 200 μM Cu for 4 days inhibited plant Cd uptake and translocation but did not affect Zn concentrations in roots and stems. Moreover, unloading of Cd and Zn from stem to leaf was restrained compared to control plants, perhaps due to Cu accumulation in leaf veins. Copper may thus interfere with root Cd uptake and restrain Cd/Zn unloading to the leaves. Further investigation of how Cu affects plant metal uptake may help elucidate the Cd/Zn hyper-accumulating mechanisms of S. plumbizincicola. PMID:23959253

  9. Cultivar variations in cadmium and lead accumulation and distribution among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weitao; Liang, Lichen; Zhang, Xue; Zhou, Qixing

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, heavy metal pollution in agricultural soil in China has received public concern. The concept of low-accumulation cultivars (LACs) was proposed to minimize the influx of pollutants to the human food chain. Variations in Cd and Pb accumulation, distribution, and tolerance among 30 wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) cultivars were studied in a hydroponic experiment to preliminary identify LACs of Cd or Pb for further field experiments. Of the 30 wheat cultivars tested, 27 and 26 wheat cultivars showed no effect of the Cd/Pb treatments on the shoot and root biomass, respectively. The results showed that the tested wheat cultivars had considerable tolerance to Cd and Pb toxicity. Significant (p < 0.05) differences in shoot Cd concentration were observed among the tested wheat cultivars under treatments Cd1.0 and Cd1.0Pb15, ranging from 0.91 to 6.74 and from 0.87 to 5.96, with the mean of 3.83 and 2.94 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. Significant (p < 0.05) differences in shoot Pb concentration were also observed among the tested wheat cultivars under treatments Pb15 and Cd1.0Pb15, ranging from 22.18 to 94.03 and from 18.30 to 76.88, with the mean of 50.38 and 41.20 mg kg(-1) DW, respectively. Low accumulation and internal distribution may both affect the cultivar differences in Cd and Pb accumulation in wheat shoots. Overall, wheat cultivars LF-13, LF-16, and LF-21 had lower Cd-accumulating abilities in their shoots. Wheat cultivars LF-13, LF-23, LF-26, and LF-27 showed low Pb accumulation characteristics in their shoots. An antagonistic interaction occurred between Cd and Pb in accumulation in wheat roots and shoots, which will be further studied in field experiments.

  10. Root anatomy and element distribution vary between two Salix caprea isolates with different Cd accumulation capacities

    PubMed Central

    Vaculík, Marek; Konlechner, Cornelia; Langer, Ingrid; Adlassnig, Wolfram; Puschenreiter, Markus; Lux, Alexander; Hauser, Marie-Theres

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of the influence of toxic elements on root anatomy and element distribution is still limited. This study describes anatomical responses, metal accumulation and element distribution of rooted cuttings of Salix caprea after exposure to Cd and/or Zn. Differences in the development of apoplastic barriers and tissue organization in roots between two distinct S. caprea isolates with divergent Cd uptake and accumulation capacities in leaves might reflect an adaptive predisposition based on different natural origins. Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) revealed that Cd and Zn interfered with the distribution of elements in a tissue- and isolate-specific manner. Zinc, Ca, Mg, Na and Si were enriched in the peripheral bark, K and S in the phloem and Cd in both vascular tissues. Si levels were lower in the superior Cd translocator. Since the cuttings originated from stocks isolated from polluted and unpolluted sites we probably uncovered different strategies against toxic elements. PMID:22325439

  11. Site of Fluoride Accumulation in Navel Orange Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chong W.; Thompson, C. Ray

    1966-01-01

    Fluoride-polluted navel orange leaves, Citrus sinensis (Linn.) Osbeck, were fractionated into the subcellular components in hexane/carbon tetrachloride mixtures having various densities. Fluoride was determined at each fraction. Analyses were also made for the subcellular distribution of chlorophyll, nitrogen, and DNA to assess the extent of cross-contamination of each component. The fraction containing cell wall, nuclei, and partly broken cells apparently contained a major amount of fluoride. However, if allowance was made for the cross-contamination of chloroplasts and chloroplast fragments, the fraction of chloroplasts was found to be the site of the highest fluoride accumulation. When each particulate component was washed with water after drying, the combined washings contained more than 50% of the total fluoride of the isolated fractions. The usual method of subcellular fractionation with aqueous solvent shifted the major site of fluoride accumulation from the fraction of chloroplasts to that of the supernatant. PMID:5908632

  12. Evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 peroxisomal and mitochondrial targeting. A survey of its subcellular distribution in the livers of various representatives of the classes Mammalia, Aves and Amphibia.

    PubMed

    Danpure, C J; Fryer, P; Jennings, P R; Allsop, J; Griffiths, S; Cunningham, A

    1994-08-01

    As part of a wider study on the molecular evolution of alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase 1 (AGT1) intracellular compartmentalization, we have determined the subcellular distribution of immunoreactive AGT1, using postembedding protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopy, in the livers of various members of the classes Mammalia, Aves, and Amphibia. As far as organellar distribution is concerned, three categories could be distinguished. In members of the first category (type I), all, or nearly all, of the immunoreactive AGT1 was concentrated within the peroxisomes. In the second category (type II), AGT1 was found more evenly distributed in both peroxisomes and mitochondria. In the third category (type III), AGT1 was localized mainly within the mitochondria with much lower, but widely variable, amounts in the peroxisomes. Type I animals include the human, two great apes (gorilla, orangutan), two Old World monkeys (anubis baboon, Japanese macaque), a New World monkey (white-faced Saki monkey), a lago, morph (European rabbit), a bat (Seba's short-tailed fruit bat), two caviomorph rodents (guinea pig, orange-rumped agouti), and two Australian marsupials (koala, Bennett's wallaby). Type II animals include two New World monkeys (common marmoset, cotton-top tamarin), three prosimians (brown lemur, fat-tailed dwarf lemur, pygmy slow loris), five rodents (a hybrid crested porcupine, Colombian ground squirrel, laboratory rat, laboratory mouse, golden hamster), an American marsupial (grey short-tailed opossum), and a bird (raven). Type III animals include the large tree shrew, three insectivores (common Eurasian mole, European hedgehog, house shrew), four carnivores (domestic cat, ocelot, domestic dog, polecat ferret), and an amphibian (common frog). In addition to these categories, some animals (e.g. guinea pig, common frog) possessed significant amounts of cytosolic AGT1. Whereas the subcellular distribution of AGT1 in some orders (e.g. Insectivora and Carnivora) did not appear

  13. Subcellular Localization of Class I Histone Deacetylases in the Developing Xenopus tectum

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xia; Ruan, Hangze; Li, Xia; Qin, Liming; Tao, Yi; Qi, Xianjie; Gao, Juanmei; Gan, Lin; Duan, Shumin; Shen, Wanhua

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are thought to localize in the nucleus to regulate gene transcription and play pivotal roles in neurogenesis, apoptosis, and plasticity. However, the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the developing brain remains unclear. Here, we show that HDAC1 and HDAC2 are located in both the mitochondria and the nucleus in the Xenopus laevis stage 34 tectum and are mainly restricted to the nucleus following further brain development. HDAC3 is widely present in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during early tectal development and is mainly distributed in the nucleus in stage 45 tectum. In contrast, HDAC8 is broadly located in the mitochondria, nucleus, and cytoplasm during tectal development. These data demonstrate that HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 are transiently localized in the mitochondria and that the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs in the Xenopus tectum is heterogeneous. Furthermore, we observed that spherical mitochondria accumulate in the cytoplasm at earlier stages, whereas elongated mitochondria are evenly distributed in the tectum at later stages. The activity of histone acetylation (H4K12) remains low in mitochondria during tectal development. Pharmacological blockades of HDACs using a broad spectrum HDAC inhibitor of Trichostatin A (TSA) or specific class I HDAC inhibitors of MS-275 and MGCD0103 decrease the number of mitochondria in the tectum at stage 34. These findings highlight a link between the subcellular distribution of class I HDACs and mitochondrial dynamics in the developing optic tectum of Xenopus laevis. PMID:26793062

  14. Accumulation of contaminants of emerging concern in food crops-part 2: Plant distribution.

    PubMed

    Hyland, Katherine C; Blaine, Andrea C; Higgins, Christopher P

    2015-10-01

    Arid agricultural regions often turn to using treated wastewater (reclaimed water) to irrigate food crops. Concerns arise, however, when considering the potential for persistent contaminants of emerging concern to accumulate into plants intended for human consumption. The present study examined the accumulation of a suite of 9 contaminants of emerging concern into 2 representative food crops, lettuce and strawberry, following uptake via the roots and subsequent distribution to other plant tissues. Calculating accumulation metrics (concentration factors) allowed for comparison of the compartmental affinity of each chemical for each plant tissue compartment. The root concentration factor was found to exhibit a positive linear correlation with the pH-adjusted octanol-water partition coefficient (DOW ) for the target contaminants of emerging concern. Coupled with the concentration-dependent accumulation observed in the roots, this result implies that accumulation of these contaminants of emerging concern into plant roots is driven by passive partitioning. Of the contaminants of emerging concern examined, nonionizable contaminants, such as triclocarban, carbamazepine, and organophosphate flame retardants displayed the greatest potential for translocation from the roots to above-ground plant compartments. In particular, the organophosphate flame retardants displayed increasing affinity for shoots and fruits with decreasing size/octanol-water partition coefficient (KOW ). Cationic diphenhydramine and anionic sulfamethoxazole, once transported to the shoots of the strawberry plant, demonstrated the greatest potential of the contaminants examined to be then carried to the edible fruit portion. PMID:25988579

  15. Rapid subcellular fractionation of the rat liver endocytic compartments involved in transcytosis of polymeric immunoglobulin A and endocytosis of asialofetuin.

    PubMed Central

    Branch, W J; Mullock, B M; Luzio, J P

    1987-01-01

    The distributions of two endocytosed radiolabelled ligands (polymeric immunoglobulin A and asialofetuin) in rat liver endocytic compartments were investigated by using rapid subcellular fractionation of post-mitochondrial supernatants on vertical density gradients of Ficoll or Nycodenz. Two endocytic compartments were identified, both ligands being initially associated with a light endocytic-vesicle fraction on Ficoll gradients, asialofetuin then accumulating in denser endosomes before transfer to lysosomes for degradation. PMID:2444213

  16. Accumulation and evolution of the spatial distribution of radicals in vitreous propanol in a glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Kurshev, V.V.; Raitsimring, A.M.

    1992-09-01

    Analysis of the dipole broadening of an EPR line is used to explain the change in the spatial distribution of radicals formed in the plasma of a high-frequency glow discharge on the surface of vitreous propanol, which contains an electron acceptor. The contributions of various mechanisms for radical formation are evaluated. A model is proposed to describe both the accumulation and the evolution of the stabilization region of radicals in the plasmolysis process. 13 refs., 4 figs.

  17. Using a fixed-wing UAS to map snow depth distribution: an evaluation at peak accumulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Michele, Carlo; Avanzi, Francesco; Passoni, Daniele; Barzaghi, Riccardo; Pinto, Livio; Dosso, Paolo; Ghezzi, Antonio; Gianatti, Roberto; Della Vedova, Giacomo

    2016-03-01

    We investigate snow depth distribution at peak accumulation over a small Alpine area ( ˜ 0.3 km2) using photogrammetry-based surveys with a fixed-wing unmanned aerial system (UAS). These devices are growing in popularity as inexpensive alternatives to existing techniques within the field of remote sensing, but the assessment of their performance in Alpine areas to map snow depth distribution is still an open issue. Moreover, several existing attempts to map snow depth using UASs have used multi-rotor systems, since they guarantee higher stability than fixed-wing systems. We designed two field campaigns: during the first survey, performed at the beginning of the accumulation season, the digital elevation model of the ground was obtained. A second survey, at peak accumulation, enabled us to estimate the snow depth distribution as a difference with respect to the previous aerial survey. Moreover, the spatial integration of UAS snow depth measurements enabled us to estimate the snow volume accumulated over the area. On the same day, we collected 12 probe measurements of snow depth at random positions within the case study to perform a preliminary evaluation of UAS-based snow depth. Results reveal that UAS estimations of point snow depth present an average difference with reference to manual measurements equal to -0.073 m and a RMSE equal to 0.14 m. We have also explored how some basic snow depth statistics (e.g., mean, standard deviation, minima and maxima) change with sampling resolution (from 5 cm up to ˜ 100 m): for this case study, snow depth standard deviation (hence coefficient of variation) increases with decreasing cell size, but it stabilizes for resolutions smaller than 1 m. This provides a possible indication of sampling resolution in similar conditions.

  18. Caesium-137 distribution, inventories and accumulation history in the Baltic Sea sediments.

    PubMed

    Zaborska, Agata; Winogradow, Aleksandra; Pempkowiak, Janusz

    2014-01-01

    The Baltic Sea is susceptible to pollution by hazardous substances due to limited water exchange, shallowness, and the large catchment area. Radionuclides, particularly (137)Cs, are one of the most hazardous anthropogenic substances present in the Baltic environment. This study was conducted to present (137)Cs present contamination that should further be a subject of reliable monitoring when the new Nuclear Power Plant is put into operation in the northern Poland. The sea-wide, up to date distribution of (137)Cs activities and inventories in the Baltic Sea bottom sediments are presented. The (137)Cs activity concentrations were measured in 30 cm long sediment cores collected at 22 sampling stations. Sediment accumulation rates were quantified by (210)Pb geochronology to follow the history of (137)Cs accumulation. The (137)Cs inventories and fluxes were calculated. Most of the Baltic Sea sediments accumulated (137)Cs in the range from 750 to 2675 Bq m(-2). The Bothnian Bay is severely contaminated by (137)Cs with inventories up to 95,191 Bq m(-2). This region is moreover characterized by extremely large patchiness of (137)Cs inventories. The (137)Cs annual fluxes are highest at the two stations located at the Bothnian Bay (342 Bq m(-2) and 527 Bq m(-2)) due to large Chernobyl (137)Cs contamination of that region and high sediment accumulation rates. When these stations are excluded, the recent, annual mean value of (137)Cs load to the Baltic Sea deposits is 38 ± 22 Bq m(-2). The distribution of radio-caesium inventories over the Baltic Sea nowadays reflects the pattern of Chernobyl contamination. The radio-caesium deposited in surface sediments is not permanently buried, but may be resuspended and redeposited by currents, bioturbation or anthropogenic activities.

  19. Does aridity influence the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in Acacia (Leguminosae: Mimosoideae)?

    PubMed

    Brown, Sharon L; Warwick, Nigel W M; Prychid, Christina J

    2013-12-01

    Calcium oxalate (CaOx) crystals are a common natural feature of many plant families, including the Leguminosae. The functional role of crystals and the mechanisms that underlie their deposition remain largely unresolved. In several species, the seasonal deposition of crystals has been observed. To gain insight into the effects of rainfall on crystal formation, the morphology, distribution and accumulation of calcium oxalate crystals in phyllodes of the leguminous Acacia sect. Juliflorae (Benth.) C. Moore & Betche from four climate zones along an aridity gradient, was investigated. The shapes of crystals, which include rare Rosanoffian morphologies, were constant between species from different climate zones, implying that morphology was not affected by rainfall. The distribution and accumulation of CaOx crystals, however, did appear to be climate-related. Distribution was primarily governed by vein density, an architectural trait which has evolved in higher plants in response to increasing aridity. Furthermore, crystals were more abundant in acacias from low rainfall areas, and in phyllodes containing high concentrations of calcium, suggesting that both aridity and soil calcium levels play important roles in the precipitation of CaOx. As crystal formation appears to be calcium-induced, we propose that CaOx crystals in Acacia most likely function in bulk calcium regulation.

  20. Subcellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus proteins and alterations induced in infected cells: A comparative study with foot-and-mouth disease virus and vesicular stomatitis virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin-Acebes, Miguel A.; Gonzalez-Magaldi, Monica; Rosas, Maria F.; Borrego, Belen; Brocchi, Emiliana; Armas-Portela, Rosario; Sobrino, Francisco

    2008-05-10

    The intracellular distribution of swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV) proteins and the induced reorganization of endomembranes in IBRS-2 cells were analyzed. Fluorescence to new SVDV capsids appeared first upon infection, concentrated in perinuclear circular structures and colocalized to dsRNA. As in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV)-infected cells, a vesicular pattern was predominantly found in later stages of SVDV capsid morphogenesis that colocalized with those of non-structural proteins 2C, 2BC and 3A. These results suggest that assembly of capsid proteins is associated to the replication complex. Confocal microscopy showed a decreased fluorescence to ER markers (calreticulin and protein disulfide isomerase), and disorganization of cis-Golgi gp74 and trans-Golgi caveolin-1 markers in SVDV- and FMDV-, but not in vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-infected cells. Electron microscopy of SVDV-infected cells at an early stage of infection revealed fragmented ER cisternae with expanded lumen and accumulation of large Golgi vesicles, suggesting alterations of vesicle traffic through Golgi compartments. At this early stage, FMDV induced different patterns of ER fragmentation and Golgi alterations. At later stages of SVDV cytopathology, cells showed a completely vacuolated cytoplasm containing vesicles of different sizes. Cell treatment with brefeldin A, which disrupts the Golgi complex, reduced SVDV ({approx} 5 log) and VSV ({approx} 4 log) titers, but did not affect FMDV growth. Thus, three viruses, which share target tissues and clinical signs in natural hosts, induce different intracellular effects in cultured cells.

  1. The impact of migration and remittances on wealth accumulation and distribution in rural Thailand.

    PubMed

    Garip, Filiz

    2014-04-01

    This article studies the impact of internal migration and remittance flows on wealth accumulation and distribution in 51 rural villages in Nang Rong, Thailand. Using data from 5,449 households, the study constructs indices of household productive and consumer assets with principal component analysis. The changes in these indices from 1994 to 2000 are modeled as a function of households' prior migration and remittance behavior with ordinary least squares, matching, and instrumental variable methods. The findings show that rich households lose productive assets with migration, potentially because of a reduction in the labor force available to maintain local economic activities, while poor households gain productive assets. Regardless of wealth status, households do not gain or lose consumer assets with migration or remittances. These results suggest an equalizing effect of migration and remittances on wealth distribution in rural Thailand. PMID:24363180

  2. Element accumulation, distribution, and phytoremediation potential in selected metallophytes growing in a contaminated area.

    PubMed

    Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Kandziora-Ciupa, Marta; Ciepał, Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    The distribution of elements in three pseudometallophytes species Cardaminopsis arenosa, Plantago lanceolata, and Plantago major, naturally occurring at metalliferous and non-metalliferous sites in southern Poland, was investigated. The accumulation of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, as well as Ca, P, Na, and K in shoots and roots was measured. The level of the accumulated trace elements (ATE) was visibly higher in C. arenosa and P. lanceolata from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. However, the level of the accumulated nutrient elements (ANE) was visibly higher only in C. arenosa plants. Also, higher potassium share in ANE was found in the shoots of C. arenosa and Plantago species from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. The highest content of Cd, Zn, Pb, Al, Fe, and Mn was found in C. arenosa, which better reflected metal concentrations in the metalliferous and non-metalliferous soil than other plants. In the studied Plantago species, in almost all cases in all sites TF (translocation coefficient) and MR (mobility ratio) were below 1, which indicates they use the excluder strategy. The best accumulation ability was found for C. arenosa. The higher translocation coefficients (TF > 1) for Zn and Cd in C. arenosa shoots make it suitable for phytoextraction from soil, while the lower translocation ratios (TF < 1) for Zn and Cd in Plantago species and also for Pb in C. arenosa make them suitable for phytostabilization. Almost in all cases the plants had enrichment coefficient >2, which suggested that they may act as indicators of the soil metal contamination.

  3. Element accumulation, distribution, and phytoremediation potential in selected metallophytes growing in a contaminated area.

    PubMed

    Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Kandziora-Ciupa, Marta; Ciepał, Ryszard

    2015-07-01

    The distribution of elements in three pseudometallophytes species Cardaminopsis arenosa, Plantago lanceolata, and Plantago major, naturally occurring at metalliferous and non-metalliferous sites in southern Poland, was investigated. The accumulation of Al, Cd, Cu, Fe, Mn, Pb, Zn, as well as Ca, P, Na, and K in shoots and roots was measured. The level of the accumulated trace elements (ATE) was visibly higher in C. arenosa and P. lanceolata from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. However, the level of the accumulated nutrient elements (ANE) was visibly higher only in C. arenosa plants. Also, higher potassium share in ANE was found in the shoots of C. arenosa and Plantago species from metalliferous sites than non-contaminated ones. The highest content of Cd, Zn, Pb, Al, Fe, and Mn was found in C. arenosa, which better reflected metal concentrations in the metalliferous and non-metalliferous soil than other plants. In the studied Plantago species, in almost all cases in all sites TF (translocation coefficient) and MR (mobility ratio) were below 1, which indicates they use the excluder strategy. The best accumulation ability was found for C. arenosa. The higher translocation coefficients (TF > 1) for Zn and Cd in C. arenosa shoots make it suitable for phytoextraction from soil, while the lower translocation ratios (TF < 1) for Zn and Cd in Plantago species and also for Pb in C. arenosa make them suitable for phytostabilization. Almost in all cases the plants had enrichment coefficient >2, which suggested that they may act as indicators of the soil metal contamination. PMID:26088758

  4. The Occurrence of Contaminant Accumulation in Lead Pipe Scales from Domestic Drinking Water Distribution Systems-ABSTRACT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous work has shown that contaminants such as Al, As and Ra, can accumulate in drinking water distribution system solids. The release of accumulated contaminants back into the water supply could conceivably result in elevated levels at consumers’ taps. The current regulatory...

  5. Accumulation and distribution characteristics of zinc and cadmium in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola.

    PubMed

    Cao, Dong; Zhang, Hongzheng; Wang, Yaodong; Zheng, Leina

    2014-08-01

    Accumulation and distribution of Zn and Cd in the hyperaccumulator plant Sedum plumbizincicola were investigated in a hydroponic experiment. Mean Cd and Zn concentrations in shoots (7,010 and 18,400 mg kg(-1)) were about sevenfold and fivefold higher than those in roots (840 and 3,000 mg kg(-1)) after exposure to 100 μM CdSO4 and 600 μM ZnSO4, respectively. Cd and Zn concentrations in young leaves (4,330 and 9,820 mg kg(-1)) were about sixfold and twofold higher than those in mature leaves (636 and 2,620 mg kg(-1)), respectively. MicroPIXE analysis showed that Zn was predominantly localized in epidermal cells in both young and mature leaves, but large amounts of Zn occurred in mesophyll cells in young leaves. Leaf tissue fractionation showed that soluble and cell wall fractions were different at the two stages of leaf growth. Young and mature leaves of S. plumbizincicola also showed different accumulation and distribution characteristics for Zn and Cd. PMID:24789526

  6. Pattern of distribution and kinetics of accumulation of gold nanorods in mouse spleen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Lascio, Nicole; Avigo, Cinzia; Armanetti, Paolo; Stea, Francesco; Cavigli, Lucia; Ratto, Fulvio; Pini, Roberto; Kusmic, Claudia; Menichetti, Luca; Faita, Francesco

    2015-03-01

    Gold nanorods (GNRs) offer a tunable optical absorption in the near infra-red wavelength region due to their plasmon resonance, which results in strong photoacoustic (PA) signal and make them suitable as contrast agent by means of PA imaging. The aim of this study was to examine the performance of synthesized polyethilene glicol (PEG)-GNRs as contrast agent for in vivo PA imaging and to evaluate their accumulation and distribution real time. Two-three month old FVB female mice were enrolled for the study, a bolus of 200μL of synthesized PEG-GNRs (53 nm length and 11 nm axial diameter, plasmon resonance at 840 nm, 1 mM Au concentration) solution was injected intravenously and detected with PA imaging. The accumulation of GNRs in the spleen was studied by means of the amplitude dynamic variation of the PA signal during time. GNRs contrast was clearly distinguished from endogenous background thanks to the nanoparticle spectroscopic specificity. Our results suggest that PA imaging could allow an efficient and noninvasive tool for in vivo detection of GNRs content and for the assessment of the kinetic parameters in target organs. The coregistration of μ-ultrasound and PA imaging is crucial for the real time evaluation of the GNRs distribution in different organs.

  7. Paleogeography of the late cretaceous of the western Interior of middle North America - coal distribution and sediment accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, L.N.R.; Kirschbaum, M.A.

    1995-12-31

    A synthesis of Late Cretaceous paleogeography of the Western Interior, from Mexico to southwestern Canada, emphasizes the areal distribution of peat-forming environments during six biostratigraphically constrained time intervals. Isopach maps of strata for each interval reveal the locations and magnitude of major depocenters. A comparison of coal distribution and sediment accumulation within an overall paleogeographic framework provides insight into the relative importance of tectonism, eustasy, and climate on the accumulation of thick peats and their preservation as coals.

  8. Observation of Accumulated Metal Cation Distribution in Fish by Novel Stigmatic Imaging Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Jun; Ikeda, Shinichiro; Toyoda, Michisato

    2014-02-01

    The accumulation of radioactive substances in biological organisms is a matter of great concern since the incident at the nuclear power plant in Fukushima, Japan. We have developed a novel technique for observing the distribution of accumulated metal cations in fish that employs a new imaging mass spectrometer, MULTUM-IMG2. Distributions of 133Cs and 88Sr in a sliced section of medaka (Oryzias latipes) are obtained with spatial resolution of µm-scale.

  9. Spatial distribution and accumulation of radicals arising in organic solids under the action of glow discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raitsimring, A. M.; Kurshev, V. V.

    1994-12-01

    The method, based on analyzing the dipolar broadening of EPR spectra was applied for investigation of the spatial distribution of radicals generated by high-frequency glow discharge in organic molecular crystals (powders of malonic and dimethylmalonic acids) and glassy isopropanol contained electron scavenger. It was shown that in the first case the radical distribution does not depend on time of discharge. The radicals are generated in layer of size ˜.05-0.1 μm at a concentration of ˜2 10 20 cm -3. For the second case the distribution function was changed in the course of plasma treatment and the depth of radical generation was varied from 0.25 to 1.5 μm during the discharge action. Contribution of the various mechanisms of radical formation were evaluated and it was shown that ionic mechanism predominated. A kinetic model is proposed to describe both the radical accumulation and evolution of spatial distribution function in plasmolysis. The use of the model, method and obtained data for general and practical applications is discussed.

  10. About the temperature, pressure and viscosity distributions in the Earth's mantle on it's accumulation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachay, Yurie; Anfilogov, Vsevolod

    2010-05-01

    Geological Earths evolution significantly depends from its initial origin. In the paper [1] we suggested a new accumulation model of planets of terrestrial group, which use the modern estimations of concentration of short-living natural radioactive isotopes in the matter of the proto planet cloud. It had been qualitative new estimations of temperature distributions in the growing pre planets in the Earth "feed" zone. For the velocity of proto planet mass increasing we use the model of Safronov. The temperature distribution in the body with the increasing radius is obtained numerically using the solution of the boundary problem for the equation of thermal conductivity with account a possibility of melt occurring without explicit marking of the boundary of crystallization front and parametrical account of convective heat transfer in the melt [2]. It is shown, that in proto planet bodies with dimensions about 100km in the main part of the inner area the temperatures achieve higher that the iron melting temperature. On that stage the relative bodies impact velocities are sufficient for crashing the upper brittle envelope and support the coupling of the inner melted parts. The mass of the growing proto planet is not sufficient to merge the mainly silicate envelope fragments. So on the stage of bodies coupling with radiuses (100-500) km it could occur the effective separation of the W-Hf system between the melted iron and cold silicate reservoirs during the period, which satisfy the experimental data a period equal to or less 10 million years. In that model on the growing stage of the iron core the impacts occur inelastic. The main gravitational potential energy transfers into the heat energy and accumulates by the planet. By the increasing of core mass the gravitational radius increases and it can keep the increasing part of cold silicate fragments. The impacts become more elastic and the less part of potential energy transfers into the heat energy. By solution of the

  11. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses.

    PubMed

    Perceval, Olivier; Couillard, Yves; Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette; Giguère, Anik; Campbell, Peter G C

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L( infinity )) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that was most

  12. Metal-induced stress in bivalves living along a gradient of Cd contamination: relating sub-cellular metal distribution to population-level responses.

    PubMed

    Perceval, Olivier; Couillard, Yves; Pinel-Alloul, Bernadette; Giguère, Anik; Campbell, Peter G C

    2004-09-20

    The use of biomarkers to assess the impacts of contaminants on aquatic ecosystems has noticeably increased over the past few years. Few of these studies, however, have contributed to the prediction of ecologically significant effects (i.e., at the population or community levels). The present field study was designed to evaluate the potential of metallothionein (MT) and sub-cellular metal partitioning measurements for predicting toxic effects at higher levels of the biological organization in freshwater bivalves (Pyganodon grandis) chronically exposed to Cd. For that purpose, we quantitatively sampled P. grandis populations in the littoral zone of nine lakes on the Precambrian Canadian Shield during two consecutive summers (1998 and 1999); lakes were characterized by contrasting Cd levels but similar trophic status. We tested relationships between the population status of P. grandis (i.e., growth parameters, density, biomass, secondary production, turnover ratio and cumulative fecundity) and (i) ambient Cd concentrations, (ii) sub-organismal responses (MT concentrations in the gill cytosol of individuals and Cd concentrations in three metal-ligand pools identified as M-HMW, the high molecular weight pool, M-MT, the metallothionein-like pool and M-LMW, the low molecular weight pool) and (iii) ecological confounding factors (food resources, presence of host fishes for the obligatory parasitic larval stage of P. grandis). Our results show that littoral density, live weight, dry viscera biomass, production and cumulative fecundity decreased with increasing concentrations of the free-cadmium ion in the environment (Pearson's r ranging from -0.63 to -0.78). On the other hand, theoretical maximum shell lengths (L( infinity )) in our populations were related to both the dissolved Ca concentration and food quality (sestonic C and N concentrations). Overall, Cd concentrations in the gill cytosolic HMW pool of the individual molluscs were the biomarker response that was most

  13. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-01-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised. PMID:26621372

  14. Fractionation of Subcellular Organelles.

    PubMed

    Graham, John M

    2015-12-01

    This unit provides both a theoretical and a practical background to all the techniques associated with the application of differential and density gradient centrifugation for the analysis of subcellular membranes. The density gradient information focuses on the use of the modern gradient solute iodixanol, chosen for its ease of use, versatility, and compatibility with biological particles. Its use in both pre-formed discontinuous and continuous gradients and in self-generated gradients is discussed. Considerable emphasis is given to selection of the appropriate centrifuge rotors and tubes and their influence on the methods used for creation, fractionation, and analysis of density gradients. Without proper consideration of these critical ancillary procedures, the resolving power of the gradient can be easily compromised.

  15. Slip distribution, strain accumulation and aseismic slip on the Chaman Fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelug, F.

    2015-12-01

    The Chaman fault system is a transcurrent fault system developed due to the oblique convergence of the India and Eurasia plates in the western boundary of the India plate. To evaluate the contemporary rates of strain accumulation along and across the Chaman Fault system, we use 2003-2011 Envisat SAR imagery and InSAR time-series methods to obtain a ground velocity field in radar line-of-sight (LOS) direction. We correct the InSAR data for different sources of systematic biases including the phase unwrapping errors, local oscillator drift, topographic residuals and stratified tropospheric delay and evaluate the uncertainty due to the residual delay using time-series of MODIS observations of precipitable water vapor. The InSAR velocity field and modeling demonstrates the distribution of deformation across the Chaman fault system. In the central Chaman fault system, the InSAR velocity shows clear strain localization on the Chaman and Ghazaband faults and modeling suggests a total slip rate of ~24 mm/yr distributed on the two faults with rates of 8 and 16 mm/yr, respectively corresponding to the 80% of the total ~3 cm/yr plate motion between India and Eurasia at these latitudes and consistent with the kinematic models which have predicted a slip rate of ~17-24 mm/yr for the Chaman Fault. In the northern Chaman fault system (north of 30.5N), ~6 mm/yr of the relative plate motion is accommodated across Chaman fault. North of 30.5 N where the topographic expression of the Ghazaband fault vanishes, its slip does not transfer to the Chaman fault but rather distributes among different faults in the Kirthar range and Sulaiman lobe. Observed surface creep on the southern Chaman fault between Nushki and north of City of Chaman, indicates that the fault is partially locked, consistent with the recorded M<7 earthquakes in last century on this segment. The Chaman fault between north of the City of Chaman to North of Kabul, does not show an increase in the rate of strain

  16. Spatial distribution and accumulation of Hg in soil surrounding a Zn/Pb smelter.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingru; Wang, Shuxiao; Wang, Long; Liu, Fang; Lin, Che-Jen; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Fengyang

    2014-10-15

    Nonferrous metal smelting is an important atmospheric mercury (Hg) emission source that has significant local and global impacts. To quantify the impact of Hg emission from non-ferrous metal smelter on the surrounding soil, an integrated model parameterizing the processes of smelter emission, air dispersion, atmospheric deposition and Hg accumulation in soil was developed. The concentrations of gaseous elemental Hg (GEM) around the smelter and the spatial distribution of Hg in the surrounding soil were measured and compared with the model results. Atmospheric deposition of Hg emitted from the smelter was identified as the main source of Hg accumulation in the surrounding soil. From 1960 to 2011, the smelter emitted approximately 105 t of Hg into the atmosphere, of which 15 t deposited locally and resulted in an increase of Hg concentration in soil from 0.12 to 1.77 mg kg(-1). A detailed examination of wind rose and model data suggested that the area within 1.0-1.5 km northwest and southeast of the smelter was most severely impacted. It was estimated that the smelter operation from 1969 to 1990, when large scale emission controls were not implemented, resulted in 6450 μg m(-2)yr(-1) of Hg net deposition and a model simulated increase of 0.40 mg kg(-1) of Hg accumulation in the soil. During the period from 1991 to 2011, atmospheric Hg emission from the smelter alone increased the average concentration in soil from 0.41 mg kg(-1) to 0.45 mg kg(-1). In the past 50 years, over 86% of Hg emitted from this smelter went into the global pool, indicating the importance of controlling Hg emissions from non-ferrous metal smelters.

  17. Human Gyrovirus Apoptin shows a similar subcellular distribution pattern and apoptosis induction as the chicken anaemia virus derived VP3/Apoptin

    PubMed Central

    Bullenkamp, J; Cole, D; Malik, F; Alkhatabi, H; Kulasekararaj, A; Odell, E W; Farzaneh, F; Gäken, J; Tavassoli, M

    2012-01-01

    The chicken anaemia virus-derived protein Apoptin/VP3 (CAV-Apoptin) has the important ability to induce tumour-selective apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cells. Recently the first human Gyrovirus (HGyV) was isolated from a human skin swab. It shows significant structural and organisational resemblance to CAV and encodes a homologue of CAV-Apoptin/VP3. Using overlapping primers we constructed a synthetic human Gyrovirus Apoptin (HGyV-Apoptin) fused to green fluorescent protein in order to compare its apoptotic function in various human cancer cell lines to CAV-Apoptin. HGyV-Apoptin displayed a similar subcellular expression pattern as observed for CAV-Apoptin, marked by translocation to the nucleus of cancer cells, although it is predominantly located in the cytosol of normal human cells. Furthermore, expression of either HGyV-Apoptin or CAV-Apoptin in several cancer cell lines triggered apoptosis at comparable levels. These findings indicate a potential anti-cancer role for HGyV-Apoptin. PMID:22495351

  18. Distribution and accumulation of heavy metals in the sediments of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chiu-Wen; Kao, Chih-Ming; Chen, Chih-Feng; Dong, Cheng-Di

    2007-01-01

    The distribution, enrichment, and accumulation of heavy metals in the sediments, especially those at the vicinity of tributary estuaries of Kaohsiung Harbor, Taiwan were investigated. Sediment samples from six locations in the Kaohsiung Harbor were collected quarterly in the period from 2002 to 2005 and characterized for metal content (e.g., Hg, Pb, Cd, Cr, Cu, Zn and Al), water content, organic matter, total nitrogen, total phosphorous, total grease, and grain size. Results showed that metal concentrations varied from 0.58 mg kg(-1) for Cd to 596 mg kg(-1) for Zn. Metal concentrations at the vicinity of river mouths were higher than those at other locations. All heavy metals studied, except Cr, had relatively high enrichment factors and geo-accumulation indices in the estuaries. Moreover, metal concentrations correlated closely to the physical-chemical properties of the sediments, which strongly suggested the influence of industrial and municipal wastewaters discharged from the neighboring industrial parks and river basins. Results would help develop strategies for pollution control and sediment remediation of Kaohsiung Harbor.

  19. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao )

    1996-01-01

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  20. Formation and distribution of coal measure-derived hydrocarbon accumulation in NW China

    SciTech Connect

    Wenxhi Zhao; Yan Zhang; Dafeng Xu; Changyi Zhao

    1996-12-31

    This study recognizes that the following conditions are necessary for the Jurassic coal measure-derived oil and gas fields in NW China: (1) The Jurassic original basins, which were dominated by lacustrine to low-positional swamp environments, should exist to accept coal-measure related sediments, (2) the original depositional settings were characterized by low and gentle depressions and humid climate where oil-prone organic materials accumulated, (3) the development of the subsequent basins and successive sedimentation should occur on the Jurassic original basins, which are necessary to keep the coal measure source rocks progressively maturing, and, (4) a certain degree of tectonic compression took place soon after the maturation of source rocks, which provided the driving force for the effective expulsion of oil and gas from coal measures. Most of the coal measure-derived oil & gas fields in NW China are horizontally distributed along the inner side of lake strandlines. They occur vertically above or below the threshold of maturation. Owing to the sharp variations of lithology and facies in coal measures, the lithologies and hydrocarbon compositions of oil and gas reservoirs play a significant role in the oil and gas accumulations of the coal measures sequences.

  1. 238Pu: accumulation, tissue distribution, and excretion in Mayak workers after exposure to plutonium aerosols.

    PubMed

    Suslova, Klara G; Sokolova, Alexandra B; Khokhryakov, Viktor V; Miller, Scott C

    2012-03-01

    The alpha spectrometry measurements of specific activity of 238Pu and 239Pu in urine from bioassay examinations of 1,013 workers employed at the radiochemical and plutonium production facilities of the Mayak Production Association and in autopsy specimens of lung, liver, and skeleton from 85 former nuclear workers who died between 1974-2009, are summarized.The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in the body and excreta has not changed with time in workers involved in production of weapons-grade plutonium production (e.g., the plutonium production facility and the former radiochemical facility). The accumulation fraction of 238Pu in individuals exposed to plutonium isotopes at the newer Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant ranged from 0.13% up to 27.5% based on the autopsy data. No statistically significant differences between 238Pu and 239Pu in distribution by the main organs of plutonium deposition were found in the Mayak workers. Based on the bioassay data,the fraction of 238Pu activity in urine is on average 38-69% of the total activity of 238Pu and 239Pu, which correlates with the isotopic composition in workplace air sampled at the Spent Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plant. In view of the higher specific activity of 238Pu, the contribution of 238Pu to the total internal dose, particularly in the skeleton and liver, might be expected to continue to increase, and continued surveillance is recommended.

  2. Magnetic field distribution of injection chicane dipoles in Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jian-Guang

    2006-01-01

    We have performed 3D computing simulations to study the magnetic field distribution of the injection chicane dipoles in the SNS accumulator ring. The simulations yield the performance characteristics of the magnets and generate the magnetic field data in three dimensional grids for further beam tracking study. Based on the simulation data, a 3D multipole expansion of the chicane dipole field, consisting of the generalized gradients and their derivatives, has been made. The harmonic and pseudo-harmonic components in the expansion give much insight into the magnet physics and can fit directly into theoretical frame work of beam optics. The expansion is quasi-analytical by fitting numeric data into interpolation functions. A 5th-order representation of the magnetic field is generated, and the effects of even higher order terms on the field representation are discussed.

  3. Magnetic field distribution of injection chicane dipoles in Spallation Neutron Source accumulator ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, J. G.

    2006-01-01

    We have performed 3D computing simulations to study the magnetic field distribution of the injection chicane dipoles in the SNS accumulator ring. The simulations yield the performance characteristics of the magnets and generate the magnetic field data in three dimensional grids for further beam tracking study. Based on the simulation data, a 3D multipole expansion of the chicane dipole field, consisting of the generalized gradients and their derivatives, has been made. The harmonic and pseudoharmonic components in the expansion give much insight into the magnet physics and can fit directly into theoretical frame work of beam optics. The expansion is quasianalytical by fitting numeric data into interpolation functions. A 5th-order representation of the magnetic field is generated, and the effects of even higher-order terms on the field representation are discussed.

  4. Quantum-mechanical calculation of carrier distribution in MOS accumulation and strong inversion layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chien-Wei; Hwu, Jenn-Gwo

    2013-10-15

    We derive a statistical physics model of two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) and propose an accurate approximation method for calculating the quantum-mechanical effects of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) structure in accumulation and strong inversion regions. We use an exponential surface potential approximation in solving the quantization energy levels and derive the function of density of states in 2D to 3D transition region by applying uncertainty principle and Schrödinger equation in k-space. The simulation results show that our approximation method and theory of density of states solve the two major problems of previous researches: the non-negligible error caused by the linear potential approximation and the inconsistency of density of states and carrier distribution in 2D to 3D transition region.

  5. Immunodetection and subcellular distribution of imidazoline receptor proteins with three antibodies in mouse and human brains: Effects of treatments with I1- and I2-imidazoline drugs.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-09-01

    Various imidazoline receptor (IR) proteins have been proposed to mediate the effects of selective I1- and I2-IR drugs. However, the association of these IR-binding proteins with classic I1- and I2-radioligand binding sites remains somewhat controversial. In this study, three IR antibodies (anti-NISCH and anti-nischarin for I1-IRs; and anti-IRBP for I1/I2-IRs) were used to immunodetect, characterize and compare IR protein patterns in brain (mouse and human; total homogenate, subcellular fractionation, grey and white matter) and some cell systems (neurones, astrocytes, human platelets). Various immunoreactive IRs (specific molecular weight bands coincidently detected with the different antibodies) were related to I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa and 85 kDa proteins) or I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa proteins) types. The biochemical characterization of cortical 167 kDa protein, localized in the membrane/cytosol but not in the nucleus, indicated that this I1-IR also forms part of higher order nischarin-related complexes. The contents of I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa, and 85 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were upregulated by treatment with I1-drugs (moxonidine, efaroxan) but not with I2-drugs (BU-224, LSL 61122). Conversely, the contents of I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were modulated by treatment with I2-drugs (decreases after BU-224 and LSL 61122, and increases after idazoxan) but not with I1-drugs (with the exception of moxonidine). These findings further indicate that brain immunoreactive IR proteins exist in multiple forms that can be grouped in the already known I1- and I2-IR types, which are expressed both in neurones and astrocytes.

  6. Immunodetection and subcellular distribution of imidazoline receptor proteins with three antibodies in mouse and human brains: Effects of treatments with I1- and I2-imidazoline drugs.

    PubMed

    Keller, Benjamin; García-Sevilla, Jesús A

    2015-09-01

    Various imidazoline receptor (IR) proteins have been proposed to mediate the effects of selective I1- and I2-IR drugs. However, the association of these IR-binding proteins with classic I1- and I2-radioligand binding sites remains somewhat controversial. In this study, three IR antibodies (anti-NISCH and anti-nischarin for I1-IRs; and anti-IRBP for I1/I2-IRs) were used to immunodetect, characterize and compare IR protein patterns in brain (mouse and human; total homogenate, subcellular fractionation, grey and white matter) and some cell systems (neurones, astrocytes, human platelets). Various immunoreactive IRs (specific molecular weight bands coincidently detected with the different antibodies) were related to I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa and 85 kDa proteins) or I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa proteins) types. The biochemical characterization of cortical 167 kDa protein, localized in the membrane/cytosol but not in the nucleus, indicated that this I1-IR also forms part of higher order nischarin-related complexes. The contents of I1-IR (167 kDa, 105/115 kDa, and 85 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were upregulated by treatment with I1-drugs (moxonidine, efaroxan) but not with I2-drugs (BU-224, LSL 61122). Conversely, the contents of I2-IR (66 kDa, 45 kDa and 30 kDa) proteins in mouse brain cortex were modulated by treatment with I2-drugs (decreases after BU-224 and LSL 61122, and increases after idazoxan) but not with I1-drugs (with the exception of moxonidine). These findings further indicate that brain immunoreactive IR proteins exist in multiple forms that can be grouped in the already known I1- and I2-IR types, which are expressed both in neurones and astrocytes. PMID:26038110

  7. Oil Secretory System in Vegetative Organs of Three Arnica Taxa: Essential Oil Synthesis, Distribution and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Krystyna; Kreitschitz, Agnieszka; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Szumny, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Arnica, a genus including the medicinal species A. montana, in its Arbo variety, and A. chamissonis, is among the plants richest in essential oils used as pharmaceutical materials. Despite its extensive use, the role of anatomy and histochemistry in the internal secretory system producing the essential oil is poorly understood. Anatomical sections allowed differentiation between two forms of secretory structures which differ according to their distribution in plants. The first axial type is connected to the vascular system of all vegetative organs and forms canals lined with epithelial cells. The second cortical type is represented by elongated intercellular spaces filled with oil formed only between the cortex cells of roots and rhizomes at maturity, with canals lacking an epithelial layer.Only in A. montana rhizomes do secretory structures form huge characteristic reservoirs. Computed tomography illustrates their spatial distribution and fusiform shape. The axial type of root secretory canals is formed at the interface between the endodermis and cortex parenchyma, while, in the stem, they are located in direct contact with veinal parenchyma. The peripheral phloem parenchyma cells are arranged in strands around sieve tube elements which possess a unique ability to accumulate large amounts of oil bodies. The cells of phloem parenchyma give rise to the aforementioned secretory structures while the lipid components (triacylglycerols) stored there support the biosynthesis of essential oils by later becoming a medium in which these oils are dissolved. The results indicate the integrity of axial secretory structures forming a continuous system in vegetative plant organs. PMID:26936790

  8. Oil Secretory System in Vegetative Organs of Three Arnica Taxa: Essential Oil Synthesis, Distribution and Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Kromer, Krystyna; Kreitschitz, Agnieszka; Kleinteich, Thomas; Gorb, Stanislav N; Szumny, Antoni

    2016-05-01

    Arnica, a genus including the medicinal species A. montana, in its Arbo variety, and A. chamissonis, is among the plants richest in essential oils used as pharmaceutical materials. Despite its extensive use, the role of anatomy and histochemistry in the internal secretory system producing the essential oil is poorly understood. Anatomical sections allowed differentiation between two forms of secretory structures which differ according to their distribution in plants. The first axial type is connected to the vascular system of all vegetative organs and forms canals lined with epithelial cells. The second cortical type is represented by elongated intercellular spaces filled with oil formed only between the cortex cells of roots and rhizomes at maturity, with canals lacking an epithelial layer.Only in A. montana rhizomes do secretory structures form huge characteristic reservoirs. Computed tomography illustrates their spatial distribution and fusiform shape. The axial type of root secretory canals is formed at the interface between the endodermis and cortex parenchyma, while, in the stem, they are located in direct contact with veinal parenchyma. The peripheral phloem parenchyma cells are arranged in strands around sieve tube elements which possess a unique ability to accumulate large amounts of oil bodies. The cells of phloem parenchyma give rise to the aforementioned secretory structures while the lipid components (triacylglycerols) stored there support the biosynthesis of essential oils by later becoming a medium in which these oils are dissolved. The results indicate the integrity of axial secretory structures forming a continuous system in vegetative plant organs.

  9. The Yin: An adverse health perspective of nanoceria: uptake, distribution, accumulation, and mechanisms of its toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yokel, Robert A.; Hussain, Salik; Garantziotis, Stavros; Demokritou, Philip; Castranova, Vincent; Cassee, Flemming R.

    2014-01-01

    This critical review evolved from a SNO Special Workshop on Nanoceria panel presentation addressing the toxicological risks of nanoceria: accumulation, target organs, and issues of clearance; how exposure dose/concentration, exposure route, and experimental preparation/model influence the different reported effects of nanoceria; and how can safer by design concepts be applied to nanoceria? It focuses on the most relevant routes of human nanoceria exposure and uptake, disposition, persistence, and resultant adverse effects. The pulmonary, oral, dermal, and topical ocular exposure routes are addressed as well as the intravenous route, as the latter provides a reference for the pharmacokinetic fate of nanoceria once introduced into blood. Nanoceria reaching the blood is primarily distributed to mononuclear phagocytic system organs. Available data suggest nanoceria’s distribution is not greatly affected by dose, shape, or dosing schedule. Significant attention has been paid to the inhalation exposure route. Nanoceria distribution from the lung to the rest of the body is less than 1% of the deposited dose, and from the gastrointestinal tract even less. Intracellular nanoceria and organ burdens persist for at least months, suggesting very slow clearance rates. The acute toxicity of nanoceria is very low. However, large/accumulated doses produce granuloma in the lung and liver, and fibrosis in the lung. Toxicity, including genotoxicity, increases with exposure time; the effects disappear slowly, possibly due to nanoceria’s biopersistence. Nanoceria may exert toxicity through oxidative stress. Adverse effects seen at sites distal to exposure may be due to nanoceria translocation or released biomolecules. An example is elevated oxidative stress indicators in the brain, in the absence of appreciable brain nanoceria. Nanoceria may change its nature in biological environments and cause changes in biological molecules. Increased toxicity has been related to greater surface

  10. Influence of vesicle size distribution on level and selectivity of accumulation of liposomal photosensitizer Tiosens in tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerovich, Gennady A.; Meerovich, Igor G.; Gurevich, Daria G.; Vorobyov, Sergey I.; Pevgov, Vyacheslav G.; Smirnova, Zoya S.; Oborotova, Natalia A.; Lukyanets, Evgeny A.; Loschenov, Victor B.; Baryshnikov, Anatoly Yu.

    2008-06-01

    The work was performed to estimate the influence of liposomal size distribution on the level and selectivity of accumulation of photosensitizer of near-IR spectral range Tiosens (liposomal form of aluminium hydroxide phenylthiophthalocyanine) in tumor. Tiosens liposome dispersions were prepared using classic Bangham procedure. Particle size was reduced and unified using Avanti Mini-Extruder equipped with Nucleopore membranes and high-pressure homogenizer Donor-1. Liposomal size distribution was determined by means of laser correlation spectroscopy. Dynamics and selectivity of Tiosens accumulation in Erlich tumor were measured in vivo using fluorescence spectroscopy. It was shown that level and selectivity of accumulation of liposome-encapsulated drug is determined mostly by content of small-sized fractions, while fractions of larger size are quickly cleared from blood by RES and not contribute in photosensitizer accumulation.

  11. APP expression, distribution and accumulation are altered by aluminum in a rodent model for Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Walton, J R; Wang, M-X

    2009-11-01

    Up-regulated expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) occurs early in the cascade of events that leads to amyloid plaque formation in the human brain. APP gene up-regulation, mediated by activated NF-kappaB, is a response to stress from nM concentrations of aluminum ions, aluminum-disregulated iron ions, reactive-oxygen species, cytokines, and physical trauma. We examined in vivo effects of aluminum on APP in aged rats, obtained from previously-reported longitudinal studies, that chronically ingested aluminum in amounts equivalent to total dietary aluminum levels that Americans routinely ingest. These rats exhibited two outcomes: one group remained cognitively-intact, scoring as well on a memory-discrimination task in old age as in middle age. The other developed cognitive deterioration, obtaining significantly lower mean performance scores in old age than in middle age and exhibiting abnormal behaviors associated with dementia. We compared the expression, distribution and accumulation of APP in hippocampal and cortical tissue of these two rat groups. Compared to results from cognitively-intact rats, hippocampal and cortical tissue from the cognitively-deteriorated rats showed elevated APP gene expression, significantly more dense APP deposits in cytoplasm of neural cells, and APP-immunoreactive neurites that were swollen and varicose. This study shows aluminum routinely derived from chronic oral ingestion, that gradually accumulates in brain regions important for memory-processing, is sufficient to increase APP levels in neural cells of those regions. Aluminum may thus launch the cascade that results in the formation of amyloid plaques in human brain.

  12. Temperature distribution and modification mechanism inside glass with heat accumulation during 250 kHz irradiation of femtosecond laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakura, Masaaki; Shimotsuma, Yasuhiko; Shimizu, Masahiro; Miura, Kiyotaka; Hirao, Kazuyuki

    2008-12-08

    Heat accumulation by high repetition rate femtosecond laser irradiation inside glass generates a much larger modification than that by a single pulse. In this study, we determined the temperature distribution due to heat accumulation and the characteristic temperature for heat modification inside a soda lime glass by analyzing the relationship between the radius of modification and glass temperature. The validity of the analysis was confirmed by reproducing the modification due to two-beam irradiation. The determined characteristic temperature suggested that the temperature distribution and the spatial dependence of the stress relaxation are important in the mechanism of heat modification.

  13. Distribution and accumulation of rotenone in tissues of warm water fishes

    SciTech Connect

    Rach, J.J.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1986-03-01

    The tissue distribution of rotenoid residues was determined in tissues of common carp Cyprinus carpio (88.2 g), bluegills Lepomis macrochirus (47.9 g), and yellow perch Perca flavescens (67.7 g) after the fish were exposed to 50..mu..g/L of rotenone-6a/sup 14/C(15.9 x 10/sup 4/ Bq/..mu..M). Exposures were terminated 1 h after the fish were moribund and failed to respond to gentle prodding. The fish were dissected, and various tissues were oxidized to determine /sup 14/C-rotenone accumulation and distribution. Major rotenone metabolites were identified by gradient-elution high performance liquid chromatography. The exposure time required for fish to reach total incapacitation was 3 h for bluegills and yellow perch, and 11.25 h for common carp. The mean rotenoid concentrations (..mu..g/100g fish) in the whole body were 22.4 in yellow perch, 39.7 in bluegills, and 107.8 in common carp. The percentage of rotenone-derived /sup 14/C activity was higher in the carcass components than in the head or viscera; the skin and bone contained about 60% of the carcass activity. The highest relative rotenoid concentrations were found in the liver, bile, gills, brain, and heart. Percentages of total rotenoid material as parent rotenone were highest in yellow perch (70.0 in the viscera and 84.4 in the fillet), followed by those for bluegills (22.7 and 27.8) and common carp (9.7 and 48.5).

  14. Accumulation and distribution characteristics of platinum group elements in roadside dusts in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Yu, Yanke; Zhou, Huaidong; Lu, Jin

    2012-06-01

    The concentrations, distribution, and accumulation of platinum group elements (PGEs) were investigated in roadside dusts collected in four different foundational areas in Beijing during February to May 2010. The results showed that PGE levels in all samples were above the average upper crust values, with mean concentrations of 57.5 ng · g(-1) Pd, 28.2 ng · g(-1) Pt, and 9.8 ng · g(-1) Rh, respectively. Palladium concentration has increased rapidly in recent years. The rank of PGE levels in four different functional regions for roadside dusts was: heavy density traffic area > residential area > educational area > tourism area. Palladium, Pt, and Rh concentrations in dusts showed strong positive correlations, indicating a common traffic-related source of these metals. Meanwhile, PGEs in these samples were not correlated with other traffic-related metals except for Cr. The average PGE ratios of road dusts from Beijing were consistent with those in Germany and Western Australia, but lower than those in the United States and Mexico, indicating that various catalyst productions were used in different countries. In addition, grain-size partitioning of PGEs in dusts indicated that concentrations of PGEs differed from one particle size to another. The coarse fraction had higher PGE concentrations than the fine fraction in roadside dusts. These results showed that autocatalyst PGE contamination estimates in the environment would be significantly underestimated if only a fine-grain size fraction (<0.063 mm) is analyzed.

  15. Cosmogenic {sup 36}Cl accumulation in unstable landforms 1. Effects of the thermal neutron distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, B.; Phillips, F.M.; Stone, W.D.; Fabryka-Martin, J.T.; Fowler, M.M.

    1994-11-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides produced in situ within minerals at the surface of the Earth are proving to be an effective means of assessing geomorphic histories. The use of multiple cosmogenic nuclides permits both exposure times and erosion rates to be determined. However, if two nuclides are produced only by spallation reactions, the systematic differences in their accumulation rates depend only on the differences in their production rates and half-lives. The relatively small differences that result require a high degree of analytical precision to yield useful results. In contrast to other spallogenic nuclides, {sup 36}Cl is also produced by low-energy neutron, absorption, which creates a different pattern of production as a function of depth. We have measured the thermal flux with depth in a concrete block using {sup 3}He-filled neutron detectors. The measured thermal neutron profile agrees well with predictions from a simple diffusion-based thermal neutron distribution model. Calculations of {sup 36}Cl production using the model suggest that the use of {sup 36}Cl along with a purely spallogenic nuclide to determine erosion rates and exposure times should be less sensitive to analytical error than are determinations from two purely spallogenic nuclides. 31 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. Satellite passive-microwave observations and the distribution of net surface accumulation in the interior of Greenland

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovinetto, M. B.; Waters, N. M.; Zwally, H. J.

    1991-01-01

    The rate of net accumulation at the surface and its distribution in ice sheet areas bounded by the dry snow line may be approximated by a determination of either firn external emissivity or various other emissivity terms. A compilation of mean annual brightness temperature for the Greenland ice sheet based on Nimbus-5 Electrically Scanning Microwave Radiometer (19 GHz) data is used to approximate the distribution of the accumulation rate in the area bounded by the dry snow line, applying a simple conversion involving a polynomial function. This is compared with a compilation produced elsewhere using Nimbus-6 SCAMS (31 GHz) data, applying a complex conversion involving the temperature dependence of the absorption coefficient, and with the latest compilation based on surface measurements of the accumulation rate. The findings indicate that in Greenland, the use of polynomial functions to convert for net surface accumulation is a reliable and simple method for estimating both the rate of accumulation and its distribution in areas where there is no melting at the surface.

  17. Detection, accumulation and distribution of nitrofuran residues in egg yolk, albumen and shell.

    PubMed

    McCracken, R J; Kennedy, D G

    2007-01-01

    Nitrofuran antibiotics have been banned for use in food-producing animals in many countries, including the European Union, owing to the threat they pose to human health. Research continues into the accumulation of these drugs in animal tissues and into the appropriate methods for their detection. In this study, an LC-MS/MS method is presented for the detection of the parent compounds, furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, furaltadone and nitrofurazone, in eggs. The parent compounds are first extracted into ethyl acetate, fats are removed by partition between acetonitrile and hexane, and the concentrated sample is analysed by LC-MS/MS. Decision limits (CCalpha) for the parents were < or =1 microg kg-1 for all four compounds. Within-day and between-day CVs are well within the limits stated in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method provides an alternative to the testing of side-chain metabolites in eggs, which is particularly important in the case of nitrofurazone, where semicarbazide contamination of food has been attributed to sources other than nitrofurazone use. This method was used together with a method for the detection of the side-chain metabolite compounds, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), 3-amino-5-morpholinomethyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one (AMOZ), 1-amino-hydantoin (AHD) and semicarbazide (SEM), to study the accumulation and distribution of nitrofurans in eggs. Eggs were collected from four groups of hens that had been treated with one of the nitrofurans at a feed concentration of 300 mg kg-1 for 1 week. Parent compounds and metabolites were found in the yolk, albumen and shell. Albumen/yolk ratios for the parent compounds were 0.7, 0.82, 0.83 and 0.31 for furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoin and nitrofurazone, respectively. Ratios for the side-chain metabolites were 1.02, 1.06, 0.83 and 0.55 for AOZ, AMOZ, AHD and SEM, respectively. However, 50% of the total SEM residues were found in eggshell. This may be significant if eggshell products reach the consumer

  18. Detection, accumulation and distribution of nitrofuran residues in egg yolk, albumen and shell.

    PubMed

    McCracken, R J; Kennedy, D G

    2007-01-01

    Nitrofuran antibiotics have been banned for use in food-producing animals in many countries, including the European Union, owing to the threat they pose to human health. Research continues into the accumulation of these drugs in animal tissues and into the appropriate methods for their detection. In this study, an LC-MS/MS method is presented for the detection of the parent compounds, furazolidone, nitrofurantoin, furaltadone and nitrofurazone, in eggs. The parent compounds are first extracted into ethyl acetate, fats are removed by partition between acetonitrile and hexane, and the concentrated sample is analysed by LC-MS/MS. Decision limits (CCalpha) for the parents were < or =1 microg kg-1 for all four compounds. Within-day and between-day CVs are well within the limits stated in Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. The method provides an alternative to the testing of side-chain metabolites in eggs, which is particularly important in the case of nitrofurazone, where semicarbazide contamination of food has been attributed to sources other than nitrofurazone use. This method was used together with a method for the detection of the side-chain metabolite compounds, 3-amino-2-oxazolidinone (AOZ), 3-amino-5-morpholinomethyl-1,3-oxazolidin-2-one (AMOZ), 1-amino-hydantoin (AHD) and semicarbazide (SEM), to study the accumulation and distribution of nitrofurans in eggs. Eggs were collected from four groups of hens that had been treated with one of the nitrofurans at a feed concentration of 300 mg kg-1 for 1 week. Parent compounds and metabolites were found in the yolk, albumen and shell. Albumen/yolk ratios for the parent compounds were 0.7, 0.82, 0.83 and 0.31 for furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoin and nitrofurazone, respectively. Ratios for the side-chain metabolites were 1.02, 1.06, 0.83 and 0.55 for AOZ, AMOZ, AHD and SEM, respectively. However, 50% of the total SEM residues were found in eggshell. This may be significant if eggshell products reach the consumer.

  19. Using Beta Distributions to Estimate Percentile Ranks and Accumulate Norms for Student Opinion of Teaching Items. Research Report No. 99.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolen, Michael J.; And Others

    Members of the beta family of distributions were used to estimate percentile ranks and to accumulate normative data collected in a university-wide system for gathering student opinions about teaching--including the areas of course content, objectives, instructor's behavior, teaching methods and materials, and outcomes of instruction. The fitted…

  20. Detection, accumulation, distribution, and depletion of furaltadone and nifursol residues in poultry muscle, liver, and gizzard.

    PubMed

    Barbosa, Jorge; Freitas, Andreia; Moura, Sara; Mourão, José Luis; Noronha da Silveira, Maria Irene; Ramos, Fernando

    2011-11-23

    Nitrofurans were broadly used as an extremely effective veterinary antibiotic especially in pig and poultry production farms. Because of fears of the carcinogenic effects on humans, the nitrofurans were banned from use in livestock production in many countries, including the European Union. The present study examines the accumulation, distribution, and depletion of furaltadone and nifursol and of their tissue-bound metabolites [3-amino-5-morpholinomethyl-2-oxazolidinone (AMOZ) and 3,5-dinitro-salicylic acid hydrazine (DNSAH), respectively, in poultry edible tissues (muscle, liver, and gizzards) following administration to chickens of therapeutic and subtherapeutic concentrations of both compounds. Nitrofurans determination was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry, respectively, for feeds and for poultry tissues. Furaltadone and nifursol, in very low concentrations, were found in samples of muscle, liver, and chicken's gizzard collected from slaughtered animals after 5 weeks of treatment and no withdrawal time period. When a withdrawal time period of 3 weeks was respected, no detectable nitrofuran parent compounds was observed in all of the studied matrices. For AMOZ, concentrations of 270 μg/kg in meat, 80 μg/kg in liver, and 331 μg/kg in gizzard were determined after administration of a medicated feed with furaltadone (132 mg/kg), 3 weeks after withdrawal of treatment. For DNSAH, the concentration values obtained are much lower than those observed for AMOZ. For meat, liver, and gizzard, DNSAH concentrations of 2.5, 6.4, and 10.3 μg/kg, respectively, were determined, after administration of a medicated feed with nifursol (98 mg/kg), 3 weeks after withdrawal of treatment. The gizzard could be considered a selected matrix for nitrofuran residues evaluation in poultry, due to its capacity of retaining either nitrofuran parent compounds or metabolites in higher concentrations

  1. Distribution and accumulation of mercury in tissues of captive-reared common loon (Gavia immer) chicks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Meyer, M.W.; Hines, R.K.; Karasov, W.H.

    2007-01-01

    We determined the distribution and accumulation of Hg in tissues of common loon (Gavia immer) chicks maintained for up to 15 weeks on either a control diet with no added methylmercury chloride (MeHgCl) or one containing either 0.4 or 1.2 ??g Hg (as MeHgCl)/g wet-weight food. Total Hg and MeHg tissue concentrations were strongly positively correlated (r2 > 0.95) with the amount of Hg delivered to individual chicks throughout the course of the experiment. The pattern of differential Hg concentration in internal tissues was consistent within each treatment: Liver > kidney > muscle > carcass > brain. Feather Hg concentrations were consistently higher than those of internal tissues and represented an important route of Hg elimination. Feather mass accounted for 4.3% ?? 0.1% (average ?? standard error) of body mass, yet 27.3% ?? 2.6% of total Hg intake was excreted into feathers. Our calculations indicate that 26.7% ?? 4.9% of ingested Hg was not accounted for and, thus, either was never absorbed or was absorbed and subsequently eliminated in feces. With the additional excretion into feathers, 54% of ingested Hg was excreted. Demethylation was evident in the liver at all treatment levels and in the kidneys of chicks dosed at 1.2 ??g Hg/g. Mercury concentrations were strongly positively correlated (r2 ??? 0.95) among internal tissues and with blood Hg concentration. Mercury concentrations of secondary feathers were moderately correlated (r2 = 0.82-0.93) with internal tissues. We supply regression models that may be used to provide perspective and a useful means of interpreting the variety of measures of Hg exposure reported in the literature. ?? 2007 SETAC.

  2. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-2 - Exclusions from accumulation distributions in the case of trusts (other than a foreign trust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES Treatment of Excess Distributions of Trusts Applicable to Taxable Years Beginning... accumulation distributions do not reduce the amount of undistributed net income for the 5 years preceding the... preceding the year of distribution other than undistributed net income accumulated while the beneficiary...

  3. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-2 - Exclusions from accumulation distributions in the case of trusts (other than a foreign trust...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... specified ages. The third exclusion from the definition of an accumulation distribution is for amounts... 21. (i) The first exception to the definition of an accumulation distribution is for amounts paid, credited, or required to be distributed to a beneficiary who was under 21 years of age or unborn when...

  4. Methionine-101 from one strain of H5N1 NS1 protein determines its IFN-antagonizing ability and subcellular distribution pattern.

    PubMed

    Meng, Jin; Zhang, Zhenfeng; Zheng, Zhenhua; Liu, Yan; Wang, Hanzhong

    2012-11-01

    Influenza A virus NS1 protein has developed two main IFN-antagonizing mechanisms by inhibiting retinoic-acid-inducible gene I (RIG-I) signal transduction, or by suppressing cellular pre-mRNA processing through binding to cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor 30 (CPSF30). However, the precise effects of NS1 on suppressing type I IFN induction have not been well characterized. Here we report that compared with PR/8/34 NS1, which is localized partially in the cytoplasm and has strong IFN-antagonizing ability via specifically inhibiting IFN-β promoter activity, H5N1 NS1 has strikingly different characteristics. It mainly accumulates in the nucleus of transfected cells and exerts rather weak IFN-counteracting ability through suppression of the overall gene expression. The M101I mutation of H5N1 NS1, namely H5-M101I, fully reversed its functions. H5-M101I gained the ability to specifically inhibit IFN-β promoter activity, translocate to the cytoplasm, and release CPSF30. The previously reported NES (nuclear export signal) (residues 138-147) was unable to lead H5N1 NS1 to translocate. This suggests that other residues may serve as a potent NES. Findings indicated that together with leucine-100, methionine-101 enhanced the regional NES. In addition, methionine-101 was the key residue for the NS1-CPSF30 interaction. This study reveals the importance of methionine-101 in the influenza A virus life cycle and may provide valuable information for antiviral strategies.

  5. [Fluoride accumulation and distribution in mulberry insects near fluoride pollution sources].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuyin; Lu, Shenggao

    2002-01-01

    Fluoride accumulation and the relative fluoride loading of different body parts in wild mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mandarina M.), mulberry geometrid (Pathonandria atrineata B.), and mulberry silkworm (Bombyx mori L.) near fluoride pollution sources were studied. Comparison of the fluoride content of insect bodies and mulberry leaves showed that insects collected from polluted sites had increased fluoride accumulation. The digestive tract of the insect had much higher fluoride content than the other parts of the body and was considered to be the important organ of fluoride accumulation. There were also wide differences in fluoride accumulation between different insect species within the same polluted site. The highly significantly correlation between fluoride contents of wild mulberry silkworm, mulberry geometrid, and mulberry silkworm with that of the mulberry leaves on which they were collected was found.

  6. Spatial distribution of heavy metal accumulation in the sediments after dam construction.

    PubMed

    Shim, Moo Joon; Yang, Yun Mo; Oh, Da Yeon; Lee, Soo Hyung; Yoon, Yi Yong

    2015-12-01

    The sedimentary environment has been modified in the Geum River where an estuary dam and midstream dams were constructed. Furthermore, the Geum River tributaries deliver contaminants from the wastewater of an industrial complex. However, the influence of tributaries and dams on sedimentary metal deposition has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study are to assess metal accumulation and to investigate the source of the metals. Sediments were collected in the main channel and two tributaries on October 2013. Abnormal accumulations of fine sediments were not observed above the midstream dams. Chromium, Ni, and Zn showed higher concentrations in above the midstream dam, but their concentrations were not related to grain size. Cadmium, Cu, Pb, and Hg were much higher upstream from the first midstream dam and came from one of the major tributaries. Arsenic was the only element found at higher concentrations downstream from the last midstream dam and was likely sourced from abandoned mines and/or agricultural activity. The pollution indexes indicated deposition of all metals, except Cr and Ni, may have been affected by anthropogenic activity. With respect to long-term accumulation of the metals, accumulation of Pb, Zn, and Cu by anthropogenic input largely increased, implying accumulation of these metals has continued due to anthropogenic activity since the estuary dam was constructed. Our results suggest that changes in river flow caused by the estuary dam and anthropogenic input from tributaries sources increased the accumulation of heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, and As). PMID:26549487

  7. Spatial distribution of heavy metal accumulation in the sediments after dam construction.

    PubMed

    Shim, Moo Joon; Yang, Yun Mo; Oh, Da Yeon; Lee, Soo Hyung; Yoon, Yi Yong

    2015-12-01

    The sedimentary environment has been modified in the Geum River where an estuary dam and midstream dams were constructed. Furthermore, the Geum River tributaries deliver contaminants from the wastewater of an industrial complex. However, the influence of tributaries and dams on sedimentary metal deposition has not been extensively studied. The objectives of this study are to assess metal accumulation and to investigate the source of the metals. Sediments were collected in the main channel and two tributaries on October 2013. Abnormal accumulations of fine sediments were not observed above the midstream dams. Chromium, Ni, and Zn showed higher concentrations in above the midstream dam, but their concentrations were not related to grain size. Cadmium, Cu, Pb, and Hg were much higher upstream from the first midstream dam and came from one of the major tributaries. Arsenic was the only element found at higher concentrations downstream from the last midstream dam and was likely sourced from abandoned mines and/or agricultural activity. The pollution indexes indicated deposition of all metals, except Cr and Ni, may have been affected by anthropogenic activity. With respect to long-term accumulation of the metals, accumulation of Pb, Zn, and Cu by anthropogenic input largely increased, implying accumulation of these metals has continued due to anthropogenic activity since the estuary dam was constructed. Our results suggest that changes in river flow caused by the estuary dam and anthropogenic input from tributaries sources increased the accumulation of heavy metals (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, and As).

  8. Comparison of GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA and the subcellular distribution of their proteins in normal human muscle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuart, C. A.; Wen, G.; Gustafson, W. C.; Thompson, E. A.

    2000-01-01

    Basal, "insulin-independent" glucose uptake into skeletal muscle is provided by glucose transporters positioned at the plasma membrane. The relative amount of the three glucose transporters expressed in muscle has not been previously quantified. Using a combination of qualitative and quantitative ribonuclease protection assay (RPA) methods, we found in normal human muscle that GLUT1, GLUT3, and GLUT4 mRNA were expressed at 90 +/- 10, 46 +/- 4, and 156 +/- 12 copies/ng RNA, respectively. Muscle was fractionated by DNase digestion and differential sedimentation into membrane fractions enriched in plasma membranes (PM) or low-density microsomes (LDM). GLUT1 and GLUT4 proteins were distributed 57% to 67% in LDM, whereas GLUT3 protein was at least 88% in the PM-enriched fractions. These data suggest that basal glucose uptake into resting human muscle could be provided in part by each of these three isoforms.

  9. Micro-distribution of uranium in bone after contamination: new insight into its mechanism of accumulation into bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Damien; Burt-Pichat, Brigitte; Le Goff, Xavier; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Falkenberg, Gerald; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vincze, Laszlo; Denecke, Melissa A; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude; Boivin, Georges

    2015-09-01

    After internal contamination, uranium rapidly distributes in the body; up to 20 % of the initial dose is retained in the skeleton, where it remains for years. Several studies suggest that uranium has a deleterious effect on the bone cell system, but little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to accumulation of uranium in bone tissue. We have performed synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) studies to assess the initial distribution of uranium within cortical and trabecular bones in contaminated rats' femurs at the micrometer scale. This sensitive technique with high spatial resolution is the only method available that can be successfully applied, given the small amount of uranium in bone tissue. Uranium was found preferentially located in calcifying zones in exposed rats and rapidly accumulates in the endosteal and periosteal area of femoral metaphyses, in calcifying cartilage and in recently formed bone tissue along trabecular bone. Furthermore, specific localized areas with high accumulation of uranium were observed in regions identified as micro-vessels and on bone trabeculae. These observations are of high importance in the study of the accumulation of uranium in bone tissue, as the generally proposed passive chemical sorption on the surface of the inorganic part (apatite) of bone tissue cannot account for these results. Our study opens original perspectives in the field of exogenous metal bio-mineralization. PMID:26084548

  10. Micro-distribution of uranium in bone after contamination: new insight into its mechanism of accumulation into bone tissue.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, Damien; Burt-Pichat, Brigitte; Le Goff, Xavier; Garrevoet, Jan; Tack, Pieter; Falkenberg, Gerald; Van Hoorebeke, Luc; Vincze, Laszlo; Denecke, Melissa A; Meyer, Daniel; Vidaud, Claude; Boivin, Georges

    2015-09-01

    After internal contamination, uranium rapidly distributes in the body; up to 20 % of the initial dose is retained in the skeleton, where it remains for years. Several studies suggest that uranium has a deleterious effect on the bone cell system, but little is known regarding the mechanisms leading to accumulation of uranium in bone tissue. We have performed synchrotron radiation-based micro-X-ray fluorescence (SR μ-XRF) studies to assess the initial distribution of uranium within cortical and trabecular bones in contaminated rats' femurs at the micrometer scale. This sensitive technique with high spatial resolution is the only method available that can be successfully applied, given the small amount of uranium in bone tissue. Uranium was found preferentially located in calcifying zones in exposed rats and rapidly accumulates in the endosteal and periosteal area of femoral metaphyses, in calcifying cartilage and in recently formed bone tissue along trabecular bone. Furthermore, specific localized areas with high accumulation of uranium were observed in regions identified as micro-vessels and on bone trabeculae. These observations are of high importance in the study of the accumulation of uranium in bone tissue, as the generally proposed passive chemical sorption on the surface of the inorganic part (apatite) of bone tissue cannot account for these results. Our study opens original perspectives in the field of exogenous metal bio-mineralization.

  11. Chronic ingestion of Mn/sub 3/O/sub 4/ by young rats: tissue accumulation, distribution, and depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Rehnberg, G.L.; Hein, J.F.; Carter, S.D.; Linko, R.S.; Laskey, J.W.

    1981-02-01

    Mn accumulation, distribution, and disappearance were evaluated in selected tissues of preweanling rats dosed daily with particulate Mn/sub 3/O/sub 4/ for 12 or 27 d postpartum. Significant findings include a high rate of Mn absorption and localization in tissues, especially the cerebrum, hypothalamus, and pituitary. In these tissues, the return of Mn concentrations to control levels was much slower when Mn dosing was continued beyond 18-20 d postpartum.

  12. The distribution of the heavy metal accumulation rate in the biomass of three Daphnia species

    SciTech Connect

    Gajula, V.K.; Hovorka, J.; Stuchlik, E.

    1995-12-31

    The difference in the accumulation rate of a mixture of heavy metals in aquatic organisms is of considerable interest because of its importance in the prediction of the effect of pollutants in aquatic systems. In this study the authors are making an effort to evaluate the accumulation patterns of pollutants in aquatic organisms by establishing a relation between the level of an accumulated mixture of heavy metals (Cd, Zn, Pb, As, Hg) in individuals of Daphnia magna, Daphnia pulicaria and Daphnia galeata and its dry weight with respect to the form of heavy metals in the aquatic environment. One age group of Daphnia species (10 day old) were exposed to 5 ppb, 10 ppb and 20 ppb of the mixture of heavy metals for 24 hours in three different experiments. In the first experiment the mixture of heavy metals was present exclusively in labelled algae (Scendesmus actus), in the second in an aquatic medium with non labelled algae, and in the third experiment the mixture of heavy metals was dissolved in the aquatic medium only without the addition of algae. The concentration of the heavy metal mixture in individuals of D.magna; D.pulicaria and D.galeata was determined using atomic absorption spectrometry. Results were statistically evaluated and the rate of accumulation and influence of various heavy metals in the biomass of three Daphnia species is discussed.

  13. Tissue distribution and correlation profiles of heavy-metal accumulation in the freshwater crayfish Astacus leptodactylus.

    PubMed

    Tunca, Evren; Ucuncu, Esra; Ozkan, Alper Devrim; Ulger, Zeynep Ergul; Tekinay, Turgay

    2013-05-01

    The present work details the analysis of heavy-metal and metalloid concentrations in exoskeleton, gill, hepatopancreas, and abdominal muscle tissues of 60 crayfish (Astacus leptodactylus) specimens collected from Lake Hirfanlı, a dam lake located in Kırşehir (Turkey) with a low metal-contamination profile. Concentrations of 11 metals (aluminum [Al], chromium [Cd], manganese [Mn], cobalt [Co], nickel [Ni], copper [Cu], molybdenum [Mo], silver [Ag], cadmium [Cd], mercury [Hg], and lead [Pb]) and a metalloid (arsenic [As]) were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and the relative frequencies of the most abundant isotopes of Cr, Cu, Ag, Cd, Hg, and Pb were evaluated. Three correlation trends were evaluated between the following: (1) different elements in the each individual tissue, (2) individual elements in different tissues, and (3) different elements in different tissues. In addition, correlation rates of growth parameters (weight, cephalothorax length, and total length) with heavy-metal and metalloid concentrations in each tissue were investigated. Our results suggest that substantial differences in metal and metalloid-accumulation levels exist between male and female specimens, with stronger correlations between the heavy-metal concentrations observed in the male cohort. It is notable that correlation trends of Co, Cu, (52)As, Cr, and Ni in exoskeleton of the male specimens display strong similarities. Likewise, a very strong correlation is present in Ni-Cd and Ni-Pb accumulations in abdominal muscle of the male specimens; a similar trend is present between Cd and Pb concentrations in the same tissue of female specimens. For correlation rates of different heavy metals and metalloid in different tissues, the strongest positive association observed was between (63)Cu in gill and As in hepatopancreas, whereas the strongest negative correlation was between accumulated Ni in abdominal muscle and As in exoskeleton. Strong correlations between

  14. Multi-peak accumulation and coarse modes observed from AERONET retrieved aerosol volume size distribution in Beijing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ying; Li, Zhengqiang; Zhang, Yuhuan; Chen, Yu; Cuesta, Juan; Ma, Yan

    2016-08-01

    We present characteristic peaks of atmospheric columnar aerosol volume size distribution retrieved from the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET) ground-based Sun-sky radiometer observation, and their correlations with aerosol optical properties and meteorological conditions in Beijing over 2013. The results show that the aerosol volume particle size distribution (VPSD) can be decomposed into up to four characteristic peaks, located in accumulation and coarse modes, respectively. The mean center radii of extra peaks in accumulation and coarse modes locate around 0.28 (±0.09) to 0.38 (±0.11) and 1.25 (±0.56) to 1.47 (±0.30) μm, respectively. The multi-peak size distributions are found in different aerosol loading conditions, with the mean aerosol optical depth (440 nm) of 0.58, 0.49, 1.18 and 1.04 for 2-, 3-I/II and 4-peak VPSD types, while the correspondingly mean relative humidity values are 58, 54, 72 and 67 %, respectively. The results also show the significant increase (from 0.25 to 0.40 μm) of the mean extra peak median radius in the accumulation mode for the 3-peak-II cases, which agrees with aerosol hygroscopic growth related to relative humidity and/or cloud or fog processing.

  15. Subcellular distribution of the calcium-storing inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-sensitive organelle in rat liver. Possible linkage to the plasma membrane through the actin microfilaments.

    PubMed Central

    Rossier, M F; Bird, G S; Putney, J W

    1991-01-01

    The role of Ins(1,4,5)P3 in the mobilization of Ca2+ from intracellular stores of non-muscle cells has been extensively demonstrated; however, the nature of the organelle releasing the Ca2+ is still poorly understood. The distributions of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites and of the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive Ca2+ pool were investigated in subcellular fractions obtained from rat liver and compared with those of other markers. The Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding vesicles appeared to be completely distinct from the endoplasmic-reticulum-derived microsomes and were enriched in the same fractions which were enriched in alkaline phosphodiesterase I activity. This co-purification of the plasma-membrane marker with the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding sites was dramatically altered after freezing or after treatment of the homogenate with the microfilament-disruptive drug cytochalasin B, suggesting that the Ins(1,4,5)P3-sensitive organelle may be linked to the plasma membrane through the actin microfilaments. No correlation was observed between the Ins(1,4,5)P3-binding capacity and the portion of the Ca2+ pool that was released by Ins(1,4,5)P3. This may result from the disruption of the native organelle during homogenization, leading to the formation of vesicles containing the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor, but lacking the Ca2+ pump. These results are consistent with the idea of a specialized Ins(1,4,5)P3-regulated organelle distinct from the endoplasmic reticulum, and we propose a model of the structural organization of this organelle, in which the anchorage to the cytoskeleton as well as the spatial separation of the Ca2+ pump from the Ins(1,4,5)P3 receptor have important functional significance. PMID:1849402

  16. [Distribution and accumulation characteristics of nutrients in solar greenhouse soil in Ji'nan, Shandong Province of East China].

    PubMed

    Cao, Qi-Wei; Zhang, Wei-Hua; Li, Li-Bin; Sun, Yu-Liang; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ai, Xi-Zhen

    2012-01-01

    Taking the solar greenhouses with different cultivating years and vegetables in Ji'nan as test objects, this paper studied the amounts and frequency distribution of soil nutrients and the relationships between cultivating years and soil nutrients accumulation characteristics, and analyzed the factors causing soil salinization and acidification by fitting soil nutrients contents with cultivating years and vegetables. In the greenhouses, the contents of soil alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen, available phosphorus, available potassium, organic matter, and electrical conductivity were significantly higher than those in the open field, with an increment of 135.3%, 475.2%, 290.1%, 97.7%, and 188.7%, respectively, but the soil pH value was 0.31 lower than that of open field. The frequency distribution of soil nutrients presented a normal curve. Differences were observed in the soil nutrients contents in the greenhouses with different cultivating vegetables. The soil alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen content and electrical conductivity were in the order of tomato > cucumber > sweet pepper, soil organic matter content and pH value were cucumber > sweet pepper > tomato, soil available phosphorus content was cucumber > tomato > sweet pepper, and soil available potassium content was tomato > cucumber > sweet pepper. There was a mild tendency of soil acidification in soil alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen and available potassium. The decrease of soil pH was closely related to the accumulation of alkali-hydrolysable nitrogen. The soil nutrients accumulation in the greenhouses had the similar patterns, i. e. , rapid accumulation in the first two cultivating years, slowed down in the third and fourth year, and kept stable later, demonstrating a dynamic balance on the whole. All the nutrients contents were positively accumulated, while soil pH presented negatively. In the greenhouses with different cultivating vegetables, there was a significant correlation between soil nutrients and cultivating

  17. Distribution and accumulative pattern of tetracyclines and sulfonamides in edible vegetables of cucumber, tomato, and lettuce.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mohamed Bedair M; Rajapaksha, Anushka Upamali; Lim, Jung Eun; Vu, Ngoc Thang; Kim, Il Seop; Kang, Ho Min; Lee, Sang Soo; Ok, Yong Sik

    2015-01-21

    Veterinary antibiotics can be released to environment by the animals' excretions, which thereby poses human health and ecological risks. Six antibiotics (tetracycline, oxytetracycline, chlortetracycline, sulfamethazine, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfadimethoxine) at three concentrations (5, 10, and 20 mg kg(-1) soil) were employed in pots filled with a loamy sand upland soil. Three types of vegetable seedlings, including cucumber (Cucumis sativus), cherry tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa), were also cultivated during 45 d in the greenhouse. All antibiotics taken up by tested plants showed negative effects on growth. Relatively high levels of tetracyclines and sulfonamides (SAs) were detected in the nonedible parts, roots, and leaves of cucumber and tomato, but fruit parts accumulated them lower than acceptable daily intake. Indeed, cucumber roots accumulated SAs by up to 94.6% of total addition (at 5 mg kg(-1) soil). PMID:25495233

  18. Bioavailability of purified subcellular metals to a marine fish.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Yao, Jie; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-09-01

    In the present study, the authors used a supply of naturally contaminated oysters to investigate how the subcellular metal distribution and the metal burden in prey affected the transfer of metals to a marine fish, the grunt Terapon jarbua. The oysters, Crassostrea hongkongensis, each with different contamination histories, were collected and separated into 3 subcellular fractions: 1) metal-rich granules, 2) cellular debris, and 3) a combined fraction of organelles, heat-denatured proteins, and metallothionein-like proteins, defined as the trophically available metal (TAM). These purified fractions showed a wide range of metal concentrations and were fed to the fish for a period of 7 d at a daily comparable feeding rate of 3% of fish body weight. After 7 d exposure, the newly absorbed metals were mainly distributed in the intestine and liver, indicating a significant tissue-specific trophic transfer, especially for Cd and Cu. The trophic transfer factors (TTFs) showed a sequence of cellular debris >TAM > metal-rich granules, suggesting the impact of subcellular distribution in prey on metal bioavailability. However, significant inverse relationships between the TTFs and the metal concentrations in diets were also found in the present study, especially for Cd and Zn. The subcellular metal compartmentalization might be less important than the metal concentration in prey influencing the trophic transfer. The authors' results have important implications for bioavailability and environmental assessment of dietary metals.

  19. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  20. Regulating Subcellular Metal Homeostasis: The Key to Crop Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Bashir, Khurram; Rasheed, Sultana; Kobayashi, Takanori; Seki, Motoaki; Nishizawa, Naoko K.

    2016-01-01

    Iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), manganese (Mn), and copper (Cu) are essential micronutrient mineral elements for living organisms, as they regulate essential cellular processes, such as chlorophyll synthesis and photosynthesis (Fe, Cu, and Mn), respiration (Fe and Cu), and transcription (Zn). The storage and distribution of these minerals in various cellular organelles is strictly regulated to ensure optimal metabolic rates. Alteration of the balance in uptake, distribution, and/or storage of these minerals severely impairs cellular metabolism and significantly affects plant growth and development. Thus, any change in the metal profile of a cellular compartment significantly affects metabolism. Different subcellular compartments are suggested to be linked through complex retrograde signaling networks to regulate cellular metal homeostasis. Various genes regulating cellular and subcellular metal distribution have been identified and characterized. Understanding the role of these transporters is extremely important to elaborate the signaling between various subcellular compartments. Moreover, modulation of the proteins involved in cellular metal homeostasis may help in the regulation of metabolism, adaptability to a diverse range of environmental conditions, and biofortification. Here, we review progress in the understanding of different subcellular metal transport components in plants and discuss the prospects of regulating cellular metabolism and strategies to develop biofortified crop plants. PMID:27547212

  1. Distribution and accumulation of hexachlorobutadiene in soils and terrestrial organisms from an agricultural area, East China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhenwu; Huang, Qifei; Cheng, Jiali; Qu, Dan; Yang, Yufei; Guo, Wei

    2014-10-01

    Hexachlorobutadiene (HCBD) is a potential persistent organic pollutant that has been found in abiotic environments and organisms. However, information on HCBD in soils and its accumulation in terrestrial food chains is scarce. This study investigated the accumulation of HCBD in soils, plants, and terrestrial fauna in a typical agricultural area in Eastern China, and drew comparisons with organochlorine pesticides (OCPs). The HCBD concentrations in soils were <0.02-3.1ng/g dry weight, which were similar to α-endosulfan concentrations but much lower than the concentrations of some other OCPs. The HCBD soil-plant accumulation factors, 8.5-38.1, were similar to those of o,p'-DDT and higher than those of HCHs and p,p'-DDT, indicating that HCBD is strongly bioaccumulated by rice and vegetables. HCBD concentrations of 1.3-8.2ng/g lipid weight were found in herbivorous insects, earthworms, and Chinese toads. The biomagnification factor, the ratio between the lipid-normalized concentrations in the predator and the prey, was found to be 0.16-0.64 for different food chains of Chinese toads, so HCBD was found not to biomagnify, which is in contrast with OCPs. Further research into whether HCBD is biomagnified in high trophic level organisms or through the entire terrestrial food web is required. PMID:25124679

  2. Prelamin A processing, accumulation and distribution in normal cells and laminopathy disorders

    PubMed Central

    Casasola, Andrea; Scalzo, David; Nandakumar, Vivek; Halow, Jessica; Recillas-Targa, Félix; Groudine, Mark; Rincón-Arano, Héctor

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lamin A is part of a complex structural meshwork located beneath the nuclear envelope and is involved in both structural support and the regulation of gene expression. Lamin A is initially expressed as prelamin A, which contains an extended carboxyl terminus that undergoes a series of post-translational modifications and subsequent cleavage by the endopeptidase ZMPSTE24 to generate lamin A. To facilitate investigations of the role of this cleavage in normal and disease states, we developed a monoclonal antibody (PL-1C7) that specifically recognizes prelamin A at the intact ZMPSTE24 cleavage site, ensuring prelamin A detection exclusively. Importantly, PL-1C7 can be used to determine prelamin A localization and accumulation in cells where lamin A is highly expressed without the use of exogenous fusion proteins. Our results show that unlike mature lamin A, prelamin A accumulates as discrete and localized foci at the nuclear periphery. Furthermore, whereas treatment with farnesylation inhibitors of cells overexpressing a GFP-prelamin A fusion protein results in the formation of large nucleoplasmic clumps, these aggregates are not observed upon similar treatment of cells expressing endogenous prelamin A or in cells lacking ZMPSTE24 expression and/or activity. Finally, we show that specific laminopathy-associated mutations exhibit both positive and negative effects on prelamin A accumulation, indicating that these mutations affect prelamin A processing efficiency in different manners. PMID:26900797

  3. Subcellular trace element distribution in Geosiphon pyriforme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maetz, Mischa; Schüßler, Arthur; Wallianos, Alexandros; Traxel, Kurt

    1999-04-01

    Geosiphon pyriforme is a unique endosymbiotic consortium consisting of a soil dwelling fungus and the cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme. At present this symbiosis becomes very interesting because of its phylogenetic relationship to the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Geosiphon pyriforme could be an important model system for these obligate symbiotic fungi, which supply 80-90% of all land plant species with nutrients, in particular phosphorous and trace elements. Combined PIXE and STIM analyses of the various compartments of Geosiphon give hints for the matter exchange between the symbiotic partners and their environment and the kind of nutrient storage and acquisition, in particular related to nitrogen fixation and metabolism. To determine the quality of our PIXE results we analysed several geological and biological standards over a time period of three years. This led to an overall precision of about 6% and an accuracy of 5-10% for nearly all detectable elements. In combination with the correction model for the occurring mass loss during the analyses this holds true even for biological targets.

  4. Zinc distribution and speciation in Arabidopsis halleri x Arabidops is lyrata progenies presenting various zinc accumulation capacities

    SciTech Connect

    Sarret, Geraldine; Willems, Glenda; Isaure, Marie-Pierre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Frerot, Helene; Pairis, Sebastien; Geoffroy, Nicolas; Manceau, Alain; Saumitou-Laprade, Pierre

    2010-04-08

    - The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the chemical form and localization of zinc (Zn) in plant leaves and their Zn accumulationcapacity. - An interspecific cross between Arabidopsis halleri sp. halleri and Arabidopsis lyrata sp. petrea segregating for Zn accumulation was used. Zinc (Zn) speciation and Zn distribution in the leaves of the parent plants and of selected F1 and F2 progenies were investigated by spectroscopic and microscopic techniques and chemical analyses. - A correlation was observed between the proportion of Zn being in octahedral coordination complexed to organic acids and free in solution (Zn?OAs + Znaq) and Zn content in the leaves. This pool varied between 40percent and 80percent of total leaf Zn depending on the plant studied. Elemental mapping of the leaves revealed different Zn partitioning between the veins and the leaf tissue. The vein : tissue fluorescence ratio was negatively correlated with Zn accumulation. - The higher proportion of Zn?OAs + Znaq and the depletion of the veins in the stronger accumulators are attributed to a higher xylem unloading and vacuolar sequestration in the leaf cells. Elemental distributions in the trichomes were also investigated, and results support the role of carboxyl and⁄ or hydroxyl groups as major Zn ligands in these cells.

  5. Cadmium accumulation and distribution in populations of Phytolacca americana L. and the role of transpiration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaoqing; Peng, Kejian; Wang, Aiguo; Lian, Chunlan; Shen, Zhenguo

    2010-02-01

    The concentrations of heavy metals in Phytolacca americana L. and corresponding soil samples from three contaminated sites and an uncontaminated site were studied. Hydroponic experiments were also conducted to investigate the Cd uptake ability and mechanism of P. americana. The field results showed that the average Cd concentration was 42 mg kg(-1) in P. americana leaves, with the highest concentration of 402 mg kg(-1) found at Datianwan. A significant relationship was observed between the concentrations of Cd in leaves and those of corresponding soils on a logarithmic scale. Under laboratory hydroponic conditions, the maximum Cd concentration in aerial tissues of P. americana was 637 mg kg(-1), under treatment with 100 microM Cd. The population from the uncontaminated site (Zijinshan) also had a remarkable ability to accumulate Cd in shoots to concentrations well in excess of 100 microM in the hydroponic experiment, similar to the population from contaminated site, suggesting that Cd accumulation is a constitutive trait of P. americana. In the presence of 100 microM Cd, the addition of polyethylene glycol decreased leaf transpiration, the shoot Cd concentration, and the shoot/root Cd concentration ratio. There was a significantly positive relationship between the shoot Cd concentration and the leaf transpiration of P. americana. A similar significant positive correlation was also obtained between the shoot/root Cd concentration and leaf transpiration. Moreover, pretreatment with 5 microM abscisic acid or 5 microM HgCl(2) significantly decreased the Cd concentration in P. americana shoots. These results suggest that transpiration has an important role in Cd accumulation in shoots of P. americana.

  6. Accumulation and distributions of {sup 137}Cs in fresh water snail Pila ampullacea

    SciTech Connect

    Suseno, Heny

    2014-10-24

    Pila ampullacea are found in tropical freshwaters of Indonesia. This snail exhibit several characteristics of ideal indicator organisms in order to understand the bioaccumulation of {sup 137}Cs. Biokinetic experiment was performaced in aquaria system and under influenced of concentration K{sup +} in water. The result of experiment shown that Under difference K{sup +} concentration in water, Pila ampullacea have capability to accumulated {sup 137}Cs with CF value range 8.95 to 12.52 ml.g{sup −1}. Both uptake and depuration rate were influenced by concentration of K{sup +} in water.

  7. Investigation of factors affecting the accumulation of vinyl chloride in polyvinyl chloride piping used in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ryan K; Lin, Po-Hsun; Edwards, Marc; Richardson, Ruth E

    2011-04-01

    Plastic piping made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and chlorinated PVC (CPVC), is being increasingly used for drinking water distribution lines. Given the formulation of the material from vinyl chloride (VC), there has been concern that the VC (a confirmed human carcinogen) can leach from the plastic piping into drinking water. PVC/CPVC pipe reactors in the laboratory and tap samples collected from consumers homes (n = 15) revealed vinyl chloride accumulation in the tens of ng/L range after a few days and hundreds of ng/L after two years. While these levels did not exceed the EPA's maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 2 μg/L, many readings that simulated stagnation times in homes (overnight) exceeded the MCL-Goal of 0 μg/L. Considerable differences in VC levels were seen across different manufacturers, while aging and biofilm effects were generally small. Preliminary evidence suggests that VC may accumulate not only via chemical leaching from the plastic piping, but also as a disinfection byproduct (DBP) via a chlorine-dependent reaction. This is supported from studies with CPVC pipe reactors where chlorinated reactors accumulated more VC than dechlorinated reactors, copper pipe reactors that accumulated VC in chlorinated reactors and not in dechlorinated reactors, and field samples where VC levels were the same before and after flushing the lines where PVC/CPVC fittings were contributing. Free chlorine residual tests suggest that VC may be formed as a secondary, rather than primary, DBP. Further research and additional studies need to be conducted in order to elucidate reaction mechanisms and tease apart relative contributions of VC accumulation from PVC/CPVC piping and chlorine-dependent reactions.

  8. Tetrodotoxin – Distribution and Accumulation in Aquatic Organisms, and Cases of Human Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu

    2008-01-01

    Many pufferfish of the family Tetraodontidae possess a potent neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX). In marine pufferfish species, toxicity is generally high in the liver and ovary, whereas in brackish water and freshwater species, toxicity is higher in the skin. In 1964, the toxin of the California newt was identified as TTX as well, and since then TTX has been detected in a variety of other organisms. TTX is produced primarily by marine bacteria, and pufferfish accumulate TTX via the food chain that begins with these bacteria. Consequently, pufferfish become non-toxic when they are fed TTX-free diets in an environment in which the invasion of TTX-bearing organisms is completely shut off. Although some researchers claim that the TTX of amphibians is endogenous, we believe that it also has an exogenous origin, i.e., from organisms consumed as food. TTX-bearing animals are equipped with a high tolerance to TTX, and thus retain or accumulate TTX possibly as a biologic defense substance. There have been many cases of human intoxication due to the ingestion of TTX-bearing pufferfish, mainly in Japan, China, and Taiwan, and several victims have died. Several cases of TTX intoxication due to the ingestion of small gastropods, including some lethal cases, were recently reported in China and Taiwan, revealing a serious public health issue. PMID:18728726

  9. Tetrodotoxin--distribution and accumulation in aquatic organisms, and cases of human intoxication.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Tamao; Arakawa, Osamu

    2008-05-28

    Many pufferfish of the family Tetraodontidae possess a potent neurotoxin, tetrodotoxin (TTX). In marine pufferfish species, toxicity is generally high in the liver and ovary, whereas in brackish water and freshwater species, toxicity is higher in the skin. In 1964, the toxin of the California newt was identified as TTX as well, and since then TTX has been detected in a variety of other organisms. TTX is produced primarily by marine bacteria, and pufferfish accumulate TTX via the food chain that begins with these bacteria. Consequently, pufferfish become non-toxic when they are fed TTX-free diets in an environment in which the invasion of TTX-bearing organisms is completely shut off. Although some researchers claim that the TTX of amphibians is endogenous, we believe that it also has an exogenous origin, i.e., from organisms consumed as food. TTX-bearing animals are equipped with a high tolerance to TTX, and thus retain or accumulate TTX possibly as a biologic defense substance. There have been many cases of human intoxication due to the ingestion of TTX-bearing pufferfish, mainly in Japan, China, and Taiwan, and several victims have died. Several cases of TTX intoxication due to the ingestion of small gastropods, including some lethal cases, were recently reported in China and Taiwan, revealing a serious public health issue.

  10. Tissue-dependent distribution and accumulation of chlorobenzenes by vegetables in urban area.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianying; Zhao, Wei; Pan, Jun; Qiu, Limin; Zhu, Yinmei

    2005-08-01

    Five seasonal vegetables from three growing sites in Hangzhou city, Zhejiang Province, were studied for the levels of four chlorobenzenes(CBs): o-dichlorobenzene (o-DCB), p-dichlorobenzene (p-DCB), m-dichlorobenzene (m-DCB), and 1,2,4-trichlorobenzene (1,2,4-TCB). Samples of each vegetable from each site were subdivided into leaves, stems, and roots, and these subsamples were analyzed separately for the levels of accumulated CBs. Relations between the levels of CBs in vegetables with the total organic carbon (TOC) of the soil, the lipid content of the vegetable, and the physicochemical properties of CBs were established. Results showed that o-DCB, p-DCB, m-DCB, 1,2,4-TCB were present in all vegetables analyzed. For spinaches (Spinacia oleracea), Chinese cabbages (Brassica rapa var. pekinensis), and celery (Apium graveolens var. dulce), the highest level of CBs was with roots, followed by leaves. While for radishes (Raphanus sativus), and carrots (Daucus carota subsp. sativus), the highest level was with leaves, followed by stems. The accumulation of CBs was found to have a good correlation with the plant-tissue lipid content, the contaminant air-water Henry's coefficient (H), the contaminant octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)), and the physiological characteristics of the vegetables.

  11. Distributions and accumulation rates of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the northern Gulf of Mexico sediments.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Puspa L; Maiti, Kanchan; Overton, Edward B; Rosenheim, Brad E; Marx, Brian D

    2016-05-01

    Sediment samples collected from shelf, slope and interior basin of the northern Gulf of Mexico during 2011-2013, 1-3 years after the Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill, were utilized to characterize PAH pollution history, in this region. Results indicate that the concentrations of surface ΣPAH43 and their accumulation rates vary between 44 and 160 ng g(-1) and 6-55 ng cm(-2) y(-1), respectively. ΣPAH43 concentration profiles, accumulation rates and Δ(14)C values are significantly altered only for the sediments in the immediate vicinity of the DWH wellhead. This shows that the impact of DWH oil input on deep-sea sediments was generally limited to the area close to the spill site. Further, the PAHs source diagnostic analyses suggest a noticeable change in PAHs composition from higher to lower molecular weight dominance which reflects a change in source of PAHs in the past three years, back to the background composition. Results indicate low to moderate levels of PAH pollution in this region at present, which are unlikely to cause adverse effects on benthic communities. PMID:26895564

  12. Subcellular partitioning profiles and metallothionein levels in indigenous clams Moerella iridescens from a metal-impacted coastal bay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zaosheng; Feng, Chenglian; Ye, Chun; Wang, Youshao; Yan, Changzhou; Li, Rui; Yan, Yijun; Chi, Qiaoqiao

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the effect of environmental metal exposure on the accumulation and subcellular distribution of metals in the digestive gland of clams with special emphasis on metallothioneins (MTs) was investigated. Specimens of indigenous Moerella iridescens were collected from different natural habitats in Maluan Bay (China), characterized by varying levels of metal contamination. The digestive glands were excised, homogenized and six subcellular fractions were separated by differential centrifugation procedures and analyzed for their Cu, Zn, Cd and Pb contents. MTs were quantified independently by spectrophotometric measurements of thiols. Site-specific differences were observed in total metal concentrations in the tissues, correlating well with variable environmental metal concentrations and reflecting the gradient trends in metal contamination. Concentrations of the non-essential Cd and Pb were more responsive to environmental exposure gradients than were tissue concentrations of the essential metals, Cu and Zn. Subcellular partitioning profiles for Cu, Zn and Cd were relatively similar, with the heat-stable protein (HSP) fraction as the dominant metal-binding compartment, whereas for Pb this fraction was much less important. The variations in proportions and concentrations of metals in this fraction along with the metal bioaccumulation gradients suggested that the induced MTs play an important role in metal homeostasis and detoxification for M. iridescens in the metal-contaminated bay. Nevertheless, progressive accumulation of non-essential metals (Cd, and especially Pb) resulting from "spillover" was observed in putative metal- sensitive (e.g., mitochondria and heat-denaturable protein (HDP)) or lysosome/microsome fractions, demonstrating that metal detoxification was incomplete and increased the toxicological risk to M. iridescens inhabiting the metal-impacted environments. Through multiple stepwise regression analysis, the induction of MTs was statistically

  13. Paleogeography and the Late Cretaceous of the Western Interior of middle North America; coal distribution and sediment accumulation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roberts, Laura N. Robinson; Kirschbaum, Mark A.

    1995-01-01

    A synthesis of Late Cretaceous paleogeography of the Western Interior from Mexico to southwestern Canada emphasizes the areal distribution of peat-forming environments during six biostratigraphically constrained time intervals. Isopach maps of strata for each interval reveal the locations and magnitude of major depocenters. The paleogeographic framework provides insight into the relative importance of tectonism, eustasy, and climate on the accumulation of thick peats and their preservation as coals. A total of 123 basin summaries and their data provide the ground truth for construction of the isopach and paleogeographic maps.

  14. Subcellular SIMS imaging of isotopically labeled amino acids in cryogenically prepared cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Ion microscopy is a potentially powerful technique for localization of isotopically labeled molecules. In this study, L-arginine and phenylalanine amino acids labeled with stable isotopes 13C and 15N were localized in cultured cells with the ion microscope at 500 nm spatial resolution. Cells were exposed to the labeled amino acids and cryogenically prepared. SIMS analyses were made in fractured freeze-dried cells. A dynamic distribution was observed from labeled arginine-treated LLC-PK 1 kidney cells at mass 28 ( 13C15N) in negative secondaries, revealing cell-to-cell heterogeneity and preferential accumulation of the amino acid (or its metabolite) in the nucleus and nucleolus of some cells. The smaller nucleolus inside the nucleus was clearly resolved in SIMS images and confirmed by correlative light microscopy. The distribution of labeled phenylalanine contrasted with arginine as it was rather homogeneously distributed in T98G human glioblastoma cells. Images of 39K, 23Na and 40Ca were also recorded to confirm the reliability of sample preparation and authenticity of the observed amino acid distributions. These observations indicate that SIMS techniques can provide a valuable technology for subcellular localization of nitrogen-containing molecules in proteomics since nitrogen does not have a radionuclide tracer isotope. Amino acids labeled with stable isotopes can be used as tracers for studying their transport and metabolism in distinct subcellular compartments with SIMS. Further studies of phenylalanine uptake in human glioblastoma cells may have special significance in boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) as a boron analogue of phenylalanine, boronophenylalanine is a clinically approved compound for the treatment of brain tumors.

  15. Plasma effects on subcellular structures

    SciTech Connect

    Gweon, Bomi; Kim, Dan Bee; Jung, Heesoo; Choe, Wonho; Kim, Daeyeon; Shin, Jennifer H.

    2010-03-08

    Atmospheric pressure helium plasma treated human hepatocytes exhibit distinctive zones of necrotic and live cells separated by a void. We propose that plasma induced necrosis is attributed to plasma species such as oxygen radicals, charged particles, metastables and/or severe disruption of charged cytoskeletal proteins. Interestingly, uncharged cytoskeletal intermediate filaments are only minimally disturbed by plasma, elucidating the possibility of plasma induced electrostatic effects selectively destroying charged proteins. These bona fide plasma effects, which inflict alterations in specific subcellular structures leading to necrosis and cellular detachment, were not observed by application of helium flow or electric field alone.

  16. The Impacts of Pine Tree Die-Off on Snow Accumulation and Distribution at Plot to Catchment Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biederman, J. A.; Harpold, A. A.; Gutmann, E. D.; Reed, D. E.; Gochis, D. J.; Brooks, P. D.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonal snow cover is a primary water source throughout much of Western North America, where insect-induced tree die-off is changing the montane landscape. Widespread mortality from insects or drought differs from well-studied cases of fire and logging in that tree mortality is not accompanied by other immediate biophysical changes. Much of the impacted landscape is a mosaic of stands of varying species, structure, management history and health overlain on complex terrain. To address the challenge of predicting the effects of forest die-off on snow water input, we quantified snow accumulation and ablation at scales ranging from individual trees, through forest stands, to nested small catchments. Our study sites in Northern Colorado and Southern Wyoming are dominated by lodgepole pine, but they include forest stands that are naturally developed, managed and clear-cut with varying mortality from Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB). Our record for winters 2010 and 2011 includes continuous meteorological data and snow depth in plots with varying MPB impact as well as stand- to catchment-scale snow surveys mid-winter and near maximal accumulation. At the plot scale, snow depth sensors in healthy stands recorded greater inputs during storms (21-42% of depth) and greater seasonal accumulation (15-40%) in canopy gaps than under trees, whereas no spatial effects of canopy geometry were observed in stands with heavy mortality. Similar patterns were observed in snow surveys near peak accumulation. At both impacted and thinned sites, spatial variability in snow depth was more closely associated with larger scale topography and changes in stand structure than with canopy cover. The role of aspect in ablation was observed to increase in impacted stands as both shading and wind attenuation decreased. Evidence of wind-controlled snow distribution was found 80-100 meters from exposed stand edges in impacted forest as compared to 10-15 meters in healthy forest. Integrating from the scale of

  17. Distribution and accumulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the food web of Nansi Lake, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guizhai; Pan, Zhaoke; Wang, Xiaoming; Mo, Xiaojie; Li, Xiaoming

    2015-04-01

    The concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were analyzed in water, sediment, and biota (aquatic plant, shrimp, and fish) of Nansi Lake by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The concentrations of total PAHs were 27.54-55.04 ng L(-1) in water, 80.31-639.23 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) in sediments, 20.92-192.78 ng g(-1) dw in aquatic plants, and 67.3-533.9 ng g(-1) dw in fish and shrimp muscles. The ratios of phenanthrene to anthracene (Ph/An), fluoranthene to pyrene (Flu/Pyr), and low molecular weight to high molecular weight (LMW/HMW) in sediment indicated that the sources of the PAHs were a mixture of pyrolytic and petrogenic contamination at most sampling sites in Nansi Lake. The composition profile of PAHs in plants was similar to that in water and animals with 2-3 ring PAHs being dominant. The 4-6 ring PAHs were the dominant PAH compounds in sediment. There is a positive correlation between sediment and aquatic plants, but their PAH composition profiles were different, implying that aquatic plant absorption of PAHs from sediment is selective and the accumulation of PAHs in aquatic plants is different. The concentration of PAHs in fish showed a positive correlation with plants, reflecting that the PAHs in fish are mainly absorbed from aquatic plants rather than directly from the water. Bioaccumulation of LMW PAHs in aquatic biota was higher than HMW PAHs. The biota-sediment accumulation factor (BSAF) values of total PAHs in the plants Potamogeton lucens Linn and Ceratophyllum demersum Linn were higher than that in most animals. The BSAF values of total PAHs in animals were in the following order: Cyprinus carpio>Macrobrachium nipponense>Carassius auratus>Channa argus. There was no significant relationship between PAH bioaccumulation and trophic levels in Nansi Lake. Risk assessment of PAHs in water, sediment, and animals indicated that the water environment of Nansi Lake is safe at present. It is worthwhile to note that benzo [a

  18. A comparison of additional treatment processes to limit particle accumulation and microbial growth during drinking water distribution.

    PubMed

    Liu, G; Lut, M C; Verberk, J Q J C; Van Dijk, J C

    2013-05-15

    Water quality changes, particle accumulation and microbial growth occurring in pilot-scale water distribution systems fed with normally treated and additional treated groundwater were monitored over a period of almost one year. The treatment processes were ranked in the following order: nanofiltration (NF) > (better than) ultrafiltration (UF) > ion exchange (IEX) for limiting particle accumulation. A different order was found for limiting overall microbial growth: NF > IEX > UF. There were strong correlations between particle load and particle accumulation, and between nutrient load and microbial growth. It was concluded that particle accumulation can be controlled by reducing the particle load in water treatment plants; and the microbial growth can be better controlled by limiting organic nutrients rather than removing biomass in water treatment plants. The major focus of this study was on microbial growth. The results demonstrated that growth occurred in all types of treated water, including the phases of bulk water, biofilm and loose deposits. Considering the growth in different phases, similar growth in bulk water was observed for all treatments; NF strongly reduced growth both in loose deposits and in biofilm; UF promoted growth in biofilm, while strongly limiting growth in loose deposits. IEX had good efficiency in between UF and NF, limiting both growths in loose deposits and in biofilm. Significant growth was found in loose deposits, suggesting that loose deposit biomass should be taken into account for growth evaluation and/or prediction. Strong correlations were found between microbial growth and pressure drop in a membrane fouling simulator which proved that a membrane fouling simulator can be a fast growth predictor (within a week). Different results obtained by adenosine triphosphate and flow cytometry cell counts revealed that ATP can accurately describe both suspended and particle-associated biomass, and flow cytometry files of TCC measurements needs

  19. Cholesterol Depletion Alters Cardiomyocyte Subcellular Signaling and Increases Contractility

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, Victoria J.; Abou Samra, Abdul B.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Lasley, Robert D.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane cholesterol levels play an important factor in regulating cell function. Sarcolemmal cholesterol is concentrated in lipid rafts and caveolae, which are flask-shaped invaginations of the plasma membrane. The scaffolding protein caveolin permits the enrichment of cholesterol in caveolae, and caveolin interactions with numerous proteins regulate their function. The purpose of this study was to determine whether acute reductions in cardiomyocyte cholesterol levels alter subcellular protein kinase activation, intracellular Ca2+ and contractility. Methods: Ventricular myocytes, isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats, were treated with the cholesterol reducing agent methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, 5 mM, 1 hr, room temperature). Total cellular cholesterol levels, caveolin-3 localization, subcellular, ERK and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling, contractility, and [Ca2+]i were assessed. Results: Treatment with MβCD reduced cholesterol levels by ~45 and shifted caveolin-3 from cytoskeleton and triton-insoluble fractions to the triton-soluble fraction, and increased ERK isoform phosphorylation in cytoskeletal, cytosolic, triton-soluble and triton-insoluble membrane fractions without altering their subcellular distributions. In contrast the primary effect of MβCD was on p38 subcellular distribution of p38α with little effect on p38 phosphorylation. Cholesterol depletion increased cardiomyocyte twitch amplitude and the rates of shortening and relaxation in conjunction with increased diastolic and systolic [Ca2+]i. Conclusions: These results indicate that acute reductions in membrane cholesterol levels differentially modulate basal cardiomyocyte subcellular MAPK signaling, as well as increasing [Ca2+]i and contractility. PMID:27441649

  20. The distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in song sparrows along Arizona's upper Santa Cruz River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Heavy metals are persistent environmental contaminants, and transport of metals into the environment poses a threat to ecosystems, as plants and wildlife are susceptible to long-term exposure, bioaccumulation, and potential toxicity. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in southwestern song sparrows (Melospiza melodia fallax), a resident riparian bird species that occurs along the US/Mexico border in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to a 2009 international wastewater facility upgrade, and (3) assess the condition of song sparrows among sites with differing potential levels of exposure. We examined five study sites along with a reference site that reflect different potential sources of contamination. Body mass residuals and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Birds at our study sites typically had higher metal concentrations than birds at the reference site. Copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium in song sparrows did exceed background levels, although most metals were below background concentrations determined from previous studies. Song sparrows generally showed lower heavy metal concentrations compared to studies conducted prior to the 2009 wastewater facility upgrade. We found no cascading effects as a result of metal exposure.

  1. Sequence conserved for subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Nair, Rajesh; Rost, Burkhard

    2002-01-01

    The more proteins diverged in sequence, the more difficult it becomes for bioinformatics to infer similarities of protein function and structure from sequence. The precise thresholds used in automated genome annotations depend on the particular aspect of protein function transferred by homology. Here, we presented the first large-scale analysis of the relation between sequence similarity and identity in subcellular localization. Three results stood out: (1) The subcellular compartment is generally more conserved than what might have been expected given that short sequence motifs like nuclear localization signals can alter the native compartment; (2) the sequence conservation of localization is similar between different compartments; and (3) it is similar to the conservation of structure and enzymatic activity. In particular, we found the transition between the regions of conserved and nonconserved localization to be very sharp, although the thresholds for conservation were less well defined than for structure and enzymatic activity. We found that a simple measure for sequence similarity accounting for pairwise sequence identity and alignment length, the HSSP distance, distinguished accurately between protein pairs of identical and different localizations. In fact, BLAST expectation values outperformed the HSSP distance only for alignments in the subtwilight zone. We succeeded in slightly improving the accuracy of inferring localization through homology by fine tuning the thresholds. Finally, we applied our results to the entire SWISS-PROT database and five entirely sequenced eukaryotes. PMID:12441382

  2. Arsenic accumulation and distribution in relation to young seedling growth in Atriplex atacamensis Phil.

    PubMed

    Vromman, Delphine; Flores-Bavestrello, Alejandra; Šlejkovec, Zdenka; Lapaille, Stéphanie; Teixeira-Cardoso, Carolina; Briceño, Margarita; Kumar, Mahendra; Martínez, Juan-Pablo; Lutts, Stanley

    2011-12-15

    Even at trace levels, arsenic is of environmental and health concern due to its high toxicity. The xerohalophyte plant species Atriplex atacamensis grows on an arsenic-contaminated mining area in North Chile. Young seedlings that were grown from seeds collected from these plants were grown in a nutrient solution under controlled environmental conditions and were exposed for 14 and 28 days to 0, 100 or 1000 μM arsenate. More than 75% of the plants that were exposed to the highest As dose survived until the end of the treatment. The seedling growth was reduced (100 μM As) or inhibited (1000 μM As) in the stress conditions, but the plants were able to efficiently close their stomata and perform osmotic adjustments to avoid secondary water stress. Arsenic accumulated up to 400 μg g(-1) DW in the shoots and 3500 μg g(-1) DW in the roots. Arsenate drastically impaired the P content and increased glycinebetaine content, although no arsenobetaine was found in the tissues. With the exception of arsenite and arsenate, no As-containing organic compound was detected. Arsenic was not excreted by the trichomes that were present at the leaf surface. Although an increase in the total level of non-protein thiols suggested that arsenite fixation on the sulfhydryl groups could occur in the stressed tissues, the majority of the soluble arsenic remained in its oxidized state As(V). Arsenate induced an increase in the free soluble polyamine concentrations in all of the organs, and it increased the proportion of spermidine and spermine and decreased the proportion of putrescine in the polyamine pool. Therefore, it is likely that these polycationic molecules may assist in arsenate sequestration in the stressed tissues, and A. atacamensis may represent a promising plant species that can be tested in field trials for its phytomanagement of As-contaminated sites in desert areas.

  3. Status of POPs accumulation in the Yellow River Delta: From distribution to risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Li, Jing; Chen, Chunli; Li, Fadong

    2016-06-15

    The Yellow River Delta (YRD) is a large region of China with complex pollution sources and a long history of environmental deterioration. Despite this, relatively little data exists on the status of important contaminants of concern in this region. Here, we review the literature on the status of key persistent organic pollutants (POPs) of concern including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) in the YRD. Sources, source identification methods, and spatial distribution patterns are presented. Additionally, POPs contamination levels reported in the literature were evaluated against popular regulatory limits worldwide to form a basis for overall environmental health. Our review determined that OCPs in the YRD originated mainly from current pesticide use and past agricultural pesticide application. Sources of PAHs included petrochemical inputs, coal fired plants, and wood combustion. PCB levels were impacted by the petrochemical industry as well as waste disposal of PCB containing equipment. OCPs exhibited a spatial distribution pattern that increased along the urban-rural gradient, while the opposite was seen for PAHs and PCBs. Comparisons of POPs contamination levels in the YRD with popular regulatory limits suggest that the extent of PCB contamination all mediums (sediment, soil, water, and biota) exceeded that of PAHs and OCPs. Overall pollution levels in the YRD seem to be in control; however, levels from heavily polluted point sources raise numerous concerns about the ecological health of the region and require more attention from regulatory authorities. PMID:27085594

  4. Distribution, Transport, and Accumulation of Pyrogenic Black Carbon in Post-Wildfire Watersheds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanter, A.; Cadol, D. D.; Frey, B.; Lohse, K. A.

    2014-12-01

    Large, high severity wildfires greatly alter forest structure, water quality, and soil development/erosion. With increased frequency of such wildfires also follows heavy post-wildfire debris flows and flooding which deliver high loads of sediment and pyrogenic black carbon (PyC) to downstream waterways. The accumulation of PyC is a multi-faceted and dynamic issue in the critical zone. Generated by incomplete combustion of organic matter, PyC (in the form of soot and char) impacts turbidity, biological and chemical oxygen demand, and pH. In addition, PyC has the potential to sequester contaminants and can store carbon over short and long timescales. The impacts of two recent wildfires in Northern New Mexico are studied with the goal of understanding the fluxes and residence times of PyC in post-wildfire, mountainous watersheds. Employing burn severity maps and geospatial data, we selected three sites to collect soil and water samples to characterize PyC: a control, an area impacted by a large, severe burn (2011), and an area impacted by a smaller, less severe burn (2013). By collaborating with researchers at the Jemez Critical Zone Observatory, soil samples are being analyzed and will provide pre-wildfire PyC concentrations for the 2013 burn area. In this study, PyC is treated as both a particulate and a solute that is transported throughout the watershed as well as degraded in soils, surface water and groundwater. We used two black carbon quantification methods: the chemo-thermal oxidation (CTO-375) method to distinguish between soil soot and char, and the benzene polycarboxylic acids (BPCA) method to quantify the total concentrations of PyC in soil and water samples. Preliminary soil data from the CTO-375 method show comparable soot concentrations in the control, 2011, and 2013 burn indicating that the soot is more recalcitrant than char and remains in the watershed long after a wildfire. This data also suggests that the fluxes of black carbon over short time

  5. Spatial and temporal temperature distribution of ultrashort pulse induced heat accumulation in glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, Sören; Hashimoto, Fumiya; Zimmermann, Felix; Ozeki, Yasuyuki; Itoh, Kazuyoshi; Tünnermann, Andreas; Nolte, Stefan

    2015-03-01

    We report on the first direct measurements of the laser induced temperature distribution after the absorption of multiple ultrashort laser pulses at high repetition rates in borosilicate glass. To this end, we developed an in-situ micro Raman setup to determine the temperature dependent ratio between Stokes and Anti-Stokes scattering. The results indicate a critical influence of the pulse energy on the induced temperature. In borosilicate glass, the maximal temperature directly after the excitation (pulse energy of 1100 nJ, repetition rate of 1 MHz, wavelength of 1044 nm, pulse duration of 600 fs, 2000 pulses per laser spot) is more than 5000 K and rapidly cools down within several hundreds of ns.

  6. Subcellular Localization of Proteins Responding to Mitoxantrone-Induced DNA Damage in Leukaemic Cells.

    PubMed

    Ćmielová, J; Lesná, M; Řezáčová, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the subcellular localization of proteins participating in the double-strand break response pathway - p53, Mdm2, p21 and Chk2. MOLT-4 cells were pre-treated with mitoxantrone in concentrations 1 nmol/l and 5 nmol/l. The trypan blue technique was used to determine cell viability and proliferation. Western blotting was used to evaluate changes in p53, Mdm2 and Chk2 protein expression and sandwich ELISA was used to evaluate changes in the p21 protein amount. After 1 nmol/l mitoxantrone cells did not die, but their ability to proliferate was decreased. The p53 protein was activated and phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. The Mdm2 protein was present in the cytoplasm with its maximal level after 8 and 16 h. The p21 protein was detected in the nucleus after 24 and 48 h. Increased levels of phosphorylated Chk2 at threonine 68 were observed in the cytoplasmic fraction after 24 and 48 h of mitoxantrone treatment. We used mitoxantrone as an inducer of double-strand breaks to bring new data about the subcellular distribution of proteins responding to DNA damage. In MOLT-4 cells, the p53 protein was activated. p53 was phosphorylated at serines 15 and 392 and accumulated in the nucleus. The Mdm2 protein was activated in advance to p53 and occurred in the cytoplasm. The p21 protein was present in the nucleus. Chk2 kinase was activated by the phosphorylation at threonine 68 and we observed increased levels of this protein in the cytoplasmic fraction.

  7. Contaminant distribution and accumulation in the surface sediments of Long Island Sound

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mecray, E.L.; Buchholtz ten Brink, M. R.

    2000-01-01

    The distribution of contaminants in surface sediments has been measured and mapped as part of a U.S. Geological Survey study of the sediment quality and dynamics of Long Island Sound. Surface samples from 219 stations were analyzed for trace (Ag, Ba, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, V, Zn and Zr) and major (Al, Fe, Mn, Ca, and Ti) elements, grain size, and Clostridium perfringens spores. Principal Components Analysis was used to identify metals that may covary as a function of common sources or geochemistry. The metallic elements generally have higher concentrations in fine-grained deposits, and their transport and depositional patterns mimic those of small particles. Fine-grained particles are remobilized and transported from areas of high bottom energy and deposited in less dynamic regions of the Sound. Metal concentrations in bottom sediments are high in the western part of the Sound and low in the bottom-scoured regions of the eastern Sound. The sediment chemistry was compared to model results (Signell et al., 1998) and maps of sedimentary environments (Knebel et al., 1999) to better understand the processes responsible for contaminant distribution across the Sound. Metal concentrations were normalized to grain-size and the resulting ratios are uniform in the depositional basins of the Sound and show residual signals in the eastern end as well as in some local areas. The preferential transport of fine-grained material from regions of high bottom stress is probably the dominant factor controlling the metal concentrations in different regions of Long Island Sound. This physical redistribution has implications for environmental management in the region.

  8. Saxitoxins and okadaic acid group: accumulation and distribution in invertebrate marine vectors from Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    García, Carlos; Pérez, Francisco; Contreras, Cristóbal; Figueroa, Diego; Barriga, Andrés; López-Rivera, Américo; Araneda, Oscar F; Contreras, Héctor R

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algae blooms (HABs) are the main source of marine toxins in the aquatic environment surrounding the austral fjords in Chile. Huichas Island (Aysén) has an history of HABs spanning more than 30 years, but there is limited investigation of the bioaccumulation of marine toxins in the bivalves and gastropods from the Region of Aysén. In this study, bivalves (Mytilus chilenses, Choromytilus chorus, Aulacomya ater, Gari solida, Tagelus dombeii and Venus antiqua) and carnivorous gastropods (Argobuccinum ranelliformes and Concholepas concholepas) were collected from 28 sites. Researchers analysed the accumulation of STX-group toxins using a LC with a derivatisation post column (LC-PCOX), while lipophilic toxins (OA-group, azapiracids, pectenotoxins and yessotoxins) were analysed using LC-MS/MS with electrospray ionisation (+/-) in visceral (hepatopancreas) and non-visceral tissues (mantle, adductor muscle, gills and foot). Levels of STX-group and OA-group toxins varied among individuals from the same site. Among all tissue samples, the highest concentrations of STX-group toxins were noted in the hepatopancreas in V. antiqua (95 ± 0.1 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)), T. dombeii (148 ± 1.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and G. solida (3232 ± 5.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05); in the adductor muscle in M. chilensis (2495 ± 6.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05) and in the foot in C. concholepas (81 ± 0.7 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and T. dombeii (114 ± 1.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)). The highest variability of toxins was detected in G. solida, where high levels of carbamate derivatives were identified (GTXs, neoSTX and STX). In addition to the detected hydrophilic toxins, OA-group toxins were detected (OA and DTX-1) with an average ratio of ≈1:1. The highest levels of OA-group toxins were in the foot of C. concholepas, with levels of 400.3 ± 3.6 μg OA eq kg(-1) (p < 0.05) and with a toxic profile composed of 90% OA. A wide range of OA-group toxins was detected in M. chilensis with a

  9. Saxitoxins and okadaic acid group: accumulation and distribution in invertebrate marine vectors from Southern Chile.

    PubMed

    García, Carlos; Pérez, Francisco; Contreras, Cristóbal; Figueroa, Diego; Barriga, Andrés; López-Rivera, Américo; Araneda, Oscar F; Contreras, Héctor R

    2015-01-01

    Harmful algae blooms (HABs) are the main source of marine toxins in the aquatic environment surrounding the austral fjords in Chile. Huichas Island (Aysén) has an history of HABs spanning more than 30 years, but there is limited investigation of the bioaccumulation of marine toxins in the bivalves and gastropods from the Region of Aysén. In this study, bivalves (Mytilus chilenses, Choromytilus chorus, Aulacomya ater, Gari solida, Tagelus dombeii and Venus antiqua) and carnivorous gastropods (Argobuccinum ranelliformes and Concholepas concholepas) were collected from 28 sites. Researchers analysed the accumulation of STX-group toxins using a LC with a derivatisation post column (LC-PCOX), while lipophilic toxins (OA-group, azapiracids, pectenotoxins and yessotoxins) were analysed using LC-MS/MS with electrospray ionisation (+/-) in visceral (hepatopancreas) and non-visceral tissues (mantle, adductor muscle, gills and foot). Levels of STX-group and OA-group toxins varied among individuals from the same site. Among all tissue samples, the highest concentrations of STX-group toxins were noted in the hepatopancreas in V. antiqua (95 ± 0.1 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)), T. dombeii (148 ± 1.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and G. solida (3232 ± 5.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05); in the adductor muscle in M. chilensis (2495 ± 6.4 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1); p < 0.05) and in the foot in C. concholepas (81 ± 0.7 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)) and T. dombeii (114 ± 1.2 μg STX-eq 100 g(-1)). The highest variability of toxins was detected in G. solida, where high levels of carbamate derivatives were identified (GTXs, neoSTX and STX). In addition to the detected hydrophilic toxins, OA-group toxins were detected (OA and DTX-1) with an average ratio of ≈1:1. The highest levels of OA-group toxins were in the foot of C. concholepas, with levels of 400.3 ± 3.6 μg OA eq kg(-1) (p < 0.05) and with a toxic profile composed of 90% OA. A wide range of OA-group toxins was detected in M. chilensis with a

  10. Capital accumulation, income distribution and endogenous fertility in an overlapping generations general equilibrium model.

    PubMed

    Raut, L K

    1991-01-01

    A study is conducted in attempts to increase the understanding of the links between macroeconomic effects and causes of population growth in formulating policy. An overlapping generations general equilibrium model is employed aggregating household decisions about fertility, savings, and investment in the human capital of children with the objective of studying intertemporal relationships among population growth, income distribution, inter-generation social mobility, skill composition of the labor force, and household income. As a result of endogenous fertility, the equilibrium path attains steady state from the second generation. Income tax transfer, child taxation, and social security taxation policies are also examined in the paper. A structural explanation is given for the inverse household income-child quantity and negative child quality-quantity relationships seen in developing countries. In a Cobb-Douglas economy, these relationships hold in the short-run, potentially working over the long-run in other economies. Overall, the model shows that group interests may hinder emergence of perfect capital markets with private initiatives. Where developing countries are concerned, these results have strong implications for population policy. A policy mix of building good quality schools, or subsidizing rural education, introducing a formal social security program, and providing high-yield, risk-free investments, banking, and insurance services to the poor is recommended. PMID:12284076

  11. Distribution of the concentration of heavy metals associated with the sediment particles accumulated on road surfaces.

    PubMed

    Zafra, C A; Temprano, J; Tejero, I

    2011-07-01

    The heavy metal pollution caused by road run-off water constitutes a problem in urban areas. The metallic load associated with road sediment must be determined in order to study its impact in drainage systems and receiving waters, and to perfect the design of prevention systems. This paper presents data regarding the sediment collected on road surfaces in the city of Torrelavega (northern Spain) during a period of 65 days (132 samples). Two sample types were collected: vacuum-dried samples and those swept up following vacuuming. The sediment loading (g m(-2)), particle size distribution (63-2800 microm) and heavy metal concentrations were determined. The data showed that the concentration of heavy metals tends to increase with the reduction in the particle diameter (exponential tendency). The concentrations ofPb, Zn, Cu, Cr, Ni, Cd, Fe, Mn and Co in the size fraction <63 microm were 350, 630, 124, 57, 56, 38, 3231, 374 and 51 mg kg(-1), respectively (average traffic density: 3800 vehicles day(-1)). By increasing the residence time of the sediment, the concentration increases, whereas the ratio of the concentration between the different size fractions decreases. The concentration across the road diminishes when the distance between the roadway and the sampling siteincreases; when the distance increases, the ratio between size fractions for heavy metal concentrations increases. Finally, the main sources of heavy metals are the particles detached by braking (brake pads) and tyre wear (rubber), and are associated with particle sizes <125 microm.

  12. Accumulation, tissue-specific distribution and debromination of decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 209) in European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris).

    PubMed

    Van den Steen, E; Covaci, A; Jaspers, V L B; Dauwe, T; Voorspoels, S; Eens, M; Pinxten, R

    2007-07-01

    In this study we investigated the accumulation, tissue-specific distribution and possible debromination of BDE 209 in a terrestrial songbird species, the European starling, using silastic implants as a method of exposure. BDE 209 accumulated in the blood of the exposed starlings to a mean peak concentration of 16+/-4.1 ng/ml on day 10. After this peak, there was a decline to 3.3+/-0.4 ng/ml blood at the end of the exposure period of 76 days, which suggests elimination of BDE 209. In the exposed group, the muscle concentrations (461 ng/g lipid weight [lw], 430 ng/g lw) were about twofold those in liver (269 ng/g lw, 237 ng/g lw). In addition to BDE 209, other PBDE congeners, particularly octa- and nonaBDEs, were also present in the muscle and liver, suggesting bioformation from BDE 209. To our knowledge, these results are the first indications for the debromination of BDE 209 in birds. PMID:17239511

  13. Subcellular localization of pituitary enzymes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, R. E.

    1970-01-01

    A cytochemical procedure is reported for identifying subcellular sites of enzymes hydrolyzing beta-naphthylamine substrates, and to study the sites of reaction product localization in cells of various tissues. Investigations using the substrate Leu 4-methoxy-8-naphthylamine, a capture with hexonium pararosaniline, and the final chelation of osmium have identified the hydrolyzing enzyme of rat liver cells; this enzyme localized on cell membranes with intense deposition in the areas of the parcanaliculi. The study of cells in the anterior pituitary of the rat showed the deposition of reaction product on cell membrane; and on the membranes of secretion granules contained within the cell. The deposition of reaction product on the cell membrane however showed no increase or decrease with changes in the physiological state of the gland and release of secretion granules from specific cells.

  14. Modeling biosilicification at subcellular scales.

    PubMed

    Javaheri, Narjes; Cronemberger, Carolina M; Kaandorp, Jaap A

    2013-01-01

    Biosilicification occurs in many organisms. Sponges and diatoms are major examples of them. In this chapter, we introduce a modeling approach that describes several biological mechanisms controlling silicification. Modeling biosilicification is a typical multiscale problem where processes at very different temporal and spatial scales need to be coupled: processes at the molecular level, physiological processes at the subcellular and cellular level, etc. In biosilicification morphology plays a fundamental role, and a spatiotemporal model is required. In the case of sponges, a particle simulation based on diffusion-limited aggregation is presented here. This model can describe fractal properties of silica aggregates in first steps of deposition on an organic template. In the case of diatoms, a reaction-diffusion model is introduced which can describe the concentrations of chemical components and has the possibility to include polymerization chain of reactions. PMID:24420712

  15. Distribution of metals and accumulation of lead by different tissues in the freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis (L.)

    SciTech Connect

    Pyatt, F.B.; Pyatt, A.J.; Pentreath, V.W.

    1997-07-01

    The concentrations of several metals in different body tissues of the freshwater snail, Lymnaea stagnalis (L.), collected from an uncontaminated environment, were measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. Significant concentrations of the potentially toxic elements manganese, titanium, and copper were detected in all tissues, although they were not detectable in the water sampled at collection; bioaccumulation is thus evidenced. Highest concentrations of manganese and copper were present in the shell, while highest concentrations of titanium were present in the head and foot. Experimental snails were continuously exposed to lead chloride (lead at 5 ppm) for an experimental period of 3 weeks. Both elements were accumulated to different extents by the snail tissues but with high concentrations again in the head of the animals, and chloride also in the visceral hump. No significant alterations in the distribution of the other elements measured were observed in the lead chloride-exposed animals.

  16. Effects of alpha-linolenic acid vs. docosahexaenoic acid supply on the distribution of fatty acids among the rat cardiac subcellular membranes after a short- or long-term dietary exposure

    PubMed Central

    Brochot, Amandine; Guinot, Marine; Auchere, Daniel; Macaire, Jean-Paul; Weill, Pierre; Grynberg, Alain; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine

    2009-01-01

    Background Previous work showed that the functional cardiac effect of dietary alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) in rats requires a long feeding period (6 months), although a docosahexaenoic (DHA) acid-supply affects cardiac adrenergic response after 2 months. However, the total cardiac membrane n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition remained unchanged after 2 months. This delay could be due to a specific reorganization of the different subcellular membrane PUFA profiles. This study was designed to investigate the evolution between 2 and 6 months of diet duration of the fatty acid profile in sarcolemmal (SL), mitochondrial (MI), nuclear (NU) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) membrane fractions. Methods Male Wistar rats were randomly assigned to 3 dietary groups (n = 10/diet/period), either n-3 PUFA-free diet (CTL), or ALA or DHA-rich diets. After 2 or 6 months, the subcellular cardiac membrane fractions were separated by differential centrifugations and sucrose gradients. Each membrane profile was analysed by gas chromatography (GC) after lipid extraction. Results As expected the n-3 PUFA-rich diets incorporated n-3 PUFA instead of n-6 PUFA in all the subcellular fractions, which also exhibited individual specificities. The diet duration increased SFA and decreased PUFA in SL, whereas NU remained constant. The SR and MI enriched in n-3 PUFA exhibited a decreased DHA level with ageing in the DHA and CTL groups. Conversely, the n-3 PUFA level remained unchanged in the ALA group, due to a significant increase in docosapentaenoic acid (DPA). N-3 PUFA rich diets lead to a better PUFA profile in all the fractions and significantly prevent the profile modifications induced by ageing. Conclusion With the ALA diet the n-3 PUFA content, particularly in SR and SL kept increasing between 2 and 6 months, which may partly account for the delay to achieve the modification of adrenergic response. PMID:19320987

  17. Effect of external phosphate addition on solid-phase iron distribution and iron accumulation in Mangrove Kandelia obovata (S. L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Jingna; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Hansell, Dennis; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Wenyun; Yan, Chongling

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of phosphate (PO4 (3-)) addition on iron (Fe) cycling in mangrove ecosystem. Kandelia obovata (S. L.), one of the dominant mangrove species in the southeast of China, was cultivated in rhizoboxes under three different levels of P concentrations. Results showed the solid-phase Fe distribution and Fe(II)/Fe(III) values in both the root zone (rhizosphere) and bulk soil (non-rhizosphere) were comparable among all P levels (p > 0.05); P addition significantly decreased the pore water Fe content both in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere zone (p < 0.05); higher amount of reactive Fe was found in rhizosphere sediments, while in the non-rhizosphere sediments, higher concentration of crystalline Fe was determined; P significantly increased iron plaque formation and iron accumulation in K. obovata (S. L.) tissues (p < 0.05); P addition increased K. obovata (S. L.) biomass and chlorophyll content. It was suggested that P is implicated in the Fe cycling in mangrove plants; more reactive iron, higher abundance of root Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and together with higher amount of K. obovata (S. L.) root organic acids exudation result in a rapid Fe cycling in rhizosphere, which contribute to comparable solid-phase iron distribution among different P levels.

  18. The distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Beijiang River, South China.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bo; Lu, Jin; Zhou, Huai-Dong; Yin, Shu-Hua; Hao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    A geochemical study of Beijiang River sediments was carried out to analyze the concentrations, distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs: Sc, V, Co, Ga, Y, Sn and Sb). The mean concentrations of Sc, V, Co, Ga, Y, Sn and Sb were 8.2, 60.3, 9.6, 17.2, 28.6, 85.6 and 39.0 mg/kg, respectively. The concentrations of the SMTEs, together with their spatial distribution showed that the SMTEs were mainly due to anthropogenic inputs from the metal smelting industries and local mining activities in the upper region of the river. The assessment by geoaccumulation index indicates that Sc, V, Co, Ga and Y are at the unpolluted level, Sn is at the 'strongly contaminated' level, and Sb is at the 'extremely contaminated' level. The pollution level of the SMTEs is: Sb > Sn > Y > Ga > Co > V > Sc. The results of correlation analysis and principal component analysis indicated the Sn and Sb were positively correlated with each other, indicating a common source in sediments. In conclusion, our results indicate that the sediments in Beijiang River have been severely contaminated by Sn and Sb.

  19. Effect of external phosphate addition on solid-phase iron distribution and iron accumulation in Mangrove Kandelia obovata (S. L.).

    PubMed

    Du, Jingna; Liu, Jingchun; Lu, Haoliang; Hansell, Dennis; Zhang, Qiong; Wang, Wenyun; Yan, Chongling

    2015-09-01

    In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to evaluate the effect of phosphate (PO4 (3-)) addition on iron (Fe) cycling in mangrove ecosystem. Kandelia obovata (S. L.), one of the dominant mangrove species in the southeast of China, was cultivated in rhizoboxes under three different levels of P concentrations. Results showed the solid-phase Fe distribution and Fe(II)/Fe(III) values in both the root zone (rhizosphere) and bulk soil (non-rhizosphere) were comparable among all P levels (p > 0.05); P addition significantly decreased the pore water Fe content both in the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere zone (p < 0.05); higher amount of reactive Fe was found in rhizosphere sediments, while in the non-rhizosphere sediments, higher concentration of crystalline Fe was determined; P significantly increased iron plaque formation and iron accumulation in K. obovata (S. L.) tissues (p < 0.05); P addition increased K. obovata (S. L.) biomass and chlorophyll content. It was suggested that P is implicated in the Fe cycling in mangrove plants; more reactive iron, higher abundance of root Fe-reducing bacteria (FeRB) and Fe-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB), and together with higher amount of K. obovata (S. L.) root organic acids exudation result in a rapid Fe cycling in rhizosphere, which contribute to comparable solid-phase iron distribution among different P levels. PMID:25943505

  20. Intracellular And Subcellular Partitioning Of Nickel In Aureococcus Anophagefferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Axe, L.; Wei, L.; Bagheri, S.; Michalopoulou, Z.

    2008-12-01

    Brown tides are caused by Aureococcus anophagefferens, a species of Pelagophyceae, and have been observed in NY/NJ waterways effecting ecosystems by attenuating light, changing water color, reducing eelgrass beds, decreasing shellfisheries, and further impacting the food web by reducing phytoplankton. Although the impact of macronutrients and iron on A. anophagefferens has been well studied, contaminants, and specifically trace metals have not. In long-term experiments designed to investigate the growth and toxicity, Cd, Cu, Ni, and Zn exposure was evaluated over 10-13 to 10-7 M for the free metal ion. While growth was inhibited or terminated from exposure to Cd and Cu, nickel addition ([Ni2+]: 10-11.23 to 10-10.23 M) promoted A. anophagefferens growth. Short-term experiments are being conducted to better understand mechanistically nickel speciation and distribution. Both total intracellular and subcellular metal concentrations are being assessed with radio-labeled 63Ni. Subcellular fractions are defined as metal-sensitive fractions (MSF) constituting organelles, cell debris, and heat-denatured protein [HDP] and biologically detoxified metal comprising heat-stabilized protein [HSP] and metal-rich granules [MRG]. Based on subcellular distribution, aqueous [Ni2+] concentrations, and A. anophagefferens growth rates, potential reaction pathways promoting A. anophagefferens growth can be addressed.

  1. The accumulation, distribution, and toxicological effects of dietary arsenic exposure in lake whitefish (Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush).

    PubMed

    Pedlar, R M; Ptashynski, M D; Wautier, K G; Evans, R E; Baron, C L; Klaverkamp, J F

    2002-01-01

    A 20-day experiment was conducted to compare the accumulation, distribution, and toxicological effects of dietary As, as arsenate, in lake whitefish (LWF, Coregonus clupeaformis) and lake trout (LT, Salvelinus namaycush). Results of this experiment were used to design an experiment of longer duration in which one of the fish species was selected and exposed three times per week to lower dietary As doses. In the present study each treatment group was exposed to a combination of one of three doses of As (0, 100, or 1000 microg As/g) and one of two types of diet, no brine shrimp (NS) or with brine shrimp (WS) for a total of eight dosing events. Brine shrimp were added to determine whether their presence enhanced consumption of As-contaminated food. Modified feeding behavior occurred in both fish species fed As contaminated diets, with the exception of the 100 microg As/g NS food. Brine shrimp addition did not affect feed consumption of the As contaminated diets. Significant As accumulation occurred in stomach, pyloric caeca, intestine, liver, kidney, and gallbladder, but not in bile or muscle. As exposure did not have a significant effect on hepatic and renal metallothionein concentrations. Concentrations of lipid peroxides were only significantly elevated in the plasma of LT fed the 1000 microg As/g WS food. Liver somatic indices decreased significantly in both species, whereas hematological parameters were not affected in either species. Histological lesions occurred in gallbladder, liver, kidney, pyloric caeca and intestine from LWF. These lesions were not observed in LT; however, gallbladders were not examined in this species. Weight gain was lower in both species fed As contaminated diets, however, condition factors were not affected. PMID:11796327

  2. Subcellular Dynamics of Multifunctional Protein Regulation: Mechanisms of GAPDH Intracellular Translocation

    PubMed Central

    Sirover, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Multidimensional proteins such as glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) exhibit distinct activities unrelated to their originally identified functions. Apart from glycolysis, GAPDH participates in iron metabolism, membrane trafficking, histone biosynthesis, the maintenance of DNA integrity and receptor mediated cell signaling. Further, multifunctional proteins exhibit distinct changes in their subcellular localization reflecting their new activities. As such, GAPDH is not only a cytosolic protein but is localized in the membrane, the nucleus, polysomes, the ER and the Golgi. In addition, although the initial subcellular localizations of multifunctional proteins may be of significance, dynamic changes in intracellular distribution may occur as a consequence of those new activities. As such, regulatory mechanisms may exist through which cells control multifunctional protein expression as a function of their subcellular localization. The temporal sequence through which subcellular translocation and the acquisition of new GAPDH functions is considered as well as post-translational modification as a basis for its intracellular transport. PMID:22388977

  3. The spatial distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Xu, Dongyu; Wei, Xin; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    The alteration of hydrologic condition of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) after impoundment has caused numerous environmental changes. This study investigated the distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs) in sediments from three tributaries (ZY, MX and CT) and one mainstream (CJ) in TGR during different seasons. The average contents of most SMTEs excluding Sb in the winter were similar to that in the summer. For Sb, its average concentrations in the summer and winter were roughly six and three times higher than its background value, respectively. Contamination factor (CF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) demonstrated that most of the sediments were obviously contaminated by Sb. The enrichment factors (EF) of Ga and Sb were higher than 2.0, revealing the possible anthropogenic inputs; However, the EFs of other SMTEs were lower than 1.5, indicating the natural inputs. Correlation and principal component analysis suggested the most SMTEs were positively correlated with major elements (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and clay contents, which implies that SMTEs had the same sources with these major metals, and the fine particles might be a major carrier for transporting SMTEs from the rivers to the TGR. PMID:26538153

  4. Distribution of mercury in Gypsy Cortinarius caperatus mushrooms from several populations: an efficient accumulator species and estimated intake of element.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    Mushroom Cortinarius caperatus is one of the several edible wild-grown species that are widely collected by fanciers. For specimens collected from 20 spatially and distantly distributed sites in Poland the median values of Hg contents of caps ranged from 0.81 to 2.4mgkg(-1) dry matter and in stipes they were 2.5-fold lower. C. caperatus efficiently accumulates Hg and the median values of the bioconcentration factor for caps range from 120 to 18 and for stipes from 47 to 7.3. This mushroom even when collected at background (uncontaminated) forested areas could be a source of elevated intake of Hg. The irregular consumption of the caps or whole fruiting bodies is not considered to pose a risk. Frequent eating of C. caperatus during the fruiting season by fanciers should be avoided because of possible health risk from Hg. Available data on Hg contents of C. caperatus from several places in Europe are also summarized.

  5. The spatial distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Xu, Dongyu; Wei, Xin; Gao, Li

    2015-11-05

    The alteration of hydrologic condition of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) after impoundment has caused numerous environmental changes. This study investigated the distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs) in sediments from three tributaries (ZY, MX and CT) and one mainstream (CJ) in TGR during different seasons. The average contents of most SMTEs excluding Sb in the winter were similar to that in the summer. For Sb, its average concentrations in the summer and winter were roughly six and three times higher than its background value, respectively. Contamination factor (CF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) demonstrated that most of the sediments were obviously contaminated by Sb. The enrichment factors (EF) of Ga and Sb were higher than 2.0, revealing the possible anthropogenic inputs; However, the EFs of other SMTEs were lower than 1.5, indicating the natural inputs. Correlation and principal component analysis suggested the most SMTEs were positively correlated with major elements (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and clay contents, which implies that SMTEs had the same sources with these major metals, and the fine particles might be a major carrier for transporting SMTEs from the rivers to the TGR.

  6. The spatial distribution, accumulation and potential source of seldom monitored trace elements in sediments of Three Gorges Reservoir, China.

    PubMed

    Han, Lanfang; Gao, Bo; Zhou, Huaidong; Xu, Dongyu; Wei, Xin; Gao, Li

    2015-01-01

    The alteration of hydrologic condition of Three Gorges Reservoir (TGR) after impoundment has caused numerous environmental changes. This study investigated the distribution, accumulation and potential sources of the seldom monitored trace elements (SMTEs) in sediments from three tributaries (ZY, MX and CT) and one mainstream (CJ) in TGR during different seasons. The average contents of most SMTEs excluding Sb in the winter were similar to that in the summer. For Sb, its average concentrations in the summer and winter were roughly six and three times higher than its background value, respectively. Contamination factor (CF) and geoaccumulation index (Igeo) demonstrated that most of the sediments were obviously contaminated by Sb. The enrichment factors (EF) of Ga and Sb were higher than 2.0, revealing the possible anthropogenic inputs; However, the EFs of other SMTEs were lower than 1.5, indicating the natural inputs. Correlation and principal component analysis suggested the most SMTEs were positively correlated with major elements (Cr, Mn, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Pb) and clay contents, which implies that SMTEs had the same sources with these major metals, and the fine particles might be a major carrier for transporting SMTEs from the rivers to the TGR. PMID:26538153

  7. Bioaccumulation, subcellular, and molecular localization and damage to physiology and ultrastructure in Nymphoides peltata (Gmel.) O. Kuntze exposed to yttrium.

    PubMed

    Fu, Yongyang; Li, Feifei; Xu, Ting; Cai, Sanjuan; Chu, Weiyue; Qiu, Han; Sha, Sha; Cheng, Guangyu; Xu, Qinsong

    2014-02-01

    Bioaccumulation, subcellular distribution, and acute toxicity of yttrium (Y) were evaluated in Nymphoides peltata. The effects of Y concentrations of 1-5 mg L(-1) applied for 4 days were assessed by measuring changes in photosynthetic pigments, nutrient contents, enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants, and ultrastructure. The accumulation of Y in subcellular fractions decreased in the order of cell wall > organelle > soluble fraction. Much more Y was located in cellulose and pectin than in other biomacromolecules. The content of some mineral elements (Mg, Ca, Fe, Mn, and Mo) increased in N. peltata, but there was an opposite effect for P and K. Meanwhile, ascorbate, and catalase activity decreased significantly for all Y concentrations. In contrast, peroxidase activity was induced, while initial rises in superoxide dismutase activity and glutathione content were followed by subsequent declines. Morphological symptoms of senescence, such as chlorosis and damage to chloroplasts and mitochondria, were observed even at the lowest Y concentration. Pigment content decreased as the Y concentration rose and the calculated EC50 and MPC of Y for N. peltata were 2 and 0.2 mg L(-1) after 4 days of exposure, respectively. The results showed that exogenous Y was highly available in water and that its high concentration in water bodies might produce harmful effects on aquatic organisms. N. peltata is proposed as a biomonitor for the assessment of metal pollution in aquatic ecosystems.

  8. Accumulation and distribution of iron, cadmium, lead and nickel in cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing two different chelated iron supplies.

    PubMed

    Csog, Árpád; Mihucz, Victor G; Tatár, Eniko; Fodor, Ferenc; Virág, István; Majdik, Cornelia; Záray, Gyula

    2011-07-01

    Cucumber plants grown in hydroponics containing 10 μM Cd(II), Ni(II) and Pb(II), and iron supplied as Fe(III) EDTA or Fe(III) citrate in identical concentrations, were investigated by total-reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry with special emphasis on the determination of iron accumulation and distribution within the different plant compartments (root, stem, cotyledon and leaves). The extent of Cd, Ni and Pb accumulation and distribution were also determined. Generally, iron and heavy-metal contaminant accumulation was higher when Fe(III) citrate was used. The accumulation of nickel and lead was higher by about 20% and 100%, respectively, if the iron supply was Fe(III) citrate. The accumulation of Cd was similar. In the case of Fe(III) citrate, the total amounts of Fe taken up were similar in the control and heavy-metal-treated plants (27-31 μmol/plant). Further, the amounts of iron transported from the root towards the shoot of the control, lead- and nickel-contaminated plants were independent of the iron(III) form. Although Fe mobility could be characterized as being low, its distribution within the shoot was not significantly affected by the heavy metals investigated.

  9. Distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria and polyphosphate accumulating organisms in a pumped-flow biofilm reactor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guangxue; Nielsen, Michael; Sorensen, Ketil; Zhan, Xinmin; Rodgers, Michael

    2009-10-01

    The spatial distributions and activities of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and polyphosphate accumulating organisms (PAOs) were investigated for a novel laboratory-scale sequencing batch pumped-flow biofilm reactor (PFBR) system that was operated for carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus removal. The PFBR comprised of two 16.5l tanks (Reactors 1 and 2), each with a biofilm module of 2m(2) surface area. To facilitate the growth of AOB and PAOs in the reactor biofilms, the influent wastewater was held in Reactor 1 under stagnant un-aerated conditions for 6 h after feeding, and was then pumped over and back between Reactors 1 and 2 for 12 h, creating aerobic conditions in the two reactors during this period; as a consequence, the biofilm in Reactor 2 was in an aerobic environment for almost all the 18.2 h operating cycle. A combination of micro-sensor measurements, molecular techniques, batch experiments and reactor studies were carried out to analyse the performance of the PFBR system. After 100 days operation at a filtered chemical oxygen demand (COD(f)) loading rate of 3.46 g/m(2) per day, the removal efficiencies were 95% COD(f), 87% TN(f) and 74% TP(f). While the PFBR microbial community structure and function were found to be highly diversified with substantial AOB and PAO populations, about 70% of the phosphorus release potential and almost 100% of the nitrification potential were located in Reactors 1 and 2, respectively. Co-enrichment of AOB and PAOs was realized in the Reactor 2 biofilm, where molecular analyses revealed unexpected microbial distributions at micro-scale, with population peaks of AOB in a 100-250 microm deep sub-surface zone and of PAOs in the 0-150 microm surface zone. The micro-distribution of AOB coincided with the position of the nitrification peak identified during micro-sensor analyses. The study demonstrates that enrichment of PAOs can be realized in a constant or near constant aerobic biofilm environment. Furthermore, the findings suggest

  10. The accumulation and localization of chalcone synthase in grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.).

    PubMed

    Wang, Huiling; Wang, Wei; Zhan, JiCheng; Yan, Ailing; Sun, Lei; Zhang, Guojun; Wang, Xiaoyue; Ren, Jiancheng; Huang, Weidong; Xu, Haiying

    2016-09-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS, E.C.2.3.1.74) is the first committed enzyme in the flavonoid pathway. Previous studies have primarily focused on the cloning, expression and regulation of the gene at the transcriptional level. Little is yet known about the enzyme accumulation, regulation at protein level, as well as its localization in grapevine. In present study, the accumulation, tissue and subcellular localization of CHS in different grapevine tissues (Vitis vinifera L. Cabernet Sauvignon) were investigated via the techniques of Western blotting, immunohistochemical localization, immunoelectron microscopy and confocal microscopy. The results showed that CHS were mainly accumulated in the grape berry skin, leaves, stem tips and stem phloem, correlated with flavonoids accumulation. The accumulation of CHS is developmental dependent in grape berry skin and flesh. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that CHS were primarily localized in the exocarp and vascular bundles of the fruits during berry development; in palisade, spongy tissues and vascular bundles of the leaves; in the primary phloem and pith ray in the stems; in the growth point, leaf primordium, and young leaves of leaf buds; and in the endoderm and primary phloem of grapevine roots. Furthermore, at the subcellular level, the cell wall, cytoplasm and nucleus localized patterns of CHS were observed in the grapevine vegetative tissue cells. Results above indicated that distribution of CHS in grapevine was organ-specific and tissue-specific. This work will provide new insight for the biosynthesis and regulation of diverse flavonoid compounds in grapevine. PMID:27161583

  11. Intracellular mannose binding lectin mediates subcellular trafficking of HIV-1 gp120 in neurons.

    PubMed

    Teodorof, C; Divakar, S; Soontornniyomkij, B; Achim, C L; Kaul, M; Singh, K K

    2014-09-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) enters the brain early during infection and leads to severe neuronal damage and central nervous system impairment. HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein 120 (gp120), a neurotoxin, undergoes intracellular trafficking and transport across neurons; however mechanisms of gp120 trafficking in neurons are unclear. Our results show that mannose binding lectin (MBL) that binds to the N-linked mannose residues on gp120, participates in intravesicular packaging of gp120 in neuronal subcellular organelles and also in subcellular trafficking of these vesicles in neuronal cells. Perinuclear MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes were observed and MBL facilitated the subcellular trafficking of gp120 via the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi vesicles. The functional carbohydrate recognition domain of MBL was required for perinuclear organization, distribution and subcellular trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicular complexes. Nocodazole, an agent that depolymerizes the microtubule network, abolished the trafficking of MBL:gp120 vesicles, suggesting that these vesicular complexes were transported along the microtubule network. Live cell imaging confirmed the association of the MBL:gp120 complexes with dynamic subcellular vesicles that underwent trafficking in neuronal soma and along the neurites. Thus, our findings suggest that intracellular MBL mediates subcellular trafficking and transport of viral glycoproteins in a microtubule-dependent mechanism in the neurons.

  12. Accumulate repeat accumulate codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative channel coding scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate codes' (ARA). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, thus belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA codes on a graph. The structure of encoder for this class can be viewed as precoded Repeat Accumulate (RA) code or as precoded Irregular Repeat Accumulate (IRA) code, where simply an accumulator is chosen as a precoder. Thus ARA codes have simple, and very fast encoder structure when they representing LDPC codes. Based on density evolution for LDPC codes through some examples for ARA codes, we show that for maximum variable node degree 5 a minimum bit SNR as low as 0.08 dB from channel capacity for rate 1/2 can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Thus based on fixed low maximum variable node degree, its threshold outperforms not only the RA and IRA codes but also the best known LDPC codes with the dame maximum node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators any desired high rate codes close to code rate 1 can be obtained with thresholds that stay close to the channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results are provided. The ARA codes also have projected graph or protograph representation that allows for high speed decoder implementation.

  13. A one-dimensional biomorphodynamic model of tidal flats: Sediment sorting, marsh distribution, and carbon accumulation under sea level rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zeng; Ye, Qinghua; Coco, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    We develop a biomorphodynamic model to investigate sediment and vegetation dynamics on a schematic intertidal flat characterized by an initially well-mixed sand-mud mixture. Major interactions between tides, wind waves, salt marshes, sediment transport and sea level rise (SLR) are taken into account. For a bare flat under only tidal action, the model predicts a convex cross-shore profile with the surficial distribution of mud and sand on the upper and lower part of the intertidal flat, respectively. When wind waves are strong, the intertidal flat is highly eroded resulting in a concave profile near the high water mark. This behavior is pronouncedly altered when the intertidal flat is vegetated with the presence of salt marshes. Numerical results suggest that a considerable amount of mud can still remain in the vegetated region even when wave action is strong. A steeper transition zone forms at the boundary between salt marshes and bare flats because of the differential sediment deposition in the two neighboring regions. The inclusion of wind waves is found to considerably enhance the size of the marsh-edge transition zone. For the numerical experiments designed in this study, the profile shape and sediment sorting behavior of tidal flats are not significantly modified by a gradual rising sea level. However, the impacts of SLR on vegetated tidal flats are still manifold: (a) driving the landward migration of intertidal zone and salt marshes; (b) enhancing sediment erosion on intertidal flats; and (c) drowning salt marshes under limited sediment supply with the constrain of seawalls. Finally, model results suggest that organic carbon accumulation on marshlands may be enhanced with an increasing SLR rate provided that salt marshes are not drowned.

  14. Response to copper excess in Arabidopsis thaliana: Impact on the root system architecture, hormone distribution, lignin accumulation and mineral profile.

    PubMed

    Lequeux, Hélène; Hermans, Christian; Lutts, Stanley; Verbruggen, Nathalie

    2010-08-01

    Growth, in particular reorganization of the root system architecture, mineral homeostasis and root hormone distribution were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana upon copper excess. Five-week-old Arabidopsis plants growing in hydroponics were exposed to different Cu(2+) concentrations (up to 5 muM). Root biomass was more severely inhibited than shoot biomass and Cu was mainly retained in roots. Cu(2+) excess also induced important changes in the ionome. In roots, Mg, Ca, Fe and Zn concentrations increased, whereas K and S decreased. Shoot K, Ca, P, and Mn concentrations decreased upon Cu(2+) exposure. Further, experiments with seedlings vertically grown on agar were carried out to investigate the root architecture changes. Increasing Cu(2+) concentrations (up to 50 muM) reduced the primary root growth and increased the density of short lateral roots. Experiment of split-root system emphasized a local toxicity of Cu(2+) on the root system. Observations of GUS reporter lines suggested changes in auxin and cytokinin accumulations and in mitotic activity within the primary and secondary root tips treated with Cu(2+). At toxic Cu(2+) concentrations (50 muM), these responses were accompanied by higher root apical meristem death. Contrary to previous reports, growth on high Cu(2+) did not induce an ethylene production. Finally lignin deposition was detected in Cu(2+)-treated roots, probably impacting on the translocation of nutrients. The effects on mineral profile, hormonal status, mitotic activity, cell viability and lignin deposition changes on the Cu(2+)-induced reorganization of the root system architecture are discussed.

  15. Analysis of Subcellular Prefoldin 1 Redistribution During Rabies Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jinyang; Han, Qinqin; Song, Yuzhu; Chen, Qiang; Xia, Xueshan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Rabies virus (RABV) is one of the old deadly zoonotic viruses. It attacks the central nervous system and causes acute encephalitis in humans and animals. Host factors are known to be essential for virus infection and replication in cells. The identification of the key host factors required for RABV infection may provide important information on RABV replication and may provide new potential targets for RABV drug discovery. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the change in the subcellular distribution and expression of the host protein Prefoldin subunit 1 (PFDN1) in RABV-infected cells and the viral expression of plasmids in the transfected cells. Materials and Methods: Mouse Neuro-2a (N2a) cells were infected by RABV or transfected with the plasmids of the nucleoprotein (N) and/or phosphoprotein (P) gene of RABV. The subcellular distribution of PFDN1 was analyzed by confocal microscopy, and the transcription levels of PFDN1 in the N and/or P gene of the RABV-transfected or RABV-infected N2a cells were assessed via real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Results: Confocal microscopy showed that PFDN1 was colocalized with the N protein of RABV in the infected N2a cells and was mainly recruited to the characteristic Negri-Body-Like (NBL) structures in the cytoplasm, as well as the cotransfection of the N and P genes of RABV. The transcription of PFDN1 in the RABV-infected N2a cells was upregulated, whereas the transfection of the N and/or P genes did not result in the upregulation of PFDN1. Conclusions: The results of this work demonstrated that the subcellular distribution of PFDN1 was altered in the RABV-infected N2a cells and colocalized with the N protein of RABV in the NBL structures. PMID:26421138

  16. Self-calibrating viscosity probes: Design and subcellular localization

    PubMed Central

    Dakanali, Marianna; Do, Thai H.; Horn, Austin; Chongchivivat, Akaraphon; Jarusreni, Tuptim; Lichlyter, Darcy; Guizzunti, Gianni; Haidekker, Mark A.; Theodorakis, Emmanuel A.

    2012-01-01

    We describe the design, synthesis and fluorescence profiles of new self-calibrating viscosity dyes in which a coumarin (reference fluorophore) has been covalently linked with a molecular rotor (viscosity sensor). Characterization of their fluorescence properties was made with separate excitation of the units and through Resonance Energy Transfer from the reference to the sensor dye. We have modified the linker and the substitution of the rotor in order to change the hydrophilicity of these probes thereby altering their subcellular localization. For instance, hydrophilic dye 12 shows a homogeneous distribution inside the cell and represents a suitable probe for viscosity measurements in the cytoplasm. 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. PMID:22698784

  17. [Accumulation and distribution of 137Cs and 90Sr radionuclides in the components of water-bottom sediments-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky].

    PubMed

    Kablova, K V; Deryagin, V V; Levina, S G; Sutyagin, A A

    2014-01-01

    This research work is devoted to analyzing the processes of accumulation and distribution of long-lived radionuclides of 90Sr and 137Cs in the components of water-sediment-macrophytes of Lake Malye Kirpichiky (Chelyabinsk region). The characteristic features of redistribution of radioactive substances, depending on the texture of the bottom sediments of the lake and the species composition of aquatic vegetation are shown. Also shown is the total stock of radionuclides in water and bottom sediments. The coefficients of 90Sr and 137Cs accumulation in bottom sediments and macrophytes have been calculated. PMID:25980292

  18. 3D subcellular SIMS imaging in cryogenically prepared single cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    The analysis of a cell with dynamic SIMS ion microscopy depends on the gradual erosion (sputtering) of the cell surface for obtaining spatially resolved chemical information in the X-, Y-, and Z-dimensions. This ideal feature of ion microscopy is rarely explored in probing microfeatures hidden beneath the cell surface. In this study, this capability is explored for the analysis of cells undergoing cell division. The mitotic cells required 3D SIMS imaging in order to study the chemical composition of specialized subcellular regions, like the mitotic spindle, hidden beneath the cell surface. Human glioblastoma T98G cells were grown on silicon chips and cryogenically prepared with a sandwich freeze-fracture method. The fractured freeze-dried cells were used for SIMS analysis with the microscope mode of the CAMECA IMS-3f, which is capable of producing 500 nm lateral image resolution. SIMS analysis of calcium in the spindle region of metaphase cells required sequential recording of as many as 10 images. The T98G human glioblastoma tumor cells revealed an unusual depletion/lack of calcium store in the metaphase spindle, which is in contrast to the accumulation of calcium stores generally observed in normal cells. This study shows the feasibility of the microscope mode imaging in resolving subcellular microfeatures in 3D and opens new avenues of research in spatially resolved chemical analysis of dividing cells.

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF RAT LIVER SUBCELLULAR MEMBRANES

    PubMed Central

    DeHeer, David H.; Olson, Merle S.; Pinckard, R. Neal

    1974-01-01

    The induction of acute hepatocellular necrosis in rats resulted in the production of complement fixing, IgM autoantibodies directed toward inner and outer mitochondrial membranes, microsomal membrane, lysosomal membrane, nuclear membrane, cytosol, but not to plasma membrane. Utilizing selective absorption procedures it was demonstrated that each subcellular membrane fraction possessed unique autoantigenic activity with little or no cross-reactivity between the various membrane fractions. It is proposed that the development of membrane-specific autoantibodies may provide an immunological marker useful in the differential characterization of various subcellular membranes. PMID:4813214

  20. Sequestration of total and methyl mercury in different subcellular pools in marine caged fish.

    PubMed

    Onsanit, Sarayut; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2011-12-30

    Mercury contamination is an important issue in marine fish, and can cause toxicity to human by fish consumption. Many studies have measured the mercury concentrations in fish and estimated the threshold levels of its risk to human, but the mercury sequestration in different subcellular pools of fish is unclear. In this study, we investigated the concentration and distribution of total mercury (THg) and methylmercury (MeHg) in different subcellular fractions in the farmed red seabream, red drum, and black seabream from Fujian marine fish farms, China. We found that both THg and MeHg were dominantly bound with the cellular debris, followed by metallothionein-like protein>metal-rich granule>heat-denatured protein>organelles pools. In general, Hg bound with the metal-sensitive fraction was small, indicating that Hg may have little toxicity to the fish (muscle). For the first time we showed that MTLP fraction had the highest % of total Hg as MeHg (88-91%) among all the subcellular fractions. Furthermore, the mercury concentration and subcellular distribution in the black seabream were both dependent on the fish size. Subcellular study may shed light on the detoxification of marine fish to Hg exposure and the potential bioavailability to humans due to fish consumption. PMID:22056886

  1. Accumulation of arsenic in tissues of rice plant (Oryza sativa L.) and its distribution in fractions of rice grain.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M Azizur; Hasegawa, H; Rahman, M Mahfuzur; Rahman, M Arifur; Miah, M A M

    2007-10-01

    A study was conducted to investigate the accumulation and distribution of arsenic in different fractions of rice grain (Oryza sativa L.) collected from arsenic affected area of Bangladesh. The agricultural soil of study area has become highly contaminated with arsenic due to the excessive use of arsenic-rich underground water (0.070+/-0.006 mg l(-1), n=6) for irrigation. Arsenic content in tissues of rice plant and in fractions of rice grain of two widely cultivated rice varieties, namely BRRI dhan28 and BRRI hybrid dhan1, were determined. Regardless of rice varieties, arsenic content was about 28- and 75-folds higher in root than that of shoot and raw rice grain, respectively. In fractions of parboiled and non-parboiled rice grain of both varieties, the order of arsenic concentrations was; rice hull>bran-polish>brown rice>raw rice>polish rice. Arsenic content was higher in non-parboiled rice grain than that of parboiled rice. Arsenic concentrations in parboiled and non-parboiled brown rice of BRRI dhan28 were 0.8+/-0.1 and 0.5+/-0.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively while those of BRRI hybrid dhan1 were 0.8+/-0.2 and 0.6+/-0.2 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. However, parboiled and non-parboiled polish rice grain of BRRI dhan28 contained 0.4+/-0.0 and 0.3+/-0.1 mg kg(-1) dry weight of arsenic, respectively while those of BRRI hybrid dhan1 contained 0.43+/-0.01 and 0.5+/-0.0 mg kg(-1) dry weight, respectively. Both polish and brown rice are readily cooked for human consumption. The concentration of arsenic found in the present study is much lower than the permissible limit in rice (1.0 mg kg(-1)) according to WHO recommendation. Thus, rice grown in soils of Bangladesh contaminated with arsenic of 14.5+/-0.1 mg kg(-1) could be considered safe for human consumption. PMID:17599387

  2. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  3. Phylogenetic distribution and evolutionary pattern of an α-proteobacterial small RNA gene that controls polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in Sinorhizobium meliloti.

    PubMed

    Lagares, Antonio; Roux, Indra; Valverde, Claudio

    2016-06-01

    It has become clear that sRNAs play relevant regulatory functions in bacteria. However, a comprehensive understanding of their biological roles considering evolutionary aspects has not been achieved for most of them. Thus, we have characterized the evolutionary and phylogenetic aspects of the Sinorhizobium meliloti mmgR gene encoding the small RNA MmgR, which has been recently reported to be involved in the regulation of polyhydroxybutyrate accumulation in this bacterium. We constructed a covariance model from a multiple sequence and structure alignment of mmgR close homologs that allowed us to extend the search and to detect further remote homologs of the sRNA gene. From our results, mmgR seemed to evolve from a common ancestor of the α-proteobacteria that diverged from the order of Rickettsiales. We have found mmgR homologs in most current species of α-proteobacteria, with a few exceptions in which genomic reduction events or gene rearrangements seem to explain its absence. Furthermore, a strong microsyntenic relationship was found between a large set of mmgR homologs and homologs of a gene encoding a putative N-formyl glutamate amidohydrolase (NFGAH) that allowed us to trace back the evolutionary path of this group of mmgR orthologs. Among them, structure and sequence traits have been completely conserved throughout evolution, namely a Rho-independent terminator and a 10-mer (5'-UUUCCUCCCU-3') that is predicted to remain in a single-stranded region of the sRNA. We thus propose the definition of the new family of α-proteobacterial sRNAs αr8, as well as the subfamily αr8s1 which encompass S. meliloti mmgR orthologs physically linked with the downstream open reading frame encoding a putative NFGAH. So far, mmgR is the trans-encoded small RNA with the widest phylogenetic distribution of well recognized orthologs among α-proteobacteria. Expression of the expected MmgR transcript in rhizobiales other than S. meliloti (Sinorhizobium fredii, Rhizobium

  4. Distribution of antibiotics in wastewater-irrigated soils and their accumulation in vegetable crops in the Pearl River Delta, southern China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Min; Wong, Chris K C; Chu, L M

    2014-11-19

    Wastewater is increasingly being used to irrigate agricultural land in many countries around the world. However, limited research has examined the occurrence of antibiotics in soil irrigated with wastewater and their accumulation in plants. This study aimed to determine the distribution of various types of antibiotics in different environmental matrices in the Pearl River Delta (PRD) region and to evaluate their accumulation and translocation in edible crops. Samples were collected from six sites in the PRD where either domestic wastewater or fishpond water was used for irrigation. Results showed that fishpond water irrigated soils had higher concentrations of antibiotics than wastewater-irrigated soils. Different trends were observed in the accumulation of antibiotics in the different edible parts of various crops. Despite the low human annual exposure to antibiotics through the consumption of edible crops (1.10 to 7950 μg/y), the potential adverse effects of antibiotics along the food chain should not be neglected.

  5. Differential Effects of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions on Tissue Accumulation, Distribution, and Toxicity in the Sprague Dawley Rat Following Daily Oral Gavage Administration for 13 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary D; Imam, Mohammed S; Paredes, Angel M; Bryant, Matthew S; Cunningham, Candice K; Felton, Robert P; Jones, Margie Y; Davis, Kelly J; Olson, Greg R

    2016-03-01

    There are concerns within the regulatory and research communities regarding the health impact associated with consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). This study evaluated particulate and ionic forms of silver and particle size for differences in silver accumulation, distribution, morphology, and toxicity when administered daily by oral gavage to Sprague Dawley rats for 13 weeks. Test materials and dose formulations were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Seven-week-old rats (10 rats per sex per group) were randomly assigned to treatments: AgNP (10, 75, and 110 nm) at 9, 18, and 36 mg/kg body weight (bw); silver acetate (AgOAc) at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg bw; and controls (2 mM sodium citrate (CIT) or water). At termination, complete necropsies were conducted, histopathology, hematology, serum chemistry, micronuclei, and reproductive system analyses were performed, and silver accumulations and distributions were determined. Rats exposed to AgNP did not show significant changes in body weights or intakes of feed and water relative to controls, and blood, reproductive system, and genetic tests were similar to controls. Differences in the distributional pattern and morphology of silver deposits were observed by TEM: AgNP appeared predominantly within cells, while AgOAc had an affinity for extracellular membranes. Significant dose-dependent and AgNP size-dependent accumulations were detected in tissues by ICP-MS. In addition, sex differences in silver accumulations were noted for a number of tissues and organs, with accumulations being significantly higher in female rats, especially in the kidney, liver, jejunum, and colon.

  6. Differential Effects of Silver Nanoparticles and Silver Ions on Tissue Accumulation, Distribution, and Toxicity in the Sprague Dawley Rat Following Daily Oral Gavage Administration for 13 Weeks.

    PubMed

    Boudreau, Mary D; Imam, Mohammed S; Paredes, Angel M; Bryant, Matthew S; Cunningham, Candice K; Felton, Robert P; Jones, Margie Y; Davis, Kelly J; Olson, Greg R

    2016-03-01

    There are concerns within the regulatory and research communities regarding the health impact associated with consumer exposure to silver nanoparticles (AgNPs). This study evaluated particulate and ionic forms of silver and particle size for differences in silver accumulation, distribution, morphology, and toxicity when administered daily by oral gavage to Sprague Dawley rats for 13 weeks. Test materials and dose formulations were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), dynamic light scattering, and inductively coupled mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). Seven-week-old rats (10 rats per sex per group) were randomly assigned to treatments: AgNP (10, 75, and 110 nm) at 9, 18, and 36 mg/kg body weight (bw); silver acetate (AgOAc) at 100, 200, and 400 mg/kg bw; and controls (2 mM sodium citrate (CIT) or water). At termination, complete necropsies were conducted, histopathology, hematology, serum chemistry, micronuclei, and reproductive system analyses were performed, and silver accumulations and distributions were determined. Rats exposed to AgNP did not show significant changes in body weights or intakes of feed and water relative to controls, and blood, reproductive system, and genetic tests were similar to controls. Differences in the distributional pattern and morphology of silver deposits were observed by TEM: AgNP appeared predominantly within cells, while AgOAc had an affinity for extracellular membranes. Significant dose-dependent and AgNP size-dependent accumulations were detected in tissues by ICP-MS. In addition, sex differences in silver accumulations were noted for a number of tissues and organs, with accumulations being significantly higher in female rats, especially in the kidney, liver, jejunum, and colon. PMID:26732888

  7. HSP60 interacts with YB-1 and affects its polysome association and subcellular localization

    SciTech Connect

    Ohashi, Sachiyo; Atsumi, Megumi; Kobayashi, Shunsuke

    2009-08-07

    YB-1 is a DNA/RNA-binding protein which, in the cytoplasm, associates with polysomes and regulates translation. However, YB-1 has a novel nuclear localization signal, and its nuclear accumulation is correlated with cancer induction. Here we designated the amino-acid sequence as YB-NLS and demonstrated that YB-NLS is necessary for the nuclear translocation of overexpressed YB-1 in NG108-15 cells. In addition, we found that a heat shock protein, HSP60, binds to YB-NLS in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, when HSP60 expression was repressed, an increase of polysome-associated YB-1 was observed in heavy-sedimenting fractions on a sucrose gradient. Overexpression of HSP60 resulted in a decrease of YB-1 in the heavy-sedimenting fractions and suppression of YB-NLS activity. Furthermore, the NLS-deleted YB-1 was apparently associated with the heavy-sedimenting polysomes. These results suggest that HSP60 interacts with YB-1 at the YB-NLS region and acts as a regulator of polysome association and the subcellular distribution of YB-1.

  8. Subcellular localization of PUMA regulates its pro-apoptotic activity in Burkitt's lymphoma B cells.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Gorbatchev; Portier, Alain; Roders, Nathalie; Arnoult, Damien; Vazquez, Aimé

    2015-11-10

    The BH3-only protein PUMA (p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis) is a major regulator of apoptosis. It belongs to the Bcl-2 family of proteins responsible for maintaining mitochondrial outer membrane integrity by controlling the intrinsic (mitochondrial) apoptotic pathway. We describe here a new pathway regulating PUMA activation through the control of its subcellular distribution. Surprisingly, neither PUMA upregulation in normal activated human B lymphocytes nor high levels of PUMA in Burkitt's lymphoma (BL) were associated with cell death. We show that PUMA is localized to the cytosol in these cells. By contrast, various apoptosis-triggering signals were found to promote the translocation of PUMA to the mitochondria in these cells, leading to their death by apoptosis. This apoptosis was associated with the binding of mitochondrial PUMA to anti-apoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family, such as Bcl-2 and Mcl-1. This translocation was caspase-independent but was prevented by inhibiting or knocking down the expression of the MAPK kinase p38. Our data suggest that the accumulation of PUMA in the cytosol may be important for the participation of this protein in apoptosis without the need for prior transcription. This regulatory pathway may be an important feature of differentiation and tumorigenic processes.

  9. 26 CFR 1.902-4 - Rules for distributions attributable to accumulated profits for taxable years in which a first...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... corporation was a less developed country corporation (as defined in 26 CFR § 1.902-2 revised as of April 1... (26 CFR § 1.902-1 revised as of April 1, 1978). (b) Combined distributions. If a domestic shareholder...) Distributions of a first-tier corporation attributable to certain distributions from second- or...

  10. Subcellular localization of ammonium transporters in Dictyostelium discoideum

    PubMed Central

    Kirsten, Janet H; Xiong, Yanhua; Davis, Carter T; Singleton, Charles K

    2008-01-01

    Background With the exception of vertebrates, most organisms have plasma membrane associated ammonium transporters which primarily serve to import a source of nitrogen for nutritional purposes. Dictyostelium discoideum has three ammonium transporters, Amts A, B and C. Our present work used fluorescent fusion proteins to determine the cellular localization of the Amts and tested the hypothesis that the transporters mediate removal of ammonia generated endogenously from the elevated protein catabolism common to many protists. Results Using RFP and YFP fusion constructs driven by the actin 15 promoter, we found that the three ammonium transporters were localized on the plasma membrane and on the membranes of subcellular organelles. AmtA and AmtB were localized on the membranes of endolysosomes and phagosomes, with AmtB further localized on the membranes of contractile vacuoles. AmtC also was localized on subcellular organelles when it was stabilized by coexpression with either the AmtA or AmtB fusion transporter. The three ammonium transporters exported ammonia linearly with regard to time during the first 18 hours of the developmental program as revealed by reduced export in the null strains. The fluorescently tagged transporters rescued export when expressed in the null strains, and thus they were functional transporters. Conclusion Unlike ammonium transporters in most organisms, which import NH3/NH4+ as a nitrogen source, those of Dictyostelium export ammonia/ammonium as a waste product from extensive catabolism of exogenously derived and endogenous proteins. Localization on proteolytic organelles and on the neutral contractile vacuole suggests that Dictyostelium ammonium transporters may have unique subcellular functions and play a role in the maintenance of intracellular ammonium distribution. A lack of correlation between the null strain phenotypes and ammonia excretion properties of the ammonium transporters suggests that it is not the excretion function that

  11. Subcellular partitioning of metals in Aporrectodea caliginosa along a gradient of metal exposure in 31 field-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Beaumelle, Léa; Gimbert, Frédéric; Hedde, Mickaël; Guérin, Annie; Lamy, Isabelle

    2015-07-01

    Subcellular fractionation of metals in organisms was proposed as a better way to characterize metal bioaccumulation. Here we report the impact of a laboratory exposure to a wide range of field-metal contaminated soils on the subcellular partitioning of metals in the earthworm Aporrectodea caliginosa. Soils moderately contaminated were chosen to create a gradient of soil metal availability; covering ranges of both soil metal contents and of several soil parameters. Following exposure, Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations were determined both in total earthworm body and in three subcellular compartments: cytosolic, granular and debris fractions. Three distinct proxies of soil metal availability were investigated: CaCl2-extractable content dissolved content predicted by a semi-mechanistic model and free ion concentration predicted by a geochemical speciation model. Subcellular partitionings of Cd and Pb were modified along the gradient of metal exposure, while stable Zn partitioning reflected regulation processes. Cd subcellular distribution responded more strongly to increasing soil Cd concentration than the total internal content, when Pb subcellular distribution and total internal content were similarly affected. Free ion concentrations were better descriptors of Cd and Pb subcellular distribution than CaCl2 extractable and dissolved metal concentrations. However, free ion concentrations and soil total metal contents were equivalent descriptors of the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Pb because they were highly correlated. Considering lowly contaminated soils, our results raise the question of the added value of three proxies of metal availability compared to soil total metal content in the assessment of metal bioavailability to earthworm.

  12. Snow distribution on Antarctic sea ice: precipitation, accumulation, and connections to sea ice thickness from in situ and NASA IceBridge observations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksym, T. L.; Kunz, C.; Kwok, R.; Leonard, K. C.; Singh, H.; Trujillo, E.; Williams, G. D.; White, S.; Wever, N.

    2014-12-01

    Snow plays a dominant role in Antarctic sea ice mass balance and its seasonal evolution. It is a primary control on sea ice thickness and the structure of sea ice ecosystems, it dominates the uncertainty in satellite estimates of ice thickness, and it may significantly modulate the response of sea ice to climate change and variability. Here, we provide an overview of recent surveys of snow distribution (both small and large scale), its temporal evolution, and its connection with the processes that drive it - precipitation, accumulation, blowing snow events, flooding, and the role of ice deformation. We present recent 3-D in situ floe-scale measurements of snow surface topography, snow depth, and ice thickness distribution that allow relationships between surface roughness features, snow accumulation, and ice thickness to be examined in unprecedented detail. These data are compared with estimates of snow depth from the NASA IceBridge radar from spring surveys in the Weddell and Amundsen/Bellingshausen Seas. Both airborne and in situ measurements suggest a significant extent of thick ice with a deep snow cover that is underrepresented in prior surveys. Finally, the seasonal evolution of precipitation, snow depth, and accumulation is examined with data from drifting buoy platforms deployed in several regions of the Antarctic. These observations show that precipitation is not necessarily a good estimator for snow accumulation and that treatment of blowing snow must be included for sea ice models to accurately simulate Antarctic snow and sea ice mass balance. The implications of these results for modeling and satellite measurement of the sea ice thickness distribution are discussed.

  13. Protein repair L-isoaspartyl methyltransferase in plants. Phylogenetic distribution and the accumulation of substrate proteins in aged barley seeds.

    PubMed Central

    Mudgett, M B; Lowenson, J D; Clarke, S

    1997-01-01

    Protein L-isoaspartate (D-aspartate) O-methyltransferases (MTs; EC 2.1.1.77) can initiate the conversion of detrimental L-isoaspartyl residues in spontaneously damaged proteins to normal L-aspartyl residues. We detected this enzyme in 45 species from 23 families representing most of the divisions of the plant kingdom. MT activity is often localized in seeds, suggesting that it has a role in their maturation, quiescence, and germination. The relationship among MT activity, the accumulation of abnormal protein L-isoaspartyl residues, and seed viability was explored in barley (Hordeum vulgare cultivar Himalaya) seeds, which contain high levels of MT. Natural aging of barley seeds for 17 years resulted in a significant reduction in MT activity and in seed viability, coupled with increased levels of "unrepaired" L-isoaspartyl residues. In seeds heated to accelerate aging, we found no reduction of MT activity, but we did observe decreased seed viability and the accumulation of isoaspartyl residues. Among populations of accelerated aged seed, those possessing the highest levels of L-isoaspartyl-containing proteins had the lowest germination percentages. These results suggest that the MT present in seeds cannot efficiently repair all spontaneously damaged proteins containing altered aspartyl residues, and their accumulation during aging may contribute to the loss of seed viability. PMID:9414558

  14. Distribution and accumulation of mercury and copper in mangrove sediments in Shenzhen, the world's most rapid urbanized city.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruili; Xu, Hualin; Chai, Minwei; Qiu, Guo Yu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the influence of mangrove forest on heavy metal accumulation and storage in intertidal sediments, core sediments from natural mangrove, restored mangrove, and adjacent mud flat spanning the intertidal zone along the south coastline of the most heavily urbanized Deep bay, Guangdong province, China were analyzed. The average concentrations of mercury (Hg) in surface sediments of natural mangrove and restored mangrove were 172 and 151 ng g(-1), whereas those of copper (Cu) were 75 and 50 μg g(-1), respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Shenzhen were at median to high levels, which is consistent with the fact that Shenzhen is in high exploitation and its mangrove suffer intensive impact from human activities. Hg and Cu concentration profiles indicated a higher metal accumulation in surface layers of sediments, in agreement with enrichment of organic matter contents. Maximum concentration, enrichment factors, and excess (background-deducted) concentration inventories of metals (Hg and Cu) were substantially different between environments, decreasing from natural mangrove sediments to restored mangrove sediments to mud flat. Furthermore, metal inputs to Futian mangrove decreased in the order natural mangrove > restored mangrove > mud flat, indicating that mangrove facilitated the accumulation and storage of Hg and Cu in sediment layers. PMID:26762317

  15. Distribution and accumulation of mercury and copper in mangrove sediments in Shenzhen, the world's most rapid urbanized city.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruili; Xu, Hualin; Chai, Minwei; Qiu, Guo Yu

    2016-02-01

    To investigate the influence of mangrove forest on heavy metal accumulation and storage in intertidal sediments, core sediments from natural mangrove, restored mangrove, and adjacent mud flat spanning the intertidal zone along the south coastline of the most heavily urbanized Deep bay, Guangdong province, China were analyzed. The average concentrations of mercury (Hg) in surface sediments of natural mangrove and restored mangrove were 172 and 151 ng g(-1), whereas those of copper (Cu) were 75 and 50 μg g(-1), respectively. Compared to those from other typical mangrove wetlands of the world, the metal levels in Shenzhen were at median to high levels, which is consistent with the fact that Shenzhen is in high exploitation and its mangrove suffer intensive impact from human activities. Hg and Cu concentration profiles indicated a higher metal accumulation in surface layers of sediments, in agreement with enrichment of organic matter contents. Maximum concentration, enrichment factors, and excess (background-deducted) concentration inventories of metals (Hg and Cu) were substantially different between environments, decreasing from natural mangrove sediments to restored mangrove sediments to mud flat. Furthermore, metal inputs to Futian mangrove decreased in the order natural mangrove > restored mangrove > mud flat, indicating that mangrove facilitated the accumulation and storage of Hg and Cu in sediment layers.

  16. Spatial distribution of metal accumulation areas on the continental shelf of the Basque Country (Bay of Biscay): A GIS-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legorburu, Irati; Galparsoro, Ibon; Larreta, Joana; Rodríguez, José Germán; Borja, Ángel

    2013-12-01

    Recent environmental legislation, worldwide, aims to restore and protect the quality of the marine environment. Within this context, in order to maintain the good functioning of marine ecosystems, sediment pollution monitoring is becoming increasingly important. Hence, for this contribution, the spatial distribution of Cd, Fe, Hg, Mn, Ni and Pb accumulation areas were determined, for the sediments of the Basque continental shelf. Statistically-assisted Geographical Information System (GIS)-mapping techniques were used, in order to infer the processes responsible for such accumulations. Differences in contaminant entrance pathways were observed between sectors. However, hydrodynamic conditions favored the rapid dispersal of contaminants and their stable distribution. The methodology used resulted in a suitable approach for identifying contaminant distribution patterns, which could be used in environmental assessment processes. Nevertheless, an important knowledge gap on the distribution of contaminants in offshore sediments was identified. Extensions of actual monitoring programs are suggested, in order to improve the information available for identifying the behavior and process-drivers for contaminants in offshore systems. This would permit the achievement of a more complete approach, to understand the effects of land-derived contaminants, on offshore systems.

  17. Comparison of two probability distributions used to model sizes of undiscovered oil and gas accumulations: Does the tail wag the assessment?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Charpentier, R.R.

    2002-01-01

    Undiscovered oil and gas assessments are commonly reported as aggregate estimates of hydrocarbon volumes. Potential commercial value and discovery costs are, however, determined by accumulation size, so engineers, economists, decision makers, and sometimes policy analysts are most interested in projected discovery sizes. The lognormal and Pareto distributions have been used to model exploration target sizes. This note contrasts the outcomes of applying these alternative distributions to the play level assessments of the U.S. Geological Survey's 1995 National Oil and Gas Assessment. Using the same numbers of undiscovered accumulations and the same minimum, medium, and maximum size estimates, substitution of the shifted truncated lognormal distribution for the shifted truncated Pareto distribution reduced assessed undiscovered oil by 16% and gas by 15%. Nearly all of the volume differences resulted because the lognormal had fewer larger fields relative to the Pareto. The lognormal also resulted in a smaller number of small fields relative to the Pareto. For the Permian Basin case study presented here, reserve addition costs were 20% higher with the lognormal size assumption. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  18. The roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in plants grown in biosolids-amended soils.

    PubMed

    Wen, Bei; Wu, Yali; Zhang, Hongna; Liu, Yu; Hu, Xiaoyu; Huang, Honglin; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2016-09-01

    The roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) in seven species of plants from biosolids-amended soils were investigated. The PFOS and PFOA root concentration factors (Croot/Csoil) ranged from 1.37 to 4.68 and 1.69 to 10.3 (ng/groot)/(ng/gsoil), respectively, while the translocation factors (Cshoot/Croot) ranged from 0.055 to 0.16 and 0.093 to 1.8 (ng/gshoot)/(ng/groot), respectively. The PFOS and PFOA accumulations in roots correlated positively with root protein contents (P < 0.05), while negatively with root lipid contents (P < 0.05). These suggested the promotion effects of protein and inhibition effects of lipid on root uptake. The translocation factors correlated positively with the ratios between protein contents in shoots to those in roots (P < 0.05), showing the importance of protein on PFOS and PFOA translocation. This study is the first to reveal the different roles of protein and lipid in the accumulation and distribution of PFOS and PFOA in plants. PMID:27381874

  19. Distribution of non-collagenous dentin matrix proteins and proteoglycans, and their relation to calcium accumulation in bisphosphonate-affected rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Ohma, N; Takagi, Y; Takano, Y

    2000-06-01

    It has been reported that multiple injections of 1-hydroxyethylidene- 1,1-bisphosphonate (HEBP) to rats prevent mineralization of incisor dentin, thereby revealing high concentrations of calcium in the non-mineralized matrix of circumpulpal dentin. To identify the molecules responsible for calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin matrix, rats were injected daily with HEBP (8 mg P/kg) for 7 d, and the incisors processed for various histochemical and immunohistochemical staining of non-collagenous matrices of dentin. Cuprolinic blue reactions for proteoglycans (PGs) were equally distributed in non-mineralized matrix of mantle and circumpulpal dentin layers. Dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and osteopontin (OPN) immunoreactions were found in non-mineralized circumpulpal dentin matrix, but not in mantle dentin. In normal incisors, however, predentin matrix showing significant DSP immunoreactivity was negative for Ca-GBHA reactions. HEBP-affected, non-mineralized OPN immunopositive bone matrix was also non-reactive for calcium. From these observations, neither PGs, OPN nor DSP appear to be responsible for calcium accumulation in HEBP-affected circumpulpal dentin. Stains-all reactive component, possibly dentin phosphoprotein (DPP), only showed the same distribution as that of Ca-GBHA in both HEBP-affected and normal dentin matrix, implicating a possible contribution of DPP to calcium accumulation in circumpulpal dentin and, hence, to appositional mineralization of dentin. PMID:10872993

  20. 26 CFR 1.902-4 - Rules for distributions attributable to accumulated profits for taxable years in which a first...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... less developed country corporation (as defined in 26 CFR § 1.902-2 revised as of April 1, 1978), then... shall be calculated under the rules relating to less developed country corporations contained in (26 CFR...) Distributions of a first-tier corporation attributable to certain distributions from second- or...

  1. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Kenneth A.; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  2. Recent advances in imaging subcellular processes.

    PubMed

    Myers, Kenneth A; Janetopoulos, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cell biology came about with the ability to first visualize cells. As microscopy techniques advanced, the early microscopists became the first cell biologists to observe the inner workings and subcellular structures that control life. This ability to see organelles within a cell provided scientists with the first understanding of how cells function. The visualization of the dynamic architecture of subcellular structures now often drives questions as researchers seek to understand the intricacies of the cell. With the advent of fluorescent labeling techniques, better and new optical techniques, and more sensitive and faster cameras, a whole array of questions can now be asked. There has been an explosion of new light microscopic techniques, and the race is on to build better and more powerful imaging systems so that we can further our understanding of the spatial and temporal mechanisms controlling molecular cell biology. PMID:27408708

  3. Aluminium Accumulation and Intra-Tree Distribution Patterns in Three Arbor aluminosa (Symplocos) Species from Central Sulawesi

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Marco; Boras, Sven; Tjoa, Aiyen; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Jansen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Aluminium (Al) at concentrations far above 1,000 mg kg-1 in aboveground plant tissues of Arbor aluminosa (Symplocos) species is the main reason why traditional Indonesian weavers rely on their leaves and bark as a mordant for dyeing textile. Recently, Symplocos species have become a flagship species for the conservation efforts of weaving communities due to their traditionally non-sustainable sampling and increasing demand for Symplocos plant material. Here we investigated Symplocos odoratissima, S. ophirensis and S. ambangensis at three montane rainforest sites in Central Sulawesi to measure Al levels in different tissues and organs. The highest Al concentrations were found in old leaves (24,180 ± 7,236 mg·kg-1 dry weight, mean ± SD), while young leaves had significantly lower Al levels (20,708 ± 7,025 mg·kg-1). Al accumulation was also lower in bark and wood tissue of the trunk (17,231 ± 8,356 mg·kg-1 and 5,181 ± 2,032 mg·kg-1, respectively). Two Al excluding species (Syzigium sp. and Lithocarpus sp.) contained only high Al levels in their roots. Moreover, no difference was found in soil pH (4.7 ± 0.61) and nutrient (K, Ca, Fe, Mg) availability at different soil levels and within or outside the crown of Symplocos trees, except for the upper soil layer. Furthermore, a positive and significant correlation between Al and Ca concentrations was found at the whole plant level for Symplocos, and at the leaf level for S. ophirensis and S. ambangensis, suggesting a potential role of Ca in Al uptake and/or detoxification within the plant. Our results provide evidence for strong Al accumulation in Symplocos species and illustrate that both Al accumulation and exclusion represent two co-occurring strategies of montane rainforest plants for dealing with Al toxicity. Indonesian weavers should be encouraged to harvest old leaves, which have the most efficient mordant capacity due to high Al concentrations. PMID:26871698

  4. Aluminium Accumulation and Intra-Tree Distribution Patterns in Three Arbor aluminosa (Symplocos) Species from Central Sulawesi.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, Marco; Boras, Sven; Tjoa, Aiyen; Watanabe, Toshihiro; Jansen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Aluminium (Al) at concentrations far above 1,000 mg kg-1 in aboveground plant tissues of Arbor aluminosa (Symplocos) species is the main reason why traditional Indonesian weavers rely on their leaves and bark as a mordant for dyeing textile. Recently, Symplocos species have become a flagship species for the conservation efforts of weaving communities due to their traditionally non-sustainable sampling and increasing demand for Symplocos plant material. Here we investigated Symplocos odoratissima, S. ophirensis and S. ambangensis at three montane rainforest sites in Central Sulawesi to measure Al levels in different tissues and organs. The highest Al concentrations were found in old leaves (24,180 ± 7,236 mg·kg-1 dry weight, mean ± SD), while young leaves had significantly lower Al levels (20,708 ± 7,025 mg·kg-1). Al accumulation was also lower in bark and wood tissue of the trunk (17,231 ± 8,356 mg·kg-1 and 5,181 ± 2,032 mg·kg-1, respectively). Two Al excluding species (Syzigium sp. and Lithocarpus sp.) contained only high Al levels in their roots. Moreover, no difference was found in soil pH (4.7 ± 0.61) and nutrient (K, Ca, Fe, Mg) availability at different soil levels and within or outside the crown of Symplocos trees, except for the upper soil layer. Furthermore, a positive and significant correlation between Al and Ca concentrations was found at the whole plant level for Symplocos, and at the leaf level for S. ophirensis and S. ambangensis, suggesting a potential role of Ca in Al uptake and/or detoxification within the plant. Our results provide evidence for strong Al accumulation in Symplocos species and illustrate that both Al accumulation and exclusion represent two co-occurring strategies of montane rainforest plants for dealing with Al toxicity. Indonesian weavers should be encouraged to harvest old leaves, which have the most efficient mordant capacity due to high Al concentrations.

  5. Distribution and accumulation of caffeine in rat tissues and its inhibition on semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Che, Baoquan; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Yongqian; Deng, Yulin

    2012-10-01

    Wistar rats were treated with caffeine or 2-bromoethylamine, the effect of caffeine on the activity of semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) in rat serum and tissues was studied using various LC-MS methods. Caffeine was found to present in all tissues after administration for 10 days and accumulated for 25 days. The level of caffeine was high in brain and liver, and the SSAO activity in all tissues was found to be inhibited by caffeine. As the concentration of caffeine increased, the SSAO activity decreased. The inhibition ratio was correlated to the levels of caffeine present. We presume that caffeine may treat with SSAO activity associated diseases.

  6. Limited Efficiency of Drug Delivery to Specific Intracellular Organelles Using Subcellularly "Targeted" Drug Delivery Systems.

    PubMed

    Maity, Amit Ranjan; Stepensky, David

    2016-01-01

    Many drugs have been designed to act on intracellular targets and to affect intracellular processes inside target cells. For the desired effects to be exerted, these drugs should permeate target cells and reach specific intracellular organelles. This subcellular drug targeting approach has been proposed for enhancement of accumulation of these drugs in target organelles and improved efficiency. This approach is based on drug encapsulation in drug delivery systems (DDSs) and/or their decoration with specific targeting moieties that are intended to enhance the drug/DDS accumulation in the intracellular organelle of interest. During recent years, there has been a constant increase in interest in DDSs targeted to specific intracellular organelles, and many different approaches have been proposed for attaining efficient drug delivery to specific organelles of interest. However, it appears that in many studies insufficient efforts have been devoted to quantitative analysis of the major formulation parameters of the DDSs disposition (efficiency of DDS endocytosis and endosomal escape, intracellular trafficking, and efficiency of DDS delivery to the target organelle) and of the resulting pharmacological effects. Thus, in many cases, claims regarding efficient delivery of drug/DDS to a specific organelle and efficient subcellular targeting appear to be exaggerated. On the basis of the available experimental data, it appears that drugs/DDS decoration with specific targeting residues can affect their intracellular fate and result in preferential drug accumulation within an organelle of interest. However, it is not clear whether these approaches will be efficient in in vivo settings and be translated into preclinical and clinical applications. Studies that quantitatively assess the mechanisms, barriers, and efficiencies of subcellular drug delivery and of the associated toxic effects are required to determine the therapeutic potential of subcellular DDS targeting.

  7. Subcellular SIMS imaging of gadolinium isotopes in human glioblastoma cells treated with a gadolinium containing MRI agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Duane R.; Lorey, Daniel R.; Chandra, Subhash

    2004-06-01

    Neutron capture therapy is an experimental binary radiotherapeutic modality for the treatment of brain tumors such as glioblastoma multiforme. Recently, neutron capture therapy with gadolinium-157 has gained attention, and techniques for studying the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157 are needed. In this preliminary study, we have been able to image the subcellular distribution of gadolinium-157, as well as the other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium, with SIMS ion microscopy. T98G human glioblastoma cells were treated for 24 h with 25 mg/ml of the metal ion complex diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid Gd(III) dihydrogen salt hydrate (Gd-DTPA). Gd-DTPA is a contrast enhancing agent used for MRI of brain tumors, blood-brain barrier impairment, diseases of the central nervous system, etc. A highly heterogeneous subcellular distribution was observed for gadolinium-157. The nuclei in each cell were distinctly lower in gadolinium-157 than in the cytoplasm. Even within the cytoplasm the gadolinium-157 was heterogeneously distributed. The other six naturally abundant isotopes of gadolinium were imaged from the same cells and exhibited a subcellular distribution consistent with that observed for gadolinium-157. These observations indicate that SIMS ion microscopy may be a viable approach for subcellular studies of gadolinium containing neutron capture therapy drugs and may even play a major role in the development and validation of new gadolinium contrast enhancing agents for diagnostic MRI applications.

  8. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0-10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm(3) cm(-3) for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  9. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying

    PubMed Central

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R.; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C.

    2015-01-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0–10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm3 cm–3 for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction. PMID:25547916

  10. Local root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation depends on the spatial distribution of soil moisture in potato: implications for ABA signalling under heterogeneous soil drying.

    PubMed

    Puértolas, Jaime; Conesa, María R; Ballester, Carlos; Dodd, Ian C

    2015-04-01

    Patterns of root abscisic acid (ABA) accumulation ([ABA]root), root water potential (Ψroot), and root water uptake (RWU), and their impact on xylem sap ABA concentration ([X-ABA]) were measured under vertical partial root-zone drying (VPRD, upper compartment dry, lower compartment wet) and horizontal partial root-zone drying (HPRD, two lateral compartments: one dry, the other wet) of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.). When water was withheld from the dry compartment for 0-10 d, RWU and Ψroot were similarly lower in the dry compartment when soil volumetric water content dropped below 0.22cm(3) cm(-3) for both spatial distributions of soil moisture. However, [ABA]root increased in response to decreasing Ψroot in the dry compartment only for HPRD, resulting in much higher ABA accumulation than in VPRD. The position of the sampled roots (~4cm closer to the surface in the dry compartment of VPRD than in HPRD) might account for this difference, since older (upper) roots may accumulate less ABA in response to decreased Ψroot than younger (deeper) roots. This would explain differences in root ABA accumulation patterns under vertical and horizontal soil moisture gradients reported in the literature. In our experiment, these differences in root ABA accumulation did not influence [X-ABA], since the RWU fraction (and thus ABA export to shoots) from the dry compartment dramatically decreased simultaneously with any increase in [ABA]root. Thus, HPRD might better trigger a long-distance ABA signal than VPRD under conditions allowing simultaneous high [ABA]root and relatively high RWU fraction.

  11. Accumulation and detoxification of manganese in hyperaccumulator Phytolacca americana.

    PubMed

    Dou, C-M; Fu, X-P; Chen, X-C; Shi, J-Y; Chen, Y-X

    2009-09-01

    Pokeweed (Phytolacca americana) has recently received much attention because of its ability to hyperaccumulate manganese (Mn). The internal mechanism of detoxification of Mn, however, is not fully understood. In the present study, we investigated Mn accumulation, subcellular distribution, chemical speciation and detoxification through oxalate in pokeweed. The plant accumulated excess Mn in the leaves, mainly in the water-soluble fraction, and over 80% of Mn was in a water-soluble form, while accumulation of excess Mn in the cellular organelle and membrane fraction caused phytotoxicity. In addition, pokeweed has an intrinsically high oxalate content. In all experiments, there was sufficient oxalate to chelate Mn in leaf water extracts at all different levels of Mn application. Phase analysis of X-ray diffraction detected oxalate-Mn chelate complexes, and gel chromatography further confirmed the chelation of Mn by oxalate. In conclusion, pokeweed accumulates excess Mn in the soluble fraction of leaf cells, most likely in vacuoles, in which detoxification of Mn could be achieved by chelation with oxalate.

  12. Effect of cadmium on the physiological parameters and the subcellular cadmium localization in the potato (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    PubMed

    Xu, Dongyu; Chen, Zhifan; Sun, Ke; Yan, Dong; Kang, Mingjie; Zhao, Ye

    2013-11-01

    The pollution of agricultural soils with cadmium (Cd) has become a serious problem worldwide. The potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) was used to investigate how different concentrations of Cd (1, 5, and 25mgkg(-1)) affected the physiological parameters and the subcellular distribution of Cd in the potato. The analyses were conducted using scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray (SEM-EDX). The results suggest that the leaf is the organ with the highest accumulation of Cd. The malondialdehyde (MDA) content increased and the chlorophyll content decreased in response to high level of Cd. The SEM-EDX microanalysis revealed that Cd was primarily deposited in the spongy and palisade tissues of the leaf. Furthermore, Cd was also detected in the cortex and the adjacent phloem and was observed inside the intercellular space, the interior surface of the plasma membrane, and on the surface of the elliptical starch granules in the tubers of the potato. Although low concentrations of Cd migrated from the root to the tuber, the accumulation of Cd in the tuber exceeded the standard for food security. Therefore, the planting of potato plants in farmland containing Cd should be seriously evaluated because Cd-containing potatoes might present high health risk to humans.

  13. Clonal variation in heavy metal accumulation and biomass production in a poplar coppice culture. II. Vertical distribution and phytoextraction potential.

    PubMed

    Laureysens, I; De Temmerman, L; Hastir, T; Van Gysel, M; Ceulemans, R

    2005-02-01

    Short rotation coppice cultures (SRC) are intensively managed, high-density plantations of multi-shoot trees. In April 1996, an SRC field trial with 17 different poplar clones was established in Boom (Belgium) on a former waste disposal site. In December 1996 and January 2001, all shoots were cut back to a height of 5 cm to create a coppice culture. For six clones, wood and bark were sampled at the bottom, middle and top of a shoot in August and November 2002. No significant height effect of metal concentration was found, but for wood, metal concentrations generally increased toward the top of the shoot in August, and decreased toward the top of the shoot in November. Phytoextraction potential of a clone was primarily determined by metal concentration and by biomass production. Shoot size and number of shoots per stool were less important, as a high biomass production could be achieved by producing a few large shoots or many smaller shoots. Clone Fritzi Pauley accumulated 1.4 kg ha(-1) of Al over two years; Wolterson and Balsam Spire showed a relatively high accumulation of Cd and Zn, i.e. averaging, respectively 47 and 57 g ha(-1) for Cd and 2.4 and 2.0 kg ha(-1) for Zn over two years.

  14. Identification of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta as a target of manganese accumulation.

    PubMed

    Robison, Gregory; Sullivan, Brendan; Cannon, Jason R; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-05-01

    Manganese serves as a cofactor to a variety of proteins necessary for proper bodily development and function. However, an overabundance of Mn in the brain can result in manganism, a neurological condition resembling Parkinson's disease (PD). Bulk sample measurement techniques have identified the globus pallidus and thalamus as targets of Mn accumulation in the brain, however smaller structures/cells cannot be measured. Here, X-ray fluorescence microscopy determined the metal content and distribution in the substantia nigra (SN) of the rodent brain. In vivo retrograde labeling of dopaminergic cells (via FluoroGold™) of the SN pars compacta (SNc) subsequently allowed for XRF imaging of dopaminergic cells in situ at subcellular resolution. Chronic Mn exposure resulted in a significant Mn increase in both the SN pars reticulata (>163%) and the SNc (>170%) as compared to control; no other metal concentrations were significantly changed. Subcellular imaging of dopaminergic cells demonstrated that Mn is located adjacent to the nucleus. Measured intracellular manganese concentrations range between 40-200 μM; concentrations as low as 100 μM have been observed to cause cell death in cell cultures. Direct observation of Mn accumulation in the SNc could establish a biological basis for movement disorders associated with manganism, specifically Mn caused insult to the SNc. Accumulation of Mn in dopaminergic cells of the SNc may help clarify the relationship between Mn and the loss of motor skills associated with manganism. PMID:25695229

  15. Identification of dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta as a target of manganese accumulation

    PubMed Central

    Robison, Gregory; Sullivan, Brendan; Cannon, Jason R.; Pushkar, Yulia

    2015-01-01

    Manganese serves as a cofactor to a variety of proteins necessary for proper bodily development and function. However, an overabundance of Mn in the brain can result in manganism, a neurological condition resembling Parkinson’s disease (PD). Bulk sample measurement techniques have identified the globus pallidus and thalamus as targets of Mn accumulation in the brain, however smaller structures/cells cannot be measured. Here, X-ray fluorescence microscopy determined the metal content and distribution in the substantia nigra (SN) of the rodent brain. In vivo retrograde labeling of dopaminergic cells (via FluoroGold™) of the SN pars compacta (SNc) subsequently allowed for XRF imaging of dopaminergic cells in situ at subcellular resolution. Chronic Mn exposure resulted in a significant Mn increase in both the SN pars reticulata (>163%) and the SNc (>170%) as compared to control; no other metal concentrations were significantly changed. Subcellular imaging of dopaminergic cells demonstrated that Mn is located adjacent to the nucleus. Measured intracellular manganese concentrations range between 40–200 μM; concentrations as low as 100 μM have been observed to cause cell death in cell cultures. Direct observation of Mn accumulation in the SNc could establish a biological basis for movement disorders associated with manganism, specifically Mn caused insult to the SNc. Accumulation of Mn in dopaminergic cells of the SNc may help clarify the relationship between Mn and the loss of motor skills associated with manganism. PMID:25695229

  16. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate-Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Sam; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2004-01-01

    Inspired by recently proposed Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate (ARA) codes [15], in this paper we propose a channel coding scheme called Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate (ARAA) codes. These codes can be seen as serial turbo-like codes or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes, and they have a projected graph or protograph representation; this allows for a high-speed iterative decoder implementation using belief propagation. An ARAA code can be viewed as a precoded Repeat-and-Accumulate (RA) code with puncturing in concatenation with another accumulator, where simply an accumulator is chosen as the precoder; thus ARAA codes have a very fast encoder structure. Using density evolution on their associated protographs, we find examples of rate-lJ2 ARAA codes with maximum variable node degree 4 for which a minimum bit-SNR as low as 0.21 dB from the channel capacity limit can be achieved as the block size goes to infinity. Such a low threshold cannot be achieved by RA or Irregular RA (IRA) or unstructured irregular LDPC codes with the same constraint on the maximum variable node degree. Furthermore by puncturing the accumulators we can construct families of higher rate ARAA codes with thresholds that stay close to their respective channel capacity thresholds uniformly. Iterative decoding simulation results show comparable performance with the best-known LDPC codes but with very low error floor even at moderate block sizes.

  17. Diverse accumulation and distribution of nutrient elements in developing wheat grain studied by laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bei; Andersch, Franka; Weschke, Winfriede; Weber, Hans; Becker, J Sabine

    2013-09-01

    The present study focused on the elemental distribution in the developing wheat grain by using the laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) imaging technique. Our studies show that the embryo accumulated high concentrations of nutrient elements, such as Fe, K, Cu, and Zn, while Ca was accumulated in the bran of the wheat grain which might be attributed to its function of structural maintenance. In the endosperm the majority of the nutrients were located in the aleurone layer. Within the grain, the embryo could be considered as a nutrient pool for macro- and micro-elements essential for the development of the seedling. Elemental images showed that considerable amounts of nutrients were stored in the scutellum of the embryo, which might be related to the high gene expression of element transporters in the scutellum. Root primordia and leaf primordia were enriched in particular elements, such as Mn and Zn respectively. In total 34 cross sections were analyzed and used for generation of a sequence of elemental distribution images to demonstrate elemental changes along the perpendicular axis of the wheat grain embryo. Further development of three-dimensional modeling will be combined with physiological studies to better understand the mechanisms of elemental distribution and storage in the wheat grain. These studies will provide fundamental knowledge on improving the nutritional value and agronomic practices.

  18. Accumulation and distribution of trace metals within soils and the austral cordgrass Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Lancelotti, Julio L; Bouza, Pablo J; Marcovecchio, Jorge E

    2015-12-15

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn were determined in soils and in below- and above-ground structures of Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh (San Antonio, Río Negro, Argentina). Also, the relationship between trace metal concentrations in soils and plants was investigated to improve our knowledge regarding the ability of this plant species to take up and accumulate trace metals from the soil. Our results indicate that, within the studied salt marsh, soil trace metal concentrations follow a decreasing concentration gradient toward the sea. They show moderate pollution and a potentially negative biological effect in one site of the salt marsh. While below-ground structures reflect the soil metal concentration pattern, this is not so evident in above-ground concentrations. Also, S. densiflora is able to absorb a limited amount of metals present in the soil, the soil bioaccumulation factor being lower in sites where soil metal concentration is higher.

  19. Accumulation and distribution of trace metals within soils and the austral cordgrass Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh.

    PubMed

    Idaszkin, Yanina L; Lancelotti, Julio L; Bouza, Pablo J; Marcovecchio, Jorge E

    2015-12-15

    Concentrations of Cd, Cu, Fe, Pb, and Zn were determined in soils and in below- and above-ground structures of Spartina densiflora in a Patagonian salt marsh (San Antonio, Río Negro, Argentina). Also, the relationship between trace metal concentrations in soils and plants was investigated to improve our knowledge regarding the ability of this plant species to take up and accumulate trace metals from the soil. Our results indicate that, within the studied salt marsh, soil trace metal concentrations follow a decreasing concentration gradient toward the sea. They show moderate pollution and a potentially negative biological effect in one site of the salt marsh. While below-ground structures reflect the soil metal concentration pattern, this is not so evident in above-ground concentrations. Also, S. densiflora is able to absorb a limited amount of metals present in the soil, the soil bioaccumulation factor being lower in sites where soil metal concentration is higher. PMID:26481413

  20. Accumulate-Repeat-Accumulate-Accumulate Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Divsalar, Dariush; Dolinar, Samuel; Thorpe, Jeremy

    2007-01-01

    Accumulate-repeat-accumulate-accumulate (ARAA) codes have been proposed, inspired by the recently proposed accumulate-repeat-accumulate (ARA) codes. These are error-correcting codes suitable for use in a variety of wireless data-communication systems that include noisy channels. ARAA codes can be regarded as serial turbolike codes or as a subclass of low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes, and, like ARA codes they have projected graph or protograph representations; these characteristics make it possible to design high-speed iterative decoders that utilize belief-propagation algorithms. The objective in proposing ARAA codes as a subclass of ARA codes was to enhance the error-floor performance of ARA codes while maintaining simple encoding structures and low maximum variable node degree.

  1. Evaluation of the mercury contamination in mushrooms of genus Leccinum from two different regions of the world: Accumulation, distribution and probable dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Falandysz, Jerzy; Zhang, Ji; Wang, Yuanzhong; Krasińska, Grażyna; Kojta, Anna; Saba, Martyna; Shen, Tao; Li, Tao; Liu, Honggao

    2015-12-15

    This study focused on investigation of the accumulation and distribution of mercury (Hg) in mushrooms of the genus Leccinum that emerged on soils of totally different geochemical bedrock composition. Hg in 6 species from geographically diverse regions of the mercuriferous belt areas in Yunnan of SW China, and 8 species from the non-mercuriferous regions of Poland in Europe was measured. Also assessed was the probable dietary intake of Hg from consumption of Leccinum spp., which are traditional organic food items in SW China and Poland. The results showed that L. chromapes, L. extremiorientale, L. griseum and L. rugosicepes are good accumulators of Hg and the sequestered Hg in caps were up to 4.8, 3.5, 3.6 and 4.7 mg Hg kg(-1) dry matter respectively. Leccinum mushrooms from Poland also efficiently accumulated Hg with their average Hg content being an order of magnitude lower due to low concentrations of Hg in forest topsoil of Poland compared to the elevated contents in Yunnan. Consumption of Leccinum mushrooms with elevated Hg contents in Yunnan at rates of up to 300 g fresh product per week during the foraging season would not result in Hg intake that exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass, assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods.

  2. Accumulation of Phenylpropanoids by White, Blue, and Red Light Irradiation and Their Organ-Specific Distribution in Chinese Cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis).

    PubMed

    Kim, Yeon Jeong; Kim, Yeon Bok; Li, Xiaohua; Choi, Su Ryun; Park, Suhyoung; Park, Jong Seok; Lim, Yong Pyo; Park, Sang Un

    2015-08-01

    This study investigated optimum light conditions for enhancing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis and the distribution of phenylpropanoids in organs of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis). Blue light caused a high accumulation of most phenolic compounds, including p-hydroxybenzoic acid, ferulic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol, at 12 days after irradiation (DAI). This increase was coincident with a noticeable increase in expression levels of BrF3H, BrF3'H, BrFLS, and BrDFR. Red light led to the highest ferulic acid content at 12 DAI and to elevated expression of the corresponding genes during the early stages of irradiation. White light induced the highest accumulation of kaempferol and increased expression of BrPAL and BrDFR at 9 DAI. The phenylpropanoid content analysis in different organs revealed organ-specific accumulation of p-hydroxybenzoic acid, quercetin, and kaempferol. These results demonstrate that blue light is effective at increasing phenylpropanoid biosynthesis in Chinese cabbage, with leaves and flowers representing the most suitable organs for the production of specific phenylpropanoids.

  3. Cellular and subcellular localization of Marlin-1 in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Vidal, René L; Valenzuela, José I; Luján, Rafael; Couve, Andrés

    2009-01-01

    Background Marlin-1 is a microtubule binding protein that associates specifically with the GABAB1 subunit in neurons and with members of the Janus kinase family in lymphoid cells. In addition, it binds the molecular motor kinesin-I and nucleic acids, preferentially single stranded RNA. Marlin-1 is expressed mainly in the central nervous system but little is known regarding its cellular and subcellular distribution in the brain. Results Here we have studied the localization of Marlin-1 in the rodent brain and cultured neurons combining immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence and pre-embedding electron microscopy. We demonstrate that Marlin-1 is enriched in restricted areas of the brain including olfactory bulb, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum. Marlin-1 is abundant in dendrites and axons of GABAergic and non-GABAergic hippocampal neurons. At the ultrastructural level, Marlin-1 is present in the cytoplasm and the nucleus of CA1 neurons in the hippocampus. In the cytoplasm it associates to microtubules in the dendritic shaft and occasionally with the Golgi apparatus, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and dendritic spines. In the nucleus, clusters of Marlin-1 associate to euchromatin. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that Marlin-1 is expressed in discrete areas of the brain. They also confirm the microtubule association at the ultrastructural level in neurons. Together with the abundance of the protein in dendrites and axons they are consistent with the emerging role of Marlin-1 as an intracellular protein linking the cytoskeleton and transport. Our study constitutes the first detailed description of the cellular and subcellular distribution of Marlin-1 in the brain. As such, it will set the basis for future studies on the functional implications of Marlin-1 in protein trafficking. PMID:19386132

  4. The influence of elevated CO2 on non-structural carbohydrate distribution and fructan accumulation in wheat canopies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, D. R.; Chatterton, N. J.; Bugbee, B.

    1994-01-01

    We grew 2.4 m2 wheat canopies in a large growth chamber under high photosynthetic photon flux (1000 micromoles m-2 s-1) and using two CO2 concentrations, 360 and 1200 micromoles mol-1. Photosynthetically active radiation (400-700 nm) was attenuated slightly faster through canopies grown in 360 micromoles mol-1 than through canopies grown in 1200 micromoles mol-1, even though high-CO2 canopies attained larger leaf area indices. Tissue fractions were sampled from each 5-cm layer of the canopies. Leaf tissue sampled from the tops of canopies grown in 1200 micromoles mol-1 accumulated significantly more total non-structural carbohydrate, starch, fructan, sucrose, and glucose (p < 0.05) than for canopies grown in 360 micromoles mol-1. Non-structural carbohydrate did not significantly increase in the lower canopy layers of the elevated CO2 treatment. Elevated CO2 induced fructan synthesis in all leaf tissue fractions, but fructan formation was greatest in the uppermost leaf area. A moderate temperature reduction of 10 degrees C over 5 d increased starch, fructan and glucose levels in canopies grown in 1200 micromoles mol-1, but concentrations of sucrose and fructose decreased slightly or remained unchanged. Those results may correspond with the use of fructosyl-residues and release of glucose when sucrose is consumed in fructan synthesis.

  5. Accumulated metal speciation in earthworm populations with multigenerational exposure to metalliferous soils: cell fractionation and high-energy synchrotron analyses.

    PubMed

    Andre, Jane; Charnock, John; Stürzenbaum, Stephen R; Kille, Peter; Morgan, A John; Hodson, Mark E

    2009-09-01

    Predicting metal bioaccumulation and toxicity in soil organisms is complicated by site-specific biotic and abiotic parameters. In this study we exploited tissue fractionation and digestion techniques, combined with X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), to investigate the whole-body and subcellular distributions, ligand affinities, and coordination chemistry of accumulated Pb and Zn in field populations of the epigeic earthworm Lumbricus rubellus inhabiting three contrasting metalliferous and two unpolluted soils. Our main findings were (i) earthworms were resident in soils with concentrations of Pb and Zn ranging from 1200 to 27,000 mg kg(-1) and 200 to 34,000 mg kg(-1), respectively; (ii) Pb and Zn primarily accumulated in the posterior alimentary canal in nonsoluble subcellular fractions of earthworms; (iii) site-specific differences in the tissue and subcellular partitioning profiles of populations were observed, with earthworms from a calcareous site partitioning proportionally more Pb to their anterior body segments and Zn to the chloragosome-rich subcellular fraction than their acidic-soil inhabiting counterparts; (iv) XAS indicated that the interpopulation differences in metal partitioning between organs were not accompanied by qualitative differences in ligand-binding speciation, because crystalline phosphate-containing pyromorphite was a predominant chemical species in the whole-worm tissues of all mine soil residents. Differences in metal (Pb, Zn) partitioning at both organ and cellular levels displayed by field populations with protracted histories of metal exposures may reflect theirinnate ecophysiological responses to essential edaphic variables, such as Ca2+ status. These observations are highly significant in the challenging exercise of interpreting holistic biomarker data delivered by "omic" technologies. PMID:19764255

  6. Distribution and accumulation of metals in the surface sediments of Coleroon river estuary, East coast of India.

    PubMed

    Anithamary, Irudhayanathan; Ramkumar, Thirunavukkarasu; Venkatramanan, Senapathi

    2012-03-01

    This study deals with the geochemical nature of distribution of metals (iron, manganese, lead and zinc) in bulk sediments and its association with sand, silt, clay and organic carbon. Ten numbers of surface sediment samples were collected during summer season of 2009 from Coleroon estuary. The sediments are mostly sandy silt in nature. The organic carbon distribution indicates that they are brought in the surroundings of coastal areas. Correlation analysis clearly indicates that fine particles and organic carbon control the distribution of metals. The most evident the significant correlations where zinc vs manganese (r = 0.641), manganese versus iron (r = 0.618), lead versus manganese (r = 0.574). The correlation between organic carbon versus manganese (r = 0.768), organic carbon versus sand (r = 0.872), organic carbon versus silt (r = 0.902), organic carbon versus clay (r = 0.793). The degree of correlation between metals and other major constituents is often used to indicate the origin of the metals. Strong positive correlation coefficient of all the above said metals and organic carbon are mainly associated with the fine grained sediments.

  7. Distribution and extent of heavy metal accumulation in Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia), upper Santa Cruz River watershed, southern Arizona, 2011-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lester, Michael B.; van Riper, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Riparian ecosystems in arid environments provide critical habitat for breeding, migratory, and wintering birds, yet are often at risk of contamination by heavy metals. Birds and other animals living in contaminated areas are susceptible to adverse health effects as a result of long-term exposure and bioaccumulation of heavy metals. We investigated the distribution and cascading extent of heavy metal accumulation in Song Sparrows (Melospiza melodia) in Arizona’s upper Santa Cruz River watershed. This study had three goals: (1) quantify the degree of heavy metal accumulation in sparrows and determine the distributional patterns among study sites, (2) compare concentrations of metals found in this study to those found in studies performed prior to the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade, and (3) assess sparrow condition among sites with differing potential sources of contamination exposure. We examined six study sites that reflected different potential sources of contamination. Hematocrit values, body mass residuals, and leukocyte counts were used to assess sparrow condition. Cadmium, copper, mercury, nickel, and selenium exceeded background concentrations at some sites, but generally were lower than or similar to concentrations found in earlier studies performed prior to the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade. Concentrations were higher in recaptured birds in 2012 than in 2011 for 7 metals in feathers and 14 metals in blood, suggesting possible bioaccumulation. We found no cascading effects as a result of heavy metal exposure, but did find that heavy metal concentrations were reduced following the 2009 international wastewater treatment plant upgrade.

  8. [137Cs distribution and accumulation in organs and tissues of sheep in the event of chronic consumption of contaminated fodder in the area of the Chernobyl NPP accident].

    PubMed

    Kudriavtsev, V N; Vasil'ev, A V; Krasnova, E G; Fadeev, M Iu

    2006-01-01

    The regularities of 137Cs distribution and accumulation in organs and tissues of sheep on a farm located in the Chernobyl accidental zone were experimentally estimated. The distribution pattern of 137Cs concentration in organs and tissues is found to depend on the duration of the radionuclide uptake with the ration. During the first 24 h the highest 137Cs concentration is reported in the parenchymal organs; starting from day 30 muscular tissue and kidneys rank first, whereas in the other organs and tissues 137Cs concentration is 1.5-2 times lower. By 137Cs content and accumulation rate the study organs are arranged in a declining order as follows: muscles > > skin > liver > kidneys > heart > spleen. The mathematical models were devised describing the dynamics of increasing with time in 137Cs concentration in muscles, liver and skin. The methodology is suggested for the prediction of levels of 137Cs contamination of the muscular tissue of sheep. The time periods were regulated for sheep feeding with 137Cs contaminated fodder that ensure the production of mutton the radionuclide concentration in which meets the sanitary-hygienic standards.

  9. Accumulation and distribution of trivalent chromium and effects on hybrid willow (Salix matsudana Koidz x alba L.) metabolism.

    PubMed

    Yu, X-Z; Gu, J-D

    2007-05-01

    The metabolic response of plants to exogenous supply and bioaccumulation of trivalent chromium (Cr(3+) ) was investigated. Pre-rooted young hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz x alba L.) were exposed to hydroponic solution spiked with CrCl(3) at 24.0 degrees C +/- 1 degrees C for 192 hours. Various physiologic parameters of the plants were monitored to determine toxicity from Cr exposure. The transpiration rate of willows exposed to 2.5 mg Cr/L was 49% higher than that of the untreated control plants, but it was decreased by 17% when exposed to 30.0 mg Cr/L. Significant decrease (> or =20%) of soluble protein in young leaves of willows was detected in the treatment group with > or =7.5 mg Cr/L. The measured chlorophyll contents in leaves of treated plants varied with the dose of Cr, but a linear correlation could not be established. The contents of chlorophyll in leaves of willows exposed to > or =7.5 mg Cr/L were higher than that of the untreated plants but lower at 30.0 mg Cr/L. Superoxide dismutase activity (SOD) in leaves between the treated and untreated willows did not show any significant difference, but activities of both catalase (CAT) and peroxidase (POD) in leaf cells of all treated plants were higher than those in the untreated willows. The correlation between the concentration of Cr and CAT activity in leaf cells was the highest of all toxicity assays (R ( 2 ) = 0.9096), indicating that CAT activity was most sensitive to the change in Cr(3+) doses compared with the other selected parameters. Results from the Cr uptake study showed that significant removal of Cr from hydroponic solution was observed in the presence of hybrid willows without showing detectable phytotoxicity, even at high does of Cr. More than 90% of the applied Cr(3+) was removed from the aqueous solution by willows at concentrations up to 7.5 mg Cr/L. Approximately 70% of the initial Cr was recovered in the plant materials. At the low-Cr(3+) treatment (2.5 mg Cr/L), Cr accumulation by

  10. Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Saba, Martyna; Falandysz, Jerzy; Nnorom, Innocent C

    2016-02-01

    Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ± 0.05 to 0.33 ± 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ± 0.014 to 0.095 ± 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ± 0.0035 to 0.053 ± 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ± 0.4 and 5.3 ± 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ± 1.3 to 42 ± 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass. PMID:26446731

  11. Accumulation and distribution of mercury in fruiting bodies by fungus Suillus luteus foraged in Poland, Belarus and Sweden.

    PubMed

    Saba, Martyna; Falandysz, Jerzy; Nnorom, Innocent C

    2016-02-01

    Presented in this paper is result of the study of the bioconcentration potential of mercury (Hg) by Suillus luteus mushroom collected from regions within Central, Eastern, and Northern regions of Europe. As determined by cold-vapor atomic absorption spectroscopy, the Hg content varied from 0.13 ± 0.05 to 0.33 ± 0.13 mg kg(-1) dry matter for caps and from 0.038 ± 0.014 to 0.095 ± 0.038 mg kg(-1) dry matter in stems. The Hg content of the soil substratum (0-10 cm layer) underneath the fruiting bodies showed generally low Hg concentrations that varied widely ranging from 0.0030 to 0.15 mg kg(-1) dry matter with mean values varying from 0.0078 ± 0.0035 to 0.053 ± 0.025 mg kg(-1) dry matter, which is below typical content in the Earth crust. The caps were observed to be on the richer in Hg than the stems at ratio between 1.8 ± 0.4 and 5.3 ± 2.6. The S. luteus mushroom showed moderate ability to accumulate Hg with bioconcentration factor (BCF) values ranging from 3.6 ± 1.3 to 42 ± 18. The consumption of fresh S. luteus mushroom in quantities up to 300 g week(-1) (assuming no Hg ingestion from other foods) from background areas in the Central, Eastern, and Northern part of Europe will not result in the intake of Hg exceeds the provisional weekly tolerance limit (PTWI) of 0.004 mg kg(-1) body mass.

  12. Acute toxicity, accumulation and tissue distribution of copper in the blue crab Callinectes sapidus acclimated to different salinities: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Martins, Camila De Martinez Gaspar; Barcarolli, Indianara Fernanda; de Menezes, Eliana Jaime; Giacomin, Marina Mussoi; Wood, Chris M; Bianchini, Adalto

    2011-01-17

    In vivo and in vitro studies were performed to evaluate acute toxicity, organ-specific distribution, and tissue accumulation of copper in Callinectes sapidus acclimated to two different experimental salinities (2 and 30 ppt). Blue crabs were quite tolerant to copper. Acute dissolved copper toxicity (96-h LC(50) and its corresponding 95% confident interval) was higher at salinity 2 ppt (5.3 (3.50-8.05) μM Cu) than at 30 ppt (53.0 (27.39-102.52) μM Cu). The difference between salinities can be completely explained based on the water chemistry because it disappeared when 96-h LC(50) values were expressed as the free Cu(2+) ion (3.1 (1.93-4.95) μM free Cu at 2 ppt versus 5.6 (2.33-13.37) μM free Cu at 30 ppt) or the Cu(2+) activity (1.4 (0.88-2.26) μM Cu activity at 2 ppt versus 1.7 (0.71-4.07) μM Cu activity at 30 ppt). The relationships between gill Cu burden and % mortality were very similar at 2 and 30 ppt, in accord with the Biotic Ligand Model. In vivo experiments showed that copper concentration in the hemolymph is not dependent on metal concentration in the surrounding medium at either experimental salinity. They also showed that copper flux into the gills is higher than into other tissues analyzed, and that anterior and posterior gills are similarly important sites of copper accumulation at both experimental salinities. In vitro experiments with isolated-perfused gills showed that there is a positive relationship between copper accumulation in this tissue and the metal concentration in the incubation media for both anterior and posterior gills. A similar result was observed at both low and high salinities. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that copper accumulation in posterior gills is also positively and strongly dependent on the incubation time with copper. Gill copper accumulation occurred at a lower rate in the first 2h of metal exposure, increasing markedly after this "steady-state" period. This finding was corroborated by a significant

  13. An image analysis method to quantify CFTR subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Pizzo, Lucilla; Fariello, María Inés; Lepanto, Paola; Aguilar, Pablo S; Kierbel, Arlinet

    2014-08-01

    Aberrant protein subcellular localization caused by mutation is a prominent feature of many human diseases. In Cystic Fibrosis (CF), a recessive lethal disorder that results from dysfunction of the Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR), the most common mutation is a deletion of phenylalanine-508 (pF508del). Such mutation produces a misfolded protein that fails to reach the cell surface. To date, over 1900 mutations have been identified in CFTR gene, but only a minority has been analyzed at the protein level. To establish if a particular CFTR variant alters its subcellular distribution, it is necessary to quantitatively determine protein localization in the appropriate cellular context. To date, most quantitative studies on CFTR localization have been based on immunoprecipitation and western blot. In this work, we developed and validated a confocal microscopy-image analysis method to quantitatively examine CFTR at the apical membrane of epithelial cells. Polarized MDCK cells transiently transfected with EGFP-CFTR constructs and stained for an apical marker were used. EGFP-CFTR fluorescence intensity in a region defined by the apical marker was normalized to EGFP-CFTR whole cell fluorescence intensity, rendering "apical CFTR ratio". We obtained an apical CFTR ratio of 0.67 ± 0.05 for wtCFTR and 0.11 ± 0.02 for pF508del. In addition, this image analysis method was able to discriminate intermediate phenotypes: partial rescue of the pF508del by incubation at 27 °C rendered an apical CFTR ratio value of 0.23 ± 0.01. We concluded the method has a good sensitivity and accurately detects milder phenotypes. Improving axial resolution through deconvolution further increased the sensitivity of the system as rendered an apical CFTR ratio of 0.76 ± 0.03 for wild type and 0.05 ± 0.02 for pF508del. The presented procedure is faster and simpler when compared with other available methods and it is therefore suitable as a screening method to identify

  14. Distribution and transport of radionuclides in a boreal mire--assessing past, present and future accumulation of uranium, thorium and radium.

    PubMed

    Lidman, Fredrik; Ramebäck, Henrik; Bengtsson, Åsa; Laudon, Hjalmar

    2013-07-01

    The spatial distribution of (238)U, (226)Ra, (40)K and the daughters of (232)Th, (228)Ra and (228)Th, were measured in a small mire in northern Sweden. High activity concentrations of (238)U and (232)Th (up to 41 Bq (238)U kg(-1)) were observed in parts of the mire with a historical or current inflow of groundwater from the surrounding till soils, but the activities declined rapidly further out in the mire. Near the outlet and in the central parts of the mire the activity concentrations were low, indicating that uranium and thorium are immobilized rapidly upon their entering the peat. The (226)Ra was found to be more mobile with high activity concentrations further out into the mire (up to 24 Bq kg(-1)), although the central parts and the area near the outlet of the mire still had low activity concentrations. Based on the fluxes to and from the mire, it was estimated that approximately 60-70% of the uranium and thorium entering the mire currently is retained within it. The current accumulation rates were found to be consistent with the historical accumulation, but possibly lower. Since much of the accumulation still is concentrated to the edges of the mire and the activities are low compared to other measurements of these radionuclides in peat, there are no indications that the mire will be saturated with respect to radionuclides like uranium, thorium and radium in the foreseen future. On the contrary, normal peat growth rates for the region suggest that the average activity concentrations of the peat currently may be decreasing, since peat growth may be faster than the accumulation of radionuclides. In order to assess the total potential for accumulation of radionuclides more thoroughly it would, however, be necessary to also investigate the behaviour of other organophilic elements like aluminium, which are likely to compete for binding sites on the organic material. Measurements of the redox potential and other redox indicators demonstrate that uranium possibly

  15. Accumulation and tissue distribution of radioiodine ( sup 131 I) from algal phytoplankton by the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis

    SciTech Connect

    Cuvin-Aralar, Ma.L.A. ); Umaly, R.C. )

    1991-12-01

    Radioactive wastes discharged from establishments involved in the use of radioisotopes such as nuclear-powered industries, tracer research and nuclear medicine are a potential public health hazard. Such wastes contain radionuclides, particularly Iodine-131 ({sup 131}I), produced in fission with a yield of about 3%. Radionuclides in waste waters are known to be taken up by molluscs such as mussels, oysters, and clams. This study aims to determine the uptake of {sup 131}I from algal phytoplankton (Chroococcus dispersus) fed to the freshwater clam Corbicula manilensis as well as the organ/tissue distribution. The results will be compared with a previous study on {sup 131}I uptake from water by the same clams.

  16. Levels, tissue distribution, and age-related accumulation of synthetic musk fragrances in Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis): comparison to organochlorines.

    PubMed

    Wan, Yi; Wei, Qiwei; Hu, Jianying; Jin, Xiaohui; Zhang, Zhaobin; Zhen, Huajun; Liu, Jianyi

    2007-01-15

    Chinese sturgeon (Acipenser sinensis) was listed as a Grade I protected animal in China in 1989, and the observed intersexual phenomenon and sex ratio deviation have suggested that chemicals have posed a risk as environment pollutants. This study analyzed seven musk fragrances in liver, muscle, heart, gonad, stomach, intestines, adipose, gill, pancreas, kidney, gallbladder, and roe from 13 female Chinese sturgeons, and the toxicokinetic behavior of musks were studied and compared with some organochlorines. Of the seven musks, HHCB, AHTN, and musk xylene were detected, and the highest concentrations were observed in adipose tissue: from 33.7 to 62.1 ng/g wet weight (ww), from 1.0 to 5.4 ng/g ww, and from 1.1 to 13 ng/g ww, respectively. Similar to the tissue distribution of DDTs and HCB, musks were detected frequently in high lipid content tissues such as roe, adipose, and liver, suggesting that tissue distribution of musks is controlled by the affinity to lipids. The concentration ratios based on lipid weight between roe and adipose were estimated to be 0.47 for HHCB, 0.58 for AHTN, and 0.51 for musk xylene, and those for the total DDTs and HCB were 0.27 and 0.61, which were relatively low compared with mammals. Relatively high concentrations of p,p'-DDE (68.4-449 ng/g ww) were detected in 10 of total 11 samples, which would cause the feminization of Chinese sturgeons during embryonic development. It was found that lipid-corrected concentrations of HHCB, AHTN, p,p'-DDE, and p,p'-DDD increased with age in female sturgeon, of which the trends were similar to those in fishes and different from those in mammals.

  17. [Accumulation, distribution and pollution assessment of heavy metals in surface sediment of Caohai plateau wetland, Guizhou province].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qing-Hai; Lin, Chang-Hu; Tan, Hong; Lin, Shao-Xia; Yang, Hong-Bo

    2013-03-01

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the concentrations and distribution characteristics of heavy metals in surface sediments of different areas in the Caohai plateau wetland. 16 samples of surface sediments were collected and 7 heavy metals were analyzed. Heavy metal pollution in surface sediments of different areas in the Caohai plateau wetland was estimated by the Tomlinson Pollution Load Index (PLI) method. The analyzed results indicated that the average contents of Cd, Hg, As, Pb, Cr, Cu, Zn were 0.985, 0.345, 15.8, 38.9, 38.6, 22.8 and 384 mg x kg(-1), respectively. The heavy metal distributions varied with regional environment changes, the order of average contents of Cd and Hg in different regions was E (the eastern region) > S (the southern region) > N (the northern region), the order of the average content of Pb was N > E > S, and that of Zn was S > E > N. The results also suggested a medium heavy metal pollution level in the surface sediment of the Caohai plateau wetland with the PLI(zone) reaching 1.17. The order of pollution level in surface sediments of different regions was E > S > N. The results showed medium pollution levels in E and Hg which reached the extreme intensity pollution level were also the major polluted elements in surface sediments of the Caohai plateau wetland. And also, results showed medium pollution levels of Cd and Pb in surface sediments of Caohai plateau wetland. Cluster analysis results showed similar pollution sources of Cd, Zn, Pb and Hg, which should be attached great importance in terms of the prevention of the Caohai plateau wetland.

  18. Dissecting the Subcellular Compartmentation of Proteins and Metabolites in Arabidopsis Leaves Using Non-aqueous Fractionation *

    PubMed Central

    Arrivault, Stéphanie; Guenther, Manuela; Florian, Alexandra; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Vosloh, Daniel; Lunn, John E.; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R.; Stitt, Mark; Schulze, Waltraud X.

    2014-01-01

    Non-aqueous fractionation is a technique for the enrichment of different subcellular compartments derived from lyophilized material. It was developed to study the subcellular distribution of metabolites. Here we analyzed the distribution of about 1,000 proteins and 70 metabolites, including 22 phosphorylated intermediates in wild-type Arabidopsis rosette leaves, using non-aqueous gradients divided into 12 fractions. Good separation of plastidial, cytosolic, and vacuolar metabolites and proteins was achieved, but cytosolic, mitochondrial, and peroxisomal proteins clustered together. There was considerable heterogeneity in the fractional distribution of transcription factors, ribosomal proteins, and subunits of the vacuolar-ATPase, indicating diverse compartmental location. Within the plastid, sub-organellar separation of thylakoids and stromal proteins was observed. Metabolites from the Calvin–Benson cycle, photorespiration, starch and sucrose synthesis, glycolysis, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle grouped with their associated proteins of the respective compartment. Non-aqueous fractionation thus proved to be a powerful method for the study of the organellar, and in some cases sub-organellar, distribution of proteins and their association with metabolites. It remains the technique of choice for the assignment of subcellular location to metabolites in intact plant tissues, and thus the technique of choice for doing combined metabolite–protein analysis on a single tissue sample. PMID:24866124

  19. Methane Content and Distribution of Natural Gas Hydrate Accumulations in the Deep-Water Basins of the Bering Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, G. A.; Scholl, D. W.; Childs, J. R.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic reflection images from the deep-water (>3500 m) Aleutian and Bowers Basins of the Bering Sea indicate an abundant presence of natural gas and gas hydrate. Distinctive velocity-amplitude anomalies, or VAMPs, stand out as both velocity pseudostructures and gas bright spots within the otherwise horizontal and uniform sedimentary reflection sequences. These are interpreted as methane chimneys overlain by interstitial gas hydrate caps. Hundreds of VAMPs have been imaged throughout the Bering Sea; several thousand are inferred to exist. Ongoing USGS development of an interpretive seismic database presents an opportunity to quantify the hydrate content of individual VAMPs and to explore the distribution of major and minor anomalies relative to basement topography, silica diagenesis features, ancient subduction boundary structures and sediment sources. We present quantitative estimates of the size and methane content of representative large VAMP structures, based on seismic reflection interval-time anomalies. Time-average and frame-component effective medium velocity models are used to relate hydrate concentration to velocity anomaly. For this specific case, differences between the two models are minimal for hydrate concentrations <35% of pore space. To facilitate modeling of sediment dominated by diatomaceous ooze, grain-scale elastic moduli for diatom frustules are back-calculated to be ~5 GPa, assuming shear and bulk modulus are equal. Maximum velocity anomaly observed within the VAMPs is +235 m/s in the hydrate zone, relative to a background P-wave velocity of 1600 m/s. This corresponds to hydrate concentration ~40% of pore space (or ~20% of bulk rock). Hydrate distribution appears to be lithologically controlled within a section of alternating turbidite and diatomaceous sediments. It is preferentially located in a zone ~40 to 90 m above the gas hydrate BSR. Free gas is most concentrated immediately below the hydrate BSR, which lies at ~360 m bsf. Evidence for

  20. Early Size Distributions of Chondrule Subgroups Overprinted by the Final Accumulation Process of Particle Components in Allende

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCain, K. A.; Simon, J. I.; Cuzzi, J. N

    2015-01-01

    Populations of compositionally distinct particles are fundamental components of undifferentiated chondritic meteorites. Many theories explain the formation of chondrites, one class of which includes mechanisms for sorting the component particles in the solar nebula prior to their accretion. Mechanisms include sorting by mass, turbulent concentration, X-winds, and photophoresis, which will produce characteristic distributions of observable properties such as particle size. Distinguishing processes that occur in specific astrophysical environments requires characterization of particle types, which include refractory Ca-Al-rich Inclusions (CAIs) and less-refractory chondrules. Previous investigations of modal abundances of CAIs and chondrules exist, but differences within and between these two groups, both of which are made up of diverse subgroups with different thermal histories and chemical compositions, remain mostly unstudied. The presence of rims, a significant event occurring after the formation of at least some chondrules, have also yet to be considered with respect to sorting. Here we present the sizes of CAIs and chondrules in Allende with attention to the smallest sizes, subgroups, and particle rims.

  1. Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought- and Salt-Tolerant, Selenium-Enriched Nutraceutical Fruit Crop for Biofortified Foods1[OA

    PubMed Central

    Bañuelos, Gary S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Walse, Spencer S.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Yang, Soo In; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.; Freeman, John L.

    2011-01-01

    The organ-specific accumulation, spatial distribution, and chemical speciation of selenium (Se) were previously unknown for any species of cactus. We investigated Se in Opuntia ficus-indica using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, microfocused x-ray fluorescence elemental and chemical mapping (μXRF), Se K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). μXRF showed Se concentrated inside small conic, vestigial leaves (cladode tips), the cladode vasculature, and the seed embryos. Se K-edge XANES demonstrated that approximately 96% of total Se in cladode, fruit juice, fruit pulp, and seed is carbon-Se-carbon (C-Se-C). Micro and bulk XANES analysis showed that cladode tips contained both selenate and C-Se-C forms. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry quantification of Se in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions followed by LC-MS structural identification showed selenocystathionine-to-selenomethionine (SeMet) ratios of 75:25, 71:29, and 32:68, respectively in cladode, fruit, and seed. Enzymatic digestions and subsequent analysis confirmed that Se was mainly present in a “free” nonproteinaceous form inside cladode and fruit, while in the seed, Se was incorporated into proteins associated with lipids. μXRF chemical mapping illuminated the specific location of Se reduction and assimilation from selenate accumulated in the cladode tips into the two LC-MS-identified C-Se-C forms before they were transported into the cladode mesophyll. We conclude that Opuntia is a secondary Se-accumulating plant whose fruit and cladode contain mostly free selenocystathionine and SeMet, while seeds contain mainly SeMet in protein. When eaten, the organic Se forms in Opuntia fruit, cladode, and seed may improve health, increase Se mineral nutrition, and help prevent multiple human cancers. PMID:21059825

  2. Selenium Accumulation, Distribution, and Speciation in Spineless Prickly Pear Cactus: A Drought- and Salt-Tolerant, Selenium-Enriched Nutraceutical Fruit Crop for Biofortified Foods

    SciTech Connect

    Banuelos, Gary S.; Fakra, Sirine C.; Walse, Spencer S.; Marcus, Matthew A.; Yang, Soo In; Pickering, Ingrid J.; Pilon-Smits, Elizabeth A.H.; Freeman, John L.

    2011-07-01

    The organ-specific accumulation, spatial distribution, and chemical speciation of selenium (Se) were previously unknown for any species of cactus. We investigated Se in Opuntia ficus-indica using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry, microfocused x-ray fluorescence elemental and chemical mapping ({micro}XRF), Se K-edge x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy, and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). {micro}XRF showed Se concentrated inside small conic, vestigial leaves (cladode tips), the cladode vasculature, and the seed embryos. Se K-edge XANES demonstrated that approximately 96% of total Se in cladode, fruit juice, fruit pulp, and seed is carbon-Se-carbon (C-Se-C). Micro and bulk XANES analysis showed that cladode tips contained both selenate and C-Se-C forms. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry quantification of Se in high-performance liquid chromatography fractions followed by LC-MS structural identification showed selenocystathionine-to-selenomethionine (SeMet) ratios of 75:25, 71:29, and 32:68, respectively in cladode, fruit, and seed. Enzymatic digestions and subsequent analysis confirmed that Se was mainly present in a 'free' nonproteinaceous form inside cladode and fruit, while in the seed, Se was incorporated into proteins associated with lipids. {micro}XRF chemical mapping illuminated the specific location of Se reduction and assimilation from selenate accumulated in the cladode tips into the two LC-MS-identified C-Se-C forms before they were transported into the cladode mesophyll. We conclude that Opuntia is a secondary Se-accumulating plant whose fruit and cladode contain mostly free selenocystathionine and SeMet, while seeds contain mainly SeMet in protein. When eaten, the organic Se forms in Opuntia fruit, cladode, and seed may improve health, increase Se mineral nutrition, and help prevent multiple human cancers.

  3. Subcellular localization of rickettsial invasion protein, InvA.

    PubMed

    Gaywee, Jariyanart; Sacci, John B; Radulovic, Suzana; Beier, Magda S; Azad, Abdu F

    2003-01-01

    To understand further the molecular basis of rickettsial host cell invasion, Rickettsia prowazekii invasion gene homolog (invA) has been characterized. Our previous experiments have shown that InvA is an Ap5A pyrophosphatase, a member of the Nudix hydrolase family, which is up-regulated during the internalization, early growth phase, and exit steps during rickettsial mammalian cell infection. In addition to the molecular characterization, subcellular localization of InvA was investigated. InvA-specific antibodies were raised in mice and used for immunoelectron microscopy. The generated antibodies were shown to recognize InvA and by immunogold labeling showed InvA in the cytoplasm of rickettsiae. A cytoplasmic location for InvA would allow for a rapid response to any internal substance and efficient functioning in hydrolysis of toxic metabolic by-products that are accumulated in the rickettsial cytoplasm during host cell invasion. Protecting bacteria from a hazardous environment could enhance their viability and allow them to remain metabolically active, which is a necessary step for the rickettsial obligate intracellular lifestyle.

  4. Function and subcellular localization of Gcn5, a histone acetyltransferase in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Fan, Xueyi; Chen, Jiangye

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is an opportunistic fungal pathogen commonly found in humans. It has the ability to switch reversibly between three growth forms: budding yeast, pseudohypha, and hypha. The transition between yeast and hyphal growth forms is critical for the pathogenesis of C. albicans. During the yeast-to-hypha morphologic transition, gene expression is regulated by transcriptional regulators including histone modifying complexes and chromatin remodeling complexes. We previously reported that Esa1, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex NuA4, is essential for the hyphal development of C. albicans. In this study, we analyzed the functional roles of Gcn5, a catalytic subunit in the histone acetyltransferase complex SAGA, in C. albicans. Gcn5 is required for the invasive and filamentous growth of C. albicans. Deletion of GCN5 impaired hyphal elongation in sensing serum and attenuated the virulence of C. albicans in a mouse systemic infection model. The C. albicans gcn5/gcn5 mutant cells also exhibited sensitivity to cell wall stress. Functional analysis showed that the HAT domain and Bromodomain in Gcn5 play distinct roles in morphogenesis and cell wall stress response of C. albicans. Our results show that the conserved residue Glu188 is crucial for the Gcn5 HAT activity and for Gcn5 function during filamentous growth. In addition, the subcellular distribution of ectopically expressed GFP-Gcn5 correlates with the different growth states of C. albicans. In stationary phase, Gcn5 accumulated in the nucleus, while during vegetative growth it localized in the cytoplasm in a morpha-independent manner. Our results suggest that the nuclear localization of Gcn5 depends on the existence of its N-terminal NLS and HAT domains.

  5. Cadmium induced changes in subcellular glutathione contents within glandular trichomes of Cucurbita pepo L.

    PubMed

    Kolb, Dagmar; Müller, Maria; Zellnig, Günther; Zechmann, Bernd

    2010-07-01

    Plants cope with cadmium (Cd) stress by complexation with phytochelatins (Pc), metallothioneins and glutathione and sequestration within vacuoles. Especially glutathione was found to play a major role in Cd detoxification as Cd shows a high binding affinity towards thiols and as glutathione is a precursor for Pc synthesis. In the present study, we have used an immunohistochemical approach combined with computer-supported transmission electron microscopy in order to measure changes in the subcellular distribution of glutathione during Cd-stress in mesophyll cells and cells of different glandular trichomes (long and short stalked) of Cucurbita pepo L. subsp. pepo var. styriaca GREB: . Even though no ultrastructural alterations were observed in leaf and glandular trichome cells after the treatment of plants with 50 microM cadmium chloride (CdCl(2)) for 48 h, all cells showed a large decrease in glutathione contents. The strongest decrease was found in nuclei and the cytosol (up to 76%) in glandular trichomes which are considered as a major side of Cd accumulation in leaves. The ratio of glutathione between the cytosol and nuclei and the other cell compartments was strongly decreased only in glandular trichomes (more than 50%) indicating that glutathione in these two cell compartments is especially important for the detoxification of Cd in glandular trichomes. Additionally, these data indicate that large amounts of Cd are withdrawn from nuclei during Cd exposure. The present study gives a detailed insight into the compartment-specific importance of glutathione during Cd exposure in mesophyll cells and glandular trichomes of C. pepo L. plants.

  6. Electron and hole accumulations at GaN/AlInN/GaN interfaces and conductive n-type AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Shotaro; Ikeyama, Kazuki; Yasuda, Toshiki; Furuta, Takashi; Takeuchi, Tetsuya; Iwaya, Motoaki; Kamiyama, Satoshi; Akasaki, Isamu

    2016-05-01

    We investigated electron and hole accumulations at GaN/AlInN/GaN interfaces by Hall effect measurement. The InN mole fraction and temperature dependences on the sheet carrier densities at the interfaces reveal that electrons and holes were induced by large positive and negative polarization charges to satisfy the charge neutrality conditions, respectively. On the basis of the above results, we then designed and demonstrated a low-resistity 10-pair Si-doped n-type AlInN/GaN distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) by using high Si doped and graded layers at the GaN/AlInN interfaces. The low-resistity n-type AlInN/GaN DBR will reduce the resistance and the internal loss in blue vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers.

  7. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Docken, Steffen S; Lewis, Timothy J; McCulloch, Andrew D; Harvey, Robert D; Clancy, Colleen E

    2016-07-01

    distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states. PMID:27409243

  8. A Computational Modeling and Simulation Approach to Investigate Mechanisms of Subcellular cAMP Compartmentation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Pei-Chi; Boras, Britton W.; Jeng, Mao-Tsuen; Lewis, Timothy J.; McCulloch, Andrew D.; Harvey, Robert D.; Clancy, Colleen E.

    2016-01-01

    distribution of cAMP at the subcellular level could be important for developing new strategies for the prevention or treatment of unfavorable responses associated with different disease states. PMID:27409243

  9. Stable cesium uptake and accumulation capacities of five plant species as influenced by bacterial inoculation and cesium distribution in the soil.

    PubMed

    Djedidi, Salem; Kojima, Katsuhiro; Yamaya, Hiroko; Ohkama-Ohtsu, Naoko; Bellingrath-Kimura, Sonoko Dorothea; Watanabe, Izumi; Yokoyama, Tadashi

    2014-09-01

    The effects of inoculation with Bacillus and Azospirillum strains on growth and cesium accumulation of five plant species, Komatsuna, Amaranth, sorghum, common millet and buckwheat, grown on cesium-spiked soil were assessed for potential use in cesium remediation. Pot experiments were performed using "artificially" Cs-contaminated soil. Three treatments were applied based on Cs location in the soil. For a soil height of 15 cm in the pots, Cs was added as follows: in the top five cm to imitate no ploughing condition; in the bottom five cm simulating inverted ploughing; and uniformly distributed Cs reproducing normal plowing. Generally, inoculation of Cs-exposed plants significantly enhanced growth and tolerance to this element. Transfer factor (ratio of Cs concentration in the plant tissues to that in surrounding soil) was strongly influenced by Cs distribution, with higher values in the top-Cs treatment. Within this treatment, inoculation of Komatsuna with Bacillus and Azospirillum strains resulted in the greatest transfer factors of 6.55 and 6.68, respectively. Cesium content in the shoots was high in the Azospirillum-inoculated Komatsuna, Amaranth, and buckwheat, i.e., 1,830, 1,220, and 1,030 µg per pot, respectively (five plants were grown in each pot). Therefore, inoculation of Komatsuna and Amaranth with the strains tested here could be effective in enhancing Cs accumulation. The decrease of Cs transfer under uniform- and bottom-Cs treatments would suggest that countermeasures aiming at decreasing the transfer of Cs could rely on ploughing practices.

  10. Sucrose Transporter AtSUC9 Mediated by a Low Sucrose Level is Involved in Arabidopsis Abiotic Stress Resistance by Regulating Sucrose Distribution and ABA Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Jia, Wanqiu; Zhang, Lijun; Wu, Di; Liu, Shan; Gong, Xue; Cui, Zhenhai; Cui, Na; Cao, Huiying; Rao, Longbing; Wang, Che

    2015-08-01

    Sucrose (Suc) transporters (SUCs or SUTs) are important regulators in plant growth and stress tolerance. However, the mechanism of SUCs in plant abiotic stress resistance remains to be dietermined. Here, we found that AtSUC9 expression was induced by abiotic stress, including salt, osmotic and cold stress conditions. Disruption of AtSUC9 led to sensitive responses to abiotic stress during seed germination and seedling growth. Further analyses indicated that the sensitivity phenotype of Atsuc9 mutants resulted from higher Suc content in shoots and lower Suc content in roots, as compared with that in wild-type (WT) plants. In addition, we found that the expression of AtSUC9 is induced in particular by low levels of exogenous and endogenous Suc, and deletion of AtSUC9 affected the expression of the low Suc level-responsive genes. AtSUC9 also showed an obvious response to treatments with low concentrations of exogenous Suc during seed germination, seedling growth and Suc distribution, and Atsuc9 mutants hardly grew in abiotic stress treatments without exogenous Suc. Moreover, our results illustrated not only that deletion of AtSUC9 blocks abiotic stress-inducible ABA accumulation but also that Atsuc9 mutants had a lower content of endogenous ABA in stress conditions than in normal conditions. Deletion of AtSUC9 also inhibited the expression of many ABA-inducible genes (SnRk2.2/3/6, ABF2/3/4, ABI1/3/4, RD29A, KIN1 and KIN2). These results indicate that AtSUC9 is induced in particular by low Suc levels then mediates the balance of Suc distribution and promotes ABA accumulation to enhance Arabidopsis abiotic stress resistance.

  11. Tuning the Catalytic Activity of Subcellular Nanoreactors.

    PubMed

    Jakobson, Christopher M; Chen, Yiqun; Slininger, Marilyn F; Valdivia, Elias; Kim, Edward Y; Tullman-Ercek, Danielle

    2016-07-31

    Bacterial microcompartments are naturally occurring subcellular organelles of bacteria and serve as a promising scaffold for the organization of heterologous biosynthetic pathways. A critical element in the design of custom biosynthetic organelles is quantitative control over the loading of heterologous enzymes to the interior of the organelles. We demonstrate that the loading of heterologous proteins to the 1,2-propanediol utilization microcompartment of Salmonella enterica can be controlled using two strategies: by modulating the transcriptional activation of the microcompartment container and by coordinating the expression of the microcompartment container and the heterologous cargo. These strategies allow general control over the loading of heterologous proteins localized by two different N-terminal targeting peptides and represent an important step toward tuning the catalytic activity of bacterial microcompartments for increased biosynthetic productivity.

  12. Controlling subcellular delivery to optimize therapeutic effect

    PubMed Central

    Mossalam, Mohanad; Dixon, Andrew S; Lim, Carol S

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on drug targeting to specific cellular organelles for therapeutic purposes. Drugs can be delivered to all major organelles of the cell (cytosol, endosome/lysosome, nucleus, nucleolus, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, peroxisomes and proteasomes) where they exert specific effects in those particular subcellular compartments. Delivery can be achieved by chemical (e.g., polymeric) or biological (e.g., signal sequences) means. Unidirectional targeting to individual organelles has proven to be immensely successful for drug therapy. Newer technologies that accommodate multiple signals (e.g., protein switch and virus-like delivery systems) mimic nature and allow for a more sophisticated approach to drug delivery. Harnessing different methods of targeting multiple organelles in a cell will lead to better drug delivery and improvements in disease therapy. PMID:21113240

  13. Inter-annual snow accumulation and melt patterns in a sub-alpine mixed conifer forest: results from a distributed physically based snow model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musselman, K. N.; Molotch, N. P.; Margulis, S. A.; Kirchner, P. B.; Bales, R. C.

    2011-12-01

    Seasonally snow covered mid-latitude forests may be highly sensitive to climate change as they often overlap or reside near the present-day synoptic mean rain-snow transition zone. Limited capabilities of satellite remote sensing in forested, steep terrain combined with sparse in-situ observations emphasize the need for improved numerical simulations of the distribution of snow water equivalent in these regions. The land surface / snowmelt model Alpine3D was used to simulate snow accumulation and melt in the 7.22 km2 sub-alpine Wolverton basin in the southern Sierra Nevada, California. The basin is part of the Southern Sierra Nevada Critical Zone Observatory. Results from three snow seasons were evaluated against data from a distributed network of automated snow depth sensors, repeated catchment-wide snow survey measurements conducted in 2008 and 2009, and LiDAR data from 2010. Compared to the local 86-year historical record, the three years of observation accumulated average (2008), 48% below average (2009) and 43% above average (2010) maximum annual SWE. A mid-winter rain-on-snow event occurred in both 2008 and 2009. The inter-annual variability in maximum SWE combined with inter-annual differences in the timing and type of precipitation events, the timing of seasonal melt onset, and differences in the persistence of spring cloud cover caused significant inter-annual variability in areal snow cover depletion rates. In 2009, the year with the least precipitation, the most spring cloud cover, and a basin-wide late-January rain event, SWE patterns exhibited the least spatial variability and areal snow cover depletion was rapid. Conversely, the greatest spatial variability in SWE was simulated in 2010, the year with the most precipitation, no rain events, and a melt season that extended into early summer. The areal snow cover depletion curve for this year exhibited a rapid exponential phase as in 2009, but a distinctly different transitional phase as deep snow cover

  14. Metabolism of polybrominated diphenyl ethers and tetrabromobisphenol A by fish liver subcellular fractions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Shen, Mengnan; Cheng, Jie; Wu, Ruohan; Zhang, Shenghu; Mao, Liang; Gao, Shixiang

    2012-06-15

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) are two major flame retardants that accumulate in fish tissues and are potentially toxic. Their debrominated and oxidated derivatives were also reported in fish tissues although the sources of theses derivatives were unidentified. Our study was to determine whether PBDEs and TBBPA could be metabolized by fish liver subcellular fractions in vitro and to identify what types of metabolites were formed. Liver microsomes and S9 fractions of crucian carp (Carassius auratus) were exposed to 4,4'-dibromodiphenyl ether (BDE 15), 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE 47) or TBBPA solutions for 4h. Exposure of liver subcellular fractions to BDE 15 resulted in the formation of bromophenol and two monohydroxylated dibromodiphenyl ether metabolites. Neither in microsomes nor in S9 studies has revealed the presence of hydroxylated metabolites with BDE 47 exposure which indicated that the oxidation reactions in vitro were hindered by the increased number of bromine substituents on the PBDEs. TBBPA underwent an oxidative cleavage near the central carbon of the molecule, which led to the production of 2,6-dibromo-4-isopropyl-phenol and three unidentified metabolites. Another metabolite of TBBPA characterized as a hexa-brominated compound with three aromatic rings was also found in the liver subcellular fractions. These results suggest that the biotransformation of BDE 15 and TBBPA in fish liver is mediated by cytochrome P450 (CYP450) enzymes, as revealed by the formation of hydroxylated metabolites and oxidative bond cleavage products. Moreover, further studies on the identification of specific CYP450 isozymes involved in the biotransformation revealed that CYP1A was the major enzyme responsible for the biotransformation of BDE 15 and TBBPA in fish liver subcellular fractions and CYP3A4 also played a major role in metabolism of TBBPA. PMID:22417763

  15. Subcellular localization of calcium deposits during zebrafish (Danio rerio) oogenesis.

    PubMed

    Golpour, Amin; Pšenička, Martin; Niksirat, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Calcium plays prominent roles in regulating a broad range of physiological events in reproduction. The aim of this study was to describe the subcellular distribution of calcium deposits during stages of oogenesis in zebrafish using a combined oxalate-pyroantimonate technique. The oocyte development of zebrafish was categorized into four stages: primary growth, cortical-alveolus, vitellogenic, and maturation, based on morphological criteria. Calcium deposits in the primary growth stage were detected in the cytoplasm, mitochondria, nucleus, and follicular cells. At the cortical-alveolus stage, calcium particles were transported from follicular cells and deposited in the cortical alveoli. In the vitellogenic stage, some cortical alveoli were compacted and transformed from flocculent electron-lucent to electron-dense objects with the progression of the stage. Calcium deposits were transformed from larger to smaller particles, coinciding with compaction of cortical alveoli. In the maturation stage, calcium deposits in all oocyte compartments decreased, with the exception of those in mitochondria. The proportion of area covered by calcium deposits in the mitochondria and cortical alveoli of oocytes at different stages of development was significantly different (p<0.05). The extent of calcium deposits in the cortical alveoli of mature oocytes was substantially lower than in earlier stages. Basic information about calcium distribution during zebrafish oogenesis may contribute to better understanding of its role in oogenesis.

  16. Accumulation and spatial distribution of Cd, Cr, and Pb in mulberry from municipal solid waste compost following application of EDTA and (NH4)2SO4.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Shulan; Shang, Xiaojuan; Duo, Lian

    2013-02-01

    Municipal solid waste compost can be used to cropland as soil amendment to supply nutrients and improve soil physical properties. But long-term application of municipal solid waste (MSW) compost may result in accumulation of toxic metals in amended soil. Phytoremediation, especially phytoextraction, is a novel, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly approach that uses metal-accumulating plants to concentrate and remove metals from contaminated soils. Ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA) was applied to metal-contaminated soil to increase the mobility and phytoavailability of metals in soil, thereby increasing the amount of toxic metals accumulated in the upper parts of phytoextracting plants. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the accumulation and spatial distribution of toxic metals (Cd, Cr, and Pb) in mulberry from MSW compost with the application of EDTA and (NH(4))(2)SO(4), (2) to examine the effectiveness of EDTA and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) applied together on toxic metals (Cd, Cr, and Pb) removal by mulberry under field conditions, and (3) to evaluate the potential of mulberry for phytoextraction of toxic metals from MSW compost. The tested plant-mulberry had been grown in MSW compost field for 4 years. EDTA solution at five rates (0, 50, 100, 50 mmol L(-1) + 1 g L(-1) (NH(4))(2)SO(4), and 100 mmol L(-1) + 1 g L(-1) (NH(4))(2)SO(4)) was added into mulberry root medium in September 2009. Twenty days later, the plants were harvested and separated into six parts according to plant height. Cd, Cr, and Pb contents in plant samples and MSW compost were analyzed using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. In the same treatment, Cd, Cr, and Pb concentrations in mulberry shoot were all higher than those in root, and Cd and Pb concentrations in shoot increased from lower to upper parts, reaching the highest in leaves. Significant increases were found in toxic metal concentration in different parts of mulberry with increasing EDTA concentration

  17. InSAR time-series constraints on inter-seismic strain accumulation and creep distribution along North Anatolian and Chaman Faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havazli, E.; Fattahi, H.; Amelung, F.

    2013-12-01

    In many aspects, the San Andreas and the North Anatolian fault zones show many similarities. They are similarly right-lateral, strike-slip faults, at the same time, are transforms. However, they vary in the maximum amount of lateral displacement and show different topographic features. The maximum offset is nearly 300 km along the San Andreas Fault whereas it is approximately 85-90 km along the North Anatolian Fault. In recent years, interseismic crustal velocities and strains have been determined for North Anatolian Fault Zone through repeated measurements using the Global Positioning System and satellite radar interferometry. The Chaman Fault in Pakistan and Afghanistan is the only major fault along the western India-Eurasia plate boundary zone and probably accommodates the entire relative plate motion of 30-35 mm/yr. Recent GPS and InSAR studies on the Chaman fault yield slip rates of 18 × 1 mm/yr. The inconsistency in geologic, geodetic and seismic slip rates along the Chaman Fault need investigations to better understand the geodynamic responses of the Indo-Asia collision along its western boundary. We use InSAR time-series analysis using archived and new SAR imagery to constrain strain accumulation across the North Anatolian Fault and Chaman Faults. We expect a relative accuracy of InSAR measurements better than 1 mm/yr over 100 km, made possible by recent advances in flattening residual, orbital error and atmospheric correction strategies [Fattahi & Amelung, 2013]. After validation of the technique in Southern San Andreas Fault, using GPS observations, we apply the same InSAR time-series approach to constrain strain accumulation across the North Anatolian and Chaman Faults. We will use the InSAR data to establish the first-order fault properties of the Chaman and North Anatolian Faults (creep distribution, locking depth) using analytical two-dimensional elastic strain accumulation models along different transects across the faults. Our preliminary results

  18. Subcellular localization of the heparin-neutralizing factor in blood platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Da Prada, M; Jakábová, M; Lüscher, E F; Pletscher, A; Richards, J G

    1976-01-01

    1. The distribution of the heparin-neutralizing factor (platelet factor 4, PF4) in subcellular organelles of blood platelets of rabbits and man was investigated. 2. In both species the organelles storing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT storage organelles) contained only trivial amounts of PF4. 3. In contrast, the content of PF4 was highest in the subcellular fractions rich in alpha-granules. 4. In conclusion, PF4 is probably localized in the alpha-granules and therefore the platelets contain at least two types of organelles (5-HT organelles and alpha-granules) capable of releasing their contents in response to the same stimuli, such as exposure to collagen, thrombin, etc. Images Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:950602

  19. Spatial variation and subcellular binding of metals in oysters from a large estuary in China.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Juan; Pan, Ke; Liu, Fengjie; Yan, Yan; Wang, Wen-Xiong

    2013-05-15

    Pearl River Estuary (PRE) is the largest estuary in Southern China and there has been an increasing concern of metal pollution due to regional industrialization. In this study, we investigated the spatial variation of metal pollution (Ag, As, Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn) as well as their subcellular handling in the oyster Crassostrea hongkongensis. Hot spots of metal contamination in the oysters were found in different sites, suggesting that there were different sources of metals in the estuary associated with industrial activity. Metals differed in their subcellular bindings in the oysters from different locations. Metal distribution in the biologically detoxified fraction decreased for Cu but increased for Zn with increasing contamination in the oysters. For Zn, there was a significant difference in its two detoxification pools (metal-rich granules and metallothionein-like proteins) in response to Zn contamination. The high Cd concentrations in oysters may carry a high Cd hazard to the consumers.

  20. Subcellular Localization of Hexokinases I and II Directs the Metabolic Fate of Glucose

    PubMed Central

    John, Scott; Weiss, James N.; Ribalet, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Background The first step in glucose metabolism is conversion of glucose to glucose 6-phosphate (G-6-P) by hexokinases (HKs), a family with 4 isoforms. The two most common isoforms, HKI and HKII, have overlapping tissue expression, but different subcellular distributions, with HKI associated mainly with mitochondria and HKII associated with both mitochondrial and cytoplasmic compartments. Here we tested the hypothesis that these different subcellular distributions are associated with different metabolic roles, with mitochondrially-bound HK's channeling G-6-P towards glycolysis (catabolic use), and cytoplasmic HKII regulating glycogen formation (anabolic use). Methodology/Principal Findings To study subcellular translocation of HKs in living cells, we expressed HKI and HKII linked to YFP in CHO cells. We concomitantly recorded the effects on glucose handling using the FRET based intracellular glucose biosensor, FLIPglu-600 mM, and glycogen formation using a glycogen-associated protein, PTG, tagged with GFP. Our results demonstrate that HKI remains strongly bound to mitochondria, whereas HKII translocates between mitochondria and the cytosol in response to glucose, G-6-P and Akt, but not ATP. Metabolic measurements suggest that HKI exclusively promotes glycolysis, whereas HKII has a more complex role, promoting glycolysis when bound to mitochondria and glycogen synthesis when located in the cytosol. Glycogen breakdown upon glucose removal leads to HKII inhibition and dissociation from mitochondria, probably mediated by increases in glycogen-derived G-6-P. Conclusions/Significance These findings show that the catabolic versus anabolic fate of glucose is dynamically regulated by extracellular glucose via signaling molecules such as intracellular glucose, G-6-P and Akt through regulation and subcellular translocation of HKII. In contrast, HKI, which activity and regulation is much less sensitive to these factors, is mainly committed to glycolysis. This may be an

  1. Tau regulates the subcellular localization of calmodulin

    SciTech Connect

    Barreda, Elena Gomez de

    2011-05-13

    Highlights: {yields} In this work we have tried to explain how a cytoplasmic protein could regulate a cell nuclear function. We have tested the role of a cytoplasmic protein (tau) in regulating the expression of calbindin gene. We found that calmodulin, a tau-binding protein with nuclear and cytoplasmic localization, increases its nuclear localization in the absence of tau. Since nuclear calmodulin regulates calbindin expression, a decrease in nuclear calmodulin, due to the presence of tau that retains it at the cytoplasm, results in a change in calbindin expression. -- Abstract: Lack of tau expression in neuronal cells results in a change in the expression of few genes. However, little is known about how tau regulates gene expression. Here we show that the presence of tau could alter the subcellular localization of calmodulin, a protein that could be located at the cytoplasm or in the nucleus. Nuclear calmodulin binds to co-transcription factors, regulating the expression of genes like calbindin. In this work, we have found that in neurons containing tau, a higher proportion of calmodulin is present in the cytoplasm compared with neurons lacking tau and that an increase in cytoplasmic calmodulin correlates with a higher expression of calbindin.

  2. Subcellular storage compartments of bacteriopheophorbide sensitizers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moser, Joerg G.; Dembeck, U.; Hubert, M.; Spengler, Bernhard; Bayer, Rainer; Wagner, Birgit

    1994-03-01

    Fluorescence colocalization with the Golgi specific stain, NBD-ceramide, and the mitochondrial localizing stain, Rhodamine 123, confirmed the earlier assumption that the Golgi apparatus is one of the prominent storage compartments for bacteriopheophorbide esters in OAT 75 SCLC cells and several amelanotic melanoma cell lines (A375, Melur SP18, SkAMel 25). Furthermore, a diffuse staining of mitochondria, of non-structured cytoplasm, and an additional storage in melanine vesicles of the amelanotic melanoma cells suggests further storage compartments with quantitatively different contributions to the phototoxicity of bacteriochlorophyll-derived photosensitizers. Independent observations of early phototoxic effects on microfilamentous networks, enzymatic activities (succinate dehydrogenase, lactate dehydrogenase), and redistribution phenomena following primary uptake of the sensitizers let us assume that only a part of the 108 molecules taken up by a cell contribute directly to phototoxicity. Thus it may be asked if a proper subcellular positioning of only a few sensitizer molecules may have similar phototoxic effects as the huge amounts stored at apparently ineffective sites.

  3. Subcellular proteomics of Trypanosoma cruzi reservosomes

    PubMed Central

    Sant’Anna, Celso; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Pereira, Miria G.; Lourenço, Daniela; de Souza, Wanderley; Almeida, Igor C.; Cunha-e-Silva, Narcisa L.

    2009-01-01

    Reservosomes are the endpoint of the endocytic pathway in Trypanosoma cruzi epimastigotes. These organelles have the particular ability to concentrate proteins and lipids obtained from medium together with the main proteolytic enzymes originated from the secretory pathway, being at the same time a storage organelle and the main site of protein degradation. Subcellular proteomics have been extensively used for profiling organelles in different cell types. Here, we combine cell fractionation and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis to identify reservosome-resident proteins. Starting from a purified reservosome fraction, we established a protocol to isolate reservosome membranes. Transmission electron microscopy was applied to confirm the purity of the fractions. To achieve a better coverage of identified proteins we analyzed the fractions separately and combined the results. LC-MS/MS analysis identified in total 709 T. cruzi-specific proteins; of these, 456 had predicted function and 253 were classified as hypothetical proteins. We could confirm the presence of most of the proteins validated by previous work and identify new proteins from different classes such as enzymes, proton pumps, transport proteins and others. The definition of the reservosome protein profile is a good tool to assess their molecular signature, identify molecular markers, and understand their relationship with different organelles. PMID:19288526

  4. Stargazing: Monitoring subcellular dynamics of brain astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Benjamin Kacerovsky, J; Murai, K K

    2016-05-26

    Astrocytes are major non-neuronal cell types in the central nervous system that regulate a variety of processes in the brain including synaptic transmission, neurometabolism, and cerebrovasculature tone. Recent discoveries have revealed that astrocytes perform very specialized and heterogeneous roles in brain homeostasis and function. Exactly how astrocytes fulfill such diverse roles in the brain remains to be fully understood and is an active area of research. In this review, we focus on the complex subcellular anatomical features of protoplasmic gray matter astrocytes in the mature, healthy brain that likely empower these cells with the ability to detect and respond to changes in neuronal and synaptic activity. In particular, we discuss how intricate processes on astrocytes allow these cells to communicate with neurons and their synapses and strategically deliver specific cellular organelles such as mitochondria and ribosomes to active compartments within the neuropil. Understanding the properties of these structural elements will lead to a better understanding of how astrocytes function in the healthy and diseased brain. PMID:26162237

  5. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes. PMID:27106876

  6. Mono- and Dinuclear Phosphorescent Rhenium(I) Complexes: Impact of Subcellular Localization on Anticancer Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Ye, Rui-Rong; Tan, Cai-Ping; Chen, Mu-He; Hao, Liang; Ji, Liang-Nian; Mao, Zong-Wan

    2016-06-01

    Elucidation of relationship among chemical structure, cellular uptake, localization, and biological activity of anticancer metal complexes is important for the understanding of their mechanisms of action. Organometallic rhenium(I) tricarbonyl compounds have emerged as potential multifunctional anticancer drug candidates that can integrate therapeutic and imaging capabilities in a single molecule. Herein, two mononuclear phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes (Re1 and Re2), along with their corresponding dinuclear complexes (Re3 and Re4), were designed and synthesized as potent anticancer agents. The subcellular accumulation of Re1-Re4 was conveniently analyzed by confocal microscopy in situ in live cells by utilizing their intrinsic phosphorescence. We found that increased lipophilicity of the bidentate ligands could enhance their cellular uptake, leading to improved anticancer efficacy. The dinuclear complexes were more potent than the mononuclear counterparts. The molecular anticancer mechanisms of action evoked by Re3 and Re4 were explored in detail. Re3 with a lower lipophilicity localizes to lysosomes and induces caspase-independent apoptosis, whereas Re4 with higher lipophilicity specially accumulates in mitochondria and induces caspase-independent paraptosis in cancer cells. Our study demonstrates that subcellular localization is crucial for the anticancer mechanisms of these phosphorescent rhenium(I) complexes.

  7. Aberrant subcellular neuronal calcium regulation in aging and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Camandola, Simonetta; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-05-01

    In this mini-review/opinion article we describe evidence that multiple cellular and molecular alterations in Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathogenesis involve perturbed cellular calcium regulation, and that alterations in synaptic calcium handling may be early and pivotal events in the disease process. With advancing age neurons encounter increased oxidative stress and impaired energy metabolism, which compromise the function of proteins that control membrane excitability and subcellular calcium dynamics. Altered proteolytic cleavage of the β-amyloid precursor protein (APP) in response to the aging process in combination with genetic and environmental factors results in the production and accumulation of neurotoxic forms of amyloid β-peptide (Aβ). Aβ undergoes a self-aggregation process and concomitantly generates reactive oxygen species that can trigger membrane-associated oxidative stress which, in turn, impairs the functions of ion-motive ATPases and glutamate and glucose transporters thereby rendering neurons vulnerable to excitotoxicity and apoptosis. Mutations in presenilin-1 that cause early-onset AD increase Aβ production, but also result in an abnormal increase in the size of endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores. Some of the events in the neurodegenerative cascade can be counteracted in animal models by manipulations that stabilize neuronal calcium homeostasis including dietary energy restriction, agonists of glucagon-like peptide 1 receptors and drugs that activate mitochondrial potassium channels. Emerging knowledge of the actions of calcium upstream and downstream of Aβ provides opportunities to develop novel preventative and therapeutic interventions for AD. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: 11th European Symposium on Calcium. PMID:20950656

  8. Myeloperoxidase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Production and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sabrina Sayori; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; de Araújo, Tomaz Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Campa, Ana; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important enzyme in the front-line protection against microorganisms. In peripheral blood, it is accepted that MPO is only produced by myeloid-lineage cells. Thus, MPO presence is unexpected in lymphocytes. We showed recently that B1-lymphocytes from mice have MPO. Here, we showed that subsets of human peripheral B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes express MPO. The content of MPO in lymphocytes was very low compared to neutrophils/monocytes with a preferential distribution in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Also, we performed a MPO mRNA expression analysis from human blood cells derived from microarray raw data publicly available, showing that MPO is modulated in infectious disease. MPO was increased in CD4(+) T lymphocytes from HIV chronic infection and in CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HCV-positive patients. Our study points out MPO as a multifunctional protein due to its subcellular localization and expression modulation in lymphocytes indicating alternative unknown functions for MPO in lymphocytes. PMID:26632272

  9. Subcellular analysis by laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Vertes, Akos; Stolee, Jessica A; Shrestha, Bindesh

    2014-12-02

    In various embodiments, a method of laser ablation electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (LAESI-MS) may generally comprise micro-dissecting a cell comprising at least one of a cell wall and a cell membrane to expose at least one subcellular component therein, ablating the at least one subcellular component by an infrared laser pulse to form an ablation plume, intercepting the ablation plume by an electrospray plume to form ions, and detecting the ions by mass spectrometry.

  10. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Yeong; Chung, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungkyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Kilcrease, James P; Bauchan, Gary R; Lim, Seungmo; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2016-08-01

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution and variability of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis sap-inoculated with three isolates of TuMV from infected radish tissue showed different symptom severities, whereas symptoms in Raphanus sativus were similar for each isolate. The helper component-protease (HC-Pro) genes of each isolate were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the three Korean isolates were clustered into the basal-BR group. The HC-Pro proteins of these isolates were tested for their RNA silencing suppressor (VSR) activity and subcellular localization in Nicotiana benthamiana. A VSR assay by co-agroinfiltration of HC-Pro with soluble-modified GFP (smGFP) showed that HC-Pro of isolate R007 and R041 showed stronger VSR activity than R065. The HC-Pros showed 98.25 % amino acid identity, and weak VSR isolate (R065) has a single variant residue in the C-terminal domain associated with protease activity and self-interaction compared to isolates with strong VSR activity. Formation of large subcellular aggregates of GFP:HC-Pro fusion proteins in N. benthamiana was only observed for HC-Pro from isolates with strong VSR activity, suggesting that R065 'weak' HC-Pro may have diminished self-association; substitution of the variant C-terminal residue largely reversed the HC-Pro aggregation and silencing suppressor characteristics. The lack of correlation between VSR efficiency and induction of systemic necrosis (SN) suggests that differences in viral accumulation due to HC-Pro are not responsible for SN.

  11. Mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous, gene-edited Tau differs from that of over-expressed human wild-type and P301L mutant Tau

    PubMed Central

    Di Xia; Gutmann, Julia M.; Götz, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and a subset of frontotemporal dementia termed FTLD-Tau are characterized by a massive, yet incompletely characterized and understood redistribution of Tau. To establish a framework for understanding this pathology, we used the genome-editing tool TALEN and generated Tau-mEOS2 knock-in mice to determine the mobility and subcellular localization of endogenous Tau in hippocampal cultures. We analysed Tau in axons, dendrites and spines at three stages of maturation using live-cell imaging, photo-conversion and FRAP assays. Tau-mEOS2 cultures were compared with those over-expressing EGFP-tagged forms of human wild-type (hWT-Tau) and P301L mutant Tau (hP301L-Tau), modelling Tau accumulation in AD and FTLD-Tau, respectively. In developing neurons, Tau-mEOS2 followed a proximo-distal gradient in axons and a subcellular distribution similar to that of endogenous Tau in neurons obtained from wild-type mice, which were abolished, when either hWT-Tau or hP301L-Tau was over-expressed. For the three conditions, FRAP analysis revealed a similar mobility in dendrites compared with axons; however, Tau-mEOS2 was less mobile than hWT-Tau and hP301L-Tau and the mobile fraction was smaller, possibly reflecting less efficient microtubule binding of Tau when over-expressed. Together, our study presents Tau-mEOS2 mice as a novel tool for the study of Tau in a physiological and a pathological context. PMID:27378256

  12. Comparison of helper component-protease RNA silencing suppression activity, subcellular localization, and aggregation of three Korean isolates of Turnip mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Han, Jae-Yeong; Chung, Jinsoo; Kim, Jungkyu; Seo, Eun-Young; Kilcrease, James P; Bauchan, Gary R; Lim, Seungmo; Hammond, John; Lim, Hyoun-Sub

    2016-08-01

    In 2014, we performed a nationwide survey in Korean radish fields to investigate the distribution and variability of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis sap-inoculated with three isolates of TuMV from infected radish tissue showed different symptom severities, whereas symptoms in Raphanus sativus were similar for each isolate. The helper component-protease (HC-Pro) genes of each isolate were sequenced, and phylogenetic analysis showed that the three Korean isolates were clustered into the basal-BR group. The HC-Pro proteins of these isolates were tested for their RNA silencing suppressor (VSR) activity and subcellular localization in Nicotiana benthamiana. A VSR assay by co-agroinfiltration of HC-Pro with soluble-modified GFP (smGFP) showed that HC-Pro of isolate R007 and R041 showed stronger VSR activity than R065. The HC-Pros showed 98.25 % amino acid identity, and weak VSR isolate (R065) has a single variant residue in the C-terminal domain associated with protease activity and self-interaction compared to isolates with strong VSR activity. Formation of large subcellular aggregates of GFP:HC-Pro fusion proteins in N. benthamiana was only observed for HC-Pro from isolates with strong VSR activity, suggesting that R065 'weak' HC-Pro may have diminished self-association; substitution of the variant C-terminal residue largely reversed the HC-Pro aggregation and silencing suppressor characteristics. The lack of correlation between VSR efficiency and induction of systemic necrosis (SN) suggests that differences in viral accumulation due to HC-Pro are not responsible for SN. PMID:27059238

  13. Proteome-wide Subcellular Topologies of E. coli Polypeptides Database (STEPdb)*

    PubMed Central

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Economou, Anastassios

    2014-01-01

    Cell compartmentalization serves both the isolation and the specialization of cell functions. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, over a third of all proteins are targeted to other subcellular compartments. Knowing how proteins are distributed within the cell and how they interact is a prerequisite for understanding it as a whole. Surface and secreted proteins are important pathogenicity determinants. Here we present the STEP database (STEPdb) that contains a comprehensive characterization of subcellular localization and topology of the complete proteome of Escherichia coli. Two widely used E. coli proteomes (K-12 and BL21) are presented organized into thirteen subcellular classes. STEPdb exploits the wealth of genetic, proteomic, biochemical, and functional information on protein localization, secretion, and targeting in E. coli, one of the best understood model organisms. Subcellular annotations were derived from a combination of bioinformatics prediction, proteomic, biochemical, functional, topological data and extensive literature re-examination that were refined through manual curation. Strong experimental support for the location of 1553 out of 4303 proteins was based on 426 articles and some experimental indications for another 526. Annotations were provided for another 320 proteins based on firm bioinformatic predictions. STEPdb is the first database that contains an extensive set of peripheral IM proteins (PIM proteins) and includes their graphical visualization into complexes, cellular functions, and interactions. It also summarizes all currently known protein export machineries of E. coli K-12 and pairs them, where available, with the secretory proteins that use them. It catalogs the Sec- and TAT-utilizing secretomes and summarizes their topological features such as signal peptides and transmembrane regions, transmembrane topologies and orientations. It also catalogs physicochemical and structural features that influence topology such as abundance

  14. Subcellular Partitioning and Analysis of Gd3+-Loaded Ultrashort Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Holt, Brian D; Law, Justin J; Boyer, Patrick D; Wilson, Lon J; Dahl, Kris Noel; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-07-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is of vast clinical utility, with tens of millions of scans performed annually. Chemical contrast agents (CAs) can greatly enhance the diagnostic potential of MRI, and ∼50% of MRI scans use CAs. However, CAs have significant limitations such as low contrast enhancement, lack of specificity, and potential toxicity. Recently developed, Gd3+-loaded ultrashort single-walled carbon nanotubes, also referred to as gadonanotubes or GNTs, exhibit ∼40 times the relaxivities of clinical CAs, representing a potential major advance in clinically relevant MRI CA materials. Although initial cytotoxicity and MRI studies have suggested great promise for GNTs, relatively little is known regarding their subcellular interactions, which are crucial for further, safe development of GNTs as CAs. In this work, we administered GNTs to a well-established human cell line (HeLa) and to murine macrophage-like cells (J774A.1). GNTs were not acutely cytotoxic and did not reduce proliferation, except for the highest exposure concentration of 27 μg/mL for J774A.1 macrophages, yet bulk uptake of GNTs occurred in minutes at picogram quantities, or millions of GNTs per cell. J774A.1 macrophages internalized substantially more GNTs than HeLa cells in a dose-dependent manner, and Raman imaging of the subcellular distribution of GNTs revealed perinuclear localization. Fluorescence intensity and lifetime imaging demonstrated that GNTs did not grossly alter subcellular compartments, including filamentous-actin structures. Together, these results provide subcellular evidence necessary to establish GNTs as a new MRI CA material.

  15. Proteome-wide subcellular topologies of E. coli polypeptides database (STEPdb).

    PubMed

    Orfanoudaki, Georgia; Economou, Anastassios

    2014-12-01

    Cell compartmentalization serves both the isolation and the specialization of cell functions. After synthesis in the cytoplasm, over a third of all proteins are targeted to other subcellular compartments. Knowing how proteins are distributed within the cell and how they interact is a prerequisite for understanding it as a whole. Surface and secreted proteins are important pathogenicity determinants. Here we present the STEP database (STEPdb) that contains a comprehensive characterization of subcellular localization and topology of the complete proteome of Escherichia coli. Two widely used E. coli proteomes (K-12 and BL21) are presented organized into thirteen subcellular classes. STEPdb exploits the wealth of genetic, proteomic, biochemical, and functional information on protein localization, secretion, and targeting in E. coli, one of the best understood model organisms. Subcellular annotations were derived from a combination of bioinformatics prediction, proteomic, biochemical, functional, topological data and extensive literature re-examination that were refined through manual curation. Strong experimental support for the location of 1553 out of 4303 proteins was based on 426 articles and some experimental indications for another 526. Annotations were provided for another 320 proteins based on firm bioinformatic predictions. STEPdb is the first database that contains an extensive set of peripheral IM proteins (PIM proteins) and includes their graphical visualization into complexes, cellular functions, and interactions. It also summarizes all currently known protein export machineries of E. coli K-12 and pairs them, where available, with the secretory proteins that use them. It catalogs the Sec- and TAT-utilizing secretomes and summarizes their topological features such as signal peptides and transmembrane regions, transmembrane topologies and orientations. It also catalogs physicochemical and structural features that influence topology such as abundance

  16. Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abbasfar, Aliazam; Divsalar, Dariush; Yao, Kung

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we propose an innovative coded modulation scheme called 'Accumulate Repeat Accumulate Coded Modulation' (ARA coded modulation). This class of codes can be viewed as serial turbo-like codes, or as a subclass of Low Density Parity Check (LDPC) codes that are combined with high level modulation. Thus at the decoder belief propagation can be used for iterative decoding of ARA coded modulation on a graph, provided a demapper transforms the received in-phase and quadrature samples to reliability of the bits.

  17. Vertical distribution of trace-element concentrations and occurrence of metallurgical slag particles in accumulated bed sediments of Lake Roosevelt, Washington, September 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, S.E.; Bell, P.R.; Lowther, J.S.; Van Metre, P.C.

    2005-01-01

    Sediment cores were collected from six locations in Lake Roosevelt to determine the vertical distributions of trace-element concentrations in the accumulated sediments of Lake Roosevelt. Elevated concentrations of arsenic, cadmium, copper, lead, mercury, and zinc occurred throughout much of the accumulated sediments. Concentrations varied greatly within the sediment core profiles, often covering a range of 5 to 10 fold. Trace-element concentrations typically were largest below the surficial sediments in the lower one-half of each profile, with generally decreasing concentrations from the 1964 horizon to the surface of the core. The trace-element profiles reflect changes in historical discharges of trace elements to the Columbia River by an upstream smelter. All samples analyzed exceeded clean-up guidelines adopted by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation for cadmium, lead, and zinc and more than 70 percent of the samples exceeded cleanup guidelines for mercury, arsenic, and copper. Although 100 percent of the samples exceeded sediment guidelines for cadmium, lead, and zinc, surficial concentrations of arsenic, copper, and mercury in some cores were less than the sediment-quality guidelines. With the exception of copper, the trace-element profiles of the five cores collected along the pre-reservoir Columbia River channel typically showed trends of decreasing concentrations in sediments deposited after the 1964 time horizon. The decreasing concentrations of trace elements in the upper half of cores from along the pre-reservoir Columbia River showed a pattern of decreasing concentrations similar to reductions in trace-element loading in liquid effluent from an upstream smelter. Except for arsenic, trace-element concentrations typically were smaller at downstream reservoir locations along the pre-reservoir Columbia River. Trace-element concentration in sediments from the Spokane Arm of the reservoir showed distinct differences compared to the similarities

  18. Phosphorylation modulates rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and cytoplasmic accumulation of Neurospora clock protein FRQ on a circadian time scale

    PubMed Central

    Diernfellner, Axel C.R.; Querfurth, Christina; Salazar, Carlos; Höfer, Thomas; Brunner, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The Neurospora clock protein FREQUENCY (FRQ) is an essential regulator of the circadian transcription factor WHITE COLLAR COMPLEX (WCC). In the course of a circadian period, the subcellular distribution of FRQ shifts from mainly nuclear to mainly cytosolic. This shift is crucial for coordinating the negative and positive limbs of the clock. We show that the subcellular redistribution of FRQ on a circadian time scale is governed by rapid, noncircadian cycles of nuclear import and export. The rate of nuclear import of newly synthesized FRQ is progressively reduced in a phosphorylation-dependent manner, leading to an increase in the steady-state level of cytoplasmic FRQ. The long-period frq7 mutant displays reduced kinetics of FRQ7 protein phosphorylation and a prolonged accumulation in the nucleus. We present a mathematical model that describes the cytoplasmic accumulation of wild-type and mutant FRQ on a circadian time scale on the basis of frequency-modulated rapid nucleocytoplasmic shuttling cycles. PMID:19759264

  19. Subcellular Characterization of Porcine Oocytes with Different Glucose-6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Bo; Ren, Liang; Liu, Di; Ma, Jian-Zhang; An, Tie-Zhu; Yang, Xiu-Qin; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Guo, Zhen-Hua; Guo, Yun-Yun; Zhu, Meng; Bai, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro maturation (IVM) efficiency of porcine embryos is still low because of poor oocyte quality. Although brilliant cresyl blue positive (BCB+) oocytes with low glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) activity have shown superior quality than BCB negative (−) oocytes with high G6PDH activity, the use of a BCB staining test before IVM is still controversial. This study aimed to shed more light on the subcellular characteristics of porcine oocytes after selection using BCB staining. We assessed germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, cortical granule (CG) migration, mitochondrial distribution, the levels of acetylated lysine 9 of histone H3 (AcH3K9) and nuclear apoptosis features to investigate the correlation between G6PDH activity and these developmentally related features. A pattern of chromatin surrounding the nucleoli was seen in 53.0% of BCB+ oocytes and 77.6% of BCB+ oocytes showed peripherally distributed CGs. After IVM, 48.7% of BCB+ oocytes had a diffused mitochondrial distribution pattern. However, there were no significant differences in the levels of AcH3K9 in the nuclei of blastocysts derived from BCB+ and BCB− oocytes; at the same time, we observed a similar incidence of apoptosis in the BCB+ and control groups. Although this study indicated that G6PDH activity in porcine oocytes was correlated with several subcellular characteristics such as germinal vesicle chromatin configuration, CG migration and mitochondrial distribution, other features such as AcH3K9 level and nuclear apoptotic features were not associated with G6PDH activity and did not validate the BCB staining test. In using this test for selecting porcine oocytes, subcellular characteristics such as the AcH3K9 level and apoptotic nuclear features should also be considered. Adding histone deacetylase inhibitors or apoptosis inhibitors into the culture medium used might improve the efficiency of IVM of BCB+ oocytes. PMID:26580437

  20. Investigation of the functional properties and subcellular localization of alpha human and rainbow trout estrogen receptors within a unique yeast cellular context.

    PubMed

    Le Grand, Adélaïde; Bouter, Anthony; Couturier, Anne; Mulner-Lorillon, Odile; Le Goff, Xavier; Chesnel, Franck; Sire, Olivier; Le Tilly, Véronique

    2015-05-01

    Estrogens are steroid hormones that play a pivotal role in growth, differentiation and function of reproductive and non-reproductive tissues, mediated through estrogen receptors (ERs). Estrogens are involved in different genomic and non-genomic cell signaling pathways which involve well-defined subcellular ER localizations. Thus, ER activity results from complex interplays between intrinsic binding properties and specific subcellular localization. Since these two factors are deeply intricate, we carried out, in a unique yeast cell context, a comparative study to better understand structure/function/subcellular distribution relationships. This was carried out by comparing two ERs: the human ER α subtype (hERα) and the short form of the α isoform of the rainbow trout ER (rtERαS). Their distinct binding properties to agonist and antagonist ligands and subcellular localizations were characterized in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells. An unexpected partial agonistic effect of ICI 182-780 was observed for rtERαS. Concomitant to distinct binding properties, distinct subcellular localizations were observed before and after ligand stimulation. Due to the unique cell context, the link between ERs intrinsic binding properties and subcellular localizations is partly unveiled and issues are hypothesized based on the role of cytoplasmic transient complexes which play a role in the ER cytoplasmic/nuclear partition, which in turn is critical for the recruitment of co-regulators in the nucleus.

  1. Evaluation of spatial distribution and accumulation of novel brominated flame retardants, HBCD and PBDEs in an Italian subalpine lake using zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha).

    PubMed

    Poma, Giulia; Binelli, Andrea; Volta, Pietro; Roscioli, Claudio; Guzzella, Licia

    2014-01-01

    Because of the reduction in the use of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy) ethane (BTBPE), decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), hexabromobenzene (HBB), and pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), started to be marketed as alternatives to the banned formulations. In this study, the spatial distribution and accumulation of NBFRs, PBDEs, and HBCD in the biota have been investigated in the littoral compartment of a large and deep subalpine lake (Lake Maggiore, Northern Italy), using zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha and roach (Rutilus rutilus) as bioindicators. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the contamination of NBFRs in the freshwater invertebrate D. polymorpha. Contamination of zebra mussel due to PBEB, HBB, and BTBPE was low, ranging from 0.9 to 2.9 ng/g lipid weight, from 1.1 to 2.9 ng/g l.w., and from 3.5 to 9.5 ng/g l.w., respectively. PBEB and BTBPE in roach were always below the detection limit, while the contamination of HBB ranged from < limits of detection (LOD) to 1.74 ng/g l.w., indicating a weak contamination. DBDPE was < LOD in all the considered biological samples. Finally, HBCD was detected in all organic tissues with mean concentrations up to 74.4 ng/g l.w. PBDE results, supported by principal component analysis elaboration, suggested a possible contamination due to the congeners composing the penta- and deca-BDE technical formulations, which are present in the Lake Maggiore basin. The biomagnification factor values showed that tetra- and penta-BDE biomagnified, while octa-, nona-, and deca-BDE were still bioavailable and detectable in the fish muscles, but they do not biomagnified. Considering the other BFRs, only HBCD showed a moderate biomagnification potential. PMID:24756669

  2. Trends during a half century in relative squamous cell carcinoma distribution by body site in the Swedish population: support for accumulated sun exposure as the main risk factor.

    PubMed

    Dal, Henrik; Boldemann, Cecilia; Lindelöf, Bernt

    2008-02-01

    There is a strong relationship between squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and exposure to ultraviolet radiation in terms of accumulated exposure. In this study, data from the Swedish Cancer Registry are surveyed to discern a reflection of behavioral and societal changes in relative distribution of SCC by body site. Data for the time period 1960-2004, including a total of 66 221 cases (56 669 people) were analyzed by body site for age and gender cohorts. The age-standardized (European population) incidence per 100 000 of SCC in the year 2004 was 30.4 in males and 15.4 in females. In the year 1960, the corresponding incidences were 7.7 and 3.8; that is, SCC has become four times more frequent in Sweden for both sexes during this period. The standardized incidence of SCC increased on all body sites except eyelids (men and women) and ears (women). Head tumors dominated among patients aged 70 years or more and diagnosed 1960-1964. Among patients less than 70 years old at diagnosis in 2000-2004, tumors of the trunk and limbs dominated. A relative increase of tumors of the scalp and neck was observed in all age groups (men), and of tumors of the trunk and upper limbs in all age groups and both sexes except among patients aged more than 90 years of age. In contrast, a relative decrease of tumors on the face (including the ears) was seen in all age groups. The relative increase of SCC of the trunk and upper limbs is a plausible reflection of intentional tanning.

  3. Developmental and Subcellular Organization of Single-Cell C₄ Photosynthesis in Bienertia sinuspersici Determined by Large-Scale Proteomics and cDNA Assembly from 454 DNA Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Offermann, Sascha; Friso, Giulia; Doroshenk, Kelly A; Sun, Qi; Sharpe, Richard M; Okita, Thomas W; Wimmer, Diana; Edwards, Gerald E; van Wijk, Klaas J

    2015-05-01

    Kranz C4 species strictly depend on separation of primary and secondary carbon fixation reactions in different cell types. In contrast, the single-cell C4 (SCC4) species Bienertia sinuspersici utilizes intracellular compartmentation including two physiologically and biochemically different chloroplast types; however, information on identity, localization, and induction of proteins required for this SCC4 system is currently very limited. In this study, we determined the distribution of photosynthesis-related proteins and the induction of the C4 system during development by label-free proteomics of subcellular fractions and leaves of different developmental stages. This was enabled by inferring a protein sequence database from 454 sequencing of Bienertia cDNAs. Large-scale proteome rearrangements were observed as C4 photosynthesis developed during leaf maturation. The proteomes of the two chloroplasts are different with differential accumulation of linear and cyclic electron transport components, primary and secondary carbon fixation reactions, and a triose-phosphate shuttle that is shared between the two chloroplast types. This differential protein distribution pattern suggests the presence of a mRNA or protein-sorting mechanism for nuclear-encoded, chloroplast-targeted proteins in SCC4 species. The combined information was used to provide a comprehensive model for NAD-ME type carbon fixation in SCC4 species.

  4. 26 CFR 1.665(b)-2A - Special rules for accumulation distributions made in taxable years beginning before January 1, 1974.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... accumulated before the beneficiary's birth or before his 21st birthday. The provisions of this subparagraph... income over to B upon his attaining the age of 21. B's 21st birthday is January 1, 1973. On January...

  5. Correlation of N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 subcellular localization and lymph node metastases of colorectal neoplasms

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yan; Lv, Liyang; Du, Juan; Yue, Longtao; Cao, Lili

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •We clarified NDRG1 subcellular location in colorectal cancer. •We found the changes of NDRG1 distribution during colorectal cancer progression. •We clarified the correlation between NDRG1 distribution and lymph node metastasis. •It is possible that NDRG1 subcellular localization may determine its function. •Maybe NDRG1 is valuable early diagnostic markers for metastasis. -- Abstract: In colorectal neoplasms, N-myc downstream-regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a primarily cytoplasmic protein, but it is also expressed on the cell membrane and in the nucleus. NDRG1 is involved in various stages of tumor development in colorectal cancer, and it is possible that the different subcellular localizations may determine the function of NDRG1 protein. Here, we attempt to clarify the characteristics of NDRG1 protein subcellular localization during the progression of colorectal cancer. We examined NDRG1 expression in 49 colorectal cancer patients in cancerous, non-cancerous, and corresponding lymph node tissues. Cytoplasmic and membrane NDRG1 expression was higher in the lymph nodes with metastases than in those without metastases (P < 0.01). Nuclear NDRG1 expression in colorectal neoplasms was significantly higher than in the normal colorectal mucosa, and yet the normal colorectal mucosa showed no nuclear expression. Furthermore, our results showed higher cytoplasmic NDRG1 expression was better for differentiation, and higher membrane NDRG1 expression resulted in a greater possibility of lymph node metastasis. These data indicate that a certain relationship between the cytoplasmic and membrane expression of NDRG1 in lymph nodes exists with lymph node metastasis. NDRG1 expression may translocate from the membrane of the colorectal cancer cells to the nucleus, where it is involved in lymph node metastasis. Combination analysis of NDRG1 subcellular expression and clinical variables will help predict the incidence of lymph node metastasis.

  6. Variations in phthalate ester (PAE) accumulation and their formation mechanism in Chinese flowering cabbage (Brassica parachinensis L.) cultivars grown on PAE-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hai-Ming; Du, Huan; Xiang, Lei; Chen, Yi-Liang; Lu, Lei-An; Li, Yan-Wen; Li, Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Mo, Ce-Hui

    2015-11-01

    Phthalate ester (PAE) accumulation in crops poses great risks to human health and has aroused great concern. Here, we investigated variations in di-n-butylphthalate (DBP) and di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) accumulation by various Chinese flowering cabbage cultivars and revealed their variation mechanism. There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in shoot PAE concentrations of 28 cultivars. Moreover, significant positive correlations between DBP and DEHP concentrations in shoots of all cultivars indicated that they could be taken up simultaneously by various cultivars. Due to the lower translocation factor of low-PAE accumulator, its shoot PAEs concentrations were much lower than root compared to high-PAE accumulator. Further, subcellular distribution showed that PAE concentrations of root cell walls and organelles were much higher than those of shoots in low-PAE accumulator. Therefore, lower translocation from root to shoot and more PAEs accumulating in cell walls and organelles of root might act as main formation mechanism of low-PAE accumulator.

  7. Heat accumulator

    SciTech Connect

    Bracht, A.

    1981-09-29

    A heat accumulator comprises a thermally-insulated reservoir full of paraffin wax mixture or other flowable or meltable heat storage mass, heat-exchangers immersed in the mass, a heat-trap connected to one of the heat-exchangers, and a heat user connected to the other heat-exchanger. Pumps circulate fluids through the heat-trap and the heat-using means and the respective heat-exchangers, and a stirrer agitates and circulates the mass, and the pumps and the stirrer and electric motors driving these devices are all immersed in the mass.

  8. Subcellular and intranuclear localization of neptunium-237 (V) in rat liver.

    PubMed

    Paquet, F; Verry, M; Grillon, G; Landesman, C; Masse, R; Taylor, D M

    1995-08-01

    The present investigation was aimed at establishing the distribution of 237Np within the different structures of hepatocytes. Rats were contaminated experimentally by intravenous injection of 237Np (V) and the subcellular structures of the liver were separated by ultracentrifugation. Twenty-four hours after contamination, the nuclear and cytosolic fractions bound 54 and 32%, respectively, of the total radionuclide. Purification of the nuclei followed by dissociation of the protein components in medium of increasing ionic strength showed a specific binding of neptunium to the structural proteins of the nuclear matrix.

  9. Subcellular Localized Chemical Imaging of Benthic Algal Nutritional Content via HgCdTe Array FT-IR

    SciTech Connect

    Wetzel, D.; Murdock, J; Dodds, W

    2008-01-01

    Algae respond rapidly and uniquely to changes in nutrient availability by adjusting pigment, storage product, and organelle content and quality. Cellular and subcellular variability of the relative abundance of macromolecular pools (e.g. protein, lipid, carbohydrate, and phosphodiesters) within the benthic (bottom dwelling) alga Cladophora glomerata (a common nuisance species in fresh and saline waters) was revealed by FT-IR microspectroscopic imaging. Nutrient heterogeneity was compared at the filament, cellular, and subcellular level, and localized nutrient uptake kinetics were studied by detecting the gradual incorporation of isotopically labeled nitrogen (N) (as K15NO3) from surrounding water into cellular proteins. Nutritional content differed substantially among filament cells, with differences driven by protein and lipid abundance. Whole cell imaging showed high subcellular macromolecular variability in all cells, including adjacent cells on a filament that developed clonally. N uptake was also very heterogeneous, both within and among cells, and did not appear to coincide with subcellular protein distribution. Despite high intercellular variability, some patterns emerged. Cells acquired more 15N the further they were away from the filament attachment point, and 15N incorporation was more closely correlated with phosphodiester content than protein, lipid, or carbohydrate content. Benthic algae are subject to substantial environmental heterogeneity induced by microscale hydrodynamic factors and spatial variability in nutrient availability. Species specific responses to nutrient heterogeneity are central to understanding this key component of aquatic ecosystems. FT-IR microspectroscopy, modified for benthic algae, allows determination of algal physiological responses at scales not available using current techniques.

  10. Classification of protein motifs based on subcellular localization uncovers evolutionary relationships at both sequence and functional levels

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most proteins have evolved in specific cellular compartments that limit their functions and potential interactions. On the other hand, motifs define amino acid arrangements conserved between protein family members and represent powerful tools for assigning function to protein sequences. The ideal motif would identify all members of a protein family but in practice many motifs identify both family members and unrelated proteins, referred to as True Positive (TP) and False Positive (FP) sequences, respectively. Results To address the relationship between protein motifs, protein function and cellular localization, we systematically assigned subcellular localization data to motif sequences from the comprehensive PROSITE sequence motif database. Using this data we analyzed relationships between localization and function. We find that TPs and FPs have a strong tendency to localize in different compartments. When multiple localizations are considered, TPs are usually distributed between related cellular compartments. We also identified cases where FPs are concentrated in particular subcellular regions, indicating possible functional or evolutionary relationships with TP sequences of the same motif. Conclusions Our findings suggest that the systematic examination of subcellular localization has the potential to uncover evolutionary and functional relationships between motif-containing sequences. We believe that this type of analysis complements existing motif annotations and could aid in their interpretation. Our results shed light on the evolution of cellular organelles and potentially establish the basis for new subcellular localization and function prediction algorithms. PMID:23865897

  11. Establishment of subcellular fractionation techniques to monitor the intracellular fate of polymer therapeutics I. Differential centrifugation fractionation B16F10 cells and use to study the intracellular fate of HPMA copolymer - doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Seib, F Philipp; Jones, Arwyn T; Duncan, Ruth

    2006-07-01

    Polymer therapeutics are being designed for lysosomotropic, endosomotropic and transcellular drug delivery. Their appropriate intracellular routing is thus crucial for successful use. For example, polymer-anticancer drug conjugates susceptible to lysosomal enzyme degradation will never deliver their drug payload unless they encounter the appropriate activating enzymes. Many studies use confocal microscopy to monitor intracellular fate, but there is a pressing need for more quantitative methods able to define intracellular compartmentation over time. Only then will it be possible to optimise the next generation of polymer therapeutics for specific applications. The aim of this study was to establish a subcellular fractionation method for B16F10 murine melanoma cells and subsequently to use it to define the intracellular trafficking of N-(2-hydroxyproplylmethacrylamide) (HPMA) copolymer-bound doxorubicin (PK1). Free doxorubicin was used as a reference. The cell cracker method was used to achieve cell breakage and optimised to reproducibly achieve approximately 90% breakage efficiency. This ensured that subsequent subcellular fractionation experiments were representative for the whole cell population. To characterise the subcellular fractions obtained by differential centrifugation, DNA (nuclei), succinate dehydrogenase (mitochondria), N-acetyl-beta-glucosaminidase (lysosomes), alkaline phosphatase (plasma membrane) and lactate dehydrogenase (cytosol) were selected as markers and their assay was carefully validated. The relative specific activity (RSA) of the fractions obtained from B16F10 cells were: nuclei (2.2), mitochondria (4.1), lysosomes (3.7) and cytosol (2.5). When used to study the intracellular distribution at non-toxic concentrations of PK1 and doxorubicin, time-dependent accumulation of PK1 in lysosomes was evident and the expected nuclear localisation of free doxorubicin was seen. Live cell fluorescence microscopy and confocal co-localisation studies

  12. Subcellular localization and compartmentation of thiamine derivatives in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Bettendorff, L; Wins, P; Lesourd, M

    1994-05-26

    The subcellular distribution of thiamine derivatives in rat brain was studied. Thiamine diphosphate content was highest in the mitochondrial and synaptosomal fractions, and lowest in microsomal, myelin and cytosolic fractions. Only 3-5% of total thiamine diphosphate was bound to transketolase, a cytosolic enzyme. Thiamine triphosphate was barely detectable in the microsomal and cytosolic fraction, but synaptosomes were slightly enriched in this compound compared to the crude homogenate. Both myelin and mitochondrial fractions contained significant amounts of thiamine triphosphate. In order to estimate the relative turnover rates of these compounds, the animals received an intraperitoneal injection of either [14C]thiamine or [14C]sulbutiamine (isobutyrylthiamine disulfide) 1 h before decapitation. The specific radioactivities of thiamine compounds found in the brain decreased in the order: thiamine > thiamine triphosphate > thiamine monophosphate > thiamine diphosphate. Incorporation of radioactivity into thiamine triphosphate was more marked with [14C]sulbutiamine than with [14C]thiamine. The highest specific radioactivity of thiamine diphosphate was found in the cytosolic fraction of the brain, though this pool represents less than 10% of total thiamine diphosphate. Cytosolic thiamine diphosphate had a twice higher specific radioactivity when [14C]sulbutiamine was used as precursor compared with thiamine though no significant differences were found in the other cellular compartments. Our results suggest the existence of two thiamine diphosphate pools: the bound cofactor pool is essentially mitochondrial and has a low turnover; a much smaller cytosolic pool (6-7% of total TDP) of high turnover is the likely precursor of thiamine triphosphate. PMID:8186256

  13. Subcellular Localization and Rolling Circle Replication of Peach Latent Mosaic Viroid: Hallmarks of Group A Viroids

    PubMed Central

    Bussière, F.; Lehoux, J.; Thompson, D. A.; Skrzeczkowski, L. J.; Perreault, J.-P.

    1999-01-01

    We characterized the peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) replication intermediates that accumulate in infected peach leaves and determined the tissue and subcellular localization of the RNA species. Using in situ hybridization, we showed that PLMVd strands of both plus and minus polarities concentrate in the cells forming the palisade parenchyma. At the cellular level, PLMVd was found to accumulate predominantly in chloroplasts. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that PLMVd replicates via a symmetric mode involving the accumulation of both circular and linear monomeric strands of both polarities. No multimeric conformer was detected, indicating that both strands self-cleave efficiently via their hammerhead sequences. Dot blot hybridizations revealed that PLMVd strands of both polarities accumulate equally but that the relative concentrations vary by more than 50-fold between peach cultivars. Taken together these results establish two hallmarks for the classification of viroids. Group A viroids (e.g., PLMVd), which possess hammerhead structures, replicate in the chloroplasts via the symmetric mode. By contrast, group B viroids, which share a conserved central region, replicate in the nucleus via an asymmetric mechanism. This is an important difference between self-cleaving and non-self-cleaving viroids, and the implications for the evolutionary origin and replication are discussed. PMID:10400727

  14. Subcellular optogenetics – controlling signaling and single-cell behavior

    PubMed Central

    Karunarathne, W. K. Ajith; O'Neill, Patrick R.; Gautam, Narasimhan

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Variation in signaling activity across a cell plays a crucial role in processes such as cell migration. Signaling activity specific to organelles within a cell also likely plays a key role in regulating cellular functions. To understand how such spatially confined signaling within a cell regulates cell behavior, tools that exert experimental control over subcellular signaling activity are required. Here, we discuss the advantages of using optogenetic approaches to achieve this control. We focus on a set of optical triggers that allow subcellular control over signaling through the activation of G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), receptor tyrosine kinases and downstream signaling proteins, as well as those that inhibit endogenous signaling proteins. We also discuss the specific insights with regard to signaling and cell behavior that these subcellular optogenetic approaches can provide. PMID:25433038

  15. Protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent proteins

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2009-09-08

    The invention provides protein subcellular localization assays using split fluorescent protein systems. The assays are conducted in living cells, do not require fixation and washing steps inherent in existing immunostaining and related techniques, and permit rapid, non-invasive, direct visualization of protein localization in living cells. The split fluorescent protein systems used in the practice of the invention generally comprise two or more self-complementing fragments of a fluorescent protein, such as GFP, wherein one or more of the fragments correspond to one or more beta-strand microdomains and are used to "tag" proteins of interest, and a complementary "assay" fragment of the fluorescent protein. Either or both of the fragments may be functionalized with a subcellular targeting sequence enabling it to be expressed in or directed to a particular subcellular compartment (i.e., the nucleus).

  16. Apical accumulation of MARCKS in neural plate cells during neurulation in the chick embryo

    PubMed Central

    Zolessi, Flavio R; Arruti, Cristina

    2001-01-01

    Background The neural tube is formed by morphogenetic movements largely dependent on cytoskeletal dynamics. Actin and many of its associated proteins have been proposed as important mediators of neurulation. For instance, mice deficient in MARCKS, an actin cross-linking membrane-associated protein that is regulated by PKC and other kinases, present severe developmental defects, including failure of cranial neural tube closure. Results To determine the distribution of MARCKS, and its possible relationships with actin during neurulation, chick embryos were transversely sectioned and double labeled with an anti-MARCKS polyclonal antibody and phalloidin. In the neural plate, MARCKS was found ubiquitously distributed at the periphery of the cells, being conspicuously accumulated in the apical cell region, in close proximity to the apical actin meshwork. This asymmetric distribution was particularly noticeable during the bending process. After the closure of the neural tube, the apically accumulated MARCKS disappeared, and this cell region became analogous to the other peripheral cell zones in its MARCKS content. Actin did not display analogous variations, remaining highly concentrated at the cell subapical territory. The transient apical accumulation of MARCKS was found throughout the neural tube axis. The analysis of another epithelial bending movement, during the formation of the lens vesicle, revealed an identical phenomenon. Conclusions MARCKS is transiently accumulated at the apical region of neural plate and lens placode cells during processes of bending. This asymmetric subcellular distribution of MARCKS starts before the onset of neural plate bending. These results suggest possible upstream regulatory actions of MARCKS on some functions of the actin subapical meshwork. PMID:11329360

  17. SIMS ion microscopy imaging of boronophenylalanine (BPA) and 13C15N-labeled phenylalanine in human glioblastoma cells: Relevance of subcellular scale observations to BPA-mediated boron neutron capture therapy of cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Subhash; Lorey, Daniel R., II

    2007-02-01

    . However, the subcellular distribution of 10B was different than the 28CN in the mitochondria-rich perinuclear cytoplasmic region: 10B was reduced in this region, but 28CN was not. These observations indicate that: (i) a comparable higher accumulation of BPA and phenylalanine at 6 h versus 2 h plausibly represents a similar time-dependent entry mechanism through the plasma membrane in response to cellular requirements for the amino acid in glioblastoma cells and (ii) intracellular processes, especially those implicated with mitochondria, can plausibly recognize BPA as a different molecule than phenylalanine and may significantly differ in its sequestration and metabolism. For further understanding cell cycle influence on BPA accumulation, DNA-synthesizing S-phase cells were compared with non-S-phase cells. SIMS observations revealed that after 1 h exposure to BPA, S-phase cells contained elevated levels of 10B in their nucleus in comparison to the nucleus of non-S-phase cells. Consequently, one reason that longer BPA exposures would increase its accumulation in most tumor cells will be the movement of the cell cycle through the S-phase. These observations suggest further cell cycle research in BPA-mediated BNCT and may have special significance for brain tumors since tumor cells are primarily the only cells in the brain with active proliferation characteristics. This study also shows the need for cryogenic sampling for subcellular measurements in BNCT, as even a brief thaw of frozen samples can result in gross redistribution of boron in subcellular compartments.

  18. MNK1 expression increases during cellular senescence and modulates the subcellular localization of hnRNP A1

    SciTech Connect

    Ziaei, Samira; Shimada, Naoko; Kucharavy, Herman; Hubbard, Karen

    2012-03-10

    Heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) is an RNA-binding protein that modulates splice site usage, polyadenylation, and cleavage efficiency. This protein has also been implicated in mRNA stability and transport from the nucleus. We have previously demonstrated that hnRNP A1 had diminished protein levels and showed cytoplasmic accumulation in senescent human diploid fibroblasts. Furthermore, we have shown that inhibition of p38 MAPK, a key regulator of cellular senescence, elevated hnRNP A1 protein levels and inhibited hnRNP A1 cytoplasmic localization. In this study, we have explored the possible involvement of MNK1, one of the downstream effector of p38 MAPK, in the regulation of hnRNP A1. We have demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of MNK1 by CGP 57380 decreased the phosphorylation levels of hnRNP A1 in young and senescent fibroblast cells and blocked the cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. In addition, MNK1 formed a complex with hnRNP A1 in vivo. The expression levels of MNK1, phospho-MNK1, and phospho-eIF4E proteins were found to be elevated in senescent cells. These data suggest that MNK1 regulates the phosphorylation and the subcellular distribution of hnRNP A1 and that MNK1 may play a role in the induction of senescence. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 and not MAPKAPK2 phosphorylates hnRNP A1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 has elevated levels in senescent cells, this has not been reported previously. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MNK1 activity induces cytoplasmic accumulation of hnRNP A1 in senescent cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Altered cytoplasmic localization of hnRNP A1 may alter gene expression patterns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our studies may increase our understanding of RNA metabolism during cellular aging.

  19. Subcellular localization and rearrangement of endoplasmic reticulum by Brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2011-03-01

    Genome packaging in the plant-infecting Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like superfamily, as well as in other positive-strand RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (e.g., poliovirus) and animals (e.g., Flock House virus), is functionally coupled to replication. Although the subcellular localization site of BMV replication has been identified, that of the capsid protein (CP) has remained elusive. In this study, the application of immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to Nicotiana benthamiana leaves expressing replication-derived BMV CP as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, in conjunction with antibodies to the CP and double-stranded RNA, a presumed marker of RNA replication, revealed that the subcellular localization sites of replication and CP overlap. Our temporal analysis by transmission electron microscopy of ultrastructural modifications induced in BMV-infected N. benthamiana leaves revealed a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) incorporating large assemblies of vesicles derived from ER accumulated in the cytoplasm during BMV infection. Additionally, for the first time, we have found by ectopic expression experiments that BMV CP itself has the intrinsic property of modifying ER to induce vesicles similar to those present in BMV infections. The significance of CP-induced vesicles in relation to CP-organized viral functions that are linked to replication-coupled packaging is discussed.

  20. Subcellular Investigation of Photosynthesis-Driven Carbon Assimilation in the Symbiotic Reef Coral Pocillopora damicornis

    PubMed Central

    Domart-Coulon, Isabelle; Escrig, Stephane; Humbel, Bruno M.; Hignette, Michel

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT  Reef-building corals form essential, mutualistic endosymbiotic associations with photosynthetic Symbiodinium dinoflagellates, providing their animal host partner with photosynthetically derived nutrients that allow the coral to thrive in oligotrophic waters. However, little is known about the dynamics of these nutritional interactions at the (sub)cellular level. Here, we visualize with submicrometer spatial resolution the carbon and nitrogen fluxes in the intact coral-dinoflagellate association from the reef coral Pocillopora damicornis by combining nanoscale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS) and transmission electron microscopy with pulse-chase isotopic labeling using [13C]bicarbonate and [15N]nitrate. This allows us to observe that (i) through light-driven photosynthesis, dinoflagellates rapidly assimilate inorganic bicarbonate and nitrate, temporarily storing carbon within lipid droplets and starch granules for remobilization in nighttime, along with carbon and nitrogen incorporation into other subcellular compartments for dinoflagellate growth and maintenance, (ii) carbon-containing photosynthates are translocated to all four coral tissue layers, where they accumulate after only 15 min in coral lipid droplets from the oral gastroderm and within 6 h in glycogen granules from the oral epiderm, and (iii) the translocation of nitrogen-containing photosynthates is delayed by 3 h. PMID:25670779

  1. Subcellular optogenetic activation of Cdc42 controls local and distal signaling to drive immune cell migration

    PubMed Central

    O’Neill, Patrick R.; Kalyanaraman, Vani; Gautam, N.

    2016-01-01

    Migratory immune cells use intracellular signaling networks to generate and orient spatially polarized responses to extracellular cues. The monomeric G protein Cdc42 is believed to play an important role in controlling the polarized responses, but it has been difficult to determine directly the consequences of localized Cdc42 activation within an immune cell. Here we used subcellular optogenetics to determine how Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell affects both cell behavior and dynamic molecular responses throughout the cell. We found that localized Cdc42 activation is sufficient to generate polarized signaling and directional cell migration. The optically activated region becomes the leading edge of the cell, with Cdc42 activating Rac and generating membrane protrusions driven by the actin cytoskeleton. Cdc42 also exerts long-range effects that cause myosin accumulation at the opposite side of the cell and actomyosin-mediated retraction of the cell rear. This process requires the RhoA-activated kinase ROCK, suggesting that Cdc42 activation at one side of a cell triggers increased RhoA signaling at the opposite side. Our results demonstrate how dynamic, subcellular perturbation of an individual signaling protein can help to determine its role in controlling polarized cellular responses. PMID:26941336

  2. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  3. Tissue and subcellular localizations of 3H-cyclosporine A in mice.

    PubMed

    Bäckman, L; Brandt, I; Appelkvist, E L; Dallner, G

    1988-02-01

    The tissue and subcellular localizations of 3H-cyclosporine A after administration to mice were determined with whole-body autoradiography and scintillation counting of lipid extracts of tissues and subcellular fractions. The radioactivity was widely distributed in the body and the pattern of distribution after oral or parenteral administration was the same, except that tissue levels were generally lower after oral administration. Pretreatment of the animals with a diet containing cyclosporine A for 30 days before the injection of radioactive cyclosporine A did not change the pattern of distribution substantially. No significant radioactivity was found in the central nervous system, except for the choroidal plexus and the area postrema region of the brain. In pregnant mice no passage of radioactivity from the placentas to fetuses was observed after a single injection. 3H-cyclosporine A and/or its metabolites showed a high affinity for the lympho-myeloid tissues, with a marked long-term retention in bone marrow and lymph nodes. There was massive excretion in the intestinal tract after parenteral administration, and the liver, bile, pancreas and salivary glands contained high levels of radioactivity. In the kidney radioactivity was confined to the outer zone of the outer kidney medulla. In liver homogenates no quantitatively significant binding of 3H-cyclosporine A and/or its metabolites to cellular molecules such as proteins, DNA, phospho- or neutral lipids was found. After lipid extraction with organic solvents, almost all radioactivity was recovered in the organic phase.

  4. Subcellular compartmentalization of Cd and Zn in two bivalves. II. Significance of trophically available metal (TAM)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, W.G.; Luoma, S.N.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines how the subcellular partitioning of Cd and Zn in the bivalves Macoma balthica and Potamocorbula amurensis may affect the trophic transfer of metal to predators. Results show that the partitioning of metals to organelles, 'enzymes' and metallothioneins (MT) comprise a subcellular compartment containing trophically available metal (TAM; i.e. metal trophically available to predators), and that because this partitioning varies with species, animal size and metal, TAM is similarly influenced. Clams from San Francisco Bay, California, were exposed for 14 d to 3.5 ??g 1-1 Cd and 20.5 ??g 1-1 Zn, including 109Cd and 65Zn as radiotracers, and were used in feeding experiments with grass shrimp Palaemon macrodatylus, or used to investigate the subcellular partitioning of metal. Grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated P. amurensis absorbed ???60% of ingested Cd, which was in accordance with the partitioning of Cd to the bivalve's TAM compartment (i.e. Cd associated with organelles, 'enzymes' and MT); a similar relationship was found in previous studies with grass shrimp fed Cd-contaminated oligochaetes. Thus, TAM may be used as a tool to predict the trophic transfer of at least Cd. Subcellular fractionation revealed that ???34% of both the Cd and Zn accumulated by M. balthica was associated with TAM, while partitioning to TAM in P. amurensis was metal-dependent (???60% for TAM-Cd%, ???73% for TAM-Zn%). The greater TAM-Cd% of P. amurensis than M. balthica is due to preferential binding of Cd to MT and 'enzymes', while enhanced TAM-Zn% of P. amurensis results from a greater binding of Zn to organelles. TAM for most species-metal combinations was size-dependent, decreasing with increased clam size. Based on field data, it is estimated that of the 2 bivalves, P. amurensis poses the greater threat of Cd exposure to predators because of higher tissue concentrations and greater partitioning as TAM; exposure of Zn to predators would be similar between these species.

  5. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabetta; Pagani, Arianna; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Ivaldi, Federico; Congiu, Terenzio; De Stefano, Daniela; Piaggio, Giulia; de Eguileor, Magda; Noonan, Douglas M; Albini, Adriana

    2016-01-01

    The increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in several industrial applications raises concerns on their potential toxicity due to factors such as tissue penetrance, small dimensions, and biopersistence. Using an in vivo model for CNT environmental exposure, mimicking CNT exposition at the workplace, we previously found that CNTs rapidly enter and disseminate in the organism, initially accumulating in the lungs and brain and later reaching the liver and kidneys via the bloodstream in CD1 mice. Here, we monitored and traced the accumulation of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs), administered systemically in mice, in different organs and the subsequent biological responses. Using the novel in vivo model, MITO-Luc bioluminescence reporter mice, we found that SWCNTs induce systemic cell proliferation, indicating a dynamic response of cells of both bone marrow and the immune system. We then examined metabolic (water/food consumption and dejections), functional (serum enzymes), and morphological (organs and tissues) alterations in CD1 mice treated with SWCNTs, using metabolic cages, performing serum analyses, and applying histological, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural (transmission electron microscopy) methods. We observed a transient accumulation of SWCNTs in the lungs, spleen, and kidneys of CD1 mice exposed to SWCNTs. A dose- and time-dependent accumulation was found in the liver, associated with increases in levels of aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase and bilirubinemia, which are metabolic markers associated with liver damage. Our data suggest that hepatic accumulation of SWCNTs associated with liver damage results in an M1 macrophage-driven inflammation. PMID:27621623

  6. Systemic distribution of single-walled carbon nanotubes in a novel model: alteration of biochemical parameters, metabolic functions, liver accumulation, and inflammation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Principi, Elisa; Girardello, Rossana; Bruno, Antonino; Manni, Isabella; Gini, Elisabe