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Sample records for accuracy fuel flowmeter

  1. High accuracy fuel flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    All three flowmeter concepts (vortex, dual turbine, and angular momentum) were subjected to experimental and analytical investigation to determine the potential portotype performance. The three concepts were subjected to a comprehensive rating. Eight parameters of performance were evaluated on a zero-to-ten scale, weighted, and summed. The relative ratings of the vortex, dual turbine, and angular momentum flowmeters are 0.71, 1.00, and 0.95, respectively. The dual turbine flowmeter concept was selected as the primary candidate and the angular momentum flowmeter as the secondary candidate for prototype development and evaluation.

  2. High Accuracy Fuel Flowmeter, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, C.; Rose, L.; Chan, A.; Chin, B.; Gregory, W.

    1983-01-01

    Technology related to aircraft fuel mass - flowmeters was reviewed to determine what flowmeter types could provide 0.25%-of-point accuracy over a 50 to one range in flowrates. Three types were selected and were further analyzed to determine what problem areas prevented them from meeting the high accuracy requirement, and what the further development needs were for each. A dual-turbine volumetric flowmeter with densi-viscometer and microprocessor compensation was selected for its relative simplicity and fast response time. An angular momentum type with a motor-driven, spring-restrained turbine and viscosity shroud was selected for its direct mass-flow output. This concept also employed a turbine for fast response and a microcomputer for accurate viscosity compensation. The third concept employed a vortex precession volumetric flowmeter and was selected for its unobtrusive design. Like the turbine flowmeter, it uses a densi-viscometer and microprocessor for density correction and accurate viscosity compensation.

  3. High accuracy fuel flowmeter. Phase 2C and 3: The mass flowrate calibration of high accuracy fuel flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, D. William

    1992-01-01

    A facility for the precise calibration of mass fuel flowmeters and turbine flowmeters located at AMETEK Aerospace Products Inc., Wilmington, Massachusetts is described. This facility is referred to as the Test and Calibration System (TACS). It is believed to be the most accurate test facility available for the calibration of jet engine fuel density measurement. The product of the volumetric flow rate measurement and the density measurement, results in a true mass flow rate determination. A dual-turbine flowmeter was designed during this program. The dual-turbine flowmeter was calibrated on the TACS to show the characteristics of this type of flowmeter. An angular momentum flowmeter was also calibrated on the TACS to demonstrate the accuracy of a true mass flowmeter having a 'state-of-the-art' design accuracy.

  4. Accuracy of flowmeters measuring horizontal groundwater flow in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bayless, E.R.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Ursic, James R.

    2011-01-01

    Borehole flowmeters that measure horizontal flow velocity and direction of groundwater flow are being increasingly applied to a wide variety of environmental problems. This study was carried out to evaluate the measurement accuracy of several types of flowmeters in an unconsolidated aquifer simulator. Flowmeter response to hydraulic gradient, aquifer properties, and well-screen construction was measured during 2003 and 2005 at the U.S. Geological Survey Hydrologic Instrumentation Facility in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi. The flowmeters tested included a commercially available heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler flowmeter, a scanning colloidal borescope flowmeter, and a fluid-conductivity logging system. Results of the study indicated that at least one flowmeter was capable of measuring borehole flow velocity and direction in most simulated conditions. The mean error in direction measurements ranged from 15.1 degrees to 23.5 degrees and the directional accuracy of all tested flowmeters improved with increasing hydraulic gradient. The range of Darcy velocities examined in this study ranged 4.3 to 155 ft/d. For many plots comparing the simulated and measured Darcy velocity, the squared correlation coefficient (r2) exceeded 0.92. The accuracy of velocity measurements varied with well construction and velocity magnitude. The use of horizontal flowmeters in environmental studies appears promising but applications may require more than one type of flowmeter to span the range of conditions encountered in the field. Interpreting flowmeter data from field settings may be complicated by geologic heterogeneity, preferential flow, vertical flow, constricted screen openings, and nonoptimal screen orientation.

  5. Rotor Re-Design for the SSME Fuel Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Bogdan

    1999-01-01

    The present report describes the process of redesigning a new rotor for the SSME Fuel Flowmeter. The new design addresses the specific requirement of a lower rotor speed which would allow the SSME operation at 1 15% rated power level without reaching a blade excitation by the wakes behind the hexagonal flow straightener upstream at frequencies close to the blade natural frequency. A series of calculations combining fleet flowmeters test data, airfoil fluid dynamics and CFD simulations of flow patterns behind the flowmeter's hexagonal straightener has led to a blade twist design alpha = alpha (radius) targeting a kf constant of 0.8256. The kf constant relates the fuel volume flow to the flowmeter rotor speed, for this particular value 17685 GPM at 3650 RPM. Based on this angle distribution, two actual blade designs were developed. A first design using the same blade airfoil as the original design targeted the new kf value only. A second design using a variable blade chord length and airfoil relative thickness targeted simultaneously the new kf value and an optimum blade design destined to provide smooth and stable operation and a significant increase in the blade natural frequency associated with the first bending mode, such that a comfortable margin could be obtained at 115% RPL. The second design is a result of a concurrent engineering process, during which several iterations were made in order to achieve a targeted blade natural frequency associated with the first bending mode of 1300 Hz. Water flow tests preliminary results indicate a kf value of 0.8179 for the f-irst design, which is within 1% of the target value. The second design rotor shows a natural frequency associated with the first bending mode of 1308 Hz, and a water-flow calibration constant of kf 0.8169.

  6. A Mathematical Model of the Thermo-Anemometric Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Korobiichuk, Igor; Bezvesilna, Olena; Ilchenko, Andriі; Shadura, Valentina; Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2015-09-11

    A thermo-anemometric flowmeter design and the principles of its work are presented in the article. A mathematical model of the temperature field in a stream of biofuel is proposed. This model allows one to determine the fuel consumption with high accuracy. Numerical modeling of the heater heat balance in the fuel flow of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter is conducted and the results are analyzed. Methods for increasing the measurement speed and accuracy of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter are proposed.

  7. The Effect of Acoustic Disturbances on the Operation of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Fuel Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marcu, Bogdan; Szabo, Roland; Dorney, Dan; Zoladz, Tom

    2007-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) uses a turbine fuel flowmeter (FFM) in its Low Pressure Fuel Duct (LPFD) to measure liquid hydrogen flowrates during engine operation. The flowmeter is required to provide accurate and robust measurements of flow rates ranging from 10000 to 18000 GPM in an environment contaminated by duct vibration and duct internal acoustic disturbances. Errors exceeding 0.5% can have a significant impact on engine operation and mission completion. The accuracy of each sensor is monitored during hot-fire engine tests on the ground. Flow meters which do not meet requirements are not flown. Among other parameters, the device is screened for a specific behavior in which a small shift in the flow rate reading is registered during a period in which the actual fuel flow as measured by a facility meter does not change. Such behavior has been observed over the years for specific builds of the FFM and must be avoided or limited in magnitude in flight. Various analyses of the recorded data have been made prior to this report in an effort to understand the cause of the phenomenon; however, no conclusive cause for the shift in the instrument behavior has been found. The present report proposes an explanation of the phenomenon based on interactions between acoustic pressure disturbances in the duct and the wakes produced by the FFM flow straightener. Physical insight into the effects of acoustic plane wave disturbances was obtained using a simple analytical model. Based on that model, a series of three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were performed using the MSFC PHANTOM turbomachinery code. The code was customized to allow the FFM rotor speed to change at every time step according to the instantaneous fluid forces on the rotor, that, in turn, are affected by acoustic plane pressure waves propagating through the device. The results of the simulations show the variation in the rotation rate of the flowmeter

  8. A Mathematical Model of the Thermo-Anemometric Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Korobiichuk, Igor; Bezvesilna, Olena; Ilchenko, Andriі; Shadura, Valentina; Nowicki, Michał; Szewczyk, Roman

    2015-01-01

    A thermo-anemometric flowmeter design and the principles of its work are presented in the article. A mathematical model of the temperature field in a stream of biofuel is proposed. This model allows one to determine the fuel consumption with high accuracy. Numerical modeling of the heater heat balance in the fuel flow of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter is conducted and the results are analyzed. Methods for increasing the measurement speed and accuracy of a thermo-anemometric flowmeter are proposed. PMID:26378535

  9. Self-Calibrating Respiratory-Flowmeter Combination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Westenskow, Dwayne R.; Orr, Joseph A.

    1990-01-01

    Dual flowmeters ensure accuracy over full range of human respiratory flow rates. System for measurement of respiratory flow employs two flowmeters; one compensates for deficiencies of other. Combination yields easily calibrated system accurate over wide range of gas flow.

  10. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, Henry H. B.; Raptis, Apostolos C.

    1983-01-01

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  11. Doppler flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Karplus, H.H.B.; Raptis, A.C.

    1981-11-13

    A Doppler flowmeter impulses an ultrasonic fixed-frequency signal obliquely into a slurry flowing in a pipe and a reflected signal is detected after having been scattered off of the slurry particles, whereby the shift in frequencies between the signals is proportional to the slurry velocity and hence slurry flow rate. This flowmeter filters the Doppler frequency-shift signal, compares the filtered and unfiltered shift signals in a divider to obtain a ratio, and then further compares this ratio against a preset fractional ratio. The flowmeter utilizes a voltage-to-frequency convertor to generate a pulsed signal having a determinable rate of repetition precisely proportional to the divergence of the ratios. The pulsed signal serves as the input control for a frequency-controlled low-pass filter, which provides thereby that the cutoff frequency of the filtered signal is known. The flowmeter provides a feedback control by minimizing the divergence. With the cutoff frequency and preset fractional ratio known, the slurry velocity and hence flow will also be determinable.

  12. Nonintrusive Flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M. W.

    1976-01-01

    The results of analytical and experimental work performed in the design, fabrication, and test of a prototype nonintrusive gaging system for use in monitoring the consumption of earth-storable fuels and oxidants in either a one-g or a zero-g environment are explained. The design specifications were those applicable to the reaction control system and to the orbital maneuvering system (OMS) fuel and oxidant on the space shuttle while in orbit. The major requirement was for the measurement of flow pulses with sufficient accuracy to provide a continuous knowledge of the fuel and oxidant remaining in the OMS system to within 1% or better. An ultrasonic frequency chirp technique was used having a high inherent rejection for signals traversing stray paths, and for random noise generated by the flowing liquid. A detailed analysis of the frequency chirp approach for two modes of operation (period and phase changes), including an error analysis are reported.

  13. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, David E.; Carter, Gary W.; Petrini, Richard R.

    1983-01-01

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid (10) containing entrained particles (12) is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly (31) on the raster area of a low-light level television camera (20). The particles (12) are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers (32) surrounding the rod optic lens assembly (31). Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen (40). The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid (10).

  14. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1981-06-10

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid.

  15. Video flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Lord, D.E.; Carter, G.W.; Petrini, R.R.

    1983-08-02

    A video flowmeter is described that is capable of specifying flow nature and pattern and, at the same time, the quantitative value of the rate of volumetric flow. An image of a determinable volumetric region within a fluid containing entrained particles is formed and positioned by a rod optic lens assembly on the raster area of a low-light level television camera. The particles are illuminated by light transmitted through a bundle of glass fibers surrounding the rod optic lens assembly. Only particle images having speeds on the raster area below the raster line scanning speed may be used to form a video picture which is displayed on a video screen. The flowmeter is calibrated so that the locus of positions of origin of the video picture gives a determination of the volumetric flow rate of the fluid. 4 figs.

  16. STS-51 pad abort. OV103-engine 2033 (ME-2) fuel flowmeter sensor open circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-08-01

    The STS-51 initial launch attempt of Discovery (OV-103) was terminated on KSC launch pad 39B on 12 Aug. 1993 at 9:12 AM E.S.T. due to a sensor redundancy failure in the liquid hydrogen system of ME-2 (Engine 2033). The event description and time line are summarized. Propellant loading was initiated on 12 Aug. 1993 at 12:00 AM EST. All space shuttle main engine (SSME) chill parameters and Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) were nominal. At engine start plus 1.34 seconds a Failure Identification (FID) was posted against Engine 2033 for exceeding the 1800 spin intra-channel (A1-A2) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel qualification limit. The engine was shut down at 1.50 seconds followed by Engines 2032 and 2030. All shut down sequences were nominal and the mission was safely aborted. SSME Avionics hardware and software performed nominally during the incident. A review of vehicle data table (VDT) data and controller software logic revealed no failure indications other than the single FID 111-101, Fuel Flowrate Intra-Channel Test Channel A disqualification. Software logic was executed according to requirements and there was no anomalous controller software operation. Immediately following the abort, a Rocketdyne/NASA failure investigation team was assembled. The team successfully isolated the failure cause to an open circuit in a Fuel Flowrate Sensor. This type of failure has occurred eight previous times in ground testing. The sensor had performed acceptably on three previous flights of the engine and SSME flight history shows 684 combined fuel flow rate sensor channel flights without failure. The disqualification of an Engine 2 (SSME No. 2033) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel was a result of an instrumentation failure and not engine performance. All other engine operations were nominal. This disqualification resulted in an engine shutdown and safe sequential shutdown of all three engines prior to ignition of the solid boosters.

  17. STS-51 pad abort. OV103-engine 2033 (ME-2) fuel flowmeter sensor open circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    The STS-51 initial launch attempt of Discovery (OV-103) was terminated on KSC launch pad 39B on 12 Aug. 1993 at 9:12 AM E.S.T. due to a sensor redundancy failure in the liquid hydrogen system of ME-2 (Engine 2033). The event description and time line are summarized. Propellant loading was initiated on 12 Aug. 1993 at 12:00 AM EST. All space shuttle main engine (SSME) chill parameters and Launch Commit Criteria (LCC) were nominal. At engine start plus 1.34 seconds a Failure Identification (FID) was posted against Engine 2033 for exceeding the 1800 spin intra-channel (A1-A2) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel qualification limit. The engine was shut down at 1.50 seconds followed by Engines 2032 and 2030. All shut down sequences were nominal and the mission was safely aborted. SSME Avionics hardware and software performed nominally during the incident. A review of vehicle data table (VDT) data and controller software logic revealed no failure indications other than the single FID 111-101, Fuel Flowrate Intra-Channel Test Channel A disqualification. Software logic was executed according to requirements and there was no anomalous controller software operation. Immediately following the abort, a Rocketdyne/NASA failure investigation team was assembled. The team successfully isolated the failure cause to an open circuit in a Fuel Flowrate Sensor. This type of failure has occurred eight previous times in ground testing. The sensor had performed acceptably on three previous flights of the engine and SSME flight history shows 684 combined fuel flow rate sensor channel flights without failure. The disqualification of an Engine 2 (SSME No. 2033) Fuel Flowrate sensor channel was a result of an instrumentation failure and not engine performance. All other engine operations were nominal. This disqualification resulted in an engine shutdown and safe sequential shutdown of all three engines prior to ignition of the solid boosters.

  18. Support of gas flowmeter upgrade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Dennis

    1996-01-01

    A project history review, literature review, and vendor search were conducted to identify a flowmeter that would improve the accuracy of gaseous flow measurements in the White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) Calibration Laboratory and the Hydrogen High Flow Facility. Both facilities currently use sonic flow nozzles to measure flowrates. The flow nozzle pressure drops combined with corresponding pressure and temperature measurements have been estimated to produce uncertainties in flowrate measurements of 2 to 5 percent. This study investigated the state of flowmeter technology to make recommendations that would reduce those uncertainties. Most flowmeters measure velocity and volume, therefore mass flow measurement must be calculated based on additional pressures and temperature measurement which contribute to the error. The two exceptions are thermal dispersion meters and Coriolis mass flowmeters. The thermal dispersion meters are accurate to 1 to 5 percent. The Coriolis meters are significantly more accurate, at least for liquids. For gases, there is evidence they may be accurate to within 0.5 percent or better of the flowrate, but there may be limitations due to inappropriate velocity, pressure, Mach number and vibration disturbances. In this report, a comparison of flowmeters is presented. Candidate Coriolis meters and a methodology to qualify the meter with tests both at WSTF and Southwest Research Institute are recommended and outlined.

  19. Fast calibration of gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lisle, R. V.; Wilson, T. L.

    1981-01-01

    Digital unit automates calibration sequence using calculator IC and programmable read-only memory to solve calibration equations. Infrared sensors start and stop calibration sequence. Instrument calibrates mass flowmeters or rotameters where flow measurement is based on mass or volume. This automatic control reduces operator time by 80 percent. Solid-state components are very reliable, and digital character allows system accuracy to be determined primarily by accuracy of transducers.

  20. Space Shuttle Hypergol Load Determination Using Nonintrusive Ultrasonic Flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudolph; Kelley, Andrew; Margasahayam, Ravi

    1996-01-01

    Space Shuttle preflight hypergol oxidizer and fuel loading were monitored using a nonintrusive flow measurement system (NFMS) during preflight operation. A pair of 4-megahertz ultrasonic transducers measured the flow rate using a transit-time flow measurement technique. Using wireless cellular phone technology, flow-rate data was monitored and recorded. Excellent correlation was observed between the flow profiles measured using the proposed nonintrusive ultrasonic flowmeters (UFM's) and those made from conventional intrusive turbine meters (TFM). Based on the preliminary tests, it is concluded that the nonintrusive method of flow measurement has the same or higher accuracy, is simpler, and costs less than the existing TFM. Benefits of UFM's include a highly flexible, cost-effective, reliable, hazard free, and streamlined hypergol operation. Redundant installation of ultrasonic flowmeters was recommended for a few more launches prior to the replacement of the existing TFM.

  1. The wide-range ejector flowmeter: calibrated gas evacuation comprising both high and low gas flows.

    PubMed

    Waaben, J; Brinkløv, M M; Jørgensen, S

    1984-11-01

    The wide-range ejector flowmeter is an active scavenging system applying calibrated gas removal directly to the anaesthetic circuit. The evacuation rate can be adjusted on the flowmeter under visual control using the calibration scale ranging from 200 ml X min-1 to 151 X min-1. The accuracy of the calibration was tested on three ejector flowmeters at 12 different presettings. The percentage deviation from presetting varied from + 18 to - 19.4 per cent. The ejector flowmeter enables the provision of consistent and accurately calibrated extraction of waste gases and is applicable within a wide range of fresh gas flows.

  2. Flowmeter evaluation for on-orbit operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. S.

    1988-01-01

    Various flowmetering concepts were flow tested to characterize the relative capabilities and limitations for on-orbit fluid-transfer operations. Performance results and basic operating principles of each flowmetering concept tested are summarized, and basic considerations required to select the best flowmeter(s) for fluid system application are discussed. Concepts tested were clamp-on ultrasonic, area averaging ultrasonic, offset ultrasonic, coriolis mass, vortex shedding, universal venturi tube, turbine, bearingless turbine, turbine/turbine differential-pressure hybrid, dragbody, and dragbody/turbine hybrid flowmeters. Fluid system flowmeter selection considerations discussed are flowmeter performance, fluid operating conditions, systems operating environments, flowmeter packaging, flowmeter maintenance, and flowmeter technology. No one flowmetering concept tested was shown to be best for all on-orbit fluid systems.

  3. Doppler radar flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Petlevich, Walter J.; Sverdrup, Edward F.

    1978-01-01

    A Doppler radar flowmeter comprises a transceiver which produces an audio frequency output related to the Doppler shift in frequency between radio waves backscattered from particulate matter carried in a fluid and the radiated radio waves. A variable gain amplifier and low pass filter are provided for amplifying and filtering the transceiver output. A frequency counter having a variable triggering level is also provided to determine the magnitude of the Doppler shift. A calibration method is disclosed wherein the amplifier gain and frequency counter trigger level are adjusted to achieve plateaus in the output of the frequency counter and thereby allow calibration without the necessity of being able to visually observe the flow.

  4. ANL Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karplus, H. B.; Raptis, A. C.; Lee, S.; Simpson, T.

    1985-10-01

    A flowmeter has been developed for measuring flow velocity in hot slurries. The flowmeter works on an ultrasonic Doppler principle in which ultrasound is injected into the flowing fluid through the solid pipe wall. Isolating waveguides separate the hot pipe from conventional ultrasonic transducers. Special clamp-on high-temperature transducers also can be adapted to work well in this application. Typical flows in pilot plants were found to be laminar, giving rise to broad-band Doppler spectra. A special circuit based on a servomechanism sensor was devised to determine the frequency average of such a broad spectrum. The device was tested at different pilot plants. Slurries with particulates greater than 70 microns (0.003 in.) yielded good signals, but slurries with extremely fine particulates were unpredictable. Small bubbles can replace the coarse particles to provide a good signal if there are not too many. Successful operation with very fine particulate slurries may have been enhanced by the presence of microbubbles.

  5. Soap film gas flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lalin, H.S.; Bermudez, J.E.; Fleming, W.T.

    1987-09-08

    A soap film gas flowmeter is described comprising: a flow tube having a hollow body with opposite open ends through which a soap film is propelled and a first closed chamber housing a soap solution. It also includes means for supporting the flow tube in a substantially vertical position with the open bottom end of the flow tube disposed in the first chamber above the soap solution; a second closed chamber into which the open top end of the flow tube extends and gas inlet means for introducing gas into the first chamber at a flow rate to be measured using the flowmeters. A gas exit means is included for discharging the gas introduced into the first chamber through the second chamber. Plus there are means for generating a single soap bubble from the soap solution substantially at the bottom end of the flow tube and a relatively large opening in the flowtube for providing an open passageway for inlet gas to pass through the flowtube when the bottom open end of the flowtube is covered by the soap solution.

  6. High-rangeability ultrasonic gas flowmeter for monitoring flare gas.

    PubMed

    Mylvaganam, K S

    1989-01-01

    A transit-time ultrasonic gas flowmeter for high-rangeability requirements, such as those encountered in flare-gas flow-metering, is presented. The concept of ray rescue angle for the orientation of the ultrasonic transducers in single-beam transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters is introduced to overcome the problem of ultrasonic beam drift in high-velocity flows. To overcome problems associated with noise at high velocities, a chirp signal is used. To preserve the accuracy of the meter at low velocities near zero flow, a combination of chirp and continuous-wave signals is used to interrogate the flow. Overall system performance is presented, based on results from extensive wind-tunnel tests.

  7. Laser double Doppler flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poffo, L.; Goujon, J.-M.; Le Page, R.; Lemaitre, J.; Guendouz, M.; Lorrain, N.; Bosc, D.

    2014-05-01

    The Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) is a non-invasive method for estimating the tissular blood flow and speed at a microscopic scale (microcirculation). It is used for medical research as well as for the diagnosis of diseases related to circulatory system tissues and organs including the issues of microvascular flow (perfusion). It is based on the Doppler effect, created by the interaction between the laser light and tissues. LDF measures the mean blood flow in a volume formed by the single laser beam, that penetrate into the skin. The size of this measurement volume is crucial and depends on skin absorption, and is not directly reachable. Therefore, current developments of the LDF are focused on the use of always more complex and sophisticated signal processing methods. On the other hand, laser Double Doppler Flowmeter (FL2D) proposes to use two laser beams to generate the measurement volume. This volume would be perfectly stable and localized at the intersection of the two laser beams. With FL2D we will be able to determine the absolute blood flow of a specific artery. One aimed application would be to help clinical physicians in health care units.

  8. Ultrasonic flowmeters: half-century progress report, 1955-2005.

    PubMed

    Lynnworth, L C; Liu, Yi

    2006-12-22

    Ultrasonic flowmeters are one of the fastest-growing technologies within the general field of instruments for process monitoring, measurement and control. Today, acoustic/ultrasonic flowmeters utilize clamp-on and wetted transducers, single and multiple paths, paths on and off the diameter, passive and active principles, contrapropagating transmission, reflection (Doppler), tag correlation, vortex shedding, liquid level sensing of open channel flow or flow in partially-full conduits, and other interactions. Ultrasonic flowmeters are applicable to liquids, gases, and multiphase mixtures, but not without limits. However, no single technology, nor one type of interaction within a technology, can be best for all fluids, occasions and situations. Users who select a particular type of ultrasonic flowmeter over one based on a competing (nonultrasonic) technology often do so for one (or more) of the following reasons: ultrasonic equipment provides a useful measurement whether the fluid is single-phase or not single-phase; equipment is easy to use; flow regime can be laminar, transitional or turbulent; transducers are totally external (no penetration of the pressure boundary); transducers, if not clamp-on, are minimally invasive; no excess pressure drop; when certain conditions are met, accuracy can be better than 0.5%; fast (ms) response; reliable despite temperature extremes; reasonable purchase price, installation, operating and maintenance costs. Sometimes mass flowrate is obtainable. Energy flowrate might be achieved for natural gas and biogas in the near future. How did ultrasonic flowmeters advance in the past fifty years to support such claims? This paper tries to answer this question by looking at ultrasonic flowmeter inventions and publications since 1955, to see how four key problems were solved.

  9. Permanent magnet flowmeter having improved output terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, Charles; Myers, Harry J.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  10. Permanent-magnet flowmeter having improved output-terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, C.; Myers, H.J.

    1981-10-26

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  11. Magnetic transit-time flowmeter

    DOEpatents

    Forster, George A.

    1976-07-06

    The flow rate of a conducting fluid in a stream is determined by disposing two permanent-magnet flowmeters in the stream, one downstream of the other. Flow of the conducting fluid causes the generation of both d-c and a-c electrical signals, the a-c comprising flow noise. Measurement of the time delay between similarities in the a-c signals by cross-correlation methods provides a measure of the rate of flow of the fluid.

  12. A novel time varying signal processing method for Coriolis mass flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Shen, Ting-Ao; Tu, Ya-Qing; Zhang, Hai-Tao

    2014-06-01

    The precision of frequency tracking method and phase difference calculation method affects the measurement precision of Coriolis Mass Flowmeter directly. To improve the accuracy of the mass flowrate, a novel signal processing method for Coriolis Mass Flowmeter is proposed for this time varying signal, which is comprised of a modified adaptive lattice notch filter and a revised sliding recursive discrete-time Fourier transform algorithm. The method cannot only track the change of frequency continuously, but also ensure the calculation accuracy when measuring phase difference. The computational load of the proposed method is small with higher accuracy. Simulation and experiment results show that the proposed method is effective.

  13. Accuracy of trace element determinations in alternate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    NASA-Lewis Research Center's work on accurate measurement of trace level of metals in various fuels is presented. The differences between laboratories and between analytical techniques especially for concentrations below 10 ppm, are discussed, detailing the Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (AAS) and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry (dc arc) techniques used by NASA-Lewis. Also presented is the design of an Interlaboratory Study which is considering the following factors: laboratory, analytical technique, fuel type, concentration and ashing additive.

  14. Electromagnetic flowmeters: a state of the art review

    SciTech Connect

    Hemp, J.; Sanderson, M.L.

    1981-01-01

    The basic problems arising in the design of electromagnetic flowmeters are described and the ways in which these are overcome are explained. The problems include (1) spurious DC or low frequency potentials across the electrodes, (2) transformer signals associated with the need to use a changing magnetic field, (3) the difficulty in predicting sensitivity and (4) velocity profile effects. The methods of overcoming these problems include AC sine wave or square wave magnet excitation, phase sensitive detection, use of Hall probe, search soil, feedback, magnetic field shaping and the use of contactless electrodes. Ways in which future electromagnetic flowmeters may be designed to extend the range of liquids that could be metered, to improve the accuracy of measurement and to incorporate self-checking means are indicated. 22 references.

  15. Flowmeter determines mix ratio for viscous adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.

    1967-01-01

    Flowmeter determines mix ratio for continuous flow mixing machine used to produce an adhesive from a high viscosity resin and aliphatic amine hardener pumped through separate lines to a rotary blender. The flowmeter uses strain gages in the two flow paths and monitors their outputs with appropriate instrumentation.

  16. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waugaman, Charles J.

    1989-01-01

    The purpose was to continue a development project on a no moving parts vortex shedding flowmeter used for flow measurement of hypergols. The project involved the design and construction of a test loop to evaluate the meter for flow of Freon which simulates the hypergol fluids. Results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of the flow meter as a function of flow rate. A family of flow meters for larger size lines and ranges of flow was sized based on the results of the tested meter.

  17. A High-Pressure Bi-Directional Cycloid Rotor Flowmeter

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuo; Ding, Fan; Ding, Chuan; Man, Zaipeng

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the flow rate of various liquids and gases is critical in industrial automation. Rotary positive displacement meters (rotary PD meters) are highly accurate flowmeters that are widely employed in engineering applications, especially in custody transfer operations and hydraulic control systems. This paper presents a high pressure rotary PD meter containing a pair of internal cycloid rotors. It has the advantages of concise structure, low pressure loss, high accuracy and low noise. The curve of the internal rotor is designed as an equidistant curtate epicycloid curve with the external rotor curve as its conjugate. The calculation method used to determine the displacement of the cycloid rotor flowmeter is discussed. A prototype was fabricated, and experiments were performed to confirm measurements over a flow range of 1–100 L/min with relative errors of less than ±0.5%. The pressure loss through the flowmeter was about 3 bar at a flow rate of 100 L/min. PMID:25196162

  18. Accuracy of trace element determinations in alternate fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenbauer-Seng, L. A.

    1980-01-01

    A review of the techniques used at Lewis Research Center (LeRC) in trace metals analysis is presented, including the results of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry and DC Arc Emission Spectrometry of blank levels and recovery experiments for several metals. The design of an Interlaboratory Study conducted by LeRC is presented. Several factors were investigated, including: laboratory, analytical technique, fuel type, concentration, and ashing additive. Conclusions drawn from the statistical analysis will help direct research efforts toward those areas most responsible for the poor interlaboratory analytical results.

  19. Acoustic flowmeters: Their applications in hydraulics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nitzsche, Ulf

    Flowmeter installations for viscous and high hydrostatic pressure media are developed. Their usability is considered for characteristic measuring tasks in the field of oil hydraulics. The properties of flow sensors are evaluated by system analysis. Acoustic measuring systems are preferred. Two ultrasonic flowmeters are realized. Simulation models, installation with piezoceramic material parameters, and sound visualization support these developments. A computer aided hydraulic test stand is developed in order to detect the measuring characteristics of this system. Flowmeter applications are shown using the identification of the static and dynamic parameters of an electrohydraulic pilot valve.

  20. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2003-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  1. Flowmeter for pressure-driven chromatography systems

    DOEpatents

    Paul, Phillip H.; Arnold, Don W.

    2002-01-01

    A flowmeter for accurately measuring the flowrate of fluids in high pressure chromatography systems. The flowmeter is a porous bed of a material, the porous bed having a porosity in the range of about 0.1 to 0.6 and a pore size in the range of about 50 nm to 1 .mu.m, disposed between a high pressure pumping means and a chromatography column. The flowmeter is provided with pressure measuring means at both the inlet and outlet of the porous bed for measuring the pressure drop through the porous bed. This flowmeter system provides not only the ability to measure accurately flowrates in the range of .mu.L/min to nL/min but also to provide a signal that can be used for a servo loop or feedback control system for high pressure pumping systems.

  2. Design of a Geothermal Downhole Magnetic Flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Glowka, Dave A.; Normann, Randy A.

    2015-06-15

    This paper covers the development of a 300°C geothermal solid-state magnetic flowmeter (or magmeter) to support in situ monitoring of future EGS (enhanced geothermal system) production wells. Existing flowmeters are simple mechanical spinner sensors. These mechanical sensors fail within as little as 10 hrs, while a solid-state magmeter has the potential for months/years of operation. The design and testing of a magnetic flow sensor for use with existing high-temperature electronics is presented.

  3. The design of optical fiber vortex flowmeter's probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiaolin; Wang, Yutian; Ni, Yang; Li, Jianxia

    2009-07-01

    The vortex flowmeter works in a poor environment, therefore the stability and accuracy of the online testing system have become the core question for getting high accuracy. The optical probe is the main part of the system which produces and obtains the vortex signal. This paper designs the vortex shedder according to the hydromechanics principle, and it is proposed to be ringlike structures, also gives the test results which prove the effectiveness of the shedder on vortex decomposition. A liquid flow online testing system is designed according to the vortex signal characteristics, and the optical fiber is chosen as the sense organ. Then it designed the probe's parameters and the necessary important circuits of the system to further increase its accuracy. It also assembles the sensor system which is designed to insure the rationality, reliability, stability of the structure. Finally it proposed the methods on the coefficient revision and the liquid condition parameter compensation to get higher accuracy.

  4. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter. (a) Identification. A gas calibration flowmeter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to...

  5. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter. (a) Identification. A gas calibration flowmeter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to...

  6. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter. (a) Identification. A gas calibration flowmeter is a device intended for medical purposes that is used to...

  7. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  8. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  9. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  10. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  11. 21 CFR 870.2100 - Cardiovascular blood flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. 870.2100 Section... Cardiovascular blood flowmeter. (a) Identification. A cardiovascular blood flowmeter is a device that is connected to a flow transducer that energizes the transducer and processes and displays the blood...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  16. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  17. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  18. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  19. 21 CFR 868.2320 - Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2320... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2320 Uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. An uncompensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for...

  20. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  1. 21 CFR 868.2340 - Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. 868.2340... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2340 Compensated thorpe tube flowmeter. (a) Identification. A compensated thorpe tube flowmeter is a device intended for medical...

  2. New technique for calibrating hydrocarbon gas flowmeters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, J. J.; Puster, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A technique for measuring calibration correction factors for hydrocarbon mass flowmeters is described. It is based on the Nernst theorem for matching the partial pressure of oxygen in the combustion products of the test hydrocarbon, burned in oxygen-enriched air, with that in normal air. It is applied to a widely used type of commercial thermal mass flowmeter for a number of hydrocarbons. The calibration correction factors measured using this technique are in good agreement with the values obtained by other independent procedures. The technique is successfully applied to the measurement of differences as low as one percent of the effective hydrocarbon content of the natural gas test samples.

  3. Water flow measurement in large bore pipes: an experimental comparison between two different types of insertion flowmeters.

    PubMed

    Cascetta, Furio; Palombo, Adolfo; Scalabrini, Gianfranco

    2003-04-01

    In this paper the metrological behavior of two different insertion flowmeters (magnetic and turbine types) in large water pipes is described. A master-slave calibration was carried out in order to estimate the overall uncertainty of the tested meters. The experimental results show that (i) the magnetic insertion tested flowmeter performs the claimed accuracy (+/- 2%) within all the flow range (20:1); (ii) the insertion turbine tested meter, instead, reaches the claimed accuracy just in the upper zone of the flow range.

  4. Smart ultrasonic flowmeter used for the operation support of water resource management in the agricultural areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmostafa, Ziani; Mustapha, Bennouna; Boissier, Raymond

    2008-10-01

    Ultrasonic sensors transmit acoustic waves and receive them later. This is done by ultrasonic transducers, which transform an ultrasonic wave into an electrical signal and vice versa. Often, it is possible to use the same transducer for both transmitting and receiving. The most important parts of any ultrasonic sensor are the transducers. The spectral and spatial radiation characteristics of these components are the prime determinants of sensor performance. Such transducers must have a robust design, stable radiation pattern (high directivity) and good receiving sensitivity. Intelligent ultrasonic sensors have the possibility to extract the information about the variables to be measured, carried by the ultrasonic signals efficiently and with accuracy. To achieve this performance, the signals are processed by dedicated hardware (accurate electronic measuring devices). Ultrasound has the property, that its velocity is strongly affected by the flow velocity of the fluids in which it propagates. The ultrasonic flowmeters have gained a lot of attention over the past few years; they have several advantages over the differential pressure flowmeter, turbine meters, coriolis meters and vortex meters. They are widely used to measure the flow of liquids, first, they are either less intrusive (wetted flowmeter) or non-intrusive (clamp-on flowmeter), depending on the model. Also, they don't have moving parts that are subject to wear over time, and with minimum obstruction of the flow. Ultrasonic flowmeter are not limited to clean liquids (Transit time flowmeter), a special type of ultrasonic flowmeter can also accurately measure the flow of slurries and liquids with many impurities (Doppler flowmeter). This part of paper describes the intelligent ultrasonic sensor. The conception or the realization of intelligent ultrasonic sensor requires the synthesis of several technologies, a knowledge in the fields of sensor, digital ultrasonic signal processing, distributed system and

  5. Variable density flowmeter for loading road tankers using process tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deloughry, Richard; Young, Matthew; Pickup, Elaine; Barratt, Lawrence

    2001-02-01

    Montell Carrington Limited produces polyethylene and polypropylene nibs, which are sold in bulk form to companies who use them to make products for the consumer market. The nibs are stored in 30 storage bunkers, each with a capacity of 500 tonnes. The external distribution of nibs is achieved using 40 tonne road tankers that are filled from each of the bunkers using gravity feed. Work has been undertaken at the Manchester Metropolitan University, in collaboration with Montell, to develop a Variable Density Flowmeter using Process Tomography that will enable the mass flow of nibs to be measured with an accuracy of +/-2% and hence control the loading of the road tankers. The flowmeter (260mm diameter) was situated between the bunker discharge outlet valve and the tanker. Measurement of the density distribution across the pipe, using Process Tomography, enabled the mass flow into the road tankers to be determined. The Montell Process Tomography (MPT) system was a PC based system incorporating Texas Instruments C40 parallel processors and a 12 electrode capacitance measuring system with a driven axial shield. The capacitance detector was an AC bridge detection circuit working at 100kHz, a demodulator and a back projection algorithm were used to obtain the process images.

  6. BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS: FIELD APPLICATION AND DATA ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper reviews application of borehole flowmeters in granular and fractured rocks. Basic data obtained in the field are the ambient flow log and the pumping-induced flow log. These basic logs may then be used to calculate other quantities of interest. The paper describes the ...

  7. In vitro assessment of an ultrasonic flowmeter for use in ventilated infants.

    PubMed

    Scalfaro, P; Cotting, J; Sly, P D

    2000-03-01

    An ultrasonic flowmeter could be advantageous over a differential pressure pneumotachograph having a constant error in varying conditions. The in vitro accuracy of ultrasonic tidal volume (VT) estimates for ventilated infants were evaluated. Flow linearity and frequency response were tested, as was the influence of humidity and oxygen content on the accuracy of VT estimates. The linearity was within the 5% limits between -350 and 350 mL x sec(-1) and was not affected by the presence of an endotracheal tube (ET). The frequency response was flat and unaffected by an ET up to 4.5 Hz. The VT in the range 7-100 mL, in air showed a mean error of 0.1% (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2-0.4%) with a maximum and minimum of 6.5 and -3.5% respectively. Humidity did not affect accuracy. After calibration in air, the maximal mean error for measurements in pure oxygen was 3.0% (95% CI 1.9-4.1%). Repeated measurements over 5.5 h had a mean error of 0.4% (95% CI -0.7-0.1%). The in vitro evaluation of an ultrasonic flowmeter showed stable accuracy in mechanical ventilation conditions. Changing connection geometry and oxygen content did not increase the error to a clinically relevant degree. The flowmeter could therefore be a better alternative than the pneumotachograph for ventilated infants.

  8. Effects of free convection and friction on heat-pulse flowmeter measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsai-Ping; Chia, Yeeping; Chen, Jiun-Szu; Chen, Hongey; Liu, Chen-Wuing

    2012-03-01

    SummaryHeat-pulse flowmeter can be used to measure low flow velocities in a borehole; however, bias in the results due to measurement error is often encountered. A carefully designed water circulation system was established in the laboratory to evaluate the accuracy and precision of flow velocity measured by heat-pulse flowmeter in various conditions. Test results indicated that the coefficient of variation for repeated measurements, ranging from 0.4% to 5.8%, tends to increase with flow velocity. The measurement error increases from 4.6% to 94.4% as the average flow velocity decreases from 1.37 cm/s to 0.18 cm/s. We found that the error resulted primarily from free convection and frictional loss. Free convection plays an important role in heat transport at low flow velocities. Frictional effect varies with the position of measurement and geometric shape of the inlet and flow-through cell of the flowmeter. Based on the laboratory test data, a calibration equation for the measured flow velocity was derived by the least-squares regression analysis. When the flowmeter is used with a diverter, the range of measured flow velocity can be extended, but the measurement error and the coefficient of variation due to friction increase significantly. At higher velocities under turbulent flow conditions, the measurement error is greater than 100%. Our laboratory experimental results suggested that, to avoid a large error, the heat-pulse flowmeter measurement is better conducted in laminar flow and the effect of free convection should be eliminated at any flow velocities. Field measurement of the vertical flow velocity using the heat-pulse flowmeter was tested in a monitoring well. The calibration of measured velocities not only improved the contrast in hydraulic conductivity between permeable and less permeable layers, but also corrected the inconsistency between the pumping rate and the measured flow rate. We identified two highly permeable sections where the horizontal

  9. Gas measurement using Coriolis mass flowmeters

    SciTech Connect

    Pawlas, G.; Patten, T.

    1995-12-31

    This paper demonstrates Coriolis mass flowmeters (CMF) can provide a solution for measuring the mass flowrate of gases directly, i.e. no knowledge of the gas properties is required. The test results for natural gas and compressed air presented here were obtained using a standard factory water calibration. This demonstrates properly designed CMF and linear devices and can provide accurate results independent of gas composition over wide pressure and mass flowrate ranges.

  10. Low flow vortex shedding flowmeter for hypergolics/all media

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thinh, Ngo

    1990-01-01

    A family of vortex shedding flowmeters for flow measurement of hypergols that requires a long term operation without removal from system lines was further developed. A family of vortex shedding flowmeters without moving parts was designed. The test loop to evaluate the meters for the Freon flow, which simulates the hypergolic fluids, was modified and reconstructed. Preliminary results were obtained on the output frequency characteristics of an 1/2 inch flowmeter as a function of the flow rate.

  11. 21 CFR 868.2350 - Gas calibration flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gas calibration flowmeter. 868.2350 Section 868.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2350 Gas calibration flowmeter....

  12. 21 CFR 868.2300 - Bourdon gauge flowmeter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bourdon gauge flowmeter. 868.2300 Section 868.2300 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2300 Bourdon gauge flowmeter....

  13. The influence of wellbore inflow on electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clemo, T.; Barrash, W.; Reboulet, E.C.; Johnson, T.C.; Leven, C.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a combined field, laboratory, and numerical study of electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements acquired without the use of a packer or skirt to block bypass flow around the flowmeter. The most significant finding is that inflow through the wellbore screen changes the ratio of flow through the flowmeter to wellbore flow. Experiments reveal up to a factor of two differences in this ratio for conditions with and without inflow through the wellbore screen. Standard practice is to assume the ratio is constant. A numerical model has been developed to simulate the effect of inflow on the flowmeter. The model is formulated using momentum conservation within the borehole and around the flowmeter. The model is embedded in the MODFLOW-2000 ground water flow code. ?? 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  14. A New Approach to Laminar Flowmeters

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Fernando Lopez; Diaz, Alvaro Deibe; Lema, Marcos Rodriguez; Rodriguez, Santiago Vazquez

    2010-01-01

    After studying the performance and characteristics of actual laminar flowmeters a new disposition for this type of sensors is proposed in such a way that the measurement errors introduced by the intrinsic nature of the device can be minimized. The preliminary study shows that the developing entry region introduces non-linearity effects in all these devices. These effects bring about not only errors, but also a change in the slope of the linear calibration respect of the Poiseuille relation. After a subsequent analysis on how these non-linearity errors can be reduced, a new disposition of this type of flowmeters is introduced. This device makes used of flow elements having pressure taps at three locations along its length and connected to three isolated chambers. In this way, the static pressure can be measured at three locations and contributed to by the pressure taps at the level of each chamber. Thus the linearization error is reduced with an additional advantage of producing a reduced pressure drop. PMID:22163486

  15. Ultrasonic flowmeters: temperature gradients and transducer geometry effects.

    PubMed

    Willatzen, M

    2003-03-01

    Ultrasonic flowmeter performance is addressed for the case of cylindrically shaped flowmeters employing two reciprocal ultrasonic transducers A and B so as to measure time-of-flight differences between signals transmitted from transducer A towards B followed by an equivalent signal transmitted from transducer B towards A. In the case where a liquid flows through the flowmeter's measuring section ("spoolpiece"), the arrival times of the two signals differ by an amount related to the flow passing between the two transducers. Firstly, a detailed study of flow measurement errors with mean flow in the laminar flow regime is carried out as a function of the mode index and the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio in the case where no temperature gradients are present in the flowmeter sensor. It is shown that all modes except the fundamental mode overestimate the mean flow by a factor of 33.33% while excitation of the fundamental mode solely give error-free measurements. The immediate consequences are that the flowmeter error decreases as the transducer diameter/cylinder diameter ratio approaches 1 from 0 reflecting the fact that the excitation level of the fundamental mode increases from almost 0 to 1 as this ratio approaches 1 from 0. Secondly, the effect on flowmeter performance due to flow-induced temperature gradients is examined. It is shown that the presence of temperature gradients leads to flowmeter errors at the higher-flow values even in the case where the fundamental mode is the only mode excited. It is also deduced that flowmeter errors in general depend on the distance between transducers A and B whether temperature gradients exist or not. This conclusion is not reflected in the usual definition of flowmeter errors given by the so-called mode-dependent deviation of measurement introduced in earlier works.

  16. Series Supply of Cryogenic Venturi Flowmeters for the ITER Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    André, J.; Poncet, J. M.; Ercolani, E.; Clayton, N.; Journeaux, J. Y.

    2015-12-01

    In the framework of the ITER project, the CEA-SBT has been contracted to supply 277 venturi tube flowmeters to measure the distribution of helium in the superconducting magnets of the ITER tokamak. Six sizes of venturi tube have been designed so as to span a measurable helium flowrate range from 0.1 g/s to 400g/s. They operate, in nominal conditions, either at 4K or at 300K, and in a nuclear and magnetic environment. Due to the cryogenic conditions and the large number of venturi tubes to be supplied, an individual calibration of each venturi tube would be too expensive and time consuming. Studies have been performed to produce a design which will offer high repeatability in manufacture, reduce the geometrical uncertainties and improve the final helium flowrate measurement accuracy. On the instrumentation side, technologies for differential and absolute pressure transducers able to operate in applied magnetic fields need to be identified and validated. The complete helium mass flow measurement chain will be qualified in four test benches: - A helium loop at room temperature to insure the qualification of a statistically relevant number of venturi tubes operating at 300K.- A supercritical helium loop for the qualification of venturi tubes operating at cryogenic temperature (a modification to the HELIOS test bench). - A dedicated vacuum vessel to check the helium leak tightness of all the venturi tubes. - A magnetic test bench to qualify different technologies of pressure transducer in applied magnetic fields up to 100mT.

  17. Calibration of sonic flowmeters for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lott, D. F.; Salsman, G. G.; Hodges, C. E.

    1980-12-01

    Scientists at the Naval Coastal Systems Center (NCSC) at Panama City, Florida, have used a commercially available acoustic flowmeter to monitor critical flow conditions during an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) funded study of the effects of biofouling on the efficiency of a prototype heat transfer system. Flowmeters of this type are particularly useful in applications requiring unimpeded flow; i.e., no sensor projecting into the moving fluid. Unfortunately, sonic flowmeters are somewhat difficult to calibrate and may be subject to drift. A method of calibration devised by NCSC may thus be of some interest to other users. It is the purpose of this report to document the special procedures used by test personnel to calibrate the flowmeters. Briefly, the calibration consisted of pumping sea water through the flowmeter into a tank suspended beneath a special load cell which provided an output voltage proportional to the weight of water in the tank. A programmable desktop calculator system was used to monitor changes in voltage as a function of time and convert these changes into flow rates for direct comparison with values read from the sonic flowmeter's digital display. Calibration checks were made at metered flows of 8, 10, 12, 14, 16, and 18 gallons per minute (gpm). It was found that computed flows were essentially linear but differed from metered values by as much as 9.0 percent.

  18. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, Stanley B.; Raue, Donald J.

    1982-01-01

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having ls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. The magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180.degree. apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  19. Magnetic flowmeter for electrically conductive liquid

    DOEpatents

    Skladzien, S.B.; Raue, D.J.

    1980-08-18

    A magnetic flowmeter includes first and second tube sections each having walls of non-magnetic material. The first tube is suitably connected to a process for passing a flow of an electrically conductive fluid to be measured. The second tube is established as a reference containing a still medium and is maintained at the same temperature as the first tube. A rotatable magnet assembly is disposed between the two tubes with at least two magnets attached to radially extending arms from a central shaft. Each magnet includes an air gap suitably sized to pass astraddle the diameter along a portion of the length of each of the two tubes. Two magnets are provided in matched pairs spaced 180/sup 0/ apart such that signals will be simultaneously generated in signal leads attached to each of the two tubes. By comparing the signals from the two tubes and varying the rotating speed of the magnet assembly until the signals are equal, or attain a maximum, the flow velocity of the fluid within the first tube can be determined. Through temperature monitoring and appropriate heaters, the two tubes are maintained at the same temperature.

  20. Validity of flowmeter data in heterogeneous alluvial aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianchi, Marco

    2017-04-01

    Numerical simulations are performed to evaluate the impact of medium-scale sedimentary architecture and small-scale heterogeneity on the validity of the borehole flowmeter test, a widely used method for measuring hydraulic conductivity (K) at the scale required for detailed groundwater flow and solute transport simulations. Reference data from synthetic K fields representing the range of structures and small-scale heterogeneity typically observed in alluvial systems are compared with estimated values from numerical simulations of flowmeter tests. Systematic errors inherent in the flowmeter K estimates are significant when the reference K field structure deviates from the hypothetical perfectly stratified conceptual model at the basis of the interpretation method of flowmeter tests. Because of these errors, the true variability of the K field is underestimated and the distributions of the reference K data and log-transformed spatial increments are also misconstrued. The presented numerical analysis shows that the validity of flowmeter based K data depends on measureable parameters defining the architecture of the hydrofacies, the conductivity contrasts between the hydrofacies and the sub-facies-scale K variability. A preliminary geological characterization is therefore essential for evaluating the optimal approach for accurate K field characterization.

  1. An ultrasonic flowmeter for measuring dynamic liquid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpini, T. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    A novel oscillating pipe system was developed to provide dynamic calibration wherein small sinusoidal signals with amplitudes of 0.5 to 10% of the steady-state flow were added to the steady-state flow by oscillating the flowmeter relative to the fixed pipes in the flow system. Excellent agreement was obtained between the dynamic velocities derived from an accelerometer mounted on the oscillating pipe system and those sensed by the flowmeter at frequencies of 7, 19, and 30 Hz. Also described were the signal processing techniques used to retrieve the small sinusoidal signals which were obscured by the fluid turbulence.

  2. Measurement of two-component flow using ultrasonic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitehouse, J. C.; Eghbali, D. A.; Flitton, V. E.; Anderson, D. G.

    Calibration of transit-time and Doppler ultrasonic flowmeters under two-component flow conditions has been conducted on 400 mm (16-in.) pipe. Testing covered total flows of 0.19 to 1.89 m(exp 3)/s (3000 to 30,000 gpm) and void fractions up to 40 percent. Both flowmeter types accurately measured total volumetric flow over a portion of their ranges. Pipe average void fraction, based on a three-beam gamma densitometer, was used to determine water component flow under stratified flow conditions, with similar results.

  3. Detecting the gas bubbles in a liquid metal coolant by means of magnetic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilner, A. I.; Morozov, S. A.; Zakharov, S. O.; Uralets, A. Yu.

    Solution of some problems of control and diagnosis of circuits with a liquid-metal coolant (LMC) often requires the detection of gas bubbles penetrating the circulation loop. The sources of gas intake can be presented by failed fuel elements in reactor core, failed heat-exchange surfaces in sodium-water steam generators in the secondary circuits, gas capture by circulating coolant from gas circuits. Sometimes the gas is especially injected into circulating coolant to study the dynamics of accumulation and extraction of gas bubbles and to solve research problems related to simulations of emergency situations. The most commonly used methods for gas bubble detection include methods based on measuring coolant electric conductivity. A method for detecting gas bubbles in LMC, based on revealing the change of its electric conductivity is considered. Magnetic flowmeter is used as a detecting element of these changes. Approximate theory for describing spectral and energy noises in signals of a magnetic flowmeter, controlling the flow rate of LMC with gas bubbles is suggested. A new method for signal reading is suggested. Experimental results illustrating the possibility of using the method for measuring the rate of bubble movement and studying the dependence of gas bubble volume on the flow rate of injected gas are presented.

  4. Improved strain-wire flowmeter has fast response time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dillon, R. C.; Dunbar, W. R.

    1965-01-01

    Strain-sensitive resistance wires in a Wheatstone bridge arrangement form the sensing element of a flowmeter. The change in resistance of the wires is measured as a function of stream velocity. Thus the electrical output is a measure of both rapidly varying and steady fluid-flow rates.

  5. The Q-sonic ultrasonic gas flowmeter for custody transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Drenthen, J.G.

    1995-12-31

    This paper presents an outline of the theory and methods applied in ultrasonic gas flow metering for custody transfer. The development of a multipath instrument for custody transfer will be discussed, and recent developments will be indicated. Practical applications are illustrated using the Servex 5-path Q.Sonic custody transfer flowmeter.

  6. Flowmeter measures flow rates of high temperature fluids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1966-01-01

    Flowmeter in which flow rate is determined by measuring the position and thus the displacement of an internal float acted upon by the flowing fluid determines the flow rates of various liquid metals at elevated temperatures. Viscous forces cause the float to move from its mounted position, affording several means for measuring this motion and the flow rate.

  7. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF BOREHOLE FLOWMETERS FOR ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In order to understand the origin of contaminant plumes and infer their future migration, one requires a knowledge of the hydraulic conductivity (K) distribution. n many aquifers, the borehole flowmeter offers the most direct technique available for developing a log of hydraulic ...

  8. Developing a flowmeter for streams with high solids content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. K.; Wilson, J. H.

    1984-07-01

    A type of flowmeter, based on a piping arrangement similar to a Wheatstone bridge, was tested to measure the flow rate of the feed to the Kerr-McGee critical solvent deashing (CSD) unit of the solvent refined coal pilot plant in Wilsonville, Alabama. To simulate the non-Newtonian behavior of the CSD feed stream, mineral oil and a mixture of a polymer, carboxymethyl cellulose, and water were used in the tests. It is shown that there is a direct relationship between the flow rate and the ratio of the pressure drops across the parallel legs of the flowmeter and across a line connecting the center of the parallel legs. A mathematical model, developed previously to predict the dynamics of the flow measuring system, was tested, and the predicted results matched the measured values fairly well.

  9. A vortex-shedding flowmeter based on IPMCs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pasquale, Giovanna; Graziani, Salvatore; Pollicino, Antonino; Strazzeri, Salvatore

    2016-01-01

    Ionic polymer-metal composites (IPMCs) are electroactive polymers that can be used both as sensors and actuators. They have been demonstrated for many potential applications, in wet and underwater environments. Applications in fields such as biomimetics, robotics, and aerospace, just to mention a few, have been proposed. In this paper, the sensing nature of IPMCs is used to develop a flowmeter based on the vortex shedding phenomenon. The system is described, and a model is proposed and verified. A setup has been realized, and data have been acquired for many working conditions. The performance of the sensing system has been investigated by using acquired experimental data. Water flux velocities in the range [0.38, 2.83] m s-1 have been investigated. This working range is comparable with ranges claimed for established technologies. Results show the suitability of the proposed system to work as a flowmeter. The proposed transducer is suitable for envisaged post-silicon applications, where the use of IPMCs gives the opportunity to realize a new generating polymeric flowmeter. This has potential applications in fields where properties of IPMCs such as low cost, usability, and disposability are relevant.

  10. Flowmetering of drainage wells in Kuwait City, Kuwait

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paillet, Frederick L.; Senay, Y.; Mukhopadhyay, A.; Szekely, F.

    2000-01-01

    A heat-pulse flowmeter was used in six drainage wells in Kuwait City for flow profiling under both ambient and pumping conditions. The data collected were used in: (a) estimating the cross-flow among the screened intervals under ambient conditions; (b) estimating the relative transmissivity adjacent to the individual screen zones; and (c) determination of the hydraulic heads at the far boundaries of the large-scale aquifer zones. These inferences were cross-checked against known hydrogeology of the aquifer-aquitard system in the study area, and the calibration results of numerical flow modeling. The major conclusions derived from the flow measurements were: (a) the presence of natural downward cross-flow under ambient condition supported the hypothesis that the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer in the study area was divided into a series of permeable units (aquifers), separated by confining or semi-confining beds (aquitards); (b) the head differences between the different screened zones, derived through modeling of the flowmeter data of the wells, provided additional confirmation for the division of the upper part of the Kuwait Group aquifer into compartments in the study area; (c) flowmeter data indicated that the second and third aquifers were contributing most of the water to the well bores, compared with the uppermost (first) and the lowermost (fourth) aquifers; and (d) inflow to the wells during pumping was associated with discrete sub-intervals in the screened zones, controlled by local aquifer heterogeneity, and possibly clogging of screens and gravel pack.

  11. Flowmeters for use in the nuclear industry: How to select the appropriate instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    Because flow is one of the most common process variables measured, numerous types of flowmeters based on a variety of measurement principles are available. Although these numerous flowmeter types allow one to measure almost any flow, the wide variety also makes selecting an appropriate flowmeter a complex and potentially difficult task. This paper reviews the definition and importance of basic hydraulic principles and the design parameters critical to an accurate flow measurement, the principles used in flow monitoring and their advantages and disadvantages, and a method for selecting an appropriate flowmeter. 6 refs.

  12. Time delay estimation in the ultrasonic flowmeter in the oil well

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jian; Lin, Weijun; Zhang, Chengyu; Shen, Zhihui; Zhang, Hailan

    2010-01-01

    A new prototype of ultrasonic flowmeter used in the oil well is presented. The flowmeter depends on the time delay between the propagating times of the downstream and upstream ultrasonic pulses. The ultrasonic passageway is slanted to prevent the disadvantage introduced by the high viscosity of the oil. Two method of time delay estimation: threshold and cross-correlation are both studied and realized.

  13. Data Oscillation Resolution of Propellant Flowmeter Used in FASTRAC Engine Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heflin, J.; Koelbl, M.; Martin, M. A.; Nesman, T.; Hicks, G. D.; Kennedy, Jim W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Stennis Space Centers' horizontal test facility, Marshall Space Flight Centers' propulsion test article and the X-34 flight vehicle are designed with V-cone flowmeters for measurement of both RP-1 and LOX flow-rates for Fastrac engine testing. Delta pressure transducer data from these flowmeters are used to calibrate the RP-1 and LOX mixture ratio in the Fastrac engine. Data from the V-Cone flowmeter delta pressure transducers have excessive oscillation. The delta pressure oscillations have caused flowrate data fluctuations that interfered with making the accurate readings necessary to calibrate the RP-1 and LOX mixture ratio required for Fastrac engine operation. The objective of this report is to document the flowmeter data oscillation problem and the method used to obtain more reliable flowmeter data.

  14. "Hot-wire" microfluidic flowmeter based on a microfiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shao-Cheng; Liu, Zeng-Yong; Li, Cheng; Ge, Shi-Jun; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2016-12-15

    Using an optical microfiber coupler (MC), we present a microfluidic platform for strong direct or indirect light-liquid interaction by wrapping a MC around a functionalized capillary. The light propagating in the MC and the liquid flowing in the capillary can be combined and divorced smoothly, keeping a long-distance interaction without the conflict of input and output coupling. Using this approach, we experimentally demonstrate a "hot-wire" microfluidic flowmeter based on a gold-integrated helical MC device. The microfluid inside the glass channel takes away the heat, then cools the MC and shifts the resonant wavelength. Due to the long-distance interaction and high temperature sensitivity, the proposed microfluidic flowmeter shows an ultrahigh flow rate sensitivity of 2.183 nm/(μl/s) at a flow rate of 1 μl/s. The minimum detectable change of the flow rate is around 9 nl/s at 1 μl/s.

  15. In-well hydraulics of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Dinwiddie, C.L.; Foley, N.A.; Molz, F.J.

    1999-03-01

    Previous studies have suggested that head losses associated with the application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) can have important and detrimental effects on the use of the instrument for measurement of hydraulic conductivity (K) profiles. Head losses associated with flow through the meter may cause bypass flow around the packer if the well is gravel packed. In any type of well, changing head losses with meter position can cause changes in flow into the well that are not related directly to the K distribution. Such flow changes, or redistribution, can cause errors in the calculation of the K profile. Numerical simulations, based on measured head losses, indicate that bypass flow in gravel packed systems increases with increasing flow rate through the meter, increasing gravel pack conductivity, and increasing gravel pack thickness. Ideally, the EBF should not be used in gravel packed wells, due to the occurrence of bypass flow. Investigations into the flow redistribution phenomenon indicate that the top portion of the aquifer is where the greatest over-estimation of K occurs. The portion of the well below the flowmeter is isolated from the observed drawdown as measured from the surface. In this region, the well experiences a reduced drawdown, which differs from the observed drawdown by an amount equal to the head loss at that meter position. Flow redistribution causes a more pronounced effect in more highly conductive mediums and may be almost negligible in mediums of low conductivity.

  16. Application of the electromagnetic borehole flowmeter and evaluation of previous pumping tests at Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant. Final report, June 15, 1992--August 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.C.; Julian, S.C.; Neton, M.J.

    1993-01-01

    Multi-well pumping tests have been concluded at wells MW79, MW108, and PW1 at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) to determine the hydraulic properties of the Regional Gravel Aquifer (RGA). Soil cores suggest that the RGA consists of a thin sandy facies (2 to 6 feet) at the top of a thicker (> 10 feet) gravelly facies. Previous analyses have not considered any permeability contrast between the two facies. To assess the accuracy of this assumption, TVA personnel conducted borehole flowmeter tests at wells MW108 and PW1. Well MW79 could not be tested. The high K sand unit is probably 10 times more permeable than comparable zone in the gravelly portion of the RGA. Previous analyses of the three multi-well aquifer tests do not use the same conceptual aquifer model. Data analysis for one pumping test assumed that leakance was significant. Data analysis for another pumping test assumed that a geologic boundary was significant. By collectively analyzing all three tests with the borehole flowmeter results, the inconsistency among the three pumping tests can be explained. Disparity exists because each pumping test had a different placement of observation wells relative to the high K zone delineating by flowmeter testing.

  17. E.M.I Effects of Cathodic Protection on Electromagnetic Flowmeters

    PubMed Central

    Gundogdu, Serdar; Sahin, Ozge

    2007-01-01

    Electromagnetic flowmeters are used to measure the speed of water flow in water distribution systems. Corrosion problem in metal pipelines can be solved by cathodic protection methods. This paper presents a research on corruptive effects of the cathodic protection system on electromagnetic flowmeter depending on its measuring principle. Experimental measurements are realized on the water distribution pipelines of the Izmir Municipality, Department of Water and Drainage Administration (IZSU) in Turkey and measurement results are given. Experimental results proved that the values measured by the electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) are affected by cathodic protection system current. Comments on the measurement results are made and precautions to be taken are proposed.

  18. Measuring intake flows in hydroelectric plants with an acoustic scintillation flowmeter

    SciTech Connect

    Lemon, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    The Acoustic Scintillation Flowmeter (ASFM) offers some unique advantages for measuring intake flows in hydroelectric plants. The method is non-intrusive, resulting in a minimum of flow interference and is well-suited to use in low-head dams and other applications where intake tunnels are short or have awkward geometries. Deployment in intake gate slots is straightforward, allowing data to be collected quickly and easily, with a minimum of plant down-time. An example of such flow measurements is shown. Interest in assessing the capability of the ASFM to make the highly-accurate measurements suitable for system efficiency evaluations led to our performing a series of tow-tank tests. Over a range of speeds from 0.5 to 5.0 m/sec, the mean deviation between the towing speed and the ASFM measurements was less than 0.5%. Measurements at an instrumented dam site are planned as the next stage in the accuracy assessment.

  19. Quantitative void fraction measurement with an eddy current flowmeter for generation IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Bergez, W.; Cavaro, M.; Paumel, K.; Jeannot, J.P.

    2015-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the response of an eddy current type flowmeter in two phase liquid-metal flow. We use the technique of ellipse fit and correlate the fluctuations in the angle of inclination of this ellipse with the void fraction. The effects of physical parameters such as coil excitation frequency and flow velocity have been studied. The results show the possibility of using an eddy current flowmeter as a gas detector for large void fractions. (authors)

  20. Quantitative void fraction detection with an eddy current flowmeter for generation IV Sodium cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, M.; Tordjeman, Ph.; Bergez, W.; Cavaro, M.; Paumel, K.; Jeannot, J. P.

    2015-07-01

    This study was carried out to understand the response of an eddy current type flowmeter in two phase liquid-metal flow. We use the technique of ellipse fit and correlate the fluctuations in the angle of inclination of this ellipse with the void fraction. The effects of physical parameters such as coil excitation frequency and flow velocity have been studied. The results show the possibility of using an eddy current flowmeter as a gas detector for large void fractions. (authors)

  1. Borehole flowmeter logging for the accurate design and analysis of tracer tests.

    PubMed

    Basiricò, Stefano; Crosta, Giovanni B; Frattini, Paolo; Villa, Alberto; Godio, Alberto

    2015-04-01

    Tracer tests often give ambiguous interpretations that may be due to the erroneous location of sampling points and/or the lack of flow rate measurements through the sampler. To obtain more reliable tracer test results, we propose a methodology that optimizes the design and analysis of tracer tests in a cross borehole mode by using vertical borehole flow rate measurements. Experiments using this approach, herein defined as the Bh-flow tracer test, have been performed by implementing three sequential steps: (1) single-hole flowmeter test, (2) cross-hole flowmeter test, and (3) tracer test. At the experimental site, core logging, pumping tests, and static water-level measurements were previously carried out to determine stratigraphy, fracture characteristics, and bulk hydraulic conductivity. Single-hole flowmeter testing makes it possible to detect the presence of vertical flows as well as inflow and outflow zones, whereas cross-hole flowmeter testing detects the presence of connections along sets of flow conduits or discontinuities intercepted by boreholes. Finally, the specific pathways and rates of groundwater flow through selected flowpaths are determined by tracer testing. We conclude that the combined use of single and cross-borehole flowmeter tests is fundamental to the formulation of the tracer test strategy and interpretation of the tracer test results.

  2. Evaluation of accuracy of calculations of VVER-1000 core states with incomplete covering of fuel by the absorber

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhomirov, A. V.; Ponomarenko, G. L.

    2012-07-01

    An additional verification of bundled software (BS) SAPFIR-95 and amp;RC [1] and code KORSAR/GP [2] was performed. Both software products were developed in A.P. Alexandrov NITI and certified by ROSTEKHNADZOR of RF for numeric simulation of stationary, transitional and emergency conditions of VVER reactors. A benchmark model for neutronics calculations was created within the limits of this work. The cold subcritical state of VVER - 1000 reactor stationary fuelling was simulated on the basis of FA with an increased height of the fuel column (TVS-2M) considering detailed presentation of radial and front neutron reflectors. A case of passing of pure condensate slug through the core in initially deep subcritical state during start of the first RCP set after refueling was considered as an examined condition of reactor operation. A relatively small size of the slug, its spatial position near the reflectors (lower and lateral), as well as failure of the inserted control rods of the control and protection system (CPS CR) to reach the lower limit of the fuel column stipulate for methodical complexity of a correct calculation of the neutron multiplication constant (K{sub eff}) using engineering codes. Code RC was used as a test program in the process of reactor calculated 3-D modeling. Code MCNP5 [3] was used as the precision program, which solves the equation of neutrons transfer by Monte-Carlo method and which was developed in the US (Los-Alamos). As a result of comparative calculations dependency of K{sub eff} on two parameters was evaluated - boron acid concentration (Cb) and CPS CR position. Reactivity effect was evaluated, which is implemented as a result of failure of all CPS control rods to reach the lower fuel limit calculated using the engineering codes mentioned above. (authors)

  3. Effect of Volatility on Air-Fuel Ratio Distribution and Torque Output of a Carbureted Light Aircraft Piston Engine.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    Positive displacement fuel flow sensor Burette type volumetric fuel flowmeter(2) Meriam laminar airflow meter Lamdascan air-fuel ratio meter Lebow inline...therefore the resulting data was not utilized. The volumetric flowrate of engine intake air was calculated from the pressure drop across a Meriam Model 50MC2

  4. Three-dimensional geostatistical inversion of flowmeter and pumping test data.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Englert, Andreas; Cirpka, Olaf A; Vereecken, Harry

    2008-01-01

    We jointly invert field data of flowmeter and multiple pumping tests in fully screened wells to estimate hydraulic conductivity using a geostatistical method. We use the steady-state drawdowns of pumping tests and the discharge profiles of flowmeter tests as our data in the inference. The discharge profiles need not be converted to absolute hydraulic conductivities. Consequently, we do not need measurements of depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity at well locations. The flowmeter profiles contain information about relative vertical distributions of hydraulic conductivity, while drawdown measurements of pumping tests provide information about horizontal fluctuation of the depth-averaged hydraulic conductivity. We apply the method to data obtained at the Krauthausen test site of the Forschungszentrum Jülich, Germany. The resulting estimate of our joint three-dimensional (3D) geostatistical inversion shows an improved 3D structure in comparison to the inversion of pumping test data only.

  5. Permeability profiles in granular aquifers using flowmeters in direct-push wells

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Paradis, D.; Lefebvre, R.; Morin, R.H.; Gloaguen, E.

    2011-01-01

    Numerical hydrogeological models should ideally be based on the spatial distribution of hydraulic conductivity (K), a property rarely defined on the basis of sufficient data due to the lack of efficient characterization methods. Electromagnetic borehole flowmeter measurements during pumping in uncased wells can effectively provide a continuous vertical distribution of K in consolidated rocks. However, relatively few studies have used the flowmeter in screened wells penetrating unconsolidated aquifers, and tests conducted in gravel-packed wells have shown that flowmeter data may yield misleading results. This paper describes the practical application of flowmeter profiles in direct-push wells to measure K and delineate hydrofacies in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers having low-to-moderate K (10-6 to 10-4 m/s). The effect of direct-push well installation on K measurements in unconsolidated deposits is first assessed based on the previous work indicating that such installations minimize disturbance to the aquifer fabric. The installation and development of long-screen wells are then used in a case study validating K profiles from flowmeter tests at high-resolution intervals (15 cm) with K profiles derived from multilevel slug tests between packers at identical intervals. For 119 intervals tested in five different wells, the difference in log K values obtained from the two methods is consistently below 10%. Finally, a graphical approach to the interpretation of flowmeter profiles is proposed to delineate intervals corresponding to distinct hydrofacies, thus providing a method whereby both the scale and magnitude of K contrasts in heterogeneous unconsolidated aquifers may be represented. Journal compilation ?? 2010 National Ground Water Association.

  6. SHOOT flowmeter and pressure transducers. [for Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashani, A.; Wilcox, R. A.; Spivak, A. L.; Daney, D. E.; Woodhouse, C. E.

    1990-01-01

    A venturi flowmeter has been designed and constructed for the Superfluid Helium On-Orbit Transfer (SHOOT) experiment. The calibration results obtained from the SHOOT venturi demonstrate the ability of the flowmeter to meet the requirements of the SHOOT experiment. Flow rates as low as 20 cu dm/h and as high as 800 cu dm/h have been measured. Performances of the SHOOT differential and absolute pressure transducers, which have undergone calibration and vibration tests, are also included. Throughout the tests, the responses of the transducers remained linear and repeatable to within + or - 1 percent of the full scales of the transducers.

  7. Using flowmeter pulse tests to define hydraulic connections in the subsurface: A fractured shale example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, J.H.; Paillet, Frederick L.

    2002-01-01

    Cross-borehole flowmeter pulse tests define subsurface connections between discrete fractures using short stress periods to monitor the propagation of the pulse through the flow system. This technique is an improvement over other cross-borehole techniques because measurements can be made in open boreholes without packers or previous identification of water-producing intervals. The method is based on the concept of monitoring the propagation of pulses rather than steady flow through the fracture network. In this method, a hydraulic stress is applied to a borehole connected to a single, permeable fracture, and the distribution of flow induced by that stress monitored in adjacent boreholes. The transient flow responses are compared to type curves computed for several different types of fracture connections. The shape of the transient flow response indicates the type of fracture connection, and the fit of the data to the type curve yields an estimate of its transmissivity and storage coefficient. The flowmeter pulse test technique was applied in fractured shale at a volatile-organic contaminant plume in Watervliet, New York. Flowmeter and other geophysical logs were used to identify permeable fractures in eight boreholes in and near the contaminant plume using single-borehole flow measurements. Flowmeter cross-hole pulse tests were used to identify connections between fractures detected in the boreholes. The results indicated a permeable fracture network connecting many of the individual boreholes, and demonstrated the presence of an ambient upward hydraulic-head gradient throughout the site.

  8. Characterization of Preferential Flow Path in Fractured Rock Using Heat-pulse Flowmeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Tsai-Ping; Lin, Ming-Hsuan; Chuang, Po-Yu; Chia, Yeeping

    2015-04-01

    Rigorous thinking on how to dispose radioactive wastes safely is essential to mankind and living environment. The concepts of multiple barriers and deep geologic disposal remain the preferred option to retard the radionuclide migration in most countries. However, the investigation of preferential groundwater flow path in a fractured rock is a challenge to the characterization of potential disposal site. Heat-pulse flowmeter is a developing logging tool for measuring the vertical flow velocity in a borehole under a constant pumping or injection rate and provides a promising direct measurement method for determining the vertical distribution of hydraulic conductivity of formation. As heat-pulse flowmeter is a potential technique to measure low-velocity borehole flow, we adopted it to test the feasibility of detecting permeable fractures. Besides, a new magnetic tracer made by nano-iron particles is developed to identify the possible flow path precisely and to verify the permeable section detected by the heat-pulse flowmeter. The magnetic tracer was received by a magnet array and can also be detected by a sensor of electric conductivity. The test site is located in the Heshe of Taiwan. Eight wells were established in a fractured sandy siltstone for characterizing the fracture network. The test wells are 25 to 45 m depth and opened ranging from 15 to 45 m. Prior to the heat-pulse flowmeter measurement, we also performed surface geological investigation, pumping test, geophysical logging, and salt tracer test. Field measurements using heat-pulse flowmeter were then conducted at a constant pumping rate. The measurement interval is 50 to 100 cm in depth but improved to 25 cm near the relatively permeable zone. Based on the results of heat-pulse flowmeter, several permeable sections were identified. The magnetic tracer tests were then conducted to verify the potential preferential flow pathway between adjacent wells. Test results indicated that water flow in borehole is

  9. Using a thermistor flowmeter with attached video camera for monitoring sponge excurrent speed and oscular behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Jorgensen, Damien; Webster, Nicole S.; Pineda, Mari-Carmen; Duckworth, Alan

    2016-01-01

    A digital, four-channel thermistor flowmeter integrated with time-lapse cameras was developed as an experimental tool for measuring pumping rates in marine sponges, particularly those with small excurrent openings (oscula). Combining flowmeters with time-lapse imagery yielded valuable insights into the contractile behaviour of oscula in Cliona orientalis. Osculum cross-sectional area (OSA) was positively correlated to measured excurrent speeds (ES), indicating that sponge pumping and osculum contraction are coordinated behaviours. Both OSA and ES were positively correlated to pumping rate (Q). Diel trends in pumping activity and osculum contraction were also observed, with sponges increasing their pumping activity to peak at midday and decreasing pumping and contracting oscula at night. Short-term elevation of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC) within the seawater initially decreased pumping rates by up to 90%, ultimately resulting in closure of the oscula and cessation of pumping. PMID:27994973

  10. Metrological analysis of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for cryogenic helium

    SciTech Connect

    Arpaia, P.; Girone, M.; Liccardo, A.; Pezzetti, M.; Piccinelli, F.

    2015-12-15

    The metrological performance of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for monitoring helium under cryogenic conditions is assessed. At this aim, an uncertainty model of the transducer, mainly based on a valve model, exploiting finite-element approach, and a virtual flowmeter model, based on the Sereg-Schlumberger method, are presented. The models are validated experimentally on a case study for helium monitoring in cryogenic systems at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The impact of uncertainty sources on the transducer metrological performance is assessed by a sensitivity analysis, based on statistical experiment design and analysis of variance. In this way, the uncertainty sources most influencing metrological performance of the transducer are singled out over the input range as a whole, at varying operating and setting conditions. This analysis turns out to be important for CERN cryogenics operation because the metrological design of the transducer is validated, and its components and working conditions with critical specifications for future improvements are identified.

  11. Metrological analysis of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for cryogenic helium.

    PubMed

    Arpaia, P; Girone, M; Liccardo, A; Pezzetti, M; Piccinelli, F

    2015-12-01

    The metrological performance of a virtual flowmeter-based transducer for monitoring helium under cryogenic conditions is assessed. At this aim, an uncertainty model of the transducer, mainly based on a valve model, exploiting finite-element approach, and a virtual flowmeter model, based on the Sereg-Schlumberger method, are presented. The models are validated experimentally on a case study for helium monitoring in cryogenic systems at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). The impact of uncertainty sources on the transducer metrological performance is assessed by a sensitivity analysis, based on statistical experiment design and analysis of variance. In this way, the uncertainty sources most influencing metrological performance of the transducer are singled out over the input range as a whole, at varying operating and setting conditions. This analysis turns out to be important for CERN cryogenics operation because the metrological design of the transducer is validated, and its components and working conditions with critical specifications for future improvements are identified.

  12. An investigation of the accuracy of empirical aircraft design for the development of an unmanned aerial vehicle intended for liquid hydrogen fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Christopher Scott

    A study was conducted to assess the accuracy of empirical techniques used for the calculation of flight performance for unmanned aerial vehicles. This was achieved by quantifying the error between a mathematical model developed with these techniques and experimental test data taken using an unmanned aircraft. The vehicle utilized for this study was developed at Washington State University for the purpose of flying using power derived from hydrogen stored as a cryogenic liquid. The vehicle has a mass of 32.8 kg loaded and performed a total of 14 flights under battery power for 3.58 total flight hours. Over these flights, the design proved it is capable of sustaining level flight from the power available from a PEM fuel cell propulsion system. The empirical techniques used by the model are explicitly outlined within. These yield several performance metrics that are compared to measurements taken during flight testing. Calculations of required thrust for steady flight over all airspeeds and rates of climb modeled are found to have a mean percent error of 3.2%+/-7.0% and a mean absolute percent error of 34.6%+/-5.1%. Comparison of the calculated and measured takeoff distance are made and the calculated thrust required to perform a level turn at a given rate is compared to flight test data. A section of a test flight is analyzed, over which the vehicle proves it can sustain level flight under 875 watts of electrical power. The aircraft's design is presented including the wing and tail, propulsion system, and build technique. The software and equipment used for the collection and analysis of flight data are given. Documentation and validation is provided of a unique test rig for the characterization of propeller performance using a car. The aircraft remains operational to assist with research of alternative energy propulsion systems and novel fuel storage techniques. The results from the comparison of the mathematical model and flight test data can be utilized to assist

  13. Application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data for improved production well construction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gossell, M.A.; Nishikawa, T.; Hanson, R.T.; Izbicki, J.A.; Tabidian, M.A.; Bertine, K.

    1999-01-01

    Ground water production wells commonly are designed to maximize well yield and, therefore, may be screened over several water-bearing zones. These water-bearing zones usually are identified, and their hydrogeologic characteristics and water quality are inferred, on the basis of indirect data such as geologic and geophysical logs. Production well designs based on these data may result in wells that are drilled deeper than necessary and are screened through zones having low permeability or poor-quality ground water. In this study, we examined the application of flowmeter logging and depth-dependent water quality samples for the improved design of production wells in a complex hydrogeologic setting. As a demonstration of these techniques, a flowmeter log and depth-dependent water quality data were collected from a long-screened production well within a multilayered coastal aquifer system in the Santa Clara-Calleguas Basin, Ventura County, California. Results showed that the well yields most of its water from four zones that constitute 58% of the screened interval. The importance of these zones to well yield was not readily discernible from indirect geologic or geophysical data. The flowmeter logs and downhole water quality data also show that small quantities of poor-quality water could degrade the overall quality of water from the well. The data obtained from one well can be applied to other proposed wells in the same hydrologic basin. The application of flowmeter and depth-dependent water quality data to well design can reduce installation costs and improve the quantity and quality of water produced from wells in complex multiple-aquifer systems.

  14. Optical flowmeter using a modal interferometer based on a single nonadiabatic fiber taper.

    PubMed

    Frazão, O; Caldas, P; Araújo, F M; Ferreira, L A; Santos, J L

    2007-07-15

    A novel in-fiber modal interferometer is presented that is based on a nonadiabatic biconical fused taper that couples light between the cladding and the core, combined with the Fresnel reflection at the fiber end. It is observed that the returned light from this fiber structure shows a channeled spectrum similar to that of a two-wave Michelson interferometer. The application of this device as a fiber optic flowmeter sensor is demonstrated.

  15. Coriolis Mass-Flowmeter for aerostatic gas amount determination in zero pressure stratosperic balloons.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behar, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    The CNES ballooning community regularly operates zero pressure balloons in many countries around the world (recently in France, Sweden, Canada and soon, Australia in 2017). An important operational flight parameter is the aerostatic gas mass injected into the balloon (currently helium and hydrogen in the study). Besides the lifting force, it determines mainly the ascent rate from which the adiabatic expansion depends directly. A too high ascent velocity in very cold air temperature profiles could result in a gas temperature drop which if too great, might induce brittleness of the envelope. A precise gas mass determination is therefore critical for performance as well as for mission safety. The various gas supply tanks in various countries all have different characteristics with possible uncertainties with regard to their volumes. This makes the currently used gas mass determination method based on supply tank pressure measurements unreliable. This method also relies on tank temperature, another source of inaccuracy in the gas amount determination. CNES has therefore prospected for alternative methods to reduce inaccuracies and perhaps also ease the operational procedures during balloon inflation. Coriolis mass-flowmeters which have reached industrial maturity, offer the great advantage over other flowmeters to be able to directly measure the mass of the transferred fluid, and not deducing it from other parameters as other types of flowmeters would do. An industrial contractor has been therefore assigned to integrate this solution into the CNES operational setup. This new system is to be tested in February 2016. The presentation will briefly explain the Coriolis flowmeter's principle and display the February 2016 performance tests' results. The expected incidence on zero pressure balloons' trajectories will also be discussed based on simulations ran on a balloon flight simulator software.

  16. Microfluidic flowmeter based on micro "hot-wire" sandwiched Fabry-Perot interferometer.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yan, Guofeng; Zhang, Liang; He, Sailing

    2015-04-06

    We present a compact microfluidic flowmeter based on Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI). The FPI was composed by a pair of fiber Bragg grating reflectors and a micro Co(2+)-doped optical fiber cavity, acting as a "hot-wire" sensor. Microfluidic channels made from commercial silica capillaries were integrated with the FPIs on a chip to realize flow-rate sensing system. By utilizing a tunable pump laser with wavelength of 1480 nm, the proposed flowmeter was experimentally demonstrated. The flow rate of the liquid sample is determined by the induced resonance wavelength shift of the FPI. The effect of the pump power, microfluidic channel scale and temperature on the performance of our flowmeter was investigated. The dynamic response was also measured under different flow-rate conditions. The experimental results achieve a sensitivity of 70 pm/(μL/s), a dynamic range up to 1.1 μL/s and response time in the level of seconds, with a spatial resolution ~200 μm. Such good performance renders the sensor a promising supplementary component in microfluidic biochemical sensing system. Furthermore, simulation modal was built up to analyze the heat distribution of the "hot-wire" cavity and optimize the FPI structure as well.

  17. In vitro validation of an ultrasonic flowmeter in order to measure the functional residual capacity in newborns.

    PubMed

    Wauer, Juliane; Leier, Tim U; Henschen, Matthias; Wauer, Roland R; Schmalisch, Gerd

    2003-05-01

    Ultrasonic transit-time airflow meters (UFM) allow simultaneous measurements of volume flow V'(t) and molar mass MM(t) of the breathing gas in the mainstream. Consequently, by using a suitable tracer gas the functional residual capacity (FRC) of the lungs can be measured by a gas wash-in/wash-out technique. The aim of this study was to investigate the in vitro accuracy of a multiple-breath wash-in/wash-out technique for FRC measurements using 4% sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) in air. V'(t) and MM(t) were measured with a Spiroson SCIENTIFIC flowmeter (ECO Medics, CH) with 1.3 ml dead space. Linearity of airflow and MM were tested using different tidal volumes (V(T)) and breathing gases with different O2 and SF6 concentrations. To determine the accuracy of FRC measurements SF6 wash-in and wash-out curves from four mechanical lung models (FRC of 22, 53, 102 and 153 ml) were evaluated by the Spiroson. For each model five measurements were performed with a physiological V(T)/FRC ratio of 0.3 and constant respiratory rate of 30 min(-1). The error of measured V(T) (range 4-60 ml) was <2.5%. There was a strong correlation between the measured and calculated MM of different breathing gases (r = 0.989), and the measuring accuracy was better than 1%. The measured FRC of the four models were 20.3, 49.7, 104.3 and 153.4 ml with a coefficient of variation of 16.5%, 4.5%, 4.9% and 3%. Accordingly, for FRC <100 ml the in vitro accuracy was better than 8% and for FRC >100 ml better than 2.5%. The determination of FRC by MM measurements using the UFM is a simple and cost-effective alternative to conventionally used gas analysers with an acceptable accuracy for many clinical purposes.

  18. Detection of Site-Specific Blood Flow Variation in Humans during Running by a Wearable Laser Doppler Flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Wataru; Nogami, Hirofumi; Takeuchi, Satoshi; Furue, Masutaka; Higurashi, Eiji; Sawada, Renshi

    2015-10-05

    Wearable wireless physiological sensors are helpful for monitoring and maintaining human health. Blood flow contains abundant physiological information but it is hard to measure blood flow during exercise using conventional blood flowmeters because of their size, weight, and use of optic fibers. To resolve these disadvantages, we previously developed a micro integrated laser Doppler blood flowmeter using microelectromechanical systems technology. This micro blood flowmeter is wearable and capable of stable measurement signals even during movement. Therefore, we attempted to measure skin blood flow at the forehead, fingertip, and earlobe of seven young men while running as a pilot experiment to extend the utility of the micro blood flowmeter. We measured blood flow in each subject at velocities of 6, 8, and 10 km/h. We succeeded in obtaining stable measurements of blood flow, with few motion artifacts, using the micro blood flowmeter, and the pulse wave signal and motion artifacts were clearly separated by conducting frequency analysis. Furthermore, the results showed that the extent of the changes in blood flow depended on the intensity of exercise as well as previous work with an ergometer. Thus, we demonstrated the capability of this wearable blood flow sensor for measurement during exercise.

  19. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  20. A simple microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter for operation at high pressure and high temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Christopher; Jundt, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    We describe a microfluidic Coriolis effect flowmeter that is simple to assemble, operates at elevated temperature and pressure, and can be operated with a lock-in amplifier. The sensor has a flow rate sensitivity greater than 2° of phase shift per 1 g/min of mass flow and is benchmarked with flow rates ranging from 0.05 to 2.0 g/min. The internal volume is 15 μl and uses off-the-shelf optical components to measure the tube motion. We demonstrate that fluid density can be calculated from the frequency of the resonating element with proper calibration.

  1. An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow.

    PubMed

    Olshausen, K; Gross, R; Kirchheim, H

    1976-11-30

    An isothermal flowmeter with improved frequency response for measuring tissue blood flow was developed using thermistors. Direct heating of the thermistors allows a simple construction of small (0.5 mm outer diameter) capillary probes which do not require any additional heating coil. The changes of a feedback current necessary to keep the thermistor at a constant increment above tissue temperature indicate tissue blood flow; a second thermistor compensates variations of tissue temperature. The dynamic performance of the device shows a low-pass characteristic with a cut-off frequency higher than 5 Hz. For low flow rates the output signal was found to be proportional to the flow; for higher flow rates a linearization was necessary. Since tissue temperature can be recorded continuously, intermittent quantitative in-vivo calibration seems possibly by evaluation of "heater off" curves in the perfused and non-perfused tissue. As the flowmeter is insensitive to tissue temperature, it can be used for long-term recordings.

  2. A study of the superficial palmar arteries using the Doppler Ultrasonic Flowmeter.

    PubMed Central

    Al-Turk, M; Metcalf, W K

    1984-01-01

    The pattern of the superficial arteries of the hand has been studied utilising the Doppler Flowmeter technique. The superficial arteries of the hand formed several diversified patterns that permitted classification into well defined categories. The arcus palmaris superficialis was complete in 84% of the hands and incomplete in 16%. The arteria digitalis palmaris communis primus took origin from the arch in 94% and from the arterial radialis indicis in 6% of the hands. The arteria princeps pollicis and radialis indicis were quite variable in their origin and frequently differed from the normal textbook description. In 52% of the subjects, the arterial patterns in the right and left hand were different with respect to one or more arteries, while they were identical in 48% of the subjects. It would be unwise to base anything more than tentative conclusions on the data so far accumulated, because of the small population used in this project and the absence of similar studies in the literature. PMID:6706837

  3. Totally Implantable Wireless Ultrasonic Doppler Blood Flowmeters: Toward Accurate Miniaturized Chronic Monitors.

    PubMed

    Rothfuss, Michael A; Unadkat, Jignesh V; Gimbel, Michael L; Mickle, Marlin H; Sejdić, Ervin

    2017-03-01

    Totally implantable wireless ultrasonic blood flowmeters provide direct-access chronic vessel monitoring in hard-to-reach places without using wired bedside monitors or imaging equipment. Although wireless implantable Doppler devices are accurate for most applications, device size and implant lifetime remain vastly underdeveloped. We review past and current approaches to miniaturization and implant lifetime extension for wireless implantable Doppler devices and propose approaches to reduce device size and maximize implant lifetime for the next generation of devices. Additionally, we review current and past approaches to accurate blood flow measurements. This review points toward relying on increased levels of monolithic customization and integration to reduce size. Meanwhile, recommendations to maximize implant lifetime should include alternative sources of power, such as transcutaneous wireless power, that stand to extend lifetime indefinitely. Coupling together the results will pave the way for ultra-miniaturized totally implantable wireless blood flow monitors for truly chronic implantation.

  4. The hot-film anemometer--a method for blood velocity determination. I. In vitro comparison with the electromagnetic blood flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P K

    1980-01-01

    In an invitro flowmodel a constrant temperature hot-film anemometer was tested, using conical needle and catheter-mounted probes. Calibration, linearization and zero-point determination as well as sensitivity change with hematocrit, angulation, flow direction and dirt deposits on the film are described. Curves were compared with those obtained simultaneously from an electromagnetic flowmeter. The hog-film anemometer was direction-insensitive and signals were seen 0.01--0.03 sec before the flowmeter signals. The frequency response of the anemometer was sufficiently higher to register turbulent flow. In 27 simultaneous measurements the mean anemometer results were 6 +/- 8% (+/- SD) higher than the flowmeter results and the peak results correspondingly 16 +/- 6%. Both differences was significant (p < 0.001). Qualitatively hog-film anemometer curves were comparable to electromagnetic flowmeter curves. However, certain differences were demonstrated.

  5. Characterization of Preferential Flow Paths from Single and Cross-borehole Flowmeter tests in a Fractured Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bour, O.; Le Borgne, T.; Paillet, F.; Caudal, J.

    2006-12-01

    The structure of the permeability field and in particular the connectivity of preferential flow paths controls the fluxes at large scale as well as the transport properties. However, this information is rarely available in the field unless intensive and time-consuming packer testing is achieved. In this study, we present a characterization of flow paths connectivity at the Plumeur fractured crystalline aquifer from cross-borehole flowmeter tests. We also compare hydraulic properties estimates obtained from single borehole flowmeter experiments, cross borehole flowmeter experiments and long term pumping tests. Cross borehole flowmeter tests have been recently proposed as an efficient technique to characterize the connectivity of fractures between boreholes. Cross borehole flowmeter tests consist of measuring transient vertical flow in an observation borehole when the pumping rate is changed in a nearby pumping well. The rate of change in borehole flow between flow zones intersected by the borehole depends on the connectivity and hydraulic properties of the flow zones between the two boreholes. Flow measurements were achieved with a calibrated heat-pulse flowmeter whose principle is to measure the time for a heat pulse to travel from a heat grid to a thermistor located a few cm above or below the heat source. We combined this method with single borehole flowmeter tests and long-term pumping tests to characterize the connectivity, geometry and hydraulic properties of large scale flow paths at the Plumeur aquifer where long-screened observation boreholes does not allow the use of packers. The aquifer is located on the south coast of Brittany in crystalline bedrock terrain characterized by igneous and metamorphic rocks. We restrict our analysis to the boreholes that are the closest to a pumping station within an area of approximately 600 meters in diameter. These boreholes react relatively rapidly to the pumping variations even for large borehole separations. Most

  6. Studies of powder flow using a recording powder flowmeter and measurement of the dynamic angle of repose.

    PubMed

    Hegde, R P; Rheingold, J L; Welch, S; Rhodes, C T

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the utility of the dynamic measurement of the angle of repose for pharmaceutical systems, using a variable rotating cylinder to quantify powder flow. The dynamic angle of repose of sodium chloride powder sieve fractions was evaluated using a variable rotating cylinder. The relationship between the static and the dynamic angle of repose is discussed. The dynamic angle of repose of six lots of a multivitamin preparation were compared for inter- and intralot variation. In both cases, no significant differences (p greater than 0.05) were observed. In the multivitamin formulation, lubricants at lower concentration levels did not show a significant effect (p greater than 0.05) on the dynamic angle of repose when compared with flow rates. The effect of different hopper sizes and geometry has been evaluated using the recording powder flowmeter. The results indicate that although different hoppers affect the quantitative nature of the results, the same general trends are apparent. Thus, it appears possible to use a recording powder flowmeter with small quantities of material to predict the effect of formulation and processing variables on the flow of production scale quantities. This paper does not describe a comprehensive evaluation of the pharmaceutical utility of measuring the dynamic angle of repose. However, the results discussed are not encouraging and suggest that the recording powder flowmeter is more sensitive to the effects of formulation and production variables on powder flow.

  7. Final report on EURAMET project No. 1046: Intercomparison of water flow standards using electromagnetic flowmeters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geršl, Jan; Lojek, Libor

    2013-01-01

    The Euramet comparison No. 1046 is a supplementary comparison of European national water flow laboratories. The comparison started in May 2008 and the measurements were finished in June 2009. Eleven laboratories took part in the comparison—namely: Austria (BEV), Bosnia and Herzegovina (IMBH), Czech Republic (CMI - pilot laboratory), France (CETIAT), Greece (EIM), Hungary (MKEH), Lithuania (VMT/LEI), Republic of Macedonia (BoM), Norway (Justervesenet), Slovakia (SMU) and Switzerland (METAS). Two electromagnetic flow-meters were used as transfer standards. Laboratories' results were compared in a range of flow-rates between 1 m3/h and 10 m3/h with water at a temperature near to 20 °C. The data were evaluated according to standard methods. Main text. To reach the main text of this paper, click on Final Report. Note that this text is that which appears in Appendix B of the BIPM key comparison database kcdb.bipm.org/. The final report has been peer-reviewed and approved for publication by EURAMET, according to the provisions of the CIPM Mutual Recognition Arrangement (CIPM MRA).

  8. Evaluation of a hot-wire respiratory flowmeter for clinical applicability.

    PubMed

    Yoshiya, I; Shimada, Y; Tanaka, K

    1979-11-01

    A hot-wire flowmeter was evaluated for clinical applicability. 1) Calibration with a syringe could be done if emptying duration was 1-15 s. 2) Outputs linearly decreased with decreasing concentration of N2 in O2. Outputs with CO2 in O2 and N2O in O2 represented nonlinear convex relationships with varying concentrations of CO2 and N2O. Correction for each gas mixture to be measured is required. 3) Outputs linearly decreased with decreasing barometric pressure. 4) Stability assessed with a piston respirator was excellent (within +/- 2% of syringe volume) after 15 min warmup time. However, daily calibrations are recommended in clinical situations. 5) Nebulization, if not excessive, was acceptable if the expired gas was measured at the mouth. 6) Hot-wire burning, which occurred when it was partially in contact with materials whose specific heat differed with air, was successfully protected with a simple shutoff circuit. 7) The possibility of producing nitrogen oxides by the catalytic action of the platinum hot-wire was denied by colorimetric determination. Interchangeability and sterilizability of transducers and improved mechanical strength with platinum-rhodium alloy are also discussed.

  9. Research on the optical fiber gas flowmeters based on intermodal interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yong; Hu, Hai-feng; Bi, Dan-juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-07-01

    In this work, a self-heating type optical fiber flowmeter with high sensitivity was proposed. The core-offset fiber structures were employed to couple a part of signal light into the fiber cladding layer, and the other part of light still propagated in the core layer. The intermodal interference between the two parts of light happened when the cladding modes were coupled back into core layer. Meanwhile, the high power laser was also introduced into fiber to heat the silver film coated on the surface of the cladding layer. When the cool gas flow passed, the temperature of the sensor probe decreased due to the heat transfer process. Because of the thermo-optic effect in the fiber, interference spectrum could be shifted when the temperature was changed. The experimental results showed the resolution of the proposed sensor was 2×10-2 m/s in the region of 0-8 m/s. The highest sensitivity could achieve 1537 pm/(m/s).

  10. Response of DWPF thermal flowmeters to composition change: Effect on 02 determination in Salt Process Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1992-02-03

    Thermal flowmeters (more accurately described as hot wire anamometers) have been installed in the Salt Process Cell (SPC) at the Savannah River Site to measure in-cell process flows. However, upon investigating the effect of composition on thermal flow meters, it was concluded that determining a priori correction factors is a very complicated process requiring fairly precise knowledge of the vapor composition and the meter characteristics. It is recommended that DWPF estimate air enleakage using a test procedure similar to one being developed in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) which circumvents the correction problem by in situ calibration, and develop a profile which characterizes air inleakaqe as a function of [Delta]P to be used in conjunction with the inleakage test procedure. The recommended test procedure has some distinct advantages over the simple material balance approach. More detailed information on the characteristics of thermal flow meters the recommended air inleakage test procedure, and the inleakage profile are discussed in this report.

  11. Response of DWPF thermal flowmeters to composition change: Effect on 02 determination in Salt Process Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, R.A.

    1992-02-03

    Thermal flowmeters (more accurately described as hot wire anamometers) have been installed in the Salt Process Cell (SPC) at the Savannah River Site to measure in-cell process flows. However, upon investigating the effect of composition on thermal flow meters, it was concluded that determining a priori correction factors is a very complicated process requiring fairly precise knowledge of the vapor composition and the meter characteristics. It is recommended that DWPF estimate air enleakage using a test procedure similar to one being developed in the Precipitate Hydrolysis Experimental Facility (PHEF) which circumvents the correction problem by in situ calibration, and develop a profile which characterizes air inleakaqe as a function of {Delta}P to be used in conjunction with the inleakage test procedure. The recommended test procedure has some distinct advantages over the simple material balance approach. More detailed information on the characteristics of thermal flow meters the recommended air inleakage test procedure, and the inleakage profile are discussed in this report.

  12. Development of Coriolis mass flowmeter with digital drive and signal processing technology.

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Li; Xu, Ke-Jun; Fang, Min; Liu, Cui; Xiong, Wen-Jun

    2013-09-01

    Coriolis mass flowmeter (CMF) often suffers from two-phase flowrate which may cause flowtube stalling. To solve this problem, a digital drive method and a digital signal processing method of CMF is studied and implemented in this paper. A positive-negative step signal is used to initiate the flowtube oscillation without knowing the natural frequency of the flowtube. A digital zero-crossing detection method based on Lagrange interpolation is adopted to calculate the frequency and phase difference of the sensor output signals in order to synthesize the digital drive signal. The digital drive approach is implemented by a multiplying digital to analog converter (MDAC) and a direct digital synthesizer (DDS). A digital Coriolis mass flow transmitter is developed with a digital signal processor (DSP) to control the digital drive, and realize the signal processing. Water flow calibrations and gas-liquid two-phase flowrate experiments are conducted to examine the performance of the transmitter. The experimental results show that the transmitter shortens the start-up time and can maintain the oscillation of flowtube in two-phase flowrate condition.

  13. Lorentz Force Flowmeter for Liquid Aluminum: Laboratory Experiments and Plant Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Yurii; Karcher, Christian; Thess, André

    2011-06-01

    This article aims to demonstrate that molten metal flow at a high temperature can be measured effectively in a contactless manner by using external direct current magnetic fields. The device applied in the present work is termed Lorentz force flowmeter (LFF) and is based on exposing the flow to a magnet system and measuring the drag force acting on it. Two series of measurements are reported. In the first series, we perform a model experiment in the laboratory using the eutectic alloy GaInSn, which is liquid at room temperature. The second series of measurements is devoted to two plant tests on flow measurement of a liquid aluminum alloy. In both tests, the force acting on the magnet system is measured that is equal to the Lorentz force acting on the flow. To generalize our results, we also derive the scaling law that relates the force acting on a localized magnet system to the flow rate of a fluid with arbitrary electrical conductivity. This law shows that LFF, if properly designed, has a wide range of potential applications in ferrous and nonferrous metallurgy.

  14. Numerical Simulation of Transit-Time Ultrasonic Flowmeters by a Direct Approach.

    PubMed

    Luca, Adrian; Marchiano, Regis; Chassaing, Jean-Camille

    2016-03-23

    This paper deals with the development of a computational code for the numerical simulation of wave propagation through domains with a complex geometry consisting in both solids and moving fluids. The emphasis is on the numerical simulation of ultrasonic flowmeters (UFMs) by modeling the wave propagation in solids with the equations of linear elasticity and in fluids with the linearized Euler equations. This approach requires high performance computing because of the high number of degrees of freedom and the long propagation distances. Therefore, the numerical method should be chosen with care. In order to minimize the numerical dissipation which may occur in this kind of configurations, the numerical method employed here is the nodal discontinuous Galerkin method. Also, this method is well suited for parallel computing. To speed up the code, almost all the computational stages have been implemented to run on GPU by using the CUDA programming model from NVIDIA. This approach has been validated and then used for the two-dimensional simulation of gas UFMs. The large contrast of acoustic impedance characteristic to gas UFMs makes their simulation a real challenge.

  15. Numerical Simulation of Transit-Time Ultrasonic Flowmeters by a Direct Approach.

    PubMed

    Luca, Adrian; Marchiano, Regis; Chassaing, Jean-Camille

    2016-06-01

    This paper deals with the development of a computational code for the numerical simulation of wave propagation through domains with a complex geometry consisting in both solids and moving fluids. The emphasis is on the numerical simulation of ultrasonic flowmeters (UFMs) by modeling the wave propagation in solids with the equations of linear elasticity (ELE) and in fluids with the linearized Euler equations (LEEs). This approach requires high performance computing because of the high number of degrees of freedom and the long propagation distances. Therefore, the numerical method should be chosen with care. In order to minimize the numerical dissipation which may occur in this kind of configuration, the numerical method employed here is the nodal discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method. Also, this method is well suited for parallel computing. To speed up the code, almost all the computational stages have been implemented to run on graphical processing unit (GPU) by using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA) programming model from NVIDIA. This approach has been validated and then used for the two-dimensional simulation of gas UFMs. The large contrast of acoustic impedance characteristic to gas UFMs makes their simulation a real challenge.

  16. Comparing flowmeter, aquifer test, and surface nuclear magnetic resonance data in Central Nebraska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, T.; Abraham, J. D.; Cannia, J. C.; Steele, G.; Hobza, C. M.; Li, Y.; McKenna, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    the earth's magnetic field. This necessitates locally calibrating the SNMR data against aquifer tests in order to derive a relation of the SNMR data to the local aquifers. After calibration, additional SNMR data can be used at sites with the same aquifer units to produce estimates of hydraulic properties. To test this methodology, SNMR, aquifer tests and flowmeter measurements were conducted at two sites within the High Plains Aquifer in Central Nebraska. A novel compressive inversion scheme was developed that simultaneously processes the entire SNMR dataset and accounts for electrical conductivity. The inverted porosity and decay times were then regressed against the aquifer and flowmeter tests to derive local calibration coefficients. Using this calibration, the SNMR derived hydraulic conductivity estimates were in good agreement with the aquifer test-derived estimates. Since the same calibration was appropriate at both sites, SNMR data can now be collected at additional sites in the area and used to estimate hydraulic properties.

  17. The hot-film anemometer--a method for blood velocity determination. II. In vivo comparison with the electromagnetic blood flowmeter.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, P K

    1980-01-01

    Using a constant temperature hot-film anemometer and an electromagnetic blood flowmeter, volumetric flows and velocity profiles were registered in the pulmonary artery, ascending aorta, abdominal aorta and superior vena cava of mongrel dogs. The anemometer registered in 3 out of 4 dogs in the ascending aorta and in 4 out of 5 dogs in the pulmonary artery. The flow profile in these two vessels was flat with a slight deviation with the highest velocity nearer to the posterior wall. In the abdominal aorta the flow profile was sinusoid and in the superior vena cava irregular. In 22 simultaneous measurements anemometer mean results were 97 +/- 23% (+/- SD) of flowmeter results and peak results correspondingly 113 +/- 23%. None of these differences were significant. It is stressed that both qualitatively and quantitatively hot-film anemometer results are comparable to electromagnetic flowmeter results. However, certain differences have been demonstrated.

  18. A transistors-based, bidirectional flowmeter for neonatal ventilation: design and experimental characterization.

    PubMed

    Giorgino, M; Morbidoni, G; Tamilia, E; Taffoni, F; Formica, D; Schena, E

    2014-01-01

    A bidirectional, low cost flowmeter for neonatal artificial ventilation, suitable for application in mono-patient breathing circuits, is described here. The sensing element consists of two nominally identical bipolar junction transistors employed as hot bodies. The sensor working principle is based on the convective heat transfer between the transistors, heated by Joule phenomenon, and the colder hitting fluid which represents the measurand. The proposed design allows the sensor to discriminate flow direction. Static calibration has been carried out in a range of flowrate values (from -8 L·min(-1) up to +8 L L·min(-1)) covering the ones employed in neonatal ventilation, at different pipe diameters (ie., 10 mm and 30 mm) and collector currents (i.e., 500 mA, 300 mA, and 100 mA) in order to assess the influence of these two parameters on sensor's response. Results show that the configuration with a pipe diameter of 10 mm at the highest collector current guarantees the highest sensitivity (i.e., 763 mV/Lmin1 at low flowrate ± 1 L-min(-1)) and ensures the minimum dead space (2 mL vs 18 mL for 30 mm of diameter). On the other hand, the 30 mm pipe diameter allows extending the range of measurement (up to ±6 L-min 1 vs ±3.5 L· min(-1) at 10 mm), and improving both the discrimination threshold (<;0.1 L·min-(1)) and the symmetry of response. These characteristics together with the low dead space and low cost foster its application to neonatal ventilation.

  19. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, J.M.; Lindner, G.M.; Rowe, J.C.

    1981-04-30

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  20. Flowmeter for determining average rate of flow of liquid in a conduit

    DOEpatents

    Kennerly, John M.; Lindner, Gordon M.; Rowe, John C.

    1982-01-01

    This invention is a compact, precise, and relatively simple device for use in determining the average rate of flow of a liquid through a conduit. The liquid may be turbulent and contain bubbles of gas. In a preferred embodiment, the flowmeter includes an electrical circuit and a flow vessel which is connected as a segment of the conduit conveying the liquid. The vessel is provided with a valved outlet and is partitioned by a vertical baffle into coaxial chambers whose upper regions are vented to permit the escape of gas. The inner chamber receives turbulent downflowing liquid from the conduit and is sized to operate at a lower pressure than the conduit, thus promoting evolution of gas from the liquid. Lower zones of the two chambers are interconnected so that the downflowing liquid establishes liquid levels in both chambers. The liquid level in the outer chamber is comparatively calm, being to a large extent isolated from the turbulence in the inner chamber once the liquid in the outer chamber has risen above the liquid-introduction zone for that chamber. Lower and upper probes are provided in the outer chamber for sensing the liquid level therein at points above its liquid-introduction zone. An electrical circuit is connected to the probes to display the time required for the liquid level in the outer chamber to successively contact the lower and upper probes. The average rate of flow through the conduit can be determined from the above-mentioned time and the vessel volume filled by the liquid during that time.

  1. Thermo-mechanical phase-shift determination in Coriolis mass-flowmeters with added masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghayesh, Mergen H.; Amabili, Marco; Païdoussis, Michael P.

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this paper is to develop an approximate analytical solution for phase-shift (and thus mass flow) prediction along the length of the measuring tube of a Coriolis mass-flowmeter. A single, straight measuring tube is considered; added masses at the sensor and excitation locations are included in the model, and thus in the equation of motion. The measuring tube is excited harmonically by an electromagnetic driver. Taking into account thermal effects, the equation of motion is derived through use of the extended Hamilton's principle and constitutive relations. The equation of motion is discretized into a set of ordinary differential equations via Galerkin's technique. The method of multiple timescales is applied to the set of resultant equations, and the equations of order one and epsilon are obtained analytically for the system at primary resonance. The solution of the equation of motion is obtained by satisfying the solvability condition (making the solution of order epsilon free of secular terms). The flow-related phase-shift in the driver-induced tube vibration is measured at two symmetrically located points on either side of the mid-length of the tube. The analytical results for the phase-shift are compared to those obtained numerically. The effect of system parameters on the measured phase-shift is discussed. It is shown that the measured phase-shift depends on the mass flow rate, of course, but it is also affected by the magnitude of the added sensor mass and location, and the temperature change; nevertheless, the factors investigated do not induce a zero phase-shift.

  2. Study of multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter for measuring coal slurry-coal log pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu; Yang, Jie; Tang, Jun

    2006-11-01

    Coal slurry-coal log pipeline is a new technology for long distance transportation of coal logs (cylindrical coal briquettes) by using coal slurry as carrier and pump as power set. Because of the difficulty of measuring flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline, the study of measuring technology and the development of flowmeter are necessary. In consideration of the characteristics of transportation of coal logs in coal slurry pipeline, a non-contacting measuring method and the supersonic Doppler effect are selected and used. By detecting frequency drifts produced by reflecting supersonic wave from moving coal particles and coal logs in pipeline the flow rate of coal slurry-coal log pipeline (the total quantity of coal transported by the pipeline) can be measured. Based on the concept of liner concentration of coal logs in pipeline and characteristics of Doppler frequency drifts of coal particles and coal logs moved in pipeline, the measuring method of supersonic wave and the transportation principle of coal slurry-coal log pipeline are discussed and a multi-acoustic channel supersonic Doppler flowmeter is designed for measuring the total quantity of coal transported by pipeline. The flowmeter is composed of supersonic transducer, electron circuit, flow rate indication and integral calculation system. The multi-acoustic channel technique and a suitable acoustic wedge with a certain shape and special solid material are selected and used for increasing the measuring precision. In this paper the Doppler signal is measured and analyzed by using mixing-frequency technique and FPT (rapid Fourier transformation), and some designed circuits and signal measurement process are also offered.

  3. Fuel flexible fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Tuthill, Richard S; Davis, Dustin W; Dai, Zhongtao

    2015-02-03

    A disclosed fuel injector provides mixing of fuel with airflow by surrounding a swirled fuel flow with first and second swirled airflows that ensures mixing prior to or upon entering the combustion chamber. Fuel tubes produce a central fuel flow along with a central airflow through a plurality of openings to generate the high velocity fuel/air mixture along the axis of the fuel injector in addition to the swirled fuel/air mixture.

  4. Fiber optic hot-wire flowmeter based on a metallic coated hybrid long period grating/fiber Bragg grating structure.

    PubMed

    Caldas, Paulo; Jorge, Pedro A S; Rego, Gaspar; Frazão, Orlando; Santos, José Luís; Ferreira, Luís Alberto; Araújo, Francisco

    2011-06-10

    In this work an all-optical hot-wire flowmeter based on a silver coated fiber combining a long period grating and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) structure is proposed. Light from a pump laser at 1480  nm propagating down the fiber is coupled by the long period grating into the fiber cladding and is absorbed by the silver coating deposited on the fiber surface over the Bragg grating structure. This absorption acts like a hot wire raising the fiber temperature locally, which is effectively detected by the FBG resonance shift. The temperature increase depends on the flow speed of the surrounding air, which has the effect of cooling the fiber. It is demonstrated that the Bragg wavelength shift can be related to the flow speed. A flow speed resolution of 0.08  m/s is achieved using this new configuration.

  5. Summary of Part 75 Administrative Processes: Table 3

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how to submit your notice of semiannual or annual RATA testing, RATA results, Appendix D fuel flowmeter accuracy tesing and Appendinx E retesting or LME unit retesting. Table 3, routine quality assurance testing.

  6. Low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter using small laser diode and bare charge-coupled-device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chong; Seong, Myeongsu; Morgan, Joshua Paul; Mazdeyasna, Siavash; Kim, Jae Gwan; Hastings, Jeffrey Todd; Yu, Guoqiang

    2016-08-01

    We report a low-cost compact diffuse speckle contrast flowmeter (DSCF) consisting of a small laser diode and a bare charge-coupled-device (CCD) chip, which can be used for contact measurements of blood flow variations in relatively deep tissues (up to ˜8 mm). Measurements of large flow variations by the contact DSCF probe are compared to a noncontact CCD-based diffuse speckle contrast spectroscopy and a standard contact diffuse correlation spectroscopy in tissue phantoms and a human forearm. Bland-Altman analysis shows no significant bias with good limits of agreement among these measurements: 96.5%±2.2% (94.4% to 100.0%) in phantom experiments and 92.8% in the forearm test. The relatively lower limit of agreement observed in the in vivo measurements (92.8%) is likely due to heterogeneous reactive responses of blood flow in different regions/volumes of the forearm tissues measured by different probes. The low-cost compact DSCF device holds great potential to be broadly used for continuous and longitudinal monitoring of blood flow alterations in ischemic/hypoxic tissues, which are usually associated with various vascular diseases.

  7. Local Lorentz force flowmeter at a continuous caster model using a new generation multicomponent force and torque sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Daniel; Schleichert, Jan; Karcher, Christian; Fröhlich, Thomas; Wondrak, Thomas; Timmel, Klaus

    2016-06-01

    Lorentz force velocimetry is a non-invasive velocity measurement technique for electrical conductive liquids like molten steel. In this technique, the metal flow interacts with a static magnetic field generating eddy currents which, in turn, produce flow-braking Lorentz forces within the fluid. These forces are proportional to the electrical conductivity and to the velocity of the melt. Due to Newton’s third law, a counter force of the same magnitude acts on the source of the applied static magnetic field which is in our case a permanent magnet. In this paper we will present a new multicomponent sensor for the local Lorentz force flowmeter (L2F2) which is able to measure simultaneously all three components of the force as well as all three components of the torque. Therefore, this new sensor is capable of accessing all three velocity components at the same time in the region near the wall. In order to demonstrate the potential of this new sensor, it is used to identify the 3-dimensional velocity field near the wide face of the mold of a continuous caster model available at the Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf. As model melt, the eutectic alloy GaInSn is used.

  8. Electromagnetic Borehole Flowmeter Surveys at Selected In Situ Redox Manipulation Barrier Wells, Zero-Valent Iron Site, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Newcomer, Darrell R.

    2009-02-09

    Ambient (i.e., static) and dynamic (i.e., pumping-induced) electromagnetic borehole flowmeter (EBF) surveys were performed in 10 selected In Situ Redox Manipulation (ISRM) barrier wells to characterize the distribution of in-well vertical flow conditions and to infer the relative hydraulic conductivity distribution in the upper-part of the unconfined aquifer. These wells are located in two areas where the aquifer is targeted for testing of zero-valent iron injection to mend a failed portion of the ISRM barrier at the 100 D Area, Hanford Site. Each of these two areas consists of a group of five wells, one group to the southwest and one group to the northeast. The upper ~15 to 20 ft (~4.6 to 6.1 m) of the unconfined aquifer was characterized for in-well vertical flow conditions and vertical profile information regarding relative hydraulic conductivity. At some well site locations, the upper ~2 to 3 ft (~0.6 to 1 m) of the well-screen interval could not be characterized under pumping (dynamic) conditions because of the presence of the pump.

  9. Input variable selection for data-driven models of Coriolis flowmeters for two-phase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lijuan; Yan, Yong; Wang, Xue; Wang, Tao

    2017-03-01

    Input variable selection is an essential step in the development of data-driven models for environmental, biological and industrial applications. Through input variable selection to eliminate the irrelevant or redundant variables, a suitable subset of variables is identified as the input of a model. Meanwhile, through input variable selection the complexity of the model structure is simplified and the computational efficiency is improved. This paper describes the procedures of the input variable selection for the data-driven models for the measurement of liquid mass flowrate and gas volume fraction under two-phase flow conditions using Coriolis flowmeters. Three advanced input variable selection methods, including partial mutual information (PMI), genetic algorithm-artificial neural network (GA-ANN) and tree-based iterative input selection (IIS) are applied in this study. Typical data-driven models incorporating support vector machine (SVM) are established individually based on the input candidates resulting from the selection methods. The validity of the selection outcomes is assessed through an output performance comparison of the SVM based data-driven models and sensitivity analysis. The validation and analysis results suggest that the input variables selected from the PMI algorithm provide more effective information for the models to measure liquid mass flowrate while the IIS algorithm provides a fewer but more effective variables for the models to predict gas volume fraction.

  10. Fossil fuels -- future fuels

    SciTech Connect

    1998-03-01

    Fossil fuels -- coal, oil, and natural gas -- built America`s historic economic strength. Today, coal supplies more than 55% of the electricity, oil more than 97% of the transportation needs, and natural gas 24% of the primary energy used in the US. Even taking into account increased use of renewable fuels and vastly improved powerplant efficiencies, 90% of national energy needs will still be met by fossil fuels in 2020. If advanced technologies that boost efficiency and environmental performance can be successfully developed and deployed, the US can continue to depend upon its rich resources of fossil fuels.

  11. An evaluation of borehole flowmeters used to measure horizontal ground-water flow in limestones of Indiana, Kentucky, and Tennessee, 1999

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, John T.; Mandell, Wayne A.; Paillet, Frederick L.; Bayless, E. Randall; Hanson, Randall T.; Kearl, Peter M.; Kerfoot, William B.; Newhouse, Mark W.; Pedler, William H.

    2001-01-01

    Three borehole flowmeters and hydrophysical logging were used to measure ground-water flow in carbonate bedrock at sites in southeastern Indiana and on the westcentral border of Kentucky and Tennessee. The three flowmeters make point measurements of the direction and magnitude of horizontal flow, and hydrophysical logging measures the magnitude of horizontal flowover an interval. The directional flowmeters evaluated include a horizontal heat-pulse flowmeter, an acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and a colloidal borescope flowmeter. Each method was used to measure flow in selected zones where previous geophysical logging had indicated water-producing beds, bedding planes, or other permeable features that made conditions favorable for horizontal-flow measurements. Background geophysical logging indicated that ground-water production from the Indiana test wells was characterized by inflow from a single, 20-foot-thick limestone bed. The Kentucky/Tennessee test wells produced water from one or more bedding planes where geophysical logs indicated the bedding planes had been enlarged by dissolution. Two of the three test wells at the latter site contained measurable vertical flow between two or more bedding planes under ambient hydraulic head conditions. Field measurements and data analyses for each flow-measurement technique were completed by a developer of the technology or by a contractor with extensive experience in the application of that specific technology. Comparison of the horizontal-flow measurements indicated that the three point-measurement techniques rarely measured the same velocities and flow directions at the same measurement stations. Repeat measurements at selected depth stations also failed to consistently reproduce either flow direction, flow magnitude, or both. At a few test stations, two of the techniques provided similar flow magnitude or direction but usually not both. Some of this variability may be attributed to naturally occurring changes in

  12. Predicting Individual Fuel Economy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Zhenhong; Greene, David L

    2011-01-01

    To make informed decisions about travel and vehicle purchase, consumers need unbiased and accurate information of the fuel economy they will actually obtain. In the past, the EPA fuel economy estimates based on its 1984 rules have been widely criticized for overestimating on-road fuel economy. In 2008, EPA adopted a new estimation rule. This study compares the usefulness of the EPA's 1984 and 2008 estimates based on their prediction bias and accuracy and attempts to improve the prediction of on-road fuel economies based on consumer and vehicle attributes. We examine the usefulness of the EPA fuel economy estimates using a large sample of self-reported on-road fuel economy data and develop an Individualized Model for more accurately predicting an individual driver's on-road fuel economy based on easily determined vehicle and driver attributes. Accuracy rather than bias appears to have limited the usefulness of the EPA 1984 estimates in predicting on-road MPG. The EPA 2008 estimates appear to be equally inaccurate and substantially more biased relative to the self-reported data. Furthermore, the 2008 estimates exhibit an underestimation bias that increases with increasing fuel economy, suggesting that the new numbers will tend to underestimate the real-world benefits of fuel economy and emissions standards. By including several simple driver and vehicle attributes, the Individualized Model reduces the unexplained variance by over 55% and the standard error by 33% based on an independent test sample. The additional explanatory variables can be easily provided by the individuals.

  13. 40 CFR 80.584 - What are the precision and accuracy criteria for approval of test methods for determining the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false What are the precision and accuracy....584 What are the precision and accuracy criteria for approval of test methods for determining the sulfur content of motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, and ECA marine fuel? (a) Precision....

  14. 40 CFR 80.584 - What are the precision and accuracy criteria for approval of test methods for determining the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the precision and accuracy....584 What are the precision and accuracy criteria for approval of test methods for determining the sulfur content of motor vehicle diesel fuel, NRLM diesel fuel, and ECA marine fuel? (a) Precision....

  15. Alternative Fuels

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Alternative fuels include gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas, and propane; alcohols such as ethanol, methanol, and butanol; vegetable and waste-derived oils; and electricity. Overview of alternative fuels is here.

  16. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-01-01

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  17. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, D.W.; Karnesky, R.A.; Leggett, R.D.; Baker, R.B.

    1987-11-24

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  18. Fuel pin

    DOEpatents

    Christiansen, David W.; Karnesky, Richard A.; Leggett, Robert D.; Baker, Ronald B.

    1989-10-03

    A fuel pin for a liquid metal nuclear reactor is provided. The fuel pin includes a generally cylindrical cladding member with metallic fuel material disposed therein. At least a portion of the fuel material extends radially outwardly to the inner diameter of the cladding member to promote efficient transfer of heat to the reactor coolant system. The fuel material defines at least one void space therein to facilitate swelling of the fuel material during fission.

  19. Borehole geophysical and flowmeter data for eight boreholes in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam, Lake Seminole, Jackson County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clarke, John S.; Hamrick, Michael D.; Holloway, O. Gary

    2011-01-01

    Borehole geophysical logs and flowmeter data were collected in April 2011 from eight boreholes to identify the depth and orientation of cavernous zones within the Miocene Tampa Limestone in the vicinity of Jim Woodruff Lock and Dam in Jackson County, Florida. These data are used to assess leakage near the dam. Each of the eight boreholes was terminated in limestone at depths ranging from 84 to 104 feet. Large cavernous zones were encountered in most of the borings, with several exceeding 20-inches in diameter. The cavernous zones generally were between 1 and 5 feet in height, but a cavern in one of the borings reached a height of about 6 feet. The resistivity of limestone layers penetrated by the boreholes generally was less than 1,000 ohm-meters. Formation resistivity near the cavernous zones did not show an appreciable contrast from surrounding bedrock, probably because the bedrock is saturated, owing to its primary permeability. Measured flow rates in the eight boreholes determined using an electromagnetic flowmeter were all less than ±0.1 liter per second. These low flow rates suggest that vertical hydraulic gradients in the boreholes are negligible and that hydraulic head in the various cavernous zones shows only minor, if any, variation.

  20. GEOSPATIAL DATA ACCURACY ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of robust accuracy assessment methods for the validation of spatial data represent's a difficult scientific challenge for the geospatial science community. The importance and timeliness of this issue is related directly to the dramatic escalation in the developmen...

  1. Landsat wildland mapping accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Todd, William J.; Gehring, Dale G.; Haman, J. F.

    1980-01-01

    A Landsat-aided classification of ten wildland resource classes was developed for the Shivwits Plateau region of the Lake Mead National Recreation Area. Single stage cluster sampling (without replacement) was used to verify the accuracy of each class.

  2. Overlay accuracy fundamentals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandel, Daniel; Levinski, Vladimir; Sapiens, Noam; Cohen, Guy; Amit, Eran; Klein, Dana; Vakshtein, Irina

    2012-03-01

    Currently, the performance of overlay metrology is evaluated mainly based on random error contributions such as precision and TIS variability. With the expected shrinkage of the overlay metrology budget to < 0.5nm, it becomes crucial to include also systematic error contributions which affect the accuracy of the metrology. Here we discuss fundamental aspects of overlay accuracy and a methodology to improve accuracy significantly. We identify overlay mark imperfections and their interaction with the metrology technology, as the main source of overlay inaccuracy. The most important type of mark imperfection is mark asymmetry. Overlay mark asymmetry leads to a geometrical ambiguity in the definition of overlay, which can be ~1nm or less. It is shown theoretically and in simulations that the metrology may enhance the effect of overlay mark asymmetry significantly and lead to metrology inaccuracy ~10nm, much larger than the geometrical ambiguity. The analysis is carried out for two different overlay metrology technologies: Imaging overlay and DBO (1st order diffraction based overlay). It is demonstrated that the sensitivity of DBO to overlay mark asymmetry is larger than the sensitivity of imaging overlay. Finally, we show that a recently developed measurement quality metric serves as a valuable tool for improving overlay metrology accuracy. Simulation results demonstrate that the accuracy of imaging overlay can be improved significantly by recipe setup optimized using the quality metric. We conclude that imaging overlay metrology, complemented by appropriate use of measurement quality metric, results in optimal overlay accuracy.

  3. Fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Bellis, P.D.; Nesselrode, F.

    1991-04-16

    This patent describes a fuel pump. It includes: a fuel reservoir member, the fuel reservoir member being formed with fuel chambers, the chambers comprising an inlet chamber and an outlet chamber, means to supply fuel to the inlet chamber, means to deliver fuel from the outlet chamber to a point of use, the fuel reservoir member chambers also including a bypass chamber, means interconnecting the bypass chamber with the outlet chamber; the fuel pump also comprising pump means interconnecting the inlet chamber and the outlet chamber and adapted to suck fuel from the fuel supply means into the inlet chamber, through the pump means, out the outlet chamber, and to the fuel delivery means; the bypass chamber and the pump means providing two substantially separate paths of fuel flow in the fuel reservoir member, bypass plunger means normally closing off the flow of fuel through the bypass chamber one of the substantially separate paths including the fuel supply means and the fuel delivery means when the bypass plunger means is closed, the second of the substantially separate paths including the bypass chamber when the bypass plunger means is open, and all of the chambers and the interconnecting means therebetween being configured so as to create turbulence in the flow of any fuel supplied to the outlet chamber by the pump means and bypassed through the bypass chamber and the interconnecting means.

  4. Fuel characteristics required for LWR fuel rod calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Meulemeester, E.

    1982-04-01

    BELGONUCLEAIRE gradually increasing in-reactor experience has enabled to assess the relative importance of attributes defined in specifications and drawings for both UO 2 and MO 2 fuels. On the basis of that experience, design codes have been benchmarked and were thereafter applied to cover the range of parameters and irradiation histories to be encountered or evaluated. To illustrate the effects of fuel characteristics on fuel behaviour, sensitivity calculations were performed on the basis of actual fuel irradiated in BWR's (DODEWAARD, GARIGLANO and OYSTER CREEK) and PWR's (BR3, DOEL, SENA, TIHANGE and MAINE YANKEE). The major characteristics are : fuel structure, UO 2 versus mixed oxide fuel; fuel accomodation (depending on the fuel microstructure and chemical composition); fuel density and densification stability; open porosity; pellet end geometry; pellet L/D ratio, gap size. Although the influence of the various parameters is not additive, these examples enable to determine the relative influence of each characteristic and to conclude to what accuracy it should be measured (in demo fuel) or controlled (in production fuel).

  5. Numerical accuracy assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boerstoel, J. W.

    1988-12-01

    A framework is provided for numerical accuracy assessment. The purpose of numerical flow simulations is formulated. This formulation concerns the classes of aeronautical configurations (boundaries), the desired flow physics (flow equations and their properties), the classes of flow conditions on flow boundaries (boundary conditions), and the initial flow conditions. Next, accuracy and economical performance requirements are defined; the final numerical flow simulation results of interest should have a guaranteed accuracy, and be produced for an acceptable FLOP-price. Within this context, the validation of numerical processes with respect to the well known topics of consistency, stability, and convergence when the mesh is refined must be done by numerical experimentation because theory gives only partial answers. This requires careful design of text cases for numerical experimentation. Finally, the results of a few recent evaluation exercises of numerical experiments with a large number of codes on a few test cases are summarized.

  6. Site characterization methodology for aquifers in support of bioreclamation activities. Volume 2: Borehole flowmeter technique, tracer tests, geostatistics and geology. Final report, August 1987-September 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Young, S.C.

    1993-08-01

    This report discusses a field demonstration of a methodology for characterizing an aquifer's geohydrology in the detail required to design an optimum network of wells and/or infiltration galleries for bioreclamation systems. The project work was conducted on a 1-hectare test site at Columbus AFB, Mississippi. The technical report is divided into two volumes. Volume I describes the test site and the well network, the assumptions, and the application of equations that define groundwater flow to a well, the results of three large-scale aquifer tests, and the results of 160 single-pump tests. Volume II describes the bore hole flowmeter tests, the tracer tests, the geological investigations, the geostatistical analysis and the guidelines for using groundwater models to design bioreclamation systems. Site characterization, Hydraulic conductivity, Groundwater flow, Geostatistics, Geohydrology, Monitoring wells.

  7. Synthetic Fuel

    ScienceCinema

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2016-07-12

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  8. Synthetic Fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Idaho National Laboratory - Steve Herring, Jim O'Brien, Carl Stoots

    2008-03-26

    Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhouse gass Two global energy priorities today are finding environmentally friendly alternatives to fossil fuels, and reducing greenhous

  9. Fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1984-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, has supported and managed a fuel cell research and development (R and D) program since 1976. Responsibility for implementing DOE's fuel cell program, which includes activities related to both fuel cells and fuel cell systems, has been assigned to the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) in Morgantown, West Virginia. The total United States effort of the private and public sectors in developing fuel cell technology is referred to as the National Fuel Cell Program (NFCP). The goal of the NFCP is to develop fuel cell power plants for base-load and dispersed electric utility systems, industrial cogeneration, and on-site applications. To achieve this goal, the fuel cell developers, electric and gas utilities, research institutes, and Government agencies are working together. Four organized groups are coordinating the diversified activities of the NFCP. The status of the overall program is reviewed in detail.

  10. Future Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-04

    tactical ground mobility and increasing operational reach • Identify, review, and assess – Technologies for reducing fuel consumption, including...T I O N S A C T I O N S TOR Focus - Tactical ground mobility - Operational reach - Not A/C, Ships, or troops Hybrid Electric Vehicle Fuel Management...Fuel Management During Combat Operations Energy Fundamentals • Energy Density • Tactical Mobility • Petroleum Use • Fuel Usage (TWV) • TWV OP TEMPO TOR

  11. Fossil Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crank, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

  12. Alternative fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J. S.; Butze, H. F.; Friedman, R.; Antoine, A. C.; Reynolds, T. W.

    1977-01-01

    Potential problems related to the use of alternative aviation turbine fuels are discussed and both ongoing and required research into these fuels is described. This discussion is limited to aviation turbine fuels composed of liquid hydrocarbons. The advantages and disadvantages of the various solutions to the problems are summarized. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source. The second solution is to minimize energy consumption at the refinery and keep fuel costs down by relaxing specifications.

  13. High accuracy OMEGA timekeeping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imbier, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) operates a worldwide satellite tracking network which uses a combination of OMEGA as a frequency reference, dual timing channels, and portable clock comparisons to maintain accurate epoch time. Propagational charts from the U.S. Coast Guard OMEGA monitor program minimize diurnal and seasonal effects. Daily phase value publications of the U.S. Naval Observatory provide corrections to the field collected timing data to produce an averaged time line comprised of straight line segments called a time history file (station clock minus UTC). Depending upon clock location, reduced time data accuracies of between two and eight microseconds are typical.

  14. NUCLEAR DATA TARGET ACCURACY REQUIREMENTS FOR MA BURNERS

    SciTech Connect

    G. Palmiotti; M. Salvatores

    2011-06-01

    A nuclear data target accuracy assessment has been carried out for two types of transmuters: a critical sodium fast reactor(SFR) and an accelerator driven system (ADMAB). Results are provided for a 7 group energy structure. Considerations about fuel cycle parameters uncertainties illustrate their dependence from the isotope final densities at end of cycle.

  15. 10 CFR 72.11 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 72.11 Section 72.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  16. 10 CFR 72.11 - Completeness and accuracy of information.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Completeness and accuracy of information. 72.11 Section 72.11 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) LICENSING REQUIREMENTS FOR THE INDEPENDENT STORAGE OF SPENT NUCLEAR FUEL, HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE, AND REACTOR-RELATED GREATER THAN CLASS...

  17. Radiocarbon dating accuracy improved

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scientists have extended the accuracy of carbon-14 (14C) dating by correlating dates older than 8,000 years with uranium-thorium dates that span from 8,000 to 30,000 years before present (ybp, present = 1950). Edouard Bard, Bruno Hamelin, Richard Fairbanks and Alan Zindler, working at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory, dated corals from reefs off Barbados using both 14C and uranium-234/thorium-230 by thermal ionization mass spectrometry techniques. They found that the two age data sets deviated in a regular way, allowing the scientists to correlate the two sets of ages. The 14C dates were consistently younger than those determined by uranium-thorium, and the discrepancy increased to about 3,500 years at 20,000 ybp.

  18. Fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Zaweski, E.F.; Niebylski, L.M.

    1986-08-05

    This patent describes distillate fuel for indirect injection compression ignition engines containing, in an amount sufficient to minimize coking, especially throttling nozzle coking in the prechambers or swirl chambers of indirect injection compression ignition engines operated on such fuel, at least the combination of (i) organic nitrate ignition accelerator and (ii) an esterified cycle dehydration product of sorbitol which, when added to the fuel in combination with the organic nitrate ignition accelerator minimizes the coking.

  19. Fuel cells 101

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschenhofer, J.H.

    1999-07-01

    This paper discusses the various types of fuel cells, the importance of cell voltage, fuel processing for natural gas, cell stacking, fuel cell plant description, advantages and disadvantages of the types of fuel cells, and applications. The types covered include: polymer electrolyte fuel cell, alkaline fuel cell, phosphoric acid fuel cell; molten carbonate fuel cell, and solid oxide fuel cell.

  20. Fuel dehazers

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, W.R.

    1986-03-01

    Hazy fuels can be caused by the emulsification of water into the fuel during refining, blending, or transportation operations. Detergent additive packages used in gasoline tend to emulsify water into the fuel. Fuels containing water haze can cause corrosion and contamination, and support microbiological growth. This results in problems. As the result of these problems, refiners, marketers, and product pipeline companies customarily have haze specifications. The haze specification may be a specific maximum water content or simply ''bright and clear'' at a specified temperature.

  1. Motor fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, L.D.

    1982-07-13

    Liquid hydrocarbon fuel compositions are provided containing antiknock quantities of ashless antiknock agents comprising selected furyl compounds including furfuryl alcohol, furfuryl amine, furfuryl esters, and alkyl furoates.

  2. Alternative fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    This paper presents the preliminary results of a review, of the experiences of Brazil, Canada, and New Zealand, which have implemented programs to encourage the use of alternative motor fuels. It will also discuss the results of a separate completed review of the Department of Energy's (DOE) progress in implementing the Alternative Motor Fuels Act of 1988. The act calls for, among other things, the federal government to use alternative-fueled vehicles in its fleet. The Persian Gulf War, environmental concerns, and the administration's National Energy Strategy have greatly heightened interest in the use of alternative fuels in this country.

  3. A Raman-Based Portable Fuel Analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farquharson, Stuart

    2010-08-01

    Fuel is the single most import supply during war. Consider that the US Military is employing over 25,000 vehicles in Iraq and Afghanistan. Most fuel is obtained locally, and must be characterized to ensure proper operation of these vehicles. Fuel properties are currently determined using a deployed chemical laboratory. Unfortunately, each sample requires in excess of 6 hours to characterize. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a portable fuel analyzer capable of determine 7 fuel properties that allow determining fuel usage. The analyzer uses Raman spectroscopy to measure the fuel samples without preparation in 2 minutes. The challenge, however, is that as distilled fractions of crude oil, all fuels are composed of hundreds of hydrocarbon components that boil at similar temperatures, and performance properties can not be simply correlated to a single component, and certainly not to specific Raman peaks. To meet this challenge, we measured over 800 diesel and jet fuels from around the world and used chemometrics to correlate the Raman spectra to fuel properties. Critical to the success of this approach is laser excitation at 1064 nm to avoid fluorescence interference (many fuels fluoresce) and a rugged interferometer that provides 0.1 cm-1 wavenumber (x-axis) accuracy to guarantee accurate correlations. Here we describe the portable fuel analyzer, the chemometric models, and the successful determination of these 7 fuel properties for over 100 unknown samples provided by the US Marine Corps, US Navy, and US Army.

  4. 40 CFR 90.417 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications... Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.417 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) Fuel flow measurement... measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of one percent of full-scale flow rate for...

  5. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception...

  6. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Fuel flow measurement specifications....314-79 Fuel flow measurement specifications. (a) The fuel flow rate measurement instrument must have a minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception...

  7. Reticence, Accuracy and Efficacy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oreskes, N.; Lewandowsky, S.

    2015-12-01

    James Hansen has cautioned the scientific community against "reticence," by which he means a reluctance to speak in public about the threat of climate change. This may contribute to social inaction, with the result that society fails to respond appropriately to threats that are well understood scientifically. Against this, others have warned against the dangers of "crying wolf," suggesting that reticence protects scientific credibility. We argue that both these positions are missing an important point: that reticence is not only a matter of style but also of substance. In previous work, Bysse et al. (2013) showed that scientific projections of key indicators of climate change have been skewed towards the low end of actual events, suggesting a bias in scientific work. More recently, we have shown that scientific efforts to be responsive to contrarian challenges have led scientists to adopt the terminology of a "pause" or "hiatus" in climate warming, despite the lack of evidence to support such a conclusion (Lewandowsky et al., 2015a. 2015b). In the former case, scientific conservatism has led to under-estimation of climate related changes. In the latter case, the use of misleading terminology has perpetuated scientific misunderstanding and hindered effective communication. Scientific communication should embody two equally important goals: 1) accuracy in communicating scientific information and 2) efficacy in expressing what that information means. Scientists should strive to be neither conservative nor adventurous but to be accurate, and to communicate that accurate information effectively.

  8. Groves model accuracy study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Matthew C.

    1991-08-01

    The United States Air Force Environmental Technical Applications Center (USAFETAC) was tasked to review the scientific literature for studies of the Groves Neutral Density Climatology Model and compare the Groves Model with others in the 30-60 km range. The tasking included a request to investigate the merits of comparing accuracy of the Groves Model to rocketsonde data. USAFETAC analysts found the Groves Model to be state of the art for middle-atmospheric climatological models. In reviewing previous comparisons with other models and with space shuttle-derived atmospheric densities, good density vs altitude agreement was found in almost all cases. A simple technique involving comparison of the model with range reference atmospheres was found to be the most economical way to compare the Groves Model with rocketsonde data; an example of this type is provided. The Groves 85 Model is used routinely in USAFETAC's Improved Point Analysis Model (IPAM). To create this model, Dr. Gerald Vann Groves produced tabulations of atmospheric density based on data derived from satellite observations and modified by rocketsonde observations. Neutral Density as presented here refers to the monthly mean density in 10-degree latitude bands as a function of altitude. The Groves 85 Model zonal mean density tabulations are given in their entirety.

  9. Fuel injector

    DOEpatents

    Lambeth, Malcolm David Dick

    2001-02-27

    A fuel injector comprises first and second housing parts, the first housing part being located within a bore or recess formed in the second housing part, the housing parts defining therebetween an inlet chamber, a delivery chamber axially spaced from the inlet chamber, and a filtration flow path interconnecting the inlet and delivery chambers to remove particulate contaminants from the flow of fuel therebetween.

  10. Novel Downhole Electromagnetic Flowmeter for Oil-Water Two-Phase Flow in High-Water-Cut Oil-Producing Wells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yanjun; Li, Haoyu; Liu, Xingbin; Zhang, Yuhui; Xie, Ronghua; Huang, Chunhui; Hu, Jinhai; Deng, Gang

    2016-01-01

    First, the measuring principle, the weight function, and the magnetic field of the novel downhole inserted electromagnetic flowmeter (EMF) are described. Second, the basic design of the EMF is described. Third, the dynamic experiments of two EMFs in oil-water two-phase flow are carried out. The experimental errors are analyzed in detail. The experimental results show that the maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 5%, the total flowrate is 5–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 60%. The maximum absolute value of the full-scale errors is better than 7%, the total flowrate is 2–60 m3/d, and the water-cut is higher than 70%. Finally, onsite experiments in high-water-cut oil-producing wells are conducted, and the possible reasons for the errors in the onsite experiments are analyzed. It is found that the EMF can provide an effective technology for measuring downhole oil-water two-phase flow. PMID:27754412

  11. Fuel cell-fuel cell hybrid system

    DOEpatents

    Geisbrecht, Rodney A.; Williams, Mark C.

    2003-09-23

    A device for converting chemical energy to electricity is provided, the device comprising a high temperature fuel cell with the ability for partially oxidizing and completely reforming fuel, and a low temperature fuel cell juxtaposed to said high temperature fuel cell so as to utilize remaining reformed fuel from the high temperature fuel cell. Also provided is a method for producing electricity comprising directing fuel to a first fuel cell, completely oxidizing a first portion of the fuel and partially oxidizing a second portion of the fuel, directing the second fuel portion to a second fuel cell, allowing the first fuel cell to utilize the first portion of the fuel to produce electricity; and allowing the second fuel cell to utilize the second portion of the fuel to produce electricity.

  12. Fuels research: Fuel thermal stability overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Alternative fuels or crude supplies are examined with respect to satisfying aviation fuel needs for the next 50 years. The thermal stability of potential future fuels is discussed and the effects of these characteristics on aircraft fuel systems are examined. Advanced fuel system technology and design guidelines for future fuels with lower thermal stability are reported.

  13. Fuel ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    This report discusses the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 which requires GAO to examine fuel ethanol imports from Central America and the Caribbean and their impact on the U.S. fuel ethanol industry. Ethanol is the alcohol in beverages, such as beer, wine, and whiskey. It can also be used as a fuel by blending with gasoline. It can be made from renewable resources, such as corn, wheat, grapes, and sugarcane, through a process of fermentation. This report finds that, given current sugar and gasoline prices, it is not economically feasible for Caribbean ethanol producers to meet the current local feedstock requirement.

  14. Test Expectancy Affects Metacomprehension Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiede, Keith W.; Wiley, Jennifer; Griffin, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Theory suggests that the accuracy of metacognitive monitoring is affected by the cues used to judge learning. Researchers have improved monitoring accuracy by directing attention to more appropriate cues; however, this is the first study to more directly point students to more appropriate cues using instructions regarding tests and…

  15. Flow-Meter and Passive Diffusion Bag Tests and Potential Influences on the Vertical Distribution of Contaminants in Wells at Galena Airport, Galena, Alaska, August to October 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, Don A.; Peterson, J.E.

    2004-01-01

    Past activities at Galena Airport, a U.S. Air Force Base in Galena, Alaska, have resulted in ground-water contamination by volatile organic compounds. The primary contaminants are petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated aliphatic hydrocarbons. The U.S. Geological Survey and Earth Tech, in cooperation with the Air Force Center for Environmental Excellence, conducted investigations at Galena Airport from August to October 2002 using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers and borehole flow-meter testing to examine the vertical distribution of ground-water contamination in selected wells. This investigation was limited to the vicinity of building 1845 and to the area between building 1845 and the Yukon River. In addition, the U.S. Geological Survey was asked to determine whether additional wells are needed to more clearly define the nature and extent of the ground-water contamination at the Air Force Base. Little or no vertical water movement occurred under ambient conditions in the wells tested at Galena Airport, Alaska, in August 2002. All of the ambient vertical flows detected in wells were at rates less than the quantitative limit of the borehole flow meter (0.03 gallons per minute). In wells 06-MW-07 and 10-MW-01, no vertical flow was detected. In wells where ambient flow was detected, the direction of flow was downward. In general, concentrations of volatile organic compounds detected in the low-flow samples from wells at Galena Airport were approximately the same concentrations detected in the closest polyethylene diffusion bag sample for a wide variety of volatile organic compounds. The data indicate that the polyethylene diffusion bag sample results are consistent with the low-flow sample results. Vertical profiling of selected wells using polyethylene diffusion bag samplers at Galena Airport showed that from September 30 to October 1, 2002, little vertical change occurred in volatile organic compound concentrations along the screen length despite the fact that

  16. Particle velocity and solid volume fraction measurements with a new capacitive flowmeter at the Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility. [Glass beads

    SciTech Connect

    Bobis, J.P.; Porges, K.G.A.; Raptis, A.C.; Brewer, W.E.; Bernovich, L.T.

    1986-08-01

    The performance of a new capacitive flowmeter has been assessed experimentally in a gas-entrained solid flow stream at the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) Solid/Gas Flow Test Facility (S/GFTF) for solid feedrates in the range of 0.5 to 2 kg/s and solid-gas loadings up to 22, corresponding to a range of solid volume fractions extending from 0.004 to 0.016. Two types of nonintrusive instruments using the capacitive principle were fabricated at ANL and installed in the horizontal leg of a 12.3 m test section to sense the solids. An improved electrode geometry designed to maximize the coverage of the duct interior while minimizing the readout error due to a nonuniform electric field, was incorporated for one spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes on the outside surface of a ceramic liner and for another spoolpiece with the sensing electrodes mounted flush with the duct inside surface. The capacitive instruments measured the solid volume fraction and the average particle velocity. The results are compared with time-of-flight measurements of short-lived radioactive particles that duplicate closely the size and density of the 1000..mu.. glass beads used in these flow tests. Results show that the solid volume fraction measurements agree with the theoretical models presented and that the particle velocity deduced from the cross-correlation scheme agreed to within 5% of the irradiated particle velocity technique for the 21 to 31 m/s range generated with the S/GFTF. 43 refs., 36 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Alternative jet aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1979-01-01

    Potential changes in jet aircraft fuel specifications due to shifts in supply and quality of refinery feedstocks are discussed with emphasis on the effects these changes would have on the performance and durability of aircraft engines and fuel systems. Combustion characteristics, fuel thermal stability, and fuel pumpability at low temperature are among the factors considered. Combustor and fuel system technology needs for broad specification fuels are reviewed including prevention of fuel system fouling and fuel system technology for fuels with higher freezing points.

  18. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  19. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  20. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  1. Fuel bundle

    SciTech Connect

    Lui, C.K.

    1989-04-04

    This patent describes a method of forming a fuel bundle of a nuclear reactor. The method consists of positioning the fuel rods in the bottom plate, positioning the tie rod in the bottom plate with the key passed through the receptacle to the underside of the bottom plate and, after the tie rod is so positioned, turning the tie rod so that the key is in engagement with the underside of the bottom plate. Thereafter mounting the top plate is mounted in engagement with the fuel rods with the upper end of the tie rod extending through the opening in the top plate and extending above the top plate, and the tie rod is secured to the upper side of sid top plate thus simultaneously securing the key to the underside of the bottom plate.

  2. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  3. When Does Choice of Accuracy Measure Alter Imputation Accuracy Assessments?

    PubMed Central

    Ramnarine, Shelina; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Li-Shiun; Culverhouse, Robert; Duan, Weimin; Hancock, Dana B.; Hartz, Sarah M.; Johnson, Eric O.; Olfson, Emily; Schwantes-An, Tae-Hwi; Saccone, Nancy L.

    2015-01-01

    Imputation, the process of inferring genotypes for untyped variants, is used to identify and refine genetic association findings. Inaccuracies in imputed data can distort the observed association between variants and a disease. Many statistics are used to assess accuracy; some compare imputed to genotyped data and others are calculated without reference to true genotypes. Prior work has shown that the Imputation Quality Score (IQS), which is based on Cohen’s kappa statistic and compares imputed genotype probabilities to true genotypes, appropriately adjusts for chance agreement; however, it is not commonly used. To identify differences in accuracy assessment, we compared IQS with concordance rate, squared correlation, and accuracy measures built into imputation programs. Genotypes from the 1000 Genomes reference populations (AFR N = 246 and EUR N = 379) were masked to match the typed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) coverage of several SNP arrays and were imputed with BEAGLE 3.3.2 and IMPUTE2 in regions associated with smoking behaviors. Additional masking and imputation was conducted for sequenced subjects from the Collaborative Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence and the Genetic Study of Nicotine Dependence in African Americans (N = 1,481 African Americans and N = 1,480 European Americans). Our results offer further evidence that concordance rate inflates accuracy estimates, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. For common variants, squared correlation, BEAGLE R2, IMPUTE2 INFO, and IQS produce similar assessments of imputation accuracy. However, for rare and low frequency variants, compared to IQS, the other statistics tend to be more liberal in their assessment of accuracy. IQS is important to consider when evaluating imputation accuracy, particularly for rare and low frequency variants. PMID:26458263

  4. High Accuracy Time Transfer Synchronization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-01

    HIGH ACCURACY TIME TRANSFER SYNCHRONIZATION Paul Wheeler, Paul Koppang, David Chalmers, Angela Davis, Anthony Kubik and William Powell U.S. Naval...Observatory Washington, DC 20392 Abstract In July 1994, the US Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a...field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchro- nization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance

  5. Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    0 1 4 3 NDARDS THE NATIONAL February 1982 Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control RESEARCH PROG RAM U.S. DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Maritime...SUBTITLE Process Analysis Via Accuracy Control 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...examples are contained in Appendix C. Included, are examples of how “A/C” process - analysis leads to design improvement and how a change in sequence can

  6. Nuclear Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nash, J. Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Trends in and factors related to the nuclear industry and nuclear fuel production are discussed. Topics addressed include nuclear reactors, survival of the U.S. uranium industry, production costs, budget cuts by the Department of Energy and U.S. Geological survey for resource studies, mining, and research/development activities. (JN)

  7. Fuel Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses the theories, construction, operation, types, and advantages of fuel cells developed by the American space programs. Indicates that the cell is an ideal small-scale power source characterized by its compactness, high efficiency, reliability, and freedom from polluting fumes. (CC)

  8. Future Fuel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stover, Del

    1991-01-01

    Tough new environmental laws, coupled with fluctuating oil prices, are likely to prompt hundreds of school systems to examine alternative fuels. Literature reviews and interviews with 45 government, education, and industry officials provided data for a comparative analysis of gasoline, diesel, natural gas, methanol, and propane. (MLF)

  9. Alternative Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-11

    Swedish Biofuels AB • Cellulosic and algal feedstocks that are non-competitive with food material $ P r o d u c t P r o d u c t Traditional fuels...JP-8 BACK-UP SLIDES Unclassified 19 What Are Biofuels ? Cellulose “first generation”“second generation” C18:0 C16:1 Triglycerides (fats, oils

  10. 40 CFR 86.1309-90 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... gasoline-fueled, natural gas-fueled, liquefied petroleum gas-fueled or methanol-fueled engines. In the CVS... associated valves, pressure and temperature sensors. The temperature of the sample lines shall be more than 5... from similar tests.) The temperature measuring system (sensors and readout) shall have an accuracy...

  11. Fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Struthers, R.C.

    1983-06-28

    An improved fuel cell comprising an anode section including an anode terminal, an anode fuel, and an anolyte electrolyte, a cathode section including a cathode terminal, an electron distributor and a catholyte electrolyte, an ion exchange section between the anode and cathode sections and including an ionolyte electrolyte, ion transfer membranes separating the ionolyte from the anolyte and the catholyte and an electric circuit connected with and between the terminals conducting free electrons from the anode section and delivering free electrons to the cathode section, said ionolyte receives ions of one polarity moving from the anolyte through the membrane related thereto preventing chemical equilibrium in the anode section and sustaining chemical reaction and the generating of free electrons therein, said ions received by the ionolyte from the anolyte release different ions from the ionolyte which move through the membrane between the ionolyte and catholyte and which add to the catholyte.

  12. Fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gheysens, J.L.G.

    1990-11-27

    This patent describes a composition for the improvement of hydrocarbon fuels exhibiting a boiling range of gasoline being suitable for use in spark ignition-type engines. It comprises an aromatic amine; a polyaminated detergent; a catalyst comprising a colloidal suspension or amine salt of transition/alkali/alkaline earth metal organic coordinations having at least one metal oxidehydroxide linked to an alkyl chain via a carboxyl group; and a solvent comprising an alkanol-aliphatic ether oxygenated hydrocarbon.

  13. Future Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Storage Devices, Fuel Management, Gasification, Fischer-Tropsch, Syngas , Hubberts’s Peak UNCLAS UNCLAS UNCLAS UU 80 Dr. Sujata Millick (703) 696...traction power – mission payloads – mobile electric power • Improved survivability • Inherent modularity improves maintainability & upgradability ...threatened the output of the Ploesti oil fields and refineries. In the FT process, so-called syngas (a mixture of molecular hydrogen and carbon monoxide

  14. Fuel conditioner

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, M.L.; Nelson, O.L. Jr.

    1988-06-28

    A fuel conditioner is described comprising 10 to 80% of a polar oxygenated hydrocarbon having an average molecular weight from about 250 to about 500, an acid acid number from about 25 to about 125, and a saponification number from about 30 to about 250; and 5 to 50% of an oxygenated compatibilizing agent having a solubility parameter of from about 8.8 to about 11.5 and moderate to strong hydrogen-bonding capacity.

  15. Alcohol fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-07-01

    Ethanol is an alcohol made from grain that can be blended with gasoline to extend petroleum supplies and to increase gasoline octane levels. Congressional proposals to encourage greater use of alternative fuels could increase the demand for ethanol. This report evaluates the growth potential of the ethanol industry to meet future demand increases and the impacts increased production would have on American agriculture and the federal budget. It is found that ethanol production could double or triple in the next eight years, and that American farmers could provide the corn for this production increase. While corn growers would benefit, other agricultural segments would not; soybean producers, for example could suffer for increased corn oil production (an ethanol byproduct) and cattle ranchers would be faced with higher feed costs because of higher corn prices. Poultry farmers might benefit from lower priced feed. Overall, net farm cash income should increase, and consumers would see slightly higher food prices. Federal budget impacts would include a reduction in federal farm program outlays by an annual average of between $930 million (for double current production of ethanol) to $1.421 billion (for triple production) during the eight-year growth period. However, due to an partial tax exemption for ethanol blended fuels, federal fuel tax revenues could decrease by between $442 million and $813 million.

  16. Assay method for MTR-type fuel elements

    SciTech Connect

    Sher, R.; Shea, P.

    1981-01-01

    This paper describes a calculation procedure that can be used by IAEA inspectors to verify unirradiated MTR-type fuel elements. The procedure is programmable on a small programmable calculator (HP-97). The accuracy of the calculation enables the inspector to determine whether the element contains the correct number of fuel plates of the stated design. 2 refs.

  17. Astronomic Position Accuracy Capability Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    portion of F. E. Warren AFB, Wyoming. The three points were called THEODORE ECC , TRACY, and JIM and consisted of metal tribrachs plastered to cinder...sets were computed as a deviation from the standard. Accuracy figures were determined from these residuals. Homo - geneity of variances was tested using

  18. The hidden KPI registration accuracy.

    PubMed

    Shorrosh, Paul

    2011-09-01

    Determining the registration accuracy rate is fundamental to improving revenue cycle key performance indicators. A registration quality assurance (QA) process allows errors to be corrected before bills are sent and helps registrars learn from their mistakes. Tools are available to help patient access staff who perform registration QA manually.

  19. Improving Speaking Accuracy through Awareness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dormer, Jan Edwards

    2013-01-01

    Increased English learner accuracy can be achieved by leading students through six stages of awareness. The first three awareness stages build up students' motivation to improve, and the second three provide learners with crucial input for change. The final result is "sustained language awareness," resulting in ongoing…

  20. Inventory accuracy in 60 days!

    PubMed

    Miller, G J

    1997-08-01

    Despite great advances in manufacturing technology and management science, thousands of organizations still don't have a handle on basic inventory accuracy. Many companies don't even measure it properly, or at all, and lack corrective action programs to improve it. This article offers an approach that has proven successful a number of times, when companies were quite serious about making improvements. Not only can it be implemented, but also it can likely be implemented within 60 days per area, if properly managed. The hardest part is selling people on the need to improve and then keeping them motivated. The net cost of such a program? Probably less than nothing, since the benefits gained usually far exceed the costs. Improved inventory accuracy can aid in enhancing customer service, determining purchasing and manufacturing priorities, reducing operating costs, and increasing the accuracy of financial records. This article also addresses the gap in contemporary literature regarding accuracy program features for repetitive, JIT, cellular, and process- and project-oriented environments.

  1. Improved accuracies for satellite tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kammeyer, P. C.; Fiala, A. D.; Seidelmann, P. K.

    1991-01-01

    A charge coupled device (CCD) camera on an optical telescope which follows the stars can be used to provide high accuracy comparisons between the line of sight to a satellite, over a large range of satellite altitudes, and lines of sight to nearby stars. The CCD camera can be rotated so the motion of the satellite is down columns of the CCD chip, and charge can be moved from row to row of the chip at a rate which matches the motion of the optical image of the satellite across the chip. Measurement of satellite and star images, together with accurate timing of charge motion, provides accurate comparisons of lines of sight. Given lines of sight to stars near the satellite, the satellite line of sight may be determined. Initial experiments with this technique, using an 18 cm telescope, have produced TDRS-4 observations which have an rms error of 0.5 arc second, 100 m at synchronous altitude. Use of a mosaic of CCD chips, each having its own rate of charge motion, in the focal place of a telescope would allow point images of a geosynchronous satellite and of stars to be formed simultaneously in the same telescope. The line of sight of such a satellite could be measured relative to nearby star lines of sight with an accuracy of approximately 0.03 arc second. Development of a star catalog with 0.04 arc second rms accuracy and perhaps ten stars per square degree would allow determination of satellite lines of sight with 0.05 arc second rms absolute accuracy, corresponding to 10 m at synchronous altitude. Multiple station time transfers through a communications satellite can provide accurate distances from the satellite to the ground stations. Such observations can, if calibrated for delays, determine satellite orbits to an accuracy approaching 10 m rms.

  2. MAPPING SPATIAL THEMATIC ACCURACY WITH FUZZY SETS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Thematic map accuracy is not spatially homogenous but variable across a landscape. Properly analyzing and representing spatial pattern and degree of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable information for using thematic maps. However, current thematic map accuracy measures (...

  3. Fuel Burn Estimation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterji, Gano

    2011-01-01

    Conclusions: Validated the fuel estimation procedure using flight test data. A good fuel model can be created if weight and fuel data are available. Error in assumed takeoff weight results in similar amount of error in the fuel estimate. Fuel estimation error bounds can be determined.

  4. Aviation fuels outlook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Momenthy, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    Options for satisfying the future demand for commercial jet fuels are analyzed. It is concluded that the most effective means to this end are to attract more refiners to the jet fuel market and encourage development of processes to convert oil shale and coal to transportation fuels. Furthermore, changing the U.S. refineries fuel specification would not significantly alter jet fuel availability.

  5. Accuracy of implant impression techniques.

    PubMed

    Assif, D; Marshak, B; Schmidt, A

    1996-01-01

    Three impression techniques were assessed for accuracy in a laboratory cast that simulated clinical practice. The first technique used autopolymerizing acrylic resin to splint the transfer copings. The second involved splinting of the transfer copings directly to an acrylic resin custom tray. In the third, only impression material was used to orient the transfer copings. The accuracy of stone casts with implant analogs was measured against a master framework. The fit of the framework on the casts was tested using strain gauges. The technique using acrylic resin to splint transfer copings in the impression material was significantly more accurate than the two other techniques. Stresses observed in the framework are described and discussed with suggestions to improve clinical and laboratory techniques.

  6. 146. FUEL LINE TO SKID 2 (FUEL LOADER) IN FUEL ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    146. FUEL LINE TO SKID 2 (FUEL LOADER) IN FUEL CONTROL ROOM (215), LSB (BLDG. 751). LIQUID NITROGEN/HELIUM HEAT EXCHANGER ON RIGHT. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 East, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  7. A high accuracy sun sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokhove, H.

    The High Accuracy Sun Sensor (HASS) is described, concentrating on measurement principle, the CCD detector used, the construction of the sensorhead and the operation of the sensor electronics. Tests on a development model show that the main aim of a 0.01-arcsec rms stability over a 10-minute period is closely approached. Remaining problem areas are associated with the sensor sensitivity to illumination level variations, the shielding of the detector, and the test and calibration equipment.

  8. Enhancing and evaluating diagnostic accuracy.

    PubMed

    Swets, J A; Getty, D J; Pickett, R M; D'Orsi, C J; Seltzer, S E; McNeil, B J

    1991-01-01

    Techniques that may enhance diagnostic accuracy in clinical settings were tested in the context of mammography. Statistical information about the relevant features among those visible in a mammogram and about their relative importances in the diagnosis of breast cancer was the basis of two decision aids for radiologists: a checklist that guides the radiologist in assigning a scale value to each significant feature of the images of a particular case, and a computer program that merges those scale values optimally to estimate a probability of malignancy. A test set of approximately 150 proven cases (including normals and benign and malignant lesions) was interpreted by six radiologists, first in their usual manner and later with the decision aids. The enhancing effect of these feature-analytic techniques was analyzed across subsets of cases that were restricted progressively to more and more difficult cases, where difficulty was defined in terms of the radiologists' judgements in the standard reading condition. Accuracy in both standard and enhanced conditions decreased regularly and substantially as case difficulty increased, but differentially, such that the enhancement effect grew regularly and substantially. For the most difficult case sets, the observed increases in accuracy translated into an increase of about 0.15 in sensitivity (true-positive proportion) for a selected specificity (true-negative proportion) of 0.85 or a similar increase in specificity for a selected sensitivity of 0.85. That measured accuracy can depend on case-set difficulty to different degrees for two diagnostic approaches has general implications for evaluation in clinical medicine. Comparative, as well as absolute, assessments of diagnostic performances--for example, of alternative imaging techniques--may be distorted by inadequate treatments of this experimental variable. Subset analysis, as defined and illustrated here, can be useful in alleviating the problem.

  9. Municipal water consumption forecast accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fullerton, Thomas M.; Molina, Angel L.

    2010-06-01

    Municipal water consumption planning is an active area of research because of infrastructure construction and maintenance costs, supply constraints, and water quality assurance. In spite of that, relatively few water forecast accuracy assessments have been completed to date, although some internal documentation may exist as part of the proprietary "grey literature." This study utilizes a data set of previously published municipal consumption forecasts to partially fill that gap in the empirical water economics literature. Previously published municipal water econometric forecasts for three public utilities are examined for predictive accuracy against two random walk benchmarks commonly used in regional analyses. Descriptive metrics used to quantify forecast accuracy include root-mean-square error and Theil inequality statistics. Formal statistical assessments are completed using four-pronged error differential regression F tests. Similar to studies for other metropolitan econometric forecasts in areas with similar demographic and labor market characteristics, model predictive performances for the municipal water aggregates in this effort are mixed for each of the municipalities included in the sample. Given the competitiveness of the benchmarks, analysts should employ care when utilizing econometric forecasts of municipal water consumption for planning purposes, comparing them to recent historical observations and trends to insure reliability. Comparative results using data from other markets, including regions facing differing labor and demographic conditions, would also be helpful.

  10. Fuel extender

    SciTech Connect

    Dorn, G.K.; Gilbert, H.A.

    1989-02-21

    An efficient and cost competitive fuel extender liquid is described for blending with lead-free gasoline as an additive thereto in a maximum amount of up to about 35% thereof with 65% by volume of the gasoline in a blended mixture wherein. The content of the extender in the resultant fuel as proportioned on the basis of its thus representative maximum content consists essentially of: naphtha X as represented by C/sub 4/, C/sub 5/ and C/sub 6/ hydrocarbons having a Reid vapor pressure of about 8.5 to 9.6 per ASTM, D323 test procedure and an initial distillation point of about 101/sup 0/F. and an end point of about 280/sup 0/F. within a range of about 10 to 25% by volume, about 3.8 to 6.0% by volume of anhydrous ethanol, a stabilizing amount of a water repellent of the class consisting of ethyl acetate and methyl isotubyl ketone; and about 4 to 10.5% by volume of aromatics benzene and toluene, of benzene and xylene or of benzene with toluene and xylene; the extender having a specific gravity substantially comparable with that of the lead-free gasoline to which it is to be added and having phase stability in the presence of water when mixed with the gasoline.

  11. Fuel cells: A survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crowe, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A survey of fuel cell technology and applications is presented. The operating principles, performance capabilities, and limitations of fuel cells are discussed. Diagrams of fuel cell construction and operating characteristics are provided. Photographs of typical installations are included.

  12. Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Information about regulations, developed by EPA, in collaboration with refiners, renewable fuel producers, and many other stakeholders, that ensure that transportation fuel sold in the United States contains a minimum volume of renewable fuel.

  13. Future aviation fuels overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reck, G. M.

    1980-01-01

    The outlook for aviation fuels through the turn of the century is briefly discussed and the general objectives of the NASA Lewis Alternative Aviation Fuels Research Project are outlined. The NASA program involves the evaluation of potential characteristics of future jet aircraft fuels, the determination of the effects of those fuels on engine and fuel system components, and the development of a component technology to use those fuels.

  14. Effect of hydrocarbon fuel type on fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, E. L.; Bittker, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified jet fuel thermal oxidation tester (JFTOT) procedure was used to evaluate deposit and sediment formation for four pure hydrocarbon fuels over the temperature range 150 to 450 C in 316-stainless-steel heater tubes. Fuel types were a normal alkane, an alkene, a naphthene, and an aromatic. Each fuel exhibited certain distinctive deposit and sediment formation characteristics. The effect of aluminum and 316-stainless-steel heater tube surfaces on deposit formation for the fuel n-decane over the same temperature range was investigated. Results showed that an aluminum surface had lower deposit formation rates at all temperatures investigated. By using a modified JFTOT procedure the thermal stability of four pure hydrocarbon fuels and two practical fuels (Jet A and home heating oil no. 2) was rated on the basis of their breakpoint temperatures. Results indicate that this method could be used to rate thermal stability for a series of fuels.

  15. Fuel cell technology: A sweeter fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kendall, Kevin

    2002-12-01

    Eating sugar gives us a boost when we feel tired because our cells use it as fuel to produce energy. Likewise, sugar can now be used to produce power in artificial biological fuel cells that function in a physiological environment.

  16. Fuel processor for fuel cell power system

    DOEpatents

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Springer, Thomas E.; Huff, James R.

    1987-01-01

    A catalytic organic fuel processing apparatus, which can be used in a fuel cell power system, contains within a housing a catalyst chamber, a variable speed fan, and a combustion chamber. Vaporized organic fuel is circulated by the fan past the combustion chamber with which it is in indirect heat exchange relationship. The heated vaporized organic fuel enters a catalyst bed where it is converted into a desired product such as hydrogen needed to power the fuel cell. During periods of high demand, air is injected upstream of the combustion chamber and organic fuel injection means to burn with some of the organic fuel on the outside of the combustion chamber, and thus be in direct heat exchange relation with the organic fuel going into the catalyst bed.

  17. Fuel Reformer Nozzle Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lai, Ming-Chia D.

    2003-01-01

    The fellowship work this summer will be in support of the development of a fuel mixer for a liquid fuel reformer that is upstream of a fuel cell. Tasks for the summer shall consist of design of a fuel mixer, setup of the laser diagnostics for determining the degree of fuel mixing, and testing of the fuel mixer. The fuel mixer shall be a venturi section with fuel injected at or near the throat, and an air swirler upstream of the venturi. Data to determine the performance of the mixer shall be taken using a Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA).

  18. Measuring Diagnoses: ICD Code Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    O'Malley, Kimberly J; Cook, Karon F; Price, Matt D; Wildes, Kimberly Raiford; Hurdle, John F; Ashton, Carol M

    2005-01-01

    Objective To examine potential sources of errors at each step of the described inpatient International Classification of Diseases (ICD) coding process. Data Sources/Study Setting The use of disease codes from the ICD has expanded from classifying morbidity and mortality information for statistical purposes to diverse sets of applications in research, health care policy, and health care finance. By describing a brief history of ICD coding, detailing the process for assigning codes, identifying where errors can be introduced into the process, and reviewing methods for examining code accuracy, we help code users more systematically evaluate code accuracy for their particular applications. Study Design/Methods We summarize the inpatient ICD diagnostic coding process from patient admission to diagnostic code assignment. We examine potential sources of errors at each step and offer code users a tool for systematically evaluating code accuracy. Principle Findings Main error sources along the “patient trajectory” include amount and quality of information at admission, communication among patients and providers, the clinician's knowledge and experience with the illness, and the clinician's attention to detail. Main error sources along the “paper trail” include variance in the electronic and written records, coder training and experience, facility quality-control efforts, and unintentional and intentional coder errors, such as misspecification, unbundling, and upcoding. Conclusions By clearly specifying the code assignment process and heightening their awareness of potential error sources, code users can better evaluate the applicability and limitations of codes for their particular situations. ICD codes can then be used in the most appropriate ways. PMID:16178999

  19. Internal reforming fuel cell assembly with simplified fuel feed

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Novacco, Lawrence J.; Allen, Jeffrey P.

    2001-01-01

    A fuel cell assembly in which fuel cells adapted to internally reform fuel and fuel reformers for reforming fuel are arranged in a fuel cell stack. The fuel inlet ports of the fuel cells and the fuel inlet ports and reformed fuel outlet ports of the fuel reformers are arranged on one face of the fuel cell stack. A manifold sealing encloses this face of the stack and a reformer fuel delivery system is arranged entirely within the region between the manifold and the one face of the stack. The fuel reformer has a foil wrapping and a cover member forming with the foil wrapping an enclosed structure.

  20. Diesel Surrogate Fuels for Engine Testing and Chemical-Kinetic Modeling: Compositions and Properties.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Charles J; Cannella, William J; Bays, J Timothy; Bruno, Thomas J; DeFabio, Kathy; Dettman, Heather D; Gieleciak, Rafal M; Huber, Marcia L; Kweon, Chol-Bum; McConnell, Steven S; Pitz, William J; Ratcliff, Matthew A

    2016-02-18

    The primary objectives of this work were to formulate, blend, and characterize a set of four ultralow-sulfur diesel surrogate fuels in quantities sufficient to enable their study in single-cylinder-engine and combustion-vessel experiments. The surrogate fuels feature increasing levels of compositional accuracy (i.e., increasing exactness in matching hydrocarbon structural characteristics) relative to the single target diesel fuel upon which the surrogate fuels are based. This approach was taken to assist in determining the minimum level of surrogate-fuel compositional accuracy that is required to adequately emulate the performance characteristics of the target fuel under different combustion modes. For each of the four surrogate fuels, an approximately 30 L batch was blended, and a number of the physical and chemical properties were measured. This work documents the surrogate-fuel creation process and the results of the property measurements.

  1. Diesel Surrogate Fuels for Engine Testing and Chemical-Kinetic Modeling: Compositions and Properties

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, Charles J.; Cannella, William J.; Bays, J. Timothy; Bruno, Thomas J.; DeFabio, Kathy; Dettman, Heather D.; Gieleciak, Rafal M.; Huber, Marcia L.; Kweon, Chol-Bum; McConnell, Steven S.; Pitz, William J.; Ratcliff, Matthew A.

    2016-01-01

    The primary objectives of this work were to formulate, blend, and characterize a set of four ultralow-sulfur diesel surrogate fuels in quantities sufficient to enable their study in single-cylinder-engine and combustion-vessel experiments. The surrogate fuels feature increasing levels of compositional accuracy (i.e., increasing exactness in matching hydrocarbon structural characteristics) relative to the single target diesel fuel upon which the surrogate fuels are based. This approach was taken to assist in determining the minimum level of surrogate-fuel compositional accuracy that is required to adequately emulate the performance characteristics of the target fuel under different combustion modes. For each of the four surrogate fuels, an approximately 30 L batch was blended, and a number of the physical and chemical properties were measured. This work documents the surrogate-fuel creation process and the results of the property measurements. PMID:27330248

  2. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  3. Emotional and Social Factors influence Poker Decision Making Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Laakasuo, Michael; Palomäki, Jussi; Salmela, Mikko

    2015-09-01

    Poker is a social game, where success depends on both game strategic knowledge and emotion regulation abilities. Thus, poker provides a productive environment for studying the effects of emotional and social factors on micro-economic decision making. Previous research indicates that experiencing negative emotions, such as moral anger, reduces mathematical accuracy in poker decision making. Furthermore, various social aspects of the game—such as losing against "bad players" due to "bad luck"—seem to fuel these emotional states. We designed an Internet-based experiment, where participants' (N = 459) mathematical accuracy in five different poker decision making tasks were assessed. In addition, we manipulated the emotional and social conditions under which the tasks were presented, in a 2 × 2 experimental setup: (1) Anger versus neutral emotional state—participants were primed either with an anger-inducing, or emotionally neutral story, and (2) Social cue versus non-social cue—during the tasks, either an image of a pair of human eyes was "following" the mouse cursor, or an image of a black moving box was presented. The results showed that anger reduced mathematical accuracy of decision making only when participants were "being watched" by a pair of moving eyes. Experienced poker players made mathematically more accurate decisions than inexperienced ones. The results contribute to current understanding on how emotional and social factors influence decision making accuracy in economic games.

  4. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  5. High accuracy time transfer synchronization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, Paul J.; Koppang, Paul A.; Chalmers, David; Davis, Angela; Kubik, Anthony; Powell, William M.

    1995-01-01

    In July 1994, the U.S. Naval Observatory (USNO) Time Service System Engineering Division conducted a field test to establish a baseline accuracy for two-way satellite time transfer synchronization. Three Hewlett-Packard model 5071 high performance cesium frequency standards were transported from the USNO in Washington, DC to Los Angeles, California in the USNO's mobile earth station. Two-Way Satellite Time Transfer links between the mobile earth station and the USNO were conducted each day of the trip, using the Naval Research Laboratory(NRL) designed spread spectrum modem, built by Allen Osborne Associates(AOA). A Motorola six channel GPS receiver was used to track the location and altitude of the mobile earth station and to provide coordinates for calculating Sagnac corrections for the two-way measurements, and relativistic corrections for the cesium clocks. This paper will discuss the trip, the measurement systems used and the results from the data collected. We will show the accuracy of using two-way satellite time transfer for synchronization and the performance of the three HP 5071 cesium clocks in an operational environment.

  6. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  7. Parameter Estimation of Spacecraft Fuel Slosh Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gangadharan, Sathya; Sudermann, James; Marlowe, Andrea; Njengam Charles

    2004-01-01

    Fuel slosh in the upper stages of a spinning spacecraft during launch has been a long standing concern for the success of a space mission. Energy loss through the movement of the liquid fuel in the fuel tank affects the gyroscopic stability of the spacecraft and leads to nutation (wobble) which can cause devastating control issues. The rate at which nutation develops (defined by Nutation Time Constant (NTC can be tedious to calculate and largely inaccurate if done during the early stages of spacecraft design. Pure analytical means of predicting the influence of onboard liquids have generally failed. A strong need exists to identify and model the conditions of resonance between nutation motion and liquid modes and to understand the general characteristics of the liquid motion that causes the problem in spinning spacecraft. A 3-D computerized model of the fuel slosh that accounts for any resonant modes found in the experimental testing will allow for increased accuracy in the overall modeling process. Development of a more accurate model of the fuel slosh currently lies in a more generalized 3-D computerized model incorporating masses, springs and dampers. Parameters describing the model include the inertia tensor of the fuel, spring constants, and damper coefficients. Refinement and understanding the effects of these parameters allow for a more accurate simulation of fuel slosh. The current research will focus on developing models of different complexity and estimating the model parameters that will ultimately provide a more realistic prediction of Nutation Time Constant obtained through simulation.

  8. Fuel Economy Label and CAFE Data Inventory

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Fuel Economy Label and CAFE Data asset contains measured summary fuel economy estimates and test data for light-duty vehicle manufacturers by model for certification as required under the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975 (EPCA) and The Energy Independent Security Act of 2007 (EISA) to collect vehicle fuel economy estimates for the creation of Economy Labels and for the calculation of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). Manufacturers submit data on an annual basis, or as needed to document vehicle model changes.The EPA performs targeted fuel economy confirmatory tests on approximately 15% of vehicles submitted for validation. Confirmatory data on vehicles is associated with its corresponding submission data to verify the accuracy of manufacturer submissions beyond standard business rules. Submitted data comes in XML format or as documents, with the majority of submissions being sent in XML, and includes descriptive information on the vehicle itself, fuel economy information, and the manufacturer's testing approach. This data may contain proprietary information (CBI) such as information on estimated sales or other data elements indicated by the submitter as confidential. CBI data is not publically available; however, within the EPA data can accessed under the restrictions of the Office of Transportation and Air Quality (OTAQ) CBI policy [RCS Link]. Datasets are segmented by vehicle model/manufacturer and/or year with corresponding fuel economy, te

  9. 40 CFR 91.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure that the specifications in Table 2 in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission...

  10. 40 CFR 91.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure that the specifications in Table 2 in... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission...

  11. 40 CFR 90.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... found in Table 2 in Appendix A of this subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW...

  12. 40 CFR 91.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure that the specifications in Table 2 in... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission...

  13. 40 CFR 90.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... found in Table 2 in Appendix A of this subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW...

  14. 40 CFR 90.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... found in Table 2 in Appendix A of this subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW...

  15. 40 CFR 90.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... found in table 2 in appendix A of this subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NONROAD SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES AT OR BELOW...

  16. 40 CFR 91.328 - Measurement equipment accuracy/calibration frequency table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... subpart. (3) Check the fuel flow measurement instrument to insure that the specifications in Table 2 in... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Measurement equipment accuracy... (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission...

  17. 40 CFR 80.8 - Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. 80.8 Section 80.8 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... Provisions § 80.8 Sampling methods for gasoline, diesel fuel, fuel additives, and renewable fuels. The..., blendstocks, fuel additives and renewable fuels for purposes of determining compliance with the...

  18. Estimation of Forest Fuel Load from Radar Remote Sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saatchi, Sassan; Despain, Don G.; Halligan, Kerry; Crabtree, Robert

    2007-01-01

    Understanding fire behavior characteristics and planning for fire management require maps showing the distribution of wildfire fuel loads at medium to fine spatial resolution across large landscapes. Radar sensors from airborne or spaceborne platforms have the potential of providing quantitative information about the forest structure and biomass components that can be readily translated to meaningful fuel load estimates for fire management. In this paper, we used multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery acquired over a large area of the Yellowstone National Park (YNP) by the AIRSAR sensor, to estimate the distribution of forest biomass and canopy fuel loads. Semi-empirical algorithms were developed to estimate crown and stem biomass and three major fuel load parameters, canopy fuel weight, canopy bulk density, and foliage moisture content. These estimates when compared directly to measurements made at plot and stand levels, provided more than 70% accuracy, and when partitioned into fuel load classes, provided more than 85% accuracy. Specifically, the radar generated fuel parameters were in good agreement with the field-based fuel measurements, resulting in coefficients of determination of R(sup 2) = 85 for the canopy fuel weight, R(sup 2)=.84 for canopy bulk density and R(sup 2) = 0.78 for the foliage biomass.

  19. Estimation of forest fuel load from radar remote sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saatchi, S.; Halligan, K.; Despain, D.G.; Crabtree, R.L.

    2007-01-01

    Understanding fire behavior characteristics and planning for fire management require maps showing the distribution of wildfire fuel loads at medium to fine spatial resolution across large landscapes. Radar sensors from airborne or spaceborne platforms have the potential of providing quantitative information about the forest structure and biomass components that can be readily translated to meaningful fuel load estimates for fire management. In this paper, we used multifrequency polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery acquired over a large area of the Yellowstone National Park by the Airborne SAR sensor to estimate the distribution of forest biomass and canopy fuel loads. Semiempirical algorithms were developed to estimate crown and stem biomass and three major fuel load parameters, namely: 1) canopy fuel weight; 2) canopy bulk density; and 3) foliage moisture content. These estimates, when compared directly to measurements made at plot and stand levels, provided more than 70% accuracy and, when partitioned into fuel load classes, provided more than 85% accuracy. Specifically, the radar-generated fuel parameters were in good agreement with the field-based fuel measurements, resulting in coefficients of determination of R2 = 85 for the canopy fuel weight, R 2 = 0.84 for canopy bulk density, and R2 =0.78 for the foliage biomass. ?? 2007 IEEE.

  20. FUEL ROD CLUSTERS

    DOEpatents

    Schultz, A.B.

    1959-08-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods and a tubular casing therefor through which a coolant flows in heat-exchange contact with the fuel rods is described. The fuel rcds are held in the casing by virtue of the compressive force exerted between longitudinal ribs of the fuel rcds and internal ribs of the casing or the internal surfaces thereof.

  1. Accuracy of perturbative master equations.

    PubMed

    Fleming, C H; Cummings, N I

    2011-03-01

    We consider open quantum systems with dynamics described by master equations that have perturbative expansions in the system-environment interaction. We show that, contrary to intuition, full-time solutions of order-2n accuracy require an order-(2n+2) master equation. We give two examples of such inaccuracies in the solutions to an order-2n master equation: order-2n inaccuracies in the steady state of the system and order-2n positivity violations. We show how these arise in a specific example for which exact solutions are available. This result has a wide-ranging impact on the validity of coupling (or friction) sensitive results derived from second-order convolutionless, Nakajima-Zwanzig, Redfield, and Born-Markov master equations.

  2. Increasing Accuracy in Environmental Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacksier, Tracey; Fernandes, Adelino; Matthew, Matt; Lehmann, Horst

    2016-04-01

    Human activity is increasing the concentrations of green house gases (GHG) in the atmosphere which results in temperature increases. High precision is a key requirement of atmospheric measurements to study the global carbon cycle and its effect on climate change. Natural air containing stable isotopes are used in GHG monitoring to calibrate analytical equipment. This presentation will examine the natural air and isotopic mixture preparation process, for both molecular and isotopic concentrations, for a range of components and delta values. The role of precisely characterized source material will be presented. Analysis of individual cylinders within multiple batches will be presented to demonstrate the ability to dynamically fill multiple cylinders containing identical compositions without isotopic fractionation. Additional emphasis will focus on the ability to adjust isotope ratios to more closely bracket sample types without the reliance on combusting naturally occurring materials, thereby improving analytical accuracy.

  3. Accuracy of Pressure Sensitive Paint

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tianshu; Guille, M.; Sullivan, J. P.

    2001-01-01

    Uncertainty in pressure sensitive paint (PSP) measurement is investigated from a standpoint of system modeling. A functional relation between the imaging system output and luminescent emission from PSP is obtained based on studies of radiative energy transports in PSP and photodetector response to luminescence. This relation provides insights into physical origins of various elemental error sources and allows estimate of the total PSP measurement uncertainty contributed by the elemental errors. The elemental errors and their sensitivity coefficients in the error propagation equation are evaluated. Useful formulas are given for the minimum pressure uncertainty that PSP can possibly achieve and the upper bounds of the elemental errors to meet required pressure accuracy. An instructive example of a Joukowsky airfoil in subsonic flows is given to illustrate uncertainty estimates in PSP measurements.

  4. Hydrogen Fuel Capability Added to Combustor Flametube Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frankenfield, Bruce J.

    2003-01-01

    Facility capabilities have been expanded at Test Cell 23, Research Combustor Lab (RCL23) at the NASA Glenn Research Center, with a new gaseous hydrogen fuel system. The purpose of this facility is to test a variety of fuel nozzle and flameholder hardware configurations for use in aircraft combustors. Previously, this facility only had jet fuel available to perform these various combustor flametube tests. The new hydrogen fuel system will support the testing and development of aircraft combustors with zero carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. Research information generated from this test rig includes combustor emissions and performance data via gas sampling probes and emissions measuring equipment. The new gaseous hydrogen system is being supplied from a 70 000-standard-ft3 tube trailer at flow rates up to 0.05 lb/s (maximum). The hydrogen supply pressure is regulated, and the flow is controlled with a -in. remotely operated globe valve. Both a calibrated subsonic venturi and a coriolis mass flowmeter are used to measure flow. Safety concerns required the placement of all hydrogen connections within purge boxes, each of which contains a small nitrogen flow that is vented past a hydrogen detector. If any hydrogen leaks occur, the hydrogen detectors alert the operators and automatically safe the facility. Facility upgrades and modifications were also performed on other fluids systems, including the nitrogen gas, cooling water, and air systems. RCL23 can provide nonvitiated heated air to the research combustor, up to 350 psig at 1200 F and 3.0 lb/s. Significant modernization of the facility control systems and the data acquisition systems was completed. A flexible control architecture was installed that allows quick changes of research configurations. The labor-intensive hardware interface has been removed and changed to a software-based system. In addition, the operation of this facility has been greatly enhanced with new software programming and graphic operator interface

  5. Concentric layer ramjet fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Burdette, G.W.; Francis, J.P.

    1988-03-08

    This patent describes a solid fuel ramjet grain comprising concentric layers of solid ramjet fuel having a perforation therethrough along the center axis of the grain. The performation is connected to a combustion after-chamber. The solid ramjet fuel layers comprises a pure hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hydrocarbon fuel or a mixture of a hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene hydrocarbon fuel and from about 5 to about 60 percent by weight of an additive to increase the fuel regression rate selected from the group consisting of magnesium, boron carbide, aluminum, and zirconium such that, when buried in the operation of the ramjet, each fuel layer produces a different level of thrust.

  6. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, H.E.; Barbanti, G.

    1994-03-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool. 6 figures.

  7. Fuel transfer system

    DOEpatents

    Townsend, Harold E.; Barbanti, Giancarlo

    1994-01-01

    A nuclear fuel bundle fuel transfer system includes a transfer pool containing water at a level above a reactor core. A fuel transfer machine therein includes a carriage disposed in the transfer pool and under the water for transporting fuel bundles. The carriage is selectively movable through the water in the transfer pool and individual fuel bundles are carried vertically in the carriage. In a preferred embodiment, a first movable bridge is disposed over an upper pool containing the reactor core, and a second movable bridge is disposed over a fuel storage pool, with the transfer pool being disposed therebetween. A fuel bundle may be moved by the first bridge from the reactor core and loaded into the carriage which transports the fuel bundle to the second bridge which picks up the fuel bundle and carries it to the fuel storage pool.

  8. Fuel cells seminar

    SciTech Connect

    1996-12-01

    This year`s meeting highlights the fact that fuel cells for both stationary and transportation applications have reached the dawn of commercialization. Sales of stationary fuel cells have grown steadily over the past 2 years. Phosphoric acid fuel cell buses have been demonstrated in urban areas. Proton-exchange membrane fuel cells are on the verge of revolutionizing the transportation industry. These activities and many more are discussed during this seminar, which provides a forum for people from the international fuel cell community engaged in a wide spectrum of fuel cell activities. Discussions addressing R&D of fuel cell technologies, manufacturing and marketing of fuel cells, and experiences of fuel cell users took place through oral and poster presentations. For the first time, the seminar included commercial exhibits, further evidence that commercial fuel cell technology has arrived. A total of 205 papers is included in this volume.

  9. Strata-based forest fuel classification for wild fire hazard assessment using terrestrial LiDAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yang; Zhu, Xuan; Yebra, Marta; Harris, Sarah; Tapper, Nigel

    2016-10-01

    Fuel structural characteristics affect fire behavior including fire intensity, spread rate, flame structure, and duration, therefore, quantifying forest fuel structure has significance in understanding fire behavior as well as providing information for fire management activities (e.g., planned burns, suppression, fuel hazard assessment, and fuel treatment). This paper presents a method of forest fuel strata classification with an integration between terrestrial light detection and ranging (LiDAR) data and geographic information system for automatically assessing forest fuel structural characteristics (e.g., fuel horizontal continuity and vertical arrangement). The accuracy of fuel description derived from terrestrial LiDAR scanning (TLS) data was assessed by field measured surface fuel depth and fuel percentage covers at distinct vertical layers. The comparison of TLS-derived depth and percentage cover at surface fuel layer with the field measurements produced root mean square error values of 1.1 cm and 5.4%, respectively. TLS-derived percentage cover explained 92% of the variation in percentage cover at all fuel layers of the entire dataset. The outcome indicated TLS-derived fuel characteristics are strongly consistent with field measured values. TLS can be used to efficiently and consistently classify forest vertical layers to provide more precise information for forest fuel hazard assessment and surface fuel load estimation in order to assist forest fuels management and fire-related operational activities. It can also be beneficial for mapping forest habitat, wildlife conservation, and ecosystem management.

  10. High accuracy broadband infrared spectropolarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnaswamy, Venkataramanan

    Mueller matrix spectroscopy or Spectropolarimetry combines conventional spectroscopy with polarimetry, providing more information than can be gleaned from spectroscopy alone. Experimental studies on infrared polarization properties of materials covering a broad spectral range have been scarce due to the lack of available instrumentation. This dissertation aims to fill the gap by the design, development, calibration and testing of a broadband Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FT-IR) spectropolarimeter. The instrument operates over the 3-12 mum waveband and offers better overall accuracy compared to the previous generation instruments. Accurate calibration of a broadband spectropolarimeter is a non-trivial task due to the inherent complexity of the measurement process. An improved calibration technique is proposed for the spectropolarimeter and numerical simulations are conducted to study the effectiveness of the proposed technique. Insights into the geometrical structure of the polarimetric measurement matrix is provided to aid further research towards global optimization of Mueller matrix polarimeters. A high performance infrared wire-grid polarizer is characterized using the spectropolarimeter. Mueller matrix spectrum measurements on Penicillin and pine pollen are also presented.

  11. ACCURACY OF CO2 SENSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Fisk, William J.; Faulkner, David; Sullivan, Douglas P.

    2008-10-01

    Are the carbon dioxide (CO2) sensors in your demand controlled ventilation systems sufficiently accurate? The data from these sensors are used to automatically modulate minimum rates of outdoor air ventilation. The goal is to keep ventilation rates at or above design requirements while adjusting the ventilation rate with changes in occupancy in order to save energy. Studies of energy savings from demand controlled ventilation and of the relationship of indoor CO2 concentrations with health and work performance provide a strong rationale for use of indoor CO2 data to control minimum ventilation rates1-7. However, this strategy will only be effective if, in practice, the CO2 sensors have a reasonable accuracy. The objective of this study was; therefore, to determine if CO2 sensor performance, in practice, is generally acceptable or problematic. This article provides a summary of study methods and findings ? additional details are available in a paper in the proceedings of the ASHRAE IAQ?2007 Conference8.

  12. Astrophysics with Microarcsecond Accuracy Astrometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unwin, Stephen C.

    2008-01-01

    Space-based astrometry promises to provide a powerful new tool for astrophysics. At a precision level of a few microarcsonds, a wide range of phenomena are opened up for study. In this paper we discuss the capabilities of the SIM Lite mission, the first space-based long-baseline optical interferometer, which will deliver parallaxes to 4 microarcsec. A companion paper in this volume will cover the development and operation of this instrument. At the level that SIM Lite will reach, better than 1 microarcsec in a single measurement, planets as small as one Earth can be detected around many dozen of the nearest stars. Not only can planet masses be definitely measured, but also the full orbital parameters determined, allowing study of system stability in multiple planet systems. This capability to survey our nearby stellar neighbors for terrestrial planets will be a unique contribution to our understanding of the local universe. SIM Lite will be able to tackle a wide range of interesting problems in stellar and Galactic astrophysics. By tracing the motions of stars in dwarf spheroidal galaxies orbiting our Milky Way, SIM Lite will probe the shape of the galactic potential history of the formation of the galaxy, and the nature of dark matter. Because it is flexibly scheduled, the instrument can dwell on faint targets, maintaining its full accuracy on objects as faint as V=19. This paper is a brief survey of the diverse problems in modern astrophysics that SIM Lite will be able to address.

  13. [Accuracy of HDL cholesterol measurements].

    PubMed

    Niedmann, P D; Luthe, H; Wieland, H; Schaper, G; Seidel, D

    1983-02-01

    The widespread use of different methods for the determination of HDL-cholesterol (in Europe: sodium phosphotungstic acid/MgCl2) in connection with enzymatic procedures (in the USA: heparin/MnCl2 followed by the Liebermann-Burchard method) but common reference values makes it necessary to evaluate not only accuracy, specificity, and precision of the precipitation step but also of the subsequent cholesterol determination. A high ratio of serum vs. concentrated precipitation reagent (10:1 V/V) leads to the formation of variable amounts of delta-3.5-cholestadiene. This substance is not recognized by cholesterol oxidase but leads to an 1.6 times overestimation by the Liebermann-Burchard method. Therefore, errors in HDL-cholesterol determination should be considered and differences up to 30% may occur between HDL-cholesterol values determined by the different techniques (heparin/MnCl2 - Liebermann-Burchard and NaPW/MgCl2-CHOD-PAP).

  14. Alternative aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P.; Grobman, J.

    1978-01-01

    In connection with the anticipated impossibility to provide on a long-term basis liquid fuels derived from petroleum, an investigation has been conducted with the objective to assess the suitability of jet fuels made from oil shale and coal and to develop a data base which will allow optimization of future fuel characteristics, taking energy efficiency of manufacture and the tradeoffs in aircraft and engine design into account. The properties of future aviation fuels are examined and proposed solutions to problems of alternative fuels are discussed. Attention is given to the refining of jet fuel to current specifications, the control of fuel thermal stability, and combustor technology for use of broad specification fuels. The first solution is to continue to develop the necessary technology at the refinery to produce specification jet fuels regardless of the crude source.

  15. Fuel injector system

    DOEpatents

    Hsu, Bertrand D.; Leonard, Gary L.

    1988-01-01

    A fuel injection system particularly adapted for injecting coal slurry fuels at high pressures includes an accumulator-type fuel injector which utilizes high-pressure pilot fuel as a purging fluid to prevent hard particles in the fuel from impeding the opening and closing movement of a needle valve, and as a hydraulic medium to hold the needle valve in its closed position. A fluid passage in the injector delivers an appropriately small amount of the ignition-aiding pilot fuel to an appropriate region of a chamber in the injector's nozzle so that at the beginning of each injection interval the first stratum of fuel to be discharged consists essentially of pilot fuel and thereafter mostly slurry fuel is injected.

  16. Dual Tank Fuel System

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Richard William; Burkhard, James Frank; Dauer, Kenneth John

    1999-11-16

    A dual tank fuel system has primary and secondary fuel tanks, with the primary tank including a filler pipe to receive fuel and a discharge line to deliver fuel to an engine, and with a balance pipe interconnecting the primary tank and the secondary tank. The balance pipe opens close to the bottom of each tank to direct fuel from the primary tank to the secondary tank as the primary tank is filled, and to direct fuel from the secondary tank to the primary tank as fuel is discharged from the primary tank through the discharge line. A vent line has branches connected to each tank to direct fuel vapor from the tanks as the tanks are filled, and to admit air to the tanks as fuel is delivered to the engine.

  17. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  18. Ground Truth Sampling and LANDSAT Accuracy Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, J. W.; Gunther, F. J.; Campbell, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    It is noted that the key factor in any accuracy assessment of remote sensing data is the method used for determining the ground truth, independent of the remote sensing data itself. The sampling and accuracy procedures developed for nuclear power plant siting study are described. The purpose of the sampling procedure was to provide data for developing supervised classifications for two study sites and for assessing the accuracy of that and the other procedures used. The purpose of the accuracy assessment was to allow the comparison of the cost and accuracy of various classification procedures as applied to various data types.

  19. Fuel economy of hybrid fuel cell vehicles.

    SciTech Connect

    Ahluwalia, R.; Wang, X.; Rousseau, A.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2004-01-01

    The potential improvement in fuel economy of a mid-size fuel-cell vehicle by combining it with an energy storage system has been assessed. An energy management strategy is developed and used to operate the direct hydrogen, pressurized fuel-cell system in a load-following mode and the energy storage system in a charge-sustaining mode. The strategy places highest priority on maintaining the energy storage system in a state where it can supply unanticipated boost power when the fuel-cell system alone cannot meet the power demand. It is found that downsizing a fuel-cell system decreases its efficiency on a drive cycle which is compensated by partial regenerative capture of braking energy. On a highway cycle with limited braking energy the increase in fuel economy with hybridization is small but on the stop-and-go urban cycle the fuel economy can improve by 27%. On the combined highway and urban drive cycles the fuel economy of the fuel-cell vehicle is estimated to increase by up to 15% by hybridizing it with an energy storage system.

  20. Survey methods for assessing land cover map accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nusser, S.M.; Klaas, E.E.

    2003-01-01

    The increasing availability of digital photographic materials has fueled efforts by agencies and organizations to generate land cover maps for states, regions, and the United States as a whole. Regardless of the information sources and classification methods used, land cover maps are subject to numerous sources of error. In order to understand the quality of the information contained in these maps, it is desirable to generate statistically valid estimates of accuracy rates describing misclassification errors. We explored a full sample survey framework for creating accuracy assessment study designs that balance statistical and operational considerations in relation to study objectives for a regional assessment of GAP land cover maps. We focused not only on appropriate sample designs and estimation approaches, but on aspects of the data collection process, such as gaining cooperation of land owners and using pixel clusters as an observation unit. The approach was tested in a pilot study to assess the accuracy of Iowa GAP land cover maps. A stratified two-stage cluster sampling design addressed sample size requirements for land covers and the need for geographic spread while minimizing operational effort. Recruitment methods used for private land owners yielded high response rates, minimizing a source of nonresponse error. Collecting data for a 9-pixel cluster centered on the sampled pixel was simple to implement, and provided better information on rarer vegetation classes as well as substantial gains in precision relative to observing data at a single-pixel.

  1. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-07-22

    A fuel injection nozzle is described connected to a fuel injection pump to inject fuel into a combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a nozzle housing defining therein a fuel sump chamber, an injection hole communicating with the sump chamber and opened at the outer surface of the nozzle housing, a stepped cylinder bore having a smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter bore section and a fuel passage communicating at one end with the sump chamber and at the other end with the smaller diameter bore section of the stepped cylinder bore; a stepped plunger fitted in the stepped cylinder bore and having a smaller diameter plunger section fitted into the smaller diameter bore section and a larger diameter plunger section fitted into the larger diameter bore section in which the smaller diameter bore section together with the end face of the smaller diameter plunger section defines a pump chamber communicating with the fuel passage and the larger diameter bore section together with the end face of the larger diameter plunger section defines a main fuel chamber into which a main fuel is supplied from the fuel injection pump; auxiliary fuel supply means for supplying an auxiliary fuel into the sump chamber and pump chamber through the fuel passage; valve means for opening and closing an injection hole; communication means for permitting the main fuel chamber to communicate with the fuel passage when the main fuel is supplied from the injection pump into the main fuel chamber to cause the stepped plunger to be moved a predetermined distance in a direction in which the auxiliary fuel in the pump chamber is pressurized.

  2. Fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaki, M.; Iwanaga, T.; Fujisawa, H.

    1988-10-18

    This patent describes a fuel injection system for a diesel engine comprising: condition detection means for detecting operating conditions of the diesel engine including a rotational position thereof; low pressure fuel supply means for supplying fuel at a low pressure at an output port thereof; high pressure fuel pump means, having a pump chamber communicating with the output port of the low pressure fuel supply means, and plunger means reciprocable within the pump chamber for introducing fuel from the output port of the low pressure fuel supply means into the pump chamber during a movement in a predetermined direction of the plunger means and for pressurizing the introduced fuel during a movement of the plunger means in the opposite direction so that pressurized fuel is delivered from the high pressure fuel pump means at an output port thereof; common rail fuel storage means, connected to the output port of the high pressure fuel pump means, for storing pressurized fuel delivered from the high pressure pump therein at a substantially continuous pressure.

  3. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Miyaki, M.

    1986-01-07

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump for delivering fuel to the cylinders of an internal combustion engine consisting of: a pump housing with a fuel chamber therein to which fuel is supplied from a fuel tank; means for compressing fuel in the pump chamber and delivering the compressed fuel to the engine cylinders with such means including a pump plunger adapted to be reciprocated so as to introduce fuel into the pump chamber and to pressurize the introduced fuel; spill means for spilling to a low-pressure side on a fuel tank side the compressed fuel which was pressurized in the pump chamber to be delivered from the pump chamber to the engine cylinders, the spill mechanism including a spill passage communicating with the pump chamber and including a solenoid valve located in the spill passage for opening and closing the spill passage with predetermined timing; escape for allowing the compressed fuel pressurized in the pump chamber to escape to the low-pressure side of the fuel tank side.

  4. Fuel cells and fuel cell catalysts

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Rice, Cynthia A.; Waszczuk, Piotr; Wieckowski, Andrzej

    2006-11-07

    A direct organic fuel cell includes a formic acid fuel solution having between about 10% and about 95% formic acid. The formic acid is oxidized at an anode. The anode may include a Pt/Pd catalyst that promotes the direct oxidation of the formic acid via a direct reaction path that does not include formation of a CO intermediate.

  5. Effects of accuracy motivation and anchoring on metacomprehension judgment and accuracy.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Qin

    2012-01-01

    The current research investigates how accuracy motivation impacts anchoring and adjustment in metacomprehension judgment and how accuracy motivation and anchoring affect metacomprehension accuracy. Participants were randomly assigned to one of six conditions produced by the between-subjects factorial design involving accuracy motivation (incentive or no) and peer performance anchor (95%, 55%, or no). Two studies showed that accuracy motivation did not impact anchoring bias, but the adjustment-from-anchor process occurred. Accuracy incentive increased anchor-judgment gap for the 95% anchor but not for the 55% anchor, which induced less certainty about the direction of adjustment. The findings offer support to the integrative theory of anchoring. Additionally, the two studies revealed a "power struggle" between accuracy motivation and anchoring in influencing metacomprehension accuracy. Accuracy motivation could improve metacomprehension accuracy in spite of anchoring effect, but if anchoring effect is too strong, it could overpower the motivation effect. The implications of the findings were discussed.

  6. Microscale Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Holladay, Jamie D.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

    2005-11-03

    Perhaprs some of the most innovative work on fuel cells has been the research dedicated to applying silicon fabrication techniques to fuel cells technology creating low power microscale fuel cells applicable to microelectro mechanical systems (MEMS), microsensors, cell phones, PDA’s, and other low power (0.001 to 5 We) applications. In this small power range, fuel cells offer the decoupling of the energy converter from the energy storage which may enable longer operating times and instant or near instant charging. To date, most of the microscale fuel cells being developed have been based on proton exchange membrane fuel cell technology (PEMFC) or direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) technology. This section will discuss requirements and considerations that need to be addressed in the development of microscale fuel cells, as well as some proposed designs and fabrication strategies.

  7. FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    FUEL CELL ELECTRODE MATERIALS. RAW MATERIAL SELECTION INFLUENCES POLARIZATION BUT IS NOT A SINGLE CONTROLLING FACTOR. AVAILABLE...DATA INDICATES THAT AN INTERRELATIONSHIP OF POROSITY, AVERAGE PORE VOLUME, AND PERMEABILITY CONTRIBUTES TO ELECTRODE FUEL CELL BEHAVIOR.

  8. Integrated fuel management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbeau, D.E.

    1987-09-29

    An aircraft fuel management system to regulate fuel from an airframe reservoir is described. The system comprises: an aircraft turbine engine having a combustor providing propulsion for the aircraft; a fuel pump receiving fuel from the reservoir and supplying fuel to the turbine engine; a motor controlling the pump so as to provide fuel to the turbine engine; means for sensing at least one engine condition; means responsive to the sensing means for controlling fuel flow to the turbine engine, and wherein the pump and the motor are of the constant speed type and further comprising valve means for controlling the fuel flow rate to the turbine engine and wherein the controlling means modulates the position of the valve means.

  9. Alternative aircraft fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1976-01-01

    NASA is studying the characteristics of future aircraft fuels produced from either petroleum or nonpetroleum sources such as oil shale or coal. These future hydrocarbon based fuels may have chemical and physical properties that are different from present aviation turbine fuels. This research is aimed at determining what those characteristics may be, how present aircraft and engine components and materials would be affected by fuel specification changes, and what changes in both aircraft and engine design would be required to utilize these future fuels without sacrificing performance, reliability, or safety. This fuels technology program was organized to include both in-house and contract research on the synthesis and characterization of fuels, component evaluations of combustors, turbines, and fuel systems, and, eventually, full-scale engine demonstrations. A review of the various elements of the program and significant results obtained so far are presented.

  10. Fuel quality combustion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naegeli, D. W.; Moses, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A high pressure research combustor operating over a wide range of burner inlet conditions was used to determine the effects of fuel molecular structure on soot formation. Six test fuels with equal hydrogen content (12.8%) were blended to stress different molecular components and final boiling points. The fuels containing high concentrations (20%) of polycyclic aromatics and partially saturated polycyclic structures such as tetralin, produced more soot than would be expected from a hydrogen content correlation for typical petroleum based fuels. Fuels containing naphthenes such as decalin agreed with the hydrogen content correlation. The contribution of polycyclic aromatics to soot formation was equivalent to a reduction in fuel hydrogen content of about one percent. The fuel sensitivity to soot formation due to the polycyclic aromatic contribution decreased as burner inlet pressure and fuel/air ratio increased.

  11. Nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Zocher, Roy W.

    1991-01-01

    A nuclear fuel element and a method of manufacturing the element. The fuel element is comprised of a metal primary container and a fuel pellet which is located inside it and which is often fragmented. The primary container is subjected to elevated pressure and temperature to deform the container such that the container conforms to the fuel pellet, that is, such that the container is in substantial contact with the surface of the pellet. This conformance eliminates clearances which permit rubbing together of fuel pellet fragments and rubbing of fuel pellet fragments against the container, thus reducing the amount of dust inside the fuel container and the amount of dust which may escape in the event of container breach. Also, as a result of the inventive method, fuel pellet fragments tend to adhere to one another to form a coherent non-fragmented mass; this reduces the tendency of a fragment to pierce the container in the event of impact.

  12. Reformulated diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    McAdams, Hiramie T [Carrollton, IL; Crawford, Robert W [Tucson, AZ; Hadder, Gerald R [Oak Ridge, TN; McNutt, Barry D [Arlington, VA

    2006-03-28

    Reformulated diesel fuels for automotive diesel engines which meet the requirements of ASTM 975-02 and provide significantly reduced emissions of nitrogen oxides (NO.sub.x) and particulate matter (PM) relative to commercially available diesel fuels.

  13. Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabihian, Farshid

    The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique

  14. Fuel collecting and recycling system

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1980-06-10

    This system serves to collect and recycle fuel leftover in the fuel manifold and fuel distribution system of a gas turbine power plant when it is shutdown and operates in conjunction with the power plant's existing fuel control.

  15. COMPOSITE FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Hurford, W.J.; Gordon, R.B.; Johnson, W.A.

    1962-12-25

    A sandwich-type fuel element for a reactor is described. This fuel element has the shape of an elongated flat plate and includes a filler plate having a plurality of compartments therein in which the fuel material is located. The filler plate is clad on both sides with a thin cladding material which is secured to the filler plate only to completely enclose the fuel material in each compartment. (AEC)

  16. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  17. Navy Fuel Specification Standardization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-04-01

    surfaced periodically to convert further to a single-fuel operation, i.e., one fuel for both aircraft and ship propulsion /power systems. This study...lead to the development of a single distillate fuel for ship propulsion , resulting eventually in the MIL-F-16884 Naval Distillate Fuel (NDF) used today...for both aircraft and ship propulsion /power systems. This report summarizes a study to consider this problem in light of current systems and

  18. Fakir fuel pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1922-01-01

    In designing the Fakir fuel pump, the fundamental idea was to obtain a simple and reliable method of conveying the fuel from a low tank to the carburetor, with the avoidance of the faults of all former methods and the simultaneous warming of the fuel by means of the heat of compression generated. The principle of the Fakir fuel pump rests on the well-known principle of the diaphragm pump, which must be suitably adapted to the present purpose.

  19. Miniature ceramic fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Lessing, Paul A.; Zuppero, Anthony C.

    1997-06-24

    A miniature power source assembly capable of providing portable electricity is provided. A preferred embodiment of the power source assembly employing a fuel tank, fuel pump and control, air pump, heat management system, power chamber, power conditioning and power storage. The power chamber utilizes a ceramic fuel cell to produce the electricity. Incoming hydro carbon fuel is automatically reformed within the power chamber. Electrochemical combustion of hydrogen then produces electricity.

  20. Transportation fuels from wood

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.; Stevens, D.J.

    1980-01-01

    The various methods of producing transportation fuels from wood are evaluated in this paper. These methods include direct liquefaction schemes such as hydrolysis/fermentation, pyrolysis, and thermochemical liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction techniques involve gasification followed by liquid fuels synthesis such as methanol synthesis or the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The cost of transportation fuels produced by the various methods are compared. In addition, three ongoing programs at Pacific Northwest Laboratory dealing with liquid fuels from wood are described.

  1. Jet fuel instability mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, S. R.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms of the formation of fuel-insoluble deposits were studied in several real fuels and in a model fuel consisting of tetralin in dodecane solution. The influence of addition to the fuels of small concentrations of various compounds on the quantities of deposits formed and on the formation and disappearance of oxygenated species in solution was assessed. The effect of temperature on deposit formation was also investigated over the range of 308-453 K.

  2. FUEL ROD ASSEMBLY

    DOEpatents

    Hutter, E.

    1959-09-01

    A cluster of nuclear fuel rods aod a tubular casing through which a coolant flows in heat-change contact with the ruel rods are described. The casting is of trefoil section and carries the fuel rods, each of which has two fin engaging the serrated fins of the other two fuel rods, whereby the fuel rods are held in the casing and are interlocked against relative longitudinal movement.

  3. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-10-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  4. Spacecraft attitude determination accuracy from mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, D.; Hashmall, J.; Baker, D.

    1994-01-01

    This document presents a compilation of the attitude accuracy attained by a number of satellites that have been supported by the Flight Dynamics Facility (FDF) at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). It starts with a general description of the factors that influence spacecraft attitude accuracy. After brief descriptions of the missions supported, it presents the attitude accuracy results for currently active and older missions, including both three-axis stabilized and spin-stabilized spacecraft. The attitude accuracy results are grouped by the sensor pair used to determine the attitudes. A supplementary section is also included, containing the results of theoretical computations of the effects of variation of sensor accuracy on overall attitude accuracy.

  5. Vented nuclear fuel element

    DOEpatents

    Grossman, Leonard N.; Kaznoff, Alexis I.

    1979-01-01

    A nuclear fuel cell for use in a thermionic nuclear reactor in which a small conduit extends from the outside surface of the emitter to the center of the fuel mass of the emitter body to permit escape of volatile and gaseous fission products collected in the center thereof by virtue of molecular migration of the gases to the hotter region of the fuel.

  6. Metallic fuel development

    SciTech Connect

    Walters, L.C.

    1987-01-01

    Metallic fuels are capable of achieving high burnup as a result of design modifications instituted in the late 1960's. The gap between the fuel slug and the cladding is fixed such that by the time the fuel swells to the cladding the fission gas bubbles interconnect and release the fission gas to an appropriately sized plenum volume. Interconnected porosity thus provides room for the fuel to deform from further swelling rather than stress the cladding. In addition, the interconnected porosity allows the fuel pin to be tolerant to transient events because as stresses are generated during a transient event the fuel flows rather than applying significant stress to the cladding. Until 1969 a number of metallic fuel alloys were under development in the US. At that time the metallic fuel development program in the US was discontinued in favor of ceramic fuels. However, development had proceeded to the point where it was clear that the zirconium addition to uranium-plutonium fuel would yield a ternary fuel with an adequately high solidus temperature and good compatibility with austenitic stainless steel cladding. Furthermore, several U-Pu-Zr fuel pins had achieved about 6 at.% bu by the late 1960's, without failure, and thus the prospect for high burnup was promising.

  7. Fuels from Recycling Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tillman, David A.

    1975-01-01

    Three systems, operating at sufficient scale, produce fuels that may be alternatives to oil and gas. These three recycling systems are: Black Clawson Fiberclaim, Franklin, Ohio; Union Carbide, South Charleston, West Virginia; and Union Electric, St. Louis, Missouri. These produce a wet fuel, a pyrolytic gas, and a dry fuel, respectively. (BT)

  8. Fireplaces and Fireplace Fuels.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Ron

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fireplaces and fuels. Its objective is for the student to be able to discuss the structural design, operation, and efficiency of fireplaces and characteristics of different fireplace fuels. Some topics covered are fuels, elements…

  9. Alternative Fuels Data Center

    SciTech Connect

    2013-06-01

    Fact sheet describes the Alternative Fuels Data Center, which provides information, data, and tools to help fleets and other transportation decision makers find ways to reduce petroleum consumption through the use of alternative and renewable fuels, advanced vehicles, and other fuel-saving measures.

  10. Fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

  11. Vehicle fuel system

    DOEpatents

    Risse, John T.; Taggart, James C.

    1976-01-01

    A vehicle fuel system comprising a plurality of tanks, each tank having a feed and a return conduit extending into a lower portion thereof, the several feed conduits joined to form one supply conduit feeding fuel to a supply pump and using means, unused fuel being returned via a return conduit which branches off to the several return conduits.

  12. Impeller flow-meter logging of vertical cross flow between basalt aquifers through wells at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Eastern Snake River Plain, Idaho. Progress report, June 22, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Bennecke, W.M.; Wood, S.H.

    1992-12-31

    An impeller flowmeter was used with a COLOG digital acquisition system to determine existing borehole flows, to compare with previous logging results, and to acquire flow measurements of vertical cross-flow of water in the wells between permeable zones in the open-hole intervals. The direction of flow found was predominantly downward with velocities ranging from 0-30 ft/min. Some flow reversals were noted and attributed to nearby pumping wells. USGS wells 44 and 46 were studied in September, 1991 near the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The results showed a usual overall flow direction downward with flow entering the wells at around 510 to 600 ft. below the land surface. Water exited these wells at lower levels around 550 to 580 ft. Flow velocities ranged up to 24 ft/min. Using published aquifer parameters, the rate of propagation of a pressure change in an aquifer was calculated for the well CPP-2 turning on and off, at 3100 gpm.

  13. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  14. Effects of chemical equilibrium on turbine engine performance for various fuels and combustor temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald H.; Snyder, Christopher A.

    1992-01-01

    A study was performed to quantify the differences in turbine engine performance with and without the chemical dissociation effects for various fuel types over a range of combustor temperatures. Both turbojet and turbofan engines were studied with hydrocarbon fuels and cryogenic, nonhydrocarbon fuels. Results of the study indicate that accuracy of engine performance decreases when nonhydrocarbon fuels are used, especially at high temperatures where chemical dissociation becomes more significant. For instance, the deviation in net thrust for liquid hydrogen fuel can become as high as 20 percent at 4160 R. This study reveals that computer central processing unit (CPU) time increases significantly when dissociation effects are included in the cycle analysis.

  15. Fuel characteristics pertinent to the design of aircraft fuel systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Henry C; Hibbard, R R

    1953-01-01

    Because of the importance of fuel properties in design of aircraft fuel systems the present report has been prepared to provide information on the characteristics of current jet fuels. In addition to information on fuel properties, discussions are presented on fuel specifications, the variations among fuels supplied under a given specification, fuel composition, and the pertinence of fuel composition and physical properties to fuel system design. In some instances the influence of variables such as pressure and temperature on physical properties is indicated. References are cited to provide fuel system designers with sources of information containing more detail than is practicable in the present report.

  16. Fuel Cell Handbook update

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, W.R.; Hirschenhofer, J.H.; Engleman, R.R. Jr.; Stauffer, D.B.

    1993-11-01

    The objective of this work was to update the 1988 version of DOE`s Fuel Cell Handbook. Significant developments in the various fuel cell technologies required revisions to reflect state-of-the-art configurations and performance. The theoretical presentation was refined in order to make the handbook more useful to both the casual reader and fuel cell or systems analyst. In order to further emphasize the practical application of fuel cell technologies, the system integration information was expanded. In addition, practical elements, such as suggestions and guidelines to approximate fuel cell performance, were provided.

  17. Alternative aircraft fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P.; Grobman, J. S.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel, and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. The effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications are discussed.

  18. Alternative aviation turbine fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobman, J.

    1977-01-01

    The efficient utilization of fossil fuels by future jet aircraft may necessitate the broadening of current aviation turbine fuel specifications. The most significant changes in specifications would be an increased aromatics content and a higher final boiling point in order to minimize refinery energy consumption and costs. These changes would increase the freezing point and might lower the thermal stability of the fuel and could cause increased pollutant emissions, increased smoke and carbon formation, increased combustor liner temperatures, and poorer ignition characteristics. This paper discusses the effects that broadened specification fuels may have on present-day jet aircraft and engine components and the technology required to use fuels with broadened specifications.

  19. Method and apparatus for measuring irradiated fuel profiles

    DOEpatents

    Lee, David M.

    1982-01-01

    A new apparatus is used to substantially instantaneously obtain a profile of an object, for example a spent fuel assembly, which profile (when normalized) has unexpectedly been found to be substantially identical to the normalized profile of the burnup monitor Cs-137 obtained with a germanium detector. That profile can be used without normalization in a new method of identifying and monitoring in order to determine for example whether any of the fuel has been removed. Alternatively, two other new methods involve calibrating that profile so as to obtain a determination of fuel burnup (which is important for complying with safeguards requirements, for utilizing fuel to an optimal extent, and for storing spent fuel in a minimal amount of space). Using either of these two methods of determining burnup, one can reduce the required measurement time significantly (by more than an order of magnitude) over existing methods, yet retain equal or only slightly reduced accuracy.

  20. Fuel nozzle assembly

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Thomas Edward; Ziminsky, Willy Steve; Lacey, Benjamin Paul; York, William David; Stevenson, Christian Xavier

    2011-08-30

    A fuel nozzle assembly is provided. The assembly includes an outer nozzle body having a first end and a second end and at least one inner nozzle tube having a first end and a second end. One of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel plenum and a fuel passage extending therefrom, while the other of the nozzle body or nozzle tube includes a fuel injection hole slidably aligned with the fuel passage to form a fuel flow path therebetween at an interface between the body and the tube. The nozzle body and the nozzle tube are fixed against relative movement at the first ends of the nozzle body and nozzle tube, enabling the fuel flow path to close at the interface due to thermal growth after a flame enters the nozzle tube.

  1. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Wheelock, C.W.; Baumeister, E.B.

    1961-09-01

    A reactor fuel element utilizing fissionable fuel materials in plate form is described. This fuel element consists of bundles of fuel-bearing plates. The bundles are stacked inside of a tube which forms the shell of the fuel element. The plates each have longitudinal fins running parallel to the direction of coolant flow, and interspersed among and parallel to the fins are ribs which position the plates relative to each other and to the fuel element shell. The plate bundles are held together by thin bands or wires. The ex tended surface increases the heat transfer capabilities of a fuel element by a factor of 3 or more over those of a simple flat plate.

  2. Fuel injection apparatus

    SciTech Connect

    Omori, T.; Sakakibara, S.; Kato, M.; Masuda, A.

    1986-06-10

    A fuel injection apparatus is described for supplying fuel from a fuel tank to at least one combustion chamber of an internal combustion engine, comprising: an injector housing defining therein a pressure cylinder bore, an injection cylinder bore and a timing cylinder bore connected in series with the pressure cylinder bore; a pressure plunger, fitted in the pressure cylinder bore and having one end defining, in the pressure cylinder bore, a pressure pump chamber communicating with the injection cylinder bore and the timing cylinder bore; first fuel supply means for supplying fuel from the fuel tank to the pressure pump chamber; pressurizing means for reciprocating the pressure plunger in the pressure cylinder bore in synchronism with the engine operation so as to pressurize fuel in the pressure pump chamber; an injection plunger, having a diameter smaller than the pressure plunger, fitted in the injection cylinder bore and having two ends defining, in the injection cylinder bore, an injection pump chamber and a first communicating chamber communicating with the pressure pump chamber; second fuel supply means for adjusting the quantity of the fuel from the fuel tank in accordance with engine operation conditions so as to supply the adjusted fuel quantity to the injection pump chamber; injection valve means for injecting the fuel into the fuel pump chamber toward a combustion chamber of the engine when the pressure in the pressure pump chamber is applied to the injection plunger through the first communicating chamber, and the fuel pressure in the injection pump chamber reaches a predetermined injection pressure.

  3. Stereotype Accuracy: Toward Appreciating Group Differences.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yueh-Ting, Ed.; And Others

    The preponderance of scholarly theory and research on stereotypes assumes that they are bad and inaccurate, but understanding stereotype accuracy and inaccuracy is more interesting and complicated than simpleminded accusations of racism or sexism would seem to imply. The selections in this collection explore issues of the accuracy of stereotypes…

  4. [Upon scientific accuracy scheme at clinical specialties].

    PubMed

    Ortega Calvo, M

    2006-11-01

    Will be medical specialties like sciences in the future? Yes, progressively they will. Accuracy in clinical specialties will be dissimilar in the future because formal-logic mathematics, quantum physics advances and relativity theory utilities. Evidence based medicine is now helping to clinical specialties on scientific accuracy by the way of decision theory.

  5. Sound source localization identification accuracy: bandwidth dependencies.

    PubMed

    Yost, William A; Zhong, Xuan

    2014-11-01

    Sound source localization accuracy using a sound source identification task was measured in the front, right quarter of the azimuth plane as rms (root-mean-square) error (degrees) for stimulus conditions in which the bandwidth (1/20 to 2 octaves wide) and center frequency (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) of 200-ms noise bursts were varied. Tones of different frequencies (250, 2000, 4000 Hz) were also used. As stimulus bandwidth increases, there is an increase in sound source localization identification accuracy (i.e., rms error decreases). Wideband stimuli (>1 octave wide) produce best sound source localization accuracy (~6°-7° rms error), and localization accuracy for these wideband noise stimuli does not depend on center frequency. For narrow bandwidths (<1 octave) and tonal stimuli, accuracy does depend on center frequency such that highest accuracy is obtained for low-frequency stimuli (centered on 250 Hz), worse accuracy for mid-frequency stimuli (centered on 2000 Hz), and intermediate accuracy for high-frequency stimuli (centered on 4000 Hz).

  6. Accuracy of Parent Identification of Stuttering Occurrence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Einarsdottir, Johanna; Ingham, Roger

    2009-01-01

    Background: Clinicians rely on parents to provide information regarding the onset and development of stuttering in their own children. The accuracy and reliability of their judgments of stuttering is therefore important and is not well researched. Aim: To investigate the accuracy of parent judgements of stuttering in their own children's speech…

  7. Increasing Deception Detection Accuracy with Strategic Questioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Timothy R.; Shaw, Allison; Shulman, Hillary C.

    2010-01-01

    One explanation for the finding of slightly above-chance accuracy in detecting deception experiments is limited variance in sender transparency. The current study sought to increase accuracy by increasing variance in sender transparency with strategic interrogative questioning. Participants (total N = 128) observed cheaters and noncheaters who…

  8. The Accuracy of Gender Stereotypes Regarding Occupations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beyer, Sylvia; Finnegan, Andrea

    Given the salience of biological sex, it is not surprising that gender stereotypes are pervasive. To explore the prevalence of such stereotypes, the accuracy of gender stereotyping regarding occupations is presented in this paper. The paper opens with an overview of gender stereotype measures that use self-perceptions as benchmarks of accuracy,…

  9. Evaluating the accuracy of selenodesic reference grids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koptev, A. A.

    1974-01-01

    Estimates were made of the accuracy of reference point grids using the technique of calculating the errors from theoretical analysis. Factors taken into consideration were: telescope accuracy, number of photographs, and libration amplitude. To solve the problem, formulas were used for the relationship between the coordinates of lunar surface points and their images on the photograph.

  10. Test methods for evaluating reformulated fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Croudace, M.C.

    1994-12-31

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) introduced regulations in the 1989 Clean Air Act Amendment governing the reformulation of gasoline and diesel fuels to improve air quality. These statutes drove the need for a fast and accurate method for analyzing product composition, especially aromatic and oxygenate content. The current method, gas chromatography, is slow, expensive, non portable, and requires a trained chemist to perform the analysis. The new mid-infrared spectroscopic method uses light to identify and quantify the different components in fuels. Each individual fuel component absorbs a specific wavelength of light depending on the molecule`s unique chemical structure. The quantity of light absorbed is proportional to the concentration of that fuel component in the mixture. The mid-infrared instrument has significant advantages; it is easy to use, rugged, portable, fully automated and cost effective. It can be used to measure multiple oxygenate or aromatic components in unknown fuel mixtures. Regulatory agencies have begun using this method in field compliance testing; petroleum refiners and marketers use it to monitor compliance, product quality and blending accuracy.

  11. Towards Arbitrary Accuracy Inviscid Surface Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Rodger W.; Hixon, Ray

    2002-01-01

    Inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions are currently limited to third order accuracy in time for non-moving surfaces and actually reduce to first order in time when the surfaces move. For steady-state calculations it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is required for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady phenomena. A surprisingly simple technique is shown here that can be used to correct the normal pressure derivatives of the flow at a surface on a Cartesian grid so that arbitrarily high order time accuracy is achieved in idealized cases. This work demonstrates that nonlinear high order time accuracy at a solid surface is possible and desirable, but it also shows that the current practice of only correcting the pressure is inadequate.

  12. Development of standard fuel models in boreal forests of Northeast China through calibration and validation.

    PubMed

    Cai, Longyan; He, Hong S; Wu, Zhiwei; Lewis, Benard L; Liang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the fire prediction capabilities of fuel models is vital to forest fire management. Various fuel models have been developed in the Great Xing'an Mountains in Northeast China. However, the performances of these fuel models have not been tested for historical occurrences of wildfires. Consequently, the applicability of these models requires further investigation. Thus, this paper aims to develop standard fuel models. Seven vegetation types were combined into three fuel models according to potential fire behaviors which were clustered using Euclidean distance algorithms. Fuel model parameter sensitivity was analyzed by the Morris screening method. Results showed that the fuel model parameters 1-hour time-lag loading, dead heat content, live heat content, 1-hour time-lag SAV(Surface Area-to-Volume), live shrub SAV, and fuel bed depth have high sensitivity. Two main sensitive fuel parameters: 1-hour time-lag loading and fuel bed depth, were determined as adjustment parameters because of their high spatio-temporal variability. The FARSITE model was then used to test the fire prediction capabilities of the combined fuel models (uncalibrated fuel models). FARSITE was shown to yield an unrealistic prediction of the historical fire. However, the calibrated fuel models significantly improved the capabilities of the fuel models to predict the actual fire with an accuracy of 89%. Validation results also showed that the model can estimate the actual fires with an accuracy exceeding 56% by using the calibrated fuel models. Therefore, these fuel models can be efficiently used to calculate fire behaviors, which can be helpful in forest fire management.

  13. Fuel cell market applications

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.C.

    1995-12-31

    This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

  14. Diesel fuel injection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schechter, M.M.; Simko, A.O.

    1986-04-22

    A fuel injection pump is described of the multiple plunger spill port type for an automotive type internal combustion engine, the pump including at least four axially spaced engine camshaft driven pump plungers grouped in pairs and sequentially and in succession moved in one direction through a fuel pumping stroke and oppositely through a fuel intake stroke. A fuel pressurization/supply chamber is contiquous to the end of each plunger for pressurization of the fuel therein or supply of fuel thereto from a supply passage upon coordinate movement of the plunger, fill/spill passage means connected to a single fuel return spill port and in parallel flow relationship to each of the plunger bores as a function of the position of the plungers, each plunger having a pair of internal passages connected at all times to its chamber and alternately alignable with the supply or fill/spill passage means as a function of the position of the plunger. A fuel discharge passage is operatively connecting each of the chambers to an individual engine cylinder, a single spill port control valve movable to block or permit the spill of fuel through the spill port to a return line to control the pressurization of fuel in all of the fuel chambers and associated discharge passages, a single solenoid connected to the spill control valve for moving it to block or unblock the spill port, and a single shuttle valve operatively associated with all of the fill/spill passage means and spill port reciprocably movable between positions to sequentially connect the plunger chambers one at a time in succession to the spill port during the pumping pressurization stroke of its plunger for the injection of fuel to an individual cylinder while the other chambers are in various stages of being refilled with fuel and preparing for pressurization upon successive actuation of the plungers by the camshaft.

  15. Alternative fuels for road vehicles

    SciTech Connect

    Poulton, M.L.

    1994-12-31

    The finite nature of global fossil fuel resources underscores the need to develop alternative vehicular fuels. Increased use of renewable and alternative fuels can extend fossil fuel supplies and help resolve air pollution problems inherent in automotive use of conventional fuels. Fuel characteristics, safety implications, feedstocks, infrastructure, fuel production costs, emissions performance, required vehicle modifications, and outlook are described for LPG, reformulated gasoline, natural gas, hydrogen, electricity, biofuels, ethanol, and methanol. 26 fig., 288 refs., 29 tabs.

  16. Influence of test fuel properties and composition on UNECE R101 CO2 and fuel economy valuation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, A.

    2015-12-01

    CO2 emission and fuel consumption of passenger cars is now assessed by using a simplistic procedure measuring the emission during a test performed without any control of the fuel properties and computing the fuel consumption through an unsophisticated formula. As pump gasoline and diesel fuels are refinery products mixture of many different hydrocarbons, and in case of gasoline may also contain a significant amount of oxygenates, the fuel properties, including the density, carbon and energy content may strongly vary from one pump fuel to the other. Being the specific test fuels carefully selected by the car manufacturers and everything but randomly chosen pump fuels, the claimed CO2 emission and fuel economy figures may differ largely from the certification values. I show from the analysis of the 2014 UK government data for 2358 diesel and 2103 petrol vehicles how same volumes of only theoretically same pump fuels used during the certification test by the cars manufacturers unfortunately do not produce the same carbon dioxide emission, and very likely do not have the same energy content. The CO2 emission per liter of diesel fuel is shown to oscillate froma maximum of 3049 g to a minimum of 2125 g, with an average of 2625 g, froma +16.13% to a -19.06% of the average. TheCO2 emission per liter of petrol fuel is shown to oscillate even more from a maximum of 3735 g to a minimum of 1767 g with an average of 2327 g, from a +60.48% to a -24.05% of the average. The proposed solution is to center the assessment on the energy demand by measuring with accuracy the mass of fuel consumed and the fuel properties of the test fuel starting from the lower heating. The corrected fuel consumption and the corrected carbon dioxide emission to mention from the test are then computed by using pure hydrocarbon reference fuels for diesel and petrol having a given lower heating value and a given hydrocarbon composition. Alternatively, exactly the same test fuel should be used by all the

  17. Anatomy-aware measurement of segmentation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tizhoosh, H. R.; Othman, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    Quantifying the accuracy of segmentation and manual delineation of organs, tissue types and tumors in medical images is a necessary measurement that suffers from multiple problems. One major shortcoming of all accuracy measures is that they neglect the anatomical significance or relevance of different zones within a given segment. Hence, existing accuracy metrics measure the overlap of a given segment with a ground-truth without any anatomical discrimination inside the segment. For instance, if we understand the rectal wall or urethral sphincter as anatomical zones, then current accuracy measures ignore their significance when they are applied to assess the quality of the prostate gland segments. In this paper, we propose an anatomy-aware measurement scheme for segmentation accuracy of medical images. The idea is to create a "master gold" based on a consensus shape containing not just the outline of the segment but also the outlines of the internal zones if existent or relevant. To apply this new approach to accuracy measurement, we introduce the anatomy-aware extensions of both Dice coefficient and Jaccard index and investigate their effect using 500 synthetic prostate ultrasound images with 20 different segments for each image. We show that through anatomy-sensitive calculation of segmentation accuracy, namely by considering relevant anatomical zones, not only the measurement of individual users can change but also the ranking of users' segmentation skills may require reordering.

  18. The Social Accuracy Model of Interpersonal Perception: Assessing Individual Differences in Perceptive and Expressive Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biesanz, Jeremy C.

    2010-01-01

    The social accuracy model of interpersonal perception (SAM) is a componential model that estimates perceiver and target effects of different components of accuracy across traits simultaneously. For instance, Jane may be generally accurate in her perceptions of others and thus high in "perceptive accuracy"--the extent to which a particular…

  19. Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation

    DOEpatents

    Ruka, Roswell J.; Basel, Richard A.; Zhang, Gong

    2011-10-25

    A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

  20. Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-10

    aCCURACY OF SMALL BASE METAL DENTAL CASTINGS,(U) M JUL 80 E A HUBET, S 6 VERMILYEA, M .J KUFFLER UNCLASSIFIED NE7 hhhhh *EN UN~CLASSIFIED SECURITY...TPCCSI70NO. 3. RECIPIENT’S .CATALOG NUMBER I _% dSutte 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Accuracy of Small Base Metal Dental Castings Manuscript S...base metal- alloys is countered by their inadequate casting accuracy . Until this problem can be overcome, the acceptance of such alloys for routine use

  1. Discrimination in measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Was, Christopher A.

    2014-01-01

    Knowledge monitoring predicts academic outcomes in many contexts. However, measures of knowledge monitoring accuracy are often incomplete. In the current study, a measure of students’ ability to discriminate known from unknown information as a component of knowledge monitoring was considered. Undergraduate students’ knowledge monitoring accuracy was assessed and used to predict final exam scores in a specific course. It was found that gamma, a measure commonly used as the measure of knowledge monitoring accuracy, accounted for a small, but significant amount of variance in academic performance whereas the discrimination and bias indexes combined to account for a greater amount of variance in academic performance. PMID:25339979

  2. REACTOR FUEL SCAVENGING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1962-04-10

    A process for removing fission products from reactor liquid fuel without interfering with the reactor's normal operation or causing a significant change in its fuel composition is described. The process consists of mixing a liquid scavenger alloy composed of about 44 at.% plutoniunm, 33 at.% lanthanum, and 23 at.% nickel or cobalt with a plutonium alloy reactor fuel containing about 3 at.% lanthanum; removing a portion of the fuel and scavenger alloy from the reactor core and replacing it with an equal amount of the fresh scavenger alloy; transferring the portion to a quiescent zone where the scavenger and the plutonium fuel form two distinct liquid layers with the fission products being dissolved in the lanthanum-rich scavenger layer; and the clean plutonium-rich fuel layer being returned to the reactor core. (AEC)

  3. Spiral cooled fuel nozzle

    DOEpatents

    Fox, Timothy; Schilp, Reinhard

    2012-09-25

    A fuel nozzle for delivery of fuel to a gas turbine engine. The fuel nozzle includes an outer nozzle wall and a center body located centrally within the nozzle wall. A gap is defined between an inner wall surface of the nozzle wall and an outer body surface of the center body for providing fuel flow in a longitudinal direction from an inlet end to an outlet end of the fuel nozzle. A turbulating feature is defined on at least one of the central body and the inner wall for causing at least a portion of the fuel flow in the gap to flow transverse to the longitudinal direction. The gap is effective to provide a substantially uniform temperature distribution along the nozzle wall in the circumferential direction.

  4. Alcohol fuels for aviation

    SciTech Connect

    Schauffler, P.

    1982-06-01

    The ten-fold increase in aviation fuel prices in eight years has caused a reassessment of alcohol fuels. In a recent test, methanol fuel-flow rate was high at takeoff, and levelled off at 10,000 feet, but above 18,000 fell 30% below avgas use. Because methanol sells thirty cents below avgas per gallon it is already an attractive fuel for piston-engine aircraft. But as 95% of aviation fuel is burned as kerosene in turbines a test program has been set up to look at the performance of small shaft turbine engines with various combinations of alcohols and water, and of straight methanol, and to look at major thrust engine at optimum fuel as well. These tests should determine the overall alcohol potentials for aviation. The tests will also tell if the breakthrough will be modest or major.

  5. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception for... is ±2 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. The controlling parameters are... of the full-scale value of the electronic device. (4) If the mass of fuel consumed is measured...

  6. 40 CFR 86.314-79 - Fuel flow measurement specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... minimum accuracy of ±1 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. An exception for... is ±2 percent of full-scale flow rate for each measurement range used. The controlling parameters are... of the full-scale value of the electronic device. (4) If the mass of fuel consumed is measured...

  7. A Validation Study of Pin Heat Transfer for UO2 Fuel Based on the IFA-432 Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Phillippe, Aaron M; Clarno, Kevin T; Banfield, James E; Ott, Larry J; Philip, Bobby; Berrill, Mark A; Sampath, Rahul S; Allu, Srikanth; Hamilton, Steven P

    2014-01-01

    The IFA-432 (Integrated Fuel Assessment) experiments from the International Fuel Performance Experiments (IFPE) database were designed to study the effects of gap size, fuel density, and fuel densification on fuel centerline temperature in light-water-reactor fuel. An evaluation of nuclear fuel pin heat transfer in the FRAPCON-3.4 and Exnihilo codes for uranium dioxide (UO$_2$) fuel systems was performed, with a focus on the densification stage (2.2 \\unitfrac{GWd}{MT(UO$_{2}$)}). In addition, sensitivity studies were performed to evaluate the effect of the radial power shape and approximations to the geometry to account for the thermocouple hole. The analysis demonstrated excellent agreement for rods 1, 2, 3, and 5 (varying gap thicknesses and density with traditional fuel), demonstrating the accuracy of the codes and their underlying material models for traditional fuel. For rod 6, which contained unstable fuel that densified an order of magnitude more than traditional, stable fuel, the magnitude of densification was over-predicted and the temperatures were outside of the experimental uncertainty. The radial power shape within the fuel was shown to significantly impact the predicted centerline temperatures, whereas modeling the fuel at the thermocouple location as either annular or solid was relatively negligible. This has provided an initial benchmarking of the pin heat transfer capability of Exnihilo for UO$_2$ fuel with respect to a well-validated nuclear fuel performance code.

  8. Fuel Tank Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    structures b) - Equal thermic inertia c) - Equal fluid volume d) - Equal pressure variation on both wings at the change of the room temperature - This...individual fuel sections. Each fuel section is further ccmpartmentated by metall tank shear walls and tank floors into three individual fuel cells to...plate Dy a stretch forming process, and the metallic tank floors . The air intake segments extend from one bulkhead to the other, thus reducing assembly

  9. Liquid fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Soloveichik, Grigorii L

    2014-01-01

    The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented.

  10. Fuels Combustion Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-18

    uncertainties in the future sources and characteristics of fuels has emphasized the need to better understand fuel effects on combustion , e.g. energy release...experimentally to be made. Unsuccessful comparisons can lead to impro- vements in modelling concepts . Two simplified models for the combustion of slurry...AD-A149 186 FUELS COMBUSTION RESEACCH(U) PRINCETON UNIV NJ DEPT OF i/i MECHANICAL AND AEROSPACE ENGINEERING F L DRYER ET AL. 18 JUL 84 NAE-i668 AFOSR

  11. Food for fuel

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, J.

    1982-05-01

    Cassava, sugar cane, grain crops, molasses - all are potential feedstocks for ethanol production. Brazil has taken a clear lead in converting food crops into ethanol fuels for the automobile, but other countries may follow and the economic consequences could be considerable. This article looks at the various options. The total activity involved in fuel ethanol production and usage is considered as comprising three related components: feedstock production, ethanol production and application of the ethanol as a transport fuel.

  12. Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.

    2010-06-30

    This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels. Thailand is of particular interest since it introduced E20 to its commercial market in 2007 and the US is now considering introducing E20 into the US market.

  13. High energy fuel compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.H.

    1983-07-19

    A high density liquid hydrocarbon fuel composition is disclosed, singularly suited for propelling turbojet limited volume missile systems designed for shipborne deployment. The contemplated fuels are basically composed of the saturated analogues of dimers of methyl cyclopentadiene and of dicyclopentadiene and optionally include the saturated analogues of the co-trimers of said dienes or the trimers of cyclopentadiene. The various dimers and trimers are combined in a relative relationship to provide optimal performing fuels for the indicated purpose.

  14. Liquid fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary The advantages of liquid fuel cells (LFCs) over conventional hydrogen–oxygen fuel cells include a higher theoretical energy density and efficiency, a more convenient handling of the streams, and enhanced safety. This review focuses on the use of different types of organic fuels as an anode material for LFCs. An overview of the current state of the art and recent trends in the development of LFC and the challenges of their practical implementation are presented. PMID:25247123

  15. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL SYSTEMS

    DOEpatents

    Thamer, B.J.; Bidwell, R.M.; Hammond, R.P.

    1959-09-15

    Homogeneous reactor fuel solutions are reported which provide automatic recombination of radiolytic gases and exhibit large thermal expansion characteristics, thereby providing stability at high temperatures and enabling reactor operation without the necessity of apparatus to recombine gases formed by the radiolytic dissociation of water in the fuel and without the necessity of liquid fuel handling outside the reactor vessel except for recovery processes. The fuels consist of phosphoric acid and water solutions of enriched uranium, wherein the uranium is in either the hexavalent or tetravalent state.

  16. Alternate Fuels Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-10-01

    AFWAL-TR-83-2057 AD A13 8 5 7 5 ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCH PHASE RI ’~*~~4 & IWITEY CMAAA * ’s~t:Uwz, ONTARIO October 1983 I•oerls Report...83-2057 P_______________ C TITLE (mod ,,--tt-) 5. TYPE OF REPORT A PERIOD COVERED Alternate Fuels ioahusticn Research Interim Report for Period Phase...I$. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse sirte it necessear and identify by block number) FUELS ALTERNATE FUELS GAS TURBINE COMBUSTION EXHAUST EMISSIONS 0

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, W.F.; Tellefson, D.R.; Shimazaki, T.T.

    1962-04-10

    A plate type fuel element which is particularly useful for organic cooled reactors is described. Generally, the fuel element comprises a plurality of fissionable fuel bearing plates held in spaced relationship by a frame in which the plates are slidably mounted in grooves. Clearance is provided in the grooves to allow the plates to expand laterally. The plates may be rigidly interconnected but are floatingly supported at their ends within the frame to allow for longi-tudinal expansion. Thus, this fuel element is able to withstand large temperature differentials without great structural stresses. (AEC)

  18. Alternative Fuels Infrastructure Development

    SciTech Connect

    Bloyd, Cary N.; Stork, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    This summary reviews the status of alternate transportation fuels development and utilization in Thailand. Thailand has continued to work to promote increased consumption of gasohol especially for highethanol content fuels like E85. The government has confirmed its effort to draw up incentives for auto makers to invest in manufacturing E85-compatible vehicles in the country. An understanding of the issues and experiences associated with the introduction of alternative fuels in other countries can help the US in anticipation potential problems as it introduces new automotive fuels.

  19. Fuel processing device

    DOEpatents

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.

    2011-08-02

    An improved fuel processor for fuel cells is provided whereby the startup time of the processor is less than sixty seconds and can be as low as 30 seconds, if not less. A rapid startup time is achieved by either igniting or allowing a small mixture of air and fuel to react over and warm up the catalyst of an autothermal reformer (ATR). The ATR then produces combustible gases to be subsequently oxidized on and simultaneously warm up water-gas shift zone catalysts. After normal operating temperature has been achieved, the proportion of air included with the fuel is greatly diminished.

  20. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Shackleford, M.H.

    1958-12-16

    A fuel element possessing good stability and heat conducting properties is described. The fuel element comprises an outer tube formed of material selected from the group consisting of stainhess steel, V, Ti. Mo. or Zr, a fuel tube concentrically fitting within the outer tube and containing an oxide of an isotope selected from the group consisting of U/sup 235/, U/sup 233/, and Pu/sup 239/, and a hollow, porous core concentrically fitting within the fuel tube and formed of an oxide of an element selected from the group consisting of Mg, Be, and Zr.

  1. Centrifugal main fuel pump

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, E.F.

    1986-08-26

    For a gas turbine power plant having a fuel supply and a fuel metering valve and variable geometry for the power plant including servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and variable geometry, a fuel pumping system, is described to supply pressurized fuel for the servo actuating mechanisms and for the engine working fluid medium. The pumping system includes a centrifugal pump solely supplying the fuel to the fuel metering valve to be delivered to the power plant for its working fluid medium, a positive displacement pump in parallel with the centrifugal pump and solely to supply pressurized fuel to the servo actuating mechanisms for the fuel metering valve and for the variable geometry, and a boost pump means disposed in serial relationship with the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump for augmenting the pressure supplied by the positive displacement pump and the centrifugal pump during predetermined operating conditions of the power plant. The combined boost pump and centrifugal pump capability is sufficient to satisfy the vapor to liquid ratio requirements of the power during its entire operating envelope.

  2. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Luscomb, D.A.

    1984-05-22

    A fuel injection pump including a plunger and a piston movably disposed in a pumping chamber, means for initiating fuel injection and means for terminating fuel injection, the plunger periodically pressurizing fuel in a pressure chamber and the piston spaced from the plunger and allowing a metering chamber to fill with a metered quantity of fuel to be injected to an engine. The means for initiating injection comprises a pilot valve having a solenoid to selectively operate between either of two states and a control valve movable between first and second positions in response to the state of pilot valve, the first position filling the metering chamber with the metered quantity of fuel. The pilot valve determines the fuel quantity to be delivered to the engine relative to a signal from an electronic controller. An accumulator is pressurized during each cycle of the plunger to provide pressurized fuel during a metering phase. A variable orifice adjusts the rate of flow during the time fuel is being metered to metering chamber.

  3. Fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Iiyama, A.; Nishimura, T.

    1988-12-06

    This patent describes a fuel injection pump comprising: (a) engageable first and second cam members, the first cam member reciprocating axially as the first cam member moves angularly relative to the second cam member when the first and second cam members are in engagement; (b) means for urging the first cam member toward the second cam member to engage the first and second cam members; (c) a plunger connected to the first cam member for reciprocation with the first cam member, the plunger defining at least a part of a pumping chamber, the pumping chamber contracting and expanding as the plunger reciprocates; (d) means for allowing fuel to move into the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber expands in a fuel intake stroke; (e) means for allowing the fuel to move out of the pumping chamber as the pumping chamber contracts in a fuel compression stroke; and (f) means for resisting movement of the plunger in at least part of the fuel compression stroke and relieving resistance to the movement of the plunger in the fuel intake stroke wherein the resisting means comprises a piston slidably mounted on the plunger, a spring urging the piston to seat the piston on a shoulder on the plunger so that the piston reciprocates as the plunger reciprocates, wherein the piston is seated on the shoulder in the fuel compression stroke and separates from the shoulder against the force of the spring in the fuel intake stroke, a second fluid chamber at least partially defined by the piston.

  4. Particle fuel diversion structure

    SciTech Connect

    Eshleman, R. D.

    1985-07-30

    A particle fuel burning furnace has an upper combustion chamber for holding a pile of particle fuel and burning the same from the bottom thereof. The furnace also includes a lower combustion chamber for after-burning combustible gases given off by the burning of solid fuel in the upper chamber and a series of spaced apart vertically-extending passageways arranged in a row and interconnecting the upper and lower chambers for communicating the combustible gases from the upper to the lower chamber. A first improved feature relates to a particle fuel delivery control device which operates an auger for filling the upper chamber with particle fuel to a desired level. A beam of light is transmitted and reflected between a photoelectric cell and reflector respectively of the device. When the particle fuel pile has grown in height during filling to the desired level the light beam is interrupted and filling is terminated. A second improved feature relates to a particle fuel diversion structure positioned in spaced relationship above and overlying the row of passageways. The structure forms a horizontal slot which extends laterally from the passageways which prevents particles of fuel from falling through the passageways and relocates the flame which burns the particle fuel pile from the bottom to a region away from the passageways.

  5. Nuclear fuel pin scanner

    DOEpatents

    Bramblett, Richard L.; Preskitt, Charles A.

    1987-03-03

    Systems and methods for inspection of nuclear fuel pins to determine fiss loading and uniformity. The system includes infeed mechanisms which stockpile, identify and install nuclear fuel pins into an irradiator. The irradiator provides extended activation times using an approximately cylindrical arrangement of numerous fuel pins. The fuel pins can be arranged in a magazine which is rotated about a longitudinal axis of rotation. A source of activating radiation is positioned equidistant from the fuel pins along the longitudinal axis of rotation. The source of activating radiation is preferably oscillated along the axis to uniformly activate the fuel pins. A detector is provided downstream of the irradiator. The detector uses a plurality of detector elements arranged in an axial array. Each detector element inspects a segment of the fuel pin. The activated fuel pin being inspected in the detector is oscillated repeatedly over a distance equal to the spacing between adjacent detector elements, thereby multiplying the effective time available for detecting radiation emissions from the activated fuel pin.

  6. FUEL ASSAY REACTOR

    DOEpatents

    Spinrad, B.I.; Sandmeier, H.A.; Martens, F.H.

    1962-12-25

    A reactor having maximum sensitivity to perturbations is described comprising a core consisting of a horizontally disposed, rectangular, annular fuel zone containing enriched uranium dioxide dispersed in graphite, the concentration of uranium dioxide increasing from the outside to the inside of the fuel zone, an internal reflector of graphite containing an axial test opening disposed within the fuel zone, an external graphite reflector, means for changing the neutron spectrum in the test opening, and means for measuring perturbations in the neutron flux caused by the introduction of different fuel elements into the test opening. (AEC)

  7. Energy: Reimagine Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lemmon, John P.

    2015-09-24

    New types of fuel cell on the horizon could eliminate the need for such trade-offs and ease the integration of renewables into the grid. Currently, fuel cells are used to generate only electricity and heat. They can be modified to store energy and produce liquid fuels such as methanol, thanks to breakthroughs in materials and designs. Developing fuel cells with a battery mode is one focus of the programme I direct at the US Advanced Research Projects Agency–Energy (ARPA-E). I lead 13 projects across academia, industry and national laboratories.

  8. Fuel cell stack arrangements

    DOEpatents

    Kothmann, Richard E.; Somers, Edward V.

    1982-01-01

    Arrangements of stacks of fuel cells and ducts, for fuel cells operating with separate fuel, oxidant and coolant streams. An even number of stacks are arranged generally end-to-end in a loop. Ducts located at the juncture of consecutive stacks of the loop feed oxidant or fuel to or from the two consecutive stacks, each individual duct communicating with two stacks. A coolant fluid flows from outside the loop, into and through cooling channels of the stack, and is discharged into an enclosure duct formed within the loop by the stacks and seals at the junctures at the stacks.

  9. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber.

  10. Amtrak fuel consumption study

    SciTech Connect

    Hitz, J.

    1981-02-01

    This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

  11. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  12. Fuel cell arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, A.O.

    1987-05-12

    A fuel cell arrangement is provided wherein cylindrical cells of the solid oxide electrolyte type are arranged in planar arrays where the cells within a plane are parallel. Planes of cells are stacked with cells of adjacent planes perpendicular to one another. Air is provided to the interior of the cells through feed tubes which pass through a preheat chamber. Fuel is provided to the fuel cells through a channel in the center of the cell stack; the fuel then passes the exterior of the cells and combines with the oxygen-depleted air in the preheat chamber. 3 figs.

  13. Developing Custom Fire Behavior Fuel Models for Mediterranean Wildland-Urban Interfaces in Southern Italy.

    PubMed

    Elia, Mario; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Lovreglio, Raffaella; Sanesi, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The dramatic increase of fire hazard in wildland-urban interfaces (WUIs) has required more detailed fuel management programs to preserve ecosystem functions and human settlements. Designing effective fuel treatment strategies allows to achieve goals such as resilient landscapes, fire-adapted communities, and ecosystem response. Therefore, obtaining background information on forest fuel parameters and fuel accumulation patterns has become an important first step in planning fuel management interventions. Site-specific fuel inventory data enhance the accuracy of fuel management planning and help forest managers in fuel management decision-making. We have customized four fuel models for WUIs in southern Italy, starting from forest classes of land-cover use and adopting a hierarchical clustering approach. Furthermore, we provide a prediction of the potential fire behavior of our customized fuel models using FlamMap 5 under different weather conditions. The results suggest that fuel model IIIP (Mediterranean maquis) has the most severe fire potential for the 95th percentile weather conditions and the least severe potential fire behavior for the 85th percentile weather conditions. This study shows that it is possible to create customized fuel models directly from fuel inventory data. This achievement has broad implications for land managers, particularly forest managers of the Mediterranean landscape, an ecosystem that is susceptible not only to wildfires but also to the increasing human population and man-made infrastructures.

  14. Developing Custom Fire Behavior Fuel Models for Mediterranean Wildland-Urban Interfaces in Southern Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elia, Mario; Lafortezza, Raffaele; Lovreglio, Raffaella; Sanesi, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    The dramatic increase of fire hazard in wildland-urban interfaces (WUIs) has required more detailed fuel management programs to preserve ecosystem functions and human settlements. Designing effective fuel treatment strategies allows to achieve goals such as resilient landscapes, fire-adapted communities, and ecosystem response. Therefore, obtaining background information on forest fuel parameters and fuel accumulation patterns has become an important first step in planning fuel management interventions. Site-specific fuel inventory data enhance the accuracy of fuel management planning and help forest managers in fuel management decision-making. We have customized four fuel models for WUIs in southern Italy, starting from forest classes of land-cover use and adopting a hierarchical clustering approach. Furthermore, we provide a prediction of the potential fire behavior of our customized fuel models using FlamMap 5 under different weather conditions. The results suggest that fuel model IIIP (Mediterranean maquis) has the most severe fire potential for the 95th percentile weather conditions and the least severe potential fire behavior for the 85th percentile weather conditions. This study shows that it is possible to create customized fuel models directly from fuel inventory data. This achievement has broad implications for land managers, particularly forest managers of the Mediterranean landscape, an ecosystem that is susceptible not only to wildfires but also to the increasing human population and man-made infrastructures.

  15. Sun-pointing programs and their accuracy

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, J.C.

    1981-05-01

    Several sun-pointing programs and their accuracy are described. FORTRAN program listings are given. Program descriptions are given for both Hewlett-Packard (HP-67) and Texas Instruments (TI-59) hand-held calculators.

  16. Critical thinking and accuracy of nurses' diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Lunney, Margaret

    2003-01-01

    Interpretations of patient data are complex and diverse, contributing to a risk of low accuracy nursing diagnoses. This risk is confirmed in research findings that accuracy of nurses' diagnoses varied widely from high to low. Highly accurate diagnoses are essential, however, to guide nursing interventions for the achievement of positive health outcomes. Development of critical thinking abilities is likely to improve accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. New views of critical thinking serve as a basis for critical thinking in nursing. Seven cognitive skills and ten habits of mind are identified as dimensions of critical thinking for use in the diagnostic process. Application of the cognitive skills of critical thinking illustrates the importance of using critical thinking for accuracy of nurses' diagnoses. Ten strategies are proposed for self-development of critical thinking abilities.

  17. Fuel Cells: Reshaping the Future

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toay, Leo

    2004-01-01

    In conjunction with the FreedomCAR (Cooperative Automotive Research) and Fuel Initiative, President George W. Bush has pledged nearly two billion dollars for fuel cell research. Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors have unveiled fuel cell demonstration vehicles, and all three of these companies have invested heavily in fuel cell research. Fuel cell…

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Di Croce, A. Michael; Draper, Robert

    1993-11-02

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

  19. Fuel cell generator energy dissipator

    DOEpatents

    Veyo, Stephen Emery; Dederer, Jeffrey Todd; Gordon, John Thomas; Shockling, Larry Anthony

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

  20. Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation)

    SciTech Connect

    Pesaran, A.; Kim, G.; Markel, T.; Wipke, K.

    2005-05-01

    Presentation on Fuel Cells Vehicle Systems Analysis (Fuel Cell Freeze Investigation) for the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program Annual Review held in Arlington, Virginia on May 23-26, 2005.

  1. 33. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Coal Fuel Elevator (diagonal in foreground), Fuel Elevator (left), Fuel Storage Bins (center), and Power Plant (right) Photographs taken by Joseph E.B. Elliot - Huber Coal Breaker, 101 South Main Street, Ashley, Luzerne County, PA

  2. Neural Mechanisms of Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff

    PubMed Central

    Heitz, Richard P.; Schall, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Intelligent agents balance speed of responding with accuracy of deciding. Stochastic accumulator models commonly explain this speed-accuracy tradeoff by strategic adjustment of response threshold. Several laboratories identify specific neurons in prefrontal and parietal cortex with this accumulation process, yet no neurophysiological correlates of speed-accuracy tradeoff have been described. We trained macaque monkeys to trade speed for accuracy on cue during visual search and recorded the activity of neurons in the frontal eye field. Unpredicted by any model, we discovered that speed-accuracy tradeoff is accomplished through several distinct adjustments. Visually responsive neurons modulated baseline firing rate, sensory gain, and the duration of perceptual processing. Movement neurons triggered responses with activity modulated in a direction opposite of model predictions. Thus, current stochastic accumulator models provide an incomplete description of the neural processes accomplishing speed-accuracy tradeoffs. The diversity of neural mechanisms was reconciled with the accumulator framework through an integrated accumulator model constrained by requirements of the motor system. PMID:23141072

  3. Determination of sulfur content of diesel fuels and diesel fuel-like fractions of waste polymer cracking.

    PubMed

    Miskolczi, N; Bartha, L; Borszéki, J; Halmos, P

    2006-05-15

    The element content of low and high sulfur containing diesel fuels was measured by different analytical methods: energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescent (EDXRF) and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission (ICP-OES) spectroscopy methods. Then results were compared. High sulfur containing diesel fuels were from heavy diesel engines and diesel fuel-like liquids obtained by thermal degradation of waste polymers. In case of X-ray analysis also the effect of the used thin foils with different chemical compositions (polypropylene, polycarbonate, polyester) on the accuracy was investigated. According to data considerable differences and deterioration of accuracy was observed in the respect of foils in case of both low and high sulfur containing hydrocarbons. Results indicated appropriate correlation between experimental results measured by both two methods, but differences could be observed in the correlation, which could be explained with different ratio of C/H of samples.

  4. 78 FR 41703 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel Pathways Under the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-11

    ... unfarmed land in other countries into cropland for energy grass-based renewable fuel production... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 80 RIN 2060-AR85 Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Additional Qualifying Renewable Fuel Pathways Under the Renewable Fuel Standard Program; Final Rule Approving Renewable...

  5. Increasing Accuracy in Computed Inviscid Boundary Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyson, Roger

    2004-01-01

    A technique has been devised to increase the accuracy of computational simulations of flows of inviscid fluids by increasing the accuracy with which surface boundary conditions are represented. This technique is expected to be especially beneficial for computational aeroacoustics, wherein it enables proper accounting, not only for acoustic waves, but also for vorticity and entropy waves, at surfaces. Heretofore, inviscid nonlinear surface boundary conditions have been limited to third-order accuracy in time for stationary surfaces and to first-order accuracy in time for moving surfaces. For steady-state calculations, it may be possible to achieve higher accuracy in space, but high accuracy in time is needed for efficient simulation of multiscale unsteady flow phenomena. The present technique is the first surface treatment that provides the needed high accuracy through proper accounting of higher-order time derivatives. The present technique is founded on a method known in art as the Hermitian modified solution approximation (MESA) scheme. This is because high time accuracy at a surface depends upon, among other things, correction of the spatial cross-derivatives of flow variables, and many of these cross-derivatives are included explicitly on the computational grid in the MESA scheme. (Alternatively, a related method other than the MESA scheme could be used, as long as the method involves consistent application of the effects of the cross-derivatives.) While the mathematical derivation of the present technique is too lengthy and complex to fit within the space available for this article, the technique itself can be characterized in relatively simple terms: The technique involves correction of surface-normal spatial pressure derivatives at a boundary surface to satisfy the governing equations and the boundary conditions and thereby achieve arbitrarily high orders of time accuracy in special cases. The boundary conditions can now include a potentially infinite number

  6. Fuel Cell Power Plants Renewable and Waste Fuels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-13

    products • 300 KW to 50 MW and beyond FuelCell Energy, the FuelCell Energy logo, Direct FuelCell and “ DFC ” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell...FuelCell and “ DFC ” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Electrical Balance Of Plant (EBOP): • Converts DC power to grid...logo, Direct FuelCell and “ DFC ” are all registered trademarks (®) of FuelCell Energy, Inc. Applications •On-site self generation of combined heat

  7. Experimental and Analytical Study of Balanced-Diaphragm Fuel Distributors for Gas-Turbine Engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straight, David M.; Gold, Harold

    1950-01-01

    A method of distributing fuel equally to a plurality of spray nozzles in a gas-turbine engine by means of balanced-diaphragm fuel distributors is presented. The experimental performance of three of eight possible distributor arrangements are discussed. An analysis of all eight arrangements is included. Criterions are given for choosing a fuel-distributor arrangement to meet specific fuel-system requirements of fuel-distribution accuracy, spray-nozzle pressure variations, and fuel-system pressures. Data obtained with a model of one distributor arrangement indicated a maximum deviation from perfect distribution of 3.3 percent for a 44 to 1 range (19.5 to 862 lb/hr) of fuel-flow rates. The maximum distributor pressure drop was 125 pounds per square inch. The method used to obtain the required wide range of flow control in the distributor valves consisted in varying the length of a constant-area flow path.

  8. Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Testing

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA's National Vehicle and Fuel Emissions Laboratory's primary responsibilities include: evaluating emission control technology; testing vehicles, engines and fuels; and determining compliance with federal emissions and fuel economy standards.

  9. Isoprenoid based alternative diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Taek Soon; Peralta-Yahya, Pamela; Keasling, Jay D.

    2015-08-18

    Fuel compositions are provided comprising a hydrogenation product of a monocyclic sesquiterpene (e.g., hydrogenated bisabolene) and a fuel additive. Methods of making and using the fuel compositions are also disclosed. ##STR00001##

  10. CEROLYTE FUEL CELL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    construction of a power plant for space. A 50-watt cerolyte battery will be constructed and a 500-watt fuel - cell power plant will be designed. Research...evaluation of a 500-watt cerolyte fuel - cell power system for space. During the first quarter work has been concentrated in the first two areas.

  11. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Horning, W.A.; Lanning, D.D.; Donahue, D.J.

    1959-10-01

    A fuel slug for a reactor which acts as a safety device is described. The fuel slug is an aluminum tube with a foil lining the inside surface of the tube, the foil being fabricated of uranium in a lead matrix.

  12. PLATINUM AND FUEL CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Platinum requirements for fuel cell vehicles (FCVS) have been identified as a concern and possible problem with FCV market penetration. Platinum is a necessary component of the electrodes of fuel cell engines that power the vehicles. The platinum is deposited on porous electrodes...

  13. Guide to fuel suppliers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-10-01

    This article is a directory of fuel suppliers to the electric power industry. The directory contains the company name, address, telephone and FAX numbers, contact person and a description of the fuels and services offered by the companies and their market areas. The directory's scope covers North America.

  14. NEUTRONIC REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Gurinsky, D.H.; Powell, R.W.; Fox, M.

    1959-11-24

    A nuclear fuel element comprising a plurality of nuclear fuel bearing strips is presented. The strips are folded along their longitudinal axes to an angle of about 60 deg and are secured at each end by ferrule to form an elongated assembly suitable for occupying a cylindrical coolant channel.

  15. Aminoamide fuel detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B.R.; Holtz, H.D.

    1981-02-10

    A detergent additive aminoamide, prepared by reacting a polycarboxylic amino acid with alkylamines, is combined into fuel for an internal combustion engine or lubricating oil as a composition suitable for reducing deposits in an internal combustion engine. In an embodiment of the invention, the aminoamide is further combined with a sulfonic acid to obtain a fuel detergent of improved operability.

  16. Imidazoline fuel detergents

    SciTech Connect

    Bonazza, B. R.; Holtz, H. D.

    1981-01-27

    A detergent additive imidazoline prepared by reacting carboxylic acid with polyamine is combined into fuel for an internal combustion engine or lubricating oil as a composition suitable for reducing deposits in an internal combustion engine. In an embodiment of the invention, the imidazoline is further combined with a sulfonic acid to obtain a fuel detergent of improved operability.

  17. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1963-06-11

    A fuel plate is designed for incorporation into control rods of the type utilized in high-flux test reactors. The fuel plate is designed so that the portion nearest the poison section of the control rod contains about one-half as much fissionable material as in the rest of the plate, thereby eliminating dangerous flux peaking in that portion. (AEC)

  18. Transportation fuels: Desulfurizing diesel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamonier, Carole

    2017-02-01

    Transportation fuels such as diesel contain organosulfur molecules that, when combusted, form sulfur oxides that are toxic and poison vehicles' catalytic convertors. Now, a method is demonstrated that can reduce the sulfur concentration of diesel fuel to very low levels at low temperatures and pressures.

  19. CO2-Neutral Fuels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goede, Adelbert; van de Sanden, Richard

    2016-06-01

    Mimicking the biogeochemical cycle of System Earth, synthetic hydrocarbon fuels are produced from recycled CO2 and H2O powered by renewable energy. Recapturing CO2 after use closes the carbon cycle, rendering the fuel cycle CO2 neutral. Non-equilibrium molecular CO2 vibrations are key to high energy efficiency.

  20. Fuels Combustion Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-07-30

    the more complex fuels I1. Extensive flow reactor data over the temperature range 1110-1235 and at 1 atm suggested that the overall pyrolyses rate...differently than the aliphatic fuels and more Importantly during Its pyrolyses step forms butadiene and vinyl acetylene, other important precursors to

  1. Solar Fuel Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Nathan S. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  2. Fuel injection nozzle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, M.; Nakatsuka, H.; Tojo, S.; Arai, K.

    1986-12-09

    A fuel injection nozzle is described which is adapted to be connected to a fuel injection pump and which serves to inject fuel into a combustion chamber in an internal combustion engine. The nozzle consists of: a body in which a suction passage and an accumulating chamber are defined, the suction passage being adapted to be connected with a fuel injection pump and the accumulating chamber being connected with the suction passage; a non-return valve means for allowing the fuel to flow from the suction passage to the accumulating chamber but prohibiting the fuel from flowing from the accumulating chamber to the suction passage; a needle valve means for injecting the fuel stored in the accumulating chamber into a combustion chamber in an engine, the needle valve means including a nozzle needle arranged coaxially and in series with the valve with end portions thereof being adjacent; a damping plunger coaxially fitted into the valve member in the manner that the damping plunger is urged toward the nozzle needle and has one end protruding into the damping chamber and engageable by the nozzle needle, throttle means disposed in the through hole in the damping plunger, for restricting the fuel flow between the damping chamber and the connector recess.

  3. Solar fuel generator

    DOEpatents

    Lewis, Nathan S.; West, William C.

    2017-01-17

    The disclosure provides conductive membranes for water splitting and solar fuel generation. The membranes comprise an embedded semiconductive/photoactive material and an oxygen or hydrogen evolution catalyst. Also provided are chassis and cassettes containing the membranes for use in fuel generation.

  4. The Fuel Schools Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEFP Journal, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Nearly 3,000 U.S. school districts reported to the Federal Energy Administration on comparative fuel costs and use in 1972-3 and 1974-5. The FEA survey represents the first major national effort to assess the impact of rising fuel costs on education. (Author/MLF)

  5. Alternative Fuels in Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouroussis, Denis; Karimi, Shahram

    2006-01-01

    The realization of dwindling fossil fuel supplies and their adverse environmental impacts has accelerated research and development activities in the domain of renewable energy sources and technologies. Global energy demand is expected to rise during the next few decades, and the majority of today's energy is based on fossil fuels. Alternative…

  6. Fuel Cells for Society

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through a SBIR contract with Lewis Research Center, ElectroChem, Inc. developed a hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell. The objective for Lewis Research Center's collaboration with ElectroChem was to develop a fuel cell system that could deliver 200-W (minimum) approximately to 10kWh of electrical energy.

  7. Tilted fuel cell apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine; Krueger, Roger L.

    2005-04-12

    Bipolar, tilted embodiments of high temperature, molten electrolyte electrochemical cells capable of directly converting carbon fuel to electrical energy are disclosed herein. The bipolar, tilted configurations minimize the electrical resistance between one cell and others connected in electrical series. The tilted configuration also allows continuous refueling of carbon fuel.

  8. Metallic fuels handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Hofman, G. L.; Leibowitz, L.; Kramer, J. M.; Billone, M. C.; Koenig, J. F.

    1985-11-01

    This compilation of Thermophysical and Mechanical Properties of certain metallic fuels is meant to be used as a common source of data in work related to the Integral Fast Reactor. This handbook focuses on the two fuel compositions chosen for the IFR; namely, Uranium-Zirconium and Uranium-Plutonium-Zirconium.

  9. Fuel cells: Operating flexibly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Young Moo

    2016-09-01

    Fuel cells typically function well only in rather limited temperature and humidity ranges. Now, a proton exchange membrane consisting of ion pair complexes is shown to enable improved fuel cell performance under a wide range of conditions that are unattainable with conventional approaches.

  10. Mixed oxide fuel development

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, R.D.; Omberg, R.P.

    1987-05-08

    This paper describes the success of the ongoing mixed-oxide fuel development program in the United States aimed at qualifying an economical fuel system for liquid metal cooled reactors. This development has been the cornerstone of the US program for the past 20 years and has proceeded in a deliberate and highly disciplined fashion with high emphasis on fuel reliability and operational safety as major features of an economical fuel system. The program progresses from feature testing in EBR-II to qualifying full size components in FFTF under fully prototypic conditions to establish a basis for extending allowable lifetimes. The development program started with the one year (300 EFPD) core, which is the FFTF driver fuel, continued with the demonstration of a two year (600 EFPD) core and is presently evaluating a three year (900 EFPD) fuel system. All three of these systems, consistent with other LMR fuel programs around the world, use fuel pellets gas bonded to a cladding tube that is assembled into a bundle and fitted into a wrapper tube or duct for ease of insertion into a core. The materials of construction progressed from austenitic CW 316 SS to lower swelling austenitic D9 to non swelling ferritic/martensitic HT9. 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. Improved hybrid rocket fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, David L.

    1995-01-01

    McDonnell Douglas Aerospace, as part of its Independent R&D, has initiated development of a clean burning, high performance hybrid fuel for consideration as an alternative to the solid rocket thrust augmentation currently utilized by American space launch systems including Atlas, Delta, Pegasus, Space Shuttle, and Titan. It could also be used in single stage to orbit or as the only propulsion system in a new launch vehicle. Compared to solid propellants based on aluminum and ammonium perchlorate, this fuel is more environmentally benign in that it totally eliminates hydrogen chloride and aluminum oxide by products, producing only water, hydrogen, nitrogen, carbon oxides, and trace amounts of nitrogen oxides. Compared to other hybrid fuel formulations under development, this fuel is cheaper, denser, and faster burning. The specific impulse of this fuel is comparable to other hybrid fuels and is between that of solids and liquids. The fuel also requires less oxygen than similar hybrid fuels to produce maximum specific impulse, thus reducing oxygen delivery system requirements.

  12. Engine Tests Using High-Sulfur Diesel Fuel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFORE COMPLETINQ FORM- 1. REPORT NUMBER ~2.GOVT ACCESSION NO, 3. RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBIER AFLRL No. 129 .. A )A-)0 iij_...SHEETS. 0 Prior to the test, calibrate: tachometer flowmeter load measurement system temperature indicators (1-7) and exhaust temperature (1 and 2

  13. NUCLEAR FUEL MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Goeddel, W.V.

    1962-06-26

    An improved method is given for making the carbides of nuclear fuel material. The metal of the fuel material, which may be a fissile and/or fertile material, is transformed into a silicide, after which the silicide is comminuted to the desired particle size. This silicide is then carburized at an elevated temperature, either above or below the melting point of the silicide, to produce an intimate mixture of the carbide of the fuel material and the carbide of silicon. This mixture of the fuel material carbide and the silicon carbide is relatively stable in the presence of moisture and does not exhibit the highly reactive surface condition which is observed with fuel material carbides made by most other known methods. (AEC)

  14. Hydrogen Fuel Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Rockward, Tommy

    2012-07-16

    For the past 6 years, open discussions and/or meetings have been held and are still on-going with OEM, Hydrogen Suppliers, other test facilities from the North America Team and International collaborators regarding experimental results, fuel clean-up cost, modeling, and analytical techniques to help determine levels of constituents for the development of an international standard for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12). Significant progress has been made. The process for the fuel standard is entering final stages as a result of the technical accomplishments. The objectives are to: (1) Determine the allowable levels of hydrogen fuel contaminants in support of the development of science-based international standards for hydrogen fuel quality (ISO TC197 WG-12); and (2) Validate the ASTM test method for determining low levels of non-hydrogen constituents.

  15. Smog control fuel additives

    SciTech Connect

    Lundby, W.

    1993-06-29

    A method is described of controlling, reducing or eliminating, ozone and related smog resulting from photochemical reactions between ozone and automotive or industrial gases comprising the addition of iodine or compounds of iodine to hydrocarbon-base fuels prior to or during combustion in an amount of about 1 part iodine per 240 to 10,000,000 parts fuel, by weight, to be accomplished by: (a) the addition of these inhibitors during or after the refining or manufacturing process of liquid fuels; (b) the production of these inhibitors for addition into fuel tanks, such as automotive or industrial tanks; or (c) the addition of these inhibitors into combustion chambers of equipment utilizing solid fuels for the purpose of reducing ozone.

  16. Jet Fuel Thermal Stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, W. F. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Various aspects of the thermal stability problem associated with the use of broadened-specification and nonpetroleum-derived turbine fuels are addressed. The state of the art is reviewed and the status of the research being conducted at various laboratories is presented. Discussions among representatives from universities, refineries, engine and airframe manufacturers, airlines, the Government, and others are presented along with conclusions and both broad and specific recommendations for future stability research and development. It is concluded that significant additional effort is required to cope with the fuel stability problems which will be associated with the potentially poorer quality fuels of the future such as broadened specification petroleum fuels or fuels produced from synthetic sources.

  17. Fuel cell water transport

    DOEpatents

    Vanderborgh, Nicholas E.; Hedstrom, James C.

    1990-01-01

    The moisture content and temperature of hydrogen and oxygen gases is regulated throughout traverse of the gases in a fuel cell incorporating a solid polymer membrane. At least one of the gases traverses a first flow field adjacent the solid polymer membrane, where chemical reactions occur to generate an electrical current. A second flow field is located sequential with the first flow field and incorporates a membrane for effective water transport. A control fluid is then circulated adjacent the second membrane on the face opposite the fuel cell gas wherein moisture is either transported from the control fluid to humidify a fuel gas, e.g., hydrogen, or to the control fluid to prevent excess water buildup in the oxidizer gas, e.g., oxygen. Evaporation of water into the control gas and the control gas temperature act to control the fuel cell gas temperatures throughout the traverse of the fuel cell by the gases.

  18. Alternative fuel transit buses

    SciTech Connect

    Motta, R.; Norton, P.; Kelly, K.

    1996-10-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratory; this project was funded by DOE. One of NREL`s missions is to objectively evaluate the performance, emissions, and operating costs of alternative fuel vehicles so fleet managers can make informed decisions when purchasing them. Alternative fuels have made greater inroads into the transit bus market than into any other. Each year, the American Public Transit Association (APTA) surveys its members on their inventory and buying plans. The latest APTA data show that about 4% of the 50,000 transit buses in its survey run on an alternative fuel. Furthermore, 1 in 5 of the new transit buses that members have on order are alternative fuel buses. This program was designed to comprehensively and objectively evaluate the alternative fuels in use in the industry.

  19. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, Alicia L.; Griffith, William L.; Dorsey, George F.; West, Brian H.

    1998-01-01

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO.sub.x emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO.sub.x produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  20. Low emissions diesel fuel

    DOEpatents

    Compere, A.L.; Griffith, W.L.; Dorsey, G.F.; West, B.H.

    1998-05-05

    A method and matter of composition for controlling NO{sub x} emissions from existing diesel engines. The method is achieved by adding a small amount of material to the diesel fuel to decrease the amount of NO{sub x} produced during combustion. Specifically, small amounts, less than about 1%, of urea or a triazine compound (methylol melamines) are added to diesel fuel. Because urea and triazine compounds are generally insoluble in diesel fuel, microemulsion technology is used to suspend or dissolve the urea or triazine compound in the diesel fuel. A typical fuel formulation includes 5% t-butyl alcohol, 4.5% water, 0.5% urea or triazine compound, 9% oleic acid, and 1% ethanolamine. The subject invention provides improved emissions in heavy diesel engines without the need for major modifications.

  1. Jet aircraft hydrocarbon fuels technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longwell, J. P. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    A broad specification, referee fuel was proposed for research and development. This fuel has a lower, closely specified hydrogen content and higher final boiling point and freezing point than ASTM Jet A. The workshop recommended various priority items for fuel research and development. Key items include prediction of tradeoffs among fuel refining, distribution, and aircraft operating costs; combustor liner temperature and emissions studies; and practical simulator investigations of the effect of high freezing point and low thermal stability fuels on aircraft fuel systems.

  2. Rejuvenation of automotive fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yu Seung; Langlois, David A.

    2016-08-23

    A process for rejuvenating fuel cells has been demonstrated to improve the performance of polymer exchange membrane fuel cells with platinum/ionomer electrodes. The process involves dehydrating a fuel cell and exposing at least the cathode of the fuel cell to dry gas (nitrogen, for example) at a temperature higher than the operating temperature of the fuel cell. The process may be used to prolong the operating lifetime of an automotive fuel cell.

  3. Fuel properties of cottonseed oil

    SciTech Connect

    Karaosmanoglu, F.; Tueter, M.; Goellue, E.; Yanmaz, S.; Altintig, E.

    1999-11-01

    The use of vegetable oils as fuel alternatives has an exceptional importance in the field of research. In this study, evaluation possibilities of cottonseed oil have been investigated as an alternative candidate for diesel fuel and fuel oil. The fuel property tests were performed according to standard analysis methods for oil and fuel. An overall evaluation of the results indicates that cottonseed oil can be proposed as a possible green substitute for fuel.

  4. Parameter Estimation of Lateral Spacecraft Fuel Slosh

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudermann, James E.; Schlee, Keith L.

    2008-01-01

    Predicting the effect of fuel slosh on the attitude control system of a spacecraft or launch vehicle is a very important and challenging task. Whether the spacecraft is spinning or moving laterally, the dynamic effect of the fuel slosh helps determine whether the spacecraft will remain on its intended trajectory. Three categories of slosh can be caused by launch vehicle or spacecraft maneuvers when the fuel is in the presence of an acceleration field. These are bulk-fluid motion, subsurface wave motion (currents), and free-surface slosh. Each of these slosh types has a periodic component defined by either a spinning or a lateral motion. For spinning spacecraft, all three types of slosh can greatly affect stability. Bulk-fluid motion and free-surface slosh can affect the lateral-slosh characteristics. For either condition, an unpredicted coupled resonance between the spacecraft and its onboard fuel could threaten a mission. This ongoing research effort seeks to improve the accuracy and efficiency of modeling techniques used to predict these types of fluid motions for lateral motion. Particular efforts focus on analyzing the effects of viscoelastic diaphragms on slosh dynamics.

  5. Cryogenic Fuel Tank Draining Analysis Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greer, Donald

    1999-01-01

    One of the technological challenges in designing advanced hypersonic aircraft and the next generation of spacecraft is developing reusable flight-weight cryogenic fuel tanks. As an aid in the design and analysis of these cryogenic tanks, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model has been developed specifically for the analysis of flow in a cryogenic fuel tank. This model employs the full set of Navier-Stokes equations, except that viscous dissipation is neglected in the energy equation. An explicit finite difference technique in two-dimensional generalized coordinates, approximated to second-order accuracy in both space and time is used. The stiffness resulting from the low Mach number is resolved by using artificial compressibility. The model simulates the transient, two-dimensional draining of a fuel tank cross section. To calculate the slosh wave dynamics the interface between the ullage gas and liquid fuel is modeled as a free surface. Then, experimental data for free convection inside a horizontal cylinder are compared with model results. Finally, cryogenic tank draining calculations are performed with three different wall heat fluxes to demonstrate the effect of wall heat flux on the internal tank flow field.

  6. Towards Experimental Accuracy from the First Principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyansky, O. L.; Lodi, L.; Tennyson, J.; Zobov, N. F.

    2013-06-01

    Producing ab initio ro-vibrational energy levels of small, gas-phase molecules with an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} would constitute a significant step forward in theoretical spectroscopy and would place calculated line positions considerably closer to typical experimental accuracy. Such an accuracy has been recently achieved for the H_3^+ molecular ion for line positions up to 17 000 cm ^{-1}. However, since H_3^+ is a two-electron system, the electronic structure methods used in this study are not applicable to larger molecules. A major breakthrough was reported in ref., where an accuracy of 0.10 cm^{-1} was achieved ab initio for seven water isotopologues. Calculated vibrational and rotational energy levels up to 15 000 cm^{-1} and J=25 resulted in a standard deviation of 0.08 cm^{-1} with respect to accurate reference data. As far as line intensities are concerned, we have already achieved for water a typical accuracy of 1% which supersedes average experimental accuracy. Our results are being actively extended along two major directions. First, there are clear indications that our results for water can be improved to an accuracy of the order of 0.01 cm^{-1} by further, detailed ab initio studies. Such level of accuracy would already be competitive with experimental results in some situations. A second, major, direction of study is the extension of such a 0.1 cm^{-1} accuracy to molecules containg more electrons or more than one non-hydrogen atom, or both. As examples of such developments we will present new results for CO, HCN and H_2S, as well as preliminary results for NH_3 and CH_4. O.L. Polyansky, A. Alijah, N.F. Zobov, I.I. Mizus, R. Ovsyannikov, J. Tennyson, L. Lodi, T. Szidarovszky and A.G. Csaszar, Phil. Trans. Royal Soc. London A, {370}, 5014-5027 (2012). O.L. Polyansky, R.I. Ovsyannikov, A.A. Kyuberis, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and N.F. Zobov, J. Phys. Chem. A, (in press). L. Lodi, J. Tennyson and O.L. Polyansky, J. Chem. Phys. {135}, 034113 (2011).

  7. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  8. Alternate-Fueled Flight: Halophytes, Algae, Bio-, and Synthetic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Synthetic and biomass fueling are now considered to be near-term aviation alternate fueling. The major impediment is a secure sustainable supply of these fuels at reasonable cost. However, biomass fueling raises major concerns related to uses of common food crops and grasses (some also called "weeds") for processing into aviation fuels. These issues are addressed, and then halophytes and algae are shown to be better suited as sources of aerospace fuels and transportation fueling in general. Some of the history related to alternate fuels use is provided as a guideline for current and planned alternate fuels testing (ground and flight) with emphasis on biofuel blends. It is also noted that lessons learned from terrestrial fueling are applicable to space missions. These materials represent an update (to 2009) and additions to the Workshop on Alternate Fueling Sustainable Supply and Halophyte Summit at Twinsburg, Ohio, October 17 to 18, 2007.

  9. Alternate-Fueled Flight: Halophytes, Algae, Bio-, and Synthetic Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendricks, R. C.

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic and biomass fueling are now considered to be near-term aviation alternate fueling. The major impediment is a secure sustainable supply of these fuels at reasonable cost. However, biomass fueling raises major concerns related to uses of common food crops and grasses (some also called "weeds") for processing into aviation fuels. These issues are addressed, and then halophytes and algae are shown to be better suited as sources of aerospace fuels and transportation fueling in general. Some of the history related to alternate fuels use is provided as a guideline for current and planned alternate fuels testing (ground and flight) with emphasis on biofuel blends. It is also noted that lessons learned from terrestrial fueling are applicable to space missions. These materials represent an update and additions to the Workshop on Alternate Fueling Sustainable Supply and Halophyte Summit at Twinsburg, OH, Oct. 17 to 18, 2007 (ref. 1).

  10. Activity monitor accuracy in persons using canes.

    PubMed

    Wendland, Deborah Michael; Sprigle, Stephen H

    2012-01-01

    The StepWatch activity monitor has not been validated on multiple indoor and outdoor surfaces in a population using ambulation aids. The aims of this technical report are to report on strategies to configure the StepWatch activity monitor on subjects using a cane and to report the accuracy of both leg-mounted and cane-mounted StepWatch devices on people ambulating over different surfaces while using a cane. Sixteen subjects aged 67 to 85 yr (mean 75.6) who regularly use a cane for ambulation participated. StepWatch calibration was performed by adjusting sensitivity and cadence. Following calibration optimization, accuracy was tested on both the leg-mounted and cane-mounted devices on different surfaces, including linoleum, sidewalk, grass, ramp, and stairs. The leg-mounted device had an accuracy of 93.4% across all surfaces, while the cane-mounted device had an aggregate accuracy of 84.7% across all surfaces. Accuracy of the StepWatch on the stairs was significantly less accurate (p < 0.001) when comparing surfaces using repeated measures analysis of variance. When monitoring community mobility, placement of a StepWatch on a person and his/her ambulation aid can accurately document both activity and device use.

  11. Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Orbit Determination Accuracy Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slojkowski, Steven E.

    2014-01-01

    Results from operational OD produced by the NASA Goddard Flight Dynamics Facility for the LRO nominal and extended mission are presented. During the LRO nominal mission, when LRO flew in a low circular orbit, orbit determination requirements were met nearly 100% of the time. When the extended mission began, LRO returned to a more elliptical frozen orbit where gravity and other modeling errors caused numerous violations of mission accuracy requirements. Prediction accuracy is particularly challenged during periods when LRO is in full-Sun. A series of improvements to LRO orbit determination are presented, including implementation of new lunar gravity models, improved spacecraft solar radiation pressure modeling using a dynamic multi-plate area model, a shorter orbit determination arc length, and a constrained plane method for estimation. The analysis presented in this paper shows that updated lunar gravity models improved accuracy in the frozen orbit, and a multiplate dynamic area model improves prediction accuracy during full-Sun orbit periods. Implementation of a 36-hour tracking data arc and plane constraints during edge-on orbit geometry also provide benefits. A comparison of the operational solutions to precision orbit determination solutions shows agreement on a 100- to 250-meter level in definitive accuracy.

  12. Accuracy metrics for judging time scale algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Douglas, R. J.; Boulanger, J.-S.; Jacques, C.

    1994-01-01

    Time scales have been constructed in different ways to meet the many demands placed upon them for time accuracy, frequency accuracy, long-term stability, and robustness. Usually, no single time scale is optimum for all purposes. In the context of the impending availability of high-accuracy intermittently-operated cesium fountains, we reconsider the question of evaluating the accuracy of time scales which use an algorithm to span interruptions of the primary standard. We consider a broad class of calibration algorithms that can be evaluated and compared quantitatively for their accuracy in the presence of frequency drift and a full noise model (a mixture of white PM, flicker PM, white FM, flicker FM, and random walk FM noise). We present the analytic techniques for computing the standard uncertainty for the full noise model and this class of calibration algorithms. The simplest algorithm is evaluated to find the average-frequency uncertainty arising from the noise of the cesium fountain's local oscillator and from the noise of a hydrogen maser transfer-standard. This algorithm and known noise sources are shown to permit interlaboratory frequency transfer with a standard uncertainty of less than 10(exp -15) for periods of 30-100 days.

  13. 78 FR 62462 - Regulation of Fuels and Fuel Additives: Modifications to Renewable Fuel Standard Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... transportation fuels, including gasoline and diesel fuel, or renewable fuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, as... biodiesel) that were produced for the highway diesel market but were also suitable for other markets such...

  14. Fuel system for rotary distributor fuel injection pump

    SciTech Connect

    Klopfer, K.H.; Kelly, W.W.

    1993-06-01

    In a fuel injection pump having a drive shaft, a pump rotor driven by the drive shaft, reciprocating pumping means with periodic intake and pumping strokes to periodically receive an intake charge of fuel and deliver fuel at high pressure for fuel injection is described; a distributor head with a plurality of angularly spaced distributor outlets, the pump rotor providing a distributor rotor with a distributor port connected to the pumping means, the distributor rotor being rotatably mounted in the distributor head for sequential registration of the distributor port with the distributor outlets for distributing said high pressure delivery of fuel thereto; a fuel system for supplying fuel to the pumping means, having an end chamber at one end of the pump rotor and a fuel supply pump driven by the drive shaft and having an inlet and outlet, the supply pump outlet being connected to the end chamber for supplying fuel thereto, and a pressure regulator for regulating the fuel pressure in the end chamber; and a control valve connected between the pumping means and the end chamber and selectively opened during the intake strokes to supply fuel to the pumping means from the end chamber and during the pumping strokes to spill fuel from the pumping means into the end chamber to terminate said high pressure delivery of fuel; the improvement wherein the fuel system comprises a fuel return passage connected in series with the end chamber downstream thereof, wherein the pressure regulator is mounted in the return passage for regulating the upstream fuel pressure, including the upstream fuel pressure within the end chamber, and is connected for conducting excess fuel for return to the supply pump inlet, and wherein the supply pump is driven by the drive shaft to supply fuel at a rate exceeding the rate of said high pressure delivery of fuel for fuel injection and to provide excess fuel flow continuously through the end chamber and return passage to the pressure regulator.

  15. Measurement accuracies in band-limited extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.

    1982-01-01

    The problem of numerical instability associated with extrapolation algorithms is addressed. An attempt is made to estimate the bounds for the acceptable errors and to place a ceiling on the measurement accuracy and computational accuracy needed for the extrapolation. It is shown that in band limited (or visible angle limited) extrapolation the larger effective aperture L' that can be realized from a finite aperture L by over sampling is a function of the accuracy of measurements. It is shown that for sampling in the interval L/b absolute value of xL, b1 the signal must be known within an error e sub N given by e sub N squared approximately = 1/4(2kL') cubed (e/8b L/L')(2kL') where L is the physical aperture, L' is the extrapolated aperture, and k = 2pi lambda.

  16. The measurement accuracy of passive radon instruments.

    PubMed

    Beck, T R; Foerster, E; Buchröder, H; Schmidt, V; Döring, J

    2014-01-01

    This paper analyses the data having been gathered from interlaboratory comparisons of passive radon instruments over 10 y with respect to the measurement accuracy. The measurement accuracy is discussed in terms of the systematic and the random measurement error. The analysis shows that the systematic measurement error of the most instruments issued by professional laboratory services can be within a range of ±10 % from the true value. A single radon measurement has an additional random measurement error, which is in the range of up to ±15 % for high exposures to radon (>2000 kBq h m(-3)). The random measurement error increases for lower exposures. The analysis especially applies to instruments with solid-state nuclear track detectors and results in proposing criteria for testing the measurement accuracy. Instruments with electrets and charcoal have also been considered, but the low stock of data enables only a qualitative discussion.

  17. Why do delayed summaries improve metacomprehension accuracy?

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mary C M; Thiede, Keith W

    2008-05-01

    We showed that metacomprehension accuracy improved when participants (N=87 college students) wrote summaries of texts prior to judging their comprehension; however, accuracy only improved when summaries were written after a delay, not when written immediately after reading. We evaluated two hypotheses proposed to account for this delayed-summarization effect (the accessibility hypothesis and the situation model hypothesis). The data suggest that participants based metacomprehension judgments more on the gist of texts when they generated summaries after a delay; whereas, they based judgments more on details when they generated summaries immediately after reading. Focusing on information relevant to the situation model of a text (the gist of a text) produced higher levels of metacomprehension accuracy, which is consistent with situation model hypothesis.

  18. Increasing Accuracy and Increasing Tension in Ho

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Wendy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Hubble Constant, Ho, provides a measure of the current expansion rate of the universe. In recent decades, there has been a huge increase in the accuracy with which extragalactic distances, and hence Ho, can be measured. While the historical factor-of-two uncertainty in Ho has been resolved, a new discrepancy has arisen between the values of Ho measured in the local universe, and that estimated from cosmic microwave background measurements, assuming a Lambda cold dark matter model. I will review the advances that have led to the increase in accuracy in measurements of Ho, as well as describe exciting future prospects with the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) and Gaia, which will make it feasible to measure extragalactic distances at percent-level accuracy in the next decade.

  19. 2009 Fuel Cell Market Report

    SciTech Connect

    Vincent, Bill; Gangi, Jennifer; Curtin, Sandra; Delmont, Elizabeth

    2010-11-01

    Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

  20. Metallic fuels for advanced reactors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmack, W. J.; Porter, D. L.; Chang, Y. I.; Hayes, S. L.; Meyer, M. K.; Burkes, D. E.; Lee, C. B.; Mizuno, T.; Delage, F.; Somers, J.

    2009-07-01

    In the framework of the Generation IV Sodium Fast Reactor Program, the Advanced Fuel Project has conducted an evaluation of the available fuel systems supporting future sodium cooled fast reactors. This paper presents an evaluation of metallic alloy fuels. Early US fast reactor developers originally favored metal alloy fuel due to its high fissile density and compatibility with sodium. The goal of fast reactor fuel development programs is to develop and qualify a nuclear fuel system that performs all of the functions of a conventional fast spectrum nuclear fuel while destroying recycled actinides. This will provide a mechanism for closure of the nuclear fuel cycle. Metal fuels are candidates for this application, based on documented performance of metallic fast reactor fuels and the early results of tests currently being conducted in US and international transmutation fuel development programs.

  1. The accuracy of Halley's cometary orbits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, D. W.

    The accuracy of a scientific computation depends in the main on the data fed in and the analysis method used. This statement is certainly true of Edmond Halley's cometary orbit work. Considering the 420 comets that had been seen before Halley's era of orbital calculation (1695 - 1702) only 24, according to him, had been observed well enough for their orbits to be calculated. Two questions are considered in this paper. Do all the orbits listed by Halley have the same accuracy? and, secondly, how accurate was Halley's method of calculation?

  2. Field Accuracy Test of Rpas Photogrammetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, P.; Coakley, R.

    2013-08-01

    Baseline Surveys Ltd is a company which specialises in the supply of accurate geospatial data, such as cadastral, topographic and engineering survey data to commercial and government bodies. Baseline Surveys Ltd invested in aerial drone photogrammetric technology and had a requirement to establish the spatial accuracy of the geographic data derived from our unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) photogrammetry before marketing our new aerial mapping service. Having supplied the construction industry with survey data for over 20 years, we felt that is was crucial for our clients to clearly understand the accuracy of our photogrammetry so they can safely make informed spatial decisions, within the known accuracy limitations of our data. This information would also inform us on how and where UAV photogrammetry can be utilised. What we wanted to find out was the actual accuracy that can be reliably achieved using a UAV to collect data under field conditions throughout a 2 Ha site. We flew a UAV over the test area in a "lawnmower track" pattern with an 80% front and 80% side overlap; we placed 45 ground markers as check points and surveyed them in using network Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System (RTK GPS). We specifically designed the ground markers to meet our accuracy needs. We established 10 separate ground markers as control points and inputted these into our photo modelling software, Agisoft PhotoScan. The remaining GPS coordinated check point data were added later in ArcMap to the completed orthomosaic and digital elevation model so we could accurately compare the UAV photogrammetry XYZ data with the RTK GPS XYZ data at highly reliable common points. The accuracy we achieved throughout the 45 check points was 95% reliably within 41 mm horizontally and 68 mm vertically and with an 11.7 mm ground sample distance taken from a flight altitude above ground level of 90 m.The area covered by one image was 70.2 m × 46.4 m, which equals 0.325 Ha. This finding has shown

  3. Size-Dependent Accuracy of Nanoscale Thermometers.

    PubMed

    Alicki, Robert; Leitner, David M

    2015-07-23

    The accuracy of two classes of nanoscale thermometers is estimated in terms of size and system-dependent properties using the spin-boson model. We consider solid state thermometers, where the energy splitting is tuned by thermal properties of the material, and fluorescent organic thermometers, in which the fluorescence intensity depends on the thermal population of conformational states of the thermometer. The results of the theoretical model compare well with the accuracy reported for several nanothermometers that have been used to measure local temperature inside living cells.

  4. Estimation and Accuracy after Model Selection

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Classical statistical theory ignores model selection in assessing estimation accuracy. Here we consider bootstrap methods for computing standard errors and confidence intervals that take model selection into account. The methodology involves bagging, also known as bootstrap smoothing, to tame the erratic discontinuities of selection-based estimators. A useful new formula for the accuracy of bagging then provides standard errors for the smoothed estimators. Two examples, nonparametric and parametric, are carried through in detail: a regression model where the choice of degree (linear, quadratic, cubic, …) is determined by the Cp criterion, and a Lasso-based estimation problem. PMID:25346558

  5. Predictive accuracy in the neuroprediction of rearrest

    PubMed Central

    Aharoni, Eyal; Mallett, Joshua; Vincent, Gina M.; Harenski, Carla L.; Calhoun, Vince D.; Sinnott-Armstrong, Walter; Gazzaniga, Michael S.; Kiehl, Kent A.

    2014-01-01

    A recently published study by the present authors (Aharoni et al., 2013) reported evidence that functional changes in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) within a sample of 96 criminal offenders who were engaged in a Go/No-Go impulse control task significantly predicted their rearrest following release from prison. In an extended analysis, we use discrimination and calibration techniques to test the accuracy of these predictions relative to more traditional models and their ability to generalize to new observations in both full and reduced models. Modest to strong discrimination and calibration accuracy were found, providing additional support for the utility of neurobiological measures in predicting rearrest. PMID:24720689

  6. Final Technical Report: Increasing Prediction Accuracy.

    SciTech Connect

    King, Bruce Hardison; Hansen, Clifford; Stein, Joshua

    2015-12-01

    PV performance models are used to quantify the value of PV plants in a given location. They combine the performance characteristics of the system, the measured or predicted irradiance and weather at a site, and the system configuration and design into a prediction of the amount of energy that will be produced by a PV system. These predictions must be as accurate as possible in order for finance charges to be minimized. Higher accuracy equals lower project risk. The Increasing Prediction Accuracy project at Sandia focuses on quantifying and reducing uncertainties in PV system performance models.

  7. Options for fuel management

    SciTech Connect

    Reardon, L.D. Jr.; Chance, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    The key to cofiring wood or other biomass with coal in existing power stations is fuel management. Fuel management includes the procurement, receiving, processing, storage, and blending of the biomass with coal. Procurement options may include the purchase of lower cost biomass fuels, receipt of subsidies to make capital modifications to cofire biomass {open_quotes}waste{close_quotes} fuels or receive tipping fees where biomass waste disposal options for a particular area are expensive. Biomass receiving options include delivery methods, unloading, measurement, and inspection. Processing options are associated with screen types, drying systems, final particle size required, and associated questions of fuel supply reliability. Issues include the ability of the coal yard to accept this processing operation, handling convenience, traffic patterns, staffing requirements, and ultimately the cost of fuel at the burner. Issues associated with storage include locating the facility, managing dust, managing moisture pick-up, and managing runoff. Blending options include pre-blending or designing a system to blend the fuels as they are transported from the coal yard to the bunkers. This paper reviews the major decisions that have to be made, and discusses some of the options available. It draws upon existing experience in cofiring systems to achieve a low cost, high reliability system to use biomass at coal-fired electricity generating stations.

  8. Internet Fuel Cells Forum

    SciTech Connect

    Sudhoff, Frederick A.

    1996-08-01

    The rapid development and integration of the Internet into the mainstream of professional life provides the fuel cell industry with the opportunity to share new ideas with unprecedented capabilities. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) has undertaken the task to maintain a Fuel Cell Forum on the Internet. Here, members can exchange ideas and information pertaining to fuel cell technologies. The purpose of this forum is to promote a better understanding of fuel cell concepts, terminology, processes, and issues relating to commercialization of fuel cell power technology. The Forum was developed by METC to provide those interested with fuel cell conference information for its current concept of exchanging ideas and information pertaining to fuel cells. Last August, the Forum expanded to an on-line and world-wide network. There are 250 members, and membership is growing at a rate of several new subscribers per week. The forum currently provides updated conference information and interactive information exchange. Forum membership is encouraged from utilities, industry, universities, and government. Because of the public nature of the internet, business sensitive, confidential, or proprietary information should not be placed on this system. The Forum is unmoderated; therefore, the views and opinions of authors expressed in the forum do not necessarily state or reflect those of the U.S. government or METC.

  9. Hydrogen vehicle fueling station

    SciTech Connect

    Daney, D.E.; Edeskuty, F.J.; Daugherty, M.A.

    1995-09-01

    Hydrogen fueling stations are an essential element in the practical application of hydrogen as a vehicle fuel, and a number of issues such as safety, efficiency, design, and operating procedures can only be accurately addressed by a practical demonstration. Regardless of whether the vehicle is powered by an internal combustion engine or fuel cell, or whether the vehicle has a liquid or gaseous fuel tank, the fueling station is a critical technology which is the link between the local storage facility and the vehicle. Because most merchant hydrogen delivered in the US today (and in the near future) is in liquid form due to the overall economics of production and delivery, we believe a practical refueling station should be designed to receive liquid. Systems studies confirm this assumption for stations fueling up to about 300 vehicles. Our fueling station, aimed at refueling fleet vehicles, will receive hydrogen as a liquid and dispense it as either liquid, high pressure gas, or low pressure gas. Thus, it can refuel any of the three types of tanks proposed for hydrogen-powered vehicles -- liquid, gaseous, or hydride. The paper discusses the fueling station design. Results of a numerical model of liquid hydrogen vehicle tank filling, with emphasis on no vent filling, are presented to illustrate the usefulness of the model as a design tool. Results of our vehicle performance model illustrate our thesis that it is too early to judge what the preferred method of on-board vehicle fuel storage will be in practice -- thus our decision to accommodate all three methods.

  10. Concentric fuel line system

    SciTech Connect

    Diener, A.N.; Parker, E.G.

    1993-08-31

    In a fuel injection type of fuel distribution system for motor vehicles, a connector structure is described comprising, in combination: an integral fuel line formed of an innermost tube having a first duct defined therein for carrying a first fuel component of the fuel distribution system, an intermediate tube being spaced from and surrounding the innermost tube so as to form a second duct there between for carrying a second fuel component of the fuel distribution system, and an outer tube being spaced from and surrounding the intermediate tube so as to form a third duct there between for carrying a third fuel component of the fuel distribution system; manifold means having a first coupling union, a second coupling union disposed upstream of the first coupling union, and a third coupling union disposed upstream of the second coupling union; the first coupling union including a first axial bore for receiving one end of the innermost tube, and a first passageway in fluid communication with the first duct; the second coupling union including a second axial bore for receiving one end of the intermediate tube, and a second passageway in fluid communication with the second duct; the third coupling union including a third axial bore for receiving one end of the outer tube, and a third passageway in fluid communication with the third duct; the first coupling union having a first mounting hole, extending transversely to the first axial bore, for receiving first screw so that an outer peripheral edge portion of the first screw is tangentially aligned with an outer circumferential wall portion of the innermost tube so as to mechanically and positively secure the one end thereof with the first axial bore; the second coupling union including a second mounting hole, extending transversely to the second axial bore, for receiving a second screw.

  11. Modeling fuel succession

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Davis, Brett; Van Wagtendonk, Jan W.; Beck, Jen; van Wagtendonk, Kent A.

    2009-01-01

    Surface fuels data are of critical importance for supporting fire incident management, risk assessment, and fuel management planning, but the development of surface fuels data can be expensive and time consuming. The data development process is extensive, generally beginning with acquisition of remotely sensed spatial data such as aerial photography or satellite imagery (Keane and others 2001). The spatial vegetation data are then crosswalked to a set of fire behavior fuel models that describe the available fuels (the burnable portions of the vegetation) (Anderson 1982, Scott and Burgan 2005). Finally, spatial fuels data are used as input to tools such as FARSITE and FlamMap to model current and potential fire spread and behavior (Finney 1998, Finney 2006). The capture date of the remotely sensed data defines the period for which the vegetation, and, therefore, fuels, data are most accurate. The more time that passes after the capture date, the less accurate the data become due to vegetation growth and processes such as fire. Subsequently, the results of any fire simulation based on these data become less accurate as the data age. Because of the amount of labor and expense required to develop these data, keeping them updated may prove to be a challenge. In this article, we describe the Sierra Nevada Fuel Succession Model, a modeling tool that can quickly and easily update surface fuel models with a minimum of additional input data. Although it was developed for use by Yosemite, Sequoia, and Kings Canyon National Parks, it is applicable to much of the central and southern Sierra Nevada. Furthermore, the methods used to develop the model have national applicability.

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT: ENVIROFUELS DIESEL FUEL CATALYZER FUEL ADDITIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA's Environmental Technology Verification Program has tested EnviroFuels diesel fuel additive, called the Diesel Fuel Catalyzer. EnviroFuels has stated that heavy-duty on and off road diesel engines are the intended market for the catalyzer. Preliminary tests conducted indicate...

  13. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1998-11-09

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  14. Heating subsurface formations by oxidizing fuel on a fuel carrier

    DOEpatents

    Costello, Michael; Vinegar, Harold J.

    2012-10-02

    A method of heating a portion of a subsurface formation includes drawing fuel on a fuel carrier through an opening formed in the formation. Oxidant is supplied to the fuel at one or more locations in the opening. The fuel is combusted with the oxidant to provide heat to the formation.

  15. Design package for fuel retrieval system fuel handling tool modification

    SciTech Connect

    TEDESCHI, D.J.

    1999-03-17

    This is a design package that contains the details for a modification to a tool used for moving fuel elements during loading of MCO Fuel Baskets for the Fuel Retrieval System. The tool is called the fuel handling tool (or stinger). This document contains requirements, development design information, tests, and test reports.

  16. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  17. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, T.D.; Smith, J.L.

    1986-07-08

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell is disclosed with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas. The cell enclosures collectively provide an enclosure for the array and effectively avoid the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components. The fuel cell further includes an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  18. FUEL ELEMENT CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-08-01

    Fuel elements having a solid core of fissionable material encased in a cladding material are described. A conversion material is provided within the cladding to react with the fission products to form stable, relatively non- volatile compounds thereby minimizing the migration of the fission products into the coolant. The conversion material is preferably a metallic fluoride, such as lead difluoride, and may be in the form of a coating on the fuel core or interior of the cladding, or dispersed within the fuel core. (AEC)

  19. Alternate Fuels Combustion Research

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    AFWAL-TR-84-2042 ESL-TR-84-29 ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCH 0) PRATT & WHITNEY CANADA MISSISSAUGA, ONTARIO CANADA In JULY 1984 Final Report for...in small engincs. -291 REFERENCES 1. Gratton, M., Sampath, P., " Alternate Fuels Combustion Research Phase If", Pratt & Whitney Canada , AFWAL-TR-83-2057...for Period May 80 Sep e ALTERNATE FUELS COMBUSTION RESEARCHMa80-Sp3 4. PERFORMING ORIJ. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTNOR(s) 4. 60ONTRA-CT-WI GANUMNER(s) *M

  20. Aviation turbine fuels, 1982

    SciTech Connect

    Shelton, E.M.; Dickson, C.L.

    1983-03-01

    Properties of some aviation turbine fuels marketed in the United States during 1982 are presented in this report. The samples represented are typical 1982 production and were analyzed in the laboratories of 14 manufacturers of aviation turbine (jet) fuels. The data were submitted for study, calculation, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Department of Energy (DOE), Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC), Bartlesville, Oklahoma, and the American Petroleum Institute (API). Results for the properties of 90 samples of aviation turbine fuels are included in the report for military grades JP-4 and HP-5, and commercial type Jet A.

  1. Bipolar fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    McElroy, James F.

    1989-01-01

    The present invention discloses an improved fuel cell utilizing an ion transporting membrane having a catalytic anode and a catalytic cathode bonded to opposite sides of the membrane, a wet-proofed carbon sheet in contact with the cathode surface opposite that bonded to the membrane and a bipolar separator positioned in electrical contact with the carbon sheet and the anode of the adjacent fuel cell. Said bipolar separator and carbon sheet forming an oxidant flowpath, wherein the improvement comprises an electrically conductive screen between and in contact with the wet-proofed carbon sheet and the bipolar separator improving the product water removal system of the fuel cell.

  2. Vegetable oil fuel standards

    SciTech Connect

    Pryde, E.H.

    1982-01-01

    Suggested standards for vegetable oils and ester fuels, as well as ASTM specifications for No. 2 diesel oil are given. The following physical properties were discussed: cetane number, cloud point, distillation temperatures, flash point, pour point, turbidity, viscosity, free fatty acids, iodine value, phosphorus, and wax. It was apparent that vegetable oils and their esters cannot meet ASTM specifications D975 for No. 2 diesel oil for use in the diesel engine. Vegetable oil modification or engine design modification may make it possible eventually for vegetable oils to become suitable alternative fuels. Vegetable oils must be recognized as experimental fuels until modifications have been tested thoroughly and generally accepted. 1 table. (DP)

  3. Molten carbonate fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Kaun, Thomas D.; Smith, James L.

    1987-01-01

    A molten electrolyte fuel cell with an array of stacked cells and cell enclosures isolating each cell except for access to gas manifolds for the supply of fuel or oxidant gas or the removal of waste gas, the cell enclosures collectively providing an enclosure for the array and effectively avoiding the problems of electrolyte migration and the previous need for compression of stack components, the fuel cell further including an inner housing about and in cooperation with the array enclosure to provide a manifold system with isolated chambers for the supply and removal of gases. An external insulated housing about the inner housing provides thermal isolation to the cell components.

  4. Fuel nozzle tube retention

    DOEpatents

    Cihlar, David William; Melton, Patrick Benedict

    2017-02-28

    A system for retaining a fuel nozzle premix tube includes a retention plate and a premix tube which extends downstream from an outlet of a premix passage defined along an aft side of a fuel plenum body. The premix tube includes an inlet end and a spring support feature which is disposed proximate to the inlet end. The premix tube extends through the retention plate. The spring retention feature is disposed between an aft side of the fuel plenum and the retention plate. The system further includes a spring which extends between the spring retention feature and the retention plate.

  5. Supercritical Fuel Pyrolysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-28

    aircraft will have to operate under very high pressures and will have to sustain very high heat loads (e.g., > 30,000 BTU/min) in order to meet aircraft...inability to predict solids formation tendencies of fuels under supercritical conditions has been brought to our attention by Dr. Tim Edwards (of the Air...introduce auto-oxidative effects [21]. The sparged fuel is then loaded into a high-pressure pump, which delivers the fuel to the reactor, as shown in Figure

  6. Natural attenuation of fuel hydrocarbon contaminants: Hydraulic conductivity dependency of biodegradation rates in a field case study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-07-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  7. Natural Attenuation of Fuel Hydrocarbon Contaminants: Correlation of Biodegradation with Hydraulic Conductivity in a Field Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Guoping; Zheng, Chunmiao

    2003-10-15

    Two biodegradation models are developed to represent natural attenuation of fuel-hydrocarbon contaminants as observed in a comprehensive natural-gradient tracer test in a heterogeneous aquifer on the Columbus Air Force Base in Mississippi, USA. The first, a first-order mass loss model, describes the irreversible losses of BTEX and its individual components, i.e., benzene (B), toluene (T), ethyl benzene (E), and xylene (X). The second, a reactive pathway model, describes sequential degradation pathways for BTEX utilizing multiple electron acceptors, including oxygen, nitrate, iron and sulfate, and via methanogenesis. The heterogeneous aquifer is represented by multiple hydraulic conductivity (K) zones delineated on the basis of numerous flowmeter K measurements. A direct propagation artificial neural network (DPN) is used as an inverse modeling tool to estimate the biodegradation rate constants associated with each of the K zones. In both the mass loss model and the reactive pathway model, the biodegradation rate constants show an increasing trend with the hydraulic conductivity. The finding of correlation between biodegradation kinetics and hydraulic conductivity distributions is of general interest and relevance to characterization and modeling of natural attenuation of hydrocarbons in other petroleum-product contaminated sites.

  8. Pore growth in U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeon Soo; Jeong, G. Y.; Sohn, D.-S.; Jamison, L. M.

    2016-09-01

    U-Mo/Al dispersion fuel is currently under development in the DOE's Material Management and Minimization program to convert HEU-fueled research reactors to LEU-fueled reactors. In some demanding conditions in high-power and high-performance reactors, large pores form in the interaction layers between the U-Mo fuel particles and the Al matrix, which pose a potential to cause fuel failure. In this study, comprehension of the formation and growth of these pores was explored. As a product, a model to predict pore growth and porosity increase was developed. The model includes three major topics: fission gas release from the U-Mo and the IL to the pores, stress evolution in the fuel meat, and the effect of amorphous IL growth. Well-characterized in-pile data from reduced-size plates were used to fit the model parameters. A data set from full-sized plates, independent and distinctively different from those used to fit the model parameters, was used to examine the accuracy of the model. The model showed fair agreement with the measured data. The model suggested that the growth of the IL has a critical effect on pore growth, as both its material properties and energetics are favorable to pore formation. Therefore, one area of the current effort, focused on suppressing IL growth, appears to be on the right track to improve the performance of this fuel.

  9. Spatial fuel data products of the LANDFIRE Project

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reeves, M.C.; Ryan, K.C.; Rollins, M.G.; Thompson, T.G.

    2009-01-01

    The Landscape Fire and Resource Management Planning Tools (LANDFIRE) Project is mapping wildland fuels, vegetation, and fire regime characteristics across the United States. The LANDFIRE project is unique because of its national scope, creating an integrated product suite at 30-m spatial resolution and complete spatial coverage of all lands within the 50 states. Here we describe development of the LANDFIRE wildland fuels data layers for the conterminous 48 states: surface fire behavior fuel models, canopy bulk density, canopy base height, canopy cover, and canopy height. Surface fire behavior fuel models are mapped by developing crosswalks to vegetation structure and composition created by LANDFIRE. Canopy fuels are mapped using regression trees relating field-referenced estimates of canopy base height and canopy bulk density to satellite imagery, biophysical gradients and vegetation structure and composition data. Here we focus on the methods and data used to create the fuel data products, discuss problems encountered with the data, provide an accuracy assessment, demonstrate recent use of the data during the 2007 fire season, and discuss ideas for updating, maintaining and improving LANDFIRE fuel data products.

  10. Speed-Accuracy Response Models: Scoring Rules Based on Response Time and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maris, Gunter; van der Maas, Han

    2012-01-01

    Starting from an explicit scoring rule for time limit tasks incorporating both response time and accuracy, and a definite trade-off between speed and accuracy, a response model is derived. Since the scoring rule is interpreted as a sufficient statistic, the model belongs to the exponential family. The various marginal and conditional distributions…

  11. Accuracy of Digital vs. Conventional Implant Impressions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang J.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Gianneschi, Grace E.; Gallucci, German O.

    2015-01-01

    The accuracy of digital impressions greatly influences the clinical viability in implant restorations. The aim of this study is to compare the accuracy of gypsum models acquired from the conventional implant impression to digitally milled models created from direct digitalization by three-dimensional analysis. Thirty gypsum and 30 digitally milled models impressed directly from a reference model were prepared. The models were scanned by a laboratory scanner and 30 STL datasets from each group were imported to an inspection software. The datasets were aligned to the reference dataset by a repeated best fit algorithm and 10 specified contact locations of interest were measured in mean volumetric deviations. The areas were pooled by cusps, fossae, interproximal contacts, horizontal and vertical axes of implant position and angulation. The pooled areas were statistically analysed by comparing each group to the reference model to investigate the mean volumetric deviations accounting for accuracy and standard deviations for precision. Milled models from digital impressions had comparable accuracy to gypsum models from conventional impressions. However, differences in fossae and vertical displacement of the implant position from the gypsum and digitally milled models compared to the reference model, exhibited statistical significance (p<0.001, p=0.020 respectively). PMID:24720423

  12. Seasonal Effects on GPS PPP Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saracoglu, Aziz; Ugur Sanli, D.

    2016-04-01

    GPS Precise Point Positioning (PPP) is now routinely used in many geophysical applications. Static positioning and 24 h data are requested for high precision results however real life situations do not always let us collect 24 h data. Thus repeated GPS surveys of 8-10 h observation sessions are still used by some research groups. Positioning solutions from shorter data spans are subject to various systematic influences, and the positioning quality as well as the estimated velocity is degraded. Researchers pay attention to the accuracy of GPS positions and of the estimated velocities derived from short observation sessions. Recently some research groups turned their attention to the study of seasonal effects (i.e. meteorological seasons) on GPS solutions. Up to now usually regional studies have been reported. In this study, we adopt a global approach and study the various seasonal effects (including the effect of the annual signal) on GPS solutions produced from short observation sessions. We use the PPP module of the NASA/JPL's GIPSY/OASIS II software and globally distributed GPS stations' data of the International GNSS Service. Accuracy studies previously performed with 10-30 consecutive days of continuous data. Here, data from each month of a year, incorporating two years in succession, is used in the analysis. Our major conclusion is that a reformulation for the GPS positioning accuracy is necessary when taking into account the seasonal effects, and typical one term accuracy formulation is expanded to a two-term one.

  13. Adult Metacomprehension: Judgment Processes and Accuracy Constraints

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhao, Qin; Linderholm, Tracy

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to review and synthesize two interrelated topics in the adult metacomprehension literature: the bases of metacomprehension judgment and the constraints on metacomprehension accuracy. Our review shows that adult readers base their metacomprehension judgments on different types of information, including experiences…

  14. Task Speed and Accuracy Decrease When Multitasking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lin, Lin; Cockerham, Deborah; Chang, Zhengsi; Natividad, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    As new technologies increase the opportunities for multitasking, the need to understand human capacities for multitasking continues to grow stronger. Is multitasking helping us to be more efficient? This study investigated the multitasking abilities of 168 participants, ages 6-72, by measuring their task accuracy and completion time when they…

  15. Accuracy Assessment for AG500, Electromagnetic Articulograph

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yunusova, Yana; Green, Jordan R.; Mefferd, Antje

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this article was to evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the AG500 (Carstens Medizinelectronik, Lenglern, Germany), an electromagnetic device developed recently to register articulatory movements in three dimensions. This technology seems to have unprecedented capabilities to provide rich information about time-varying…

  16. Least squares polynomial fits and their accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lear, W. M.

    1977-01-01

    Equations are presented which attempt to fit least squares polynomials to tables of date. It is concluded that much data are needed to reduce the measurement error standard deviation by a significant amount, however at certain points great accuracy is attained.

  17. A microwave position sensor with submillimeter accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stelzer, A.; Diskus, C. G.; Lubke, K.; Thim, H. W.

    1999-12-01

    Design and characteristics of a prototype distance sensor are presented in this paper. The radar front-end operates at 35 GHz and applies six-port technology and direct frequency measurement. The sensor makes use of both frequency-modulated continuous wave and interferometer principles and is capable of measuring distance with a very high accuracy of ±0.1 mm.

  18. Vowel Space Characteristics and Vowel Identification Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the relation between vowel production characteristics and intelligibility. Method: Acoustic characteristics of 10 vowels produced by 45 men and 48 women from the J. M. Hillenbrand, L. A. Getty, M. J. Clark, and K. Wheeler (1995) study were examined and compared with identification accuracy. Global (mean f0, F1, and F2;…

  19. Statistical Parameters for Describing Model Accuracy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-20

    mean and the standard deviation, approximately characterizes the accuracy of the model, since the width of the confidence interval whose center is at...Using a modified version of Chebyshev’s inequality, a similar result is obtained for the upper bound of the confidence interval width for any

  20. High Accuracy Transistor Compact Model Calibrations

    SciTech Connect

    Hembree, Charles E.; Mar, Alan; Robertson, Perry J.

    2015-09-01

    Typically, transistors are modeled by the application of calibrated nominal and range models. These models consists of differing parameter values that describe the location and the upper and lower limits of a distribution of some transistor characteristic such as current capacity. Correspond- ingly, when using this approach, high degrees of accuracy of the transistor models are not expected since the set of models is a surrogate for a statistical description of the devices. The use of these types of models describes expected performances considering the extremes of process or transistor deviations. In contrast, circuits that have very stringent accuracy requirements require modeling techniques with higher accuracy. Since these accurate models have low error in transistor descriptions, these models can be used to describe part to part variations as well as an accurate description of a single circuit instance. Thus, models that meet these stipulations also enable the calculation of quantifi- cation of margins with respect to a functional threshold and uncertainties in these margins. Given this need, new model high accuracy calibration techniques for bipolar junction transis- tors have been developed and are described in this report.

  1. Direct Behavior Rating: Considerations for Rater Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, Sayward E.; Riley-Tillman, T. Chris; Chafouleas, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavior rating (DBR) offers users a flexible, feasible method for the collection of behavioral data. Previous research has supported the validity of using DBR to rate three target behaviors: academic engagement, disruptive behavior, and compliance. However, the effect of the base rate of behavior on rater accuracy has not been established.…

  2. Accuracy of Depth to Water Measurements

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Accuracy of depth to water measurements is an issue identified by the Forum as a concern of Superfund decision-makers as they attempt to determine directions of ground-water flow, areas of recharge or discharge, the hydraulic characteristics of...

  3. Bullet trajectory reconstruction - Methods, accuracy and precision.

    PubMed

    Mattijssen, Erwin J A T; Kerkhoff, Wim

    2016-05-01

    Based on the spatial relation between a primary and secondary bullet defect or on the shape and dimensions of the primary bullet defect, a bullet's trajectory prior to impact can be estimated for a shooting scene reconstruction. The accuracy and precision of the estimated trajectories will vary depending on variables such as, the applied method of reconstruction, the (true) angle of incidence, the properties of the target material and the properties of the bullet upon impact. This study focused on the accuracy and precision of estimated bullet trajectories when different variants of the probing method, ellipse method, and lead-in method are applied on bullet defects resulting from shots at various angles of incidence on drywall, MDF and sheet metal. The results show that in most situations the best performance (accuracy and precision) is seen when the probing method is applied. Only for the lowest angles of incidence the performance was better when either the ellipse or lead-in method was applied. The data provided in this paper can be used to select the appropriate method(s) for reconstruction and to correct for systematic errors (accuracy) and to provide a value of the precision, by means of a confidence interval of the specific measurement.

  4. Bayesian Methods for Medical Test Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Broemeling, Lyle D.

    2011-01-01

    Bayesian methods for medical test accuracy are presented, beginning with the basic measures for tests with binary scores: true positive fraction, false positive fraction, positive predictive values, and negative predictive value. The Bayesian approach is taken because of its efficient use of prior information, and the analysis is executed with a Bayesian software package WinBUGS®. The ROC (receiver operating characteristic) curve gives the intrinsic accuracy of medical tests that have ordinal or continuous scores, and the Bayesian approach is illustrated with many examples from cancer and other diseases. Medical tests include X-ray, mammography, ultrasound, computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, nuclear medicine and tests based on biomarkers, such as blood glucose values for diabetes. The presentation continues with more specialized methods suitable for measuring the accuracies of clinical studies that have verification bias, and medical tests without a gold standard. Lastly, the review is concluded with Bayesian methods for measuring the accuracy of the combination of two or more tests. PMID:26859485

  5. 47 CFR 65.306 - Calculation accuracy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Calculation accuracy. 65.306 Section 65.306 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES (CONTINUED) INTERSTATE RATE OF RETURN PRESCRIPTION PROCEDURES AND METHODOLOGIES Exchange Carriers § 65.306 Calculation...

  6. Navigation Accuracy Guidelines for Orbital Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. Russell; Alfriend, Kyle T.

    2004-01-01

    Some simple guidelines based on the accuracy in determining a satellite formation s semi-major axis differences are useful in making preliminary assessments of the navigation accuracy needed to support such missions. These guidelines are valid for any elliptical orbit, regardless of eccentricity. Although maneuvers required for formation establishment, reconfiguration, and station-keeping require accurate prediction of the state estimate to the maneuver time, and hence are directly affected by errors in all the orbital elements, experience has shown that determination of orbit plane orientation and orbit shape to acceptable levels is less challenging than the determination of orbital period or semi-major axis. Furthermore, any differences among the member s semi-major axes are undesirable for a satellite formation, since it will lead to differential along-track drift due to period differences. Since inevitable navigation errors prevent these differences from ever being zero, one may use the guidelines this paper presents to determine how much drift will result from a given relative navigation accuracy, or conversely what navigation accuracy is required to limit drift to a given rate. Since the guidelines do not account for non-two-body perturbations, they may be viewed as useful preliminary design tools, rather than as the basis for mission navigation requirements, which should be based on detailed analysis of the mission configuration, including all relevant sources of uncertainty.

  7. Accuracy of References in Five Entomology Journals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kristof, Cynthia

    ln this paper, the bibliographical references in five core entomology journals are examined for citation accuracy in order to determine if the error rates are similar. Every reference printed in each journal's first issue of 1992 was examined, and these were compared to the original (cited) publications, if possible, in order to determine the…

  8. Method for measuring centroid algorithm accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klein, S.; Liewer, K.

    2002-01-01

    This paper will describe such a method for measuring the accuracy of centroid algorithms using a relatively inexpensive setup consisting of a white light source, lenses, a CCD camea, an electro-strictive actuator, and a DAC (Digital-to-Analog Converter), and employing embedded PowerPC, VxWorks, and Solaris based software.

  9. High accuracy gaseous x-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, G.C.

    1983-11-01

    An outline is given of the design and operation of high accuracy position-sensitive x-ray detectors suitable for experiments using synchrotron radiation. They are based on the gas proportional detector, with position readout using a delay line; a detailed examination is made of factors which limit spatial resolution. Individual wire readout may be used for extremely high counting rates.

  10. Observed Consultation: Confidence and Accuracy of Assessors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tweed, Mike; Ingham, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Judgments made by the assessors observing consultations are widely used in the assessment of medical students. The aim of this research was to study judgment accuracy and confidence and the relationship between these. Assessors watched recordings of consultations, scoring the students on: a checklist of items; attributes of consultation; a…

  11. Analyzing thematic maps and mapping for accuracy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rosenfield, G.H.

    1982-01-01

    Two problems which exist while attempting to test the accuracy of thematic maps and mapping are: (1) evaluating the accuracy of thematic content, and (2) evaluating the effects of the variables on thematic mapping. Statistical analysis techniques are applicable to both these problems and include techniques for sampling the data and determining their accuracy. In addition, techniques for hypothesis testing, or inferential statistics, are used when comparing the effects of variables. A comprehensive and valid accuracy test of a classification project, such as thematic mapping from remotely sensed data, includes the following components of statistical analysis: (1) sample design, including the sample distribution, sample size, size of the sample unit, and sampling procedure; and (2) accuracy estimation, including estimation of the variance and confidence limits. Careful consideration must be given to the minimum sample size necessary to validate the accuracy of a given. classification category. The results of an accuracy test are presented in a contingency table sometimes called a classification error matrix. Usually the rows represent the interpretation, and the columns represent the verification. The diagonal elements represent the correct classifications. The remaining elements of the rows represent errors by commission, and the remaining elements of the columns represent the errors of omission. For tests of hypothesis that compare variables, the general practice has been to use only the diagonal elements from several related classification error matrices. These data are arranged in the form of another contingency table. The columns of the table represent the different variables being compared, such as different scales of mapping. The rows represent the blocking characteristics, such as the various categories of classification. The values in the cells of the tables might be the counts of correct classification or the binomial proportions of these counts divided by

  12. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction Femoral Tunnel Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Hiemstra, Laurie A.; Kerslake, Sarah; Lafave, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Background: Medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) reconstruction is a procedure aimed to reestablish the checkrein to lateral patellar translation in patients with symptomatic patellofemoral instability. Correct femoral tunnel position is thought to be crucial to successful MPFL reconstruction, but the accuracy of this statement in terms of patient outcomes has not been tested. Purpose: To assess the accuracy of femoral tunnel placement in an MPFL reconstruction cohort and to determine the correlation between tunnel accuracy and a validated disease-specific, patient-reported quality-of-life outcome measure. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: Between June 2008 and February 2014, a total of 206 subjects underwent an MPFL reconstruction. Lateral radiographs were measured to determine the accuracy of the femoral tunnel by measuring the distance from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point. Banff Patella Instability Instrument (BPII) scores were collected a mean 24 months postoperatively. Results: A total of 155 (79.5%) subjects had adequate postoperative lateral radiographs and complete BPII scores. The mean duration of follow-up (±SD) was 24.4 ± 8.2 months (range, 12-74 months). Measurement from the center of the femoral tunnel to the Schöttle point resulted in 143 (92.3%) tunnels being categorized as “good” or “ideal.” There were 8 failures in the cohort, none of which occurred in malpositioned tunnels. The mean distance from the center of the MPFL tunnel to the center of the Schöttle point was 5.9 ± 4.2 mm (range, 0.5-25.9 mm). The mean postoperative BPII score was 65.2 ± 22.5 (range, 9.2-100). Pearson r correlation demonstrated no statistically significant relationship between accuracy of femoral tunnel position and BPII score (r = –0.08; 95% CI, –0.24 to 0.08). Conclusion: There was no evidence of a correlation between the accuracy of MPFL reconstruction femoral tunnel in relation to the Schöttle point and

  13. Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Operation With Dual Fuel Flexibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    160, pp 827-834. FuelCell Energy, Inc. March 2005. Final Technical Progress Report , “Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell Product Design Improvement...Corporation 100 CTC Drive Johnstown, PA 15904-1935 Final Report Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army... FuelCell Energy (FCE) to test an internally reforming 250 kW carbonate direct fuel cell using HD-5 propane. This fuel cell power plant, originally

  14. Organic fuel cells and fuel cell conducting sheets

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Ha, Su; Adams, Brian

    2007-10-16

    A passive direct organic fuel cell includes an organic fuel solution and is operative to produce at least 15 mW/cm.sup.2 when operating at room temperature. In additional aspects of the invention, fuel cells can include a gas remover configured to promote circulation of an organic fuel solution when gas passes through the solution, a modified carbon cloth, one or more sealants, and a replaceable fuel cartridge.

  15. Accuracy of genotype imputation in sheep breeds.

    PubMed

    Hayes, B J; Bowman, P J; Daetwyler, H D; Kijas, J W; van der Werf, J H J

    2012-02-01

    Although genomic selection offers the prospect of improving the rate of genetic gain in meat, wool and dairy sheep breeding programs, the key constraint is likely to be the cost of genotyping. Potentially, this constraint can be overcome by genotyping selection candidates for a low density (low cost) panel of SNPs with sparse genotype coverage, imputing a much higher density of SNP genotypes using a densely genotyped reference population. These imputed genotypes would then be used with a prediction equation to produce genomic estimated breeding values. In the future, it may also be desirable to impute very dense marker genotypes or even whole genome re-sequence data from moderate density SNP panels. Such a strategy could lead to an accurate prediction of genomic estimated breeding values across breeds, for example. We used genotypes from 48 640 (50K) SNPs genotyped in four sheep breeds to investigate both the accuracy of imputation of the 50K SNPs from low density SNP panels, as well as prospects for imputing very dense or whole genome re-sequence data from the 50K SNPs (by leaving out a small number of the 50K SNPs at random). Accuracy of imputation was low if the sparse panel had less than 5000 (5K) markers. Across breeds, it was clear that the accuracy of imputing from sparse marker panels to 50K was higher if the genetic diversity within a breed was lower, such that relationships among animals in that breed were higher. The accuracy of imputation from sparse genotypes to 50K genotypes was higher when the imputation was performed within breed rather than when pooling all the data, despite the fact that the pooled reference set was much larger. For Border Leicesters, Poll Dorsets and White Suffolks, 5K sparse genotypes were sufficient to impute 50K with 80% accuracy. For Merinos, the accuracy of imputing 50K from 5K was lower at 71%, despite a large number of animals with full genotypes (2215) being used as a reference. For all breeds, the relationship of

  16. Handbook of fuel cell performance

    SciTech Connect

    Benjamin, T.G.; Camara, E.H.; Marianowski, L.G.

    1980-05-01

    The intent of this document is to provide a description of fuel cells, their performances and operating conditions, and the relationship between fuel processors and fuel cells. This information will enable fuel cell engineers to know which fuel processing schemes are most compatible with which fuel cells and to predict the performance of a fuel cell integrated with any fuel processor. The data and estimates presented are for the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells because they are closer to commercialization than other types of fuel cells. Performance of the cells is shown as a function of operating temperature, pressure, fuel conversion (utilization), and oxidant utilization. The effect of oxidant composition (for example, air versus O/sub 2/) as well as fuel composition is examined because fuels provided by some of the more advanced fuel processing schemes such as coal conversion will contain varying amounts of H/sub 2/, CO, CO/sub 2/, CH/sub 4/, H/sub 2/O, and sulfur and nitrogen compounds. A brief description of fuel cells and their application to industrial, commercial, and residential power generation is given. The electrochemical aspects of fuel cells are reviewed. The phosphoric acid fuel cell is discussed, including how it is affected by operating conditions; and the molten carbonate fuel cell is discussed. The equations developed will help systems engineers to evaluate the application of the phosphoric acid and molten carbonate fuel cells to commercial, utility, and industrial power generation and waste heat utilization. A detailed discussion of fuel cell efficiency, and examples of fuel cell systems are given.

  17. Seventh Edition Fuel Cell Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    NETL

    2004-11-01

    Provides an overview of fuel cell technology and research projects. Discusses the basic workings of fuel cells and their system components, main fuel cell types, their characteristics, and their development status, as well as a discussion of potential fuel cell applications.

  18. Fuel Injector With Shear Atomizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beal, George W.; Mills, Virgil L.; Smith, Durward B., II; Beacom, William F.

    1995-01-01

    Atomizer for injecting liquid fuel into combustion chamber uses impact and swirl to break incoming stream of fuel into small, more combustible droplets. Slanted holes direct flow of liquid fuel to stepped cylindrical wall. Impact on wall atomizes liquid. Air flowing past vanes entrains droplets of liquid in swirling flow. Fuel injected at pressure lower than customarily needed.

  19. Transportation Fuels Markets, PADD 5

    EIA Publications

    2015-01-01

    This study examines supply, demand, and distribution of transportation fuels in Petroleum Administration for Defense District (PADD) 5, a region that includes the western states of California, Arizona, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, Alaska, and Hawaii. For this study, transportation fuels include gasoline, diesel fuel, and jet fuel.

  20. Automotive Fuel and Exhaust Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Irby, James F.; And Others

    Materials are provided for a 14-hour course designed to introduce the automotive mechanic to the basic operations of automotive fuel and exhaust systems incorporated on military vehicles. The four study units cover characteristics of fuels, gasoline fuel system, diesel fuel systems, and exhaust system. Each study unit begins with a general…