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Sample records for accuracy motion estimation

  1. Multiple ping sonar accuracy improvement using robust motion estimation and ping fusion.

    PubMed

    Yu, Lian; Neretti, Nicola; Intrator, Nathan

    2006-04-01

    Noise degrades the accuracy of sonar systems. We demonstrate a practical method for increasing the effective signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) by fusing time delay information from a burst of multiple sonar pings. This approach can be useful when there is no relative motion between the sonar and the target during the burst of sonar pinging. Otherwise, the relative motion degrades the fusion and therefore, has to be addressed before fusion can be used. In this paper, we present a robust motion estimation algorithm which uses information from multiple receivers to estimate the relative motion between pings in the burst. We then compensate for motion, and show that the fusion of information from the burst of motion compensated pings improves both the resilience to noise and sonar accuracy, consequently increasing the operating range of the sonar system.

  2. Fast subpel motion estimation for H.264/advanced video coding with an adaptive motion vector accuracy decision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoyoung; Jung, Bongsoo; Jung, Jooyoung; Jeon, Byeungwoo

    2012-11-01

    The quarter-pel motion vector accuracy supported by H.264/advanced video coding (AVC) in motion estimation (ME) and compensation (MC) provides high compression efficiency. However, it also increases the computational complexity. While various well-known fast integer-pel ME methods are already available, lack of a good, fast subpel ME method results in problems associated with relatively high computational complexity. This paper presents one way of solving the complexity problem of subpel ME by making adaptive motion vector (MV) accuracy decisions in inter-mode selection. The proposed MV accuracy decision is made using inter-mode selection of a macroblock with two decision criteria. Pixels are classified as stationary (and/or homogeneous) or nonstationary (and/or nonhomogeneous). In order to avoid unnecessary interpolation and processing, a proper subpel ME level is chosen among four different combinations, each of which has a different MV accuracy and number of subpel ME iterations based on the classification. Simulation results using an open source x264 software encoder show that without any noticeable degradation (by -0.07 dB on average), the proposed method reduces total encoding time and subpel ME time, respectively, by 51.78% and by 76.49% on average, as compared to the conventional full-pel pixel search.

  3. Motion estimation accuracy for visible-light/gamma-ray imaging fusion for portable portal monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnowski, Thomas P.; Cunningham, Mark F.; Goddard, James S.; Cheriyadat, Anil M.; Hornback, Donald E.; Fabris, Lorenzo; Kerekes, Ryan A.; Ziock, Klaus-Peter; Gee, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    The use of radiation sensors as portal monitors is increasing due to heightened concerns over the smuggling of fissile material. Portable systems that can detect significant quantities of fissile material that might be present in vehicular traffic are of particular interest. We have constructed a prototype, rapid-deployment portal gamma-ray imaging portal monitor that uses machine vision and gamma-ray imaging to monitor multiple lanes of traffic. Vehicles are detected and tracked by using point detection and optical flow methods as implemented in the OpenCV software library. Points are clustered together but imperfections in the detected points and tracks cause errors in the accuracy of the vehicle position estimates. The resulting errors cause a "blurring" effect in the gamma image of the vehicle. To minimize these errors, we have compared a variety of motion estimation techniques including an estimate using the median of the clustered points, a "best-track" filtering algorithm, and a constant velocity motion estimation model. The accuracy of these methods are contrasted and compared to a manually verified ground-truth measurement by quantifying the rootmean- square differences in the times the vehicles cross the gamma-ray image pixel boundaries compared with a groundtruth manual measurement.

  4. Accuracy of System Step Response Roll Magnitude Estimation from Central and Peripheral Visual Displays and Simulator Cockpit Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosman, R. J. A. W.; Vandervaart, J. C.

    1984-01-01

    An experiment to investigate visual roll attitude and roll rate perception is described. The experiment was also designed to assess the improvements of perception due to cockpit motion. After the onset of the motion, subjects were to make accurate and quick estimates of the final magnitude of the roll angle step response by pressing the appropriate button of a keyboard device. The differing time-histories of roll angle, roll rate and roll acceleration caused by a step response stimulate the different perception processes related the central visual field, peripheral visual field and vestibular organs in different, yet exactly known ways. Experiments with either of the visual displays or cockpit motion and some combinations of these were run to asses the roles of the different perception processes. Results show that the differences in response time are much more pronounced than the differences in perception accuracy.

  5. Nonlinear circuits for naturalistic visual motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, James E; Clark, Damon A

    2015-01-01

    Many animals use visual signals to estimate motion. Canonical models suppose that animals estimate motion by cross-correlating pairs of spatiotemporally separated visual signals, but recent experiments indicate that humans and flies perceive motion from higher-order correlations that signify motion in natural environments. Here we show how biologically plausible processing motifs in neural circuits could be tuned to extract this information. We emphasize how known aspects of Drosophila's visual circuitry could embody this tuning and predict fly behavior. We find that segregating motion signals into ON/OFF channels can enhance estimation accuracy by accounting for natural light/dark asymmetries. Furthermore, a diversity of inputs to motion detecting neurons can provide access to more complex higher-order correlations. Collectively, these results illustrate how non-canonical computations improve motion estimation with naturalistic inputs. This argues that the complexity of the fly's motion computations, implemented in its elaborate circuits, represents a valuable feature of its visual motion estimator.

  6. Dynamic accuracy of inertial measurement units during simple pendulum motion.

    PubMed

    Brodie, M A; Walmsley, A; Page, W

    2008-06-01

    A motion measurement system based on inertial measurement units (IMUs) has been suggested as an alternative to contemporary video motion capture. This paper reports an investigation into the accuracy of IMUs in estimating 3D orientation during simple pendulum motion. The IMU vendor's (XSens Technologies) accuracy claim of 3 degrees root mean squared (RMS) error is tested. IMUs are integrated electronic devices that contain accelerometers, magnetometers and gyroscopes. The motion of a pendulum swing was measured using both IMUs and video motion capture as a reference. The IMU raw data were processed by the Kalman filter algorithm supplied by the vendor and a custom fusion algorithm developed by the authors. The IMU measurement of pendulum motion using the vendor's Kalman filter algorithm did not compare well with the video motion capture with a RMS error of between 8.5 degrees and 11.7 degrees depending on the length and type of pendulum swing. The maximum orientation error was greater than 30 degrees , occurring approximately eight seconds into the motion. The custom fusion algorithm estimation of orientation compared well with the video motion capture with a RMS error of between 0.8 degrees and 1.3 degrees . Future research should concentrate on developing a general purpose fusion algorithm and vendors of IMUs should provide details about the errors to be expected in different measurement situations, not just those in a 'best case' scenario. PMID:18568821

  7. Nonlinear circuits for naturalistic visual motion estimation

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, James E; Clark, Damon A

    2015-01-01

    Many animals use visual signals to estimate motion. Canonical models suppose that animals estimate motion by cross-correlating pairs of spatiotemporally separated visual signals, but recent experiments indicate that humans and flies perceive motion from higher-order correlations that signify motion in natural environments. Here we show how biologically plausible processing motifs in neural circuits could be tuned to extract this information. We emphasize how known aspects of Drosophila's visual circuitry could embody this tuning and predict fly behavior. We find that segregating motion signals into ON/OFF channels can enhance estimation accuracy by accounting for natural light/dark asymmetries. Furthermore, a diversity of inputs to motion detecting neurons can provide access to more complex higher-order correlations. Collectively, these results illustrate how non-canonical computations improve motion estimation with naturalistic inputs. This argues that the complexity of the fly's motion computations, implemented in its elaborate circuits, represents a valuable feature of its visual motion estimator. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09123.001 PMID:26499494

  8. Inertial Measures of Motion for Clinical Biomechanics: Comparative Assessment of Accuracy under Controlled Conditions – Changes in Accuracy over Time

    PubMed Central

    Lebel, Karina; Boissy, Patrick; Hamel, Mathieu; Duval, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Background Interest in 3D inertial motion tracking devices (AHRS) has been growing rapidly among the biomechanical community. Although the convenience of such tracking devices seems to open a whole new world of possibilities for evaluation in clinical biomechanics, its limitations haven’t been extensively documented. The objectives of this study are: 1) to assess the change in absolute and relative accuracy of multiple units of 3 commercially available AHRS over time; and 2) to identify different sources of errors affecting AHRS accuracy and to document how they may affect the measurements over time. Methods This study used an instrumented Gimbal table on which AHRS modules were carefully attached and put through a series of velocity-controlled sustained motions including 2 minutes motion trials (2MT) and 12 minutes multiple dynamic phases motion trials (12MDP). Absolute accuracy was assessed by comparison of the AHRS orientation measurements to those of an optical gold standard. Relative accuracy was evaluated using the variation in relative orientation between modules during the trials. Findings Both absolute and relative accuracy decreased over time during 2MT. 12MDP trials showed a significant decrease in accuracy over multiple phases, but accuracy could be enhanced significantly by resetting the reference point and/or compensating for initial Inertial frame estimation reference for each phase. Interpretation The variation in AHRS accuracy observed between the different systems and with time can be attributed in part to the dynamic estimation error, but also and foremost, to the ability of AHRS units to locate the same Inertial frame. Conclusions Mean accuracies obtained under the Gimbal table sustained conditions of motion suggest that AHRS are promising tools for clinical mobility assessment under constrained conditions of use. However, improvement in magnetic compensation and alignment between AHRS modules are desirable in order for AHRS to reach their

  9. Estimation of ground motion parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Oliver, Adolph A.; Page, Robert A.; Joyner, William B.

    1978-01-01

    Strong motion data from western North America for earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5 are examined to provide the basis for estimating peak acceleration, velocity, displacement, and duration as a function of distance for three magnitude classes. Data from the San Fernando earthquake are examined to assess the effects of associated structures and of geologic site conditions on peak recorded motions. Small but statistically significant differences are observed in peak values of horizontal acceleration, velocity, and displacement recorded on soil at the base of small structures compared with values recorded at the base of large structures. Values of peak horizontal acceleration recorded at soil sites in the San Fernando earthquake are not significantly different from the values recorded at rock sites, but values of peak horizontal velocity and displacement are significantly greater at soil sites than at rock sites. Three recently published relationships for predicting peak horizontal acceleration are compared and discussed. Considerations are reviewed relevant to ground motion predictions at close distances where there are insufficient recorded data points.

  10. Fast local motion estimation algorithm using elementary motion detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Eiji; Nakamura, Takehito; Sawada, Katsutoshi

    2003-06-01

    This paper presnts a fast local motion estimation algorithm based on so called elementary motion detectors or EMDs. EMDs, modeling insect"s visual signal processing systems, have low computational complexity aspects and can thus be key components to realize such a fast local motion estimation algorithm. The contribution of the presented work is to introduce dual parameter estimators or DPEs by configuring EMDs so that they can estimate local motions in terms of both direction and speed mode parameters simultaneously. The estimated local motion vectors are displayed as arrows superimposed over video image frames. The developed algorithm is implmented in a DirectShow application by using Mircosoft"s DirectX runtime library and is evaluated using various types of video image sequences. It is found to be able to estimate local motion vectors in real time even in moderate PC computing platforms and hece no high profile hardware devices are needed for its real time operation.

  11. Validation and Comparison of Approaches to Respiratory Motion Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabus, Sven; Klinder, Tobias; Murphy, Keelin; Werner, René; Sarrut, David

    The accuracy of respiratory motion estimation has a direct impact on the success of clinical applications such as diagnosis, as well as planning, delivery, and assessment of therapy for lung or other thoracic diseases. While rigid registration is well suited to validation and has reached a mature state in clinical applications, for non-rigid registration no gold-standard exists. This chapter investigates the validation of non-rigid registration accuracy with a focus on lung motion. The central questions addressed in this chapter are (1) how to measure registration accuracy, (2) how to generate ground-truth for validation, and (3) how to interpret accuracy assessment results.

  12. Estimation of ground motion parameters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boore, David M.; Joyner, W.B.; Oliver, A.A.; Page, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Strong motion data from western North America for earthquakes of magnitude greater than 5 are examined to provide the basis for estimating peak acceleration, velocity, displacement, and duration as a function of distance for three magnitude classes. A subset of the data (from the San Fernando earthquake) is used to assess the effects of structural size and of geologic site conditions on peak motions recorded at the base of structures. Small but statistically significant differences are observed in peak values of horizontal acceleration, velocity and displacement recorded on soil at the base of small structures compared with values recorded at the base of large structures. The peak acceleration tends to b3e less and the peak velocity and displacement tend to be greater on the average at the base of large structures than at the base of small structures. In the distance range used in the regression analysis (15-100 km) the values of peak horizontal acceleration recorded at soil sites in the San Fernando earthquake are not significantly different from the values recorded at rock sites, but values of peak horizontal velocity and displacement are significantly greater at soil sites than at rock sites. Some consideration is given to the prediction of ground motions at close distances where there are insufficient recorded data points. As might be expected from the lack of data, published relations for predicting peak horizontal acceleration give widely divergent estimates at close distances (three well known relations predict accelerations between 0.33 g to slightly over 1 g at a distance of 5 km from a magnitude 6.5 earthquake). After considering the physics of the faulting process, the few available data close to faults, and the modifying effects of surface topography, at the present time it would be difficult to accept estimates less than about 0.8 g, 110 cm/s, and 40 cm, respectively, for the mean values of peak acceleration, velocity, and displacement at rock sites

  13. Motion models in attitude estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, D.; Wheeler, Z.; Sedlak, J.

    1994-01-01

    Attitude estimator use observations from different times to reduce the effects of noise. If the vehicle is rotating, the attitude at one time needs to be propagated to that at another time. If the vehicle measures its angular velocity, attitude propagating entails integrating a rotational kinematics equation only. If a measured angular velocity is not available, torques can be computed and an additional rotational dynamics equation integrated to give the angular velocity. Initial conditions for either of these integrations come from the estimation process. Sometimes additional quantities, such as gyro and torque parameters, are also solved for. Although the partial derivatives of attitude with respect to initial attitude and gyro parameters are well known, the corresponding partial derivatives with respect to initial angular velocity and torque parameters are less familiar. They can be derived and computed numerically in a way that is analogous to that used for the initial attitude and gyro parameters. Previous papers have demonstrated the feasibility of using dynamics models for attitude estimation but have not provided details of how each angular velocity and torque parameters can be estimated. This tutorial paper provides some of that detail, notably how to compute the state transition matrix when closed form expressions are not available. It also attempts to put dynamics estimation in perspective by showing the progression from constant to gyro-propagated to dynamics-propagated attitude motion models. Readers not already familiar with attitude estimation will find this paper an introduction to the subject, and attitude specialists may appreciate the collection of heretofore scattered results brought together in a single place.

  14. Fast motion deblurring using sensor-aided motion trajectory estimation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eunsung; Chae, Eunjung; Cheong, Hejin; Paik, Joonki

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an image deblurring algorithm to remove motion blur using analysis of motion trajectories and local statistics based on inertial sensors. The proposed method estimates a point-spread-function (PSF) of motion blur by accumulating reweighted projections of the trajectory. A motion blurred image is then adaptively restored using the estimated PSF and spatially varying activity map to reduce both restoration artifacts and noise amplification. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms existing PSF estimation-based motion deconvolution methods in the sense of both objective and subjective performance measures. The proposed algorithm can be employed in various imaging devices because of its efficient implementation without an iterative computational structure.

  15. Accuracy estimation for supervised learning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Glover, C.W.; Oblow, E.M.; Rao, N.S.V.

    1997-04-01

    This paper illustrates the relative merits of three methods - k-fold Cross Validation, Error Bounds, and Incremental Halting Test - to estimate the accuracy of a supervised learning algorithm. For each of the three methods we point out the problem they address, some of the important assumptions that are based on, and illustrate them through an example. Finally, we discuss the relative advantages and disadvantages of each method.

  16. Linearized motion estimation for articulated planes.

    PubMed

    Datta, Ankur; Sheikh, Yaser; Kanade, Takeo

    2011-04-01

    In this paper, we describe the explicit application of articulation constraints for estimating the motion of a system of articulated planes. We relate articulations to the relative homography between planes and show that these articulations translate into linearized equality constraints on a linear least-squares system, which can be solved efficiently using a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker system. The articulation constraints can be applied for both gradient-based and feature-based motion estimation algorithms and to illustrate this, we describe a gradient-based motion estimation algorithm for an affine camera and a feature-based motion estimation algorithm for a projective camera that explicitly enforces articulation constraints. We show that explicit application of articulation constraints leads to numerically stable estimates of motion. The simultaneous computation of motion estimates for all of the articulated planes in a scene allows us to handle scene areas where there is limited texture information and areas that leave the field of view. Our results demonstrate the wide applicability of the algorithm in a variety of challenging real-world cases such as human body tracking, motion estimation of rigid, piecewise planar scenes, and motion estimation of triangulated meshes.

  17. Estimating Motion From MRI Data

    PubMed Central

    OZTURK, CENGIZHAN; DERBYSHIRE, J. ANDREW; MCVEIGH, ELLIOT R.

    2007-01-01

    Invited Paper Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an ideal imaging modality to measure blood flow and tissue motion. It provides excellent contrast between soft tissues, and images can be acquired at positions and orientations freely defined by the user. From a temporal sequence of MR images, boundaries and edges of tissues can be tracked by image processing techniques. Additionally, MRI permits the source of the image signal to be manipulated. For example, temporary magnetic tags displaying a pattern of variable brightness may be placed in the object using MR saturation techniques, giving the user a known pattern to detect for motion tracking. The MRI signal is a modulated complex quantity, being derived from a rotating magnetic field in the form of an induced current. Well-defined patterns can also be introduced into the phase of the magnetization, and could be thought of as generalized tags. If the phase of each pixel is preserved during image reconstruction, relative phase shifts can be used to directly encode displacement, velocity and acceleration. New methods for modeling motion fields from MRI have now found application in cardiovascular and other soft tissue imaging. In this review, we shall describe the methods used for encoding, imaging, and modeling motion fields with MRI. PMID:18958181

  18. Correspondence estimation from non-rigid motion information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wulff, Jonas; Lotz, Thomas; Stehle, Thomas; Aach, Til; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    The DIET (Digital Image Elasto Tomography) system is a novel approach to screen for breast cancer using only optical imaging information of the surface of a vibrating breast. 3D tracking of skin surface motion without the requirement of external markers is desirable. A novel approach to establish point correspondences using pure skin images is presented here. Instead of the intensity, motion is used as the primary feature, which can be extracted using optical flow algorithms. Taking sequences of multiple frames into account, this motion information alone is accurate and unambiguous enough to allow for a 3D reconstruction of the breast surface. Two approaches, direct and probabilistic, for this correspondence estimation are presented here, suitable for different levels of calibration information accuracy. Reconstructions show that the results obtained using these methods are comparable in accuracy to marker-based methods while considerably increasing resolution. The presented method has high potential in optical tissue deformation and motion sensing.

  19. Repurposing video recordings for structure motion estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaloo, Ali; Lattanzi, David

    2016-04-01

    Video monitoring of public spaces is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, particularly near essential structures and facilities. During any hazard event that dynamically excites a structure, such as an earthquake or hurricane, proximal video cameras may inadvertently capture the motion time-history of the structure during the event. If this dynamic time-history could be extracted from the repurposed video recording it would become a valuable forensic analysis tool for engineers performing post-disaster structural evaluations. The difficulty is that almost all potential video cameras are not installed to monitor structure motions, leading to camera perspective distortions and other associated challenges. This paper presents a method for extracting structure motions from videos using a combination of computer vision techniques. Images from a video recording are first reprojected into synthetic images that eliminate perspective distortion, using as-built knowledge of a structure for calibration. The motion of the camera itself during an event is also considered. Optical flow, a technique for tracking per-pixel motion, is then applied to these synthetic images to estimate the building motion. The developed method was validated using the experimental records of the NEESHub earthquake database. The results indicate that the technique is capable of estimating structural motions, particularly the frequency content of the response. Further work will evaluate variants and alternatives to the optical flow algorithm, as well as study the impact of video encoding artifacts on motion estimates.

  20. Repurposing video recordings for structure motion estimations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaloo, Ali; Lattanzi, David

    2016-04-01

    Video monitoring of public spaces is becoming increasingly ubiquitous, particularly near essential structures and facilities. During any hazard event that dynamically excites a structure, such as an earthquake or hurricane, proximal video cameras may inadvertently capture the motion time-history of the structure during the event. If this dynamic time-history could be extracted from the repurposed video recording it would become a valuable forensic analysis tool for engineers performing post-disaster structural evaluations. The difficulty is that almost all potential video cameras are not installed to monitor structure motions, leading to camera perspective distortions and other associated challenges. This paper presents a method for extracting structure motions from videos using a combination of computer vision techniques. Images from a video recording are first reprojected into synthetic images that eliminate perspective distortion, using as-built knowledge of a structure for calibration. The motion of the camera itself during an event is also considered. Optical flow, a technique for tracking per-pixel motion, is then applied to these synthetic images to estimate the building motion. The developed method was validated using the experimental records of the NEESHub earthquake database. The results indicate that the technique is capable of estimating structural motions, particularly the frequency content of the response. Further work will evaluate variants and alternatives to the optical flow algorithm, as well as study the impact of video encoding artifacts on motion estimates.

  1. Adaptive vehicle motion estimation and prediction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Liang; Thorpe, Chuck E.

    1999-01-01

    Accurate motion estimation and reliable maneuver prediction enable an automated car to react quickly and correctly to the rapid maneuvers of the other vehicles, and so allow safe and efficient navigation. In this paper, we present a car tracking system which provides motion estimation, maneuver prediction and detection of the tracked car. The three strategies employed - adaptive motion modeling, adaptive data sampling, and adaptive model switching probabilities - result in an adaptive interacting multiple model algorithm (AIMM). The experimental results on simulated and real data demonstrate that our tracking system is reliable, flexible, and robust. The adaptive tracking makes the system intelligent and useful in various autonomous driving tasks.

  2. A Fourier approach to cloud motion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.; Lo, R. C.; Rosenfield, A.

    1977-01-01

    A Fourier technique is described for estimating cloud motion from pairs of pictures using the phase of the cross spectral density. The method allows motion estimates to be made for individual spatial frequencies, which are related to cloud pattern dimensions. Results obtained are presented and compared with the results of a Fourier domain cross correlation scheme. Using both artificial and real cloud data show that the technique is relatively sensitive to the presence of mixtures of motions, changes in cloud shape, and edge effects.

  3. A Fourier approach to cloud motion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arking, A.; Lo, R. C.; Rosenfeld, A.

    1978-01-01

    A Fourier phase-difference technique for cloud motion estimation from pairs of pictures is described, and results obtained using this technique are compared with the results of a Fourier-domain cross-correlation scheme. The phase-difference technique makes use of the phase of the cross-spectral density and allows motion estimates to be made for individual spatial frequencies, which are related to cloud pattern dimensions. When objects being tracked do not change their shape, size, and orientation to more than a limited degree, both techniques are effective. The phase difference technique is relatively sensitive to the presence of mixtures of motions, changes in cloud shape, and edge effects; in these circumstances, the cross-correlation scheme is preferable. It is suggested that the Fourier transform phase difference estimation methods can be applied in problems such as landmark matching.

  4. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters.

    PubMed

    Tehrani, Joubin Nasehi; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-21

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation. PMID:26531324

  5. Sensitivity of tumor motion simulation accuracy to lung biomechanical modeling approaches and parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nasehi Tehrani, Joubin; Yang, Yin; Werner, Rene; Lu, Wei; Low, Daniel; Guo, Xiaohu; Wang, Jing

    2015-11-01

    Finite element analysis (FEA)-based biomechanical modeling can be used to predict lung respiratory motion. In this technique, elastic models and biomechanical parameters are two important factors that determine modeling accuracy. We systematically evaluated the effects of lung and lung tumor biomechanical modeling approaches and related parameters to improve the accuracy of motion simulation of lung tumor center of mass (TCM) displacements. Experiments were conducted with four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). A Quasi-Newton FEA was performed to simulate lung and related tumor displacements between end-expiration (phase 50%) and other respiration phases (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40%). Both linear isotropic and non-linear hyperelastic materials, including the neo-Hookean compressible and uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin models, were used to create a finite element model (FEM) of lung and tumors. Lung surface displacement vector fields (SDVFs) were obtained by registering the 50% phase CT to other respiration phases, using the non-rigid demons registration algorithm. The obtained SDVFs were used as lung surface displacement boundary conditions in FEM. The sensitivity of TCM displacement to lung and tumor biomechanical parameters was assessed in eight patients for all three models. Patient-specific optimal parameters were estimated by minimizing the TCM motion simulation errors between phase 50% and phase 0%. The uncoupled Mooney-Rivlin material model showed the highest TCM motion simulation accuracy. The average TCM motion simulation absolute errors for the Mooney-Rivlin material model along left-right, anterior-posterior, and superior-inferior directions were 0.80 mm, 0.86 mm, and 1.51 mm, respectively. The proposed strategy provides a reliable method to estimate patient-specific biomechanical parameters in FEM for lung tumor motion simulation.

  6. Improving visual estimates of cervical spine range of motion.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Brandon P; Webb, Matthew L; Bohl, Daniel D; Fu, Michael; Buerba, Rafael A; Gruskay, Jordan A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-01

    Cervical spine range of motion (ROM) is a common measure of cervical conditions, surgical outcomes, and functional impairment. Although ROM is routinely assessed by visual estimation in clinical practice, visual estimates have been shown to be unreliable and inaccurate. Reliable goniometers can be used for assessments, but the associated costs and logistics generally limit their clinical acceptance. To investigate whether training can improve visual estimates of cervical spine ROM, we asked attending surgeons, residents, and medical students at our institution to visually estimate the cervical spine ROM of healthy subjects before and after a training session. This training session included review of normal cervical spine ROM in 3 planes and demonstration of partial and full motion in 3 planes by multiple subjects. Estimates before, immediately after, and 1 month after this training session were compared to assess reliability and accuracy. Immediately after training, errors decreased by 11.9° (flexion-extension), 3.8° (lateral bending), and 2.9° (axial rotation). These improvements were statistically significant. One month after training, visual estimates remained improved, by 9.5°, 1.6°, and 3.1°, respectively, but were statistically significant only in flexion-extension. Although the accuracy of visual estimates can be improved, clinicians should be aware of the limitations of visual estimates of cervical spine ROM. Our study results support scrutiny of visual assessment of ROM as a criterion for diagnosing permanent impairment or disability. PMID:25379754

  7. Students' Accuracy of Measurement Estimation: Context, Units, and Logical Thinking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Andre, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study examined students' accuracy of measurement estimation for linear distances, different units of measure, task context, and the relationship between accuracy estimation and logical thinking. Middle school students completed a series of tasks that included estimating the length of various objects in different contexts and completed a test…

  8. Ground motion estimation and nonlinear seismic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    McCallen, D.B.; Hutchings, L.J.

    1995-08-14

    Site specific predictions of the dynamic response of structures to extreme earthquake ground motions are a critical component of seismic design for important structures. With the rapid development of computationally based methodologies and powerful computers over the past few years, engineers and scientists now have the capability to perform numerical simulations of many of the physical processes associated with the generation of earthquake ground motions and dynamic structural response. This paper describes application of a physics based, deterministic, computational approach for estimation of earthquake ground motions which relies on site measurements of frequently occurring small (i.e. M < 3 ) earthquakes. Case studies are presented which illustrate application of this methodology for two different sites, and nonlinear analyses of a typical six story steel frame office building are performed to illustrate the potential sensitivity of nonlinear response to site conditions and proximity to the causative fault.

  9. Back-propagation beamformer design for motion estimation in echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xinxin; Liebgott, Hervé; Friboulet, Denis

    2015-07-01

    Transverse oscillation (TO) techniques have shown their potential for improving the accuracy of local motion estimation in the transverse direction (i.e., the direction perpendicular to the beam axis). The conventional design of TOs in linear geometry, which is based on the Fraunhofer approximation, relates point spread function (PSF) and apodization function through a Fourier transform. Motivated by the adaptation of TOs in echocardiography, we propose a specific beamforming approach based on back-propagation (BP) to build TOs in sector-shaped geometry. Numerical simulations and experimental data give a comparison between proposed and conventional beamforming for TOs. The accuracy is first quantified by comparing the generated and theoretical PSF using the root mean square error (RMSE) and shows that BP-based beamforming approximates the desired TOs more closely than the conventional approach. Motion estimation is then evaluated. The axial and lateral displacements are within the range [0-0.6] mm and [0°-6.4°], respectively, which correspond to 0.8 times the axial (0.73 mm) and lateral (8°) wavelengths. The result shows that the proposed method yields a clear improvement for lateral displacements, by reducing the error by 28.6% compared with Fourier transform-based beamforming, while maintaining the same error for axial motion estimation. Experimental measurements are discussed to complete this study and confirm that BP-based beamforming leads to better controlled TO images than conventional Fourier-based beamforming.

  10. [An improved motion estimation of medical image series via wavelet transform].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Rao, Nini; Wang, Gang

    2006-10-01

    The compression of medical image series is very important in telemedicine. The motion estimation plays a key role in the video sequence compression. In this paper, an improved square-diamond search (SDS) algorithm is proposed for the motion estimation of medical image series. The improved SDS algorithm reduces the number of the searched points. This improved SDS algorithm is used in wavelet transformation field to estimate the motion of medical image series. A simulation experiment for digital subtraction angiography (DSA) is made. The experiment results show that the algorithm accuracy is higher than that of other algorithms in the motion estimation of medical image series. PMID:17121333

  11. Motion estimation using point cluster method and Kalman filter.

    PubMed

    Senesh, M; Wolf, A

    2009-05-01

    The most frequently used method in a three dimensional human gait analysis involves placing markers on the skin of the analyzed segment. This introduces a significant artifact, which strongly influences the bone position and orientation and joint kinematic estimates. In this study, we tested and evaluated the effect of adding a Kalman filter procedure to the previously reported point cluster technique (PCT) in the estimation of a rigid body motion. We demonstrated the procedures by motion analysis of a compound planar pendulum from indirect opto-electronic measurements of markers attached to an elastic appendage that is restrained to slide along the rigid body long axis. The elastic frequency is close to the pendulum frequency, as in the biomechanical problem, where the soft tissue frequency content is similar to the actual movement of the bones. Comparison of the real pendulum angle to that obtained by several estimation procedures--PCT, Kalman filter followed by PCT, and low pass filter followed by PCT--enables evaluation of the accuracy of the procedures. When comparing the maximal amplitude, no effect was noted by adding the Kalman filter; however, a closer look at the signal revealed that the estimated angle based only on the PCT method was very noisy with fluctuation, while the estimated angle based on the Kalman filter followed by the PCT was a smooth signal. It was also noted that the instantaneous frequencies obtained from the estimated angle based on the PCT method is more dispersed than those obtained from the estimated angle based on Kalman filter followed by the PCT method. Addition of a Kalman filter to the PCT method in the estimation procedure of rigid body motion results in a smoother signal that better represents the real motion, with less signal distortion than when using a digital low pass filter. Furthermore, it can be concluded that adding a Kalman filter to the PCT procedure substantially reduces the dispersion of the maximal and minimal

  12. Motion Estimation System Utilizing Point Cloud Registration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Qi (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A system and method of estimation motion of a machine is disclosed. The method may include determining a first point cloud and a second point cloud corresponding to an environment in a vicinity of the machine. The method may further include generating a first extended gaussian image (EGI) for the first point cloud and a second EGI for the second point cloud. The method may further include determining a first EGI segment based on the first EGI and a second EGI segment based on the second EGI. The method may further include determining a first two dimensional distribution for points in the first EGI segment and a second two dimensional distribution for points in the second EGI segment. The method may further include estimating motion of the machine based on the first and second two dimensional distributions.

  13. Intensity-Based Registration for Lung Motion Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Kunlin; Ding, Kai; Amelon, Ryan E.; Du, Kaifang; Reinhardt, Joseph M.; Raghavan, Madhavan L.; Christensen, Gary E.

    Image registration plays an important role within pulmonary image analysis. The task of registration is to find the spatial mapping that brings two images into alignment. Registration algorithms designed for matching 4D lung scans or two 3D scans acquired at different inflation levels can catch the temporal changes in position and shape of the region of interest. Accurate registration is critical to post-analysis of lung mechanics and motion estimation. In this chapter, we discuss lung-specific adaptations of intensity-based registration methods for 3D/4D lung images and review approaches for assessing registration accuracy. Then we introduce methods for estimating tissue motion and studying lung mechanics. Finally, we discuss methods for assessing and quantifying specific volume change, specific ventilation, strain/ stretch information and lobar sliding.

  14. Accuracy estimation of foamy virus genome copying

    PubMed Central

    Gärtner, Kathleen; Wiktorowicz, Tatiana; Park, Jeonghae; Mergia, Ayalew; Rethwilm, Axel; Scheller, Carsten

    2009-01-01

    Background Foamy viruses (FVs) are the most genetically stable viruses of the retrovirus family. This is in contrast to the in vitro error rate found for recombinant FV reverse transcriptase (RT). To investigate the accuracy of FV genome copying in vivo we analyzed the occurrence of mutations in HEK 293T cell culture after a single round of reverse transcription using a replication-deficient vector system. Furthermore, the frequency of FV recombination by template switching (TS) and the cross-packaging ability of different FV strains were analyzed. Results We initially sequenced 90,000 nucleotides and detected 39 mutations, corresponding to an in vivo error rate of approximately 4 × 10-4 per site per replication cycle. Surprisingly, all mutations were transitions from G to A, suggesting that APOBEC3 activity is the driving force for the majority of mutations detected in our experimental system. In line with this, we detected a late but significant APOBEC3G and 3F mRNA by quantitative PCR in the cells. We then analyzed 170,000 additional nucleotides from experiments in which we co-transfected the APOBEC3-interfering foamy viral bet gene and observed a significant 50% drop in G to A mutations, indicating that APOBEC activity indeed contributes substantially to the foamy viral replication error rate in vivo. However, even in the presence of Bet, 35 out of 37 substitutions were G to A, suggesting that residual APOBEC activity accounted for most of the observed mutations. If we subtract these APOBEC-like mutations from the total number of mutations, we calculate a maximal intrinsic in vivo error rate of 1.1 × 10-5 per site per replication. In addition to the point mutations, we detected one 49 bp deletion within the analyzed 260000 nucleotides. Analysis of the recombination frequency of FV vector genomes revealed a 27% probability for a template switching (TS) event within a 1 kilobase (kb) region. This corresponds to a 98% probability that FVs undergo at least one

  15. Accuracy of Aerodynamic Model Parameters Estimated from Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1997-01-01

    An important put of building mathematical models based on measured date is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of this accuracy, the parameter estimates themselves have limited value. An expression is developed for computing quantitatively correct parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood parameter estimates when the output residuals are colored. This result is important because experience in analyzing flight test data reveals that the output residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Monte Carlo simulation runs were used to show that parameter accuracy measures from the new technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for correction factors or frequency domain analysis of the output residuals. The technique was applied to flight test data from repeated maneuvers flown on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle. As in the simulated cases, parameter accuracy measures from the new technique were in agreement with the scatter in the parameter estimates from repeated maneuvers, whereas conventional parameter accuracy measures were optimistic.

  16. Children Use Categories to Maximize Accuracy in Estimation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duffy, Sean; Huttenlocher, Janellen; Crawford, L. Elizabeth

    2006-01-01

    The present study tests a model of category effects upon stimulus estimation in children. Prior work with adults suggests that people inductively generalize distributional information about a category of stimuli and use this information to adjust their estimates of individual stimuli in a way that maximizes average accuracy in estimation (see…

  17. Motion estimation in the 3-D Gabor domain.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mu; Reed, Todd R

    2007-08-01

    Motion estimation methods can be broadly classified as being spatiotemporal or frequency domain in nature. The Gabor representation is an analysis framework providing localized frequency information. When applied to image sequences, the 3-D Gabor representation displays spatiotemporal/spatiotemporal-frequency (st/stf) information, enabling the application of robust frequency domain methods with adjustable spatiotemporal resolution. In this work, the 3-D Gabor representation is applied to motion analysis. We demonstrate that piecewise uniform translational motion can be estimated by using a uniform translation motion model in the st/stf domain. The resulting motion estimation method exhibits both good spatiotemporal resolution and substantial noise resistance compared to existing spatiotemporal methods. To form the basis of this model, we derive the signature of the translational motion in the 3-D Gabor domain. Finally, to obtain higher spatiotemporal resolution for more complex motions, a dense motion field estimation method is developed to find a motion estimate for every pixel in the sequence.

  18. Respiratory motion estimation in x-ray angiography for improved guidance during coronary interventions.

    PubMed

    Baka, N; Lelieveldt, B P F; Schultz, C; Niessen, W; van Walsum, T

    2015-05-01

    During percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) catheters and arteries are visualized by x-ray angiography (XA) sequences, using brief contrast injections to show the coronary arteries. If we could continue visualizing the coronary arteries after the contrast agent passed (thus in non-contrast XA frames), we could potentially lower contrast use, which is advantageous due to the toxicity of the contrast agent. This paper explores the possibility of such visualization in mono-plane XA acquisitions with a special focus on respiratory based coronary artery motion estimation. We use the patient specific coronary artery centerlines from pre-interventional 3D CTA images to project on the XA sequence for artery visualization. To achieve this, a framework for registering the 3D centerlines with the mono-plane 2D + time XA sequences is presented. During the registration the patient specific cardiac and respiratory motion is learned. We investigate several respiratory motion estimation strategies with respect to accuracy, plausibility and ease of use for motion prediction in XA frames with and without contrast. The investigated strategies include diaphragm motion based prediction, and respiratory motion extraction from the guiding catheter tip motion. We furthermore compare translational and rigid respiratory based heart motion. We validated the accuracy of the 2D/3D registration and the respiratory and cardiac motion estimations on XA sequences of 12 interventions. The diaphragm based motion model and the catheter tip derived motion achieved 1.58 mm and 1.83 mm median 2D accuracy, respectively. On a subset of four interventions we evaluated the artery visualization accuracy for non-contrast cases. Both diaphragm, and catheter tip based prediction performed similarly, with about half of the cases providing satisfactory accuracy (median error < 2 mm).

  19. Respiratory motion estimation in x-ray angiography for improved guidance during coronary interventions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baka, N.; Lelieveldt, B. P. F.; Schultz, C.; Niessen, W.; van Walsum, T.

    2015-05-01

    During percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI) catheters and arteries are visualized by x-ray angiography (XA) sequences, using brief contrast injections to show the coronary arteries. If we could continue visualizing the coronary arteries after the contrast agent passed (thus in non-contrast XA frames), we could potentially lower contrast use, which is advantageous due to the toxicity of the contrast agent. This paper explores the possibility of such visualization in mono-plane XA acquisitions with a special focus on respiratory based coronary artery motion estimation. We use the patient specific coronary artery centerlines from pre-interventional 3D CTA images to project on the XA sequence for artery visualization. To achieve this, a framework for registering the 3D centerlines with the mono-plane 2D + time XA sequences is presented. During the registration the patient specific cardiac and respiratory motion is learned. We investigate several respiratory motion estimation strategies with respect to accuracy, plausibility and ease of use for motion prediction in XA frames with and without contrast. The investigated strategies include diaphragm motion based prediction, and respiratory motion extraction from the guiding catheter tip motion. We furthermore compare translational and rigid respiratory based heart motion. We validated the accuracy of the 2D/3D registration and the respiratory and cardiac motion estimations on XA sequences of 12 interventions. The diaphragm based motion model and the catheter tip derived motion achieved 1.58 mm and 1.83 mm median 2D accuracy, respectively. On a subset of four interventions we evaluated the artery visualization accuracy for non-contrast cases. Both diaphragm, and catheter tip based prediction performed similarly, with about half of the cases providing satisfactory accuracy (median error < 2 mm).

  20. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2014-03-01

    Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4DCBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR). The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: 1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and 2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction (SART) technique coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and back-projection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The SMEIR algorithm improves image reconstruction accuracy of 4D-CBCT and tumor motion trajectory estimation accuracy as compared to conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstruction and motion estimation.

  1. Bayesian Estimation of Combined Accuracy for Tests with Verification Bias

    PubMed Central

    Broemeling, Lyle D.

    2011-01-01

    This presentation will emphasize the estimation of the combined accuracy of two or more tests when verification bias is present. Verification bias occurs when some of the subjects are not subject to the gold standard. The approach is Bayesian where the estimation of test accuracy is based on the posterior distribution of the relevant parameter. Accuracy of two combined binary tests is estimated employing either “believe the positive” or “believe the negative” rule, then the true and false positive fractions for each rule are computed for two tests. In order to perform the analysis, the missing at random assumption is imposed, and an interesting example is provided by estimating the combined accuracy of CT and MRI to diagnose lung cancer. The Bayesian approach is extended to two ordinal tests when verification bias is present, and the accuracy of the combined tests is based on the ROC area of the risk function. An example involving mammography with two readers with extreme verification bias illustrates the estimation of the combined test accuracy for ordinal tests. PMID:26859487

  2. A Nonparametric Approach to Estimate Classification Accuracy and Consistency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Quinn N.; Cheng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    When cut scores for classifications occur on the total score scale, popular methods for estimating classification accuracy (CA) and classification consistency (CC) require assumptions about a parametric form of the test scores or about a parametric response model, such as item response theory (IRT). This article develops an approach to estimate CA…

  3. The Effect of Training on Accuracy of Angle Estimation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waller, T. Gary; Wright, Robert H.

    This report describes a study to determine the effect of training on accuracy in estimating angles. The study was part of a research program directed toward improving navigation techniques for low-level flight in Army aircraft and was made to assess the feasibility of visually estimating angles on a map in order to determine angles of drift.…

  4. The accuracy of conventional 2D video for quantifying upper limb kinematics in repetitive motion occupational tasks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Hsiung; Azari, David P; Hu, Yu Hen; Lindstrom, Mary J; Thelen, Darryl; Yen, Thomas Y; Radwin, Robert G

    2015-01-01

    Marker-less 2D video tracking was studied as a practical means to measure upper limb kinematics for ergonomics evaluations. Hand activity level (HAL) can be estimated from speed and duty cycle. Accuracy was measured using a cross-correlation template-matching algorithm for tracking a region of interest on the upper extremities. Ten participants performed a paced load transfer task while varying HAL (2, 4, and 5) and load (2.2 N, 8.9 N and 17.8 N). Speed and acceleration measured from 2D video were compared against ground truth measurements using 3D infrared motion capture. The median absolute difference between 2D video and 3D motion capture was 86.5 mm/s for speed, and 591 mm/s(2) for acceleration, and less than 93 mm/s for speed and 656 mm/s(2) for acceleration when camera pan and tilt were within ± 30 degrees. Single-camera 2D video had sufficient accuracy (< 100 mm/s) for evaluating HAL. Practitioner Summary: This study demonstrated that 2D video tracking had sufficient accuracy to measure HAL for ascertaining the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value(®) for repetitive motion when the camera is located within ± 30 degrees off the plane of motion when compared against 3D motion capture for a simulated repetitive motion task.

  5. The Accuracy of Conventional 2D Video for Quantifying Upper Limb Kinematics in Repetitive Motion Occupational Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chia-Hsiung; Azari, David; Hu, Yu Hen; Lindstrom, Mary J.; Thelen, Darryl; Yen, Thomas Y.; Radwin, Robert G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Marker-less 2D video tracking was studied as a practical means to measure upper limb kinematics for ergonomics evaluations. Background Hand activity level (HAL) can be estimated from speed and duty cycle. Accuracy was measured using a cross correlation template-matching algorithm for tracking a region of interest on the upper extremities. Methods Ten participants performed a paced load transfer task while varying HAL (2, 4, and 5) and load (2.2 N, 8.9 N and 17.8 N). Speed and acceleration measured from 2D video were compared against ground truth measurements using 3D infrared motion capture. Results The median absolute difference between 2D video and 3D motion capture was 86.5 mm/s for speed, and 591 mm/s2 for acceleration, and less than 93 mm/s for speed and 656 mm/s2 for acceleration when camera pan and tilt were within ±30 degrees. Conclusion Single-camera 2D video had sufficient accuracy (< 100 mm/s) for evaluating HAL. Practitioner Summary This study demonstrated that 2D video tracking had sufficient accuracy to measure HAL for ascertaining the American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists Threshold Limit Value® for repetitive motion when the camera is located within ±30 degrees off the plane of motion when compared against 3D motion capture for a simulated repetitive motion task. PMID:25978764

  6. High Accuracy Decoding of Dynamical Motion from a Large Retinal Population.

    PubMed

    Marre, Olivier; Botella-Soler, Vicente; Simmons, Kristina D; Mora, Thierry; Tkačik, Gašper; Berry, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    Motion tracking is a challenge the visual system has to solve by reading out the retinal population. It is still unclear how the information from different neurons can be combined together to estimate the position of an object. Here we recorded a large population of ganglion cells in a dense patch of salamander and guinea pig retinas while displaying a bar moving diffusively. We show that the bar's position can be reconstructed from retinal activity with a precision in the hyperacuity regime using a linear decoder acting on 100+ cells. We then took advantage of this unprecedented precision to explore the spatial structure of the retina's population code. The classical view would have suggested that the firing rates of the cells form a moving hill of activity tracking the bar's position. Instead, we found that most ganglion cells in the salamander fired sparsely and idiosyncratically, so that their neural image did not track the bar. Furthermore, ganglion cell activity spanned an area much larger than predicted by their receptive fields, with cells coding for motion far in their surround. As a result, population redundancy was high, and we could find multiple, disjoint subsets of neurons that encoded the trajectory with high precision. This organization allows for diverse collections of ganglion cells to represent high-accuracy motion information in a form easily read out by downstream neural circuits. PMID:26132103

  7. Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images using tag motion constraints and multi-level b-splines interpolation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Meng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Jie; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Jin, Lianghai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (TCMR) images is of great significance in clinical diagnosis and the treatment of heart disease. Currently, the harmonic phase analysis method (HARP) and the local sine-wave modeling method (SinMod) have been proven as two state-of-the-art motion estimation methods for TCMR images, since they can directly obtain the inter-frame motion displacement vector field (MDVF) with high accuracy and fast speed. By comparison, SinMod has better performance over HARP in terms of displacement detection, noise and artifacts reduction. However, the SinMod method has some drawbacks: 1) it is unable to estimate local displacements larger than half of the tag spacing; 2) it has observable errors in tracking of tag motion; and 3) the estimated MDVF usually has large local errors. To overcome these problems, we present a novel motion estimation method in this study. The proposed method tracks the motion of tags and then estimates the dense MDVF by using the interpolation. In this new method, a parameter estimation procedure for global motion is applied to match tag intersections between different frames, ensuring specific kinds of large displacements being correctly estimated. In addition, a strategy of tag motion constraints is applied to eliminate most of errors produced by inter-frame tracking of tags and the multi-level b-splines approximation algorithm is utilized, so as to enhance the local continuity and accuracy of the final MDVF. In the estimation of the motion displacement, our proposed method can obtain a more accurate MDVF compared with the SinMod method and our method can overcome the drawbacks of the SinMod method. However, the motion estimation accuracy of our method depends on the accuracy of tag lines detection and our method has a higher time complexity.

  8. Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance images using tag motion constraints and multi-level b-splines interpolation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Yan, Meng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Jie; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Jin, Lianghai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    Myocardial motion estimation of tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (TCMR) images is of great significance in clinical diagnosis and the treatment of heart disease. Currently, the harmonic phase analysis method (HARP) and the local sine-wave modeling method (SinMod) have been proven as two state-of-the-art motion estimation methods for TCMR images, since they can directly obtain the inter-frame motion displacement vector field (MDVF) with high accuracy and fast speed. By comparison, SinMod has better performance over HARP in terms of displacement detection, noise and artifacts reduction. However, the SinMod method has some drawbacks: 1) it is unable to estimate local displacements larger than half of the tag spacing; 2) it has observable errors in tracking of tag motion; and 3) the estimated MDVF usually has large local errors. To overcome these problems, we present a novel motion estimation method in this study. The proposed method tracks the motion of tags and then estimates the dense MDVF by using the interpolation. In this new method, a parameter estimation procedure for global motion is applied to match tag intersections between different frames, ensuring specific kinds of large displacements being correctly estimated. In addition, a strategy of tag motion constraints is applied to eliminate most of errors produced by inter-frame tracking of tags and the multi-level b-splines approximation algorithm is utilized, so as to enhance the local continuity and accuracy of the final MDVF. In the estimation of the motion displacement, our proposed method can obtain a more accurate MDVF compared with the SinMod method and our method can overcome the drawbacks of the SinMod method. However, the motion estimation accuracy of our method depends on the accuracy of tag lines detection and our method has a higher time complexity. PMID:26712656

  9. Increasing accuracy in the assessment of motion sickness: A construct methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stout, Cynthia S.; Cowings, Patricia S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose is to introduce a new methodology that should improve the accuracy of the assessment of motion sickness. This construct methodology utilizes both subjective reports of motion sickness and objective measures of physiological correlates to assess motion sickness. Current techniques and methods used in the framework of a construct methodology are inadequate. Current assessment techniques for diagnosing motion sickness and space motion sickness are reviewed, and attention is called to the problems with the current methods. Further, principles of psychophysiology that when applied will probably resolve some of these problems are described in detail.

  10. Estimating Software-Development Costs With Greater Accuracy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Dan; Hihn, Jairus; Lum, Karen

    2008-01-01

    COCOMOST is a computer program for use in estimating software development costs. The goal in the development of COCOMOST was to increase estimation accuracy in three ways: (1) develop a set of sensitivity software tools that return not only estimates of costs but also the estimation error; (2) using the sensitivity software tools, precisely define the quantities of data needed to adequately tune cost estimation models; and (3) build a repository of software-cost-estimation information that NASA managers can retrieve to improve the estimates of costs of developing software for their project. COCOMOST implements a methodology, called '2cee', in which a unique combination of well-known pre-existing data-mining and software-development- effort-estimation techniques are used to increase the accuracy of estimates. COCOMOST utilizes multiple models to analyze historical data pertaining to software-development projects and performs an exhaustive data-mining search over the space of model parameters to improve the performances of effort-estimation models. Thus, it is possible to both calibrate and generate estimates at the same time. COCOMOST is written in the C language for execution in the UNIX operating system.

  11. Factors affecting the accuracy of chest compression depth estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jung Hee; Cha, Won Chul; Chae, Minjung Kathy; Park, Hang A; Hwang, Sung Yeon; Jin, Sang Chan; Lee, Tae Rim; Shin, Tae Gun; Sim, Min Seob; Jo, Ik Joon; Song, Keun Jeong; Rhee, Joong Eui; Jeong, Yeon Kwon

    2014-01-01

    Objective We aimed to estimate the accuracy of visual estimation of chest compression depth and identify potential factors affecting accuracy. Methods This simulation study used a basic life support mannequin, the Ambu man. We recorded chest compression with 7 different depths from 1 to 7 cm. Each video clip was recorded for a cycle of compression. Three different viewpoints were used to record the video. After filming, 25 clips were randomly selected. Health care providers in an emergency department were asked to estimate the depth of compressions while watching the selected video clips. Examiner determinants such as experience and cardiopulmonary resuscitation training and environment determinants such as the location of the camera (examiner) were collected and analyzed. An estimated depth was considered correct if it was consistent with the one recorded. A multivariate analysis predicting the accuracy of compression depth estimation was performed. Results Overall, 103 subjects were enrolled in the study; 42 (40.8%) were physicians, 56 (54.4%) nurses, and 5 (4.8%) emergency medical technicians. The mean accuracy was 0.89 (standard deviation, 0.76). Among examiner determinants, only subjects’ occupation and clinical experience showed significant association with outcome (P=0.03 and P=0.08, respectively). All environmental determinants showed significant association with the outcome (all P<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that accuracy rate was significantly associated with occupation, camera position, and compression depth. Conclusions The accuracy rate of chest compression depth estimation was 0.89 and was significantly related with examiner’s occupation, camera view position, and compression depth.

  12. Testing the Accuracy of a Projectile Motion Apparatus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henderson, Bret; Martell, Eric

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to predict where a ball would land given initial velocity, angular velocity, and atmospheric conditions. A spinning spherical object flying through air is affected by gravity, quadratic drag forces, and the Magnus force. Mathematica was used to numerically solve predictions for the equations of motion. These predictions were compared with experimental data gathered by launching tennis balls, baseballs, and/or soccer balls from a machine we designed to propel the balls with a pre-determined initial velocity and initial angular velocity.

  13. Colored noise effects on batch attitude accuracy estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bilanow, Stephen

    1991-01-01

    The effects of colored noise on the accuracy of batch least squares parameter estimates with applications to attitude determination cases are investigated. The standard approaches used for estimating the accuracy of a computed attitude commonly assume uncorrelated (white) measurement noise, while in actual flight experience measurement noise often contains significant time correlations and thus is colored. For example, horizon scanner measurements from low Earth orbit were observed to show correlations over many minutes in response to large scale atmospheric phenomena. A general approach to the analysis of the effects of colored noise is investigated, and interpretation of the resulting equations provides insight into the effects of any particular noise color and the worst case noise coloring for any particular parameter estimate. It is shown that for certain cases, the effects of relatively short term correlations can be accommodated by a simple correction factor. The errors in the predicted accuracy assuming white noise and the reduced accuracy due to the suboptimal nature of estimators that do not take into account the noise color characteristics are discussed. The appearance of a variety of sample noise color characteristics are demonstrated through simulation, and their effects are discussed for sample estimation cases. Based on the analysis, options for dealing with the effects of colored noise are discussed.

  14. Pose estimation for one-dimensional object with general motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinbo; Song, Ge; Zhang, Xiaohu

    2014-11-01

    Our primary interest is in real-time one-dimensional object's pose estimation. In this paper, a method to estimate general motion one-dimensional object's pose, that is, the position and attitude parameters, using a single camera is proposed. Centroid-movement is necessarily continuous and orderly in temporal space, which means it follows at least approximately certain motion law in a short period of time. Therefore, the centroid trajectory in camera frame can be described as a combination of temporal polynomials. Two endpoints on one-dimensional object, A and B, at each time are projected on the corresponding image plane. With the relationship between A, B and centroid C, we can obtain a linear equation system related to the temporal polynomials' coefficients, in which the camera has been calibrated and the image coordinates of A and B are known. Then in the cases that object moves continuous in natural temporal space within the view of a stationary camera, the position of endpoints on the one-dimensional object can be located and also the attitude can be estimated using two end points. Moreover the position of any other point aligned on one-dimensional object can also be solved. Scene information is not needed in the proposed method. If the distance between the endpoints is not known, a scale factor between the object's real positions and the estimated results will exist. In order to improve the algorithm's performance from accuracy and robustness, we derive a pain of linear and optimal algorithms. Simulations' and experiments' results show that the method is valid and robust with respect to various Gaussian noise levels. The paper's work contributes to making self-calibration algorithms using one-dimensional objects applicable to practice. Furthermore, the method can also be used to estimate the pose and shape parameters of parallelogram, prism or cylinder objects.

  15. A Review of the Accuracy and Utility of Motion Sensors to Measure Physical Activity of Frail, Older Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Ruth; Brady, Noeleen M; Dillon, Christina; Horgan, N Frances; Timmons, Suzanne

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this review was to examine the utility and accuracy of commercially available motion sensors to measure step-count and time spent upright in frail older hospitalized patients. A database search (CINAHL and PubMed, 2004-2014) and a further hand search of papers' references yielded 24 validation studies meeting the inclusion criteria. Fifteen motion sensors (eight pedometers, six accelerometers, and one sensor systems) have been tested in older adults. Only three have been tested in hospital patients, two of which detected postures and postural changes accurately, but none estimated step-count accurately. Only one motion sensor remained accurate at speeds typical of frail older hospitalized patients, but it has yet to be tested in this cohort. Time spent upright can be accurately measured in the hospital, but further validation studies are required to determine which, if any, motion sensor can accurately measure step-count. PMID:26583827

  16. Flies and humans share a motion estimation strategy that exploits natural scene statistics

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Damon A.; Fitzgerald, James E.; Ales, Justin M.; Gohl, Daryl M.; Silies, Marion A.; Norcia, Anthony M.; Clandinin, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    Sighted animals extract motion information from visual scenes by processing spatiotemporal patterns of light falling on the retina. The dominant models for motion estimation exploit intensity correlations only between pairs of points in space and time. Moving natural scenes, however, contain more complex correlations. Here we show that fly and human visual systems encode the combined direction and contrast polarity of moving edges using triple correlations that enhance motion estimation in natural environments. Both species extract triple correlations with neural substrates tuned for light or dark edges, and sensitivity to specific triple correlations is retained even as light and dark edge motion signals are combined. Thus, both species separately process light and dark image contrasts to capture motion signatures that can improve estimation accuracy. This striking convergence argues that statistical structures in natural scenes have profoundly affected visual processing, driving a common computational strategy over 500 million years of evolution. PMID:24390225

  17. Effects of Accuracy Feedback on Fractal Characteristics of Time Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Nikita A.; Wallot, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    The current experiment investigated the effect of visual accuracy feedback on the structure of variability of time interval estimates in the continuation tapping paradigm. Participants were asked to repeatedly estimate a 1-s interval for a prolonged period of time by tapping their index finger. In some conditions, participants received accuracy feedback after every estimate, whereas in other conditions, no feedback was given. Also, the likelihood of receiving visual feedback was manipulated by adjusting the tolerance band around the 1-s target interval so that feedback was displayed only if the temporal estimate deviated from the target interval by more than 50, 100, or 200 ms respectively. We analyzed the structure of variability of the inter-tap intervals with fractal and multifractal methods that allow for a quantification of complex long-range correlation patterns in the timing performance. Our results indicate that feedback changes the long-range correlation structure of time estimates: Increased amounts of feedback lead to a decrease in fractal long-range correlations, as well to a decrease in the magnitude of local fluctuations in the performance. The multifractal characteristics of the time estimates were not impacted by the presence of accuracy feedback. Nevertheless, most of the data sets show significant multifractal signatures. We interpret these findings as showing that feedback acts to constrain and possibly reorganize timing performance. Implications for mechanistic and complex systems-based theories of timing behavior are discussed. PMID:22046149

  18. Analytic signal phase-based myocardial motion estimation in tagged MRI sequences by a bilinear model and motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Basarab, Adrian; Girard, Patrick R; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; Delachartre, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Different mathematical tools, such as multidimensional analytic signals, allow for the calculation of 2D spatial phases of real-value images. The motion estimation method proposed in this paper is based on two spatial phases of the 2D analytic signal applied to cardiac sequences. By combining the information of these phases issued from analytic signals of two successive frames, we propose an analytical estimator for 2D local displacements. To improve the accuracy of the motion estimation, a local bilinear deformation model is used within an iterative estimation scheme. The main advantages of our method are: (1) The phase-based method allows the displacement to be estimated with subpixel accuracy and is robust to image intensity variation in time; (2) Preliminary filtering is not required due to the bilinear model. The proposed algorithm, integrating phase-based optical flow motion estimation and the combination of global motion compensation with local bilinear transform, allows spatio-temporal cardiac motion analysis, e.g. strain and dense trajectory estimation over the cardiac cycle. Results from 7 realistic simulated tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences show that our method is more accurate compared with state-of-the-art method for cardiac motion analysis and with another differential approach from the literature. The motion estimation errors (end point error) of the proposed method are reduced by about 33% compared with that of the two methods. In our work, the frame-to-frame displacements are further accumulated in time, to allow for the calculation of myocardial Lagrangian cardiac strains and point trajectories. Indeed, from the estimated trajectories in time on 11 in vivo data sets (9 patients and 2 healthy volunteers), the shape of myocardial point trajectories belonging to pathological regions are clearly reduced in magnitude compared with the ones from normal regions. Myocardial point trajectories, estimated from our phase-based analytic

  19. Analytic signal phase-based myocardial motion estimation in tagged MRI sequences by a bilinear model and motion compensation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Basarab, Adrian; Girard, Patrick R; Croisille, Pierre; Clarysse, Patrick; Delachartre, Philippe

    2015-08-01

    Different mathematical tools, such as multidimensional analytic signals, allow for the calculation of 2D spatial phases of real-value images. The motion estimation method proposed in this paper is based on two spatial phases of the 2D analytic signal applied to cardiac sequences. By combining the information of these phases issued from analytic signals of two successive frames, we propose an analytical estimator for 2D local displacements. To improve the accuracy of the motion estimation, a local bilinear deformation model is used within an iterative estimation scheme. The main advantages of our method are: (1) The phase-based method allows the displacement to be estimated with subpixel accuracy and is robust to image intensity variation in time; (2) Preliminary filtering is not required due to the bilinear model. The proposed algorithm, integrating phase-based optical flow motion estimation and the combination of global motion compensation with local bilinear transform, allows spatio-temporal cardiac motion analysis, e.g. strain and dense trajectory estimation over the cardiac cycle. Results from 7 realistic simulated tagged magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences show that our method is more accurate compared with state-of-the-art method for cardiac motion analysis and with another differential approach from the literature. The motion estimation errors (end point error) of the proposed method are reduced by about 33% compared with that of the two methods. In our work, the frame-to-frame displacements are further accumulated in time, to allow for the calculation of myocardial Lagrangian cardiac strains and point trajectories. Indeed, from the estimated trajectories in time on 11 in vivo data sets (9 patients and 2 healthy volunteers), the shape of myocardial point trajectories belonging to pathological regions are clearly reduced in magnitude compared with the ones from normal regions. Myocardial point trajectories, estimated from our phase-based analytic

  20. Improving Estimation Accuracy of Aggregate Queries on Data Cubes

    SciTech Connect

    Pourabbas, Elaheh; Shoshani, Arie

    2008-08-15

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of estimation of a target database from summary databases derived from a base data cube. We show that such estimates can be derived by choosing a primary database which uses a proxy database to estimate the results. This technique is common in statistics, but an important issue we are addressing is the accuracy of these estimates. Specifically, given multiple primary and multiple proxy databases, that share the same summary measure, the problem is how to select the primary and proxy databases that will generate the most accurate target database estimation possible. We propose an algorithmic approach for determining the steps to select or compute the source databases from multiple summary databases, which makes use of the principles of information entropy. We show that the source databases with the largest number of cells in common provide the more accurate estimates. We prove that this is consistent with maximizing the entropy. We provide some experimental results on the accuracy of the target database estimation in order to verify our results.

  1. Can we estimate the accuracy of ADME-Tox predictions?

    PubMed

    Tetko, Igor V; Bruneau, Pierre; Mewes, Hans-Werner; Rohrer, Douglas C; Poda, Gennadiy I

    2006-08-01

    There have recently been developments in the methods used to access the accuracy of the prediction and applicability domain of absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity models, and also in the methods used to predict the physicochemical properties of compounds in the early stages of drug development. The methods are classified into two main groups: those based on the analysis of similarity of molecules, and those based on the analysis of calculated properties. An analysis of octanol-water distribution coefficients is used to exemplify the consistency of estimated and calculated accuracy of the ALOGPS program (http://www.vcclab.org) to predict in-house and publicly available datasets.

  2. Adaptive quarter-pel motion estimation and motion vector coding algorithm for the H.264/AVC standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Seung-Won; Park, Chun-Su; Ha, Le Thanh; Ko, Sung-Jea

    2009-11-01

    We present an adaptive quarter-pel (Qpel) motion estimation (ME) method for H.264/AVC. Instead of applying Qpel ME to all macroblocks (MBs), the proposed method selectively performs Qpel ME in an MB level. In order to reduce the bit rate, we also propose a motion vector (MV) encoding technique that adaptively selects a different variable length coding (VLC) table according to the accuracy of the MV. Experimental results show that the proposed method can achieve about 3% average bit rate reduction.

  3. Interferometric estimation of ice sheet motion and topography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joughlin, Ian; Kwok, Ron; Fahnestock, Mark; Winebrenner, Dale; Tulaczyk, Slawek; Gogenini, Prasad

    1997-01-01

    With ERS-1/2 satellite radar interferometry, it is possible to make measurements of glacier motion with high accuracy and fine spatial resolution. Interferometric techniques were applied to map velocity and topography for several outlet glaciers in Greenland. For the Humboldt and Petermann glaciers, data from several adjacent tracks were combined to make a wide-area map that includes the enhanced flow regions of both glaciers. The discharge flux of the Petermann glacier upstream of the grounding line was estimated, thereby establishing the potential use of ERS-1/2 interferometric data for monitoring ice-sheet discharge. Interferograms collected along a single track are sensitive to only one component of motion. By utilizing data from ascending and descending passes and by making a surface-parallel flow assumption, it is possible to measure the full three-dimensional vector flow field. The application of this technique for an area on the Ryder glacier is demonstrated. Finally, ERS-1/2 interferograms were used to observe a mini-surge on the Ryder glacier that occurred in autumn of 1995.

  4. Simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) for 4D cone-beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing; Gu, Xuejun

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: Image reconstruction and motion model estimation in four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) are conventionally handled as two sequential steps. Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of 4D-CBCT is degraded by view aliasing artifacts, and the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling is decreased by the inferior 4D-CBCT. The objective of this work is to enhance both the image quality of 4D-CBCT and the accuracy of motion model estimation with a novel strategy enabling simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).Methods: The proposed SMEIR algorithm consists of two alternating steps: (1) model-based iterative image reconstruction to obtain a motion-compensated primary CBCT (m-pCBCT) and (2) motion model estimation to obtain an optimal set of deformation vector fields (DVFs) between the m-pCBCT and other 4D-CBCT phases. The motion-compensated image reconstruction is based on the simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART) coupled with total variation minimization. During the forward- and backprojection of SART, measured projections from an entire set of 4D-CBCT are used for reconstruction of the m-pCBCT by utilizing the updated DVF. The DVF is estimated by matching the forward projection of the deformed m-pCBCT and measured projections of other phases of 4D-CBCT. The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is quantitatively evaluated on a 4D NCAT phantom. The quality of reconstructed 4D images and the accuracy of tumor motion trajectory are assessed by comparing with those resulting from conventional sequential 4D-CBCT reconstructions (FDK and total variation minimization) and motion estimation (demons algorithm). The performance of the SMEIR algorithm is further evaluated by reconstructing a lung cancer patient 4D-CBCT.Results: Image quality of 4D-CBCT is greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm in both phantom and patient studies. When all projections are used to reconstruct a 3D-CBCT by FDK, motion

  5. The Accuracy of Broselow Tape Weight Estimate among Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    AlGarni, Abdullaziz; AlGamdi, Fasial; Jawish, Mona; Wani, Tariq Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of the Broselow Tape (BT) versions 2007 and 2011 in estimating weight among pediatric population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Fahad Medical City and six schools across Riyadh province on 1–143-month-old children. BT 2007 and 2011 estimated weights were recorded. Both tapes via the child's height produce an estimated weight, which was compared with the actual weight. Results. A total of 3537 children were recruited. The height (cm) of the subjects was 97.7 ± 24.1 and the actual weight (kg) was 16.07 ± 8.9, whereas the estimated weight determined by BT 2007 was 15.87 ± 7.56 and by BT 2011 was 16.38 ± 7.95. Across all the five age groups, correlation between actual weight and BT 2007 ranged between 0.702 and 0.788, while correlation between actual weight and BT 2011 ranged between 0.698 and 0.788. Correlation between BT 2007 and BT 2011 across all the five age groups ranged from 0.979 to 0.989. Accuracy of both the tape versions was adversely affected when age was >95 months and body weight was >26 kilograms. Conclusions. Our study showed that BT 2007 and 2011 provided accurate estimation of the body weight based on measured body height. However, 2011 version provided more precise estimate for weight. PMID:27668258

  6. The Accuracy of Broselow Tape Weight Estimate among Pediatric Population

    PubMed Central

    AlGarni, Abdullaziz; AlGamdi, Fasial; Jawish, Mona; Wani, Tariq Ahmad

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine the accuracy of the Broselow Tape (BT) versions 2007 and 2011 in estimating weight among pediatric population. Methods. A cross-sectional study was conducted at King Fahad Medical City and six schools across Riyadh province on 1–143-month-old children. BT 2007 and 2011 estimated weights were recorded. Both tapes via the child's height produce an estimated weight, which was compared with the actual weight. Results. A total of 3537 children were recruited. The height (cm) of the subjects was 97.7 ± 24.1 and the actual weight (kg) was 16.07 ± 8.9, whereas the estimated weight determined by BT 2007 was 15.87 ± 7.56 and by BT 2011 was 16.38 ± 7.95. Across all the five age groups, correlation between actual weight and BT 2007 ranged between 0.702 and 0.788, while correlation between actual weight and BT 2011 ranged between 0.698 and 0.788. Correlation between BT 2007 and BT 2011 across all the five age groups ranged from 0.979 to 0.989. Accuracy of both the tape versions was adversely affected when age was >95 months and body weight was >26 kilograms. Conclusions. Our study showed that BT 2007 and 2011 provided accurate estimation of the body weight based on measured body height. However, 2011 version provided more precise estimate for weight.

  7. Curvature and torsion estimation for coronary-artery motion analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina, Ruben; Wahle, Andreas; Olszewski, Mark E.; Sonka, Milan

    2004-04-01

    The dynamics of curvature and torsion are important for the geometric description of arteries and for the distribution of accumulating plaque. In this research, two methods for estimating curvature and torsion are analyzed with respect to their accuracy. The first method is based on estimating the curvature and torsion of the artery centerline using the Fourier transform. Since the centerline always represents an open curve, extensions ensuring a minimal spectral energy are added on both ends to obtain a closed curve suitable for Fourier analysis. The second method has been previously used for analyzing the motion of coronary arteries and is based on the least squares fitting of a cubic polynomial to the centerline of the artery. Validation is performed using two mathematical, time-varying phantoms as well as 4-D (3-D plus time) in-vivo data of coronary arteries reconstructed by fusion of biplane angiograms and intravascular ultrasound images. Results show that both methods are accurate for estimating curvature and torsion, and that both methods have average errors below 2.15%.

  8. Complexity scalable motion estimation for H.264/AVC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Changsung; Xin, Jun; Vetro, Anthony; Kuo, C.-C. Jay

    2006-01-01

    A new complexity-scalable framework for motion estimation is proposed to efficiently reduce the motioncomplexity of encoding process, with focus on long term memory motion-compensated prediction of the H.264 video coding standard in this work. The objective is to provide a complexity scalable scheme for the given motion estimation algorithm such that it reduces the encoding complexity to the desired level with insignificant penalty in rate-distortion performance. In principle, the proposed algorithm adaptively allocates available motion-complexity budget to macroblock based on estimated impact towards overall rate-distortion (RD) performance subject to the given encoding time limit. To estimate macroblock-wise tradeoff between RD coding gain (J) and motion-complexity (C), the correlation of J-C curve between current macroblock and collocated macroblock in previous frame is exploited to predict initial motion-complexity budget of current macroblock. The initial budget is adaptively assigned to each blocksize and block-partition successively and motion-complexity budget is updated at the end of every encoding unit for remaining ones. Based on experiment, proposed J-C slope based allocation is better than uniform motion-complexity allocation scheme in terms of RDC tradeoff. It is demonstrated by experimental results that the proposed algorithm can reduce the H.264 motion estimation complexity to the desired level with little degradation in the rate distortion performance.

  9. Estimating nonrigid motion from inconsistent intensity with robust shape features

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenyang; Ruan, Dan

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To develop a nonrigid motion estimation method that is robust to heterogeneous intensity inconsistencies amongst the image pairs or image sequence. Methods: Intensity and contrast variations, as in dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, present a considerable challenge to registration methods based on general discrepancy metrics. In this study, the authors propose and validate a novel method that is robust to such variations by utilizing shape features. The geometry of interest (GOI) is represented with a flexible zero level set, segmented via well-behaved regularized optimization. The optimization energy drives the zero level set to high image gradient regions, and regularizes it with area and curvature priors. The resulting shape exhibits high consistency even in the presence of intensity or contrast variations. Subsequently, a multiscale nonrigid registration is performed to seek a regular deformation field that minimizes shape discrepancy in the vicinity of GOIs. Results: To establish the working principle, realistic 2D and 3D images were subject to simulated nonrigid motion and synthetic intensity variations, so as to enable quantitative evaluation of registration performance. The proposed method was benchmarked against three alternative registration approaches, specifically, optical flow, B-spline based mutual information, and multimodality demons. When intensity consistency was satisfied, all methods had comparable registration accuracy for the GOIs. When intensities among registration pairs were inconsistent, however, the proposed method yielded pronounced improvement in registration accuracy, with an approximate fivefold reduction in mean absolute error (MAE = 2.25 mm, SD = 0.98 mm), compared to optical flow (MAE = 9.23 mm, SD = 5.36 mm), B-spline based mutual information (MAE = 9.57 mm, SD = 8.74 mm) and mutimodality demons (MAE = 10.07 mm, SD = 4.03 mm). Applying the proposed method on a real MR image sequence also provided

  10. Effectiveness of external respiratory surrogates for in vivo liver motion estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Kai-Hsiang; Ho, Ming-Chih; Yeh, Chi-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Chien; Lian, Feng-Li; Lin, Win-Li; Yen, Jia-Yush; Chen, Yung-Yaw

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: Due to low frame rate of MRI and high radiation damage from fluoroscopy and CT, liver motion estimation using external respiratory surrogate signals seems to be a better approach to track liver motion in real-time for liver tumor treatments in radiotherapy and thermotherapy. This work proposes a liver motion estimation method based on external respiratory surrogate signals. Animal experiments are also conducted to investigate related issues, such as the sensor arrangement, multisensor fusion, and the effective time period. Methods: Liver motion and abdominal motion are both induced by respiration and are proved to be highly correlated. Contrary to the difficult direct measurement of the liver motion, the abdominal motion can be easily accessed. Based on this idea, our study is split into the model-fitting stage and the motion estimation stage. In the first stage, the correlation between the surrogates and the liver motion is studied and established via linear regression method. In the second stage, the liver motion is estimated by the surrogate signals with the correlation model. Animal experiments on cases of single surrogate signal, multisurrogate signals, and long-term surrogate signals are conducted and discussed to verify the practical use of this approach. Results: The results show that the best single sensor location is at the middle of the upper abdomen, while multisurrogate models are generally better than the single ones. The estimation error is reduced from 0.6 mm for the single surrogate models to 0.4 mm for the multisurrogate models. The long-term validity of the estimation models is quite satisfactory within the period of 10 min with the estimation error less than 1.4 mm. Conclusions: External respiratory surrogate signals from the abdomen motion produces good performance for liver motion estimation in real-time. Multisurrogate signals enhance estimation accuracy, and the estimation model can maintain its accuracy for at least 10 min. This

  11. Analysis of the Accuracy and Robustness of the Leap Motion Controller

    PubMed Central

    Weichert, Frank; Bachmann, Daniel; Rudak, Bartholomäus; Fisseler, Denis

    2013-01-01

    The Leap Motion Controller is a new device for hand gesture controlled user interfaces with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. However, up to this point its capabilities in real environments have not been analyzed. Therefore, this paper presents a first study of a Leap Motion Controller. The main focus of attention is on the evaluation of the accuracy and repeatability. For an appropriate evaluation, a novel experimental setup was developed making use of an industrial robot with a reference pen allowing a position accuracy of 0.2 mm. Thereby, a deviation between a desired 3D position and the average measured positions below 0.2 mm has been obtained for static setups and of 1.2 mm for dynamic setups. Using the conclusion of this analysis can improve the development of applications for the Leap Motion controller in the field of Human-Computer Interaction. PMID:23673678

  12. Analysis of the accuracy and robustness of the leap motion controller.

    PubMed

    Weichert, Frank; Bachmann, Daniel; Rudak, Bartholomäus; Fisseler, Denis

    2013-05-14

    The Leap Motion Controller is a new device for hand gesture controlled user interfaces with declared sub-millimeter accuracy. However, up to this point its capabilities in real environments have not been analyzed. Therefore, this paper presents a first study of a Leap Motion Controller. The main focus of attention is on the evaluation of the accuracy and repeatability. For an appropriate evaluation, a novel experimental setup was developed making use of an industrial robot with a reference pen allowing a position accuracy of 0.2 mm. Thereby, a deviation between a desired 3D position and the average measured positions below 0.2 mm has been obtained for static setups and of 1.2 mm for dynamic setups. Using the conclusion of this analysis can improve the development of applications for the Leap Motion controller in the field of Human-Computer Interaction.

  13. The Effect of Transponder Motion on the Accuracy of the Calypso Electromagnetic Localization System

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Martin J. Eidens, Richard; Vertatschitsch, Edward; Wright, J. Nelson

    2008-09-01

    Purpose: To determine position and velocity-dependent effects in the overall accuracy of the Calypso Electromagnetic localization system, under conditions that emulate transponder motion during normal free breathing. Methods and Materials: Three localization transponders were mounted on a remote-controlled turntable that could move the transponders along a circular trajectory at speeds up to 3 cm/s. A stationary calibration established the coordinates of multiple points on each transponder's circular path. Position measurements taken while the transponders were in motion at a constant speed were then compared with the stationary coordinates. Results: No statistically significant changes in the transponder positions in (x,y,z) were detected when the transponders were in motion. Conclusions: The accuracy of the localization system is unaffected by transponder motion.

  14. Wireless capsule endoscopy video reduction based on camera motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Pan, Ning; Lu, Heng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Qian; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a novel technology aiming for investigating the diseases and abnormalities in small intestine. The major drawback of WCE examination is that it takes a long time to examine the whole WCE video. In this paper, we present a new reduction scheme for WCE video to reduce the examination time. To achieve this task, a WCE video motion model is proposed. Under this motion model, the WCE imaging motion is estimated in two stages (the coarse level and the fine level). In the coarse level, the WCE camera motion is estimated with a combination of Bee Algorithm and Mutual Information. In the fine level, the local gastrointestinal tract motion is estimated with SIFT flow. Based on the result of WCE imaging motion estimation, the reduction scheme preserves key images in WCE video with scene changes. From experimental results, we notice that the proposed motion model is suitable for the motion estimation in successive WCE images. Through the comparison with APRS and FCM-NMF scheme, our scheme can produce an acceptable reduction sequence for browsing and examination. PMID:22868484

  15. Wireless capsule endoscopy video reduction based on camera motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Pan, Ning; Lu, Heng; Song, Enmin; Wang, Qian; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2013-04-01

    Wireless capsule endoscopy (WCE) is a novel technology aiming for investigating the diseases and abnormalities in small intestine. The major drawback of WCE examination is that it takes a long time to examine the whole WCE video. In this paper, we present a new reduction scheme for WCE video to reduce the examination time. To achieve this task, a WCE video motion model is proposed. Under this motion model, the WCE imaging motion is estimated in two stages (the coarse level and the fine level). In the coarse level, the WCE camera motion is estimated with a combination of Bee Algorithm and Mutual Information. In the fine level, the local gastrointestinal tract motion is estimated with SIFT flow. Based on the result of WCE imaging motion estimation, the reduction scheme preserves key images in WCE video with scene changes. From experimental results, we notice that the proposed motion model is suitable for the motion estimation in successive WCE images. Through the comparison with APRS and FCM-NMF scheme, our scheme can produce an acceptable reduction sequence for browsing and examination.

  16. Accuracy in parameter estimation in cluster randomized designs.

    PubMed

    Pornprasertmanit, Sunthud; Schneider, W Joel

    2014-09-01

    When planning to conduct a study, not only is it important to select a sample size that will ensure adequate statistical power, often it is important to select a sample size that results in accurate effect size estimates. In cluster-randomized designs (CRD), such planning presents special challenges. In CRD studies, instead of assigning individual objects to treatment conditions, objects are grouped in clusters, and these clusters are then assigned to different treatment conditions. Sample size in CRD studies is a function of 2 components: the number of clusters and the cluster size. Planning to conduct a CRD study is difficult because 2 distinct sample size combinations might be associated with similar costs but can result in dramatically different levels of statistical power and accuracy in effect size estimation. Thus, we present a method that assists researchers in finding the least expensive sample size combination that still results in adequate accuracy in effect size estimation. Alternatively, if researchers have a fixed budget, they can select the sample size combination that results in the most precise estimate of effect size. A free computer program that automates these procedures is available. PMID:25046449

  17. Introducing differential motion estimation into hybrid video coders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cagnazzo, M.; Pesquet-Popescu, B.

    2010-07-01

    Differential motion estimation produces dense motion vector fields which are far too demanding in terms of coding rate in order to be used in video coding. However, a pel-recursive technique like that introduced by Cafforio and Rocca can be modified in order to work using only the information available at the decoder side. This allows to improve the motion vectors produced in the classical predictive modes of H.264. In this paper we describe the modification needed in order to introduce a differential motion estimation method into the H.264 codec. Experimental results will validate a coding mode, opening new perspectives in using differential-based motion estimation techniques into classical hybrid codecs.

  18. Prostate intrafraction motion evaluation using kV fluoroscopy during treatment delivery: A feasibility and accuracy study

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, Justus; Wu Qiuwen

    2008-05-15

    Margin reduction for prostate radiotherapy is limited by uncertainty in prostate localization during treatment. We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of measuring prostate intrafraction motion using kV fluoroscopy performed simultaneously with radiotherapy. Three gold coils used for target localization were implanted into the patient's prostate gland before undergoing hypofractionated online image-guided step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. At each fraction, the patient was aligned using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), after which the IMRT treatment delivery and fluoroscopy were performed simultaneously. In addition, a post-treatment CBCT was acquired with the patient still on the table. To measure the intrafraction motion, we developed an algorithm to register the fluoroscopy images to a reference image derived from the post-treatment CBCT, and we estimated coil motion in three-dimensional (3D) space by combining information from registrations at different gantry angles. We also detected the MV beam turning on and off using MV scatter incident in the same fluoroscopy images, and used this information to synchronize our intrafraction evaluation with the treatment delivery. In addition, we assessed the following: the method to synchronize with treatment delivery, the dose from kV imaging, the accuracy of the localization, and the error propagated into the 3D localization from motion between fluoroscopy acquisitions. With 0.16 mAs/frame and a bowtie filter implemented, the coils could be localized with the gantry at both 0 deg. and 270 deg. with the MV beam off, and at 270 deg. with the MV beam on when multiple fluoroscopy frames were averaged. The localization in two-dimensions for phantom and patient measurements was performed with submillimeter accuracy. After backprojection into 3D the patient localization error was (-0.04{+-}0.30) mm, (0.09{+-}0.36) mm, and (0.03{+-}0.68) mm in the

  19. Prostate intrafraction motion evaluation using kV fluoroscopy during treatment delivery: A feasibility and accuracy study

    PubMed Central

    Adamson, Justus; Wu, Qiuwen

    2008-01-01

    Margin reduction for prostate radiotherapy is limited by uncertainty in prostate localization during treatment. We investigated the feasibility and accuracy of measuring prostate intrafraction motion using kV fluoroscopy performed simultaneously with radiotherapy. Three gold coils used for target localization were implanted into the patient’s prostate gland before undergoing hypofractionated online image-guided step-and-shoot intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) on an Elekta Synergy linear accelerator. At each fraction, the patient was aligned using a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT), after which the IMRT treatment delivery and fluoroscopy were performed simultaneously. In addition, a post-treatment CBCT was acquired with the patient still on the table. To measure the intrafraction motion, we developed an algorithm to register the fluoroscopy images to a reference image derived from the post-treatment CBCT, and we estimated coil motion in three-dimensional (3D) space by combining information from registrations at different gantry angles. We also detected the MV beam turning on and off using MV scatter incident in the same fluoroscopy images, and used this information to synchronize our intrafraction evaluation with the treatment delivery. In addition, we assessed the following: the method to synchronize with treatment delivery, the dose from kV imaging, the accuracy of the localization, and the error propagated into the 3D localization from motion between fluoroscopy acquisitions. With 0.16 mAs∕frame and a bowtie filter implemented, the coils could be localized with the gantry at both 0° and 270° with the MV beam off, and at 270° with the MV beam on when multiple fluoroscopy frames were averaged. The localization in two-dimensions for phantom and patient measurements was performed with submillimeter accuracy. After backprojection into 3D the patient localization error was (−0.04±0.30) mm, (0.09±0.36) mm, and (0.03±0.68) mm in the right

  20. Human joint motion estimation for electromyography (EMG)-based dynamic motion control.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qin; Hosoda, Ryo; Venture, Gentiane

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to investigate a joint motion estimation method from Electromyography (EMG) signals during dynamic movement. In most EMG-based humanoid or prosthetics control systems, EMG features were directly or indirectly used to trigger intended motions. However, both physiological and nonphysiological factors can influence EMG characteristics during dynamic movements, resulting in subject-specific, non-stationary and crosstalk problems. Particularly, when motion velocity and/or joint torque are not constrained, joint motion estimation from EMG signals are more challenging. In this paper, we propose a joint motion estimation method based on muscle activation recorded from a pair of agonist and antagonist muscles of the joint. A linear state-space model with multi input single output is proposed to map the muscle activity to joint motion. An adaptive estimation method is proposed to train the model. The estimation performance is evaluated in performing a single elbow flexion-extension movement in two subjects. All the results in two subjects at two load levels indicate the feasibility and suitability of the proposed method in joint motion estimation. The estimation root-mean-square error is within 8.3% ∼ 10.6%, which is lower than that being reported in several previous studies. Moreover, this method is able to overcome subject-specific problem and compensate non-stationary EMG properties.

  1. A Refined Algorithm On The Estimation Of Residual Motion Errors In Airborne SAR Images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Xuelian; Xiang, Maosheng; Yue, Huanyin; Guo, Huadong

    2010-10-01

    Due to the lack of accuracy in the navigation system, residual motion errors (RMEs) frequently appear in the airborne SAR image. For very high resolution SAR imaging and repeat-pass SAR interferometry, the residual motion errors must be estimated and compensated. We have proposed a new algorithm before to estimate the residual motion errors for an individual SAR image. It exploits point-like targets distributed along the azimuth direction, and not only corrects the phase, but also improves the azimuth focusing. But the required point targets are selected by hand, which is time- and labor-consuming. In addition, the algorithm is sensitive to noises. In this paper, a refined algorithm is proposed aiming at these two shortcomings. With real X-band airborne SAR data, the feasibility and accuracy of the refined algorithm are demonstrated.

  2. The Plus or Minus Game - Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-03-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in TPT (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi Questions.") For several years the authors (a college physics professor, a retired algebra teacher, and a fifth-grade teacher) have been playing a game, primarily at home to challenge each other for fun, but also in the classroom as an educational tool. We call the game "The Plus or Minus Game." The game combines estimation with the principle of precision and uncertainty in a competitive and fun way.

  3. Slipping objects in image registration: improved motion field estimation with direction-dependent regularization.

    PubMed

    Schmidt-Richberg, Alexander; Ehrhardt, Jan; Werner, Rene; Handels, Heinz

    2009-01-01

    The computation of accurate motion fields is a crucial aspect in 4D medical imaging. It is usually done using a non-linear registration without further modeling of physiological motion properties. However, a globally homogeneous smoothing (regularization) of the motion field during the registration process can contradict the characteristics of motion dynamics. This is particularly the case when two organs slip along each other which leads to discontinuities in the motion field. In this paper, we present a diffusion-based model for incorporating physiological knowledge in image registration. By decoupling normal- and tangential-directed smoothing, we are able to estimate slipping motion at the organ borders while ensuring smooth motion fields in the inside and preventing gaps to arise in the field. We evaluate our model focusing on the estimation of respiratory lung motion. By accounting for the discontinuous motion of visceral and parietal pleurae, we are able to show a significant increase of registration accuracy with respect to the target registration error (TRE).

  4. Real-time soft tissue motion estimation for lung tumors during radiotherapy delivery

    SciTech Connect

    Rottmann, Joerg; Berbeco, Ross; Keall, Paul

    2013-09-15

    Purpose: To provide real-time lung tumor motion estimation during radiotherapy treatment delivery without the need for implanted fiducial markers or additional imaging dose to the patient.Methods: 2D radiographs from the therapy beam's-eye-view (BEV) perspective are captured at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz with a frame grabber allowing direct RAM access to the image buffer. An in-house developed real-time soft tissue localization algorithm is utilized to calculate soft tissue displacement from these images in real-time. The system is tested with a Varian TX linear accelerator and an AS-1000 amorphous silicon electronic portal imaging device operating at a resolution of 512 × 384 pixels. The accuracy of the motion estimation is verified with a dynamic motion phantom. Clinical accuracy was tested on lung SBRT images acquired at 2 fps.Results: Real-time lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images without fiducial markers is successfully demonstrated. For the phantom study, a mean tracking error <1.0 mm [root mean square (rms) error of 0.3 mm] was observed. The tracking rms accuracy on BEV images from a lung SBRT patient (≈20 mm tumor motion range) is 1.0 mm.Conclusions: The authors demonstrate for the first time real-time markerless lung tumor motion estimation from BEV images alone. The described system can operate at a frame rate of 12.8 Hz and does not require prior knowledge to establish traceable landmarks for tracking on the fly. The authors show that the geometric accuracy is similar to (or better than) previously published markerless algorithms not operating in real-time.

  5. Motion-compensated frame interpolation based on multihypothesis motion estimation and texture optimization.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seong-Gyun; Lee, Chul; Kim, Chang-Su

    2013-11-01

    A novel motion-compensated frame interpolation (MCFI) algorithm to increase video temporal resolutions based on multihypothesis motion estimation and texture optimization is proposed in this paper. Initially, we form multiple motion hypotheses for each pixel by employing different motion estimation parameters, i.e., different block sizes and directions. Then, we determine the best motion hypothesis for each pixel by solving a labeling problem and optimizing the parameters. In the labeling problem, the cost function is composed of color, shape, and smoothness terms. Finally, we refine the motion hypothesis field based on the texture optimization technique and blend multiple source pixels to interpolate each pixel in the intermediate frame. Simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm provides significantly better MCFI performance than conventional algorithms.

  6. Compensation technique for the intrinsic error in ultrasound motion estimation using a speckle tracking method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taki, Hirofumi; Yamakawa, Makoto; Shiina, Tsuyoshi; Sato, Toru

    2015-07-01

    High-accuracy ultrasound motion estimation has become an essential technique in blood flow imaging, elastography, and motion imaging of the heart wall. Speckle tracking has been one of the best motion estimators; however, conventional speckle-tracking methods neglect the effect of out-of-plane motion and deformation. Our proposed method assumes that the cross-correlation between a reference signal and a comparison signal depends on the spatio-temporal distance between the two signals. The proposed method uses the decrease in the cross-correlation value in a reference frame to compensate for the intrinsic error caused by out-of-plane motion and deformation without a priori information. The root-mean-square error of the estimated lateral tissue motion velocity calculated by the proposed method ranged from 6.4 to 34% of that using a conventional speckle-tracking method. This study demonstrates the high potential of the proposed method for improving the estimation of tissue motion using an ultrasound speckle-tracking method in medical diagnosis.

  7. Estimated Accuracy of Three Common Trajectory Statistical Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kabashnikov, Vitaliy P.; Chaikovsky, Anatoli P.; Kucsera, Tom L.; Metelskaya, Natalia S.

    2011-01-01

    Three well-known trajectory statistical methods (TSMs), namely concentration field (CF), concentration weighted trajectory (CWT), and potential source contribution function (PSCF) methods were tested using known sources and artificially generated data sets to determine the ability of TSMs to reproduce spatial distribution of the sources. In the works by other authors, the accuracy of the trajectory statistical methods was estimated for particular species and at specified receptor locations. We have obtained a more general statistical estimation of the accuracy of source reconstruction and have found optimum conditions to reconstruct source distributions of atmospheric trace substances. Only virtual pollutants of the primary type were considered. In real world experiments, TSMs are intended for application to a priori unknown sources. Therefore, the accuracy of TSMs has to be tested with all possible spatial distributions of sources. An ensemble of geographical distributions of virtual sources was generated. Spearman s rank order correlation coefficient between spatial distributions of the known virtual and the reconstructed sources was taken to be a quantitative measure of the accuracy. Statistical estimates of the mean correlation coefficient and a range of the most probable values of correlation coefficients were obtained. All the TSMs that were considered here showed similar close results. The maximum of the ratio of the mean correlation to the width of the correlation interval containing the most probable correlation values determines the optimum conditions for reconstruction. An optimal geographical domain roughly coincides with the area supplying most of the substance to the receptor. The optimal domain s size is dependent on the substance decay time. Under optimum reconstruction conditions, the mean correlation coefficients can reach 0.70 0.75. The boundaries of the interval with the most probable correlation values are 0.6 0.9 for the decay time of 240 h

  8. Ubiquitous human upper-limb motion estimation using wearable sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wong, Wai-Choong; Wu, Jian-Kang

    2011-07-01

    Human motion capture technologies have been widely used in a wide spectrum of applications, including interactive game and learning, animation, film special effects, health care, navigation, and so on. The existing human motion capture techniques, which use structured multiple high-resolution cameras in a dedicated studio, are complicated and expensive. With the rapid development of microsensors-on-chip, human motion capture using wearable microsensors has become an active research topic. Because of the agility in movement, upper-limb motion estimation has been regarded as the most difficult problem in human motion capture. In this paper, we take the upper limb as our research subject and propose a novel ubiquitous upper-limb motion estimation algorithm, which concentrates on modeling the relationship between upper-arm movement and forearm movement. A link structure with 5 degrees of freedom (DOF) is proposed to model the human upper-limb skeleton structure. Parameters are defined according to Denavit-Hartenberg convention, forward kinematics equations are derived, and an unscented Kalman filter is deployed to estimate the defined parameters. The experimental results have shown that the proposed upper-limb motion capture and analysis algorithm outperforms other fusion methods and provides accurate results in comparison to the BTS optical motion tracker.

  9. Estimation of Large-Scale Organ Motion in B-Mode Ultrasound Image Sequences: A Survey.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Valeria; Székely, Gábor; Tanner, Christine

    2015-12-01

    Reviewed here are methods developed for following (i.e., tracking) structures in medical B-mode ultrasound time sequences during large-scale motion. The resulting motion estimation problem and its key components are defined. The main tracking approaches are described, and their strengths and weaknesses are discussed. Existing motion estimation methods, tested on multiple in vivo sequences, are categorized with respect to their clinical applications, namely, cardiac, respiratory and muscular motion. A large number of works in this field had to be discarded as thorough validation of the results was missing. The remaining relevant works identified indicate the possibility of reaching an average tracking accuracy up to 1-2 mm. Real-time performance can be achieved using several methods. Yet only very few of these have progressed to clinical practice. The latest trends include incorporation of complementary and prior information. Advances are expected from common evaluation databases and 4-D ultrasound scanning technologies.

  10. Interrater Reliability Estimators Commonly Used in Scoring Language Assessments: A Monte Carlo Investigation of Estimator Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morgan, Grant B.; Zhu, Min; Johnson, Robert L.; Hodge, Kari J.

    2014-01-01

    Common estimators of interrater reliability include Pearson product-moment correlation coefficients, Spearman rank-order correlations, and the generalizability coefficient. The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of estimators of interrater reliability when varying the true reliability, number of scale categories, and number of…

  11. Nonlinear transform for robust dense block-based motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Taubman, David; Naman, Aous Thabit

    2014-05-01

    We present a noniterative multiresolution motion estimation strategy, involving block-based comparisons in each detail band of a Laplacian pyramid. A novel matching score is developed and analyzed. The proposed matching score is based on a class of nonlinear transformations of Laplacian detail bands, yielding 1-bit or 2-bit representations. The matching score is evaluated in a dense full-search motion estimation setting, with synthetic video frames and an optical flow data set. Together with a strategy for combining the matching scores across resolutions, the proposed method is shown to produce smoother and more robust estimates than mean square error (MSE) in each detail band and combined. It tolerates more of nontranslational motion, such as rotation, validating the analysis, while providing much better localization of the motion discontinuities. We also provide an efficient implementation of the motion estimation strategy and show that the computational complexity of the approach is closely related to the traditional MSE block-based full-search motion estimation procedure.

  12. Accuracy of selected techniques for estimating ice-affected streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, John F.

    1991-01-01

    This paper compares the accuracy of selected techniques for estimating streamflow during ice-affected periods. The techniques are classified into two categories - subjective and analytical - depending on the degree of judgment required. Discharge measurements have been made at three streamflow-gauging sites in Iowa during the 1987-88 winter and used to established a baseline streamflow record for each site. Using data based on a simulated six-week field-tip schedule, selected techniques are used to estimate discharge during the ice-affected periods. For the subjective techniques, three hydrographers have independently compiled each record. Three measures of performance are used to compare the estimated streamflow records with the baseline streamflow records: the average discharge for the ice-affected period, and the mean and standard deviation of the daily errors. Based on average ranks for three performance measures and the three sites, the analytical and subjective techniques are essentially comparable. For two of the three sites, Kruskal-Wallis one-way analysis of variance detects significant differences among the three hydrographers for the subjective methods, indicating that the subjective techniques are less consistent than the analytical techniques. The results suggest analytical techniques may be viable tools for estimating discharge during periods of ice effect, and should be developed further and evaluated for sites across the United States.

  13. MUlti-Dimensional Spline-Based Estimator (MUSE) for motion estimation: algorithm development and initial results.

    PubMed

    Viola, Francesco; Coe, Ryan L; Owen, Kevin; Guenther, Drake A; Walker, William F

    2008-12-01

    Image registration and motion estimation play central roles in many fields, including RADAR, SONAR, light microscopy, and medical imaging. Because of its central significance, estimator accuracy, precision, and computational cost are of critical importance. We have previously presented a highly accurate, spline-based time delay estimator that directly determines sub-sample time delay estimates from sampled data. The algorithm uses cubic splines to produce a continuous representation of a reference signal and then computes an analytical matching function between this reference and a delayed signal. The location of the minima of this function yields estimates of the time delay. In this paper we describe the MUlti-dimensional Spline-based Estimator (MUSE) that allows accurate and precise estimation of multi-dimensional displacements/strain components from multi-dimensional data sets. We describe the mathematical formulation for two- and three-dimensional motion/strain estimation and present simulation results to assess the intrinsic bias and standard deviation of this algorithm and compare it to currently available multi-dimensional estimators. In 1000 noise-free simulations of ultrasound data we found that 2D MUSE exhibits maximum bias of 2.6 x 10(-4) samples in range and 2.2 x 10(-3) samples in azimuth (corresponding to 4.8 and 297 nm, respectively). The maximum simulated standard deviation of estimates in both dimensions was comparable at roughly 2.8 x 10(-3) samples (corresponding to 54 nm axially and 378 nm laterally). These results are between two and three orders of magnitude better than currently used 2D tracking methods. Simulation of performance in 3D yielded similar results to those observed in 2D. We also present experimental results obtained using 2D MUSE on data acquired by an Ultrasonix Sonix RP imaging system with an L14-5/38 linear array transducer operating at 6.6 MHz. While our validation of the algorithm was performed using ultrasound data, MUSE is

  14. Motion correction for improving the accuracy of dual-energy myocardial perfusion CT imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pack, Jed D.; Yin, Zhye; Xiong, Guanglei; Mittal, Priya; Dunham, Simon; Elmore, Kimberly; Edic, Peter M.; Min, James K.

    2016-03-01

    Coronary Artery Disease (CAD) is the leading cause of death globally [1]. Modern cardiac computed tomography angiography (CCTA) is highly effective at identifying and assessing coronary blockages associated with CAD. The diagnostic value of this anatomical information can be substantially increased in combination with a non-invasive, low-dose, correlative, quantitative measure of blood supply to the myocardium. While CT perfusion has shown promise of providing such indications of ischemia, artifacts due to motion, beam hardening, and other factors confound clinical findings and can limit quantitative accuracy. In this paper, we investigate the impact of applying a novel motion correction algorithm to correct for motion in the myocardium. This motion compensation algorithm (originally designed to correct for the motion of the coronary arteries in order to improve CCTA images) has been shown to provide substantial improvements in both overall image quality and diagnostic accuracy of CCTA. We have adapted this technique for application beyond the coronary arteries and present an assessment of its impact on image quality and quantitative accuracy within the context of dual-energy CT perfusion imaging. We conclude that motion correction is a promising technique that can help foster the routine clinical use of dual-energy CT perfusion. When combined, the anatomical information of CCTA and the hemodynamic information from dual-energy CT perfusion should facilitate better clinical decisions about which patients would benefit from treatments such as stent placement, drug therapy, or surgery and help other patients avoid the risks and costs associated with unnecessary, invasive, diagnostic coronary angiography procedures.

  15. Novel true-motion estimation algorithm and its application to motion-compensated temporal frame interpolation.

    PubMed

    Dikbas, Salih; Altunbasak, Yucel

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, a new low-complexity true-motion estimation (TME) algorithm is proposed for video processing applications, such as motion-compensated temporal frame interpolation (MCTFI) or motion-compensated frame rate up-conversion (MCFRUC). Regular motion estimation, which is often used in video coding, aims to find the motion vectors (MVs) to reduce the temporal redundancy, whereas TME aims to track the projected object motion as closely as possible. TME is obtained by imposing implicit and/or explicit smoothness constraints on the block-matching algorithm. To produce better quality-interpolated frames, the dense motion field at interpolation time is obtained for both forward and backward MVs; then, bidirectional motion compensation using forward and backward MVs is applied by mixing both elegantly. Finally, the performance of the proposed algorithm for MCTFI is demonstrated against recently proposed methods and smoothness constraint optical flow employed by a professional video production suite. Experimental results show that the quality of the interpolated frames using the proposed method is better when compared with the MCFRUC techniques.

  16. Estimation and filtering techniques for high-accuracy GPS applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1989-01-01

    Techniques for determination of very precise orbits for satellites of the Global Positioning System (GPS) are currently being studied and demonstrated. These techniques can be used to make cm-accurate measurements of station locations relative to the geocenter, monitor earth orientation over timescales of hours, and provide tropospheric and clock delay calibrations during observations made with deep space radio antennas at sites where the GPS receivers have been collocated. For high-earth orbiters, meter-level knowledge of position will be available from GPS, while at low altitudes, sub-decimeter accuracy will be possible. Estimation of satellite orbits and other parameters such as ground station positions is carried out with a multi-satellite batch sequential pseudo-epoch state process noise filter. Both square-root information filtering (SRIF) and UD-factorized covariance filtering formulations are implemented in the software.

  17. Parallaxes and Proper Motions of QSOs: A Test of Astrometric Precision and Accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Hugh C.; Dahn, Conard C.; Zacharias, Norbert; Canzian, Blaise; Guetter, Harry H.; Levine, Stephen E.; Luginbuhl, Christian B.; Monet, Alice K. B.; Monet, David G.; Pier, Jeffrey R.; Stone, Ronald C.; Subasavage, John P.; Tilleman, Trudy; Walker, Richard L.; Johnston, Kenneth J.

    2016-11-01

    Optical astrometry of 12 fields containing quasi-stellar objects (QSOs) is presented. The targets are radio sources in the International Celestial Reference Frame with accurate radio positions that also have optical counterparts. The data are used to test several quantities: the internal precision of the relative optical astrometry, the relative parallaxes and proper motions, the procedures to correct from relative to absolute parallax and proper motion, the accuracy of the absolute parallaxes and proper motions, and the stability of the optical photocenters for these optically variable QSOs. For these 12 fields, the mean error in absolute parallax is 0.38 mas and the mean error in each coordinate of absolute proper motion is 1.1 mas yr‑1. The results yield a mean absolute parallax of ‑0.03 ± 0.11 mas. For 11 targets, we find no significant systematic motions of the photocenters at the level of 1–2 mas over the 10 years of this study; for one BL Lac object, we find a possible motion of 4 mas correlated with its brightness.

  18. Self-Motion and Depth Estimation from Image Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John

    1999-01-01

    An image-based version of a computational model of human self-motion perception (developed in collaboration with Dr. Leland S. Stone at NASA Ames Research Center) has been generated and tested. The research included in the grant proposal sought to extend the utility of the self-motion model so that it could be used for explaining and predicting human performance in a greater variety of aerospace applications. The model can now be tested with video input sequences (including computer generated imagery) which enables simulation of human self-motion estimation in a variety of applied settings.

  19. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilms, M.; Werner, R.; Ehrhardt, J.; Schmidt-Richberg, A.; Schlemmer, H.-P.; Handels, H.

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found.

  20. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Ehrhardt, J; Schmidt-Richberg, A; Schlemmer, H-P; Handels, H

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found. PMID:24557007

  1. Multivariate regression approaches for surrogate-based diffeomorphic estimation of respiratory motion in radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Wilms, M; Werner, R; Ehrhardt, J; Schmidt-Richberg, A; Schlemmer, H-P; Handels, H

    2014-03-01

    Breathing-induced location uncertainties of internal structures are still a relevant issue in the radiation therapy of thoracic and abdominal tumours. Motion compensation approaches like gating or tumour tracking are usually driven by low-dimensional breathing signals, which are acquired in real-time during the treatment. These signals are only surrogates of the internal motion of target structures and organs at risk, and, consequently, appropriate models are needed to establish correspondence between the acquired signals and the sought internal motion patterns. In this work, we present a diffeomorphic framework for correspondence modelling based on the Log-Euclidean framework and multivariate regression. Within the framework, we systematically compare standard and subspace regression approaches (principal component regression, partial least squares, canonical correlation analysis) for different types of common breathing signals (1D: spirometry, abdominal belt, diaphragm tracking; multi-dimensional: skin surface tracking). Experiments are based on 4D CT and 4D MRI data sets and cover intra- and inter-cycle as well as intra- and inter-session motion variations. Only small differences in internal motion estimation accuracy are observed between the 1D surrogates. Increasing the surrogate dimensionality, however, improved the accuracy significantly; this is shown for both 2D signals, which consist of a common 1D signal and its time derivative, and high-dimensional signals containing the motion of many skin surface points. Eventually, comparing the standard and subspace regression variants when applied to the high-dimensional breathing signals, only small differences in terms of motion estimation accuracy are found.

  2. A Generalized Correlation-Based Model for Out-of-Plane Motion Estimation in Freehand Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Afsham, Narges; Najafi, Mohammad; Abolmaesumi, Purang; Rohling, Robert

    2014-01-01

    A big challenge in sensorless image-based ultrasound tracking is in the out-of-plane motion estimation. The correlation value of a specific model of speckle known as fully developed speckle (FDS) can be used to estimate the out-of-plane displacement. In real tissue, this kind of pattern is rare and the deviation of speckle pattern from the ideal FDS model diminishes the accuracy of the out-of-plane motion estimation. In this paper a new method for estimation of the out-of-plane motion is proposed. Firstly a closed-form mathematical derivation is provided for the correlation of two RF echo signal patches at different positions. A linear regression model of the ultrasound beam profile is proposed to account for the spatial variability of the ultrasound beam and enhance the accuracy of out-of-plane motion estimation in real tissue. The statistical model of speckle used here is based on the Rician-Inverse Gaussian (RiIG) stochastic process of the speckle formation, which can be considered as a generalized form of the K-distribution with richer parametrization. In this work, for the first time the second-order statistics of the RIG model is used for speckle tracking. This statistical model allows for derivation of a closed-form formulation for the correlation coefficient based on the statistical parameters of every patch. Since the effect of coherency is considered in the RiIG model, it increases the reliability of the out-of-plane motion estimation. The flexibility of the proposed method enables almost any patch through the whole image to be used for the purpose of displacement estimation. The method has been evaluated both on ex vivo and in vivo tissues in various experiments including out-of-plane rotation (tilt, yaw) and free-hand imaging. The overall outcome demonstrates the potential of the proposed method for in vivo tissues.

  3. Quantitative Assessment of Shockwave Lithotripsy Accuracy and the Effect of Respiratory Motion*

    PubMed Central

    Bailey, Michael R.; Shah, Anup R.; Hsi, Ryan S.; Paun, Marla; Harper, Jonathan D.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background and Purpose Effective stone comminution during shockwave lithotripsy (SWL) is dependent on precise three-dimensional targeting of the shockwave. Respiratory motion, imprecise targeting or shockwave alignment, and stone movement may compromise treatment efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the accuracy of shockwave targeting during SWL treatment and the effect of motion from respiration. Patients and Methods Ten patients underwent SWL for the treatment of 13 renal stones. Stones were targeted fluoroscopically using a Healthtronics Lithotron (five cases) or Dornier Compact Delta II (five cases) shockwave lithotripter. Shocks were delivered at a rate of 1 to 2 Hz with ramping shockwave energy settings of 14 to 26 kV or level 1 to 5. After the low energy pretreatment and protective pause, a commercial diagnostic ultrasound (US) imaging system was used to record images of the stone during active SWL treatment. Shockwave accuracy, defined as the proportion of shockwaves that resulted in stone motion with shockwave delivery, and respiratory stone motion were determined by two independent observers who reviewed the ultrasonographic videos. Results Mean age was 51±15 years with 60% men, and mean stone size was 10.5±3.7 mm (range 5–18 mm). A mean of 2675±303 shocks was delivered. Shockwave-induced stone motion was observed with every stone. Accurate targeting of the stone occurred in 60%±15% of shockwaves. Conclusions US imaging during SWL revealed that 40% of shockwaves miss the stone and contribute solely to tissue injury, primarily from movement with respiration. These data support the need for a device to deliver shockwaves only when the stone is in target. US imaging provides real-time assessment of stone targeting and accuracy of shockwave delivery. PMID:22471349

  4. Glottal space segmentation from motion estimation and Gabor filtering.

    PubMed

    Mendez, A; Ismaili Alaoui, E M; García, B; Ibn-Elhaj, E; Ruiz, I

    2009-01-01

    Obtaining the glottal space segmentation is essential to characterize morphological disorders of vocal folds. In this study, the tested images are been acquired by direct optical inspection of the glottis using an endoscope and most of them are very poor quality. The application of motion estimation is very useful to segment the vocal folds endoscopic videos without user interaction. This approach involves three process steps: 1) Wiener motion estimator--to shift the measurement the next frame regarding to the current frame, and look for similarities between them. The best matching will accurate a shift equal to the displacement vector of the object; 2) Segmentation using motion estimation results and applying Gabor filtering; 3) Experimental results to demonstrate that the proposed method is effective. Our proposal works correctly with 95% of database test videos and it shows a great advance in design, and in the nearby future, a complete method to diagnose vocal folds pathologies.

  5. Quantitative underwater 3D motion analysis using submerged video cameras: accuracy analysis and trajectory reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Silvatti, Amanda P; Cerveri, Pietro; Telles, Thiago; Dias, Fábio A S; Baroni, Guido; Barros, Ricardo M L

    2013-01-01

    In this study we aim at investigating the applicability of underwater 3D motion capture based on submerged video cameras in terms of 3D accuracy analysis and trajectory reconstruction. Static points with classical direct linear transform (DLT) solution, a moving wand with bundle adjustment and a moving 2D plate with Zhang's method were considered for camera calibration. As an example of the final application, we reconstructed the hand motion trajectories in different swimming styles and qualitatively compared this with Maglischo's model. Four highly trained male swimmers performed butterfly, breaststroke and freestyle tasks. The middle fingertip trajectories of both hands in the underwater phase were considered. The accuracy (mean absolute error) of the two calibration approaches (wand: 0.96 mm - 2D plate: 0.73 mm) was comparable to out of water results and highly superior to the classical DLT results (9.74 mm). Among all the swimmers, the hands' trajectories of the expert swimmer in the style were almost symmetric and in good agreement with Maglischo's model. The kinematic results highlight symmetry or asymmetry between the two hand sides, intra- and inter-subject variability in terms of the motion patterns and agreement or disagreement with the model. The two outcomes, calibration results and trajectory reconstruction, both move towards the quantitative 3D underwater motion analysis.

  6. Improving Accuracy of Influenza-Associated Hospitalization Rate Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Carrie; Kirley, Pam Daily; Aragon, Deborah; Meek, James; Farley, Monica M.; Ryan, Patricia; Collins, Jim; Lynfield, Ruth; Baumbach, Joan; Zansky, Shelley; Bennett, Nancy M.; Fowler, Brian; Thomas, Ann; Lindegren, Mary L.; Atkinson, Annette; Finelli, Lyn; Chaves, Sandra S.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic test sensitivity affects rate estimates for laboratory-confirmed influenza–associated hospitalizations. We used data from FluSurv-NET, a national population-based surveillance system for laboratory-confirmed influenza hospitalizations, to capture diagnostic test type by patient age and influenza season. We calculated observed rates by age group and adjusted rates by test sensitivity. Test sensitivity was lowest in adults >65 years of age. For all ages, reverse transcription PCR was the most sensitive test, and use increased from <10% during 2003–2008 to ≈70% during 2009–2013. Observed hospitalization rates per 100,000 persons varied by season: 7.3–50.5 for children <18 years of age, 3.0–30.3 for adults 18–64 years, and 13.6–181.8 for adults >65 years. After 2009, hospitalization rates adjusted by test sensitivity were ≈15% higher for children <18 years, ≈20% higher for adults 18–64 years, and ≈55% for adults >65 years of age. Test sensitivity adjustments improve the accuracy of hospitalization rate estimates. PMID:26292017

  7. Temporally diffeomorphic cardiac motion estimation from three-dimensional echocardiography by minimization of intensity consistency error

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhijun; Ashraf, Muhammad; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of cardiac motion is important for evaluation of heart function. Three dimensional (3D) echocardiography is among the most frequently used imaging modalities for motion estimation because it is convenient, real-time, low-cost, and nonionizing. However, motion estimation from 3D echocardiographic sequences is still a challenging problem due to low image quality and image corruption by noise and artifacts. Methods: The authors have developed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation approach in which the velocity field instead of the displacement field was optimized. The optimal velocity field optimizes a novel similarity function, which we call the intensity consistency error, defined as multiple consecutive frames evolving to each time point. The optimization problem is solved by using the steepest descent method. Results: Experiments with simulated datasets, images of an ex vivo rabbit phantom, images of in vivo open-chest pig hearts, and healthy human images were used to validate the authors’ method. Simulated and real cardiac sequences tests showed that results in the authors’ method are more accurate than other competing temporal diffeomorphic methods. Tests with sonomicrometry showed that the tracked crystal positions have good agreement with ground truth and the authors’ method has higher accuracy than the temporal diffeomorphic free-form deformation (TDFFD) method. Validation with an open-access human cardiac dataset showed that the authors’ method has smaller feature tracking errors than both TDFFD and frame-to-frame methods. Conclusions: The authors proposed a diffeomorphic motion estimation method with temporal smoothness by constraining the velocity field to have maximum local intensity consistency within multiple consecutive frames. The estimated motion using the authors’ method has good temporal consistency and is more accurate than other temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation methods. PMID:24784402

  8. Right ventricular strain analysis from three-dimensional echocardiography by using temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Meihua; Ashraf, Muhammad; Broberg, Craig S.; Sahn, David J.; Song, Xubo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Quantitative analysis of right ventricle (RV) motion is important for study of the mechanism of congenital and acquired diseases. Unlike left ventricle (LV), motion estimation of RV is more difficult because of its complex shape and thin myocardium. Although attempts of finite element models on MR images and speckle tracking on echocardiography have shown promising results on RV strain analysis, these methods can be improved since the temporal smoothness of the motion is not considered. Methods: The authors have proposed a temporally diffeomorphic motion estimation method in which a spatiotemporal transformation is estimated by optimization of a registration energy functional of the velocity field in their earlier work. The proposed motion estimation method is a fully automatic process for general image sequences. The authors apply the method by combining with a semiautomatic myocardium segmentation method to the RV strain analysis of three-dimensional (3D) echocardiographic sequences of five open-chest pigs under different steady states. Results: The authors compare the peak two-point strains derived by their method with those estimated from the sonomicrometry, the results show that they have high correlation. The motion of the right ventricular free wall is studied by using segmental strains. The baseline sequence results show that the segmental strains in their methods are consistent with results obtained by other image modalities such as MRI. The image sequences of pacing steady states show that segments with the largest strain variation coincide with the pacing sites. Conclusions: The high correlation of the peak two-point strains of their method and sonomicrometry under different steady states demonstrates that their RV motion estimation has high accuracy. The closeness of the segmental strain of their method to those from MRI shows the feasibility of their method in the study of RV function by using 3D echocardiography. The strain analysis of the

  9. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. PMID:27385378

  10. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  11. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR).

    PubMed

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10-40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  12. Respiratory motion correction in 4D-PET by simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalantari, Faraz; Li, Tianfang; Jin, Mingwu; Wang, Jing

    2016-08-01

    In conventional 4D positron emission tomography (4D-PET), images from different frames are reconstructed individually and aligned by registration methods. Two issues that arise with this approach are as follows: (1) the reconstruction algorithms do not make full use of projection statistics; and (2) the registration between noisy images can result in poor alignment. In this study, we investigated the use of simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) methods for motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET. A modified ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm coupled with total variation minimization (OSEM-TV) was used to obtain a primary motion-compensated PET (pmc-PET) from all projection data, using Demons derived deformation vector fields (DVFs) as initial motion vectors. A motion model update was performed to obtain an optimal set of DVFs in the pmc-PET and other phases, by matching the forward projection of the deformed pmc-PET with measured projections from other phases. The OSEM-TV image reconstruction was repeated using updated DVFs, and new DVFs were estimated based on updated images. A 4D-XCAT phantom with typical FDG biodistribution was generated to evaluate the performance of the SMEIR algorithm in lung and liver tumors with different contrasts and different diameters (10–40 mm). The image quality of the 4D-PET was greatly improved by the SMEIR algorithm. When all projections were used to reconstruct 3D-PET without motion compensation, motion blurring artifacts were present, leading up to 150% tumor size overestimation and significant quantitative errors, including 50% underestimation of tumor contrast and 59% underestimation of tumor uptake. Errors were reduced to less than 10% in most images by using the SMEIR algorithm, showing its potential in motion estimation/correction in 4D-PET.

  13. Demonstration of precise estimation of polar motion parameters with the global positioning system: Initial results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichten, S. M.

    1991-01-01

    Data from the Global Positioning System (GPS) were used to determine precise polar motion estimates. Conservatively calculated formal errors of the GPS least squares solution are approx. 10 cm. The GPS estimates agree with independently determined polar motion values from very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) at the 5 cm level. The data were obtained from a partial constellation of GPS satellites and from a sparse worldwide distribution of ground stations. The accuracy of the GPS estimates should continue to improve as more satellites and ground receivers become operational, and eventually a near real time GPS capability should be available. Because the GPS data are obtained and processed independently from the large radio antennas at the Deep Space Network (DSN), GPS estimation could provide very precise measurements of Earth orientation for calibration of deep space tracking data and could significantly relieve the ever growing burden on the DSN radio telescopes to provide Earth platform calibrations.

  14. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio; Formica, Domenico

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  15. On the Orientation Error of IMU: Investigating Static and Dynamic Accuracy Targeting Human Motion

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Luca; Taffoni, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    The accuracy in orientation tracking attainable by using inertial measurement units (IMU) when measuring human motion is still an open issue. This study presents a systematic quantification of the accuracy under static conditions and typical human dynamics, simulated by means of a robotic arm. Two sensor fusion algorithms, selected from the classes of the stochastic and complementary methods, are considered. The proposed protocol implements controlled and repeatable experimental conditions and validates accuracy for an extensive set of dynamic movements, that differ in frequency and amplitude of the movement. We found that dynamic performance of the tracking is only slightly dependent on the sensor fusion algorithm. Instead, it is dependent on the amplitude and frequency of the movement and a major contribution to the error derives from the orientation of the rotation axis w.r.t. the gravity vector. Absolute and relative errors upper bounds are found respectively in the range [0.7° ÷ 8.2°] and [1.0° ÷ 10.3°]. Alongside dynamic, static accuracy is thoroughly investigated, also with an emphasis on convergence behavior of the different algorithms. Reported results emphasize critical issues associated with the use of this technology and provide a baseline level of performance for the human motion related application. PMID:27612100

  16. Performance comparison of rigid and affine models for motion estimation using ultrasound radio-frequency signals.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaochang; Liu, Ke; Shao, Jinghua; Gao, Jing; Huang, Lingyun; Bai, Jing; Luo, Jianwen

    2015-11-01

    Tissue motion estimation is widely used in many ultrasound techniques. Rigid-model-based and nonrigid-modelbased methods are two main groups of space-domain methods of tissue motion estimation. The affine model is one of the commonly used nonrigid models. The performances of the rigid model and affine model have not been compared on ultrasound RF signals, which have been demonstrated to obtain higher accuracy, precision, and resolution in motion estimation compared with B-mode images. In this study, three methods, i.e., the normalized cross-correlation method with rigid model (NCC), the optical flow method with rigid model (OFRM), and the optical flow method with affine model (OFAM), are compared using ultrasound RF signals, rather than the B-mode images used in previous studies. Simulations, phantom, and in vivo experiments are conducted to make the comparison. In the simulations, the root-mean-square errors (RMSEs) of axial and lateral displacements and strains are used to assess the accuracy of motion estimation, and the elastographic signal-tonoise ratio (SNRe) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNRe) are used to evaluate the quality of axial strain images. In the phantom experiments, the registration error between the pre- and postdeformation RF signals, as well as the SNRe and CNRe of axial strain images, are utilized as the evaluation criteria. In the in vivo experiments, the registration error is used to evaluate the estimation performance. The results show that the affinemodel- based method (i.e., OFAM) obtains the lowest RMSE or registration error and the highest SNRe and CNRe among all the methods. The affine model is demonstrated to be superior to the rigid model in motion estimation based on RF signals.

  17. Relationship between strong-motion array parameters and the accuracy of source inversion and physical waves

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iida, M.; Miyatake, T.; Shimazaki, K.

    1990-01-01

    We develop general rules for a strong-motion array layout on the basis of our method of applying a prediction analysis to a source inversion scheme. A systematic analysis is done to obtain a relationship between fault-array parameters and the accuracy of a source inversion. Our study of the effects of various physical waves indicates that surface waves at distant stations contribute significantly to the inversion accuracy for the inclined fault plane, whereas only far-field body waves at both small and large distances contribute to the inversion accuracy for the vertical fault, which produces more phase interference. These observations imply the adequacy of the half-space approximation used throughout our present study and suggest rules for actual array designs. -from Authors

  18. The acquisition and implementation of the smoothness maximization motion strategy is dependent on spatial accuracy demands.

    PubMed

    Sosnik, Ronen; Flash, Tamar; Hauptmann, Bjoern; Karni, Avi

    2007-01-01

    We recently showed that extensive training on a sequence of planar hand trajectories passing through several targets resulted in the co-articulation of movement components and in the formation of new movement elements (primitives) (Sosnik et al. in Exp Brain Res 156(4):422-438, 2004). Reduction in movement duration was accompanied by the gradual replacing of a piecewise combination of rectilinear trajectories with a single, longer curved one, the latter affording the maximization of movement smoothness ("global motion planning"). The results from transfer experiments, conducted by the end of the last training session, have suggested that the participants have acquired movement elements whose attributes were solely dictated by the figural (i.e., geometrical) form of the path, rather than by both path geometry and its time derivatives. Here we show that the acquired movement generation strategy ("global motion planning") was not specific to the trained configuration or total movement duration. Performance gain (i.e., movement smoothness, defined by the fit of the data to the behavior, predicted by the "global planning" model) transferred to non-trained configurations in which the targets were spatially co-aligned or when participants were instructed to perform the task in a definite amount of time. Surprisingly, stringent accuracy demands, in transfer conditions, resulted not only in an increased movement duration but also in reverting to the straight trajectories (loss of co-articulation), implying that the performance gain was dependent on accuracy constraints. Only 28.5% of the participants (two out of seven) who were trained in the absence of visual feedback from the hand (dark condition) co-articulated by the end of the last training session compared to 75% (six out of eight) who were trained in the light, and none of them has acquired a geometrical motion primitive. Furthermore, six naive participants who trained in dark condition on large size targets have all

  19. An Adaptive Motion Estimation Scheme for Video Coding

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yuan; Jia, Kebin

    2014-01-01

    The unsymmetrical-cross multihexagon-grid search (UMHexagonS) is one of the best fast Motion Estimation (ME) algorithms in video encoding software. It achieves an excellent coding performance by using hybrid block matching search pattern and multiple initial search point predictors at the cost of the computational complexity of ME increased. Reducing time consuming of ME is one of the key factors to improve video coding efficiency. In this paper, we propose an adaptive motion estimation scheme to further reduce the calculation redundancy of UMHexagonS. Firstly, new motion estimation search patterns have been designed according to the statistical results of motion vector (MV) distribution information. Then, design a MV distribution prediction method, including prediction of the size of MV and the direction of MV. At last, according to the MV distribution prediction results, achieve self-adaptive subregional searching by the new estimation search patterns. Experimental results show that more than 50% of total search points are dramatically reduced compared to the UMHexagonS algorithm in JM 18.4 of H.264/AVC. As a result, the proposed algorithm scheme can save the ME time up to 20.86% while the rate-distortion performance is not compromised. PMID:24672313

  20. An adaptive motion estimation scheme for video coding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengyu; Gao, Yuan; Jia, Kebin

    2014-01-01

    The unsymmetrical-cross multihexagon-grid search (UMHexagonS) is one of the best fast Motion Estimation (ME) algorithms in video encoding software. It achieves an excellent coding performance by using hybrid block matching search pattern and multiple initial search point predictors at the cost of the computational complexity of ME increased. Reducing time consuming of ME is one of the key factors to improve video coding efficiency. In this paper, we propose an adaptive motion estimation scheme to further reduce the calculation redundancy of UMHexagonS. Firstly, new motion estimation search patterns have been designed according to the statistical results of motion vector (MV) distribution information. Then, design a MV distribution prediction method, including prediction of the size of MV and the direction of MV. At last, according to the MV distribution prediction results, achieve self-adaptive subregional searching by the new estimation search patterns. Experimental results show that more than 50% of total search points are dramatically reduced compared to the UMHexagonS algorithm in JM 18.4 of H.264/AVC. As a result, the proposed algorithm scheme can save the ME time up to 20.86% while the rate-distortion performance is not compromised.

  1. Human heading estimation during visually simulated curvilinear motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, L. S.; Perrone, J. A.

    1997-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that humans cannot estimate their direction of forward translation (heading) from the resulting retinal motion (flow field) alone when rotation rates are higher than approximately 1 deg/sec. It has been argued that either oculomotor or static depth cues are necessary to disambiguate the rotational and translational components of the flow field and, thus, to support accurate heading estimation. We have re-examined this issue using visually simulated motion along a curved path towards a layout of random points as the stimulus. Our data show that, in this curvilinear motion paradigm, five of six observers could estimate their heading relatively accurately and precisely (error and uncertainty < approximately 4 deg), even for rotation rates as high as 16 deg/sec, without the benefit of either oculomotor or static depth cues signaling rotation rate. Such performance is inconsistent with models of human self-motion estimation that require rotation information from sources other than the flow field to cancel the rotational flow.

  2. Accuracy of an UWB-based position tracking system used for time-motion analyses in game sports.

    PubMed

    Leser, Roland; Schleindlhuber, Armin; Lyons, Keith; Baca, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ultra-wideband (UWB)-based positioning system Ubisense, which is used for time-motion analysis in sports. Furthermore, some alternatives for positioning the system's transponders on the atheletes, as well as the accuracy depending on the location of measurement, were tested. Therefore, in a pre-study, some basic issues were examined (measurement assumptions and consistency and location of the system's transponder used for position detection), and position measurements at the borders and in the centre of a basketball field were performed. In the main study, 13 male basketball players (15.8 years ± 0.6; 187.9 height ± 3.4; 77.5 weight ± 3.7), equipped with a Ubisense transponder mounted on top of their heads, handled a trundle wheel during simulated match play. The players with the trundle wheel participated passively in the match by following one of the ten competing players. The distance measurements of the trundle wheel were used as reference values and compared to the Ubisense distance estimations. Best results were found with the measurements of a single mounted transponder on top of the athlete's heads. No differences were detectable in the accuracy between measurements in the centre and at the borders of the basketball field. The (Ubisense) system's difference to the (trundle wheel) reference was 3.45 ± 1.99%, resulting in 95% limits of agreement of -0.46-7.35%. The study indicates the examined system's sufficient accuracy for time-motion analysis in basketball. PMID:24512176

  3. Accuracy of an UWB-based position tracking system used for time-motion analyses in game sports.

    PubMed

    Leser, Roland; Schleindlhuber, Armin; Lyons, Keith; Baca, Arnold

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of the ultra-wideband (UWB)-based positioning system Ubisense, which is used for time-motion analysis in sports. Furthermore, some alternatives for positioning the system's transponders on the atheletes, as well as the accuracy depending on the location of measurement, were tested. Therefore, in a pre-study, some basic issues were examined (measurement assumptions and consistency and location of the system's transponder used for position detection), and position measurements at the borders and in the centre of a basketball field were performed. In the main study, 13 male basketball players (15.8 years ± 0.6; 187.9 height ± 3.4; 77.5 weight ± 3.7), equipped with a Ubisense transponder mounted on top of their heads, handled a trundle wheel during simulated match play. The players with the trundle wheel participated passively in the match by following one of the ten competing players. The distance measurements of the trundle wheel were used as reference values and compared to the Ubisense distance estimations. Best results were found with the measurements of a single mounted transponder on top of the athlete's heads. No differences were detectable in the accuracy between measurements in the centre and at the borders of the basketball field. The (Ubisense) system's difference to the (trundle wheel) reference was 3.45 ± 1.99%, resulting in 95% limits of agreement of -0.46-7.35%. The study indicates the examined system's sufficient accuracy for time-motion analysis in basketball.

  4. EEG-based learning system for online motion sickness level estimation in a dynamic vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Shu-Fang; Ko, Li-Wei

    2013-10-01

    Motion sickness is a common experience for many people. Several previous researches indicated that motion sickness has a negative effect on driving performance and sometimes leads to serious traffic accidents because of a decline in a person's ability to maintain self-control. This safety issue has motivated us to find a way to prevent vehicle accidents. Our target was to determine a set of valid motion sickness indicators that would predict the occurrence of a person's motion sickness as soon as possible. A successful method for the early detection of motion sickness will help us to construct a cognitive monitoring system. Such a monitoring system can alert people before they become sick and prevent them from being distracted by various motion sickness symptoms while driving or riding in a car. In our past researches, we investigated the physiological changes that occur during the transition of a passenger's cognitive state using electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum analysis, and we found that the EEG power responses in the left and right motors, parietal, lateral occipital, and occipital midline brain areas were more highly correlated to subjective sickness levels than other brain areas. In this paper, we propose the use of a self-organizing neural fuzzy inference network (SONFIN) to estimate a driver's/passenger's sickness level based on EEG features that have been extracted online from five motion sickness-related brain areas, while either in real or virtual vehicle environments. The results show that our proposed learning system is capable of extracting a set of valid motion sickness indicators that originated from EEG dynamics, and through SONFIN, a neuro-fuzzy prediction model, we successfully translated the set of motion sickness indicators into motion sickness levels. The overall performance of this proposed EEG-based learning system can achieve an average prediction accuracy of ~82%.

  5. EEG-based learning system for online motion sickness level estimation in a dynamic vehicle environment.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Shu-Fang; Ko, Li-Wei

    2013-10-01

    Motion sickness is a common experience for many people. Several previous researches indicated that motion sickness has a negative effect on driving performance and sometimes leads to serious traffic accidents because of a decline in a person's ability to maintain self-control. This safety issue has motivated us to find a way to prevent vehicle accidents. Our target was to determine a set of valid motion sickness indicators that would predict the occurrence of a person's motion sickness as soon as possible. A successful method for the early detection of motion sickness will help us to construct a cognitive monitoring system. Such a monitoring system can alert people before they become sick and prevent them from being distracted by various motion sickness symptoms while driving or riding in a car. In our past researches, we investigated the physiological changes that occur during the transition of a passenger's cognitive state using electroencephalography (EEG) power spectrum analysis, and we found that the EEG power responses in the left and right motors, parietal, lateral occipital, and occipital midline brain areas were more highly correlated to subjective sickness levels than other brain areas. In this paper, we propose the use of a self-organizing neural fuzzy inference network (SONFIN) to estimate a driver's/passenger's sickness level based on EEG features that have been extracted online from five motion sickness-related brain areas, while either in real or virtual vehicle environments. The results show that our proposed learning system is capable of extracting a set of valid motion sickness indicators that originated from EEG dynamics, and through SONFIN, a neuro-fuzzy prediction model, we successfully translated the set of motion sickness indicators into motion sickness levels. The overall performance of this proposed EEG-based learning system can achieve an average prediction accuracy of ~82%. PMID:24808604

  6. Systematic accuracy and precision analysis of video motion capturing systems--exemplified on the Vicon-460 system.

    PubMed

    Windolf, Markus; Götzen, Nils; Morlock, Michael

    2008-08-28

    With rising demand on highly accurate acquisition of small motion the use of video-based motion capturing becomes more and more popular. However, the performance of these systems strongly depends on a variety of influencing factors. A method was developed in order to systematically assess accuracy and precision of motion capturing systems with regard to influential system parameters. A calibration and measurement robot was designed to perform a repeatable dynamic calibration and to determine the resultant system accuracy and precision in a control volume investigating small motion magnitudes (180 x 180 x 150 mm3). The procedure was exemplified on the Vicon-460 system. Following parameters were analyzed: Camera setup, calibration volume, marker size and lens filter application. Equipped with four cameras the Vicon-460 system provided an overall accuracy of 63+/-5 microm and overall precision (noise level) of 15 microm for the most favorable parameter setting. Arbitrary changes in camera arrangement revealed variations in mean accuracy between 76 and 129 microm. The noise level normal to the cameras' projection plane was found higher compared to the other coordinate directions. Measurements including regions unaffected by the dynamic calibration reflected considerably lower accuracy (221+/-79 microm). Lager marker diameters led to higher accuracy and precision. Accuracy dropped significantly when using an optical lens filter. This study revealed significant influence of the system environment on the performance of video-based motion capturing systems. With careful configuration, optical motion capturing provides a powerful measuring opportunity for the majority of biomechanical applications.

  7. Memory bandwidth-scalable motion estimation for mobile video coding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsieh, Jui-Hung; Tai, Wei-Cheng; Chang, Tian-Sheuan

    2011-12-01

    The heavy memory access of motion estimation (ME) execution consumes significant power and could limit ME execution when the available memory bandwidth (BW) is reduced because of access congestion or changes in the dynamics of the power environment of modern mobile devices. In order to adapt to the changing BW while maintaining the rate-distortion (R-D) performance, this article proposes a novel data BW-scalable algorithm for ME with mobile multimedia chips. The available BW is modeled in a R-D sense and allocated to fit the dynamic contents. The simulation result shows 70% BW savings while keeping equivalent R-D performance compared with H.264 reference software for low-motion CIF-sized video. For high-motion sequences, the result shows our algorithm can better use the available BW to save an average bit rate of up to 13% with up to 0.1-dB PSNR increase for similar BW usage.

  8. Motion Compensated Abdominal Diffusion Weighted MRI by Simultaneous Image Registration and Model Estimation (SIR-ME).

    PubMed

    Kurugol, Sila; Freiman, Moti; Afacan, Onur; Domachevsky, Liran; Perez-Rossello, Jeannette M; Callahan, Michael J; Warfield, Simon K

    2015-01-01

    Non-invasive characterization of water molecule's mobility variations by quantitative analysis of diffusion-weighted MRI (DW-MRI) signal decay in the abdomen has the potential to serve as a biomarker in gastrointestinal and oncological applications. Accurate and reproducible estimation of the signal decay model parameters is challenging due to the presence of respiratory, cardiac, and peristalsis motion. Independent registration of each b-value image to the b-value=0 s/mm(2) image prior to parameter estimation might be sub-optimal because of the low SNR and contrast difference between images of varying b-value. In this work, we introduce a motion-compensated parameter estimation framework that simultaneously solves image registration and model estimation (SIR-ME) problems by utilizing the interdependence of acquired volumes along the diffusion weighting dimension. We evaluated the improvement in model parameters estimation accuracy using 16 in-vivo DW-MRI data sets of Crohn's disease patients by comparing parameter estimates obtained using the SIR-ME model to the parameter estimates obtained by fitting the signal decay model to the acquired DW-MRI images. The proposed SIR-ME model reduced the average root-mean-square error between the observed signal and the fitted model by more than 50%. Moreover, the SIR-ME model estimates discriminate between normal and abnormal bowel loops better than the standard parameter estimates.

  9. 3D fluoroscopic image estimation using patient-specific 4DCBCT-based motion models.

    PubMed

    Dhou, S; Hurwitz, M; Mishra, P; Cai, W; Rottmann, J; Li, R; Williams, C; Wagar, M; Berbeco, R; Ionascu, D; Lewis, J H

    2015-05-01

    3D fluoroscopic images represent volumetric patient anatomy during treatment with high spatial and temporal resolution. 3D fluoroscopic images estimated using motion models built using 4DCT images, taken days or weeks prior to treatment, do not reliably represent patient anatomy during treatment. In this study we developed and performed initial evaluation of techniques to develop patient-specific motion models from 4D cone-beam CT (4DCBCT) images, taken immediately before treatment, and used these models to estimate 3D fluoroscopic images based on 2D kV projections captured during treatment. We evaluate the accuracy of 3D fluoroscopic images by comparison to ground truth digital and physical phantom images. The performance of 4DCBCT-based and 4DCT-based motion models are compared in simulated clinical situations representing tumor baseline shift or initial patient positioning errors. The results of this study demonstrate the ability for 4DCBCT imaging to generate motion models that can account for changes that cannot be accounted for with 4DCT-based motion models. When simulating tumor baseline shift and patient positioning errors of up to 5 mm, the average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error in six datasets were 1.20 and 2.2 mm, respectively, for 4DCBCT-based motion models. 4DCT-based motion models applied to the same six datasets resulted in average tumor localization error and the 95th percentile error of 4.18 and 5.4 mm, respectively. Analysis of voxel-wise intensity differences was also conducted for all experiments. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image generation in digital and physical phantoms and shows the potential advantage of 4DCBCT-based 3D fluoroscopic image estimation when there are changes in anatomy between the time of 4DCT imaging and the time of treatment delivery.

  10. Travel distance estimation from visual motion by leaky path integration.

    PubMed

    Lappe, Markus; Jenkin, Michael; Harris, Laurence R

    2007-06-01

    Visual motion can be a cue to travel distance when the motion signals are integrated. Distance estimates from visually simulated self-motion are imprecise, however. Previous work in our labs has given conflicting results on the imprecision: experiments by Frenz and Lappe had suggested a general underestimation of travel distance, while results from Redlick, Jenkin and Harris had shown an overestimation of travel distance. Here we describe a collaborative study that resolves the conflict by tracing it to differences in the tasks given to the subjects. With an identical set of subjects and identical visual motion simulation we show that underestimation of travel distance occurs when the task involves a judgment of distance from the starting position, and that overestimation of travel distance occurs when the task requires a judgment of the remaining distance to a particular target position. We present a leaky integrator model that explains both effects with a single mechanism. In this leaky integrator model we introduce the idea that, depending on the task, either the distance from start, or the distance to target is used as a state variable. The state variable is updated during the movement by integration over the space covered by the movement, rather than over time. In this model, travel distance mis-estimation occurs because the integration leaks and because the transformation of visual motion to travel distance involves a gain factor. Mis-estimates in both tasks can be explained with the same leak rate and gain in both conditions. Our results thus suggest that observers do not simply integrate traveled distance and then relate it to the task. Instead, the internally represented variable is either distance from the origin or distance to the goal, whichever is relevant.

  11. Heart Motion Prediction Based on Adaptive Estimation Algorithms for Robotic Assisted Beating Heart Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Tuna, E. Erdem; Franke, Timothy J.; Bebek, Özkan; Shiose, Akira; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2013-01-01

    Robotic assisted beating heart surgery aims to allow surgeons to operate on a beating heart without stabilizers as if the heart is stationary. The robot actively cancels heart motion by closely following a point of interest (POI) on the heart surface—a process called Active Relative Motion Canceling (ARMC). Due to the high bandwidth of the POI motion, it is necessary to supply the controller with an estimate of the immediate future of the POI motion over a prediction horizon in order to achieve sufficient tracking accuracy. In this paper, two least-square based prediction algorithms, using an adaptive filter to generate future position estimates, are implemented and studied. The first method assumes a linear system relation between the consecutive samples in the prediction horizon. On the contrary, the second method performs this parametrization independently for each point over the whole the horizon. The effects of predictor parameters and variations in heart rate on tracking performance are studied with constant and varying heart rate data. The predictors are evaluated using a 3 degrees of freedom test-bed and prerecorded in-vivo motion data. Then, the one-step prediction and tracking performances of the presented approaches are compared with an Extended Kalman Filter predictor. Finally, the essential features of the proposed prediction algorithms are summarized. PMID:23976889

  12. Estimation of self-motion duration and distance in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Kautzky, Magdalena

    2016-01-01

    Spatial orientation and navigation rely on information about landmarks and self-motion cues gained from multi-sensory sources. In this study, we focused on self-motion and examined the capability of rodents to extract and make use of information about own movement, i.e. path integration. Path integration has been investigated in depth in insects and humans. Demonstrations in rodents, however, mostly stem from experiments on heading direction; less is known about distance estimation. We introduce a novel behavioural paradigm that allows for probing temporal and spatial contributions to path integration. The paradigm is a bisection task comprising movement in a virtual reality environment in combination with either timing the duration ran or estimating the distance covered. We performed experiments with Mongolian gerbils and could show that the animals can keep track of time and distance during spatial navigation. PMID:27293792

  13. Estimation of self-motion duration and distance in rodents.

    PubMed

    Kautzky, Magdalena; Thurley, Kay

    2016-05-01

    Spatial orientation and navigation rely on information about landmarks and self-motion cues gained from multi-sensory sources. In this study, we focused on self-motion and examined the capability of rodents to extract and make use of information about own movement, i.e. path integration. Path integration has been investigated in depth in insects and humans. Demonstrations in rodents, however, mostly stem from experiments on heading direction; less is known about distance estimation. We introduce a novel behavioural paradigm that allows for probing temporal and spatial contributions to path integration. The paradigm is a bisection task comprising movement in a virtual reality environment in combination with either timing the duration ran or estimating the distance covered. We performed experiments with Mongolian gerbils and could show that the animals can keep track of time and distance during spatial navigation.

  14. Projection-based block-matching motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Chengjie; Tran, Trac D.; Prince, Jerry L.; Topiwala, Pankaj N.

    2000-12-01

    This paper introduces a fast block-based motion estimation algorithm based on matching projections. The idea is simple: blocks cannot match well if their corresponding 1D projections do not match well. We can take advantage of this observation to translate the expensive 2D block matching problem to a simpler 1D matching one by quickly eliminating a majority of matching candidates. Our novel motion estimation algorithm offers computational scalability through a single parameter and global optimum can still be achieved. Moreover, an efficient implementation to compute projections and to buffer recyclable data is also presented. Experiments show that the proposed algorithm is several times faster than the exhaustive search algorithm with nearly identical prediction performance. With the proposed BME method, high-performance real-time all- software video encoding starts to become practical for reasonable video sizes.

  15. An Alternative Estimate of the Motion of the Capricorn Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burris, S. G.; Gordon, R. G.

    2013-12-01

    Diffuse plate boundaries cover ~15% of Earth's surface and can exceed 1000 km in across-strike width. Deforming oceanic lithosphere in the equatorial Indian Ocean accommodates the motion between the India and Capricorn plates and serves as their mutual diffuse plate boundary. This deforming lithosphere lies between the Central Indian Ridge to the west and the Sumatra trench to the east; the plates diverge to the west of ≈74°E and converge to the east of it. Many data have shown that the pole of rotation between the India and Capricorn plates lies within this diffuse plate boundary [1,2]. Surprisingly, however, the recently estimated angular velocity in the MORVEL global set of angular velocities [3] places this pole of rotation north of prior poles by several degrees, and north of the diffuse plate boundary. The motion between the India and Capricorn plates can only be estimated indirectly by differencing the motion of the India plate relative to the Somalia plate, on the one hand, and the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Somalia plate, on the other. While the MORVEL India-Somalia angular velocity is similar to prior estimates, the MORVEL Capricorn-Somalia pole of rotation lies northwest of its predecessors. The difference is not caused by new transform azimuth data incorporated into MORVEL or by the new application of a correction to spreading rates for outward displacement. Instead the difference appears to be caused by a few anomalous spreading rates near the northern end of the Capricorn-Somalia plate boundary along the Central Indian Ridge. Rejecting these data leads to consistency with prior results. Implications for the motion of the Capricorn plate relative to Australia will be discussed. [1] DeMets, C., R. G. Gordon, and J.-Y. Royer, 2005. Motion between the Indian, Capricorn, and Somalian plates since 20 Ma: implications for the timing and magnitude of distributed deformation in the equatorial Indian ocean, Geophys. J. Int., 161, 445-468. [2

  16. Analysis of accuracy in optical motion capture - A protocol for laboratory setup evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Patric; Ferraro, Matteo; Minder, Ursina; Denton, Trevor; Blasimann, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Baur, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    Validity and reliability as scientific quality criteria have to be considered when using optical motion capture (OMC) for research purposes. Literature and standards recommend individual laboratory setup evaluation. However, system characteristics such as trueness, precision and uncertainty are often not addressed in scientific reports on 3D human movement analysis. One reason may be the lack of simple and practical methods for evaluating accuracy parameters of OMC. A protocol was developed for investigating the accuracy of an OMC system (Vicon, volume 5.5×1.2×2.0m(3)) with standard laboratory equipment and by means of trueness and uncertainty of marker distances. The study investigated the effects of number of cameras (6, 8 and 10), measurement height (foot, knee and hip) and movement condition (static and dynamic) on accuracy. Number of cameras, height and movement condition affected system accuracy significantly. For lower body assessment during level walking, the most favorable setting (10 cameras, foot region) revealed mean trueness and uncertainty to be -0.08 and 0.33mm, respectively. Dynamic accuracy cannot be predicted based on static error assessments. Dynamic procedures have to be used instead. The significant influence of the number of cameras and the measurement location suggests that instrumental errors should be evaluated in a laboratory- and task-specific manner. The use of standard laboratory equipment makes the proposed procedure widely applicable and it supports the setup process of OCM by simple functional error assessment. Careful system configuration and thorough measurement process control are needed to produce high-quality data.

  17. Analysis of accuracy in optical motion capture - A protocol for laboratory setup evaluation.

    PubMed

    Eichelberger, Patric; Ferraro, Matteo; Minder, Ursina; Denton, Trevor; Blasimann, Angela; Krause, Fabian; Baur, Heiner

    2016-07-01

    Validity and reliability as scientific quality criteria have to be considered when using optical motion capture (OMC) for research purposes. Literature and standards recommend individual laboratory setup evaluation. However, system characteristics such as trueness, precision and uncertainty are often not addressed in scientific reports on 3D human movement analysis. One reason may be the lack of simple and practical methods for evaluating accuracy parameters of OMC. A protocol was developed for investigating the accuracy of an OMC system (Vicon, volume 5.5×1.2×2.0m(3)) with standard laboratory equipment and by means of trueness and uncertainty of marker distances. The study investigated the effects of number of cameras (6, 8 and 10), measurement height (foot, knee and hip) and movement condition (static and dynamic) on accuracy. Number of cameras, height and movement condition affected system accuracy significantly. For lower body assessment during level walking, the most favorable setting (10 cameras, foot region) revealed mean trueness and uncertainty to be -0.08 and 0.33mm, respectively. Dynamic accuracy cannot be predicted based on static error assessments. Dynamic procedures have to be used instead. The significant influence of the number of cameras and the measurement location suggests that instrumental errors should be evaluated in a laboratory- and task-specific manner. The use of standard laboratory equipment makes the proposed procedure widely applicable and it supports the setup process of OCM by simple functional error assessment. Careful system configuration and thorough measurement process control are needed to produce high-quality data. PMID:27230474

  18. Motion correction for myocardial T1 mapping using image registration with synthetic image estimation.

    PubMed

    Xue, Hui; Shah, Saurabh; Greiser, Andreas; Guetter, Christoph; Littmann, Arne; Jolly, Marie-Pierre; Arai, Andrew E; Zuehlsdorff, Sven; Guehring, Jens; Kellman, Peter

    2012-06-01

    Quantification of myocardial T1 relaxation has potential value in the diagnosis of both ischemic and nonischemic cardiomyopathies. Image acquisition using the modified Look-Locker inversion recovery technique is clinically feasible for T1 mapping. However, respiratory motion limits its applicability and degrades the accuracy of T1 estimation. The robust registration of acquired inversion recovery images is particularly challenging due to the large changes in image contrast, especially for those images acquired near the signal null point of the inversion recovery and other inversion times for which there is little tissue contrast. In this article, we propose a novel motion correction algorithm. This approach is based on estimating synthetic images presenting contrast changes similar to the acquired images. The estimation of synthetic images is formulated as a variational energy minimization problem. Validation on a consecutive patient data cohort shows that this strategy can perform robust nonrigid registration to align inversion recovery images experiencing significant motion and lead to suppression of motion induced artifacts in the T1 map.

  19. Estimation of Rigid-Body and Respiratory Motion of the Heart From Marker-Tracking Data for SPECT Motion Correction

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Joyeeta Mitra; McNamara, Joseph E.; Johnson, Karen L.; Dey, Joyoni; King, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    Motion of patients undergoing cardiac SPECT perfusion imaging causes artifacts in the acquired images which may lead to difficulty in interpretation. Our work investigates a technique of obtaining patient motion estimates from retro-reflective markers on stretchy bands wrapped around the chest and abdomen of patients being imaged clinically. Motion signals obtained from the markers consist of at least two components, body motion (BM) and periodic motion (PM) due to respiration. We present a method for separating these components from the motion-tracking data of each marker, and then report a method for combining the BM estimated from chest markers to estimate the 6-degree-of-freedom (6-DOF) rigid-body motion (RBM) of the heart. Motion studies of volunteers and patients are used to evaluate the methods. Illustrative examples of the motion of the heart due to patient body movement and respiration (upward creep) are presented and compared to estimates of the motion of the heart obtained directly from SPECT data. Our motion-tracking method is seen to give reasonable agreement with the motion-estimates from the SPECT data while being considerably less noisy. PMID:20539825

  20. Population activity in the human dorsal pathway predicts the accuracy of visual motion detection.

    PubMed

    Donner, Tobias H; Siegel, Markus; Oostenveld, Robert; Fries, Pascal; Bauer, Markus; Engel, Andreas K

    2007-07-01

    A person's ability to detect a weak visual target stimulus varies from one viewing to the next. We tested whether the trial-to-trial fluctuations of neural population activity in the human brain are related to the fluctuations of behavioral performance in a "yes-no" visual motion-detection task. We recorded neural population activity with whole head magnetoencephalography (MEG) while subjects searched for a weak coherent motion signal embedded in spatiotemporal noise. We found that, during motion viewing, MEG activity in the 12- to 24-Hz ("beta") frequency range is higher, on average, before correct behavioral choices than before errors and that it predicts correct choices on a trial-by-trial basis. This performance-predictive activity is not evident in the prestimulus baseline and builds up slowly after stimulus onset. Source reconstruction revealed that the performance-predictive activity is expressed in the posterior parietal and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices and, less strongly, in the visual motion-sensitive area MT+. The 12- to 24-Hz activity in these key stages of the human dorsal visual pathway is correlated with behavioral choice in both target-present and target-absent conditions. Importantly, in the absence of the target, 12- to 24-Hz activity tends to be higher before "no" choices ("correct rejects") than before "yes" choices ("false alarms"). It thus predicts the accuracy, and not the content, of subjects' upcoming perceptual reports. We conclude that beta band activity in the human dorsal visual pathway indexes, and potentially controls, the efficiency of neural computations underlying simple perceptual decisions.

  1. Estimating Classification Consistency and Accuracy for Cognitive Diagnostic Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cui, Ying; Gierl, Mark J.; Chang, Hua-Hua

    2012-01-01

    This article introduces procedures for the computation and asymptotic statistical inference for classification consistency and accuracy indices specifically designed for cognitive diagnostic assessments. The new classification indices can be used as important indicators of the reliability and validity of classification results produced by…

  2. Application of universal kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion: Statistical significance of results

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, J.R.; Roberts, K.P.

    1989-02-01

    Universal kriging is compared with ordinary kriging for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Ordinary kriging is based on a stationary random function model; universal kriging is based on a nonstationary random function model representing first-order drift. Accuracy of universal kriging is compared with that for ordinary kriging; cross-validation is used as the basis for comparison. Hypothesis testing on these results shows that accuracy obtained using universal kriging is not significantly different from accuracy obtained using ordinary kriging. Test based on normal distribution assumptions are applied to errors measured in the cross-validation procedure; t and F tests reveal no evidence to suggest universal and ordinary kriging are different for estimation of earthquake ground motion. Nonparametric hypothesis tests applied to these errors and jackknife statistics yield the same conclusion: universal and ordinary kriging are not significantly different for this application as determined by a cross-validation procedure. These results are based on application to four independent data sets (four different seismic events).

  3. Accuracy of Estimations of Measurements by Students with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, M. Gail; Forrester, Jennifer H.; Robertson, Laura E.; Gardner, Grant E.; Taylor, Amy R.

    2012-01-01

    There is a dearth of information about how students with visual impairments learn science-process skills. This study investigated students' concepts and skills in one science area: the estimation of measurements. The estimation of measurements is one of the fundamental concepts that connects all science disciplines that provide the necessary…

  4. ACCURACY OF THE 1992 NATIONAL LAND COVER DATASET AREA ESTIMATES: AN ANALYSIS AT MULTIPLE SPATIAL EXTENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract for poster presentation:

    Site-specific accuracy assessments evaluate fine-scale accuracy of land-use/land-cover(LULC) datasets but provide little insight into accuracy of area estimates of LULC

    classes derived from sampling units of varying size. Additiona...

  5. Accuracy and precision of gait events derived from motion capture in horses during walk and trot.

    PubMed

    Boye, Jenny Katrine; Thomsen, Maj Halling; Pfau, Thilo; Olsen, Emil

    2014-03-21

    This study aimed to create an evidence base for detection of stance-phase timings from motion capture in horses. The objective was to compare the accuracy (bias) and precision (SD) for five published algorithms for the detection of hoof-on and hoof-off using force plates as the reference standard. Six horses were walked and trotted over eight force plates surrounded by a synchronised 12-camera infrared motion capture system. The five algorithms (A-E) were based on: (A) horizontal velocity of the hoof; (B) Fetlock angle and horizontal hoof velocity; (C) horizontal displacement of the hoof relative to the centre of mass; (D) horizontal velocity of the hoof relative to the Centre of Mass and; (E) vertical acceleration of the hoof. A total of 240 stance phases in walk and 240 stance phases in trot were included in the assessment. Method D provided the most accurate and precise results in walk for stance phase duration with a bias of 4.1% for front limbs and 4.8% for hind limbs. For trot we derived a combination of method A for hoof-on and method E for hoof-off resulting in a bias of -6.2% of stance in the front limbs and method B for the hind limbs with a bias of 3.8% of stance phase duration. We conclude that motion capture yields accurate and precise detection of gait events for horses walking and trotting over ground and the results emphasise a need for different algorithms for front limbs versus hind limbs in trot.

  6. A mathematical model for efficient estimation of aircraft motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bach, R. E., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    In the usual formulation of the aircraft state-estimation problem, motions along a flight trajectory are represented by a plant consisting of nonlinear state and measurement models. Problem solution using this formulation requires that both state- and measurement-dependent Jacobian matrices be evaluated along any trajectory. In this paper it is shown that a set of state variables can be chosen to realize a linear state model of very simple form, such that all nonlinearities appear in the measurement model. The potential advantage of the new formulation is computational: the Jacobian matrix corresponding to a linear state model is constant, a feature that should outweigh the fact that the measurement model is more complicated than in the conventinal formulation. To compare the modeling methods, aircraft motions from typical flight-test and accident data were estimated, using each formulation with the same off-line (smoothing) algorithm. The results of these experiments, reported in the paper, demonstrate clearly the computational superiority of the linear state-variable formulation. The procedure advocated here may be extended to other nonlinear estimation problems, including on-line (filtering) applications.

  7. Shape estimation of gastrointestinal polyps using motion information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruano, Josue; Martinez, Fabio; Gomez, Martin; Romero, Eduardo

    2013-11-01

    Polyp size quanti cation is currently the main variable for deciding the patient treatment during an endoscopic procedure. Nowadays, the polyp size is estimated by an expert, even when using devices that are provided with calibrated grids. As such estimation is highly subjective, automatic approaches have come to be appealing but also challenging because the polyp shape and appearance variability, the di erent types of motion present during the capture and the specular highlight noise. This work presents a novel approach to automatically estimate gastrointestinal polyp shapes in a video endoscopic sequence using spatiotemporal information. For doing so, a local spatio temporal descriptor is built up to obtain an initial segmentation since the polyp is the region with more movement. Then, an initial polyp manual segmentation outlines a region of interest (RoI) in the rst frame of the sequence and used as a reference for the polyp tracking during the sequence. Afterward, an exhaustive cross-correlation of the initial shape is carried out along the sequence and fused with the motion descriptor to re ne the original segmentation. The proposed approach was evaluated in 15 real video sequences achieving an average DSC score of 0:67% .

  8. Accuracy of Same-Subject Estimates: Are Two Judgements Better Than One.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bastick, Tony

    The accuracy of the mean of two estimates was compared with the accuracy of a single independent estimate from the same subject. A subject was asked to estimate the size of one attribute of a constant stimulus, e.g., the total of a set of numbers. The same subject was also asked to give an estimate for an upper and lower bound on the size of the…

  9. Accuracy of heritability estimations in presence of hidden population stratification

    PubMed Central

    Dandine-Roulland, Claire; Bellenguez, Céline; Debette, Stéphanie; Amouyel, Philippe; Génin, Emmanuelle; Perdry, Hervé

    2016-01-01

    The heritability of a trait is the proportion of its variance explained by genetic factors; it has historically been estimated using familial data. However, new methods have appeared for estimating heritabilities using genomewide data from unrelated individuals. A drawback of this strategy is that population stratification can bias the estimates. Indeed, an environmental factor associated with the phenotype may differ among population subgroups. This factor being associated both with the phenotype and the genetic variation in the population would be a confounder. A common solution consists in adjusting on the first Principal Components (PCs) of the genomic data. We study this procedure on simulated data and on 6000 individuals from the Three-City Study. We analyse the geographical coordinates of the birth cities, which are not genetically determined, but the heritability of which should be overestimated due to population stratification. We also analyse various anthropometric traits. The procedure fails to correct the bias in geographical coordinates heritability estimates. The heritability estimates of the anthropometric traits are affected by the inclusion of the first PC, but not by the following PCs, contrarily to geographical coordinates. We recommend to be cautious with heritability estimates obtained from a large population. PMID:27220488

  10. SU-E-J-188: Theoretical Estimation of Margin Necessary for Markerless Motion Tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, R; Block, A; Harkenrider, M; Roeske, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To estimate the margin necessary to adequately cover the target using markerless motion tracking (MMT) of lung lesions given the uncertainty in tracking and the size of the target. Methods: Simulations were developed in Matlab to determine the effect of tumor size and tracking uncertainty on the margin necessary to achieve adequate coverage of the target. For simplicity, the lung tumor was approximated by a circle on a 2D radiograph. The tumor was varied in size from a diameter of 0.1 − 30 mm in increments of 0.1 mm. From our previous studies using dual energy markerless motion tracking, we estimated tracking uncertainties in x and y to have a standard deviation of 2 mm. A Gaussian was used to simulate the deviation between the tracked location and true target location. For each size tumor, 100,000 deviations were randomly generated, the margin necessary to achieve at least 95% coverage 95% of the time was recorded. Additional simulations were run for varying uncertainties to demonstrate the effect of the tracking accuracy on the margin size. Results: The simulations showed an inverse relationship between tumor size and margin necessary to achieve 95% coverage 95% of the time using the MMT technique. The margin decreased exponentially with target size. An increase in tracking accuracy expectedly showed a decrease in margin size as well. Conclusion: In our clinic a 5 mm expansion of the internal target volume (ITV) is used to define the planning target volume (PTV). These simulations show that for tracking accuracies in x and y better than 2 mm, the margin required is less than 5 mm. This simple simulation can provide physicians with a guideline estimation for the margin necessary for use of MMT clinically based on the accuracy of their tracking and the size of the tumor.

  11. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  12. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H. N.; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J. W.; van den Berg, Cornelis A. T.

    2016-07-01

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0–1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  13. Image-driven, model-based 3D abdominal motion estimation for MR-guided radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stemkens, Bjorn; Tijssen, Rob H N; de Senneville, Baudouin Denis; Lagendijk, Jan J W; van den Berg, Cornelis A T

    2016-07-21

    Respiratory motion introduces substantial uncertainties in abdominal radiotherapy for which traditionally large margins are used. The MR-Linac will open up the opportunity to acquire high resolution MR images just prior to radiation and during treatment. However, volumetric MRI time series are not able to characterize 3D tumor and organ-at-risk motion with sufficient temporal resolution. In this study we propose a method to estimate 3D deformation vector fields (DVFs) with high spatial and temporal resolution based on fast 2D imaging and a subject-specific motion model based on respiratory correlated MRI. In a pre-beam phase, a retrospectively sorted 4D-MRI is acquired, from which the motion is parameterized using a principal component analysis. This motion model is used in combination with fast 2D cine-MR images, which are acquired during radiation, to generate full field-of-view 3D DVFs with a temporal resolution of 476 ms. The geometrical accuracies of the input data (4D-MRI and 2D multi-slice acquisitions) and the fitting procedure were determined using an MR-compatible motion phantom and found to be 1.0-1.5 mm on average. The framework was tested on seven healthy volunteers for both the pancreas and the kidney. The calculated motion was independently validated using one of the 2D slices, with an average error of 1.45 mm. The calculated 3D DVFs can be used retrospectively for treatment simulations, plan evaluations, or to determine the accumulated dose for both the tumor and organs-at-risk on a subject-specific basis in MR-guided radiotherapy.

  14. Dense motion field estimation from myocardial boundary displacements.

    PubMed

    Morais, Pedro; Queirós, Sandro; Ferreira, Adriano; Rodrigues, Nuno F; Baptista, Maria J; D'hooge, Jan; Vilaça, João L; Barbosa, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive cardiovascular interventions guided by multiple imaging modalities are rapidly gaining clinical acceptance for the treatment of several cardiovascular diseases. These images are typically fused with richly detailed pre-operative scans through registration techniques, enhancing the intra-operative clinical data and easing the image-guided procedures. Nonetheless, rigid models have been used to align the different modalities, not taking into account the anatomical variations of the cardiac muscle throughout the cardiac cycle. In the current study, we present a novel strategy to compensate the beat-to-beat physiological adaptation of the myocardium. Hereto, we intend to prove that a complete myocardial motion field can be quickly recovered from the displacement field at the myocardial boundaries, therefore being an efficient strategy to locally deform the cardiac muscle. We address this hypothesis by comparing three different strategies to recover a dense myocardial motion field from a sparse one, namely, a diffusion-based approach, thin-plate splines, and multiquadric radial basis functions. Two experimental setups were used to validate the proposed strategy. First, an in silico validation was carried out on synthetic motion fields obtained from two realistic simulated ultrasound sequences. Then, 45 mid-ventricular 2D sequences of cine magnetic resonance imaging were processed to further evaluate the different approaches. The results showed that accurate boundary tracking combined with dense myocardial recovery via interpolation/diffusion is a potentially viable solution to speed up dense myocardial motion field estimation and, consequently, to deform/compensate the myocardial wall throughout the cardiac cycle. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Real time estimation of ship motions using Kalman filtering techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triantafyllou, M. S.; Bodson, M.; Athans, M.

    1983-01-01

    The estimation of the heave, pitch, roll, sway, and yaw motions of a DD-963 destroyer is studied, using Kalman filtering techniques, for application in VTOL aircraft landing. The governing equations are obtained from hydrodynamic considerations in the form of linear differential equations with frequency dependent coefficients. In addition, nonminimum phase characteristics are obtained due to the spatial integration of the water wave forces. The resulting transfer matrix function is irrational and nonminimum phase. The conditions for a finite-dimensional approximation are considered and the impact of the various parameters is assessed. A detailed numerical application for a DD-963 destroyer is presented and simulations of the estimations obtained from Kalman filters are discussed.

  16. Fast-coding robust motion estimation model in a GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Carlos; Botella, Guillermo; de Sande, Francisco; Prieto-Matias, Manuel

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays vision systems are used with countless purposes. Moreover, the motion estimation is a discipline that allow to extract relevant information as pattern segmentation, 3D structure or tracking objects. However, the real-time requirements in most applications has limited its consolidation, considering the adoption of high performance systems to meet response times. With the emergence of so-called highly parallel devices known as accelerators this gap has narrowed. Two extreme endpoints in the spectrum of most common accelerators are Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and Graphics Processing Systems (GPU), which usually offer higher performance rates than general propose processors. Moreover, the use of GPUs as accelerators involves the efficient exploitation of any parallelism in the target application. This task is not easy because performance rates are affected by many aspects that programmers should overcome. In this paper, we evaluate OpenACC standard, a programming model with directives which favors porting any code to a GPU in the context of motion estimation application. The results confirm that this programming paradigm is suitable for this image processing applications achieving a very satisfactory acceleration in convolution based problems as in the well-known Lucas & Kanade method.

  17. Epicentral parameter estimation from intensity data of uncertain accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilham, R. G.; Singh, B.; Szeliga, W. M.; Hough, S.

    2009-12-01

    In parts of the world where seismic productivity is sparse we must rely on the historical record to provide estimates of future seismic hazard. Paleoseismic data can constrain location and magnitude for those earthquakes whose ruptures breach the surface, but for most earthquakes prior to 1900 almost all that is known of them comes from felt intensity data. Empirical approaches have hitherto been used to estimate both location and magnitude from these data, but isoseismal contouring methods, with or without computer aided interpolation are often biased by the user. Numerical methods to avoid isoseismal estimation appear to circumvent this bias but where we have been able to test such methods with sparse data we have found the location and magnitude can be critically dependent on a few key observations. The inclusion or rejection of these critical data again introduces a user bias. The most acceptable approach is to provide an uncertainty to each intensity observation, and to include this uncertainty in the calculations of probable location and magnitude. Examples, of this approach are provided for the Allah Bund 1819 and Kashmir 1555, 1885, and 2005 earthquakes in India.

  18. Fine-Motion-Control Method for Realizing High-Accuracy and High-Speed Contact Motion of Industrial Robots by Employing Sensorless Force Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Naoki; Yoshioka, Takashi; Ohishi, Kiyoshi; Miyazaki, Toshimasa

    This paper proposes a new fine-motion-control method for realizing high-accuracy and high-speed contact motion of industrial robots by employing sensorless force control. Today, although industrial robots have become considerably important in the modern industrial society, their functions are limited. A typical limited function is the positioning motion control of robots used in the manufacturing industry. Contact motion is necessary for almost all new applications. In this study, by employing the proposed motion control, smooth and quick contact motion of industrial robots is realized by using a sensorless I-P (Integral-Proportional) force feedback controller. The proposed method is simple and effective, takes into account both the inertia of a robot and the behavior of the I-P force controller. In the experiments, a three-degree-of-freedom robot is brought into contact with an object (a concrete block or a rubber board) by the I-P force control using the proposed method. Further, in the experiment, the motion of the robot's end-effector was considered. The validity of the proposed method is confirmed by using a six-axis force sensor and an acceleration sensor in the contact motion experiments.

  19. Motion field estimation for a dynamic scene using a 3D LiDAR.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-09-09

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively.

  20. Motion Field Estimation for a Dynamic Scene Using a 3D LiDAR

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qingquan; Zhang, Liang; Mao, Qingzhou; Zou, Qin; Zhang, Pin; Feng, Shaojun; Ochieng, Washington

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel motion field estimation method based on a 3D light detection and ranging (LiDAR) sensor for motion sensing for intelligent driverless vehicles and active collision avoidance systems. Unlike multiple target tracking methods, which estimate the motion state of detected targets, such as cars and pedestrians, motion field estimation regards the whole scene as a motion field in which each little element has its own motion state. Compared to multiple target tracking, segmentation errors and data association errors have much less significance in motion field estimation, making it more accurate and robust. This paper presents an intact 3D LiDAR-based motion field estimation method, including pre-processing, a theoretical framework for the motion field estimation problem and practical solutions. The 3D LiDAR measurements are first projected to small-scale polar grids, and then, after data association and Kalman filtering, the motion state of every moving grid is estimated. To reduce computing time, a fast data association algorithm is proposed. Furthermore, considering the spatial correlation of motion among neighboring grids, a novel spatial-smoothing algorithm is also presented to optimize the motion field. The experimental results using several data sets captured in different cities indicate that the proposed motion field estimation is able to run in real-time and performs robustly and effectively. PMID:25207868

  1. Estimation of the accuracy with which the position of the center of mass of an Interkosmos series artificial earth satellite is calculated. [the effect of atmospheric density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elyasberg, P. Y.; Kugayenko, B. V.; Voyskovskiy, M. I.

    1975-01-01

    The effects of disturbing forces on position calculation, and errors in the initial conditions of motion and in the selected assignment calculation schemes are estimated. It is shown that the main disturbing effects on the accuracy are due to density variations of the upper atmosphere. Recommendations are presented for estimating the calculation accuracy along with an example of such an estimate for the Interkosmos-7 artificial earth satellite. Other factors considered include the adopted scheme and computational algorithms used, effects of disturbing forces not taken into account earlier, and errors in the values of constants and in models of disturbing forces.

  2. Real-Time Baseline Error Estimation and Correction for GNSS/Strong Motion Seismometer Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C. Y. N.; Groves, P. D.; Ziebart, M. K.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate and rapid estimation of permanent surface displacement is required immediately after a slip event for earthquake monitoring or tsunami early warning. It is difficult to achieve the necessary accuracy and precision at high- and low-frequencies using GNSS or seismometry alone. GNSS and seismic sensors can be integrated to overcome the limitations of each. Kalman filter algorithms with displacement and velocity states have been developed to combine GNSS and accelerometer observations to obtain the optimal displacement solutions. However, the sawtooth-like phenomena caused by the bias or tilting of the sensor decrease the accuracy of the displacement estimates. A three-dimensional Kalman filter algorithm with an additional baseline error state has been developed. An experiment with both a GNSS receiver and a strong motion seismometer mounted on a movable platform and subjected to known displacements was carried out. The results clearly show that the additional baseline error state enables the Kalman filter to estimate the instrument's sensor bias and tilt effects and correct the state estimates in real time. Furthermore, the proposed Kalman filter algorithm has been validated with data sets from the 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah Earthquake. The results indicate that the additional baseline error state can not only eliminate the linear and quadratic drifts but also reduce the sawtooth-like effects from the displacement solutions. The conventional zero-mean baseline-corrected results cannot show the permanent displacements after an earthquake; the two-state Kalman filter can only provide stable and optimal solutions if the strong motion seismometer had not been moved or tilted by the earthquake. Yet the proposed Kalman filter can achieve the precise and accurate displacements by estimating and correcting for the baseline error at each epoch. The integration filters out noise-like distortions and thus improves the real-time detection and measurement capability

  3. Improving the Accuracy of Estimation of Climate Extremes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolina, Olga; Detemmerman, Valery; Trenberth, Kevin E.

    2010-12-01

    Workshop on Metrics and Methodologies of Estimation of Extreme Climate Events; Paris, France, 27-29 September 2010; Climate projections point toward more frequent and intense weather and climate extremes such as heat waves, droughts, and floods, in a warmer climate. These projections, together with recent extreme climate events, including flooding in Pakistan and the heat wave and wildfires in Russia, highlight the need for improved risk assessments to help decision makers and the public. But accurate analysis and prediction of risk of extreme climate events require new methodologies and information from diverse disciplines. A recent workshop sponsored by the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) and hosted at United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) headquarters in France brought together, for the first time, a unique mix of climatologists, statisticians, meteorologists, oceanographers, social scientists, and risk managers (such as those from insurance companies) who sought ways to improve scientists' ability to characterize and predict climate extremes in a changing climate.

  4. Lumbar joint torque estimation based on simplified motion measurement using multiple inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Saori; Tanaka, Takayuki; Imamura, Yumeko; Kusaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We estimate lumbar torque based on motion measurement using only three inertial sensors. First, human motion is measured by a 6-axis motion tracking device that combines a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis gyroscope placed on the shank, thigh, and back. Next, the lumbar joint torque during the motion is estimated by kinematic musculoskeletal simulation. The conventional method for estimating joint torque uses full body motion data measured by an optical motion capture system. However, in this research, joint torque is estimated by using only three link angles of the body, thigh, and shank. The utility of our method was verified by experiments. We measured motion of bendung knee and waist simultaneously. As the result, we were able to estimate the lumbar joint torque from measured motion. PMID:26737834

  5. Lumbar joint torque estimation based on simplified motion measurement using multiple inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Miyajima, Saori; Tanaka, Takayuki; Imamura, Yumeko; Kusaka, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    We estimate lumbar torque based on motion measurement using only three inertial sensors. First, human motion is measured by a 6-axis motion tracking device that combines a 3-axis accelerometer and a 3-axis gyroscope placed on the shank, thigh, and back. Next, the lumbar joint torque during the motion is estimated by kinematic musculoskeletal simulation. The conventional method for estimating joint torque uses full body motion data measured by an optical motion capture system. However, in this research, joint torque is estimated by using only three link angles of the body, thigh, and shank. The utility of our method was verified by experiments. We measured motion of bendung knee and waist simultaneously. As the result, we were able to estimate the lumbar joint torque from measured motion.

  6. Determining the Accuracy of Aerodynamic Model Parameters Estimated from Flight Test Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1995-01-01

    An important part of building mathematical models based on measured data is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of this accuracy, the parameter estimates themselves have limited value. In this work, an expression for computing quantitatively correct parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood parameter estimates with colored residuals is developed and validated. This result is important because experience in analyzing flight test data reveals that the output residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Monte Carlo simulation runs were used to show that parameter accuracy measures from the new technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for correction factors or frequency domain analysis of the output residuals. The technique was applied to flight test data from repeated maneuvers flown on the F-18 High Alpha Research Vehicle (HARV). As in the simulated cases, parameter accuracy measures from the new technique were in agreement with the scatter in the parameter estimates from repeated maneuvers, while conventional parameter accuracy measures were optimistic.

  7. Influence of ultrasound speckle tracking strategies for motion and strain estimation.

    PubMed

    Curiale, Ariel H; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Speckle Tracking is one of the most prominent techniques used to estimate the regional movement of the heart based on ultrasound acquisitions. Many different approaches have been proposed, proving their suitability to obtain quantitative and qualitative information regarding myocardial deformation, motion and function assessment. New proposals to improve the basic algorithm usually focus on one of these three steps: (1) the similarity measure between images and the speckle model; (2) the transformation model, i.e. the type of motion considered between images; (3) the optimization strategies, such as the use of different optimization techniques in the transformation step or the inclusion of structural information. While many contributions have shown their good performance independently, it is not always clear how they perform when integrated in a whole pipeline. Every step will have a degree of influence over the following and hence over the final result. Thus, a Speckle Tracking pipeline must be analyzed as a whole when developing novel methods, since improvements in a particular step might be undermined by the choices taken in further steps. This work presents two main contributions: (1) We provide a complete analysis of the influence of the different steps in a Speckle Tracking pipeline over the motion and strain estimation accuracy. (2) The study proposes a methodology for the analysis of Speckle Tracking systems specifically designed to provide an easy and systematic way to include other strategies. We close the analysis with some conclusions and recommendations that can be used as an orientation of the degree of influence of the models for speckle, the transformation models, interpolation schemes and optimization strategies over the estimation of motion features. They can be further use to evaluate and design new strategy into a Speckle Tracking system. PMID:27132112

  8. Influence of ultrasound speckle tracking strategies for motion and strain estimation.

    PubMed

    Curiale, Ariel H; Vegas-Sánchez-Ferrero, Gonzalo; Aja-Fernández, Santiago

    2016-08-01

    Speckle Tracking is one of the most prominent techniques used to estimate the regional movement of the heart based on ultrasound acquisitions. Many different approaches have been proposed, proving their suitability to obtain quantitative and qualitative information regarding myocardial deformation, motion and function assessment. New proposals to improve the basic algorithm usually focus on one of these three steps: (1) the similarity measure between images and the speckle model; (2) the transformation model, i.e. the type of motion considered between images; (3) the optimization strategies, such as the use of different optimization techniques in the transformation step or the inclusion of structural information. While many contributions have shown their good performance independently, it is not always clear how they perform when integrated in a whole pipeline. Every step will have a degree of influence over the following and hence over the final result. Thus, a Speckle Tracking pipeline must be analyzed as a whole when developing novel methods, since improvements in a particular step might be undermined by the choices taken in further steps. This work presents two main contributions: (1) We provide a complete analysis of the influence of the different steps in a Speckle Tracking pipeline over the motion and strain estimation accuracy. (2) The study proposes a methodology for the analysis of Speckle Tracking systems specifically designed to provide an easy and systematic way to include other strategies. We close the analysis with some conclusions and recommendations that can be used as an orientation of the degree of influence of the models for speckle, the transformation models, interpolation schemes and optimization strategies over the estimation of motion features. They can be further use to evaluate and design new strategy into a Speckle Tracking system.

  9. Accuracy of estimating wolf summer territories by daytime locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demma, Dominic J.; Mech, L. David

    2011-01-01

    We used locations of 6 wolves (Canis lupus) in Minnesota from Global Positioning System (GPS) collars to compare day-versus-night locations to estimate territory size and location during summer. We employed both minimum convex polygon (MCP) and fixed kernel (FK) methods. We used two methods to partition GPS locations for day-versus-night home-range comparisons: (1) daytime = 0800–2000 h; nighttime = 2000–0800 h; and (2) sunup versus sundown. Regardless of location-partitioning method, mean area of daytime MCPs did not differ significantly from nighttime MCPs. Similarly, mean area of daytime FKs (95% probability contour) were not significantly different from nightime FKs. FK core use areas (50% probability contour) did not differ between daytime and nighttime nor between sunup and sundown locations. We conclude that in areas similar to our study area day-only locations are adequate for describing the location, extent and core use areas of summer wolf territories by both MCP and FK methods.

  10. Accuracy of estimating wolf summer territories by daytime locations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demma, D.J.; Mech, L.D.

    2011-01-01

    We used locations of 6 wolves (Canis lupus) in Minnesota from Global Positioning System (GPS) collars to compare day-versus-night locations to estimate territory size and location during summer. We employed both minimum convex polygon (MCP) and fixed kernel (FK) methods. We used two methods to partition GPS locations for day-versus-night home-range comparisons: (1) daytime = 0800-2000 Ah; nighttime = 2000-0800 Ah; and (2) sunup versus sundown. Regardless of location-partitioning method, mean area of daytime MCPs did not differ significantly from nighttime MCPs. Similarly, mean area of daytime FKs (95% probability contour) were not significantly different from nightime FKs. FK core use areas (50% probability contour) did not differ between daytime and nighttime nor between sunup and sundown locations. We conclude that in areas similar to our study area day-only locations are adequate for describing the location, extent and core use areas of summer wolf territories by both MCP and FK methods. ?? 2011 American Midland Naturalist.

  11. Two Approaches to Estimation of Classification Accuracy Rate under Item Response Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Quinn N.; Cheng, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Within the framework of item response theory (IRT), there are two recent lines of work on the estimation of classification accuracy (CA) rate. One approach estimates CA when decisions are made based on total sum scores, the other based on latent trait estimates. The former is referred to as the Lee approach, and the latter, the Rudner approach,…

  12. Estimation of spatial-temporal gait parameters using a low-cost ultrasonic motion analysis system.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications. PMID:25140636

  13. Estimation of Spatial-Temporal Gait Parameters Using a Low-Cost Ultrasonic Motion Analysis System

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a low-cost motion analysis system using a wireless ultrasonic sensor network is proposed and investigated. A methodology has been developed to extract spatial-temporal gait parameters including stride length, stride duration, stride velocity, stride cadence, and stride symmetry from 3D foot displacements estimated by the combination of spherical positioning technique and unscented Kalman filter. The performance of this system is validated against a camera-based system in the laboratory with 10 healthy volunteers. Numerical results show the feasibility of the proposed system with average error of 2.7% for all the estimated gait parameters. The influence of walking speed on the measurement accuracy of proposed system is also evaluated. Statistical analysis demonstrates its capability of being used as a gait assessment tool for some medical applications. PMID:25140636

  14. Optimal surface marker locations for tumor motion estimation in lung cancer radiotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Bin; Jiang Graves, Yan; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2012-12-01

    Using fiducial markers on the patient’s body surface to predict the tumor location is a widely used approach in lung cancer radiotherapy. The purpose of this work is to propose an algorithm that automatically identifies a sparse set of locations on the patient’s surface with the optimal prediction power for the tumor motion. In our algorithm, it is assumed that there is a linear relationship between the surface marker motion and the tumor motion. The sparse selection of markers on the external surface and the linear relationship between the marker motion and the internal tumor motion are represented by a prediction matrix. Such a matrix is determined by solving an optimization problem, where the objective function contains a sparsity term that penalizes the number of markers chosen on the patient’s surface. Bregman iteration is used to solve the proposed optimization problem. The performance of our algorithm has been tested on realistic clinical data of four lung cancer patients. Thoracic 4DCT scans with ten phases are used for the study. On a reference phase, a grid of points are casted on the patient’s surfaces (except for the patient’s back) and propagated to other phases via deformable image registration of the corresponding CT images. Tumor locations at each phase are also manually delineated. We use nine out of ten phases of the 4DCT images to identify a small group of surface markers that are mostly correlated with the motion of the tumor and find the prediction matrix at the same time. The tenth phase is then used to test the accuracy of the prediction. It is found that on average six to seven surface markers are necessary to predict tumor locations with a 3D error of about 1 mm. It is also found that the selected marker locations lie closely in those areas where surface point motion has a large amplitude and a high correlation with the tumor motion. Our method can automatically select sparse locations on the patient’s external surface and

  15. Reconstruction Accuracy Assessment of Surface and Underwater 3D Motion Analysis: A New Approach.

    PubMed

    de Jesus, Kelly; de Jesus, Karla; Figueiredo, Pedro; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo; Fernandes, Ricardo Jorge; Machado, Leandro José

    2015-01-01

    This study assessed accuracy of surface and underwater 3D reconstruction of a calibration volume with and without homography. A calibration volume (6000 × 2000 × 2500 mm) with 236 markers (64 above and 88 underwater control points--with 8 common points at water surface--and 92 validation points) was positioned on a 25 m swimming pool and recorded with two surface and four underwater cameras. Planar homography estimation for each calibration plane was computed to perform image rectification. Direct linear transformation algorithm for 3D reconstruction was applied, using 1600000 different combinations of 32 and 44 points out of the 64 and 88 control points for surface and underwater markers (resp.). Root Mean Square (RMS) error with homography of control and validations points was lower than without it for surface and underwater cameras (P ≤ 0.03). With homography, RMS errors of control and validation points were similar between surface and underwater cameras (P ≥ 0.47). Without homography, RMS error of control points was greater for underwater than surface cameras (P ≤ 0.04) and the opposite was observed for validation points (P ≤ 0.04). It is recommended that future studies using 3D reconstruction should include homography to improve swimming movement analysis accuracy.

  16. The Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) for Vehicle Motion State Estimation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Siwei; Liu, Yanheng; Wang, Jian; Deng, Weiwen; Oh, Heekuck

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-sensory Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) through extending innovation-based adaptive estimation (IAE) to estimate the motion state of the moving vehicles ahead. JAKF views Lidar and Radar data as the source of the local filters, which aims to adaptively adjust the measurement noise variance-covariance (V-C) matrix 'R' and the system noise V-C matrix 'Q'. Then, the global filter uses R to calculate the information allocation factor 'β' for data fusion. Finally, the global filter completes optimal data fusion and feeds back to the local filters to improve the measurement accuracy of the local filters. Extensive simulation and experimental results show that the JAKF has better adaptive ability and fault tolerance. JAKF enables one to bridge the gap of the accuracy difference of various sensors to improve the integral filtering effectivity. If any sensor breaks down, the filtered results of JAKF still can maintain a stable convergence rate. Moreover, the JAKF outperforms the conventional Kalman filter (CKF) and the innovation-based adaptive Kalman filter (IAKF) with respect to the accuracy of displacement, velocity, and acceleration, respectively. PMID:27438835

  17. The Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) for Vehicle Motion State Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Siwei; Liu, Yanheng; Wang, Jian; Deng, Weiwen; Oh, Heekuck

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a multi-sensory Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) through extending innovation-based adaptive estimation (IAE) to estimate the motion state of the moving vehicles ahead. JAKF views Lidar and Radar data as the source of the local filters, which aims to adaptively adjust the measurement noise variance-covariance (V-C) matrix ‘R’ and the system noise V-C matrix ‘Q’. Then, the global filter uses R to calculate the information allocation factor ‘β’ for data fusion. Finally, the global filter completes optimal data fusion and feeds back to the local filters to improve the measurement accuracy of the local filters. Extensive simulation and experimental results show that the JAKF has better adaptive ability and fault tolerance. JAKF enables one to bridge the gap of the accuracy difference of various sensors to improve the integral filtering effectivity. If any sensor breaks down, the filtered results of JAKF still can maintain a stable convergence rate. Moreover, the JAKF outperforms the conventional Kalman filter (CKF) and the innovation-based adaptive Kalman filter (IAKF) with respect to the accuracy of displacement, velocity, and acceleration, respectively. PMID:27438835

  18. The Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) for Vehicle Motion State Estimation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Siwei; Liu, Yanheng; Wang, Jian; Deng, Weiwen; Oh, Heekuck

    2016-07-16

    This paper proposes a multi-sensory Joint Adaptive Kalman Filter (JAKF) through extending innovation-based adaptive estimation (IAE) to estimate the motion state of the moving vehicles ahead. JAKF views Lidar and Radar data as the source of the local filters, which aims to adaptively adjust the measurement noise variance-covariance (V-C) matrix 'R' and the system noise V-C matrix 'Q'. Then, the global filter uses R to calculate the information allocation factor 'β' for data fusion. Finally, the global filter completes optimal data fusion and feeds back to the local filters to improve the measurement accuracy of the local filters. Extensive simulation and experimental results show that the JAKF has better adaptive ability and fault tolerance. JAKF enables one to bridge the gap of the accuracy difference of various sensors to improve the integral filtering effectivity. If any sensor breaks down, the filtered results of JAKF still can maintain a stable convergence rate. Moreover, the JAKF outperforms the conventional Kalman filter (CKF) and the innovation-based adaptive Kalman filter (IAKF) with respect to the accuracy of displacement, velocity, and acceleration, respectively.

  19. Automatic 3D motion estimation of left ventricle from C-arm rotational angiocardiography using a prior motion model and learning based boundary detector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingqing; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Mueller, Kerstin; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Compared to pre-operative imaging modalities, it is more convenient to estimate the current cardiac physiological status from C-arm angiocardiography since C-arm is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality to guide many cardiac interventions. The 3D shape and motion of the left ventricle (LV) estimated from rotational angiocardiography provide important cardiac function measurements, e.g., ejection fraction and myocardium motion dyssynchrony. However, automatic estimation of the 3D LV motion is difficult since all anatomical structures overlap on the 2D X-ray projections and the nearby confounding strong image boundaries (e.g., pericardium) often cause ambiguities to LV endocardium boundary detection. In this paper, a new framework is proposed to overcome the aforementioned difficulties: (1) A new learning-based boundary detector is developed by training a boosting boundary classifier combined with the principal component analysis of a local image patch; (2) The prior LV motion model is learned from a set of dynamic cardiac computed tomography (CT) sequences to provide a good initial estimate of the 3D LV shape of different cardiac phases; (3) The 3D motion trajectory is learned for each mesh point; (4) All these components are integrated into a multi-surface graph optimization method to extract the globally coherent motion. The method is tested on seven patient scans, showing significant improvement on the ambiguous boundary cases with a detection accuracy of 2.87 +/- 1.00 mm on LV endocardium boundary delineation in the 2D projections.

  20. Automatic 3D motion estimation of left ventricle from C-arm rotational angiocardiography using a prior motion model and learning based boundary detector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingqing; Zheng, Yefeng; Wang, Yang; Mueller, Kerstin; Lauritsch, Guenter

    2013-01-01

    Compared to pre-operative imaging modalities, it is more convenient to estimate the current cardiac physiological status from C-arm angiocardiography since C-arm is a widely used intra-operative imaging modality to guide many cardiac interventions. The 3D shape and motion of the left ventricle (LV) estimated from rotational angiocardiography provide important cardiac function measurements, e.g., ejection fraction and myocardium motion dyssynchrony. However, automatic estimation of the 3D LV motion is difficult since all anatomical structures overlap on the 2D X-ray projections and the nearby confounding strong image boundaries (e.g., pericardium) often cause ambiguities to LV endocardium boundary detection. In this paper, a new framework is proposed to overcome the aforementioned difficulties: (1) A new learning-based boundary detector is developed by training a boosting boundary classifier combined with the principal component analysis of a local image patch; (2) The prior LV motion model is learned from a set of dynamic cardiac computed tomography (CT) sequences to provide a good initial estimate of the 3D LV shape of different cardiac phases; (3) The 3D motion trajectory is learned for each mesh point; (4) All these components are integrated into a multi-surface graph optimization method to extract the globally coherent motion. The method is tested on seven patient scans, showing significant improvement on the ambiguous boundary cases with a detection accuracy of 2.87 +/- 1.00 mm on LV endocardium boundary delineation in the 2D projections. PMID:24505748

  1. Uav Aerial Survey: Accuracy Estimation for Automatically Generated Dense Digital Surface Model and Orthothoto Plan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altyntsev, M. A.; Arbuzov, S. A.; Popov, R. A.; Tsoi, G. V.; Gromov, M. O.

    2016-06-01

    A dense digital surface model is one of the products generated by using UAV aerial survey data. Today more and more specialized software are supplied with modules for generating such kind of models. The procedure for dense digital model generation can be completely or partly automated. Due to the lack of reliable criterion of accuracy estimation it is rather complicated to judge the generation validity of such models. One of such criterion can be mobile laser scanning data as a source for the detailed accuracy estimation of the dense digital surface model generation. These data may be also used to estimate the accuracy of digital orthophoto plans created by using UAV aerial survey data. The results of accuracy estimation for both kinds of products are presented in the paper.

  2. SAR imagery of moving targets: application of time-frequency distributions for estimating motion parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haimovich, Alexander M.; Peckham, C. D.; Teti, Joseph G., Jr.

    1994-06-01

    It is well known that targets moving along track within a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) field of view are imaged as defocused objects. The SAR stripmap mode is tuned to stationary ground targets and the mismatch between the SAR processing parameters and the target motion parameters causes the energy to spill over to adjacent image pixels, thus not only hindering target feature extraction, but also reducing the probability of detection. The problem can be remedied by generating the image using a filter matched to the actual target motion parameters, effectively focusing the SAR image on the target. For a fixed rate of motion the target velocity can be estimated from the slope of the Doppler frequency characteristic. The processing is carried out on the range compressed data but before azimuth compression. The problem is similar to the classical problem of estimating the instantaneous frequency of a linear FM signal (chirp). This paper investigates the application of three different time-frequency analysis techniques to estimate the instantaneous Doppler frequency of range compressed SAR data. In particular, we compare the Wigner-Ville distribution, the Gabor expansion and the Short-Time Fourier transform with respect to their performance in noisy SAR data. Criteria are suggested to quantify the performance of each method in the joint time- frequency domain. It is shown that these methods exhibit sharp signal-to-noise threshold effects, i.e., a certain SNR below which the accuracy of the velocity estimation deteriorates rapidly. It is also shown that the methods differ with respect to their representation of the SAR data.

  3. Estimation of measurement accuracy of track point coordinates in nuclear photoemulsion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shamanov, V. V.

    1995-03-01

    A simple method for an estimation of the measurement accuracy of track point coordinates in nuclear photoemulsion is described. The method is based on analysis of residual deviations of measured track points from a straight line approximating the track. Reliability of the algorithm is illustrated by Monte Carlo simulation. Examples of using the method for an estimation of the accuracy of track point coordinates measured with the microscope KSM-1 (VEB Carl Zeiss Jena) are given.

  4. Quantum limits on optical phase estimation accuracy from classical rate-distortion theory

    SciTech Connect

    Nair, Ranjith

    2014-12-04

    The classical information-theoretic lower bound on the distortion of a random variable upon transmission through a noisy channel is applied to quantum-optical phase estimation. An approach for obtaining Bayesian lower bounds on the phase estimation accuracy is described that employs estimates of the classical capacity of the relevant quantum-optical channels. The Heisenberg limit for lossless phase estimation is derived for arbitrary probe state and prior distributions of the phase, and shot-noise scaling of the phase accuracy is established in the presence of nonzero loss for a parallel entanglement-assisted strategy with a single probe mode.

  5. 4D human body posture estimation based on a motion capture system and a multi-rigid link model.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Naoya; Suzuki, Yasuyuki; Ozaki, Wataru; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Nomura, Taishin

    2012-01-01

    Human motion analysis in various fields such as neurophysiology, clinical medicine, and sports sciences utilizes a multi-rigid link model of a human body for considering kinetics by solving inverse dynamics of a motion, in which a motion capture system with reflective markers are often used to measure the motion, and then the obtained motion are mapped onto the multi-rigid link model. However, algorithms for such a mapping from spatio-temporal positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of the model are not always fully disclosed. Moreover, a common difficulty for such algorithms is an error caused by displacements of the markers attached on the body surface, referred to as the skin motion error. In this study, we developed a simple algorithm that maps positions of the markers to the corresponding posture of a rigid link model, and examined accuracy of the algorithm by evaluating quantitatively differences between the measured and the estimated posture. We also analyzed the skin motion error. It is shown that magnitude of the error was determined not only by the amplitude of the skin motion, but also by the direction of the marker displacement relative to the frame of reference attached to each segment of the body.

  6. Evaluation of approaches for estimating the accuracy of genomic prediction in plant breeding

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In genomic prediction, an important measure of accuracy is the correlation between the predicted and the true breeding values. Direct computation of this quantity for real datasets is not possible, because the true breeding value is unknown. Instead, the correlation between the predicted breeding values and the observed phenotypic values, called predictive ability, is often computed. In order to indirectly estimate predictive accuracy, this latter correlation is usually divided by an estimate of the square root of heritability. In this study we use simulation to evaluate estimates of predictive accuracy for seven methods, four (1 to 4) of which use an estimate of heritability to divide predictive ability computed by cross-validation. Between them the seven methods cover balanced and unbalanced datasets as well as correlated and uncorrelated genotypes. We propose one new indirect method (4) and two direct methods (5 and 6) for estimating predictive accuracy and compare their performances and those of four other existing approaches (three indirect (1 to 3) and one direct (7)) with simulated true predictive accuracy as the benchmark and with each other. Results The size of the estimated genetic variance and hence heritability exerted the strongest influence on the variation in the estimated predictive accuracy. Increasing the number of genotypes considerably increases the time required to compute predictive accuracy by all the seven methods, most notably for the five methods that require cross-validation (Methods 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6). A new method that we propose (Method 5) and an existing method (Method 7) used in animal breeding programs were the fastest and gave the least biased, most precise and stable estimates of predictive accuracy. Of the methods that use cross-validation Methods 4 and 6 were often the best. Conclusions The estimated genetic variance and the number of genotypes had the greatest influence on predictive accuracy. Methods 5 and 7 were the

  7. A Method to Estimate Mean Position, Motion Magnitude, Motion Correlation, and Trajectory of a Tumor From Cone-Beam CT Projections for Image-Guided Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard Cho, Byungchul; Keall, Paul J.

    2008-12-01

    Purpose: To develop a probability-based method for estimating the mean position, motion magnitude, and trajectory of a tumor using cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections. Method and Materials: CBCT acquisition was simulated for more than 80 hours of patient-measured trajectories for thoracic/abdominal tumors and prostate. The trajectories were divided into 60-second segments for which CBCT was simulated by projecting the tumor position onto a rotating imager. Tumor (surrogate) visibility on all projections was assumed. The mean and standard deviation of the tumor position and motion correlation along the three axes were determined with maximum likelihood estimation based on the projection data, assuming a Gaussian spatial distribution. The unknown position component along the imager axis was approximated by its expectation value, determined by the Gaussian distribution. Transformation of the resulting three-dimensional position to patient coordinates provided the estimated trajectory. Two trajectories were experimentally investigated by CBCT acquisition of a phantom. Results: The root-mean-square error of the estimated mean position was 0.05 mm. The root-mean-square error of the trajectories was <1 mm in 99.1% of the thorax/abdomen cases and in 99.7% of the prostate cases. The experimental trajectory estimation agreed with the actual phantom trajectory within 0.44 mm in any direction. Clinical applicability was demonstrated by estimating the tumor trajectory for a pancreas cancer case. Conclusions: A method for estimation of mean position, motion magnitude, and trajectory of a tumor from CBCT projections has been developed. The accuracy was typically much better than 1 mm. The method is applicable to motion-inclusive, respiratory-gated, and tumor-tracking radiotherapy.

  8. Reference trajectory generation for rehabilitation robots: complementary limb motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; van Asseldonk, Edwin H F; Buss, Martin; van der Kooij, Herman

    2009-02-01

    For gait rehabilitation robots, an important question is how to ensure stable gait, while avoiding any interaction forces between robot and human in case the patient walks correctly. To achieve this, the definition of "correct" gait needs to adapted both to the individual patient and to the situation. Recently, we proposed a method for online trajectory generation that can be applied for hemiparetic subjects. Desired states for one (disabled) leg are generated online based on the movements of the other (sound) leg. An instantaneous mapping between legs is performed by exploiting physiological interjoint couplings. This way, the patient generates the reference motion for the affected leg autonomously. The approach, called Complementary Limb Motion Estimation (CLME), is implemented on the LOPES gait rehabilitation robot and evaluated with healthy subjects in two different experiments. In a previously described study, subjects walk only with one leg, while the robot's other leg acts as a fake prosthesis, to simulate complete loss of function in one leg. This study showed that CLME ensures stable gait. In a second study, to be presented in this paper, healthy subjects walk with both their own legs to assess the interference with self-determined walking. Evaluation criteria are: Power delivered to the joints by the robot, electromyography (EMG) distortions, and kinematic distortions, all compared to zero torque control, which is the baseline of minimum achievable interference. Results indicate that interference of the robot is lower with CLME than with a fixed reference trajectory, mainly in terms of lowered exchanged power and less alteration of EMG. This implies that subjects can walk more naturally with CLME, and they are assisted less by the robot when it is not needed. Future studies with patients are yet to show whether these properties of CLME transfer to the clinical domain.

  9. The Theory and Practice of Estimating the Accuracy of Dynamic Flight-Determined Coefficients

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maine, R. E.; Iliff, K. W.

    1981-01-01

    Means of assessing the accuracy of maximum likelihood parameter estimates obtained from dynamic flight data are discussed. The most commonly used analytical predictors of accuracy are derived and compared from both statistical and simplified geometrics standpoints. The accuracy predictions are evaluated with real and simulated data, with an emphasis on practical considerations, such as modeling error. Improved computations of the Cramer-Rao bound to correct large discrepancies due to colored noise and modeling error are presented. The corrected Cramer-Rao bound is shown to be the best available analytical predictor of accuracy, and several practical examples of the use of the Cramer-Rao bound are given. Engineering judgement, aided by such analytical tools, is the final arbiter of accuracy estimation.

  10. Compressive Video Recovery Using Block Match Multi-Frame Motion Estimation Based on Single Pixel Cameras

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Sheng; Zeng, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Qin, Shujia; Lai, King Wai Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory has opened up new paths for the development of signal processing applications. Based on this theory, a novel single pixel camera architecture has been introduced to overcome the current limitations and challenges of traditional focal plane arrays. However, video quality based on this method is limited by existing acquisition and recovery methods, and the method also suffers from being time-consuming. In this paper, a multi-frame motion estimation algorithm is proposed in CS video to enhance the video quality. The proposed algorithm uses multiple frames to implement motion estimation. Experimental results show that using multi-frame motion estimation can improve the quality of recovered videos. To further reduce the motion estimation time, a block match algorithm is used to process motion estimation. Experiments demonstrate that using the block match algorithm can reduce motion estimation time by 30%. PMID:26950127

  11. Compressive Video Recovery Using Block Match Multi-Frame Motion Estimation Based on Single Pixel Cameras.

    PubMed

    Bi, Sheng; Zeng, Xiao; Tang, Xin; Qin, Shujia; Lai, King Wai Chiu

    2016-01-01

    Compressive sensing (CS) theory has opened up new paths for the development of signal processing applications. Based on this theory, a novel single pixel camera architecture has been introduced to overcome the current limitations and challenges of traditional focal plane arrays. However, video quality based on this method is limited by existing acquisition and recovery methods, and the method also suffers from being time-consuming. In this paper, a multi-frame motion estimation algorithm is proposed in CS video to enhance the video quality. The proposed algorithm uses multiple frames to implement motion estimation. Experimental results show that using multi-frame motion estimation can improve the quality of recovered videos. To further reduce the motion estimation time, a block match algorithm is used to process motion estimation. Experiments demonstrate that using the block match algorithm can reduce motion estimation time by 30%.

  12. Determining the accuracy of maximum likelihood parameter estimates with colored residuals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morelli, Eugene A.; Klein, Vladislav

    1994-01-01

    An important part of building high fidelity mathematical models based on measured data is calculating the accuracy associated with statistical estimates of the model parameters. Indeed, without some idea of the accuracy of parameter estimates, the estimates themselves have limited value. In this work, an expression based on theoretical analysis was developed to properly compute parameter accuracy measures for maximum likelihood estimates with colored residuals. This result is important because experience from the analysis of measured data reveals that the residuals from maximum likelihood estimation are almost always colored. The calculations involved can be appended to conventional maximum likelihood estimation algorithms. Simulated data runs were used to show that the parameter accuracy measures computed with this technique accurately reflect the quality of the parameter estimates from maximum likelihood estimation without the need for analysis of the output residuals in the frequency domain or heuristically determined multiplication factors. The result is general, although the application studied here is maximum likelihood estimation of aerodynamic model parameters from flight test data.

  13. Arterial mechanical motion estimation based on a semi-rigid body deformation approach.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Pablo; Hamarneh, Ghassan; Ros, Rafael; Ros, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Arterial motion estimation in ultrasound (US) sequences is a hard task due to noise and discontinuities in the signal derived from US artifacts. Characterizing the mechanical properties of the artery is a promising novel imaging technique to diagnose various cardiovascular pathologies and a new way of obtaining relevant clinical information, such as determining the absence of dicrotic peak, estimating the Augmentation Index (AIx), the arterial pressure or the arterial stiffness. One of the advantages of using US imaging is the non-invasive nature of the technique unlike Intra Vascular Ultra Sound (IVUS) or angiography invasive techniques, plus the relative low cost of the US units. In this paper, we propose a semi rigid deformable method based on Soft Bodies dynamics realized by a hybrid motion approach based on cross-correlation and optical flow methods to quantify the elasticity of the artery. We evaluate and compare different techniques (for instance optical flow methods) on which our approach is based. The goal of this comparative study is to identify the best model to be used and the impact of the accuracy of these different stages in the proposed method. To this end, an exhaustive assessment has been conducted in order to decide which model is the most appropriate for registering the variation of the arterial diameter over time. Our experiments involved a total of 1620 evaluations within nine simulated sequences of 84 frames each and the estimation of four error metrics. We conclude that our proposed approach obtains approximately 2.5 times higher accuracy than conventional state-of-the-art techniques. PMID:24871987

  14. Motion estimation and compensation for coronary artery and myocardium in cardiac CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Qiulin; Matthews, James; Razeto, Marco; Linde, Jesper J.; Nakanishi, Satoru

    2015-03-01

    Motion blurring is still a challenge for cardiac CT imaging. A new motion estimation (ME) and motion compensation method is developed for cardiac CT. The proposed method estimates motion of entire heart, and then applies motion compensation. Therefore, the proposed method reduces motion artifacts not only in coronary artery region as most other methods did, but also reduces motion blurring in myocardium region. In motion compensated reconstruction, we use the Fourier transfer method proposed by Pack et al to obtain a series of partial images, and then warp and sum together to obtain final motion compensated images. The robustness and performance of the proposed method was verified with data from 10 patients and improvements in sharpness of both coronary arteries and myocardium were obtained.

  15. Using geocoded survey data to improve the accuracy of multilevel small area synthetic estimates.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Joanna; Moon, Graham; Twigg, Liz

    2016-03-01

    This paper examines the secondary data requirements for multilevel small area synthetic estimation (ML-SASE). This research method uses secondary survey data sets as source data for statistical models. The parameters of these models are used to generate data for small areas. The paper assesses the impact of knowing the geographical location of survey respondents on the accuracy of estimates, moving beyond debating the generic merits of geocoded social survey datasets to examine quantitatively the hypothesis that knowing the approximate location of respondents can improve the accuracy of the resultant estimates. Four sets of synthetic estimates are generated to predict expected levels of limiting long term illnesses using different levels of knowledge about respondent location. The estimates were compared to comprehensive census data on limiting long term illness (LLTI). Estimates based on fully geocoded data were more accurate than estimates based on data that did not include geocodes. PMID:26857175

  16. SU-E-J-135: An Investigation of Ultrasound Imaging for 3D Intra-Fraction Prostate Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    O'Shea, T; Harris, E; Bamber, J; Evans, P

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study investigates the use of a mechanically swept 3D ultrasound (US) probe to estimate intra-fraction motion of the prostate during radiation therapy using an US phantom and simulated transperineal imaging. Methods: A 3D motion platform was used to translate an US speckle phantom while simulating transperineal US imaging. Motion patterns for five representative types of prostate motion, generated from patient data previously acquired with a Calypso system, were using to move the phantom in 3D. The phantom was also implanted with fiducial markers and subsequently tracked using the CyberKnife kV x-ray system for comparison. A normalised cross correlation block matching algorithm was used to track speckle patterns in 3D and 2D US data. Motion estimation results were compared with known phantom translations. Results: Transperineal 3D US could track superior-inferior (axial) and anterior-posterior (lateral) motion to better than 0.8 mm root-mean-square error (RMSE) at a volume rate of 1.7 Hz (comparable with kV x-ray tracking RMSE). Motion estimation accuracy was poorest along the US probe's swept axis (right-left; RL; RMSE < 4.2 mm) but simple regularisation methods could be used to improve RMSE (< 2 mm). 2D US was found to be feasible for slowly varying motion (RMSE < 0.5 mm). 3D US could also allow accurate radiation beam gating with displacement thresholds of 2 mm and 5 mm exhibiting a RMSE of less than 0.5 mm. Conclusion: 2D and 3D US speckle tracking is feasible for prostate motion estimation during radiation delivery. Since RL prostate motion is small in magnitude and frequency, 2D or a hybrid (2D/3D) US imaging approach which also accounts for potential prostate rotations could be used. Regularisation methods could be used to ensure the accuracy of tracking data, making US a feasible approach for gating or tracking in standard or hypo-fractionated prostate treatments.

  17. The Plus or Minus Game--Teaching Estimation, Precision, and Accuracy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forringer, Edward R.; Forringer, Richard S.; Forringer, Daniel S.

    2016-01-01

    A quick survey of physics textbooks shows that many (Knight, Young, and Serway for example) cover estimation, significant digits, precision versus accuracy, and uncertainty in the first chapter. Estimation "Fermi" questions are so useful that there has been a column dedicated to them in "TPT" (Larry Weinstein's "Fermi…

  18. "Battleship Numberline": A Digital Game for Improving Estimation Accuracy on Fraction Number Lines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lomas, Derek; Ching, Dixie; Stampfer, Eliane; Sandoval, Melanie; Koedinger, Ken

    2011-01-01

    Given the strong relationship between number line estimation accuracy and math achievement, might a computer-based number line game help improve math achievement? In one study by Rittle-Johnson, Siegler and Alibali (2001), a simple digital game called "Catch the Monster" provided practice in estimating the location of decimals on a number line.…

  19. Motion estimation performance models with application to hardware error tolerance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheong, Hye-Yeon; Ortega, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The progress of VLSI technology towards deep sub-micron feature sizes, e.g., sub-100 nanometer technology, has created a growing impact of hardware defects and fabrication process variability, which lead to reductions in yield rate. To address these problems, a new approach, system-level error tolerance (ET), has been recently introduced. Considering that a significant percentage of the entire chip production is discarded due to minor imperfections, this approach is based on accepting imperfect chips that introduce imperceptible/acceptable system-level degradation; this leads to increases in overall effective yield. In this paper, we investigate the impact of hardware faults on the video compression performance, with a focus on the motion estimation (ME) process. More specifically, we provide an analytical formulation of the impact of single and multiple stuck-at-faults within ME computation. We further present a model for estimating the system-level performance degradation due to such faults, which can be used for the error tolerance based decision strategy of accepting a given faulty chip. We also show how different faults and ME search algorithms compare in terms of error tolerance and define the characteristics of search algorithm that lead to increased error tolerance. Finally, we show that different hardware architectures performing the same metric computation have different error tolerance characteristics and we present the optimal ME hardware architecture in terms of error tolerance. While we focus on ME hardware, our work could also applied to systems (e.g., classifiers, matching pursuits, vector quantization) where a selection is made among several alternatives (e.g., class label, basis function, quantization codeword) based on which choice minimizes an additive metric of interest.

  20. The accuracy of photo-based structure-from-motion DEMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, M. R.; Robson, S.

    2012-04-01

    Data for detailed digital elevation models (DEMs) are usually collected by expensive laser-based techniques, or by photogrammetric methods that require expertise and specialist software. However, recent advances in computer vision research now permit 3D models to be automatically derived from unordered collections of photographs, offering the potential for significantly cheaper and quicker DEM production. Here, we assess the accuracy of this approach for geomorphological applications using examples from a coastal cliff and a volcanic edifice. The reconstruction process is based on a combination of structure-from-motion and multi-view stereo algorithms (SfM-MVS). Using multiple photographs of a scene taken from different positions with a consumer-grade camera, dense point clouds (millions of points) can be derived. Processing is carried out by automated 'reconstruction pipeline' software downloadable from the internet, e.g. http://blog.neonascent.net/archives/bundler-photogrammetry-package/. Unlike traditional photogrammetric approaches, the initial reconstruction process does not require the identification of any control points or initial camera calibration and is carried out with little or no operator intervention. However, such reconstructions are initally un-scaled and un-oriented so additional software (http://www.lancs.ac.uk/staff/jamesm/software/sfm_georef.htm) has been developed to permit georeferencing. Although this step requires the presence of some control points or features within the scene, it does not have the relatively strict image acquisition and control requirements of traditional photogrammetry. For accuracy, and to allow error analysis, georeferencing observations are made within the image set, rather than requiring feature matching within the point cloud. In our coastal example, 133 photos taken with a Canon EOS 450D and 28 mm prime lens, from viewing distances of ~20 m, were used to reconstruct a ~60 m long section of eroding cliff. The

  1. A vision-based system for measuring the displacements of large structures: Simultaneous adaptive calibration and full motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, C. Almeida; Costa, C. Oliveira; Batista, J.

    2016-05-01

    The paper describes a kinematic model-based solution to estimate simultaneously the calibration parameters of the vision system and the full-motion (6-DOF) of large civil engineering structures, namely of long deck suspension bridges, from a sequence of stereo images captured by digital cameras. Using an arbitrary number of images and assuming a smooth structure motion, an Iterated Extended Kalman Filter is used to recursively estimate the projection matrices of the cameras and the structure full-motion (displacement and rotation) over time, helping to meet the structure health monitoring fulfilment. Results related to the performance evaluation, obtained by numerical simulation and with real experiments, are reported. The real experiments were carried out in indoor and outdoor environment using a reduced structure model to impose controlled motions. In both cases, the results obtained with a minimum setup comprising only two cameras and four non-coplanar tracking points, showed a high accuracy results for on-line camera calibration and structure full motion estimation.

  2. Patient Motion and Targeting Accuracy in Robotic Spinal Radiosurgery: 260 Single-Fraction Fiducial-Free Cases

    SciTech Connect

    Fuerweger, Christoph; Drexler, Christian; Kufeld, Markus; Muacevic, Alexander; Wowra, Berndt; Schlaefer, Alexander

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate clinical targeting precision and assess patient movement data during fiducial-free, single-fraction spinal radiosurgery with the Cyberknife (CK). Methods and Materials: Image-guided spine tracking accuracy was tested using two phantoms. Movement patterns (three translations, roll, pitch and yaw) were obtained from log files of 260 patient treatments (47 cervical, 89 thoracic, 90 lumbar, and 34 pelvic/sacral). For two treatments (average and maximum motion scenario), we added offsets to all beams according to recorded patient movements and recalculated the delivered dose distribution to simulate the dosimetric impact of intrafraction motion. Results: Phantom spine position was registered with an accuracy of <0.2 mm for translational and <0.3{sup o} for rotational directions. Residual patient motion yielded mean targeting errors per beam of 0.28 {+-} 0.13 mm (X), 0.25 {+-} 0.15 mm (Y), 0.19 {+-} 0.11 mm (Z) and 0.40 {+-} 0.20{sup o} (roll), 0.20 {+-} 0.08{sup o} (pitch), and 0.19 {+-} 0.08{sup o} (yaw). Spine region had little influence on overall targeting error, which was <1 mm for more than 95% of treatments (median, 0.48 mm). In the maximum motion case, target coverage decreased by 1.7% (from 92.1% to 90.4%) for the 20-Gy prescription isodose. Spinal cord volume receiving more than 8 Gy increased slightly, from 2.41 to 2.46 cm{sup 3}. Conclusions: Submillimeter targeting precision was obtained for fiducial-free spinal radiosurgery despite patient motion. Patient motion has little effect on the delivered dose distribution when image-guided correction of beam aiming is employed.

  3. MOTION FLOW ESTIMATION FROM IMAGE SEQUENCES WITH APPLICATIONS TO BIOLOGICAL GROWTH AND MOTILITY

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Gang; Baskin, Tobias I.; Palaniappan, Kannappan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for motion flow estimation that considers errors in all the derivative measurements is presented. Based on the total least squares (TLS) model, we accurately estimate the motion flow in the general noise case by combining noise model (in form of covariance matrix) with a parametric motion model. The proposed algorithm is tested on two different types of biological motion, a growing plant root and a gastrulating embryo, with sequences obtained microscopically. The local, instantaneous velocity field estimated by the algorithm reveals the behavior of the underlying cellular elements. PMID:19424454

  4. Accuracy of early estimation of maturity at a district general hospital.

    PubMed

    Brindle, M J

    1981-12-12

    The accuracy of routine sonar scanning of patients attending the antenatal clinic of a general hospital before the 19th week of pregnancy was calculated and compared with the potential accuracy of the techniques used. Out of 200 patients who went into labour spontaneously, 164 delivered within nine days of the sonar prediction, and 152 delivered within nine days of the date estimated from the menstrual history. The discrepancy between the mean of the expected date of delivery from the sonar examination and that derived from the menstrual history was 2.24 days. When the two estimations differed by a week or more the sonar estimation was more accurate, and all 44 patients in this group delivered by the sixth day after the sonar prediction. These findings emphasise the need for those providing a similar service to review the accuracy of their own work.

  5. Estimation of diagnostic test accuracy without full verification: a review of latent class methods

    PubMed Central

    Collins, John; Huynh, Minh

    2014-01-01

    The performance of a diagnostic test is best evaluated against a reference test that is without error. For many diseases, this is not possible, and an imperfect reference test must be used. However, diagnostic accuracy estimates may be biased if inaccurately verified status is used as the truth. Statistical models have been developed to handle this situation by treating disease as a latent variable. In this paper, we conduct a systematized review of statistical methods using latent class models for estimating test accuracy and disease prevalence in the absence of complete verification. PMID:24910172

  6. Reduction of Motion Artifacts and Improvement of R Peak Detecting Accuracy Using Adjacent Non-Intrusive ECG Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Minho; Jeong, Jae Jin; Kim, Seung Hun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Non-intrusive electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring has many advantages: easy to measure and apply in daily life. However, motion noise in the measured signal is the major problem of non-intrusive measurement. This paper proposes a method to reduce the noise and to detect the R peaks of ECG in a stable manner in a sitting arrangement using non-intrusive sensors. The method utilizes two capacitive ECG sensors (cECGs) to measure ECG, and another two cECGs located adjacent to the sensors for ECG are added to obtain the information on motion. Then, active noise cancellation technique and the motion information are used to reduce motion noise. To verify the proposed method, ECG was measured indoors and during driving, and the accuracy of the detected R peaks was compared. After applying the method, the sum of sensitivity and positive predictivity increased 8.39% on average and 26.26% maximally in the data. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the motion noise was reduced and that more reliable R peak positions could be obtained by the proposed method. The robustness of the new ECG measurement method will elicit benefits to various health care systems that require noninvasive heart rate or heart rate variability measurements. PMID:27196910

  7. Reduction of Motion Artifacts and Improvement of R Peak Detecting Accuracy Using Adjacent Non-Intrusive ECG Sensors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Minho; Jeong, Jae Jin; Kim, Seung Hun; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    Non-intrusive electrocardiogram (ECG) monitoring has many advantages: easy to measure and apply in daily life. However, motion noise in the measured signal is the major problem of non-intrusive measurement. This paper proposes a method to reduce the noise and to detect the R peaks of ECG in a stable manner in a sitting arrangement using non-intrusive sensors. The method utilizes two capacitive ECG sensors (cECGs) to measure ECG, and another two cECGs located adjacent to the sensors for ECG are added to obtain the information on motion. Then, active noise cancellation technique and the motion information are used to reduce motion noise. To verify the proposed method, ECG was measured indoors and during driving, and the accuracy of the detected R peaks was compared. After applying the method, the sum of sensitivity and positive predictivity increased 8.39% on average and 26.26% maximally in the data. Based on the results, it was confirmed that the motion noise was reduced and that more reliable R peak positions could be obtained by the proposed method. The robustness of the new ECG measurement method will elicit benefits to various health care systems that require noninvasive heart rate or heart rate variability measurements. PMID:27196910

  8. Estimating satellite pose and motion parameters using a novelty filter and neural net tracker

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Andrew J.; Casasent, David; Vermeulen, Pieter; Barnard, Etienne

    1989-01-01

    A system for determining the position, orientation and motion of a satellite with respect to a robotic spacecraft using video data is advanced. This system utilizes two levels of pose and motion estimation: an initial system which provides coarse estimates of pose and motion, and a second system which uses the coarse estimates and further processing to provide finer pose and motion estimates. The present paper emphasizes the initial coarse pose and motion estimation sybsystem. This subsystem utilizes novelty detection and filtering for locating novel parts and a neural net tracker to track these parts over time. Results of using this system on a sequence of images of a spin stabilized satellite are presented.

  9. A robust and accurate center-frequency estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving motion estimation performance of SinMod on tagged cardiac MR images without known tagging parameters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hong; Wang, Jie; Xu, Xiangyang; Song, Enmin; Wang, Qian; Jin, Renchao; Hung, Chih-Cheng; Fei, Baowei

    2014-11-01

    A robust and accurate center-frequency (CF) estimation (RACE) algorithm for improving the performance of the local sine-wave modeling (SinMod) method, which is a good motion estimation method for tagged cardiac magnetic resonance (MR) images, is proposed in this study. The RACE algorithm can automatically, effectively and efficiently produce a very appropriate CF estimate for the SinMod method, under the circumstance that the specified tagging parameters are unknown, on account of the following two key techniques: (1) the well-known mean-shift algorithm, which can provide accurate and rapid CF estimation; and (2) an original two-direction-combination strategy, which can further enhance the accuracy and robustness of CF estimation. Some other available CF estimation algorithms are brought out for comparison. Several validation approaches that can work on the real data without ground truths are specially designed. Experimental results on human body in vivo cardiac data demonstrate the significance of accurate CF estimation for SinMod, and validate the effectiveness of RACE in facilitating the motion estimation performance of SinMod.

  10. Method and system for non-linear motion estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Ligang (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A method and system for extrapolating and interpolating a visual signal including determining a first motion vector between a first pixel position in a first image to a second pixel position in a second image, determining a second motion vector between the second pixel position in the second image and a third pixel position in a third image, determining a third motion vector between one of the first pixel position in the first image and the second pixel position in the second image, and the second pixel position in the second image and the third pixel position in the third image using a non-linear model, determining a position of the fourth pixel in a fourth image based upon the third motion vector.

  11. Accuracy and precision of stream reach water surface slopes estimated in the field and from maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Isaak, D.J.; Hubert, W.A.; Krueger, K.L.

    1999-01-01

    The accuracy and precision of five tools used to measure stream water surface slope (WSS) were evaluated. Water surface slopes estimated in the field with a clinometer or from topographic maps used in conjunction with a map wheel or geographic information system (GIS) were significantly higher than WSS estimated in the field with a surveying level (biases of 34, 41, and 53%, respectively). Accuracy of WSS estimates obtained with an Abney level did not differ from surveying level estimates, but conclusions regarding the accuracy of Abney levels and clinometers were weakened by intratool variability. The surveying level estimated WSS most precisely (coefficient of variation [CV] = 0.26%), followed by the GIS (CV = 1.87%), map wheel (CV = 6.18%), Abney level (CV = 13.68%), and clinometer (CV = 21.57%). Estimates of WSS measured in the field with an Abney level and estimated for the same reaches with a GIS used in conjunction with l:24,000-scale topographic maps were significantly correlated (r = 0.86), but there was a tendency for the GIS to overestimate WSS. Detailed accounts of the methods used to measure WSS and recommendations regarding the measurement of WSS are provided.

  12. Examination on accuracy of the radar rainfall estimated by using Korean dual-pol radar rainfall estimation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jungsoo; Choi, Dayoung; Suk, Mi-Kyung; Nam, Kyung-Yeub; Lee, Sangmi; Ko, Jeong-Seok

    2016-04-01

    Weather Radar Center (WRC) in Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) have tried to improve the accuracy of the radar rainfall. WRC introduced Radar-AWS Rainrate (RAR) algorithm in 2001 to quantitatively improve the accuracy of the radar rainfall. Whereafter, RAR algorithm have been advanced and still used to estimate the radar rainfall. WRC has developed Korean dual-pol radar rainfall estimation algorithm from 2014 when the project of constructing the dual-pol radar network was initiated. WRC therefore suggested first Korean dual-pol radar rainfall estimation equations (R(Z), R(Z, ZDR), R(ZDR, KDP), and R(KDP)) in 2014 and developed the equations in 2015. Since WRC just suggested each equation, it needs to algorithmize the equations. This study suggested Korean dual-pol radar rainfall estimation algorithm and examined on the accuracy of the radar rainfall estimated by the algorithm. The radar measurements obtained by dual-pol radars (BRI, BSL, and SBS) which were introduced in 2015 were used.

  13. Software Effort Estimation Accuracy: A Comparative Study of Estimations Based on Software Sizing and Development Methods

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lafferty, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    The number of project failures and those projects completed over cost and over schedule has been a significant issue for software project managers. Among the many reasons for failure, inaccuracy in software estimation--the basis for project bidding, budgeting, planning, and probability estimates--has been identified as a root cause of a high…

  14. WearDY: Wearable dynamics. A prototype for human whole-body force and motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latella, Claudia; Kuppuswamy, Naveen; Nori, Francesco

    2016-06-01

    Motion capture is a powerful tool used in a large range of applications towards human movement analysis. Although it is a well-established technique, its main limitation is the lack of dynamic information such as forces and torques during the motion capture. In this paper, we present a novel approach for human wearable dynamic (WearDY) motion capture for the simultaneous estimation of whole-body forces along with the motion. Our conceptual framework encompasses traditional passive markers based methods, inertial and contact force sensor modalities and harnesses a probabilistic computational framework for estimating dynamic quantities originally proposed in the domain of humanoid robot control. We present preliminary experimental analysis of our framework on subjects performing a two Degrees-of-Freedom bowing task and we estimate the motion and dynamic quantities. We discuss the implication of our proposal towards the design of a novel wearable force and motion capture suit and its applications.

  15. Estimation of Gaze Detection Accuracy Using the Calibration Information-Based Fuzzy System.

    PubMed

    Gwon, Su Yeong; Jung, Dongwook; Pan, Weiyuan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    Gaze tracking is a camera-vision based technology for identifying the location where a user is looking. In general, a calibration process is applied at the initial stage of most gaze tracking systems. This process is necessary to calibrate for the differences in the eyeballs and cornea size of the user, as well as the angle kappa, and to find the relationship between the user's eye and screen coordinates. It is applied on the basis of the information of the user's pupil and corneal specular reflection obtained while the user is looking at several predetermined positions on a screen. In previous studies, user calibration was performed using various types of markers and marker display methods. However, studies on estimating the accuracy of gaze detection through the results obtained during the calibration process have yet to be carried out. Therefore, we propose the method for estimating the accuracy of a final gaze tracking system with a near-infrared (NIR) camera by using a fuzzy system based on the user calibration information. Here, the accuracy of the final gaze tracking system ensures the gaze detection accuracy during the testing stage of the gaze tracking system. Experiments were performed using a total of four types of markers and three types of marker display methods. From them, it was found that the proposed method correctly estimated the accuracy of the gaze tracking regardless of the various marker and marker display types applied. PMID:26742045

  16. Estimation of Gaze Detection Accuracy Using the Calibration Information-Based Fuzzy System

    PubMed Central

    Gwon, Su Yeong; Jung, Dongwook; Pan, Weiyuan; Park, Kang Ryoung

    2016-01-01

    Gaze tracking is a camera-vision based technology for identifying the location where a user is looking. In general, a calibration process is applied at the initial stage of most gaze tracking systems. This process is necessary to calibrate for the differences in the eyeballs and cornea size of the user, as well as the angle kappa, and to find the relationship between the user’s eye and screen coordinates. It is applied on the basis of the information of the user’s pupil and corneal specular reflection obtained while the user is looking at several predetermined positions on a screen. In previous studies, user calibration was performed using various types of markers and marker display methods. However, studies on estimating the accuracy of gaze detection through the results obtained during the calibration process have yet to be carried out. Therefore, we propose the method for estimating the accuracy of a final gaze tracking system with a near-infrared (NIR) camera by using a fuzzy system based on the user calibration information. Here, the accuracy of the final gaze tracking system ensures the gaze detection accuracy during the testing stage of the gaze tracking system. Experiments were performed using a total of four types of markers and three types of marker display methods. From them, it was found that the proposed method correctly estimated the accuracy of the gaze tracking regardless of the various marker and marker display types applied. PMID:26742045

  17. Influence of heart motion on cardiac output estimation by means of electrical impedance tomography: a case study.

    PubMed

    Proença, Martin; Braun, Fabian; Rapin, Michael; Solà, Josep; Adler, Andy; Grychtol, Bartłomiej; Bohm, Stephan H; Lemay, Mathieu; Thiran, Jean-Philippe

    2015-06-01

    Electrical impedance tomography (EIT) is a non-invasive imaging technique that can measure cardiac-related intra-thoracic impedance changes. EIT-based cardiac output estimation relies on the assumption that the amplitude of the impedance change in the ventricular region is representative of stroke volume (SV). However, other factors such as heart motion can significantly affect this ventricular impedance change. In the present case study, a magnetic resonance imaging-based dynamic bio-impedance model fitting the morphology of a single male subject was built. Simulations were performed to evaluate the contribution of heart motion and its influence on EIT-based SV estimation. Myocardial deformation was found to be the main contributor to the ventricular impedance change (56%). However, motion-induced impedance changes showed a strong correlation (r = 0.978) with left ventricular volume. We explained this by the quasi-incompressibility of blood and myocardium. As a result, EIT achieved excellent accuracy in estimating a wide range of simulated SV values (error distribution of 0.57 ± 2.19 ml (1.02 ± 2.62%) and correlation of r = 0.996 after a two-point calibration was applied to convert impedance values to millilitres). As the model was based on one single subject, the strong correlation found between motion-induced changes and ventricular volume remains to be verified in larger datasets.

  18. Comparing Accuracy of Parameter Estimation Using IRT Models in the Presence of Guessing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fu, Qiong

    2010-01-01

    This research investigated how the accuracy of person ability and item difficulty parameter estimation varied across five IRT models with respect to the presence of guessing, targeting, and varied combinations of sample sizes and test lengths. The data were simulated with 50 replications under each of the 18 combined conditions. Five IRT models…

  19. Practical Issues in Estimating Classification Accuracy and Consistency with R Package cacIRT

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lathrop, Quinn N.

    2015-01-01

    There are two main lines of research in estimating classification accuracy (CA) and classification consistency (CC) under Item Response Theory (IRT). The R package cacIRT provides computer implementations of both approaches in an accessible and unified framework. Even with available implementations, there remains decisions a researcher faces when…

  20. Sample Size Planning for the Standardized Mean Difference: Accuracy in Parameter Estimation via Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Rausch, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Methods for planning sample size (SS) for the standardized mean difference so that a narrow confidence interval (CI) can be obtained via the accuracy in parameter estimation (AIPE) approach are developed. One method plans SS so that the expected width of the CI is sufficiently narrow. A modification adjusts the SS so that the obtained CI is no…

  1. Accuracy of plant specimen disease severity estimates: concepts, history, methods, ramifications and challenges for the future

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knowledge of the extent of the symptoms of a plant disease, generally referred to as severity, is key to both fundamental and applied aspects of plant pathology. Most commonly, severity is obtained visually and the accuracy of each estimate (closeness to the actual value) by individual raters is par...

  2. Accuracy of Estimates and Statistical Power for Testing Meditation in Latent Growth Curve Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheong, JeeWon

    2011-01-01

    The latent growth curve modeling (LGCM) approach has been increasingly utilized to investigate longitudinal mediation. However, little is known about the accuracy of the estimates and statistical power when mediation is evaluated in the LGCM framework. A simulation study was conducted to address these issues under various conditions including…

  3. Accuracy of hands v. household measures as portion size estimation aids.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Alice A; Hsu, Michelle S H; Rangan, Anna M; Seimon, Radhika V; Lee, Crystal M Y; Das, Arpita; Finch, Charles H; Sainsbury, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    Accurate estimation of food portion size is critical in dietary studies. Hands are potentially useful as portion size estimation aids; however, their accuracy has not been tested. The aim of the present study was to test the accuracy of a novel portion size estimation method using the width of the fingers as a 'ruler' to measure the dimensions of foods ('finger width method'), as well as fists and thumb or finger tips. These hand measures were also compared with household measures (cups and spoons). A total of sixty-seven participants (70 % female; age 32·7 (sd 13·7) years; BMI 23·2 (sd  3·5) kg/m(2)) attended a 1·5 h session in which they estimated the portion sizes of forty-two pre-weighed foods and liquids. Hand measurements were used in conjunction with geometric formulas to convert estimations to volumes. Volumes determined with hand and household methods were converted to estimated weights using density factors. Estimated weights were compared with true weights, and the percentage difference from the true weight was used to compare accuracy between the hand and household methods. Of geometrically shaped foods and liquids estimated with the finger width method, 80 % were within ±25 % of the true weight of the food, and 13 % were within ±10 %, in contrast to 29 % of those estimated with the household method being within ±25 % of the true weight of the food, and 8 % being within ±10 %. For foods that closely resemble a geometric shape, the finger width method provides a novel and acceptably accurate method of estimating portion size. PMID:27547392

  4. A comparison of instrumentation methods to estimate thoracolumbar motion in field-based occupational studies.

    PubMed

    Schall, Mark C; Fethke, Nathan B; Chen, Howard; Gerr, Fred

    2015-05-01

    The performance of an inertial measurement unit (IMU) system for directly measuring thoracolumbar trunk motion was compared to that of the Lumbar Motion Monitor (LMM). Thirty-six male participants completed a simulated material handling task with both systems deployed simultaneously. Estimates of thoracolumbar trunk motion obtained with the IMU system were processed using five common methods for estimating trunk motion characteristics. Results of measurements obtained from IMUs secured to the sternum and pelvis had smaller root-mean-square differences and mean bias estimates in comparison to results obtained with the LMM than results of measurements obtained solely from a sternum mounted IMU. Fusion of IMU accelerometer measurements with IMU gyroscope and/or magnetometer measurements was observed to increase comparability to the LMM. Results suggest investigators should consider computing thoracolumbar trunk motion as a function of estimates from multiple IMUs using fusion algorithms rather than using a single accelerometer secured to the sternum in field-based studies.

  5. Precise Image-Based Motion Estimation for Autonomous Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew E.; Matthies, Larry H.

    1998-01-01

    Space science and solar system exploration are driving NASA to develop an array of small body missions ranging in scope from near body flybys to complete sample return. This paper presents an algorithm for onboard motion estimation that will enable the precision guidance necessary for autonomous small body landing. Our techniques are based on automatic feature tracking between a pair of descent camera images followed by two frame motion estimation and scale recovery using laser altimetry data. The output of our algorithm is an estimate of rigid motion (attitude and position) and motion covariance between frames. This motion estimate can be passed directly to the spacecraft guidance and control system to enable rapid execution of safe and precise trajectories.

  6. Accuracy of tumor motion compensation algorithm from a robotic respiratory tracking system: A simulation study

    SciTech Connect

    Seppenwoolde, Yvette; Berbeco, Ross I.; Nishioka, Seiko; Shirato, Hiroki; Heijmen, Ben

    2007-07-15

    The Synchrony{sup TM} Respiratory Tracking System (RTS) is a treatment option of the CyberKnife robotic treatment device to irradiate extra-cranial tumors that move due to respiration. Advantages of RTS are that patients can breath normally and that there is no loss of linac duty cycle such as with gated therapy. Tracking is based on a measured correspondence model (linear or polynomial) between internal tumor motion and external (chest/abdominal) marker motion. The radiation beam follows the tumor movement via the continuously measured external marker motion. To establish the correspondence model at the start of treatment, the 3D internal tumor position is determined at 15 discrete time points by automatic detection of implanted gold fiducials in two orthogonal x-ray images; simultaneously, the positions of the external markers are measured. During the treatment, the relationship between internal and external marker positions is continuously accounted for and is regularly checked and updated. Here we use computer simulations based on continuously and simultaneously recorded internal and external marker positions to investigate the effectiveness of tumor tracking by the RTS. The Cyberknife does not allow continuous acquisition of x-ray images to follow the moving internal markers (typical imaging frequency is once per minute). Therefore, for the simulations, we have used data for eight lung cancer patients treated with respiratory gating. All of these patients had simultaneous and continuous recordings of both internal tumor motion and external abdominal motion. The available continuous relationship between internal and external markers for these patients allowed investigation of the consequences of the lower acquisition frequency of the RTS. With the use of the RTS, simulated treatment errors due to breathing motion were reduced largely and consistently over treatment time for all studied patients. A considerable part of the maximum reduction in treatment error

  7. Power outage estimation for tropical cyclones: improved accuracy with simpler models.

    PubMed

    Nateghi, Roshanak; Guikema, Seth; Quiring, Steven M

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we discuss an outage-forecasting model that we have developed. This model uses very few input variables to estimate hurricane-induced outages prior to landfall with great predictive accuracy. We also show the results for a series of simpler models that use only publicly available data and can still estimate outages with reasonable accuracy. The intended users of these models are emergency response planners within power utilities and related government agencies. We developed our models based on the method of random forest, using data from a power distribution system serving two states in the Gulf Coast region of the United States. We also show that estimates of system reliability based on wind speed alone are not sufficient for adequately capturing the reliability of system components. We demonstrate that a multivariate approach can produce more accurate power outage predictions.

  8. Tracking using motion estimation with physically motivated inter-region constraints.

    PubMed

    Arif, Omar; Sundaramoorthi, Ganesh; Hong, Byung-Woo; Yezzi, Anthony

    2014-09-01

    We propose a method for tracking structures (e.g., ventricles and myocardium) in cardiac images (e.g., magnetic resonance) by propagating forward in time a previous estimate of the structures using a new physically motivated motion estimation scheme. Our method estimates motion by regularizing only within structures so that differing motions among different structures are not mixed. It simultaneously satisfies the physical constraints at the interface between a fluid and a medium that the normal component of the fluid's motion must match the normal component of the medium's motion and the No-Slip condition, which states that the tangential velocity approaches zero near the interface. We show that these conditions lead to partial differential equations with Robin boundary conditions at the interface, which couple the motion between structures. We show that propagating a segmentation across frames using our motion estimation scheme leads to more accurate segmentation than traditional motion estimation that does not use physical constraints. Our method is suited to interactive segmentation, prominently used in commercial applications for cardiac analysis, where segmentation propagation is used to predict a segmentation in the next frame. We show that our method leads to more accurate predictions than a popular and recent interactive method used in cardiac segmentation.

  9. The Accuracy of Webcams in 2D Motion Analysis: Sources of Error and Their Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, A.; Moreno, R.; Candelas, P.; Belmar, F.

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we show the potential of webcams as precision measuring instruments in a physics laboratory. Various sources of error appearing in 2D coordinate measurements using low-cost commercial webcams are discussed, quantifying their impact on accuracy and precision, and simple procedures to control these sources of error are presented.…

  10. Accuracy or precision: Implications of sample design and methodology on abundance estimation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kowalewski, Lucas K.; Chizinski, Christopher J.; Powell, Larkin A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Pegg, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    Sampling by spatially replicated counts (point-count) is an increasingly popular method of estimating population size of organisms. Challenges exist when sampling by point-count method, and it is often impractical to sample entire area of interest and impossible to detect every individual present. Ecologists encounter logistical limitations that force them to sample either few large-sample units or many small sample-units, introducing biases to sample counts. We generated a computer environment and simulated sampling scenarios to test the role of number of samples, sample unit area, number of organisms, and distribution of organisms in the estimation of population sizes using N-mixture models. Many sample units of small area provided estimates that were consistently closer to true abundance than sample scenarios with few sample units of large area. However, sample scenarios with few sample units of large area provided more precise abundance estimates than abundance estimates derived from sample scenarios with many sample units of small area. It is important to consider accuracy and precision of abundance estimates during the sample design process with study goals and objectives fully recognized, although and with consequence, consideration of accuracy and precision of abundance estimates is often an afterthought that occurs during the data analysis process.

  11. Preliminary evaluation of the dosimetric accuracy of cone-beam computed tomography for cases with respiratory motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Bae, Sunhyun; Chung, Weon Kuu; Lee, Yoonhee

    2014-04-01

    Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images are currently used for patient positioning and adaptive dose calculation; however, the degree of CBCT uncertainty in cases of respiratory motion remains an interesting issue. This study evaluated the uncertainty of CBCT-based dose calculations for a moving target. Using a phantom, we estimated differences in the geometries and the Hounsfield units (HU) between CT and CBCT. The calculated dose distributions based on CT and CBCT images were also compared using a radiation treatment planning system, and the comparison included cases with respiratory motion. The geometrical uncertainties of the CT and the CBCT images were less than 0.15 cm. The HU differences between CT and CBCT images for standard-dose-head, high-quality-head, normal-pelvis, and low-dose-thorax modes were 31, 36, 23, and 33 HU, respectively. The gamma (3%, 0.3 cm)-dose distribution between CT and CBCT was greater than 1 in 99% of the area. The gamma-dose distribution between CT and CBCT during respiratory motion was also greater than 1 in 99% of the area. The uncertainty of the CBCT-based dose calculation was evaluated for cases with respiratory motion. In conclusion, image distortion due to motion did not significantly influence dosimetric parameters.

  12. Estimation of motion parameters for a rigid body from its orthogonal projection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ganguly, S.; Ghosh, B.; Tarn, T. J.; Bejczy, A. K.

    1989-01-01

    An estimate is presented of the motion parameters, namely, linear and angular velocities of a rigid body rotating and translating in three-dimensional-space. It is assumed that the velocities are constant and that only the orthogonal projection of the motion is observable. In particular, if (x, y, z) is the Cartesian coordinate, it is assumed that the projection of the motion on the x-y plane is observed and the information along the z coordinate is lost.

  13. Closed-form solutions for estimating a rigid motion from plane correspondences extracted from point clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshelham, Kourosh

    2016-04-01

    Registration is often a prerequisite step in processing point clouds. While planar surfaces are suitable features for registration, most of the existing plane-based registration methods rely on iterative solutions for the estimation of transformation parameters from plane correspondences. This paper presents a new closed-form solution for the estimation of a rigid motion from a set of point-plane correspondences. The role of normalization is investigated and its importance for accurate plane fitting and plane-based registration is shown. The paper also presents a thorough evaluation of the closed-form solutions and compares their performance with the iterative solution in terms of accuracy, robustness, stability and efficiency. The results suggest that the closed-form solution based on point-plane correspondences should be the method of choice in point cloud registration as it is significantly faster than the iterative solution, and performs as well as or better than the iterative solution in most situations. The normalization of the point coordinates is also recommended as an essential preprocessing step for point cloud registration. An implementation of the closed-form solutions in MATLAB is available at: http://people.eng.unimelb.edu.au/kkhoshelham/research.html#directmotion

  14. Motion estimation in the frequency domain using fuzzy c-planes clustering.

    PubMed

    Erdem, C E; Karabulut, G Z; Yanmaz, E; Anarim, E

    2001-01-01

    A recent work explicitly models the discontinuous motion estimation problem in the frequency domain where the motion parameters are estimated using a harmonic retrieval approach. The vertical and horizontal components of the motion are independently estimated from the locations of the peaks of respective periodogram analyses and they are paired to obtain the motion vectors using a procedure proposed. In this paper, we present a more efficient method that replaces the motion component pairing task and hence eliminates the problems of the pairing method described. The method described in this paper uses the fuzzy c-planes (FCP) clustering approach to fit planes to three-dimensional (3-D) frequency domain data obtained from the peaks of the periodograms. Experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  15. Estimated results analysis and application of the precise point positioning based high-accuracy ionosphere delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shi-tai; Peng, Jun-huan

    2015-12-01

    The characterization of ionosphere delay estimated with precise point positioning is analyzed in this paper. The estimation, interpolation and application of the ionosphere delay are studied based on the processing of 24-h data from 5 observation stations. The results show that the estimated ionosphere delay is affected by the hardware delay bias from receiver so that there is a difference between the estimated and interpolated results. The results also show that the RMSs (root mean squares) are bigger, while the STDs (standard deviations) are better than 0.11 m. When the satellite difference is used, the hardware delay bias can be canceled. The interpolated satellite-differenced ionosphere delay is better than 0.11 m. Although there is a difference between the between the estimated and interpolated ionosphere delay results it cannot affect its application in single-frequency positioning and the positioning accuracy can reach cm level.

  16. The reliability and accuracy of an electromagnetic motion analysis system when used conjointly with an accelerometer.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, D C; Sole, G; Abbott, J H; Milosavljevic, S

    2011-07-01

    The effect of an accelerometer driven electronic postural monitor (Spineangel®) placed within the electromagnetic measurement field of the Polhemus Fastrak™ is unknown. This study assessed the reliability and accuracy of Fastrak™ linear and angular measurements, when the Spineangel® was placed close to the sensor(s) and transmitter. Bland Altman plots and intraclass correlation coefficient (2,1) were used to determine protocol reproducibility and measurement consistency. Excellent reliability was found for linear and angular measurements (0.96, 95% CI: 0.90-0.99; and 1.00, 95% CI: 1.00-1.00, respectively) with the inclusion of Spineangel®; similar results were found, without the inclusion of Spineangel®, for linear and angular measurements, (0.96, 95% CI: 0.89-0.99; and 1.00, 95% CI: 1.00-1.00, respectively). The greatest linear discrepancies between the two test conditions were found to be less than 3.5 mm, while the greatest angular discrepancies were below 3.5°. As the effect on accuracy was minimal, these findings support the conjoint use of the Fastrak™ during validation studies of the Spineangel® device. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: Although previous studies have used the Fastrak™ as the gold standard measurement system, the influence of an accelerometer driven postural monitor on accuracy has not been reported. The strength of the present study has been to determine the effect of accelerometer placement within the electromagnetic field on the reliability and accuracy of the Fastrak™.

  17. Dorsomedial prefrontal cortex activity predicts the accuracy in estimating others' preferences.

    PubMed

    Kang, Pyungwon; Lee, Jongbin; Sul, Sunhae; Kim, Hackjin

    2013-01-01

    The ability to accurately estimate another person's preferences is crucial for a successful social life. In daily interactions, we often do this on the basis of minimal information. The aims of the present study were (a) to examine whether people can accurately judge others based only on a brief exposure to their appearances, and (b) to reveal the underlying neural mechanisms with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Participants were asked to make guesses about unfamiliar target individuals' preferences for various items after looking at their faces for 3 s. The behavioral results showed that participants estimated others' preferences above chance level. The fMRI data revealed that higher accuracy in preference estimation was associated with greater activity in the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (DMPFC) when participants were guessing the targets' preferences relative to thinking about their own preferences. These findings suggest that accurate estimations of others' preferences may require increased activity in the DMPFC. A functional connectivity analysis revealed that higher accuracy in preference estimation was related to increased functional connectivity between the DMPFC and the brain regions that are known to be involved in theory of mind processing, such as the temporoparietal junction (TPJ) and the posterior cingulate cortex (PCC)/precuneus, during correct vs. incorrect guessing trials. On the contrary, the tendency to refer to self-preferences when estimating others' preference was related to greater activity in the ventromedial prefrontal cortex. These findings imply that the DMPFC may be a core region in estimating the preferences of others and that higher accuracy may require stronger communication between the DMPFC and the TPJ and PCC/precuneus, part of a neural network known to be engaged in mentalizing.

  18. Comparing the accuracy of experimental estimates to guessing: a new perspective on replication and the "Crisis of Confidence" in psychology.

    PubMed

    Davis-Stober, Clintin P; Dana, Jason

    2014-03-01

    We develop a general measure of estimation accuracy for fundamental research designs, called v. The v measure compares the estimation accuracy of the ubiquitous ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator, which includes sample means as a special case, with a benchmark estimator that randomizes the direction of treatment effects. For sample and effect sizes common to experimental psychology, v suggests that OLS produces estimates that are insufficiently accurate for the type of hypotheses being tested. We demonstrate how v can be used to determine sample sizes to obtain minimum acceptable estimation accuracy. Software for calculating v is included as online supplemental material (R Core Team, 2012).

  19. Comparing the accuracy of experimental estimates to guessing: a new perspective on replication and the "Crisis of Confidence" in psychology.

    PubMed

    Davis-Stober, Clintin P; Dana, Jason

    2014-03-01

    We develop a general measure of estimation accuracy for fundamental research designs, called v. The v measure compares the estimation accuracy of the ubiquitous ordinary least squares (OLS) estimator, which includes sample means as a special case, with a benchmark estimator that randomizes the direction of treatment effects. For sample and effect sizes common to experimental psychology, v suggests that OLS produces estimates that are insufficiently accurate for the type of hypotheses being tested. We demonstrate how v can be used to determine sample sizes to obtain minimum acceptable estimation accuracy. Software for calculating v is included as online supplemental material (R Core Team, 2012). PMID:23661222

  20. Feasibility of Measuring Mean Vertical Motion for Estimating Advection. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Dean; Mahrt, L.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous recent studies calculate horizontal and vertical advection terms for budget studies of net ecosystem exchange of carbon. One potential uncertainty in such studies is the estimate of mean vertical motion. This work addresses the reliability of vertical advection estimates by contrasting the vertical motion obtained from the standard practise of measuring the vertical velocity and applying a tilt correction, to the vertical motion calculated from measurements of the horizontal divergence of the flow using a network of towers. Results are compared for three different tilt correction methods. Estimates of mean vertical motion are sensitive to the choice of tilt correction method. The short-term mean (10 to 60 minutes) vertical motion based on the horizontal divergence is more realistic compared to the estimates derived from the standard practise. The divergence shows long-term mean (days to months) sinking motion at the site, apparently due to the surface roughness change. Because all the tilt correction methods rely on the assumption that the long-term mean vertical motion is zero for a given wind direction, they fail to reproduce the vertical motion based on the divergence.

  1. A parallel algorithm for motion estimation in video coding using the bilinear transformation.

    PubMed

    Konstantopoulos, Charalampos

    2015-01-01

    Accurate motion estimation between frames is important for drastically reducing data redundancy in video coding. However, advanced motion estimation methods are computationally intensive and their execution in real time usually requires a parallel implementation. In this paper, we investigate the parallel implementation of such a motion estimation technique. Specifically, we present a parallel algorithm for motion estimation based on the bilinear transformation on the well-known parallel model of the hypercube network and formally prove the time and the space complexity of the proposed algorithm. We also show that the parallel algorithm can also run on other hypercubic networks, such as butterfly, cube-connected-cycles, shuffle-exchange or de Bruijn network with only constant slowdown.

  2. Estimation of Broadband Ground Motion at Ocean-bottom Strong-motion Stations for the 2003 Tokachi-oki Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Y.; Takenaka, H.; Hirata, K.; Watanabe, T.

    2004-12-01

    The 2003 Tokachi-oki earthquake (MJMA8.0) occurred on September 25, 2003 (UT). In this study, we reproduce the broadband ground motion from the earthquake using near-field strong-motion records (accelerograms) at three ocean-bottom stations (KOB1, KOB2 and KOB3) on the sea floor off Kushiro, Hokkaido, installed by the Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC). The distance and direction from the epicenter to KOB1, KOB2 and KOB3 are 28 km, east-southeast and 83 km,east and 80 km, east-northeast, respectively. Three components (x, y, z) strong motion observation system, enclosed within a cylindrical pressure housing, can record ground motion in broadband frequency range up to DC. The x component is parallel to the axis of the cylinder which is almost horizontal. Since it is suspected that the strong-motion observation systems themselves had moved during the main shock, a simple time-integration of the original acceleration results in wrong velocity and displacement ground motion. So we apply the following processing to the data: We assume that the motion of each strong-motion seismometer can be represented by (1) rotation around the cylinder axis (i.e., roll), (2) tilting of the cylinder (i.e., pitch), and (3) parallel motion. To estimate rotation and tilting, we first use a median-filter for the original records. After the compensation of these movements, the rotated records are integrated into velocity ones. Next, we follow the base-line correction method of Boore (2001) and obtain the ground motion using the amount of submarine upheaval estimated from the two seabed tsunami sensors near KOB1 and KOB3 by Hirata and Baba (2004). By this approach we have successfully obtained broadband velocity and displacement ground motion including DC components. The maximum horizontal (vector resultant) and vertical velocities at KOB1 and KOB3 are estimated to be approximately 160 cm/s, 40 cm/s and 130 cm/s, 20 cm/s, while the corresponding maximum

  3. Estimation of 3D myocardial motion from tagged MRI using LDDMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotamraju, Vinay; McVeigh, Elliot; Beg, Mirza Faisal

    2007-03-01

    Non-invasive estimation of regional cardiac function is important for assessment of myocardial contractility. The use of MR tagging technique enables acquisition of intra-myocardial tissue motion by placing a spatially modulated pattern of magnetization whose deformation with the myocardium over the cardiac cycle can be imaged. Quantitative computation of parameters such as wall thickening, shearing, rotation, torsion and strain within the myocardium is traditionally achieved by processing the tag-marked MR image frames to 1) segment the tag lines and 2) detect the correspondence between points across the time-indexed frames. In this paper, we describe our approach to solving this problem using the Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM) algorithm in which tag-line segmentation and motion reconstruction occur simultaneously. Our method differs from earlier proposed non rigid registration based cardiac motion estimation methods in that our matching cost incorporates image intensity overlap via the L2 norm and the estimated tranformations are diffeomorphic. We also present a novel method of generating synthetic tag line images with known ground truth and motion characteristics that closely follow those in the original data; these can be used for validation of motion estimation algorithms. Initial validation shows that our method is able to accurately segment tag-lines and estimate a dense 3D motion field describing the motion of the myocardium in both the left and the right ventricle.

  4. Theory and Validation of Magnetic Resonance Fluid Motion Estimation Using Intensity Flow Data

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Kelvin Kian Loong; Kelso, Richard Malcolm; Worthley, Stephen Grant; Sanders, Prashanthan; Mazumdar, Jagannath; Abbott, Derek

    2009-01-01

    Background Motion tracking based on spatial-temporal radio-frequency signals from the pixel representation of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of a non-stationary fluid is able to provide two dimensional vector field maps. This supports the underlying fundamentals of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation and generates a new methodology for flow measurement that is based on registration of nuclear signals from moving hydrogen nuclei in fluid. However, there is a need to validate the computational aspect of the approach by using velocity flow field data that we will assume as the true reference information or ground truth. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we create flow vectors based on an ideal analytical vortex, and generate artificial signal-motion image data to verify our computational approach. The analytical and computed flow fields are compared to provide an error estimate of our methodology. The comparison shows that the fluid motion estimation approach using simulated MR data is accurate and robust enough for flow field mapping. To verify our methodology, we have tested the computational configuration on magnetic resonance images of cardiac blood and proved that the theory of magnetic resonance fluid motion estimation can be applicable practically. Conclusions/Significance The results of this work will allow us to progress further in the investigation of fluid motion prediction based on imaging modalities that do not require velocity encoding. This article describes a novel theory of motion estimation based on magnetic resonating blood, which may be directly applied to cardiac flow imaging. PMID:19270756

  5. Motion as a perturbation: Measurement-guided dose estimates to moving patient voxels during modulated arc deliveries

    SciTech Connect

    Feygelman, Vladimir; Zhang, Geoffrey; Hunt, Dylan; Opp, Daniel; Stambaugh, Cassandra; Wolf, Theresa K.; Nelms, Benjamin E.

    2013-02-15

    MLC sequences. For all phantoms and plans, time-resolved (10 Hz) ion chamber dose was collected. In addition, coronal (XY) films were exposed in the cube phantom to a VMAT beam with two different starting phases, and compared to the reconstructed motion-perturbed dose planes. Results: For the X or Y motions with the moving strip and geometrical phantoms, the maximum difference between perturbation-reconstructed and ion chamber doses did not exceed 1.9%, and the average for any motion pattern/starting phase did not exceed 1.3%. For the VMAT plans on the cubic and thoracic phantoms, one point exhibited a 3.5% error, while the remaining five were all within 1.1%. Across all the measurements (N = 22), the average disagreement was 0.5 {+-} 1.3% (1 SD). The films exhibited {gamma}(3%/3 mm) passing rates {>=}90%. Conclusions: The dose to an arbitrary moving voxel in a patient can be estimated with acceptable accuracy for a VMAT delivery, by performing a single QA measurement with a cylindrical phantom and applying two consecutive perturbations to the TPS-calculated patient dose. The first one accounts for the differences between the planned and delivered static doses, while the second one corrects for the motion.

  6. Accuracy of Igenity genomically estimated breeding values for predicting Australian Angus BREEDPLAN traits.

    PubMed

    Boerner, V; Johnston, D; Wu, X-L; Bauck, S

    2015-02-01

    Genomically estimated breeding values (GEBV) for Angus beef cattle are available from at least 2 commercial suppliers (Igenity [http://www.igenity.com] and Zoetis [http://www.zoetis.com]). The utility of these GEBV for improving genetic evaluation depends on their accuracies, which can be estimated by the genetic correlation with phenotypic target traits. Genomically estimated breeding values of 1,032 Angus bulls calculated from prediction equations (PE) derived by 2 different procedures in the U.S. Angus population were supplied by Igenity. Both procedures were based on Illuminia BovineSNP50 BeadChip genotypes. In procedure sg, GEBV were calculated from PE that used subsets of only 392 SNP, where these subsets were individually selected for each trait by BayesCπ. In procedure rg GEBV were calculated from PE derived in a ridge regression approach using all available SNP. Because the total set of 1,032 bulls with GEBV contained 732 individuals used in the Igenity training population, GEBV subsets were formed characterized by a decreasing average relationship between individuals in the subsets and individuals in the training population. Accuracies of GEBV were estimated as genetic correlations between GEBV and their phenotypic target traits modeling GEBV as trait observations in a bivariate REML approach, in which phenotypic observations were those recorded in the commercial Australian Angus seed stock sector. Using results from the GEBV subset excluding all training individuals as a reference, estimated accuracies were generally in agreement with those already published, with both types of GEBV (sg and rg) yielding similar results. Accuracies for growth traits ranged from 0.29 to 0.45, for reproductive traits from 0.11 to 0.53, and for carcass traits from 0.3 to 0.75. Accuracies generally decreased with an increasing genetic distance between the training and the validation population. However, for some carcass traits characterized by a low number of phenotypic

  7. Respiratory liver motion estimation and its effect on scanned proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Boye, D.; Tanner, C.; Lomax, A. J.; Knopf, A.

    2012-04-01

    Proton therapy with active scanning beam delivery has significant advantages compared to conventional radiotherapy. However, so far only static targets have been treated in this way, since moving targets potentially lead to interplay effects. For 4D treatment planning, information on the target motion is needed to calculate time-resolved dose distributions. In this study, respiratory liver motion has been extracted from 4D CT data using two deformable image registration algorithms. In moderately moving patient cases (mean motion range around 6 mm), the registration error was no more than 3 mm, while it reached 7 mm for larger motions (range around 13 mm). The obtained deformation fields have then been used to calculate different time-resolved 4D treatment plans. Averaged over both motion estimations, interplay effects can increase the D5-D95 value for the clinical target volume (CTV) from 8.8% in a static plan to 23.4% when motion is considered. It has also been found that the different deformable registration algorithms can provide different motion estimations despite performing similarly for the selected landmarks, which in turn can lead to differing 4D dose distributions. Especially for single-field treatments where no motion mitigation is used, a maximum (mean) dose difference (averaged over three cases) of 32.8% (2.9%) can be observed. However, this registration ambiguity-induced uncertainty can be reduced if rescanning is applied or if the treatment plan consists of multiple fields, where the maximum (mean) difference can decrease to 15.2% (0.57%). Our results indicate the necessity to interpret 4D dose distributions for scanned proton therapy with some caution or with error bars to reflect the uncertainties resulting from the motion estimation. On the other hand, rescanning has been found to be an appropriate motion mitigation technique and, furthermore, has been shown to be a robust approach to also deal with these motion estimation uncertainties.

  8. Full 3-D transverse oscillations: a method for tissue motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Salles, Sebastien; Liebgott, Hervé; Garcia, Damien; Vray, Didier

    2015-08-01

    We present a new method to estimate 4-D (3-D + time) tissue motion. The method used combines 3-D phase based motion estimation with an unconventional beamforming strategy. The beamforming technique allows us to obtain full 3-D RF volumes with axial, lateral, and elevation modulations. Based on these images, we propose a method to estimate 3-D motion that uses phase images instead of amplitude images. First, volumes featuring 3-D oscillations are created using only a single apodization function, and the 3-D displacement between two consecutive volumes is estimated simultaneously by applying this 3-D estimation. The validity of the method is investigated by conducting simulations and phantom experiments. The results are compared with those obtained with two other conventional estimation methods: block matching and optical flow. The results show that the proposed method outperforms the conventional methods, especially in the transverse directions.

  9. Recent Progress on the Second Generation CMORPH: LEO-IR Based Precipitation Estimates and Cloud Motion Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Pingping; Joyce, Robert; Wu, Shaorong

    2015-04-01

    As reported at the EGU General Assembly of 2014, a prototype system was developed for the second generation CMORPH to produce global analyses of 30-min precipitation on a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe from pole to pole through integration of information from satellite observations as well as numerical model simulations. The second generation CMORPH is built upon the Kalman Filter based CMORPH algorithm of Joyce and Xie (2011). Inputs to the system include rainfall and snowfall rate retrievals from passive microwave (PMW) measurements aboard all available low earth orbit (LEO) satellites, precipitation estimates derived from infrared (IR) observations of geostationary (GEO) as well as LEO platforms, and precipitation simulations from numerical global models. Key to the success of the 2nd generation CMORPH, among a couple of other elements, are the development of a LEO-IR based precipitation estimation to fill in the polar gaps and objectively analyzed cloud motion vectors to capture the cloud movements of various spatial scales over the entire globe. In this presentation, we report our recent work on the refinement for these two important algorithm components. The prototype algorithm for the LEO IR precipitation estimation is refined to achieve improved quantitative accuracy and consistency with PMW retrievals. AVHRR IR TBB data from all LEO satellites are first remapped to a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe and in a 30-min interval. Temporally and spatially co-located data pairs of the LEO TBB and inter-calibrated combined satellite PMW retrievals (MWCOMB) are then collected to construct tables. Precipitation at a grid box is derived from the TBB through matching the PDF tables for the TBB and the MWCOMB. This procedure is implemented for different season, latitude band and underlying surface types to account for the variations in the cloud - precipitation relationship. At the meantime, a sub-system is developed to construct analyzed fields of

  10. The ZIPE solution for the Earth's rotation parameters and some accuracy estimations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montag, H.; Gendt, G.

    The solution of the Central Institute for Physics of the Earth (ZIPE) for the realization of the terrestrial reference frame and the determination of the Earth's rotation parameters (ERP) using satellite laser ranging data to Lageos of 1987 is presented. The data, constants, parameters, models and algorithms used are described. On the basis of comparisons with other solutions the accuracy of the ERP results of the ZIPE was estimated.

  11. The implementation of binned Kernel density estimation to determine open clusters' proper motions: validation of the method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priyatikanto, R.; Arifyanto, M. I.

    2015-01-01

    Stellar membership determination of an open cluster is an important process to do before further analysis. Basically, there are two classes of membership determination method: parametric and non-parametric. In this study, an alternative of non-parametric method based on Binned Kernel Density Estimation that accounts measurements errors (simply called BKDE- e) is proposed. This method is applied upon proper motions data to determine cluster's membership kinematically and estimate the average proper motions of the cluster. Monte Carlo simulations show that the average proper motions determination using this proposed method is statistically more accurate than ordinary Kernel Density Estimator (KDE). By including measurement errors in the calculation, the mode location from the resulting density estimate is less sensitive to non-physical or stochastic fluctuation as compared to ordinary KDE that excludes measurement errors. For the typical mean measurement error of 7 mas/yr, BKDE- e suppresses the potential of miscalculation by a factor of two compared to KDE. With median accuracy of about 93 %, BKDE- e method has comparable accuracy with respect to parametric method (modified Sanders algorithm). Application to real data from The Fourth USNO CCD Astrograph Catalog (UCAC4), especially to NGC 2682 is also performed. The mode of member stars distribution on Vector Point Diagram is located at μ α cos δ=-9.94±0.85 mas/yr and μ δ =-4.92±0.88 mas/yr. Although the BKDE- e performance does not overtake parametric approach, it serves a new view of doing membership analysis, expandable to astrometric and photometric data or even in binary cluster search.

  12. Age estimation by measurements of developing teeth: accuracy of Cameriere's method on a Brazilian sample.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Mário Marques; Tinoco, Rachel Lima Ribeiro; de Braganca, Daniel Pereira Parreiras; de Lima, Silas Henrique Rabelo; Francesquini Junior, Luiz; Daruge Junior, Eduardo

    2011-11-01

    Developing teeth are commonly the criteria used for age estimation in children and young adults. The method developed by Cameriere et al. (Int J Legal Med 2006;120:49-52) is based on measures of teeth with open apex, and application of a formula, to estimate chronological age of children. The present study evaluated a sample of panoramic radiographs from Brazilian children from 5 to 15 years of age, to evaluate the accuracy of the method proposed by Cameriere et al. The results has proven the system reliable for age estimation, with a median residual error of -0.014 years between chronological and estimated ages (p = 0.603). There was a slight tendency to overestimate the ages of 5-10 years and underestimate the ages of 11-15 years.

  13. Improving the Accuracy of Laplacian Estimation with Novel Variable Inter-Ring Distances Concentric Ring Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive concentric ring electrodes are a promising alternative to conventional disc electrodes. Currently, the superiority of tripolar concentric ring electrodes over disc electrodes, in particular, in accuracy of Laplacian estimation, has been demonstrated in a range of applications. In our recent work, we have shown that accuracy of Laplacian estimation can be improved with multipolar concentric ring electrodes using a general approach to estimation of the Laplacian for an (n + 1)-polar electrode with n rings using the (4n + 1)-point method for n ≥ 2. This paper takes the next step toward further improving the Laplacian estimate by proposing novel variable inter-ring distances concentric ring electrodes. Derived using a modified (4n + 1)-point method, linearly increasing and decreasing inter-ring distances tripolar (n = 2) and quadripolar (n = 3) electrode configurations are compared to their constant inter-ring distances counterparts. Finite element method modeling and analytic results are consistent and suggest that increasing inter-ring distances electrode configurations may decrease the truncation error resulting in more accurate Laplacian estimates compared to respective constant inter-ring distances configurations. For currently used tripolar electrode configuration, the truncation error may be decreased more than two-fold, while for the quadripolar configuration more than a six-fold decrease is expected. PMID:27294933

  14. Estimating accuracy of land-cover composition from two-stage cluster sampling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehman, S.V.; Wickham, J.D.; Fattorini, L.; Wade, T.D.; Baffetta, F.; Smith, J.H.

    2009-01-01

    Land-cover maps are often used to compute land-cover composition (i.e., the proportion or percent of area covered by each class), for each unit in a spatial partition of the region mapped. We derive design-based estimators of mean deviation (MD), mean absolute deviation (MAD), root mean square error (RMSE), and correlation (CORR) to quantify accuracy of land-cover composition for a general two-stage cluster sampling design, and for the special case of simple random sampling without replacement (SRSWOR) at each stage. The bias of the estimators for the two-stage SRSWOR design is evaluated via a simulation study. The estimators of RMSE and CORR have small bias except when sample size is small and the land-cover class is rare. The estimator of MAD is biased for both rare and common land-cover classes except when sample size is large. A general recommendation is that rare land-cover classes require large sample sizes to ensure that the accuracy estimators have small bias. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc.

  15. Improving the Accuracy of Laplacian Estimation with Novel Variable Inter-Ring Distances Concentric Ring Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Makeyev, Oleksandr; Besio, Walter G.

    2016-01-01

    Noninvasive concentric ring electrodes are a promising alternative to conventional disc electrodes. Currently, the superiority of tripolar concentric ring electrodes over disc electrodes, in particular, in accuracy of Laplacian estimation, has been demonstrated in a range of applications. In our recent work, we have shown that accuracy of Laplacian estimation can be improved with multipolar concentric ring electrodes using a general approach to estimation of the Laplacian for an (n + 1)-polar electrode with n rings using the (4n + 1)-point method for n ≥ 2. This paper takes the next step toward further improving the Laplacian estimate by proposing novel variable inter-ring distances concentric ring electrodes. Derived using a modified (4n + 1)-point method, linearly increasing and decreasing inter-ring distances tripolar (n = 2) and quadripolar (n = 3) electrode configurations are compared to their constant inter-ring distances counterparts. Finite element method modeling and analytic results are consistent and suggest that increasing inter-ring distances electrode configurations may decrease the truncation error resulting in more accurate Laplacian estimates compared to respective constant inter-ring distances configurations. For currently used tripolar electrode configuration, the truncation error may be decreased more than two-fold, while for the quadripolar configuration more than a six-fold decrease is expected. PMID:27294933

  16. Evaluation of spatial filtering on the accuracy of wheat area estimate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Moreira, M. A.; Chen, S. C.; Delima, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    A 3 x 3 pixel spatial filter for postclassification was used for wheat classification to evaluate the effects of this procedure on the accuracy of area estimation using LANDSAT digital data obtained from a single pass. Quantitative analyses were carried out in five test sites (approx 40 sq km each) and t tests showed that filtering with threshold values significantly decreased errors of commission and omission. In area estimation filtering improved the overestimate of 4.5% to 2.7% and the root-mean-square error decreased from 126.18 ha to 107.02 ha. Extrapolating the same procedure of automatic classification using spatial filtering for postclassification to the whole study area, the accuracy in area estimate was improved from the overestimate of 10.9% to 9.7%. It is concluded that when single pass LANDSAT data is used for crop identification and area estimation the postclassification procedure using a spatial filter provides a more accurate area estimate by reducing classification errors.

  17. Motion estimation of objects in KC-135 microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hewgill, Lisa

    1994-01-01

    The simulated microgravity environment aboard a KC-135 aircraft flying along a parabolic trajectory was used to study the ability of an autonomous space robot to grasp a freely translating and rotating object. Since the KC-135 cabin environment and the instrumentation for the Extravehicular Activity Helper/Retriever (EVAHR) do not provide a practical intertial reference frame, estimators based on the extended Kalman filter algorithm were used to model the relative translational dynamics of the KC-135 and the EVAHR. The estimator algorithms require intensive mathematical computation and therefore, i860 real-time. Estimator design, implementation concerns, and issues specific to the KC-135 environment are discussed and the architecture of the KC-135 translational state estimator is depicted.

  18. Comparison of the accuracy of kriging and IDW interpolations in estimating groundwater arsenic concentrations in Texas.

    PubMed

    Gong, Gordon; Mattevada, Sravan; O'Bryant, Sid E

    2014-04-01

    Exposure to arsenic causes many diseases. Most Americans in rural areas use groundwater for drinking, which may contain arsenic above the currently allowable level, 10µg/L. It is cost-effective to estimate groundwater arsenic levels based on data from wells with known arsenic concentrations. We compared the accuracy of several commonly used interpolation methods in estimating arsenic concentrations in >8000 wells in Texas by the leave-one-out-cross-validation technique. Correlation coefficient between measured and estimated arsenic levels was greater with inverse distance weighted (IDW) than kriging Gaussian, kriging spherical or cokriging interpolations when analyzing data from wells in the entire Texas (p<0.0001). Correlation coefficient was significantly lower with cokriging than any other methods (p<0.006) for wells in Texas, east Texas or the Edwards aquifer. Correlation coefficient was significantly greater for wells in southwestern Texas Panhandle than in east Texas, and was higher for wells in Ogallala aquifer than in Edwards aquifer (p<0.0001) regardless of interpolation methods. In regression analysis, the best models are when well depth and/or elevation were entered into the model as covariates regardless of area/aquifer or interpolation methods, and models with IDW are better than kriging in any area/aquifer. In conclusion, the accuracy in estimating groundwater arsenic level depends on both interpolation methods and wells' geographic distributions and characteristics in Texas. Taking well depth and elevation into regression analysis as covariates significantly increases the accuracy in estimating groundwater arsenic level in Texas with IDW in particular.

  19. Motion estimation by integrated low cost system (vision and MEMS) for positioning of a scooter "Vespa"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, A.; Milan, N.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2011-12-01

    In the automotive sector, especially in these last decade, a growing number of investigations have taken into account electronic systems to check and correct the behavior of drivers, increasing road safety. The possibility to identify with high accuracy the vehicle position in a mapping reference frame for driving directions and best-route analysis is also another topic which attracts lot of interest from the research and development sector. To reach the objective of accurate vehicle positioning and integrate response events, it is necessary to estimate time by time the position, orientation and velocity of the system. To this aim low cost GPS and MEMS (sensors can be used. In comparison to a four wheel vehicle, the dynamics of a two wheel vehicle (e.g. a scooter) feature a higher level of complexity. Indeed more degrees of freedom must be taken into account to describe the motion of the latter. For example a scooter can twist sideways, thus generating a roll angle. A slight pitch angle has to be considered as well, since wheel suspensions have a higher degree of motion with respect to four wheel vehicles. In this paper we present a method for the accurate reconstruction of the trajectory of a motorcycle ("Vespa" scooter), which can be used as alternative to the "classical" approach based on the integration of GPS and INS sensors. Position and orientation of the scooter are derived from MEMS data and images acquired by on-board digital camera. A Bayesian filter provides the means for integrating the data from MEMS-based orientation sensor and the GPS receiver.

  20. Motion Estimation Utilizing Range Detection-Enhanced Visual Odometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friend, Paul Russell (Inventor); Chen, Qi (Inventor); Chang, Hong (Inventor); Morris, Daniel Dale (Inventor); Graf, Jodi Seaborn (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A motion determination system is disclosed. The system may receive a first and a second camera image from a camera, the first camera image received earlier than the second camera image. The system may identify corresponding features in the first and second camera images. The system may receive range data comprising at least one of a first and a second range data from a range detection unit, corresponding to the first and second camera images, respectively. The system may determine first positions and the second positions of the corresponding features using the first camera image and the second camera image. The first positions or the second positions may be determined by also using the range data. The system may determine a change in position of the machine based on differences between the first and second positions, and a VO-based velocity of the machine based on the determined change in position.

  1. Motion estimation using the firefly algorithm in ultrasonic image sequence of soft tissue.

    PubMed

    Chao, Chih-Feng; Horng, Ming-Huwi; Chen, Yu-Chan

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasonic image sequence of the soft tissue is widely used in disease diagnosis; however, the speckle noises usually influenced the image quality. These images usually have a low signal-to-noise ratio presentation. The phenomenon gives rise to traditional motion estimation algorithms that are not suitable to measure the motion vectors. In this paper, a new motion estimation algorithm is developed for assessing the velocity field of soft tissue in a sequence of ultrasonic B-mode images. The proposed iterative firefly algorithm (IFA) searches for few candidate points to obtain the optimal motion vector, and then compares it to the traditional iterative full search algorithm (IFSA) via a series of experiments of in vivo ultrasonic image sequences. The experimental results show that the IFA can assess the vector with better efficiency and almost equal estimation quality compared to the traditional IFSA method.

  2. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yücel, Meryem A.; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M.; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R2 below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  3. Mayer waves reduce the accuracy of estimated hemodynamic response functions in functional near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Yücel, Meryem A; Selb, Juliette; Aasted, Christopher M; Lin, Pei-Yi; Borsook, David; Becerra, Lino; Boas, David A

    2016-08-01

    Analysis of cerebral hemodynamics reveals a wide spectrum of oscillations ranging from 0.0095 to 2 Hz. While most of these oscillations can be filtered out during analysis of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) signals when estimating stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses, oscillations around 0.1 Hz are an exception. This is due to the fact that they share a common spectral range with typical stimulus evoked hemodynamic responses from the brain. Here we investigate the effect of hemodynamic oscillations around 0.1 Hz on the estimation of hemodynamic response functions from fNIRS data. Our results show that for an expected response of ~1 µM in oxygenated hemoglobin concentration (HbO), Mayer wave oscillations with an amplitude > ~1 µM at 0.1 Hz reduce the accuracy of the estimated response as quantified by a 3 fold increase in the mean squared error and decrease in correlation (R(2) below 0.78) when compared to the true HRF. These results indicate that the amplitude of oscillations at 0.1 Hz can serve as an objective metric of the expected HRF estimation accuracy. In addition, we investigated the effect of short separation regression on the recovered HRF, and found that this improves the recovered HRF when large amplitude 0.1 Hz oscillations are present in fNIRS data. We suspect that the development of other filtering strategies may provide even further improvement. PMID:27570699

  4. The accuracy of three methods of age estimation using radiographic measurements of developing teeth.

    PubMed

    Liversidge, H M; Lyons, F; Hector, M P

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of age estimation using three quantitative methods of developing permanent teeth was investigated. These were Mörnstad et al. [Scand. J. Dent. Res. 102 (1994) 137], Liversidge and Molleson [J. For. Sci. 44 (1999) 917] and Carels et al. [J. Biol. Bucc. 19 (1991) 297]. The sample consisted of 145 white Caucasian children (75 girls, 70 boys) aged between 8 and 13 years. Tooth length and apex width of mandibular canine, premolars and first and second molars were measured from orthopantomographs using a digitiser. These data were substituted into equations from the three methods and estimated age was calculated and compared to chronological age. Age was under-estimated in boys and girls using all the three methods; the mean difference between chronological and estimated ages for method I was -0.83 (standard deviation +/-0.96) years for boys and -0.67 (+/-0.76) years for girls; method II -0.79 (+/-0.93) and -0.63 (+/-0.92); method III -1.03 (+/-1.48) and -1.35 (+/-1.11) for boys and girls, respectively. Further analysis of age cohorts, found the most accurate method to be method I for the age group 8.00-8.99 years where age could be predicted to 0.14+/-0.44 years (boys) and 0.10+/-0.32 years (girls). Accuracy was greater for younger children compared to older children and this decreased with age.

  5. Geoscience Laser Ranging System - Estimated accuracy of geodetic parameters and their dependence on system characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Steven C.; Chinn, Douglas S.; Dunn, Peter J.

    1990-01-01

    Covariance analysis of the performance of the Geoscience Laser Ranging System (GLRS) indicates that three-dimensional relative positions can be recovered to an accuracy of several millimeters over spatial scales from a few kilometers to several hundred kilometers and over temporal scales as short as several days. The key factors influencing the accuracy are range noise, number of targets and their locations, system pointing capability, dwell time on the targets, orbital geometry, and gravity field uncertainties. Based on the present trade-off studies, GLRS is designed to provide range measurements with 10 mm or better accuracy, fire at a rate of 40 pulses-per-second, point over a cone extending to 50 deg from nadir, and operate with a dwell time on individual targets of 2 s or less. Given a strain rate of 10 to the -14th/s, estimated GLRS accuracy parameters suggest that the deformation can be detected in less than a month if it extends over 100 km and in less than 6 months if it extends over 10 km.

  6. On the accuracy of dynamic mode decomposition in estimating instability of wave packet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Chong; Xue, Dong; Wang, Jinjun

    2015-08-01

    Lots of unstable flows in both nature and engineering pose multi-scale perturbations with infinitesimal initial amplitude, which compete and interact with each other during their unstable evolution. Dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) analysis can be used to extract these components' temporal/spatial growth rate. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy performance and confidence limit of DMD algorithm in the circumstance of multi-scale instability wave packet. In the present study, we use a linear combination of a sinusoidal unstable wave and its high-order harmonics as a prototype, based on which an error analysis of DMD algorithm is taken. In first, different numerical algorithms of DMD analysis are compared in terms of both accuracy and efficiency. The accuracy evaluation of the classical DMD algorithm in a large parameter domain is followed. It is found that the superimposition of finer structures with less energy dominance might damage the estimation accuracy of the primary structures' growth rate. Strong evidences suggest that even in a linear circumstance, resolving the dynamics of small-scale structures is comparably more difficult than that of the primary structures, i.e., DMD algorithm has a preference for structures with energetic dominance. Finally, the recommended thresholds for the sampling/discretizing parameters are summarized for practical usage.

  7. Accuracy of Herdsmen Reporting versus Serologic Testing for Estimating Foot-and-Mouth Disease Prevalence

    PubMed Central

    Handel, Ian G.; Tanya, Vincent N.; Hamman, Saidou M.; Nfon, Charles; Bergman, Ingrid E.; Malirat, Viviana; Sorensen, Karl J.; Bronsvoort, Barend M. de C.

    2014-01-01

    Herdsman-reported disease prevalence is widely used in veterinary epidemiologic studies, especially for diseases with visible external lesions; however, the accuracy of such reports is rarely validated. Thus, we used latent class analysis in a Bayesian framework to compare sensitivity and specificity of herdsman reporting with virus neutralization testing and use of 3 nonstructural protein ELISAs for estimates of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) prevalence on the Adamawa plateau of Cameroon in 2000. Herdsman-reported estimates in this FMD-endemic area were comparable to those obtained from serologic testing. To harness to this cost-effective resource of monitoring emerging infectious diseases, we suggest that estimates of the sensitivity and specificity of herdsmen reporting should be done in parallel with serologic surveys of other animal diseases. PMID:25417556

  8. Estimating parameters with pre-specified accuracies in distributed parameter systems using optimal experiment design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potters, M. G.; Bombois, X.; Mansoori, M.; Van den Hof, Paul M. J.

    2016-08-01

    Estimation of physical parameters in dynamical systems driven by linear partial differential equations is an important problem. In this paper, we introduce the least costly experiment design framework for these systems. It enables parameter estimation with an accuracy that is specified by the experimenter prior to the identification experiment, while at the same time minimising the cost of the experiment. We show how to adapt the classical framework for these systems and take into account scaling and stability issues. We also introduce a progressive subdivision algorithm that further generalises the experiment design framework in the sense that it returns the lowest cost by finding the optimal input signal, and optimal sensor and actuator locations. Our methodology is then applied to a relevant problem in heat transfer studies: estimation of conductivity and diffusivity parameters in front-face experiments. We find good correspondence between numerical and theoretical results.

  9. Accuracy of methods of age estimation in predicting dental age of preadolescents in South Indian children.

    PubMed

    Balla, Sudheer B; Venkat Baghirath, P; Hari Vinay, B; Vijay Kumar, J; Babu, D B Gandhi

    2016-10-01

    Age estimation in forensic context is of prime importance for criminal, civil and administrative laws. The objective of this study is to test the accuracy of 3 methods of age estimation in South Indian children (preadolescents) aged between 7 and 15 years. It is a retrospective study of orthopantamograms (OPGs) of 150 children among which 79 were boys and 71 were girls. Cameriere's, Willems and Acharya's age estimation methods were used to predict chronological age. Paired t-test was used to compare all data and relationships between continuous variables were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The Cameriere's method Underestimated the real age by -0.62 years in boys and -0.54 years in girls. Both Willems and Acharya's methods overestimated age in both sexes by 0.41, 0.18 years and 0.41, 0.47 years respectively.

  10. Accuracy of methods of age estimation in predicting dental age of preadolescents in South Indian children.

    PubMed

    Balla, Sudheer B; Venkat Baghirath, P; Hari Vinay, B; Vijay Kumar, J; Babu, D B Gandhi

    2016-10-01

    Age estimation in forensic context is of prime importance for criminal, civil and administrative laws. The objective of this study is to test the accuracy of 3 methods of age estimation in South Indian children (preadolescents) aged between 7 and 15 years. It is a retrospective study of orthopantamograms (OPGs) of 150 children among which 79 were boys and 71 were girls. Cameriere's, Willems and Acharya's age estimation methods were used to predict chronological age. Paired t-test was used to compare all data and relationships between continuous variables were examined using Pearson's correlation coefficient. The Cameriere's method Underestimated the real age by -0.62 years in boys and -0.54 years in girls. Both Willems and Acharya's methods overestimated age in both sexes by 0.41, 0.18 years and 0.41, 0.47 years respectively. PMID:27428567

  11. Geostatistical radar-raingauge merging: A novel method for the quantification of rain estimation accuracy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delrieu, Guy; Wijbrans, Annette; Boudevillain, Brice; Faure, Dominique; Bonnifait, Laurent; Kirstetter, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2014-09-01

    Compared to other estimation techniques, one advantage of geostatistical techniques is that they provide an index of the estimation accuracy of the variable of interest with the kriging estimation standard deviation (ESD). In the context of radar-raingauge quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE), we address in this article the question of how the kriging ESD can be transformed into a local spread of error by using the dependency of radar errors to the rain amount analyzed in previous work. The proposed approach is implemented for the most significant rain events observed in 2008 in the Cévennes-Vivarais region, France, by considering both the kriging with external drift (KED) and the ordinary kriging (OK) methods. A two-step procedure is implemented for estimating the rain estimation accuracy: (i) first kriging normalized ESDs are computed by using normalized variograms (sill equal to 1) to account for the observation system configuration and the spatial structure of the variable of interest (rainfall amount, residuals to the drift); (ii) based on the assumption of a linear relationship between the standard deviation and the mean of the variable of interest, a denormalization of the kriging ESDs is performed globally for a given rain event by using a cross-validation procedure. Despite the fact that the KED normalized ESDs are usually greater than the OK ones (due to an additional constraint in the kriging system and a weaker spatial structure of the residuals to the drift), the KED denormalized ESDs are generally smaller the OK ones, a result consistent with the better performance observed for the KED technique. The evolution of the mean and the standard deviation of the rainfall-scaled ESDs over a range of spatial (5-300 km2) and temporal (1-6 h) scales demonstrates that there is clear added value of the radar with respect to the raingauge network for the shortest scales, which are those of interest for flash-flood prediction in the considered region.

  12. Accuracy of Four Dental Age Estimation Methods in Southern Indian Children

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Praveen; Perumalla, Kiran Kumar; Srinivasaraju, D.; Srinivas, Jami; Kalyan, U. Siva; Rasool, SK. Md. Iftekhar

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: For various forensic investigations of both living and dead individuals, the knowledge of the actual age or date of birth of the subject is of utmost importance. In recent years, age estimation has gained importance for a variety of reasons, including identifying criminal and legal responsibility, and for many other social events such as birth certificate, marriage, beginning a job, joining the army and retirement. Developing teeth are used to assess maturity and estimate age in number of disciplines; however the accuracy of different methods has not been assessed systematically. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of four dental age estimation methods. Materials and Methods: Digital Orthopantomographs (OPGS) of South Indian children between the ages of 6 and 16 y who visited the department of Department of Oral medicine and Radiology of GITAM Dental College, Visakhapatnam, Andhra Pradesh, India with similar ethnic origin were assessed. Dental age was calculated using Demirjian, Willems, Nolla, and adopted Haavikko methods and the difference between estimated dental age and chronological age were compared with paired t-test and Wilcoxon signed rank test. Results: An overestimation of the dental age was observed by using Demirjian and Nolla methods (0.1±1.63, 0.47±0.83 years in total sample respectively) and an underestimation of dental age was observed by using Willems and Haavikko methods (-0.4±1.53, -2.9±1.41 years respectively in total sample). Conclusion: Nolla’s method was more accurate in estimating dental age compared to other methods. Moreover, all the four methods were found to be reliable in estimating age of individuals of unknown chronological age in South Indian children. PMID:25738008

  13. Real-time motion compensated patient positioning and non-rigid deformation estimation using 4-D shape priors.

    PubMed

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years, range imaging (RI) techniques have been proposed for patient positioning and respiration analysis in motion compensation. Yet, current RI based approaches for patient positioning employ rigid-body transformations, thus neglecting free-form deformations induced by respiratory motion. Furthermore, RI based respiration analysis relies on non-rigid registration techniques with run-times of several seconds. In this paper we propose a real-time framework based on RI to perform respiratory motion compensated positioning and non-rigid surface deformation estimation in a joint manner. The core of our method are pre-procedurally obtained 4-D shape priors that drive the intra-procedural alignment of the patient to the reference state, simultaneously yielding a rigid-body table transformation and a free-form deformation accounting for respiratory motion. We show that our method outperforms conventional alignment strategies by a factor of 3.0 and 2.3 in the rotation and translation accuracy, respectively. Using a GPU based implementation, we achieve run-times of 40 ms. PMID:23286095

  14. Real-time motion compensated patient positioning and non-rigid deformation estimation using 4-D shape priors.

    PubMed

    Wasza, Jakob; Bauer, Sebastian; Hornegger, Joachim

    2012-01-01

    Over the last years, range imaging (RI) techniques have been proposed for patient positioning and respiration analysis in motion compensation. Yet, current RI based approaches for patient positioning employ rigid-body transformations, thus neglecting free-form deformations induced by respiratory motion. Furthermore, RI based respiration analysis relies on non-rigid registration techniques with run-times of several seconds. In this paper we propose a real-time framework based on RI to perform respiratory motion compensated positioning and non-rigid surface deformation estimation in a joint manner. The core of our method are pre-procedurally obtained 4-D shape priors that drive the intra-procedural alignment of the patient to the reference state, simultaneously yielding a rigid-body table transformation and a free-form deformation accounting for respiratory motion. We show that our method outperforms conventional alignment strategies by a factor of 3.0 and 2.3 in the rotation and translation accuracy, respectively. Using a GPU based implementation, we achieve run-times of 40 ms.

  15. Plate Motion and Crustal Deformation Estimated with Geodetic Data from the Global Positioning System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.; Heflin, Michael B.

    1995-01-01

    We use geodetic data taken over four years with the Global Positioning System (GPS) to estimate: (1) motion between six major plates and (2) motion relative to these plates of ten sites in plate boundary zones. The degree of consistency between geodetic velocities and rigid plates requires the (one-dimensional) standard errors in horizontal velocities to be approx. 2 mm/yr. Each of the 15 angular velocities describing motion between plate pairs that we estimate with GPS differs insignificantly from the corresponding angular velocity in global plate motion model NUVEL-1A, which averages motion over the past 3 m.y. The motion of the Pacific plate relative to both the Eurasian and North American plates is observed to be faster than predicted by NUVEL-1A, supporting the inference from Very Long B ase- line Interferometry (VLBI) that motion of the Pacific plate has speed up over the past few m.y. The Eurasia-North America pole of rotation is estimated to be north of NUVEL-1A, consistent with the independent hypothesis that the pole has recently migrated northward across northeast Asia to near the Lena River delta. Victoria, which lies above the main thrust at the Cascadia subduction zone, moves relative to the interior of the overriding plate at 30% of the velocity of the subducting plate, reinforcing the conclusion that the thrust there is locked beneath the continental shelf and slope.

  16. Accuracy of tablet counts estimated by members of the public and healthcare professionals

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hyun-Sik; Choi, Yoon Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objective Intentional and accidental drug intoxication is commonly seen in the emergency department. When treating intoxicated patients, accessing the amount of the ingested drug is crucial albeit often difficult. We investigated the accuracy of estimating tablet counts when participants were asked to hold tablets in their fists and hands (semi-quantitative terms). Methods The widths and lengths of the participants’ hands were measured. Then, the subjects were asked to hold 5-mm round, 10-mm round, 10-mm oval, and 15-mm elliptical tablets using their hands and fists and to estimate the number of tablets they were holding. Differences between the estimated and actual numbers of tablets were examined. Results A total of 47 members of the public and 32 healthcare professionals were included in our study. In our analyses of the differences between the actual and estimated amounts of tablets held in the participants’ hands and fists, we found that the actual amount was higher than the estimated amount for all tablet types and in both groups. When participants held the tablets in the same manner (handful or fistful), the differences between the actual and estimated amounts were greater for 5- than 15-mm-sized tablets (P<0.05). Conclusion The treatment of patients presenting with drug overdoses to the emergency department should be based on the assumption that the actual amount of drugs the patients ingested is likely greater than the amount the patients state. PMID:27752592

  17. Estimation and visualization of longitudinal muscle motion using ultrasonography: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Li, Jizhou; Zhou, Yongjin; Ivanov, Kamen; Zheng, Yong-Ping

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasonography is a convenient and widely used technique to look into the longitudinal muscle motion as it is radiation-free and real-time. The motion of localized parts of the muscle, disclosed by ultrasonography, spatially reflects contraction activities of the corresponding muscles. However, little attention was paid to the estimation of longitudinal muscle motion, especially towards estimation of dense deformation field at different depths under the skin. Yet fewer studies on the visualization of such muscle motion or further clinical applications were reported in the literature. A primal-dual algorithm was used to estimate the motion of gastrocnemius muscle (GM) in longitudinal direction in this study. To provide insights into the rules of longitudinal muscle motion, we proposed a novel framework including motion estimation, visualization and quantitative analysis to interpret synchronous activities of collaborating muscles with spatial details. The proposed methods were evaluated on ultrasound image sequences, captured at a rate of 25 frames per second from eight healthy subjects. In order to estimate and visualize the GM motion in longitudinal direction, each subject was asked to perform isometric plantar flexion twice. Preliminary results show that the proposed visualization methods provide both spatial and temporal details and they are helpful to study muscle contractions. One of the proposed quantitative measures was also tested on a patient with unilateral limb dysfunction caused by cerebral infarction. The measure revealed distinct patterns between the normal and the dysfunctional lower limb. The proposed framework and its associated quantitative measures could potentially be used to complement electromyography (EMG) and torque signals in functional assessment of skeletal muscles.

  18. Scatter to volume registration for model-free respiratory motion estimation from dynamic MRIs.

    PubMed

    Miao, S; Wang, Z J; Pan, L; Butler, J; Moran, G; Liao, R

    2016-09-01

    Respiratory motion is one major complicating factor in many image acquisition applications and image-guided interventions. Existing respiratory motion estimation and compensation methods typically rely on breathing motion models learned from certain training data, and therefore may not be able to effectively handle intra-subject and/or inter-subject variations of respiratory motion. In this paper, we propose a respiratory motion compensation framework that directly recovers motion fields from sparsely spaced and efficiently acquired dynamic 2-D MRIs without using a learned respiratory motion model. We present a scatter-to-volume deformable registration algorithm to register dynamic 2-D MRIs with a static 3-D MRI to recover dense deformation fields. Practical considerations and approximations are provided to solve the scatter-to-volume registration problem efficiently. The performance of the proposed method was investigated on both synthetic and real MRI datasets, and the results showed significant improvements over the state-of-art respiratory motion modeling methods. We also demonstrated a potential application of the proposed method on MRI-based motion corrected PET imaging using hybrid PET/MRI.

  19. Frontally placed eyes versus laterally placed eyes: computational comparison of their functions for ego-motion estimation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhi; Wang, Pengfei; Zhai, Ruifang; Tang, Yazhe

    2016-04-01

    Both frontally placed eyes and laterally placed eyes are popular in nature, and although which one is better could be one of the most intuitive questions to ask, it could also be the hardest question to answer. Their most obvious difference is that, at least as supposed in the computer vision community, stereopsis plays the central role in the visual system composed of frontally placed eyes (or cameras); however, it is not available in the lateral configuration due to the lack of overlap between the visual fields. As a result, researchers have adopted completely different approaches to model the two configurations and developed computational mimics of them to address various vision problems. Recently, the advent of novel quasi-parallax conception unifies the ego-motion estimation procedure of these two eye configurations into the same framework and makes systematic comparison feasible. In this paper, we intend to establish the computational superiority of eye topography from the perspective of ego-motion estimation. Specifically, quasi-parallax is applied to fuse motion cues from individual cameras at an early stage, at the pixel level, and to recover the translation and rotation separately with high accuracy and efficiency without the need of feature matching. Furthermore, its applicability on the extended sideways arrangements is studied successfully to make our comparison more general and insightful. Extensive experiments on both synthetic and real data have been done, and the computational superiority of the lateral configuration is verified.

  20. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy.

    PubMed

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-09-18

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms.

  1. Accuracy comparison of spatial interpolation methods for estimation of air temperatures in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Y.; Shim, K.; Jung, M.; Kim, S.

    2013-12-01

    Because of complex terrain, micro- as well as meso-climate variability is extreme by locations in Korea. In particular, air temperature of agricultural fields are influenced by topographic features of the surroundings making accurate interpolation of regional meteorological data from point-measured data. This study was conducted to compare accuracy of a spatial interpolation method to estimate air temperature in Korean Peninsula with the rugged terrains in South Korea. Four spatial interpolation methods including Inverse Distance Weighting (IDW), Spline, Kriging and Cokriging were tested to estimate monthly air temperature of unobserved stations. Monthly measured data sets (minimum and maximum air temperature) from 456 automatic weather station (AWS) locations in South Korea were used to generate the gridded air temperature surface. Result of cross validation showed that using Exponential theoretical model produced a lower root mean square error (RMSE) than using Gaussian theoretical model in case of Kriging and Cokriging and Spline produced the lowest RMSE of spatial interpolation methods in both maximum and minimum air temperature estimation. In conclusion, Spline showed the best accuracy among the methods, but further experiments which reflect topography effects such as temperature lapse rate are necessary to improve the prediction.

  2. How Angular Velocity Features and Different Gyroscope Noise Types Interact and Determine Orientation Estimation Accuracy

    PubMed Central

    Pasciuto, Ilaria; Ligorio, Gabriele; Bergamini, Elena; Vannozzi, Giuseppe; Sabatini, Angelo Maria; Cappozzo, Aurelio

    2015-01-01

    In human movement analysis, 3D body segment orientation can be obtained through the numerical integration of gyroscope signals. These signals, however, are affected by errors that, for the case of micro-electro-mechanical systems, are mainly due to: constant bias, scale factor, white noise, and bias instability. The aim of this study is to assess how the orientation estimation accuracy is affected by each of these disturbances, and whether it is influenced by the angular velocity magnitude and 3D distribution across the gyroscope axes. Reference angular velocity signals, either constant or representative of human walking, were corrupted with each of the four noise types within a simulation framework. The magnitude of the angular velocity affected the error in the orientation estimation due to each noise type, except for the white noise. Additionally, the error caused by the constant bias was also influenced by the angular velocity 3D distribution. As the orientation error depends not only on the noise itself but also on the signal it is applied to, different sensor placements could enhance or mitigate the error due to each disturbance, and special attention must be paid in providing and interpreting measures of accuracy for orientation estimation algorithms. PMID:26393606

  3. Hidden Markov Modeling for Weigh-In-Motion Estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Abercrombie, Robert K; Ferragut, Erik M; Boone, Shane

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a hidden Markov model to assist in the weight measurement error that arises from complex vehicle oscillations of a system of discrete masses. Present reduction of oscillations is by a smooth, flat, level approach and constant, slow speed in a straight line. The model uses this inherent variability to assist in determining the true total weight and individual axle weights of a vehicle. The weight distribution dynamics of a generic moving vehicle were simulated. The model estimation converged to within 1% of the true mass for simulated data. The computational demands of this method, while much greater than simple averages, took only seconds to run on a desktop computer.

  4. Accuracy of soil water content estimates from gamma radiation monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Jie; Huisman, Johan Alexander; Reemt Bogena, Heye; Vereecken, Harry

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial gamma radiation is known to be sensitive to soil water content, and could be promising for soil water content determination because of the availability of continental-scale gamma radiation monitoring networks. However, the accuracy of soil water content estimates that can be obtained from this type of data is currently unknown. Therefore, the aim of this study is to assess the accuracy of soil water content estimates from measured time series of gamma radiation. For this, four gamma radiation monitoring stations were each equipped with four soil water content sensors at 5 and 15 cm depth to provide reference soil water content measurements. The contributions of terrestrial radiation and secondary cosmic radiation were separated from the total amount of measured gamma radiation by assuming that the long-term contribution of secondary cosmic radiation was constant, and that variations were related to changes in air pressure and incoming neutrons. In addition, precipitation effects related to atmospheric washout of radon progenies to the ground that cause an increase of gamma radiation were considered by excluding time periods with precipitation and time periods less than three hours after precipitation. The estimated terrestrial gamma radiation was related to soil water content using an exponential function with two fit parameters. For daily soil water content estimates, the goodness of fit ranged from R2= 0.21 to 0.48 and the RMSE ranged from 0.048 to 0.117 m3m-3. The accuracy of the soil water content estimates improved considerably when a weekly resolution was used (RMSE ranged from 0.029 to 0.084 m3m-3). Overall, these results indicate that gamma radiation monitoring data can be used to obtain useful soil water content information. The remaining differences between measured and estimated soil water content can at least partly be explained by the fact that the terrestrial gamma radiation is strongly determined by the upper few centimeters of the soil

  5. Refining the Technical Components for the Second Generation CMORPH: LEO-IR Based Precipitation Estimates and Cloud Motion Vector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, P.; Joyce, R.; Wu, S.

    2015-12-01

    A prototype system was developed for the second generation CMORPH to produce global analyses of 30-min precipitation on a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe from pole to pole through integration of information from satellite observations as well as numerical model simulations. The second generation CMORPH is built upon the Kalman Filter based CMORPH algorithm of Joyce and Xie (2011). Inputs to the system include rainfall and snowfall rate retrievals from passive microwave (PMW) measurements aboard all available low earth orbit (LEO) satellites, precipitation estimates derived from infrared (IR) observations of geostationary (GEO) as well as LEO platforms, and precipitation simulations from numerical global models. Key to the success of the 2nd generation CMORPH, among a couple of other elements, are the development of a LEO-IR based precipitation estimation to fill in the polar gaps and objectively analyzed cloud motion vectors to capture the cloud movements of various spatial scales over the entire globe. The prototype algorithm for the LEO IR precipitation estimation is refined to achieve improved quantitative accuracy and consistency with PMW retrievals. AVHRR IR TBB data from all LEO satellites are first remapped to a 0.05olat/lon grid over the entire globe and in a 30-min interval. AVHRR TBB - precipitation relationships are separately established through PDF calibration of the TBB data against temporally/spatially collocated combined PMW retrievals (MWCOMB) and against the CloudSat radar measurements, respectively, then combined using a weighted mean to reflect the strengths of both data sources. A sub-system is developed to construct analyzed fields of cloud motion vectors from the GEO/LEO IR based precipitation estimates and the CFS Reanalysis (CFSR) precipitation fields. Motion vectors are first derived separately from the satellite IR based precipitation estimates and the CFSR precipitation fields. These individually derived motion vectors are then

  6. Asymmetry of Drosophila ON and OFF motion detectors enhances real-world velocity estimation.

    PubMed

    Leonhardt, Aljoscha; Ammer, Georg; Meier, Matthias; Serbe, Etienne; Bahl, Armin; Borst, Alexander

    2016-05-01

    The reliable estimation of motion across varied surroundings represents a survival-critical task for sighted animals. How neural circuits have adapted to the particular demands of natural environments, however, is not well understood. We explored this question in the visual system of Drosophila melanogaster. Here, as in many mammalian retinas, motion is computed in parallel streams for brightness increments (ON) and decrements (OFF). When genetically isolated, ON and OFF pathways proved equally capable of accurately matching walking responses to realistic motion. To our surprise, detailed characterization of their functional tuning properties through in vivo calcium imaging and electrophysiology revealed stark differences in temporal tuning between ON and OFF channels. We trained an in silico motion estimation model on natural scenes and discovered that our optimized detector exhibited differences similar to those of the biological system. Thus, functional ON-OFF asymmetries in fly visual circuitry may reflect ON-OFF asymmetries in natural environments.

  7. Robust Parallel Motion Estimation and Mapping with Stereo Cameras in Underground Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chun; Li, Zhengning; Zhou, Yuan

    2016-06-01

    Presently, we developed a novel robust motion estimation method for localization and mapping in underground infrastructure using a pre-calibrated rigid stereo camera rig. Localization and mapping in underground infrastructure is important to safety. Yet it's also nontrivial since most underground infrastructures have poor lighting condition and featureless structure. Overcoming these difficulties, we discovered that parallel system is more efficient than the EKF-based SLAM approach since parallel system divides motion estimation and 3D mapping tasks into separate threads, eliminating data-association problem which is quite an issue in SLAM. Moreover, the motion estimation thread takes the advantage of state-of-art robust visual odometry algorithm which is highly functional under low illumination and provides accurate pose information. We designed and built an unmanned vehicle and used the vehicle to collect a dataset in an underground garage. The parallel system was evaluated by the actual dataset. Motion estimation results indicated a relative position error of 0.3%, and 3D mapping results showed a mean position error of 13cm. Off-line process reduced position error to 2cm. Performance evaluation by actual dataset showed that our system is capable of robust motion estimation and accurate 3D mapping in poor illumination and featureless underground environment.

  8. Ground motion modeling of the 1906 San Francisco earthquake II: Ground motion estimates for the 1906 earthquake and scenario events

    SciTech Connect

    Aagaard, B; Brocher, T; Dreger, D; Frankel, A; Graves, R; Harmsen, S; Hartzell, S; Larsen, S; McCandless, K; Nilsson, S; Petersson, N A; Rodgers, A; Sjogreen, B; Tkalcic, H; Zoback, M L

    2007-02-09

    We estimate the ground motions produced by the 1906 San Francisco earthquake making use of the recently developed Song et al. (2008) source model that combines the available geodetic and seismic observations and recently constructed 3D geologic and seismic velocity models. Our estimates of the ground motions for the 1906 earthquake are consistent across five ground-motion modeling groups employing different wave propagation codes and simulation domains. The simulations successfully reproduce the main features of the Boatwright and Bundock (2005) ShakeMap, but tend to over predict the intensity of shaking by 0.1-0.5 modified Mercalli intensity (MMI) units. Velocity waveforms at sites throughout the San Francisco Bay Area exhibit characteristics consistent with rupture directivity, local geologic conditions (e.g., sedimentary basins), and the large size of the event (e.g., durations of strong shaking lasting tens of seconds). We also compute ground motions for seven hypothetical scenarios rupturing the same extent of the northern San Andreas fault, considering three additional hypocenters and an additional, random distribution of slip. Rupture directivity exerts the strongest influence on the variations in shaking, although sedimentary basins do consistently contribute to the response in some locations, such as Santa Rosa, Livermore, and San Jose. These scenarios suggest that future large earthquakes on the northern San Andreas fault may subject the current San Francisco Bay urban area to stronger shaking than a repeat of the 1906 earthquake. Ruptures propagating southward towards San Francisco appear to expose more of the urban area to a given intensity level than do ruptures propagating northward.

  9. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3   ±   1.0 and 3.3   ±   3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target. This paper was presented at RSNA 2013 and was carried out at Kanazawa University, JAPAN.

  10. Improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images: preliminary study for image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT).

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Rie; Sanada, Shigeru; Sakuta, Keita; Kawashima, Hiroki

    2015-05-21

    The bone suppression technique based on advanced image processing can suppress the conspicuity of bones on chest radiographs, creating soft tissue images obtained by the dual-energy subtraction technique. This study was performed to evaluate the usefulness of bone suppression image processing in image-guided radiation therapy. We demonstrated the improved accuracy of markerless motion tracking on bone suppression images. Chest fluoroscopic images of nine patients with lung nodules during respiration were obtained using a flat-panel detector system (120 kV, 0.1 mAs/pulse, 5 fps). Commercial bone suppression image processing software was applied to the fluoroscopic images to create corresponding bone suppression images. Regions of interest were manually located on lung nodules and automatic target tracking was conducted based on the template matching technique. To evaluate the accuracy of target tracking, the maximum tracking error in the resulting images was compared with that of conventional fluoroscopic images. The tracking errors were decreased by half in eight of nine cases. The average maximum tracking errors in bone suppression and conventional fluoroscopic images were 1.3 ± 1.0 and 3.3 ± 3.3 mm, respectively. The bone suppression technique was especially effective in the lower lung area where pulmonary vessels, bronchi, and ribs showed complex movements. The bone suppression technique improved tracking accuracy without special equipment and implantation of fiducial markers, and with only additional small dose to the patient. Bone suppression fluoroscopy is a potential measure for respiratory displacement of the target.

  11. Accuracy and sampling error of two age estimation techniques using rib histomorphometry on a modern sample.

    PubMed

    García-Donas, Julieta G; Dyke, Jeffrey; Paine, Robert R; Nathena, Despoina; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-02-01

    Most age estimation methods are proven problematic when applied in highly fragmented skeletal remains. Rib histomorphometry is advantageous in such cases; yet it is vital to test and revise existing techniques particularly when used in legal settings (Crowder and Rosella, 2007). This study tested Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994) histological age estimation methods on a Modern Greek sample using different sampling sites. Six left 4th ribs of known age and sex were selected from a modern skeletal collection. Each rib was cut into three equal segments. Two thin sections were acquired from each segment. A total of 36 thin sections were prepared and analysed. Four variables (cortical area, intact and fragmented osteon density and osteon population density) were calculated for each section and age was estimated according to Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994). The results showed that both methods produced a systemic underestimation of the individuals (to a maximum of 43 years) although a general improvement in accuracy levels was observed when applying the Stout et al. (1994) formula. There is an increase of error rates with increasing age with the oldest individual showing extreme differences between real age and estimated age. Comparison of the different sampling sites showed small differences between the estimated ages suggesting that any fragment of the rib could be used without introducing significant error. Yet, a larger sample should be used to confirm these results.

  12. Accuracy and precision of estimating age of gray wolves by tooth wear

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gipson, P.S.; Ballard, W.B.; Nowak, R.M.; Mech, L.D.

    2000-01-01

    We evaluated the accuracy and precision of tooth wear for aging gray wolves (Canis lupus) from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario based on 47 known-age or known-minimum-age skulls. Estimates of age using tooth wear and a commercial cementum annuli-aging service were useful for wolves up to 14 years old. The precision of estimates from cementum annuli was greater than estimates from tooth wear, but tooth wear estimates are more applicable in the field. We tended to overestimate age by 1-2 years and occasionally by 3 or 4 years. The commercial service aged young wolves with cementum annuli to within ?? 1 year of actual age, but under estimated ages of wolves ???9 years old by 1-3 years. No differences were detected in tooth wear patterns for wild wolves from Alaska, Minnesota, and Ontario, nor between captive and wild wolves. Tooth wear was not appropriate for aging wolves with an underbite that prevented normal wear or severely broken and missing teeth.

  13. Accuracy and sampling error of two age estimation techniques using rib histomorphometry on a modern sample.

    PubMed

    García-Donas, Julieta G; Dyke, Jeffrey; Paine, Robert R; Nathena, Despoina; Kranioti, Elena F

    2016-02-01

    Most age estimation methods are proven problematic when applied in highly fragmented skeletal remains. Rib histomorphometry is advantageous in such cases; yet it is vital to test and revise existing techniques particularly when used in legal settings (Crowder and Rosella, 2007). This study tested Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994) histological age estimation methods on a Modern Greek sample using different sampling sites. Six left 4th ribs of known age and sex were selected from a modern skeletal collection. Each rib was cut into three equal segments. Two thin sections were acquired from each segment. A total of 36 thin sections were prepared and analysed. Four variables (cortical area, intact and fragmented osteon density and osteon population density) were calculated for each section and age was estimated according to Stout & Paine (1992) and Stout et al. (1994). The results showed that both methods produced a systemic underestimation of the individuals (to a maximum of 43 years) although a general improvement in accuracy levels was observed when applying the Stout et al. (1994) formula. There is an increase of error rates with increasing age with the oldest individual showing extreme differences between real age and estimated age. Comparison of the different sampling sites showed small differences between the estimated ages suggesting that any fragment of the rib could be used without introducing significant error. Yet, a larger sample should be used to confirm these results. PMID:26698389

  14. High-resolution Neogene and Quaternary estimates of Nubia-Eurasia-North America Plate motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Iaffaldano, G.; Merkouriev, S.

    2015-10-01

    Reconstructions of the history of convergence between the Nubia and Eurasia plates constitute an important part of a broader framework for understanding deformation in the Mediterranean region and the closing of the Mediterranean Basin. Herein, we combine high-resolution reconstructions of Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate motions to determine rotations that describe Nubia-Eurasia Plate motion at ˜1 Myr intervals for the past 20 Myr. We apply trans-dimensional hierarchical Bayesian inference to the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America rotation sequences in order to reduce noise in the newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations. The noise-reduced rotation sequences for the Eurasia-North America and Nubia-North America Plate pairs describe remarkably similar kinematic histories since 20 Ma, consisting of relatively steady seafloor spreading from 20 to 8 Ma, ˜20 per cent opening-rate slowdowns at 8-6.5 Ma, and steady plate motion from ˜7 Ma to the present. Our newly estimated Nubia-Eurasia rotations predict that convergence across the central Mediterranean Sea slowed by ˜50 per cent and rotated anticlockwise after ˜25 Ma until 13 Ma. Motion since 13 Ma has remained relatively steady. An absence of evidence for a significant change in motion immediately before or during the Messinian Salinity Crisis at 6.3-5.6 Ma argues against a change in plate motion as its causative factor. The detachment of the Arabian Peninsula from Africa at 30-24 Ma may have triggered the convergence rate slowdown before 13 Ma; however, published reconstructions of Nubia-Eurasia motion for times before 20 Ma are too widely spaced to determine with confidence whether the two are correlated. A significant discrepancy between our new estimates of Nubia-Eurasia motion during the past few Myr and geodetic estimates calls for further investigation.

  15. Precise Image-Based Motion Estimation for Autonomous Small Body Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Andrew Edie; Matthies, Larry H.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed and tested a software algorithm that enables onboard autonomous motion estimation near small bodies using descent camera imagery and laser altimetry. Through simulation and testing, we have shown that visual feature tracking can decrease uncertainty in spacecraft motion to a level that makes landing on small, irregularly shaped, bodies feasible. Possible future work will include qualification of the algorithm as a flight experiment for the Deep Space 4/Champollion comet lander mission currently under study at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. Estimating Internal Respiratory Motion from Respiratory Surrogate Signals Using Correspondence Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClelland, Jamie

    It is often difficult or impossible to directly monitor the respiratory motion of the tumour and other internal anatomy during RT treatment. Implanted markers can be used, but this involves an invasive procedure and has a number of other associated risks and problems. An alternative option is to use a correspondence model. This models the relationship between a respiratory surrogate signal(s), such as spirometry or the displacement of the skin surface, and the motion of the internal anatomy. Such a model allows the internal motion to be estimated from the surrogate signal(s), which can be easily monitored during RT treatment. The correspondence model is constructed prior to RT treatment. Imaging data is simultaneously acquired with the surrogate signal(s), and the internal motion is measured from the imaging data, e.g. using deformable image registration. A correspondence model is then fit relating the internal motion to the surrogate signal(s). This can then be used during treatment to estimate the internal motion from the surrogate signal(s). This chapter reviews the most popular correspondence models that have been used in the literature, as well as the different surrogate signals, types of imaging data used to measure the internal motion, and fitting methods used to fit the correspondence model to the data.

  17. Effects of window size and shape on accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of target images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Sharon S.

    1993-01-01

    A new algorithm is presented for increasing the accuracy of subpixel centroid estimation of (nearly) point target images in cases where the signal-to-noise ratio is low and the signal amplitude and shape vary from frame to frame. In the algorithm, the centroid is calculated over a data window that is matched in width to the image distribution. Fourier analysis is used to explain the dependency of the centroid estimate on the size of the data window, and simulation and experimental results are presented which demonstrate the effects of window size for two different noise models. The effects of window shape were also investigated for uniform and Gaussian-shaped windows. The new algorithm was developed to improve the dynamic range of a close-range photogrammetric tracking system that provides feedback for control of a large gap magnetic suspension system (LGMSS).

  18. SLIMMER: SLIce MRI motion estimation and reconstruction tool for studies of fetal anatomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kio; Habas, Piotr A.; Rajagopalan, Vidya; Scott, Julia; Rousseau, Francois; Barkovich, A. James; Glenn, Orit A.; Studholme, Colin

    2011-03-01

    We describe a free software tool which combines a set of algorithms that provide a framework for building 3D volumetric images of regions of moving anatomy using multiple fast multi-slice MRI studies. It is specifically motivated by the clinical application of unsedated fetal brain imaging, which has emerged as an important area for image analysis. The tool reads multiple DICOM image stacks acquired in any angulation into a consistent patient coordinate frame and allows the user to select regions to be locally motion corrected. It combines algorithms for slice motion estimation, bias field inconsistency correction and 3D volume reconstruction from multiple scattered slice stacks. The tool is built onto the RView (http://rview.colin-studholme.net) medical image display software and allows the user to inspect slice stacks, and apply both stack and slice level motion estimation that incorporates temporal constraints based on slice timing and interleave information read from the DICOM data. Following motion estimation an algorithm for bias field inconsistency correction provides the user with the ability to remove artifacts arising from the motion of the local anatomy relative to the imaging coils. Full 3D visualization of the slice stacks and individual slice orientations is provided to assist in evaluating the quality of the motion correction and final image reconstruction. The tool has been evaluated on a range of clinical data acquired on GE, Siemens and Philips MRI scanners.

  19. Intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from CT imaging using the 3D optical flow method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, Thomas; Zhang, Geoffrey; Huang, Tzung-Chi; Lin, Kang-Ping

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this work was to develop and validate an automated method for intrathoracic tumour motion estimation from breath-hold computed tomography (BH CT) imaging using the three-dimensional optical flow method (3D OFM). A modified 3D OFM algorithm provided 3D displacement vectors for each voxel which were used to map tumour voxels on expiration BH CT onto inspiration BH CT images. A thoracic phantom and simulated expiration/inspiration BH CT pairs were used for validation. The 3D OFM was applied to the measured inspiration and expiration BH CT images from one lung cancer and one oesophageal cancer patient. The resulting displacements were plotted in histogram format and analysed to provide insight regarding the tumour motion. The phantom tumour displacement was measured as 1.20 and 2.40 cm with full-width at tenth maximum (FWTM) for the distribution of displacement estimates of 0.008 and 0.006 cm, respectively. The maximum error of any single voxel's motion estimate was 1.1 mm along the z-dimension or approximately one-third of the z-dimension voxel size. The simulated BH CT pairs revealed an rms error of less than 0.25 mm. The displacement of the oesophageal tumours was nonuniform and up to 1.4 cm, this was a new finding. A lung tumour maximum displacement of 2.4 cm was found in the case evaluated. In conclusion, 3D OFM provided an accurate estimation of intrathoracic tumour motion, with estimated errors less than the voxel dimension in a simulated motion phantom study. Surprisingly, oesophageal tumour motion was large and nonuniform, with greatest motion occurring at the gastro-oesophageal junction. Presented at The IASTED Second International Conference on Biomedical Engineering (BioMED 2004), Innsbruck, Austria, 16-18 February 2004.

  20. Accuracy of patient specific organ-dose estimates obtained using an automated image segmentation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat-Schmidt, Taly; Wang, Adam; Coradi, Thomas; Haas, Benjamin; Star-Lack, Josh

    2016-03-01

    The overall goal of this work is to develop a rapid, accurate and fully automated software tool to estimate patient-specific organ doses from computed tomography (CT) scans using a deterministic Boltzmann Transport Equation solver and automated CT segmentation algorithms. This work quantified the accuracy of organ dose estimates obtained by an automated segmentation algorithm. The investigated algorithm uses a combination of feature-based and atlas-based methods. A multiatlas approach was also investigated. We hypothesize that the auto-segmentation algorithm is sufficiently accurate to provide organ dose estimates since random errors at the organ boundaries will average out when computing the total organ dose. To test this hypothesis, twenty head-neck CT scans were expertly segmented into nine regions. A leave-one-out validation study was performed, where every case was automatically segmented with each of the remaining cases used as the expert atlas, resulting in nineteen automated segmentations for each of the twenty datasets. The segmented regions were applied to gold-standard Monte Carlo dose maps to estimate mean and peak organ doses. The results demonstrated that the fully automated segmentation algorithm estimated the mean organ dose to within 10% of the expert segmentation for regions other than the spinal canal, with median error for each organ region below 2%. In the spinal canal region, the median error was 7% across all data sets and atlases, with a maximum error of 20%. The error in peak organ dose was below 10% for all regions, with a median error below 4% for all organ regions. The multiple-case atlas reduced the variation in the dose estimates and additional improvements may be possible with more robust multi-atlas approaches. Overall, the results support potential feasibility of an automated segmentation algorithm to provide accurate organ dose estimates.

  1. Accuracy Rates of Sex Estimation by Forensic Anthropologists through Comparison with DNA Typing Results in Forensic Casework.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard M; Parks, Connie L; Richard, Adam H

    2016-09-01

    A common task in forensic anthropology involves the estimation of the biological sex of a decedent by exploiting the sexual dimorphism between males and females. Estimation methods are often based on analysis of skeletal collections of known sex and most include a research-based accuracy rate. However, the accuracy rates of sex estimation methods in actual forensic casework have rarely been studied. This article uses sex determinations based on DNA results from 360 forensic cases to develop accuracy rates for sex estimations conducted by forensic anthropologists. The overall rate of correct sex estimation from these cases is 94.7% with increasing accuracy rates as more skeletal material is available for analysis and as the education level and certification of the examiner increases. Nine of 19 incorrect assessments resulted from cases in which one skeletal element was available, suggesting that the use of an "undetermined" result may be more appropriate for these cases.

  2. Accuracy Rates of Sex Estimation by Forensic Anthropologists through Comparison with DNA Typing Results in Forensic Casework.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Richard M; Parks, Connie L; Richard, Adam H

    2016-09-01

    A common task in forensic anthropology involves the estimation of the biological sex of a decedent by exploiting the sexual dimorphism between males and females. Estimation methods are often based on analysis of skeletal collections of known sex and most include a research-based accuracy rate. However, the accuracy rates of sex estimation methods in actual forensic casework have rarely been studied. This article uses sex determinations based on DNA results from 360 forensic cases to develop accuracy rates for sex estimations conducted by forensic anthropologists. The overall rate of correct sex estimation from these cases is 94.7% with increasing accuracy rates as more skeletal material is available for analysis and as the education level and certification of the examiner increases. Nine of 19 incorrect assessments resulted from cases in which one skeletal element was available, suggesting that the use of an "undetermined" result may be more appropriate for these cases. PMID:27352918

  3. Multiresolution parametric estimation of transparent motions and denoising of fluoroscopic images.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Vincent; Liénard, Jean; Bouthemy, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    We describe a novel multiresolution parametric framework to estimate transparent motions typically present in X-Ray exams. Assuming the presence if two transparent layers, it computes two affine velocity fields by minimizing an appropriate objective function with an incremental Gauss-Newton technique. We have designed a realistic simulation scheme of fluoroscopic image sequences to validate our method on data with ground truth and different levels of noise. An experiment on real clinical images is also reported. We then exploit this transparent-motion estimation method to denoise two layers image sequences using a motion-compensated estimation method. In accordance with theory, we show that we reach a denoising factor of 2/3 in a few iterations without bringing any local artifacts in the image sequence.

  4. Fuzzy entropy based motion artifact detection and pulse rate estimation for fingertip photoplethysmography.

    PubMed

    Paradkar, Neeraj; Chowdhury, Shubhajit Roy

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents a fingertip photoplethysmography (PPG) based technique to estimate the pulse rate of the subject. The PPG signal obtained from a pulse oximeter is used for the analysis. The input samples are corrupted with motion artifacts due to minor motion of the subjects. Entropy measure of the input samples is used to detect the motion artifacts and estimate the pulse rate. A three step methodology is adapted to identify and classify signal peaks as true systolic peaks or artifact. CapnoBase database and CSL Benchmark database are used to analyze the technique and pulse rate estimation was performed with positive predictive value and sensitivity figures of 99.84% and 99.32% respectively for CapnoBase and 98.83% and 98.84% for CSL database respectively.

  5. Correlated z-values and the accuracy of large-scale statistical estimates.

    PubMed

    Efron, Bradley

    2010-09-01

    We consider large-scale studies in which there are hundreds or thousands of correlated cases to investigate, each represented by its own normal variate, typically a z-value. A familiar example is provided by a microarray experiment comparing healthy with sick subjects' expression levels for thousands of genes. This paper concerns the accuracy of summary statistics for the collection of normal variates, such as their empirical cdf or a false discovery rate statistic. It seems like we must estimate an N by N correlation matrix, N the number of cases, but our main result shows that this is not necessary: good accuracy approximations can be based on the root mean square correlation over all N · (N - 1)/2 pairs, a quantity often easily estimated. A second result shows that z-values closely follow normal distributions even under non-null conditions, supporting application of the main theorem. Practical application of the theory is illustrated for a large leukemia microarray study. PMID:21052523

  6. Correlated z-values and the accuracy of large-scale statistical estimates

    PubMed Central

    Efron, Bradley

    2009-01-01

    We consider large-scale studies in which there are hundreds or thousands of correlated cases to investigate, each represented by its own normal variate, typically a z-value. A familiar example is provided by a microarray experiment comparing healthy with sick subjects' expression levels for thousands of genes. This paper concerns the accuracy of summary statistics for the collection of normal variates, such as their empirical cdf or a false discovery rate statistic. It seems like we must estimate an N by N correlation matrix, N the number of cases, but our main result shows that this is not necessary: good accuracy approximations can be based on the root mean square correlation over all N · (N − 1)/2 pairs, a quantity often easily estimated. A second result shows that z-values closely follow normal distributions even under non-null conditions, supporting application of the main theorem. Practical application of the theory is illustrated for a large leukemia microarray study. PMID:21052523

  7. The effect of practical portion size measurement aids on the accuracy of portion size estimates made by young adults.

    PubMed

    Byrd-Bredbenner, C; Schwartz, J

    2004-08-01

    A barrier to controlling the amount of food consumed may be the difficulty consumers have in accurately estimating portion sizes. Although portion size measurement aids (PSMAs) can improve estimation accuracy, their bulk and/or cost tends to make them impractical for regular use. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect on portion size estimation accuracy of two practical PSMAs: a 2-D PSMA (life size picture of tennis and golf balls) and 3-D PSMAs (tennis and golf balls). Young adults were randomly assigned to one of two groups and estimated the portion sizes of 36 foods divided into three equal sets. PSMAs were not used to estimate portion sizes in Food Set 1. Study group 1 (n = 57) used the 2-D PSMA and study group 2 (n = 56) used the 3-D PSMAs to estimate the portion sizes in Food Set 2. Neither group used PSMAs to estimate portion sizes in Food Set 3. Repeated measures anova indicated that both groups significantly improved estimation accuracy between Food Sets 1 and 2 and between Foods Sets 1 and 3. Thus, even short-term exposure to practical PSMAs may improve estimation accuracy and these improvements persist when the PSMA is no longer available. However, the accuracy rate for Food Set 2 was only about 60% indicating that a great deal of estimation error remains. PMID:15250844

  8. Analysis of Scattering Components from Fully Polarimetric SAR Images for Improving Accuracies of Urban Density Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susaki, J.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we analyze probability density functions (PDFs) of scatterings derived from fully polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) images for improving the accuracies of estimated urban density. We have reported a method for estimating urban density that uses an index Tv+c obtained by normalizing the sum of volume and helix scatterings Pv+c. Validation results showed that estimated urban densities have a high correlation with building-to-land ratios (Kajimoto and Susaki, 2013b; Susaki et al., 2014). While the method is found to be effective for estimating urban density, it is not clear why Tv+c is more effective than indices derived from other scatterings, such as surface or double-bounce scatterings, observed in urban areas. In this research, we focus on PDFs of scatterings derived from fully polarimetric SAR images in terms of scattering normalization. First, we introduce a theoretical PDF that assumes that image pixels have scatterers showing random backscattering. We then generate PDFs of scatterings derived from observations of concrete blocks with different orientation angles, and from a satellite-based fully polarimetric SAR image. The analysis of the PDFs and the derived statistics reveals that the curves of the PDFs of Pv+c are the most similar to the normal distribution among all the scatterings derived from fully polarimetric SAR images. It was found that Tv+c works most effectively because of its similarity to the normal distribution.

  9. Vehicle Position Estimation Based on Magnetic Markers: Enhanced Accuracy by Compensation of Time Delays

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Yeun-Sub; Jeong, Rag-Gyo; Kang, Seok-Won

    2015-01-01

    The real-time recognition of absolute (or relative) position and orientation on a network of roads is a core technology for fully automated or driving-assisted vehicles. This paper presents an empirical investigation of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a self-positioning system based on a magnetic marker reference sensing method for an autonomous vehicle. Specifically, the estimation accuracy of the magnetic sensing ruler (MSR) in the up-to-date estimation of the actual position was successfully enhanced by compensating for time delays in signal processing when detecting the vertical magnetic field (VMF) in an array of signals. In this study, the signal processing scheme was developed to minimize the effects of the distortion of measured signals when estimating the relative positional information based on magnetic signals obtained using the MSR. In other words, the center point in a 2D magnetic field contour plot corresponding to the actual position of magnetic markers was estimated by tracking the errors between pre-defined reference models and measured magnetic signals. The algorithm proposed in this study was validated by experimental measurements using a test vehicle on a pilot network of roads. From the results, the positioning error was found to be less than 0.04 m on average in an operational test. PMID:26580622

  10. Vehicle Position Estimation Based on Magnetic Markers: Enhanced Accuracy by Compensation of Time Delays.

    PubMed

    Byun, Yeun-Sub; Jeong, Rag-Gyo; Kang, Seok-Won

    2015-01-01

    The real-time recognition of absolute (or relative) position and orientation on a network of roads is a core technology for fully automated or driving-assisted vehicles. This paper presents an empirical investigation of the design, implementation, and evaluation of a self-positioning system based on a magnetic marker reference sensing method for an autonomous vehicle. Specifically, the estimation accuracy of the magnetic sensing ruler (MSR) in the up-to-date estimation of the actual position was successfully enhanced by compensating for time delays in signal processing when detecting the vertical magnetic field (VMF) in an array of signals. In this study, the signal processing scheme was developed to minimize the effects of the distortion of measured signals when estimating the relative positional information based on magnetic signals obtained using the MSR. In other words, the center point in a 2D magnetic field contour plot corresponding to the actual position of magnetic markers was estimated by tracking the errors between pre-defined reference models and measured magnetic signals. The algorithm proposed in this study was validated by experimental measurements using a test vehicle on a pilot network of roads. From the results, the positioning error was found to be less than 0.04 m on average in an operational test. PMID:26580622

  11. Improving Estimation Accuracy of Quasars’ Photometric Redshifts by Integration of KNN and SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Bo; Ding, Hongpeng; Zhang, Yanxia; Zhao, Yongheng

    2015-08-01

    The massive photometric data collected from multiple large-scale sky surveys offers significant opportunities for measuring distances of many celestial objects by photometric redshifts zphot in a wide coverage of the sky. However, catastrophic failure, an unsolved problem for a long time, exists in the current photometric redshift estimation approaches (such as k-nearest-neighbor). In this paper, we propose a novel two-stage approach by integration of k-nearest-neighbor (KNN) and support vector machine (SVM) methods together. In the first stage, we apply KNN algorithm on photometric data and estimate their corresponding zphot. By analysis, we observe two dense regions with catastrophic failure, one in the range of zphot [0.1,1.1], the other in the range of zphot [1.5,2.5]. In the second stage, we map the photometric multiband input pattern of points falling into the two ranges from original attribute space into high dimensional feature space by Gaussian kernel function in SVM. In the high dimensional feature space, many bad estimation points resulted from catastrophic failure by using simple Euclidean distance computation in KNN can be identified by classification hyperplane SVM and further be applied correction. Experimental results based on SDSS data for quasars showed that the two-stage fusion approach can significantly mitigate catastrophic failure and improve the estimation accuracy of photometric redshift.

  12. Dynamics of subjective discomfort in motion sickness as measured with a magnitude estimation method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, O. L.; Oman, C. M.

    1982-01-01

    Eight subjects, wearing left-right vision reversing goggles, executed sequences of controlled active head movements to provoke motion sickness. Head movement sequences were interspaced with periods of eye closure and no head movement to permit partial remission of symptoms between sequences. Subjects reported the level of discomfort experienced by using a magnitude estimation technique derived from Stevens' (1957) ratio scaling method. Using this approach, we demonstrated that the time course of subjective discomfort exhibits a profile, similar in all our subjects, characterized by both fast and slow response components. The potential usefulness of magnitude estimation for research on the dynamic properties of the mechanism generating motion sickness symptoms is discussed.

  13. Accuracy and sensitivity of four-dimensional dose calculation to systematic motion variability in stereotatic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chan, Mark K H; Kwong, Dora L W; Ng, Sherry C Y; Tong, Anthony S M; Tam, Eric K W

    2012-11-08

    The dynamic movement of radiation beam in real-time tumor tracking may cause overdosing to critical organs surrounding the target. The primary objective of this study was to verify the accuracy of the 4D planning module incorporated in CyberKnife treatment planning system. The secondary objective was to evaluate the error that may occur in the case of a systematic change of motion pattern. Measurements were made using a rigid thorax phantom. Target motion was simulated with two waveforms (sin and cos4) of different amplitude and frequency. Inversely optimized dose distributions were calculated in the CyberKnife treatment planning system using the 4D Monte Carlo dose calculation algorithm. Each plan was delivered to the phantom assuming (1) reproducible target motion,and (2) systematic change of target motion pattern. The accuracy of 4D dose calculation algorithm was assessed using GAFCHROMIC EBT2 films based on 5%/3 mm γ criteria. Treatment plans were considered acceptable if the percentage of pixels passing the 5%/3 mm γ criteria was greater than 90%. The mean percentages of pixels passing were 95% for the target and 91% for the static off-target structure, respectively, with reproducible target motion. When systematic changes of the motion pattern were introduced during treatment delivery, the mean percentages of pixels passing decreased significantly in the off-target films (48%; p < 0.05), but did not change significantly in the target films (92%; p = 0.324) compared to results of reproducible target motion. These results suggest that the accuracy of 4D dose calculation, particularly in off-target stationary structure, is strongly tied to the reproducibility of target motion and that the solutions of 4D planning do not reflect the clinical nature of nonreproducible target motion generally.

  14. Accuracy of Non-Destructive Testing of PBRs to Estimate Fragilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, J. N.; Brune, R.; Biasi, G. P.; Anooshehpoor, R.; Purvance, M.

    2011-12-01

    Prior studies of Precariously Balanced Rocks (PBRs) have involved various methods of documenting rock shapes and fragilities. These have included non-destructive testing (NDT) methods such as photomodeling, and potentially destructive testing (PDT) such as forced tilt tests. PDT methods usually have the potential of damaging or disturbing the rock or its pedestal so that the PBR usefulness for future generations is compromised. To date we have force-tilt tested approximately 28 PBRs, and of these we believe 7 have been compromised. We suggest here that given other inherent uncertainties in the current methodologies, NDT methods are now sufficiently advanced as to be adequate for the current state of the art use for comparison with Ground Motion Prediction Equations (GMPEs) and seismic hazard maps (SHMs). Here we compare tilt-test static toppling estimates to three non-destructive methods: (1) 3-D photographic modeling (2) profile analysis assuming the rock is 2-D, and (3) expert judgments from photographs. 3-D modeling uses the commercial Photomodeler program and photographs in the field taken from numerous directions around the rock. The output polyhedral shape is analyzed in Matlab determine the center of mass and in Autocad to estimate the static overturning angle alpha. For the 2-D method we chose the photograph in profile looking perpendicular to the estimated direction of toppling. The rock is outlined as a 2-D object in Matlab. Rock dimensions, rocking points, and a vertical reference are supplied by the photo analyst to estimate the center of gravity and static force overturning angles. For the expert opinion method we used additional photographs taken from different directions to improve the estimates of the center of mass and the rocking points. We used 7 rocks for comparisons. The error in estimating tan alpha from 3-D modeling is about 0.05. For 2-D estimates an average error is about 0.1 (?). For expert opinion estimates the error is about 0.06. For

  15. Video stimuli reduce object-directed imitation accuracy: a novel two-person motion-tracking approach

    PubMed Central

    Reader, Arran T.; Holmes, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Imitation is an important form of social behavior, and research has aimed to discover and explain the neural and kinematic aspects of imitation. However, much of this research has featured single participants imitating in response to pre-recorded video stimuli. This is in spite of findings that show reduced neural activation to video vs. real life movement stimuli, particularly in the motor cortex. We investigated the degree to which video stimuli may affect the imitation process using a novel motion tracking paradigm with high spatial and temporal resolution. We recorded 14 positions on the hands, arms, and heads of two individuals in an imitation experiment. One individual freely moved within given parameters (moving balls across a series of pegs) and a second participant imitated. This task was performed with either simple (one ball) or complex (three balls) movement difficulty, and either face-to-face or via a live video projection. After an exploratory analysis, three dependent variables were chosen for examination: 3D grip position, joint angles in the arm, and grip aperture. A cross-correlation and multivariate analysis revealed that object-directed imitation task accuracy (as represented by grip position) was reduced in video compared to face-to-face feedback, and in complex compared to simple difficulty. This was most prevalent in the left-right and forward-back motions, relevant to the imitator sitting face-to-face with the actor or with a live projected video of the same actor. The results suggest that for tasks which require object-directed imitation, video stimuli may not be an ecologically valid way to present task materials. However, no similar effects were found in the joint angle and grip aperture variables, suggesting that there are limits to the influence of video stimuli on imitation. The implications of these results are discussed with regards to previous findings, and with suggestions for future experimentation. PMID:26042073

  16. Shared Sensory Estimates for Human Motion Perception and Pursuit Eye Movements

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Trishna; Battifarano, Matthew; Simoncini, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Are sensory estimates formed centrally in the brain and then shared between perceptual and motor pathways or is centrally represented sensory activity decoded independently to drive awareness and action? Questions about the brain's information flow pose a challenge because systems-level estimates of environmental signals are only accessible indirectly as behavior. Assessing whether sensory estimates are shared between perceptual and motor circuits requires comparing perceptual reports with motor behavior arising from the same sensory activity. Extrastriate visual cortex both mediates the perception of visual motion and provides the visual inputs for behaviors such as smooth pursuit eye movements. Pursuit has been a valuable testing ground for theories of sensory information processing because the neural circuits and physiological response properties of motion-responsive cortical areas are well studied, sensory estimates of visual motion signals are formed quickly, and the initiation of pursuit is closely coupled to sensory estimates of target motion. Here, we analyzed variability in visually driven smooth pursuit and perceptual reports of target direction and speed in human subjects while we manipulated the signal-to-noise level of motion estimates. Comparable levels of variability throughout viewing time and across conditions provide evidence for shared noise sources in the perception and action pathways arising from a common sensory estimate. We found that conditions that create poor, low-gain pursuit create a discrepancy between the precision of perception and that of pursuit. Differences in pursuit gain arising from differences in optic flow strength in the stimulus reconcile much of the controversy on this topic. PMID:26041919

  17. Shared sensory estimates for human motion perception and pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Trishna; Battifarano, Matthew; Simoncini, Claudio; Osborne, Leslie C

    2015-06-01

    Are sensory estimates formed centrally in the brain and then shared between perceptual and motor pathways or is centrally represented sensory activity decoded independently to drive awareness and action? Questions about the brain's information flow pose a challenge because systems-level estimates of environmental signals are only accessible indirectly as behavior. Assessing whether sensory estimates are shared between perceptual and motor circuits requires comparing perceptual reports with motor behavior arising from the same sensory activity. Extrastriate visual cortex both mediates the perception of visual motion and provides the visual inputs for behaviors such as smooth pursuit eye movements. Pursuit has been a valuable testing ground for theories of sensory information processing because the neural circuits and physiological response properties of motion-responsive cortical areas are well studied, sensory estimates of visual motion signals are formed quickly, and the initiation of pursuit is closely coupled to sensory estimates of target motion. Here, we analyzed variability in visually driven smooth pursuit and perceptual reports of target direction and speed in human subjects while we manipulated the signal-to-noise level of motion estimates. Comparable levels of variability throughout viewing time and across conditions provide evidence for shared noise sources in the perception and action pathways arising from a common sensory estimate. We found that conditions that create poor, low-gain pursuit create a discrepancy between the precision of perception and that of pursuit. Differences in pursuit gain arising from differences in optic flow strength in the stimulus reconcile much of the controversy on this topic. PMID:26041919

  18. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glitzner, M.; de Senneville, B. Denis; Lagendijk, J. J. W.; Raaymakers, B. W.; Crijns, S. P. M.

    2015-08-01

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with {{≤ft(2.5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. {{≤ft(5 \\text{mm}\\right)}3} . In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  19. On-line 3D motion estimation using low resolution MRI.

    PubMed

    Glitzner, M; de Senneville, B Denis; Lagendijk, J J W; Raaymakers, B W; Crijns, S P M

    2015-08-21

    Image processing such as deformable image registration finds its way into radiotherapy as a means to track non-rigid anatomy. With the advent of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) guided radiotherapy, intrafraction anatomy snapshots become technically feasible. MRI provides the needed tissue signal for high-fidelity image registration. However, acquisitions, especially in 3D, take a considerable amount of time. Pushing towards real-time adaptive radiotherapy, MRI needs to be accelerated without degrading the quality of information. In this paper, we investigate the impact of image resolution on the quality of motion estimations. Potentially, spatially undersampled images yield comparable motion estimations. At the same time, their acquisition times would reduce greatly due to the sparser sampling. In order to substantiate this hypothesis, exemplary 4D datasets of the abdomen were downsampled gradually. Subsequently, spatiotemporal deformations are extracted consistently using the same motion estimation for each downsampled dataset. Errors between the original and the respectively downsampled version of the dataset are then evaluated. Compared to ground-truth, results show high similarity of deformations estimated from downsampled image data. Using a dataset with (2.5 mm)3 voxel size, deformation fields could be recovered well up to a downsampling factor of 2, i.e. (5 mm)3. In a therapy guidance scenario MRI, imaging speed could accordingly increase approximately fourfold, with acceptable loss of estimated motion quality.

  20. Multiple-camera/motion stereoscopy for range estimation in helicopter flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Phillip N.; Sridhar, Banavar; Suorsa, Raymond E.

    1993-01-01

    Aiding the pilot to improve safety and reduce pilot workload by detecting obstacles and planning obstacle-free flight paths during low-altitude helicopter flight is desirable. Computer vision techniques provide an attractive method of obstacle detection and range estimation for objects within a large field of view ahead of the helicopter. Previous research has had considerable success by using an image sequence from a single moving camera to solving this problem. The major limitations of single camera approaches are that no range information can be obtained near the instantaneous direction of motion or in the absence of motion. These limitations can be overcome through the use of multiple cameras. This paper presents a hybrid motion/stereo algorithm which allows range refinement through recursive range estimation while avoiding loss of range information in the direction of travel. A feature-based approach is used to track objects between image frames. An extended Kalman filter combines knowledge of the camera motion and measurements of a feature's image location to recursively estimate the feature's range and to predict its location in future images. Performance of the algorithm will be illustrated using an image sequence, motion information, and independent range measurements from a low-altitude helicopter flight experiment.

  1. On the accuracy of Black Hole Mass estimation from Broad Emission Lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mejia-Restrepo, Julian; Trakhtenbrot, Benny; Lira, Paulina; Netzer, Hagai; Capellupo, Daniel

    2016-08-01

    In this talk we compare single-epoch (SE) black hole mass (MBH) estimates based on low ionization (Hα, Hβ, and MgII) and high ionization (CIV) broad emission lines. We also examine the implications of different continuum modeling approaches in line width and MBH measurements. For this purpose we use a sample of 39 unobscured AGNs at z=1.55 selected to cover a large range in MBH (2.0dex) and L/Ledd (2.5dex) and observed by X-shooter. We find that using a local power-law continuum instead of a physically-motivated thin disk continuum leads to only slight underestimation of the FWHM of the lines and the associated MBH(FWHM). However, the line dispersion σ and associated MBH(σ) are strongly affected by the continuum placement providing less reliable mass estimates. We find that low ionization lines provides reliable virial MBH estimation. However, the CIV line is not reliable in the majority of the cases, indicating that the gas emitting this line may not be virialized. We find that Hα, Hβ show similar line widths and that FWHM(MgII) is about 30% narrower than FWHM(Hβ) . We test and confirm several recent suggestions to improve the accuracy in CIV-based mass estimates, relying on other UV emission lines. However, we find that such improvements do not help in reducing the scatter between CIV-based and Balmer-line-based mass estimates. This work has been recently accepted for publication in MNRAS.

  2. Effects of Regional Topography and Spacecraft Observation Geometry on Surface Soil Moisture Estimation Accuracies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Akbar, R.; West, R. D.; Colliander, A.; Kim, S.; Dunbar, R. S.

    2015-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active-Passive Mission (SMAP), launched in January 2015, provides near-daily global surface soil moisture estimates via combined Active Radar and Passive Radiometer observations at various spatial resolutions. The goal of this mission is to enhance our understanding of global carbon and water cycles. This presentation will focus on a comprehensive assessment of the SMAP high resolution radar backscatter data (formally the L1C_S0_HiRes data product) obtained over a 3 km Woody Savanna region in north-central California during a 2.5 month period starting late May 2015. The effects of spacecraft observation geometry (fore- and aft-looks as well as ascending and descending obits) along with regional topography on soil moisture estimation abilities will be examined. Furthermore surface soil moisture retrievals, obtained through utilization of different combinations of observation geometries, will be compared to an existing network of in situsensors. Current electromagnetic scattering and emission models do not properly account for surface topography, therefore physical forward model predictions and observations have unaccounted mismatch errors which also affect soil moisture estimation accuracies. The goal of this study is to quantify these soil moisture prediction errors and highlight the need for new and complete Electromagnetic modeling efforts.

  3. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data. PMID:27410085

  4. Effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on estimation accuracy of crop biophysical parameters.

    PubMed

    Luo, Shezhou; Chen, Jing M; Wang, Cheng; Xi, Xiaohuan; Zeng, Hongcheng; Peng, Dailiang; Li, Dong

    2016-05-30

    Vegetation leaf area index (LAI), height, and aboveground biomass are key biophysical parameters. Corn is an important and globally distributed crop, and reliable estimations of these parameters are essential for corn yield forecasting, health monitoring and ecosystem modeling. Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) is considered an effective technology for estimating vegetation biophysical parameters. However, the estimation accuracies of these parameters are affected by multiple factors. In this study, we first estimated corn LAI, height and biomass (R2 = 0.80, 0.874 and 0.838, respectively) using the original LiDAR data (7.32 points/m2), and the results showed that LiDAR data could accurately estimate these biophysical parameters. Second, comprehensive research was conducted on the effects of LiDAR point density, sampling size and height threshold on the estimation accuracy of LAI, height and biomass. Our findings indicated that LiDAR point density had an important effect on the estimation accuracy for vegetation biophysical parameters, however, high point density did not always produce highly accurate estimates, and reduced point density could deliver reasonable estimation results. Furthermore, the results showed that sampling size and height threshold were additional key factors that affect the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Therefore, the optimal sampling size and the height threshold should be determined to improve the estimation accuracy of biophysical parameters. Our results also implied that a higher LiDAR point density, larger sampling size and height threshold were required to obtain accurate corn LAI estimation when compared with height and biomass estimations. In general, our results provide valuable guidance for LiDAR data acquisition and estimation of vegetation biophysical parameters using LiDAR data.

  5. Estimation of strong ground motions from hypothetical earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone, Pacific Northwest

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heaton, T.H.; Hartzell, S.H.

    1989-01-01

    Strong ground motions are estimated for the Pacific Northwest assuming that large shallow earthquakes, similar to those experienced in southern Chile, southwestern Japan, and Colombia, may also occur on the Cascadia subduction zone. Fifty-six strong motion recordings for twenty-five subduction earthquakes of Ms???7.0 are used to estimate the response spectra that may result from earthquakes Mw<81/4. Large variations in observed ground motion levels are noted for a given site distance and earthquake magnitude. When compared with motions that have been observed in the western United States, large subduction zone earthquakes produce relatively large ground motions at surprisingly large distances. An earthquake similar to the 22 May 1960 Chilean earthquake (Mw 9.5) is the largest event that is considered to be plausible for the Cascadia subduction zone. This event has a moment which is two orders of magnitude larger than the largest earthquake for which we have strong motion records. The empirical Green's function technique is used to synthesize strong ground motions for such giant earthquakes. Observed teleseismic P-waveforms from giant earthquakes are also modeled using the empirical Green's function technique in order to constrain model parameters. The teleseismic modeling in the period range of 1.0 to 50 sec strongly suggests that fewer Green's functions should be randomly summed than is required to match the long-period moments of giant earthquakes. It appears that a large portion of the moment associated with giant earthquakes occurs at very long periods that are outside the frequency band of interest for strong ground motions. Nevertheless, the occurrence of a giant earthquake in the Pacific Northwest may produce quite strong shaking over a very large region. ?? 1989 Birkha??user Verlag.

  6. The electronic image stabilization technology research based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chao; Ji, Ming; Zhang, Ying; Jiang, Wentao; Lu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Jiaoying; Yang, Heng

    2016-01-01

    The electronic image stabilization technology based on improved optical-flow motion vector estimation technique can effectively improve the non normal shift, such as jitter, rotation and so on. Firstly, the ORB features are extracted from the image, a set of regions are built on these features; Secondly, the optical-flow vector is computed in the feature regions, in order to reduce the computational complexity, the multi resolution strategy of Pyramid is used to calculate the motion vector of the frame; Finally, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the effect of the algorithm is carried out. The results show that the proposed algorithm has better stability compared with image stabilization based on the traditional optical-flow motion vector estimation method.

  7. Tracking of EEG activity using motion estimation to understand brain wiring.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Humaira; Malik, Aamir Saeed; Ullah, Rafi; Shim, Seong-O; Bawakid, Abdullah; Khan, Muhammad Burhan; Subhani, Ahmad Rauf

    2015-01-01

    The fundamental step in brain research deals with recording electroencephalogram (EEG) signals and then investigating the recorded signals quantitatively. Topographic EEG (visual spatial representation of EEG signal) is commonly referred to as brain topomaps or brain EEG maps. In this chapter, full search full search block motion estimation algorithm has been employed to track the brain activity in brain topomaps to understand the mechanism of brain wiring. The behavior of EEG topomaps is examined throughout a particular brain activation with respect to time. Motion vectors are used to track the brain activation over the scalp during the activation period. Using motion estimation it is possible to track the path from the starting point of activation to the final point of activation. Thus it is possible to track the path of a signal across various lobes.

  8. Motion Estimation Based on Mutual Information and Adaptive Multi-Scale Thresholding.

    PubMed

    Xu, Rui; Taubman, David; Naman, Aous Thabit

    2016-03-01

    This paper proposes a new method of calculating a matching metric for motion estimation. The proposed method splits the information in the source images into multiple scale and orientation subbands, reduces the subband values to a binary representation via an adaptive thresholding algorithm, and uses mutual information to model the similarity of corresponding square windows in each image. A moving window strategy is applied to recover a dense estimated motion field whose properties are explored. The proposed matching metric is a sum of mutual information scores across space, scale, and orientation. This facilitates the exploitation of information diversity in the source images. Experimental comparisons are performed amongst several related approaches, revealing that the proposed matching metric is better able to exploit information diversity, generating more accurate motion fields.

  9. An evaluation of data-driven motion estimation in comparison to the usage of external-surrogates in cardiac SPECT imaging.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Joyeeta Mitra; Hutton, Brian F; Johnson, Karen L; Pretorius, P Hendrik; King, Michael A

    2013-11-01

    Motion estimation methods in single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) can be classified into methods which depend on just the emission data (data-driven), or those that use some other source of information such as an external surrogate. The surrogate-based methods estimate the motion exhibited externally which may not correlate exactly with the movement of organs inside the body. The accuracy of data-driven strategies on the other hand is affected by the type and timing of motion occurrence during acquisition, the source distribution, and various degrading factors such as attenuation, scatter, and system spatial resolution. The goal of this paper is to investigate the performance of two data-driven motion estimation schemes based on the rigid-body registration of projections of motion-transformed source distributions to the acquired projection data for cardiac SPECT studies. Comparison is also made of six intensity based registration metrics to an external surrogate-based method. In the data-driven schemes, a partially reconstructed heart is used as the initial source distribution. The partially-reconstructed heart has inaccuracies due to limited angle artifacts resulting from using only a part of the SPECT projections acquired while the patient maintained the same pose. The performance of different cost functions in quantifying consistency with the SPECT projection data in the data-driven schemes was compared for clinically realistic patient motion occurring as discrete pose changes, one or two times during acquisition. The six intensity-based metrics studied were mean-squared difference, mutual information, normalized mutual information (NMI), pattern intensity (PI), normalized cross-correlation and entropy of the difference. Quantitative and qualitative analysis of the performance is reported using Monte-Carlo simulations of a realistic heart phantom including degradation factors such as attenuation, scatter and system spatial resolution. Further the

  10. Automatic motion estimation using flow parameters for dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Barrois, Guillaume; Coron, Alain; Lucidarme, Olivier; Bridal, S Lori

    2015-03-21

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound (DCE-US) sequences are subject to motion which can disturb functional flow quantification. This can make estimated parameters more variable or unreliable. Methods that compensate for motion are therefore desirable. The most commonly used motion correction techniques in DCE-US register the images in the sequence with respect to a user-selected reference image. However, this image may not include all features that are representative of the whole sequence. Moreover, image-based registration neglects pertinent, functional-flow information contained in the DCE-US sequence. An operator-free method is proposed that combines the motion estimation and flow-parameter quantification (M/Q method) in a single mathematical framework. This method is based on a realistic multiplicative model of the DCE-US noise. By computing likelihood in this model, motion and flow parameters are both estimated iteratively. First, the maximization is accomplished by estimating functional and motion parameters. Then, a final registration based on a non-parametric temporal smoothing of the sequence is performed. This method is compared to a conventional (mutual information) registration method where all the images of the sequence are registered with respect to a reference image chosen by an expert. The two methods are evaluated on simulated sequences and DCE-US sequences acquired in patients (N = 15). The M/Q method demonstrates significantly (p < 0.05) lower Dice coefficients and Hausdorff distance than the conventional method on the simulated data sets. On the in vivo sequences analysed, the M/Q methods outperformed the conventional method in terms of mean Dice and Hausdorff distance on 80% of the sequences, and in terms of standard deviation of Dice and Hausdorff distance on 87% of the sequences.

  11. Tracking of electroencephalography signals across brain lobes using motion estimation and cross-correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seng Hooi; Nisar, Humaira; Yap, Vooi Voon; Shim, Seong-O.

    2015-11-01

    Electroencephalography (EEG) is the signal generated by electrical activity in the human brain. EEG topographic maps (topo-maps) give an idea of brain activation. Functional connectivity helps to find functionally integrated relationship between spatially separated brain regions. Brain connectivity can be measured by several methods. The classical methods calculate the coherence and correlation of the signal. We have developed an algorithm to map functional neural connectivity in the brain by using a full search block matching motion estimation algorithm. We have used oddball paradigm to examine the flow of activation across brain lobes for a specific activity. In the first step, the EEG signal is converted into topo-maps. The flow of activation between consecutive frames is tracked using full search block motion estimation, which appears in the form of motion vectors. In the second step, vector median filtering is used to obtain a smooth motion field by removing the unwanted noise. For each topo-map, several activation paths are tracked across various brain lobes. We have also developed correlation activity maps by following the correlation coefficient paths between electrodes. These paths are selected when the correlation coefficient between electrodes is >70%. We have compared the motion estimation path with the correlation coefficient activation maps. The tracked paths obtained by using motion estimation and correlation give very similar results. The inter-subject comparison shows that four out of five subjects tracked path involves all four (occipital, temporal, parietal, frontal) brain lobes for the same stimuli. The intra-subject analysis shows that three out of five subjects show different tracked lobes for different stimuli.

  12. Navigation Aiding by a Hybrid Laser-Camera Motion Estimator for Micro Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Atman, Jamal; Popp, Manuel; Ruppelt, Jan; Trommer, Gert F

    2016-09-16

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) equipped with various sensors are able to carry out autonomous flights. However, the self-localization of autonomous agents is mostly dependent on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In order to provide an accurate navigation solution in absence of GNSS signals, this article presents a hybrid sensor. The hybrid sensor is a deep integration of a monocular camera and a 2D laser rangefinder so that the motion of the MAV is estimated. This realization is expected to be more flexible in terms of environments compared to laser-scan-matching approaches. The estimated ego-motion is then integrated in the MAV's navigation system. However, first, the knowledge about the pose between both sensors is obtained by proposing an improved calibration method. For both calibration and ego-motion estimation, 3D-to-2D correspondences are used and the Perspective-3-Point (P3P) problem is solved. Moreover, the covariance estimation of the relative motion is presented. The experiments show very accurate calibration and navigation results.

  13. Navigation Aiding by a Hybrid Laser-Camera Motion Estimator for Micro Aerial Vehicles.

    PubMed

    Atman, Jamal; Popp, Manuel; Ruppelt, Jan; Trommer, Gert F

    2016-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) equipped with various sensors are able to carry out autonomous flights. However, the self-localization of autonomous agents is mostly dependent on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In order to provide an accurate navigation solution in absence of GNSS signals, this article presents a hybrid sensor. The hybrid sensor is a deep integration of a monocular camera and a 2D laser rangefinder so that the motion of the MAV is estimated. This realization is expected to be more flexible in terms of environments compared to laser-scan-matching approaches. The estimated ego-motion is then integrated in the MAV's navigation system. However, first, the knowledge about the pose between both sensors is obtained by proposing an improved calibration method. For both calibration and ego-motion estimation, 3D-to-2D correspondences are used and the Perspective-3-Point (P3P) problem is solved. Moreover, the covariance estimation of the relative motion is presented. The experiments show very accurate calibration and navigation results. PMID:27649203

  14. Predictive-based cross line for fast motion estimation in MPEG-4 videos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hui; Jiang, Jianmin

    2004-05-01

    Block-based motion estimation is widely used in the field of video compression due to its feature of high processing speed and competitive compression efficiency. In the chain of compression operations, however, motion estimation still remains to be the most time-consuming process. As a result, any improvement in fast motion estimation will enable practical applications of MPEG techniques more efficient and more sustainable in terms of both processing speed and computing cost. To meet the requirements of real-time compression of videos and image sequences, such as video conferencing, remote video surveillance and video phones etc., we propose a new search algorithm and achieve fast motion estimation for MPEG compression standards based on existing algorithm developments. To evaluate the proposed algorithm, we adopted MPEG-4 and the prediction line search algorithm as the benchmarks to design the experiments. Their performances are measured by: (i) reconstructed video quality; (ii) processing time. The results reveal that the proposed algorithm provides a competitive alternative to the existing prediction line search algorithm. In comparison with MPEG-4, the proposed algorithm illustrates significant advantages in terms of processing speed and video quality.

  15. Navigation Aiding by a Hybrid Laser-Camera Motion Estimator for Micro Aerial Vehicles

    PubMed Central

    Atman, Jamal; Popp, Manuel; Ruppelt, Jan; Trommer, Gert F.

    2016-01-01

    Micro Air Vehicles (MAVs) equipped with various sensors are able to carry out autonomous flights. However, the self-localization of autonomous agents is mostly dependent on Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). In order to provide an accurate navigation solution in absence of GNSS signals, this article presents a hybrid sensor. The hybrid sensor is a deep integration of a monocular camera and a 2D laser rangefinder so that the motion of the MAV is estimated. This realization is expected to be more flexible in terms of environments compared to laser-scan-matching approaches. The estimated ego-motion is then integrated in the MAV’s navigation system. However, first, the knowledge about the pose between both sensors is obtained by proposing an improved calibration method. For both calibration and ego-motion estimation, 3D-to-2D correspondences are used and the Perspective-3-Point (P3P) problem is solved. Moreover, the covariance estimation of the relative motion is presented. The experiments show very accurate calibration and navigation results. PMID:27649203

  16. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for the UCSB Campus, and Related Response of the Engineering 1 Building

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Bonilla, F.; Doroudian, M.; Elgamal, A.; Hueze, F.

    2000-06-06

    This is the second report on the UC/CLC Campus Earthquake Program (CEP), concerning the estimation of exposure of the U.C. Santa Barbara campus to strong earthquake motions (Phase 2 study). The main results of Phase 1 are summarized in the current report. This document describes the studies which resulted in site-specific strong motion estimates for the Engineering I site, and discusses the potential impact of these motions on the building. The main elements of Phase 2 are: (1) determining that a M 6.8 earthquake on the North Channel-Pitas Point (NCPP) fault is the largest threat to the campus. Its recurrence interval is estimated at 350 to 525 years; (2) recording earthquakes from that fault on March 23, 1998 (M 3.2) and May 14, 1999 (M 3.2) at the new UCSB seismic station; (3) using these recordings as empirical Green's functions (EGF) in scenario earthquake simulations which provided strong motion estimates (seismic syntheses) at a depth of 74 m under the Engineering I site; 240 such simulations were performed, each with the same seismic moment, but giving a broad range of motions that were analyzed for their mean and standard deviation; (4) laboratory testing, at U.C. Berkeley and U.C. Los Angeles, of soil samples obtained from drilling at the UCSB station site, to determine their response to earthquake-type loading; (5) performing nonlinear soil dynamic calculations, using the soil properties determined in-situ and in the laboratory, to calculate the surface strong motions resulting from the seismic syntheses at depth; (6) comparing these CEP-generated strong motion estimates to acceleration spectra based on the application of state-of-practice methods - the IBC 2000 code, UBC 97 code and Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA), this comparison will be used to formulate design-basis spectra for future buildings and retrofits at UCSB; and (7) comparing the response of the Engineering I building to the CEP ground motion estimates and to the design

  17. High resolution reconstructions of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions during the Neogene: Comparison to GPS estimates and implications for global plate motion estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.; Calais, E.

    2013-12-01

    Plate kinematic data from the slow-spreading Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) are the primary source of information about relative movements between Antarctica and Africa over geologic time and are critical for linking the movements of plates in the Atlantic and Indian Ocean basins. We describe the first high-resolution model of SWIR plate kinematics from the present to 20 Ma, consisting of rotations based on 21 magnetic reversals with ~1 million-year spacing. The new rotations, which are derived from 4822 identifications of magnetic reversals C1n to C6no and 6000 crossings of 21 fracture zones and transform faults, describe in detail the ultra-slow motions of the Nubia, Lwandle, and Somalia plates north of the SWIR relative to the Antarctic plate. A search for the Nubia-Lwandle-Antarctic triple junction with all data since C5n.2 (11.0 Ma) gives a best location at the Andrew Bain transform fault (~32E), in accord with previous work. Plate kinematic data from the SWIR east of the Andrew Bain fracture zone support the existence of the previously proposed Lwandle plate at high confidence level. The likely diffuse Lwandle-Somalia plate boundary north of the SWIR is however only loosely constrained to 45E-52E. After calibrating the new rotations for the biasing effects of finite-width magnetic polarity transition zones (i.e. outward displacement), the new rotations reveal that SWIR plate motion has remained steady from the present back to 7.5 Ma, but was modestly faster (~25%) from 19.6 Ma to 7.5 Ma. GPS estimates of present SWIR plate motions based on more than 100 continuous GPS sites on the Antarctic, Nubia, and Somalia plates are remarkably consistent with SWIR velocities determined with the new geological reconstructions. The superb agreement between the two independent plate motion estimates validates both sets of estimates and our calibration for outward displacement. Implications of the new estimates, including evidence for anomalously wide outward displacement

  18. Testing the accuracy of a 1-D volcanic plume model in estimating mass eruption rate

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mastin, Larry G.

    2014-01-01

    During volcanic eruptions, empirical relationships are used to estimate mass eruption rate from plume height. Although simple, such relationships can be inaccurate and can underestimate rates in windy conditions. One-dimensional plume models can incorporate atmospheric conditions and give potentially more accurate estimates. Here I present a 1-D model for plumes in crosswind and simulate 25 historical eruptions where plume height Hobs was well observed and mass eruption rate Mobs could be calculated from mapped deposit mass and observed duration. The simulations considered wind, temperature, and phase changes of water. Atmospheric conditions were obtained from the National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis 2.5° model. Simulations calculate the minimum, maximum, and average values (Mmin, Mmax, and Mavg) that fit the plume height. Eruption rates were also estimated from the empirical formula Mempir = 140Hobs4.14 (Mempir is in kilogram per second, Hobs is in kilometer). For these eruptions, the standard error of the residual in log space is about 0.53 for Mavg and 0.50 for Mempir. Thus, for this data set, the model is slightly less accurate at predicting Mobs than the empirical curve. The inability of this model to improve eruption rate estimates may lie in the limited accuracy of even well-observed plume heights, inaccurate model formulation, or the fact that most eruptions examined were not highly influenced by wind. For the low, wind-blown plume of 14–18 April 2010 at Eyjafjallajökull, where an accurate plume height time series is available, modeled rates do agree better with Mobs than Mempir.

  19. Effect of time discretization of the imaging process on the accuracy of trajectory estimation in fluorescence microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yau; Chao, Jerry; Lin, Zhiping; Ober, Raimund J

    2014-08-25

    In fluorescence microscopy, high-speed imaging is often necessary for the proper visualization and analysis of fast subcellular dynamics. Here, we examine how the speed of image acquisition affects the accuracy with which parameters such as the starting position and speed of a microscopic non-stationary fluorescent object can be estimated from the resulting image sequence. Specifically, we use a Fisher information-based performance bound to investigate the detector-dependent effect of frame rate on the accuracy of parameter estimation. We demonstrate that when a charge-coupled device detector is used, the estimation accuracy deteriorates as the frame rate increases beyond a point where the detector's readout noise begins to overwhelm the low number of photons detected in each frame. In contrast, we show that when an electron-multiplying charge-coupled device (EMCCD) detector is used, the estimation accuracy improves with increasing frame rate. In fact, at high frame rates where the low number of photons detected in each frame renders the fluorescent object difficult to detect visually, imaging with an EMCCD detector represents a natural implementation of the Ultrahigh Accuracy Imaging Modality, and enables estimation with an accuracy approaching that which is attainable only when a hypothetical noiseless detector is used. PMID:25321248

  20. Position Estimation of an Epicardial Crawling Robot on the Beating Heart by Modeling of Physiological Motion

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Nathan A.; del Agua, Diego Moral; Zenati, Marco A.; Riviere, Cameron N.

    2012-01-01

    HeartLander, a small mobile robot designed to provide treatments to the surface of the beating heart, overcomes a major difficulty of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, providing a stable operating platform. This is achieved inherently in the way the robot adheres to and crawls over the surface of the heart. This mode of operation does not require physiological motion compensation to provide this stable environment; however, modeling of physiological motion is advantageous in providing more accurate position estimation as well as synchronization of motion to the physiological cycles. The work presented uses an Extended Kalman Filter framework to estimate parameters of non-stationary Fourier series models of the motion of the heart due to the respiratory and cardiac cycles as well as the position of the robot as it moves over the surface of the heart. The proposed method is demonstrated in the laboratory with HeartLander operating on a physiological motion simulator. Improved performance is demonstrated in comparison to the filtering methods previously used with HeartLander. The use of detected physiological cycle phases to synchronize locomotion of HeartLander is also described. PMID:23066511

  1. Position Estimation of an Epicardial Crawling Robot on the Beating Heart by Modeling of Physiological Motion.

    PubMed

    Wood, Nathan A; Del Agua, Diego Moral; Zenati, Marco A; Riviere, Cameron N

    2011-12-01

    HeartLander, a small mobile robot designed to provide treatments to the surface of the beating heart, overcomes a major difficulty of minimally invasive cardiac surgery, providing a stable operating platform. This is achieved inherently in the way the robot adheres to and crawls over the surface of the heart. This mode of operation does not require physiological motion compensation to provide this stable environment; however, modeling of physiological motion is advantageous in providing more accurate position estimation as well as synchronization of motion to the physiological cycles. The work presented uses an Extended Kalman Filter framework to estimate parameters of non-stationary Fourier series models of the motion of the heart due to the respiratory and cardiac cycles as well as the position of the robot as it moves over the surface of the heart. The proposed method is demonstrated in the laboratory with HeartLander operating on a physiological motion simulator. Improved performance is demonstrated in comparison to the filtering methods previously used with HeartLander. The use of detected physiological cycle phases to synchronize locomotion of HeartLander is also described.

  2. Drift-Free Position Estimation of Periodic or Quasi-Periodic Motion Using Inertial Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Latt, Win Tun; Veluvolu, Kalyana Chakravarthy; Ang, Wei Tech

    2011-01-01

    Position sensing with inertial sensors such as accelerometers and gyroscopes usually requires other aided sensors or prior knowledge of motion characteristics to remove position drift resulting from integration of acceleration or velocity so as to obtain accurate position estimation. A method based on analytical integration has previously been developed to obtain accurate position estimate of periodic or quasi-periodic motion from inertial sensors using prior knowledge of the motion but without using aided sensors. In this paper, a new method is proposed which employs linear filtering stage coupled with adaptive filtering stage to remove drift and attenuation. The prior knowledge of the motion the proposed method requires is only approximate band of frequencies of the motion. Existing adaptive filtering methods based on Fourier series such as weighted-frequency Fourier linear combiner (WFLC), and band-limited multiple Fourier linear combiner (BMFLC) are modified to combine with the proposed method. To validate and compare the performance of the proposed method with the method based on analytical integration, simulation study is performed using periodic signals as well as real physiological tremor data, and real-time experiments are conducted using an ADXL-203 accelerometer. Results demonstrate that the performance of the proposed method outperforms the existing analytical integration method. PMID:22163935

  3. Strong earthquake motion estimates for three sites on the U.C. San Diego campus

    SciTech Connect

    Day, S; Doroudian, M; Elgamal, A; Gonzales, S; Heuze, F; Lai, T; Minster, B; Oglesby, D; Riemer, M; Vernon, F; Vucetic, M; Wagoner, J; Yang, Z

    2002-05-07

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill, sample, and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling

  4. Strong Earthquake Motion Estimates for Three Sites on the U.C. Riverside Campus

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, R.; Elgamal, A.; Heuze, F.; Lai, T.; Lavalle, D.; Lawrence, B.; Liu, P.C.; Matesic, L.; Park, S.; Riemar, M.; Steidl, J.; Vucetic, M.; Wagoner, J.; Yang, Z.

    2000-11-01

    The approach of the Campus Earthquake Program (CEP) is to combine the substantial expertise that exists within the UC system in geology, seismology, and geotechnical engineering, to estimate the earthquake strong motion exposure of UC facilities. These estimates draw upon recent advances in hazard assessment, seismic wave propagation modeling in rocks and soils, and dynamic soil testing. The UC campuses currently chosen for application of our integrated methodology are Riverside, San Diego, and Santa Barbara. The procedure starts with the identification of possible earthquake sources in the region and the determination of the most critical fault(s) related to earthquake exposure of the campus. Combined geological, geophysical, and geotechnical studies are then conducted to characterize each campus with specific focus on the location of particular target buildings of special interest to the campus administrators. We drill and geophysically log deep boreholes next to the target structure, to provide direct in-situ measurements of subsurface material properties, and to install uphole and downhole 3-component seismic sensors capable of recording both weak and strong motions. The boreholes provide access below the soil layers, to deeper materials that have relatively high seismic shear-wave velocities. Analyses of conjugate downhole and uphole records provide a basis for optimizing the representation of the low-strain response of the sites. Earthquake rupture scenarios of identified causative faults are combined with the earthquake records and with nonlinear soil models to provide site-specific estimates of strong motions at the selected target locations. The predicted ground motions are shared with the UC consultants, so that they can be used as input to the dynamic analysis of the buildings. Thus, for each campus targeted by the CEP project, the strong motion studies consist of two phases, Phase 1--initial source and site characterization, drilling, geophysical

  5. Volcanic explosion clouds - Density, temperature, and particle content estimates from cloud motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, L.; Self, S.

    1980-01-01

    Photographic records of 10 vulcanian eruption clouds produced during the 1978 eruption of Fuego Volcano in Guatemala have been analyzed to determine cloud velocity and acceleration at successive stages of expansion. Cloud motion is controlled by air drag (dominant during early, high-speed motion) and buoyancy (dominant during late motion when the cloud is convecting slowly). Cloud densities in the range 0.6 to 1.2 times that of the surrounding atmosphere were obtained by fitting equations of motion for two common cloud shapes (spheres and vertical cylinders) to the observed motions. Analysis of the heat budget of a cloud permits an estimate of cloud temperature and particle weight fraction to be made from the density. Model results suggest that clouds generally reached temperatures within 10 K of that of the surrounding air within 10 seconds of formation and that dense particle weight fractions were less than 2% by this time. The maximum sizes of dense particles supported by motion in the convecting clouds range from 140 to 1700 microns.

  6. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task.

  7. Pupil size dynamics during fixation impact the accuracy and precision of video-based gaze estimation.

    PubMed

    Choe, Kyoung Whan; Blake, Randolph; Lee, Sang-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Video-based eye tracking relies on locating pupil center to measure gaze positions. Although widely used, the technique is known to generate spurious gaze position shifts up to several degrees in visual angle because pupil centration can change without eye movement during pupil constriction or dilation. Since pupil size can fluctuate markedly from moment to moment, reflecting arousal state and cognitive processing during human behavioral and neuroimaging experiments, the pupil size artifact is prevalent and thus weakens the quality of the video-based eye tracking measurements reliant on small fixational eye movements. Moreover, the artifact may lead to erroneous conclusions if the spurious signal is taken as an actual eye movement. Here, we measured pupil size and gaze position from 23 human observers performing a fixation task and examined the relationship between these two measures. Results disclosed that the pupils contracted as fixation was prolonged, at both small (<16s) and large (∼4min) time scales, and these pupil contractions were accompanied by systematic errors in gaze position estimation, in both the ellipse and the centroid methods of pupil tracking. When pupil size was regressed out, the accuracy and reliability of gaze position measurements were substantially improved, enabling differentiation of 0.1° difference in eye position. We confirmed the presence of systematic changes in pupil size, again at both small and large scales, and its tight relationship with gaze position estimates when observers were engaged in a demanding visual discrimination task. PMID:25578924

  8. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks' execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs. PMID:27589753

  9. Effect of Variations in IRU Integration Time Interval On Accuracy of Aqua Attitude Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natanson, G. A.; Tracewell, Dave

    2003-01-01

    During Aqua launch support, attitude analysts noticed several anomalies in Onboard Computer (OBC) rates and in rates computed by the ground Attitude Determination System (ADS). These included: 1) periodic jumps in the OBC pitch rate every 2 minutes; 2) spikes in ADS pitch rate every 4 minutes; 3) close agreement between pitch rates computed by ADS and those derived from telemetered OBC quaternions (in contrast to the step-wise pattern observed for telemetered OBC rates); 4) spikes of +/- 10 milliseconds in telemetered IRU integration time every 4 minutes (despite the fact that telemetered time tags of any two sequential IRU measurements were always 1 second apart from each other). An analysis presented in the paper explains this anomalous behavior by a small average offset of about 0.5 +/- 0.05 microsec in the time interval between two sequential accumulated angle measurements. It is shown that errors in the estimated pitch angle due to neglecting the aforementioned variations in the integration time interval by the OBC is within +/- 2 arcseconds. Ground attitude solutions are found to be accurate enough to see the effect of the variations on the accuracy of the estimated pitch angle.

  10. Sample size planning for the coefficient of variation from the accuracy in parameter estimation approach.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Ken

    2007-11-01

    The accuracy in parameter estimation approach to sample size planning is developed for the coefficient of variation, where the goal of the method is to obtain an accurate parameter estimate by achieving a sufficiently narrow confidence interval. The first method allows researchers to plan sample size so that the expected width of the confidence interval for the population coefficient of variation is sufficiently narrow. A modification allows a desired degree of assurance to be incorporated into the method, so that the obtained confidence interval will be sufficiently narrow with some specified probability (e.g., 85% assurance that the 95 confidence interval width will be no wider than to units). Tables of necessary sample size are provided for a variety of scenarios that may help researchers planning a study where the coefficient of variation is of interest plan an appropriate sample size in order to have a sufficiently narrow confidence interval, optionally with somespecified assurance of the confidence interval being sufficiently narrow. Freely available computer routines have been developed that allow researchers to easily implement all of the methods discussed in the article.

  11. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-08-30

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks' execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs.

  12. Evaluation of the accuracy of fetal dose estimates using TG-36 data

    SciTech Connect

    Kry, Stephen F.; Starkschall, George; Antolak, John A.; Salehpour, Mohammad

    2007-04-15

    The American Association of Physicists in Medicine Radiation Therapy Committee Task Group 36 report (TG-36) provides guidelines for managing radiation therapy of pregnant patients. Included in the report are data that can be used to estimate the dose to the fetus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the accuracy of these fetal dose estimates as compared to clinically measured values. TG-36 calculations were performed and compared with measurements of the fetal dose made in vivo or in appropriately-designed phantoms. Calculation and measurement data was collected for eight pregnant patients who underwent radiation therapy at the MD Anderson Cancer Center as well as for several fetal dose studies in the literature. The maximum measured unshielded fetal dose was 47 cGy, which was 1.5% of the prescription dose. For all cases, TG-36 calculations and measured fetal doses differed by up to a factor of 3--the ratio of the calculated to measured dose ranged from 0.34 to 2.93. On average, TG-36 calculations underestimated the measured dose by 31%. No significant trends in the relationship between the calculated and measured fetal doses were found based on the distance from, or the size of, the treatment field.

  13. Estimation Accuracy on Execution Time of Run-Time Tasks in a Heterogeneous Distributed Environment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qi; Cai, Weidong; Jin, Dandan; Shen, Jian; Fu, Zhangjie; Liu, Xiaodong; Linge, Nigel

    2016-01-01

    Distributed Computing has achieved tremendous development since cloud computing was proposed in 2006, and played a vital role promoting rapid growth of data collecting and analysis models, e.g., Internet of things, Cyber-Physical Systems, Big Data Analytics, etc. Hadoop has become a data convergence platform for sensor networks. As one of the core components, MapReduce facilitates allocating, processing and mining of collected large-scale data, where speculative execution strategies help solve straggler problems. However, there is still no efficient solution for accurate estimation on execution time of run-time tasks, which can affect task allocation and distribution in MapReduce. In this paper, task execution data have been collected and employed for the estimation. A two-phase regression (TPR) method is proposed to predict the finishing time of each task accurately. Detailed data of each task have drawn interests with detailed analysis report being made. According to the results, the prediction accuracy of concurrent tasks’ execution time can be improved, in particular for some regular jobs. PMID:27589753

  14. Accuracy of a digital skinfold system for measuring skinfold thickness and estimating body fat.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Teresa F; Restivo, Maria Teresa; Guerra, Rita S; Marques, Elisa; Chousal, Maria F; Mota, Jorge

    2011-02-01

    The use of skinfold thickness measurements to evaluate the distribution of subcutaneous adipose tissue and to predict body fat has recognised advantages. However, the different types of skinfold calliper available present limitations that make them unattractive and perhaps less used in daily practice. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the accuracy and functionality of a new digital skinfold system, the Liposoft 2008+Adipsmeter V0 (LA), for measuring skinfold thickness and determining body fat proportion (%BF). Skinfold thickness measurements made by the LA were compared with those obtained with a Harpenden (H) calliper from two samples of adults (n 45) and older adults (n 56) in a university-based cross-sectional study. A comparison was also conducted between estimated %BF from skinfolds and dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Bland and Altman plots show that skinfolds measured by the LA and H calliper are in high agreement, with a mean difference of 0·3 (95% CI -3·1, 3·4) mm. In regard to the %BF estimated from LA and H skinfolds measurement, the LA produced a similar approximation to dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry %BF, with a mean difference of 0·2 (95% CI -0·8, 1·2) %, compared with %BF obtained with the H calliper. The LA system is an accurate instrumentation and represents an innovation in the evaluation of skinfold thickness and body composition based on anthropometric measurement.

  15. Motion estimation for H.264/AVC on multiple GPUs using NVIDIA CUDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pieters, Bart; Hollemeersch, Charles F.; Lambert, Peter; Van de Walle, Rik

    2009-08-01

    To achieve the high coding efficiency the H.264/AVC standard offers, the encoding process quickly becomes computationally demanding. One of the most intensive encoding phases is motion estimation. Even modern CPUs struggle to process high-definition video sequences in real-time. While personal computers are typically equipped with powerful Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) to accelerate graphics operations, these GPUs lie dormant when encoding a video sequence. Furthermore, recent developments show more and more computer configurations come with multiple GPUs. However, no existing GPU-enabled motion estimation architectures target multiple GPUs. In addition, these architectures provide no early-out behavior nor can they enforce a specific processing order. We developed a motion search architecture, capable of executing motion estimation and partitioning for an H.264/AVC sequence entirely on the GPU using the NVIDIA CUDA (Compute Unified Device Architecture) platform. This paper describes our architecture and presents a novel job scheduling system we designed, making it possible to control the GPU in a flexible way. This job scheduling system can enforce real-time demands of the video encoder by prioritizing calculations and providing an early-out mode. Furthermore, the job scheduling system allows the use of multiple GPUs in one computer system and efficient load balancing of the motion search over these GPUs. This paper focuses on the execution speed of the novel job scheduling system on both single and multi-GPU systems. Initial results show that real-time full motion search of 720p high-definition content is possible with a 32 by 32 search window running on a system with four GPUs.

  16. Self-motion magnitude estimation during linear oscillation - Changes with head orientation and following fatigue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, D. E.; Wood, D. L.; Gulledge, W. L.; Goodrich, R. L.

    1979-01-01

    Two types of experiments concerning the estimated magnitude of self-motion during exposure to linear oscillation on a parallel swing are described in this paper. Experiment I examined changes in magnitude estimation as a function of variation of the subject's head orientation, and Experiments II a, II b, and II c assessed changes in magnitude estimation performance following exposure to sustained, 'intense' linear oscillation (fatigue-inducting stimulation). The subjects' performance was summarized employing Stevens' power law R = k x S to the nth, where R is perceived self-motion magnitude, k is a constant, S is amplitude of linear oscillation, and n is an exponent). The results of Experiment I indicated that the exponents, n, for the magnitude estimation functions varied with head orientation and were greatest when the head was oriented 135 deg off the vertical. In Experiments II a-c, the magnitude estimation function exponents were increased following fatigue. Both types of experiments suggest ways in which the vestibular system's contribution to a spatial orientation perceptual system may vary. This variability may be a contributing factor to the development of pilot/astronaut disorientation and may also be implicated in the occurrence of motion sickness.

  17. Quaternionic Spatiotemporal Filtering for Dense Motion Field Estimation in Ultrasound Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, Adrien; Girard, Patrick; Vray, Didier

    2010-12-01

    Blood motion estimation provides fundamental clinical information to prevent and detect pathologies such as cancer. Ultrasound imaging associated with Doppler methods is often used for blood flow evaluation. However, Doppler methods suffer from shortcomings such as limited spatial resolution and the inability to estimate lateral motion. Numerous methods such as block matching and decorrelation-based techniques have been proposed to overcome these limitations. In this paper, we propose an original method to estimate dense fields of vector velocity from ultrasound image sequences. Our proposal is based on a spatiotemporal approach and considers 2D+t data as a 3D volume. Orientation of the texture within this volume is related to velocity. Thus, we designed a bank of 3D quaternionic filters to estimate local orientation and then calculate local velocities. The method was applied to a large set of experimental and simulated flow sequences with low motion ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]1 mm/s) within small vessels ([InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.]1 mm). Evaluation was conducted with several quantitative criteria such as the normalized mean error or the estimated mean velocity. The results obtained show the good behaviour of our method, characterizing the flows studied.

  18. Accurate estimation of motion blur parameters in noisy remote sensing image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xueyan; Wang, Lin; Shao, Xiaopeng; Wang, Huilin; Tao, Zhong

    2015-05-01

    The relative motion between remote sensing satellite sensor and objects is one of the most common reasons for remote sensing image degradation. It seriously weakens image data interpretation and information extraction. In practice, point spread function (PSF) should be estimated firstly for image restoration. Identifying motion blur direction and length accurately is very crucial for PSF and restoring image with precision. In general, the regular light-and-dark stripes in the spectrum can be employed to obtain the parameters by using Radon transform. However, serious noise existing in actual remote sensing images often causes the stripes unobvious. The parameters would be difficult to calculate and the error of the result relatively big. In this paper, an improved motion blur parameter identification method to noisy remote sensing image is proposed to solve this problem. The spectrum characteristic of noisy remote sensing image is analyzed firstly. An interactive image segmentation method based on graph theory called GrabCut is adopted to effectively extract the edge of the light center in the spectrum. Motion blur direction is estimated by applying Radon transform on the segmentation result. In order to reduce random error, a method based on whole column statistics is used during calculating blur length. Finally, Lucy-Richardson algorithm is applied to restore the remote sensing images of the moon after estimating blur parameters. The experimental results verify the effectiveness and robustness of our algorithm.

  19. Cardiac motion estimation by using high-dimensional features and K-means clustering method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oubel, Estanislao; Hero, Alfred O.; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2006-03-01

    Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is currently the reference modality for myocardial motion and strain analysis. Mutual Information (MI) based non rigid registration has proven to be an accurate method to retrieve cardiac motion and overcome many drawbacks present on previous approaches. In a previous work1, we used Wavelet-based Attribute Vectors (WAVs) instead of pixel intensity to measure similarity between frames. Since the curse of dimensionality forbids the use of histograms to estimate MI of high dimensional features, k-Nearest Neighbors Graphs (kNNG) were applied to calculate α-MI. Results showed that cardiac motion estimation was feasible with that approach. In this paper, K-Means clustering method is applied to compute MI from the same set of WAVs. The proposed method was applied to four tagging MRI sequences, and the resulting displacements were compared with respect to manual measurements made by two observers. Results show that more accurate motion estimation is obtained with respect to the use of pixel intensity.

  20. Effectiveness of slow motion video compared to real time video in improving the accuracy and consistency of subjective gait analysis in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Lane, D.M.; Hill, S.A.; Huntingford, J.L.; Lafuente, P.; Wall, R.; Jones, K.A.

    2015-01-01

    Objective measures of canine gait quality via force plates, pressure mats or kinematic analysis are considered superior to subjective gait assessment (SGA). Despite research demonstrating that SGA does not accurately detect subtle lameness, it remains the most commonly performed diagnostic test for detecting lameness in dogs. This is largely because the financial, temporal and spatial requirements for existing objective gait analysis equipment makes this technology impractical for use in general practice. The utility of slow motion video as a potential tool to augment SGA is currently untested. To evaluate a more accessible way to overcome the limitations of SGA, a slow motion video study was undertaken. Three experienced veterinarians reviewed video footage of 30 dogs, 15 with a diagnosis of primary limb lameness based on history and physical examination, and 15 with no indication of limb lameness based on history and physical examination. Four different videos were made for each dog, demonstrating each dog walking and trotting in real time, and then again walking and trotting in 50% slow motion. For each video, the veterinary raters assessed both the degree of lameness, and which limb(s) they felt represented the source of the lameness. Spearman’s rho, Cramer’s V, and t-tests were performed to determine if slow motion video increased either the accuracy or consistency of raters’ SGA relative to real time video. Raters demonstrated no significant increase in consistency or accuracy in their SGA of slow motion video relative to real time video. Based on these findings, slow motion video does not increase the consistency or accuracy of SGA values. Further research is required to determine if slow motion video will benefit SGA in other ways. PMID:26623383

  1. A TECHNIQUE FOR ASSESSING THE ACCURACY OF SUB-PIXEL IMPERVIOUS SURFACE ESTIMATES DERIVED FROM LANDSAT TM IMAGERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We developed a technique for assessing the accuracy of sub-pixel derived estimates of impervious surface extracted from LANDSAT TM imagery. We utilized spatially coincident
    sub-pixel derived impervious surface estimates, high-resolution planimetric GIS data, vector--to-
    r...

  2. MAPPING SPATIAL ACCURACY AND ESTIMATING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FROM THEMATIC LAND COVER MAPS USING FUZZY SET THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The accuracy of thematic map products is not spatially homogenous, but instead variable across most landscapes. Properly analyzing and representing the spatial distribution (pattern) of thematic map accuracy would provide valuable user information for assessing appropriate applic...

  3. Long-period earthquake simulations in the Wasatch Front, UT: misfit characterization and ground motion estimates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Ramírez-Guzmán, Leonardo

    2011-01-01

    In this research we characterize the goodness-of-fit between observed and synthetic seismograms from three small magnitude (M3.6-4.5) earthquakes in the region using the Wasatch Front community velocity model (WCVM) in order to determine the ability of the WCVM to predict earthquake ground motions for scenario earthquake modeling efforts. We employ the goodness-of-fit algorithms and criteria of Olsen and Mayhew (2010). In focusing comparisons on the ground motion parameters that are of greatest importance in engineering seismology, we find that the synthetic seismograms calculated using the WCVM produce a fair fit to the observed ground motion records up to a frequency of 0.5 Hz for two of the modeled earthquakes and up to 0.1 Hz for one of the earthquakes. In addition to the reference seismic material model (WCVM), we carry out earthquake simulations using material models with perturbations to the regional seismic model and with perturbations to the deep sedimentary basins. Simple perturbations to the regional seismic velocity model and to the seismic velocities of the sedimentary basin result in small improvements in the observed misfit but do not indicate a significantly improved material model. Unresolved differences between the observed and synthetic seismograms are likely due to un-modeled heterogeneities and incorrect basin geometries in the WCVM. These differences suggest that ground motion prediction accuracy from deterministic modeling varies across the region and further efforts to improve the WCVM are needed.

  4. Pathological tremor and voluntary motion modeling and online estimation for active compensation.

    PubMed

    Bo, Antônio Padilha Lanari; Poignet, Philippe; Geny, Christian

    2011-04-01

    This paper presents an algorithm to perform online tremor characterization from motion sensors measurements, while filtering the voluntary motion performed by the patient. In order to estimate simultaneously both nonstationary signals in a stochastic filtering framework, pathological tremor was represented by a time-varying harmonic model and voluntary motion was modeled as an auto-regressive moving-average (ARMA) model. Since it is a nonlinear problem, an extended Kalman filter (EKF) was used. The developed solution was evaluated with simulated signals and experimental data from patients with different pathologies. Also, the results were comprehensively compared with alternative techniques proposed in the literature, evidencing the better performance of the proposed method. The algorithm presented in this paper may be an important tool in the design of active tremor compensation systems.

  5. ASSESSING THE ACCURACY OF NATIONAL LAND COVER DATASET AREA ESTIMATES AT MULTIPLE SPATIAL EXTENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Site specific accuracy assessments provide fine-scale evaluation of the thematic accuracy of land use/land cover (LULC) datasets; however, they provide little insight into LULC accuracy across varying spatial extents. Additionally, LULC data are typically used to describe lands...

  6. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  7. MO-G-18C-03: Evaluation of Deformable Image Registration for Lung Motion Estimation Using Hyperpolarized Gas Tagging MRI

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Q; Zhang, Y; Liu, Y; Hu, L; Yin, F; Cai, J; Miller, W

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Hyperpolarized gas (HP) tagging MRI is a novel imaging technique for direct measurement of lung motion during breathing. This study aims to quantitatively evaluate the accuracy of deformable image registration (DIR) in lung motion estimation using HP tagging MRI as references. Methods: Three healthy subjects were imaged using the HP MR tagging, as well as a high-resolution 3D proton MR sequence (TrueFISP) at the end-of-inhalation (EOI) and the end-of-exhalation (EOE). Ground truth of lung motion and corresponding displacement vector field (tDVF) was derived from HP tagging MRI by manually tracking the displacement of tagging grids between EOI and EOE. Seven different DIR methods were applied to the high-resolution TrueFISP MR images (EOI and EOE) to generate the DIR-based DVFs (dDVF). The DIR methods include Velocity (VEL), MIM, Mirada, multi-grid B-spline from Elastix (MGB) and 3 other algorithms from DIRART toolbox (Double Force Demons (DFD), Improved Lucas-Kanade (ILK), and Iterative Optical Flow (IOF)). All registrations were performed by independent experts. Target registration error (TRE) was calculated as tDVF – dDVF. Analysis was performed for the entire lungs, and separately for the upper and lower lungs. Results: Significant differences between tDVF and dDVF were observed. Besides the DFD and IOF algorithms, all other dDVFs showed similarity in deformation magnitude distribution but away from the ground truth. The average TRE for entire lung ranged 2.5−23.7mm (mean=8.8mm), depending on the DIR method and subject's breathing amplitude. Larger TRE (13.3–23.7mm) was found in subject with larger breathing amplitude of 45.6mm. TRE was greater in lower lung (2.5−33.9 mm, mean=12.4mm) than that in upper lung (2.5−11.9 mm, mean=5.8mm). Conclusion: Significant differences were observed in lung motion estimation between the HP gas tagging MRI method and the DIR methods, especially when lung motion is large. Large variation among different DIR

  8. SU-E-J-219: Quantitative Evaluation of Motion Effects On Accuracy of Image-Guided Radiotherapy with Fiducial Markers Using CT Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, I; Oyewale, S; Ahmad, S; Algan, O; Alsbou, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate quantitatively patient motion effects on the localization accuracy of image-guided radiation with fiducial markers using axial CT (ACT), helical CT (HCT) and cone-beam CT (CBCT) using modeling and experimental phantom studies. Methods: Markers with different lengths (2.5 mm, 5 mm, 10 mm, and 20 mm) were inserted in a mobile thorax phantom which was imaged using ACT, HCT and CBCT. The phantom moved with sinusoidal motion with amplitudes ranging 0–20 mm and a frequency of 15 cycles-per-minute. Three parameters that include: apparent marker lengths, center position and distance between the centers of the markers were measured in the different CT images of the mobile phantom. A motion mathematical model was derived to predict the variations in the previous three parameters and their dependence on the motion in the different imaging modalities. Results: In CBCT, the measured marker lengths increased linearly with increase in motion amplitude. For example, the apparent length of the 10 mm marker was about 20 mm when phantom moved with amplitude of 5 mm. Although the markers have elongated, the center position and the distance between markers remained at the same position for different motion amplitudes in CBCT. These parameters were not affected by motion frequency and phase in CBCT. In HCT and ACT, the measured marker length, center and distance between markers varied irregularly with motion parameters. The apparent lengths of the markers varied with inverse of the phantom velocity which depends on motion frequency and phase. Similarly the center position and distance between markers varied inversely with phantom speed. Conclusion: Motion may lead to variations in maker length, center position and distance between markers using CT imaging. These effects should be considered in patient setup using image-guided radiation therapy based on fiducial markers matching using 2D-radiographs or volumetric CT imaging.

  9. Angular Motion Estimation Using Dynamic Models in a Gyro-Free Inertial Measurement Unit

    PubMed Central

    Edwan, Ezzaldeen; Knedlik, Stefan; Loffeld, Otmar

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we summarize the results of using dynamic models borrowed from tracking theory in describing the time evolution of the state vector to have an estimate of the angular motion in a gyro-free inertial measurement unit (GF-IMU). The GF-IMU is a special type inertial measurement unit (IMU) that uses only a set of accelerometers in inferring the angular motion. Using distributed accelerometers, we get an angular information vector (AIV) composed of angular acceleration and quadratic angular velocity terms. We use a Kalman filter approach to estimate the angular velocity vector since it is not expressed explicitly within the AIV. The bias parameters inherent in the accelerometers measurements' produce a biased AIV and hence the AIV bias parameters are estimated within an augmented state vector. Using dynamic models, the appended bias parameters of the AIV become observable and hence we can have unbiased angular motion estimate. Moreover, a good model is required to extract the maximum amount of information from the observation. Observability analysis is done to determine the conditions for having an observable state space model. For higher grades of accelerometers and under relatively higher sampling frequency, the error of accelerometer measurements is dominated by the noise error. Consequently, simulations are conducted on two models, one has bias parameters appended in the state space model and the other is a reduced model without bias parameters. PMID:22778586

  10. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. PMID:26930684

  11. 3D Geometry and Motion Estimations of Maneuvering Targets for Interferometric ISAR With Sparse Aperture.

    PubMed

    Xu, Gang; Xing, Mengdao; Xia, Xiang-Gen; Zhang, Lei; Chen, Qianqian; Bao, Zheng

    2016-05-01

    In the current scenario of high-resolution inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) imaging, the non-cooperative targets may have strong maneuverability, which tends to cause time-variant Doppler modulation and imaging plane in the echoed data. Furthermore, it is still a challenge to realize ISAR imaging of maneuvering targets from sparse aperture (SA) data. In this paper, we focus on the problem of 3D geometry and motion estimations of maneuvering targets for interferometric ISAR (InISAR) with SA. For a target of uniformly accelerated rotation, the rotational modulation in echo is formulated as chirp sensing code under a chirp-Fourier dictionary to represent the maneuverability. In particular, a joint multi-channel imaging approach is developed to incorporate the multi-channel data and treat the multi-channel ISAR image formation as a joint-sparsity constraint optimization. Then, a modified orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP) algorithm is employed to solve the optimization problem to produce high-resolution range-Doppler (RD) images and chirp parameter estimation. The 3D target geometry and the motion estimations are followed by using the acquired RD images and chirp parameters. Herein, a joint estimation approach of 3D geometry and rotation motion is presented to realize outlier removing and error reduction. In comparison with independent single-channel processing, the proposed joint multi-channel imaging approach performs better in 2D imaging, 3D imaging, and motion estimation. Finally, experiments using both simulated and measured data are performed to confirm the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  12. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock.

  13. Complementary limb motion estimation for the control of active knee prostheses.

    PubMed

    Vallery, Heike; Burgkart, Rainer; Hartmann, Cornelia; Mitternacht, Jürgen; Riener, Robert; Buss, Martin

    2011-02-01

    To restore walking after transfemoral amputation, various actuated exoprostheses have been developed, which control the knee torque actively or via variable damping. In both cases, an important issue is to find the appropriate control that enables user-dominated gait. Recently, we suggested a generic method to deduce intended motion of impaired or amputated limbs from residual human body motion. Based on interjoint coordination in physiological gait, statistical regression is used to estimate missing motion. In a pilot study, this complementary limb motion estimation (CLME) strategy is applied to control an active knee exoprosthesis. A motor-driven prosthetic knee with one degree of freedom has been realized, and one above-knee amputee has used it with CLME. Performed tasks are walking on a treadmill and alternating stair ascent and descent. The subject was able to walk on the treadmill at varying speeds, but needed assistance with the stairs, especially to descend. The promising results with CLME are compared with the subject's performance with her own prosthesis, the C-Leg from Otto Bock. PMID:21303189

  14. Left ventricle motion estimation based on signal-dependent time-frequency representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez, Marco A.; Weiderpass, Heinar A.; Furuie, Sergio S.

    2003-05-01

    In current clinical practice, the noninvasive assessment of left ventricular deformation can be determined using all the principal imaging modalities, including contrast angiography, echocardiography, cine computed tomography, single photon emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. However, since the heart undergoes complex motion, proper characterization of its motion still remains an open and challenging research problem. A number of approaches for nonrigid motion analysis have been studied in the literature. Much of the effort has confined to estimate the displacement vector for each image point or optical flow. This is a challenging problem in image analysis because of a wide range of possible motions and the presence of noise in the image sets. In this work, we present an algorithm for computation of optical flow based on a signal-dependent radially Gaussian kernel that adapts over time. The adaptive kernel obtained from the proposed algorithm is used to estimate a 3D-frequency spectrum for a given pixel in a series of images. The orientation of the spectrum in the frequency domain is totally governed by the pixel velocity. In a recent contribution, a linear regression model is used over the spectrum to obtain the velocity components that are proportional to the pixel movement.

  15. Estimation of heart rate variability using a compact radiofrequency motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Matsuoka, Narumi; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Abe, Makoto; Homma, Noriyasu; Otake, Hideharu; Kim, Junghyun; Ohtaki, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    Physiological indices that reflect autonomic nervous activity are considered useful for monitoring peoples' health on a daily basis. A number of such indices are derived from heart rate variability, which is obtained by a radiofrequency (RF) motion sensor without making physical contact with the user's body. However, the bulkiness of RF motion sensors used in previous studies makes them unsuitable for home use. In this study, a new method to measure heart rate variability using a compact RF motion sensor that is sufficiently small to fit in a user's shirt pocket is proposed. To extract a heart rate related component from the sensor signal, an algorithm that optimizes a digital filter based on the power spectral density of the signal is proposed. The signals of the RF motion sensor were measured for 29 subjects during the resting state and their heart rate variability was estimated from the measured signals using the proposed method and a conventional method. A correlation coefficient between true heart rate and heart rate estimated from the proposed method was 0.69. Further, the experimental results showed the viability of the RF sensor for monitoring autonomic nervous activity. However, some improvements such as controlling the direction of sensing were necessary for stable measurement.

  16. Estimation of heart rate variability using a compact radiofrequency motion sensor.

    PubMed

    Sugita, Norihiro; Matsuoka, Narumi; Yoshizawa, Makoto; Abe, Makoto; Homma, Noriyasu; Otake, Hideharu; Kim, Junghyun; Ohtaki, Yukio

    2015-12-01

    Physiological indices that reflect autonomic nervous activity are considered useful for monitoring peoples' health on a daily basis. A number of such indices are derived from heart rate variability, which is obtained by a radiofrequency (RF) motion sensor without making physical contact with the user's body. However, the bulkiness of RF motion sensors used in previous studies makes them unsuitable for home use. In this study, a new method to measure heart rate variability using a compact RF motion sensor that is sufficiently small to fit in a user's shirt pocket is proposed. To extract a heart rate related component from the sensor signal, an algorithm that optimizes a digital filter based on the power spectral density of the signal is proposed. The signals of the RF motion sensor were measured for 29 subjects during the resting state and their heart rate variability was estimated from the measured signals using the proposed method and a conventional method. A correlation coefficient between true heart rate and heart rate estimated from the proposed method was 0.69. Further, the experimental results showed the viability of the RF sensor for monitoring autonomic nervous activity. However, some improvements such as controlling the direction of sensing were necessary for stable measurement. PMID:26603507

  17. Predictive accuracy of bioelectrical impedance in estimating body composition of Native American women.

    PubMed

    Stolarczyk, L M; Heyward, V H; Hicks, V L; Baumgartner, R N

    1994-05-01

    The predictive accuracy of race-specific and fatness-specific bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) equations for estimating criterion fat-free mass (FFM) derived from two-component (2C) and multicomponent (MC) models was examined. Body density (Db) of Native American women (n = 151) aged 18-60 y was measured by hydrostatic weighing at residual volume. Total body bone ash was obtained by dual-energy, x-ray absorptiometry. Cross-validation of the Rising (5), Segal (3), and Gray (4) equations against FFM2C yielded high correlation coefficients (0.86-0.95) and acceptable SEEs (1.47-2.72 kg). Cross-validation of these equations against criterion FFMMC, with Db adjusted for total body mineral, yielded similar correlation coefficients (0.82-0.94) and SEEs (1.69-2.80 kg). However, each BIA equation significantly overestimated FFMMC. A new race-specific BIA equation based on an MC model was developed: FFMMC = 0.001254(HT2)-0.04904(R) + 0.1555(WT) + 0.1417(Xc) - 0.0833(AGE) + 20.05 (R = 0.864, and SEE = 2.63 kg). PMID:8172101

  18. ABodyBuilder: Automated antibody structure prediction with data–driven accuracy estimation

    PubMed Central

    Leem, Jinwoo; Dunbar, James; Georges, Guy; Shi, Jiye; Deane, Charlotte M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Computational modeling of antibody structures plays a critical role in therapeutic antibody design. Several antibody modeling pipelines exist, but no freely available methods currently model nanobodies, provide estimates of expected model accuracy, or highlight potential issues with the antibody's experimental development. Here, we describe our automated antibody modeling pipeline, ABodyBuilder, designed to overcome these issues. The algorithm itself follows the standard 4 steps of template selection, orientation prediction, complementarity-determining region (CDR) loop modeling, and side chain prediction. ABodyBuilder then annotates the ‘confidence’ of the model as a probability that a component of the antibody (e.g., CDRL3 loop) will be modeled within a root–mean square deviation threshold. It also flags structural motifs on the model that are known to cause issues during in vitro development. ABodyBuilder was tested on 4 separate datasets, including the 11 antibodies from the Antibody Modeling Assessment–II competition. ABodyBuilder builds models that are of similar quality to other methodologies, with sub–Angstrom predictions for the ‘canonical’ CDR loops. Its ability to model nanobodies, and rapidly generate models (∼30 seconds per model) widens its potential usage. ABodyBuilder can also help users in decision–making for the development of novel antibodies because it provides model confidence and potential sequence liabilities. ABodyBuilder is freely available at http://opig.stats.ox.ac.uk/webapps/abodybuilder. PMID:27392298

  19. Star Tracker Based ATP System Conceptual Design and Pointing Accuracy Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orfiz, Gerardo G.; Lee, Shinhak

    2006-01-01

    A star tracker based beaconless (a.k.a. non-cooperative beacon) acquisition, tracking and pointing concept for precisely pointing an optical communication beam is presented as an innovative approach to extend the range of high bandwidth (> 100 Mbps) deep space optical communication links throughout the solar system and to remove the need for a ground based high power laser as a beacon source. The basic approach for executing the ATP functions involves the use of stars as the reference sources from which the attitude knowledge is obtained and combined with high bandwidth gyroscopes for propagating the pointing knowledge to the beam pointing mechanism. Details of the conceptual design are presented including selection of an orthogonal telescope configuration and the introduction of an optical metering scheme to reduce misalignment error. Also, estimates are presented that demonstrate that aiming of the communications beam to the Earth based receive terminal can be achieved with a total system pointing accuracy of better than 850 nanoradians (3 sigma) from anywhere in the solar system.

  20. Detecting and estimating head motion in brain PET acquisitions using raw time-of-flight PET data.

    PubMed

    Schleyer, P J; Dunn, J T; Reeves, S; Brownings, S; Marsden, P K; Thielemans, K

    2015-08-21

    Head motion during brain PET imaging is not uncommon and can negatively affect image quality. Motion correction techniques typically either use hardware to prospectively measure head motion, or they divide the acquisition into short fixed-frames and then align and combine these to produce a motion free image. The aim of this work was to retrospectively detect when motion occurred in PET data without the use of motion detection hardware, and then align the frames defined by these motion occurrences. We describe two methods that use either principal component analysis or the motion induced spatial displacements over time to detect motion in raw time-of-flight PET data. The points in time of motion then define the temporal boundaries of frames which are reconstructed without attenuation correction, aligned and combined. Phantom and [18F]-Fallypride patient acquisitions were used to validate and evaluate these approaches, which were compared with motion estimation using 60 s fixed-frames. Both methods identified all motion occurrences in phantom data, and unlike the fixed-frame approach did not exhibit intra-frame motion. With patient acquisitions, images corrected with the motion detection methods increased the average image sharpness by the same amount as the fixed-frame approach, but reduced the number of reconstructions and registrations by a factor of 3.4 on average. Detecting head motion in raw PET data alone is possible, allowing retrospective motion estimation of any listmode brain PET acquisition without additional hardware, subsequently decreasing data processing and potentially reducing intra-frame motion.

  1. Detecting and estimating head motion in brain PET acquisitions using raw time-of-flight PET data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schleyer, P. J.; Dunn, J. T.; Reeves, S.; Brownings, S.; Marsden, P. K.; Thielemans, K.

    2015-08-01

    Head motion during brain PET imaging is not uncommon and can negatively affect image quality. Motion correction techniques typically either use hardware to prospectively measure head motion, or they divide the acquisition into short fixed-frames and then align and combine these to produce a motion free image. The aim of this work was to retrospectively detect when motion occurred in PET data without the use of motion detection hardware, and then align the frames defined by these motion occurrences. We describe two methods that use either principal component analysis or the motion induced spatial displacements over time to detect motion in raw time-of-flight PET data. The points in time of motion then define the temporal boundaries of frames which are reconstructed without attenuation correction, aligned and combined. Phantom and [18F]-Fallypride patient acquisitions were used to validate and evaluate these approaches, which were compared with motion estimation using 60 s fixed-frames. Both methods identified all motion occurrences in phantom data, and unlike the fixed-frame approach did not exhibit intra-frame motion. With patient acquisitions, images corrected with the motion detection methods increased the average image sharpness by the same amount as the fixed-frame approach, but reduced the number of reconstructions and registrations by a factor of 3.4 on average. Detecting head motion in raw PET data alone is possible, allowing retrospective motion estimation of any listmode brain PET acquisition without additional hardware, subsequently decreasing data processing and potentially reducing intra-frame motion.

  2. [Super-resolution reconstruction of lung 4D-CT images based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Shan; Wang, Tingting; Lü, Qingwen; Zhang, Yu

    2015-07-01

    Super-resolution image reconstruction techniques play an important role for improving image resolution of lung 4D-CT. We presents a super-resolution approach based on fast sub-pixel motion estimation to reconstruct lung 4D-CT images. A fast sub-pixel motion estimation method was used to estimate the deformation fields between "frames", and then iterative back projection (IBP) algorithm was employed to reconstruct high-resolution images. Experimental results showed that compared with traditional interpolation method and super-resolution reconstruction algorithm based on full search motion estimation, the proposed method produced clearer images with significantly enhanced image structure details and reduced time for computation.

  3. Accuracy of ARGOS Locations of Pinnipeds at-Sea Estimated Using Fastloc GPS

    PubMed Central

    Costa, Daniel P.; Robinson, Patrick W.; Arnould, John P. Y.; Harrison, Autumn-Lynn; Simmons, Samantha E.; Hassrick, Jason L.; Hoskins, Andrew J.; Kirkman, Stephen P.; Oosthuizen, Herman; Villegas-Amtmann, Stella; Crocker, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Background ARGOS satellite telemetry is one of the most widely used methods to track the movements of free-ranging marine and terrestrial animals and is fundamental to studies of foraging ecology, migratory behavior and habitat-use. ARGOS location estimates do not include complete error estimations, and for many marine organisms, the most commonly acquired locations (Location Class 0, A, B, or Z) are provided with no declared error estimate. Methodology/Principal Findings We compared the accuracy of ARGOS locations to those obtained using Fastloc GPS from the same electronic tags on five species of pinnipeds: 9 California sea lions (Zalophus californianus), 4 Galapagos sea lions (Zalophus wollebaeki), 6 Cape fur seals (Arctocephalus pusillus pusillus), 3 Australian fur seals (A. p. doriferus) and 5 northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris). These species encompass a range of marine habitats (highly pelagic vs coastal), diving behaviors (mean dive durations 2–21 min) and range of latitudes (equator to temperate). A total of 7,318 ARGOS positions and 27,046 GPS positions were collected. Of these, 1,105 ARGOS positions were obtained within five minutes of a GPS position and were used for comparison. The 68th percentile ARGOS location errors as measured in this study were LC-3 0.49 km, LC-2 1.01 km, LC-1 1.20 km, LC-0 4.18 km, LC-A 6.19 km, LC-B 10.28 km. Conclusions/Significance The ARGOS errors measured here are greater than those provided by ARGOS, but within the range of other studies. The error was non-normally distributed with each LC highly right-skewed. Locations of species that make short duration dives and spend extended periods on the surface (sea lions and fur seals) had less error than species like elephant seals that spend more time underwater and have shorter surface intervals. Supplemental data (S1) are provided allowing the creation of density distributions that can be used in a variety of filtering algorithms to improve the quality of ARGOS

  4. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT.

    PubMed

    Müller, K; Maier, A K; Schwemmer, C; Lauritsch, G; De Buck, S; Wielandts, J-Y; Hornegger, J; Fahrig, R

    2014-06-21

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  5. Image artefact propagation in motion estimation and reconstruction in interventional cardiac C-arm CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, K.; Maier, A. K.; Schwemmer, C.; Lauritsch, G.; De Buck, S.; Wielandts, J.-Y.; Hornegger, J.; Fahrig, R.

    2014-06-01

    The acquisition of data for cardiac imaging using a C-arm computed tomography system requires several seconds and multiple heartbeats. Hence, incorporation of motion correction in the reconstruction step may improve the resulting image quality. Cardiac motion can be estimated by deformable three-dimensional (3D)/3D registration performed on initial 3D images of different heart phases. This motion information can be used for a motion-compensated reconstruction allowing the use of all acquired data for image reconstruction. However, the result of the registration procedure and hence the estimated deformations are influenced by the quality of the initial 3D images. In this paper, the sensitivity of the 3D/3D registration step to the image quality of the initial images is studied. Different reconstruction algorithms are evaluated for a recently proposed cardiac C-arm CT acquisition protocol. The initial 3D images are all based on retrospective electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated data. ECG-gating of data from a single C-arm rotation provides only a few projections per heart phase for image reconstruction. This view sparsity leads to prominent streak artefacts and a poor signal to noise ratio. Five different initial image reconstructions are evaluated: (1) cone beam filtered-backprojection (FDK), (2) cone beam filtered-backprojection and an additional bilateral filter (FFDK), (3) removal of the shadow of dense objects (catheter, pacing electrode, etc) before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection (cathFDK), (4) removal of the shadow of dense objects before reconstruction with a cone beam filtered-backprojection and a bilateral filter (cathFFDK). The last method (5) is an iterative few-view reconstruction (FV), the prior image constrained compressed sensing combined with the improved total variation algorithm. All reconstructions are investigated with respect to the final motion-compensated reconstruction quality. The algorithms were tested on a mathematical

  6. Long Bone X-ray Image Stitching Using C-arm Motion Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lejing; Traub, Joerg; Heining, Sandro Michael; Benhimane, Selim; Euler, Ekkehard; Graumann, Rainer; Navab, Nassir

    In this paper, we propose a novel method to generate panoramic X-ray images intra-operatively by using the previously introduced camera augmented mobile C-arm by Navab et al. [1]. This advanced mobile C-arm system acquires registered X-ray and optical images by construction, which facilitates the generation of panoramic X-ray images based on the motion estimation of the X-ray source. Visual marker tracking is employed to estimate the camera motion and this estimated motion is also applied to the X-ray source. Our proposed method is suitable and practical for intra-operative usage generating panoramic X-ray images without the requirement of a fronto-parallel setup and overlapping X-ray images. The results show that the panoramic X-ray images generated by our method are accurate enough (errors less than 1%) for metric measurements and promise suitability for intra-operative clinical applications in trauma surgery.

  7. Estimate of procession and polar motion errors from planetary encounter station location solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pease, G. E.

    1978-01-01

    Jet Propulsion Laboratory Deep Space Station (DSS) location solutions based on two JPL planetary ephemerides, DE 84 and DE 96, at eight planetary encounters were used to obtain weighted least squares estimates of precession and polar motion errors. The solution for precession error in right ascension yields a value of 0.3 X 10 to the minus 5 power plus or minus 0.8 X 10 to the minus 6 power deg/year. This maps to a right ascension error of 1.3 X 10 to the minus 5 power plus or minus 0.4 X 10 to the minus 5 power deg at the first Voyager 1979 Jupiter encounter if the current JPL DSS location set is used. Solutions for precession and polar motion using station locations based on DE 84 agree well with the solution using station locations referenced to DE 96. The precession solution removes the apparent drift in station longitude and spin axis distance estimates, while the encounter polar motion solutions consistently decrease the scatter in station spin axis distance estimates.

  8. A method for shoulder range-of-motion estimation using a single wireless sensor node.

    PubMed

    Thiemjarus, Surapa; Marukatat, Sanparith; Poomchoompol, Pongwat

    2013-01-01

    This study proposes a method for range-of-motion (ROM) estimation based on the acceleration and geomagnetic data acquired using a single miniaturized wireless sensor node. An experiment on eight shoulder rehabilitation protocols in real human subjects has been conducted, with a sensor placed on user's left and right upper arms and wrists. The experimental results demonstrate the limitations of estimation methods that use sensors placed on skin surface and that, despite being a different body segment, the wrist is a better placement position for sensor-based shoulder joint ROM measurement than the shoulder itself. PMID:24111083

  9. Provision of Controlled Motion Accuracy of Industrial Robots and Multiaxis Machines by the Method of Integrated Deviations Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krakhmalev, O. N.; Petreshin, D. I.; Fedonin, O. N.

    2016-04-01

    There is a developed method of correction of the integrated motion deviations of industrial robots and multiaxis machines, which are caused by the primary geometrical deviations of their segments. This method can be used to develop a control system providing the motion correction for industrial robots and multiaxis machines.

  10. Orbital Roulette: A New Method of Gravity Estimation from Observed Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beloborodov, Andrei M.; Levin, Yuri

    2004-09-01

    The traditional way of estimating the gravitational field from observed motions of test objects is based on the virial relation between their kinetic and potential energy. We find a more efficient method. It is based on the natural presumption that the objects are observed at a random moment of time and therefore have random orbital time phases. The proposed estimator, which we call ``orbital roulette,'' checks the randomness of the phases. The method has the following advantages: (1) It accurately estimates Keplerian (point-mass) potentials as well as non-Keplerian potentials, where the unknown gravitating mass is distributed in space. (2) It is a complete statistical estimator: it checks a trial potential and accepts it or rules it out with a certain significance level; the best-fit measurement is thus supplemented with error bars at any confidence level. (3) It needs no a priori assumptions about the distribution of orbital parameters of the test bodies. We test our estimator with Monte Carlo-generated motions and demonstrate its efficiency. Useful applications include the Galactic Center, dark-matter halo of the Galaxy, and clusters of stars or galaxies.

  11. In-room breathing motion estimation from limited projection views using a sliding deformation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delmon, V.; Vandemeulebroucke, J.; Pinho, R.; Vila Oliva, M.; Sarrut, D.; Rit, S.

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To estimate in-room breathing motion from a limited number of 2D cone-beam (CB) projection images by registering them to a phase of the 4D planning CT. Methods: Breathing motion was modelled using a piecewise continuous B-spline representation [1], allowing to preserve the sliding along the thoracic wall while limiting the degrees of freedom. The deformed target 3D image was subsequently used to generate Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (DRR). The Normalized Correlation Coefficient (NCC) between the measured projection images and the DRR was computed in the 2D projection space. However, the partial derivatives of the NCC relative to the transform parameters were backprojected into the 3D space, avoiding the projection of the transform Jacobian matrix which is computationally intractable [2]. Results: The method was quantitatively evaluated on 16 lung cancer patients. 40 CB projection images were simulated using the end-exhale phase of the 4D planning CT and the geometric parameters of a clinical CB protocol. The end-inhale phase was deformed to match these simulated projections. The Target Registration Error (TRE) decreased from 8.8 mm to 2.0 mm while the TRE obtained from the 3D/3D registration of the reconstructed CBCT was significantly worse (2.6 mm), due to view aliasing artefacts. We also provide the motion compensated image reconstructed from a real CB acquisition showing the quality improvement brought by the in-room deformation model compared to the planning motion model. Conclusions: We have developed a 2D/3D deformable registration algorithm that enables in-room breathing motion estimation from cone-beam projection images.

  12. Seismic Wave Amplification in Las Vegas: Site Response and Empirical Estimates of Ground Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodgers, A.; McCallen, D.; Tkalcic, H.; Wagoner, J.; Louie, J.; Anderson, J.; Luke, B.; Snelson, C.; Taylor, W.

    2004-12-01

    This presentation will summarize a multidisciplinary effort to understand seismic wave amplification in Las Vegas Valley. The project involves weak motion recording and analysis, geotechnical and seismic refraction field studies, geologic and lithologic interpretation and model building. We will provide a brief overview of the project, then focus on specifics of seismic wave amplification including observations and interpretations. We analyzed recordings of nuclear explosions from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and regional earthquakes to estimate site response in Las Vegas. An empirical transfer function method was used to transform ground motion time-series at one (reference) station to other stations, using frequency dependent site response curves in the band 0.2-5.0 Hz. The method transforms the time-series to the frequency domain by Fast Fourier transform, multiplies the amplitude spectrum by the site response curve and inverse FFT's back to the time domain. The approach is validated by the ability to predict horizontal component S-wave ground motion measures, such as peak and rms ground velocities and accelerations. We then can provide empirical estimates of ground motion for a wider distribution of sites in Las Vegas. Frequency dependent amplifications (site response) and peak ground motions are strongly correlated with measures of shallow shear-wave (geotechnical) velocities. Details of the geotechnical measurements and models will be presented in a companion presentation. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  13. Diagnostic accuracy of myocardial deformation indices for detecting high risk coronary artery disease in patients without regional wall motion abnormality

    PubMed Central

    Rostamzadeh, Alireza; Shojaeifard, Maryam; Rezaei, Yousef; Dehghan, Kasra

    2015-01-01

    Background: The prediction of coronary artery disease (CAD) by conventional echocardiographic measurements is principally based on the estimation of ejection fraction and regional wall motion abnormality (RWMA). This study aimed to determine whether strain echocardiography of left ventricle measured by velocity vector imaging (VVI) method could detect patients with a high-risk CAD. Methods: In a prospective study, a total of 119 consecutive patients who were assessed for eligibility were categorized into three groups: (1) without CAD as normal (n=59), (2) 1- or 2-vessel disease as low-risk (n=29), and (3) left main and/or 3-vessel disease as high-risk (n=31). The peaks of systolic strain and strain rate from 18 curves of apical views were averaged as global longitudinal strain and strain rate (GLS and GLSR), respectively; the 6 systolic peaks of strain and strain rate at base- and mid-ventricular of short axis views were averaged as mean radial strain rate (MRSR). Results: GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of left ventricle were significantly lower in the high-risk group (P=0.047, P=0.004 and P=0.030, respectively). Receiver operating characteristics curve showed that the optimal values of GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR for detecting the severe CAD were -17%, -1 s-1, and 1.45 s-1 with the sensitivities of 77%, 71%, and 71% and the specificities of 63%, 67%, and 62%, respectively. Conclusion: Decrements in the GLS, GLSR, and basal MRSR of the left ventricle can detect the high-risk CAD cases among patients without RWMA at rest. PMID:26309603

  14. MAPPING SPATIAL ACCURACY AND ESTIMATING LANDSCAPE INDICATORS FROM THEMATIC LAND COVER MAPS USING FUZZY SET THEORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a fuzzy set-based method of mapping spatial accuracy of thematic map and computing several ecological indicators while taking into account spatial variation of accuracy associated with different land cover types and other factors (e.g., slope, soil type, etc.)...

  15. Estimation of seismic ground motions using deterministic approach for major cities of Gujarat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukla, J.; Choudhury, D.

    2012-06-01

    A deterministic seismic hazard analysis has been carried out for various sites of the major cities (Ahmedabad, Surat, Bhuj, Jamnagar and Junagadh) of the Gujarat region in India to compute the seismic hazard exceeding a certain level in terms of peak ground acceleration (PGA) and to estimate maximum possible PGA at each site at bed rock level. The seismic sources in Gujarat are very uncertain and recurrence intervals of regional large earthquakes are not well defined. Because the instrumental records of India specifically in the Gujarat region are far from being satisfactory for modeling the seismic hazard using the probabilistic approach, an attempt has been made in this study to accomplish it through the deterministic approach. In this regard, all small and large faults of the Gujarat region were evaluated to obtain major fault systems. The empirical relations suggested by earlier researchers for the estimation of maximum magnitude of earthquake motion with various properties of faults like length, surface area, slip rate, etc. have been applied to those faults to obtain the maximum earthquake magnitude. For the analysis, seven different ground motion attenuation relations (GMARs) of strong ground motion have been utilized to calculate the maximum horizontal ground accelerations for each major city of Gujarat. Epistemic uncertainties in the hazard computations are accounted for within a logic-tree framework by considering the controlling parameters like b-value, maximum magnitude and ground motion attenuation relations (GMARs). The corresponding deterministic spectra have been prepared for each major city for the 50th and 84th percentiles of ground motion occurrence. These deterministic spectra are further compared with the specified spectra of Indian design code IS:1893-Part I (2002) to validate them for further practical use. Close examination of the developed spectra reveals that the expected ground motion values become high for the Kachchh region i.e. Bhuj

  16. Influence of Head Motion on the Accuracy of 3D Reconstruction with Cone-Beam CT: Landmark Identification Errors in Maxillofacial Surface Model

    PubMed Central

    Song, Jin-Myoung; Cho, Jin-Hyoung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of head motion on the accuracy of three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction with cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. Materials and Methods Fifteen dry skulls were incorporated into a motion controller which simulated four types of head motion during CBCT scan: 2 horizontal rotations (to the right/to the left) and 2 vertical rotations (upward/downward). Each movement was triggered to occur at the start of the scan for 1 second by remote control. Four maxillofacial surface models with head motion and one control surface model without motion were obtained for each skull. Nine landmarks were identified on the five maxillofacial surface models for each skull, and landmark identification errors were compared between the control model and each of the models with head motion. Results Rendered surface models with head motion were similar to the control model in appearance; however, the landmark identification errors showed larger values in models with head motion than in the control. In particular, the Porion in the horizontal rotation models presented statistically significant differences (P < .05). Statistically significant difference in the errors between the right and left side landmark was present in the left side rotation which was opposite direction to the scanner rotation (P < .05). Conclusions Patient movement during CBCT scan might cause landmark identification errors on the 3D surface model in relation to the direction of the scanner rotation. Clinicians should take this into consideration to prevent patient movement during CBCT scan, particularly horizontal movement. PMID:27065238

  17. 3D motion and strain estimation of the heart: initial clinical findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbosa, Daniel; Hristova, Krassimira; Loeckx, Dirk; Rademakers, Frank; Claus, Piet; D'hooge, Jan

    2010-03-01

    The quantitative assessment of regional myocardial function remains an important goal in clinical cardiology. As such, tissue Doppler imaging and speckle tracking based methods have been introduced to estimate local myocardial strain. Recently, volumetric ultrasound has become more readily available, allowing therefore the 3D estimation of motion and myocardial deformation. Our lab has previously presented a method based on spatio-temporal elastic registration of ultrasound volumes to estimate myocardial motion and deformation in 3D, overcoming the spatial limitations of the existing methods. This method was optimized on simulated data sets in previous work and is currently tested in a clinical setting. In this manuscript, 10 healthy volunteers, 10 patient with myocardial infarction and 10 patients with arterial hypertension were included. The cardiac strain values extracted with the proposed method were compared with the ones estimated with 1D tissue Doppler imaging and 2D speckle tracking in all patient groups. Although the absolute values of the 3D strain components assessed by this new methodology were not identical to the reference methods, the relationship between the different patient groups was similar.

  18. Reconciling geodetic and geologic estimates of recent plate motion across the Southwest Indian Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Calais, E.; Merkouriev, S.

    2016-10-01

    We use recently published, high-resolution reconstructions of the Southwest Indian Ridge to test whether a previously described systematic difference between Global Positioning System (GPS) and 3.16-Myr-average estimates of seafloor spreading rates between Antarctica and Africa is evidence for a recent slowdown in Southwest Indian Ridge seafloor spreading rates. Along the Nubia-Antarctic segment of the ridge, seafloor opening rates that are estimated with the new, high-resolution reconstructions and corrected for outward displacement agree well with geodetic rate estimates and reduce previously reported, highly significant non-closure of the Nubia-Antarctic-Sur plate circuit. The observations are inconsistent with a slowdown in spreading rates and instead indicate that Nubia-Antarctic plate motion has been steady since at least 5.2 Ma. Lwandle-Antarctic seafloor spreading rates that are estimated from the new high-resolution reconstructions differ insignificantly from a GPS estimate, thereby implying steady Lwandle-Antarctic plate motion since 5.2 Ma. Between the Somalia and Antarctic plates, the new Southwest Indian Ridge reconstructions eliminate roughly half of the systematic difference between the GPS and MORVEL spreading rate estimates. We interpret the available observations as evidence that Somalia-Antarctic spreading rates have been steady since at least 5.2 Ma and postulate that the remaining difference is attributable to random and/or systematic errors in the plate kinematic estimates and the combined effects of insufficient geodetic sampling of undeforming areas of the Somalia plate, glacial isostatic adjustment in Antarctica, and transient deformation triggered by the 1998 Mw=8.2 Antarctic earthquake, the 2004 Mw=9.3 Sumatra earthquake, or possibly other large historic earthquakes.

  19. Ground motion estimation in Delhi from postulated regional and local earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Himanshu; Kumar, Ashok; Kamal

    2013-04-01

    Ground motions are estimated at 55 sites in Delhi, the capital of India from four postulated earthquakes (three regional M w = 7.5, 8.0, and 8.5 and one local). The procedure consists of (1) synthesis of ground motion at a hard reference site (NDI) and (2) estimation of ground motion at other sites in the city via known transfer functions and application of the random vibration theory. This work provides a more extensive coverage than earlier studies (e.g., Singh et al., Bull Seism Soc Am 92:555-569, 2002; Bansal et al., J Seismol 13:89-105, 2009). The Indian code response spectra corresponding to Delhi (zone IV) are found to be conservative at hard soil sites for all postulated earthquakes but found to be deficient for M w = 8.0 and 8.5 earthquakes at soft soil sites. Spectral acceleration maps at four different natural periods are strongly influenced by the shallow geological and soil conditions. Three pockets of high acceleration values are seen. These pockets seem to coincide with the contacts of (a) Aravalli quartzite and recent Yamuna alluvium (towards the East), (b) Aravalli quartzite and older quaternary alluvium (towards the South), and (c) older quaternary alluvium and recent Yamuna alluvium (towards the North).

  20. A continuous-time, nonlinear observer for estimating structure from motion from omnidirectional optic flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conroy, Joseph K.

    Various insect species utilize certain types of self-motion to perceive structure in their local environment, a process known as active vision. This dissertation presents the development of a continuous-time formulated observer for estimating structure from motion that emulates the biological phenomenon of active vision. In an attempt to emulate the wide-field of view of compound eyes and neurophysiology of insects, the observer utilizes an omni-directional optic flow field. Exponential stability of the observer is assured provided the persistency of excitation condition is met. Persistency of excitation is assured by altering the direction of motion sufficiently quickly. An equal convergence rate on the entire viewable area can be achieved by executing certain prototypical maneuvers. Practical implementation of the observer is accomplished both in simulation and via an actual flying quadrotor testbed vehicle. Furthermore, this dissertation presents the vehicular implementation of a complimentary navigation methodology known as wide-field integration of the optic flow field. The implementation of the developed insect-inspired navigation methodologies on physical testbed vehicles utilized in this research required the development of many subsystems that comprise a control and navigation suite, including avionics development and state sensing, model development via system identification, feedback controller design, and state estimation strategies. These requisite subsystems and their development are discussed.

  1. Does motion affect liver stiffness estimates in shear wave elastography? Phantom and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Chami, Linda; Correas, Jean Michel; Lefort, Muriel; Lucidarme, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of free-breathing (FB) vs. Apnea on Shear-wave elastography (SWE) measurements. Quantitative liver-stiffness measurements were obtained during FB and Apnea for 97 patients with various body-morphologies and liver textures. Quality indexes of FB and Apnea elasticity maps (percentage of non-filling (PNF), temporal (TV) and spatial (SV) variabilities) were computed. SWE measurements were also obtained from an homogeneous phantom at rest and during a mechanically-induced motion. Liver-stiffness values estimated from FB and Apnea acquisitions were correlated, particularly for homogeneous livers (r=0.76, P<0.001) and favorable body-morphologies (r=0.68, P<0.001). However FB values were consistently 20-25% lower than Apnea ones (P<0.001). FB also systematically resulted in degradation of TV (P<0.005) and PNF (P<0.001) compared to Apnea but had no impact on SV. With the phantom, no differences between SWE measurements at rest and during motion were observed. Apnea and FB measurements are highly correlated, although FB data quality is degraded compared to Apnea and estimated stiffness in FB is systematically lower than in Apnea. These discrepancies between rest and motion states were observed for patients but not for phantom data, suggesting that patient breath-holding impacts liver stiffness. PMID:27501901

  2. Does motion affect liver stiffness estimates in shear wave elastography? Phantom and clinical study.

    PubMed

    Pellot-Barakat, Claire; Chami, Linda; Correas, Jean Michel; Lefort, Muriel; Lucidarme, Olivier

    2016-09-01

    This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of free-breathing (FB) vs. Apnea on Shear-wave elastography (SWE) measurements. Quantitative liver-stiffness measurements were obtained during FB and Apnea for 97 patients with various body-morphologies and liver textures. Quality indexes of FB and Apnea elasticity maps (percentage of non-filling (PNF), temporal (TV) and spatial (SV) variabilities) were computed. SWE measurements were also obtained from an homogeneous phantom at rest and during a mechanically-induced motion. Liver-stiffness values estimated from FB and Apnea acquisitions were correlated, particularly for homogeneous livers (r=0.76, P<0.001) and favorable body-morphologies (r=0.68, P<0.001). However FB values were consistently 20-25% lower than Apnea ones (P<0.001). FB also systematically resulted in degradation of TV (P<0.005) and PNF (P<0.001) compared to Apnea but had no impact on SV. With the phantom, no differences between SWE measurements at rest and during motion were observed. Apnea and FB measurements are highly correlated, although FB data quality is degraded compared to Apnea and estimated stiffness in FB is systematically lower than in Apnea. These discrepancies between rest and motion states were observed for patients but not for phantom data, suggesting that patient breath-holding impacts liver stiffness.

  3. Accuracy in estimation of timber assortments and stem distribution - A comparison of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kankare, Ville; Vauhkonen, Jari; Tanhuanpää, Topi; Holopainen, Markus; Vastaranta, Mikko; Joensuu, Marianna; Krooks, Anssi; Hyyppä, Juha; Hyyppä, Hannu; Alho, Petteri; Viitala, Risto

    2014-11-01

    Detailed information about timber assortments and diameter distributions is required in forest management. Forest owners can make better decisions concerning the timing of timber sales and forest companies can utilize more detailed information to optimize their wood supply chain from forest to factory. The objective here was to compare the accuracies of high-density laser scanning techniques for the estimation of tree-level diameter distribution and timber assortments. We also introduce a method that utilizes a combination of airborne and terrestrial laser scanning in timber assortment estimation. The study was conducted in Evo, Finland. Harvester measurements were used as a reference for 144 trees within a single clear-cut stand. The results showed that accurate tree-level timber assortments and diameter distributions can be obtained, using terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) or a combination of TLS and airborne laser scanning (ALS). Saw log volumes were estimated with higher accuracy than pulpwood volumes. The saw log volumes were estimated with relative root-mean-squared errors of 17.5% and 16.8% with TLS and a combination of TLS and ALS, respectively. The respective accuracies for pulpwood were 60.1% and 59.3%. The differences in the bucking method used also caused some large errors. In addition, tree quality factors highly affected the bucking accuracy, especially with pulpwood volume.

  4. Accuracy and precision of a custom camera-based system for 2D and 3D motion tracking during speech and nonspeech motor tasks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yongqiang; Max, Ludo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Studying normal or disordered motor control requires accurate motion tracking of the effectors (e.g., orofacial structures). The cost of electromagnetic, optoelectronic, and ultrasound systems is prohibitive for many laboratories, and limits clinical applications. For external movements (lips, jaw), video-based systems may be a viable alternative, provided that they offer high temporal resolution and sub-millimeter accuracy. Method We examined the accuracy and precision of 2D and 3D data recorded with a system that combines consumer-grade digital cameras capturing 60, 120, or 240 frames per second (fps), retro-reflective markers, commercially-available computer software (APAS, Ariel Dynamics), and a custom calibration device. Results Overall mean error (RMSE) across tests was 0.15 mm for static tracking and 0.26 mm for dynamic tracking, with corresponding precision (SD) values of 0.11 and 0.19 mm, respectively. The effect of frame rate varied across conditions, but, generally, accuracy was reduced at 240 fps. The effect of marker size (3 vs. 6 mm diameter) was negligible at all frame rates for both 2D and 3D data. Conclusion Motion tracking with consumer-grade digital cameras and the APAS software can achieve sub-millimeter accuracy at frame rates that are appropriate for kinematic analyses of lip/jaw movements for both research and clinical purposes. PMID:24686484

  5. A revised estimate of Pacific-North America motion and implications for Western North America plate boundary zone tectonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demets, Charles; Gordon, Richard G.; Stein, Seth; Argus, Donald F.

    1987-01-01

    Marine magnetic profiles from the Gulf of Californa are studied in order to revise the estimate of Pacific-North America motion. It is found that since 3 Ma spreading has averaged 48 mm/yr, consistent with a new global plate motion model derived without any data. The present data suggest that strike-slip motion on faults west of the San Andreas is less than previously thought, reducing the San Andreas discrepancy with geodetic, seismological, and other geologic observations.

  6. Estimation of hurdle clearance parameters using a monocular human motion tracking method.

    PubMed

    Krzeszowski, Tomasz; Przednowek, Krzysztof; Wiktorowicz, Krzysztof; Iskra, Janusz

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a method of monocular human motion tracking for estimation of hurdle clearance kinematic parameters. The analysis involved 10 image sequences of five hurdlers at various training levels. Recording of the sequences was carried out under simulated starting conditions of a 110 m hurdle race. The parameters were estimated using the particle swarm optimization algorithm and they are based on analysis of the images recorded with a 100 Hz camera. The proposed method does not involve using any special clothes, markers, inertial sensors, etc. As the quality criteria, the mean absolute error and mean relative error were used. The level of computed errors justifies the use of this method to estimate hurdle clearance parameters.

  7. Determination of Parameters of Meteor Bodies from Observational Data with High Accuracy of Estimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsevich, Maria

    A great volume of data has been accumulated thus far related to the photoregistration of the paths of meteor bodies in the terrestrial atmosphere. Most images have been obtained by four fireball networks, which operate in the USA, Canada, Europe, and Spain in different time periods. The approximation of the actual data using theoretical models makes it possible to achieve additional estimates, which do not directly follow from the observations. For example, the correct mathematical modeling of meteor events in the atmosphere is necessary for further estimates of the key parameters, including the extra-atmospheric mass, the ablation coefficient, and the effective enthalpy of evaporation of entering bodies. In turn, this information is needed by some applications, namely, those aimed at studying the problems of asteroid and comet security, to develop measures of planetary defense, and to determine the bodies that can reach Earth's surface. In the report, the mathematical technique to find basic dynamic parameters of the theoretical relationship between the height and the velocity of the meteor body motion that help to fit observations along the luminous part of the trajectories in the best way is suggested. The main difference from previous studies is that the given observations are approximated using the analytical solution of the equations of meteor physics. Note that, for the limited values of the mass loss parameter, analytical solution is usually replaced by the simpler expression (e.g., Stulov et al., 1995). In particular, this approximate solution was earlier used as a trial function during the implementation of the least-squares method. New model presented in the report was applied to a number of bright meteors observed by the Canadian camera network and by the US Prairie network. Results of such calculation are partly presented. During our data processing we discovered several sufficiently thermostable meteor bodies whose mass loss parameters were almost

  8. Accuracy of genomic prediction using deregressed breeding values estimated from purebred and crossbred offspring phenotypes in pigs.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A M; Bastiaansen, J W M; Lopes, M S; Veroneze, R; Groenen, M A M; de Koning, D-J

    2015-07-01

    Genomic selection is applied to dairy cattle breeding to improve the genetic progress of purebred (PB) animals, whereas in pigs and poultry the target is a crossbred (CB) animal for which a different strategy appears to be needed. The source of information used to estimate the breeding values, i.e., using phenotypes of CB or PB animals, may affect the accuracy of prediction. The objective of our study was to assess the direct genomic value (DGV) accuracy of CB and PB pigs using different sources of phenotypic information. Data used were from 3 populations: 2,078 Dutch Landrace-based, 2,301 Large White-based, and 497 crossbreds from an F1 cross between the 2 lines. Two female reproduction traits were analyzed: gestation length (GLE) and total number of piglets born (TNB). Phenotypes used in the analyses originated from offspring of genotyped individuals. Phenotypes collected on CB and PB animals were analyzed as separate traits using a single-trait model. Breeding values were estimated separately for each trait in a pedigree BLUP analysis and subsequently deregressed. Deregressed EBV for each trait originating from different sources (CB or PB offspring) were used to study the accuracy of genomic prediction. Accuracy of prediction was computed as the correlation between DGV and the DEBV of the validation population. Accuracy of prediction within PB populations ranged from 0.43 to 0.62 across GLE and TNB. Accuracies to predict genetic merit of CB animals with one PB population in the training set ranged from 0.12 to 0.28, with the exception of using the CB offspring phenotype of the Dutch Landrace that resulted in an accuracy estimate around 0 for both traits. Accuracies to predict genetic merit of CB animals with both parental PB populations in the training set ranged from 0.17 to 0.30. We conclude that prediction within population and trait had good predictive ability regardless of the trait being the PB or CB performance, whereas using PB population(s) to predict

  9. Assessing the impact of vertical land motion on twentieth century global mean sea level estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, B. D.; Thompson, P.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Ray, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Near-global and continuous measurements from satellite altimetry have provided accurate estimates of global mean sea level in the past two decades. Extending these estimates further into the past is a challenge using the historical tide gauge records. Not only is sampling nonuniform in both space and time, but tide gauges are also affected by vertical land motion (VLM) that creates a relative sea level change not representative of ocean variability. To allow for comparisons to the satellite altimetry estimated global mean sea level (GMSL), typically the tide gauges are corrected using glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. This approach, however, does not correct other sources of VLM that remain in the tide gauge record. Here we compare Global Positioning System (GPS) VLM estimates at the tide gauge locations to VLM estimates from GIA models, and assess the influence of non-GIA-related VLM on GMSL estimates. We find that the tide gauges, on average, are experiencing positive VLM (i.e., uplift) after removing the known effect of GIA, resulting in an increase of 0.24 ± 0.08 mm yr-1 in GMSL trend estimates from 1900 to present when using GPS-based corrections. While this result is likely dependent on the subset of tide gauges used and the actual corrections used, it does suggest that non-GIA VLM plays a significant role in twentieth century estimates of GMSL. Given the relatively short GPS records used to obtain these VLM estimates, we also estimate the uncertainty in the GMSL trend that results from limited knowledge of non-GIA-related VLM.

  10. The spatial accuracy of cellular dose estimates obtained from 3D reconstructed serial tissue autoradiographs.

    PubMed

    Humm, J L; Macklis, R M; Lu, X Q; Yang, Y; Bump, K; Beresford, B; Chin, L M

    1995-01-01

    In order to better predict and understand the effects of radiopharmaceuticals used for therapy, it is necessary to determine more accurately the radiation absorbed dose to cells in tissue. Using thin-section autoradiography, the spatial distribution of sources relative to the cells can be obtained from a single section with micrometre resolution. By collecting and analysing serial sections, the 3D microscopic distribution of radionuclide relative to the cellular histology, and therefore the dose rate distribution, can be established. In this paper, a method of 3D reconstruction of serial sections is proposed, and measurements are reported of (i) the accuracy and reproducibility of quantitative autoradiography and (ii) the spatial precision with which tissue features from one section can be related to adjacent sections. Uncertainties in the activity determination for the specimen result from activity losses during tissue processing (4-11%), and the variation of grain count per unit activity between batches of serial sections (6-25%). Correlation of the section activity to grain count densities showed deviations ranging from 6-34%. The spatial alignment uncertainties were assessed using nylon fibre fiduciary markers incorporated into the tissue block, and compared to those for alignment based on internal tissue landmarks. The standard deviation for the variation in nylon fibre fiduciary alignment was measured to be 41 microns cm-1, compared to 69 microns cm-1 when internal tissue histology landmarks were used. In addition, tissue shrinkage during histological processing of up to 10% was observed. The implications of these measured activity and spatial distribution uncertainties upon the estimate of cellular dose rate distribution depends upon the range of the radiation emissions. For long-range beta particles, uncertainties in both the activity and spatial distribution translate linearly to the uncertainty in dose rate of < 15%. For short-range emitters (< 100

  11. Accuracy of pressure-flow estimates of velopharyngeal orifice size in an analog model and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Guyette, T W; Carpenter, M A

    1988-12-01

    This study examined the accuracy of pressure-flow estimates of velopharyngeal (V-P) orifice size as applied to an analog model and two human subjects. Accuracy was assessed under differing conditions of degree of nasal resistance and type of instrumental interface. Known V-P orifice openings were introduced in the model through use of cover plates and in the humans through use of modified nasopharyngeal obturators. Nasal resistances were altered with perforated nasal plugs. Instrumental interfaces differed principally in the method used to detect nasal cavity pressure. Measures were applied to the hydrokinetic equation to estimate V-P area values. Data from the analog model and the human subjects were comparable in many respects. In low nasal resistance, area estimates were reasonably accurate regardless of the interface utilized. In high nasal resistance error typically increased, although not equally across interface types. Potential sources of error are identified and discussed.

  12. Accuracy of pressure-flow estimates of velopharyngeal orifice size in an analog model and human subjects.

    PubMed

    Guyette, T W; Carpenter, M A

    1988-12-01

    This study examined the accuracy of pressure-flow estimates of velopharyngeal (V-P) orifice size as applied to an analog model and two human subjects. Accuracy was assessed under differing conditions of degree of nasal resistance and type of instrumental interface. Known V-P orifice openings were introduced in the model through use of cover plates and in the humans through use of modified nasopharyngeal obturators. Nasal resistances were altered with perforated nasal plugs. Instrumental interfaces differed principally in the method used to detect nasal cavity pressure. Measures were applied to the hydrokinetic equation to estimate V-P area values. Data from the analog model and the human subjects were comparable in many respects. In low nasal resistance, area estimates were reasonably accurate regardless of the interface utilized. In high nasal resistance error typically increased, although not equally across interface types. Potential sources of error are identified and discussed. PMID:3230884

  13. Hierarchical information fusion for global displacement estimation in microsensor motion capture.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiaoli; Zhang, Zhi-Qiang; Wu, Jian-Kang; Wong, Wai-Choong

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents a novel hierarchical information fusion algorithm to obtain human global displacement for different gait patterns, including walking, running, and hopping based on seven body-worn inertial and magnetic measurement units. In the first-level sensor fusion, the orientation for each segment is achieved by a complementary Kalman filter (CKF) which compensates for the orientation error of the inertial navigation system solution through its error state vector. For each foot segment, the displacement is also estimated by the CKF, and zero velocity update is included for the drift reduction in foot displacement estimation. Based on the segment orientations and left/right foot locations, two global displacement estimates can be acquired from left/right lower limb separately using a linked biomechanical model. In the second-level geometric fusion, another Kalman filter is deployed to compensate for the difference between the two estimates from the sensor fusion and get more accurate overall global displacement estimation. The updated global displacement will be transmitted to left/right foot based on the human lower biomechanical model to restrict the drifts in both feet displacements. The experimental results have shown that our proposed method can accurately estimate human locomotion for the three different gait patterns with regard to the optical motion tracker.

  14. Quaternionic attitude estimation for robotic and human motion tracking using sequential Monte Carlo methods with von Mises-Fisher and nonuniform densities simulations.

    PubMed

    To, Gary; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, wireless positioning and tracking devices based on semiconductor micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors have successfully integrated into the consumer electronics market. Information from the sensors is processed by an attitude estimation program. Many of these algorithms were developed primarily for aeronautical applications. The parameters affecting the accuracy and stability of the system vary with the intended application. The performance of these algorithms occasionally destabilize during human motion tracking activities, which does not satisfy the reliability and high accuracy demand in biomedical application. A previous study accessed the feasibility of using semiconductor based inertial measurement units (IMUs) for human motion tracking. IMU hardware has been redesigned and an attitude estimation algorithm using sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods, or particle filter, for quaternions was developed. The method presented in this paper uses von Mises-Fisher and a nonuniform simulation to provide density estimation of the rotation group SO(3). Synthetic signal simulation, robotics applications, and human applications have been investigated.

  15. Quaternionic attitude estimation for robotic and human motion tracking using sequential Monte Carlo methods with von Mises-Fisher and nonuniform densities simulations.

    PubMed

    To, Gary; Mahfouz, Mohamed R

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, wireless positioning and tracking devices based on semiconductor micro electro-mechanical system (MEMS) sensors have successfully integrated into the consumer electronics market. Information from the sensors is processed by an attitude estimation program. Many of these algorithms were developed primarily for aeronautical applications. The parameters affecting the accuracy and stability of the system vary with the intended application. The performance of these algorithms occasionally destabilize during human motion tracking activities, which does not satisfy the reliability and high accuracy demand in biomedical application. A previous study accessed the feasibility of using semiconductor based inertial measurement units (IMUs) for human motion tracking. IMU hardware has been redesigned and an attitude estimation algorithm using sequential Monte Carlo (SMC) methods, or particle filter, for quaternions was developed. The method presented in this paper uses von Mises-Fisher and a nonuniform simulation to provide density estimation of the rotation group SO(3). Synthetic signal simulation, robotics applications, and human applications have been investigated. PMID:23674420

  16. A low cost matching motion estimation sensor based on the NIOS II microprocessor.

    PubMed

    González, Diego; Botella, Guillermo; Meyer-Baese, Uwe; García, Carlos; Sanz, Concepción; Prieto-Matías, Manuel; Tirado, Francisco

    2012-09-27

    This work presents the implementation of a matching-based motion estimation sensor on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and NIOS II microprocessor applying a C to Hardware (C2H) acceleration paradigm. The design, which involves several matching algorithms, is mapped using Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology. These algorithms, as well as the hardware implementation, are presented here together with an extensive analysis of the resources needed and the throughput obtained. The developed low-cost system is practical for real-time throughput and reduced power consumption and is useful in robotic applications, such as tracking, navigation using an unmanned vehicle, or as part of a more complex system.

  17. Real-time tumor motion estimation using respiratory surrogate via memory-based learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruijiang; Lewis, John H.; Berbeco, Ross I.; Xing, Lei

    2012-08-01

    th percentile error of 3.4 mm on unseen test data. The average 3D error was further reduced to 1.4 mm when the model was tuned to its optimal setting for each respiratory trace. In one trace where a few outliers are present in the training data, the proposed method achieved an error reduction of as much as ∼50% compared with the best linear model (1.0 mm versus 2.1 mm). The memory-based learning technique is able to accurately capture the highly complex and nonlinear relations between tumor and surrogate motion in an efficient manner (a few milliseconds per estimate). Furthermore, the algorithm is particularly suitable to handle situations where the training data are contaminated by large errors or outliers. These desirable properties make it an ideal candidate for accurate and robust tumor gating/tracking using respiratory surrogates.

  18. High-resolution estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge plate motions, 20 Ma to present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeMets, C.; Merkouriev, S.; Sauter, D.

    2015-12-01

    We present the first estimates of Southwest Indian Ridge (SWIR) plate motions at high temporal resolution during the Quaternary and Neogene based on nearly 5000 crossings of 21 magnetic reversals out to C6no (19.72 Ma) and the digitized traces of 17 fracture zones and transform faults. Our reconstructions of this slow-spreading mid-ocean ridge reveal several unexpected results with notable implications for regional and global plate reconstructions since 20 Ma. Extrapolations of seafloor opening distances to zero-age seafloor based on reconstructions of reversals C1n (0.78 Ma) through C3n.4 (5.2 Ma) reveal evidence for surprisingly large outward displacement of 5 ± 1 km west of 32°E, where motion between the Nubia and Antarctic plates occurs, but 2 ± 1 km east of 32°E, more typical of most mid-ocean ridges. Newly estimated SWIR seafloor spreading rates are up to 15 per cent slower everywhere along the ridge than previous estimates. Reconstructions of the numerous observations for times back to 11 Ma confirm the existence of the hypothesized Lwandle plate at high confidence level and indicate that the Lwandle plate's western and eastern boundaries respectively intersect the ridge near the Andrew Bain transform fault complex at 32°E and between ˜45°E and 52°E, in accord with previous results. The Nubia-Antarctic, Lwandle-Antarctic and Somalia-Antarctic rotation sequences that best fit many magnetic reversal, fracture zone and transform fault crossings define previously unknown changes in the Neogene motions of all three plate pairs, consisting of ˜20 per cent slowdowns in their spreading rates at 7.2^{+0.9 }_{ -1.4} Ma if we enforce a simultaneous change in motion everywhere along the SWIR and gradual 3°-7° anticlockwise rotations of the relative slip directions. We apply trans-dimensional Bayesian analysis to our noisy, best-fitting rotation sequences in order to estimate less-noisy rotation sequences suitable for use in future global plate reconstructions

  19. Disease severity estimates - effects of rater accuracy and assessments methods for comparing treatments

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assessment of disease is fundamental to the discipline of plant pathology, and estimates of severity are often made visually. However, it is established that visual estimates can be inaccurate and unreliable. In this study estimates of Septoria leaf blotch on leaves of winter wheat from non-treated ...

  20. Time-to-Collision estimation from motion based on primate visual processing.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, John M; Kenyon, Garrett T; Ziolkowski, Richard W

    2005-08-01

    A population coded algorithm, built on established models of motion processing in the primate visual system, computes the time-to-collision of a mobile robot to real-world environmental objects from video imagery. A set of four transformations starts with motion energy, a spatiotemporal frequency based computation of motion features. The following processing stages extract image velocity features similar to, but distinct from, optic flow; "translation" features, which account for velocity errors including those resulting from the aperture problem; and finally, estimate the time-to-collision. Biologically motivated population coding distinguishes this approach from previous methods based on optic flow. A comparison of the population coded approach with the popular optic flow algorithm of Lucas and Kanade against three types of approaching objects shows that the proposed method produces more robust time-to-collision information from a real world input stimulus in the presence of the aperture problem and other noise sources. The improved performance comes with increased computational cost, which would ideally be mitigated by special purpose hardware architectures.

  1. Motion Estimation Using the Single-row Superposition-type Planar Compound-like Eye

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Gwo-Long

    2007-01-01

    How can the compound eye of insects capture the prey so accurately and quickly? This interesting issue is explored from the perspective of computer vision instead of from the viewpoint of biology. The focus is on performance evaluation of noise immunity for motion recovery using the single-row superposition-type planar compound like eye (SPCE). The SPCE owns a special symmetrical framework with tremendous amount of ommatidia inspired by compound eye of insects. The noise simulates possible ambiguity of image patterns caused by either environmental uncertainty or low resolution of CCD devices. Results of extensive simulations indicate that this special visual configuration provides excellent motion estimation performance regardless of the magnitude of the noise. Even when the noise interference is serious, the SPCE is able to dramatically reduce errors of motion recovery of the ego-translation without any type of filters. In other words, symmetrical, regular, and multiple vision sensing devices of the compound-like eye have statistical averaging advantage to suppress possible noises. This discovery lays the basic foundation in terms of engineering approaches for the secret of the compound eye of insects.

  2. SU-E-J-150: Impact of Intrafractional Prostate Motion On the Accuracy and Efficiency of Prostate SBRT Delivery: A Retrospective Analysis of Prostate Tracking Log Files

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, H; Hirsch, A; Willins, J; Kachnic, J; Qureshi, M; Katz, M; Nicholas, B; Keohan, S; De Armas, R; Lu, H; Efstathiou, J; Zietman, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To measure intrafractional prostate motion by time-based stereotactic x-ray imaging and investigate the impact on the accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery. Methods: Prostate tracking log files with 1,892 x-ray image registrations from 18 SBRT fractions for 6 patients were retrospectively analyzed. Patient setup and beam delivery sessions were reviewed to identify extended periods of large prostate motion that caused delays in setup or interruptions in beam delivery. The 6D prostate motions were compared to the clinically used PTV margin of 3–5 mm (3 mm posterior, 5 mm all other directions), a hypothetical PTV margin of 2–3 mm (2 mm posterior, 3 mm all other directions), and the rotation correction limits (roll ±2°, pitch ±5° and yaw ±3°) of CyberKnife to quantify beam delivery accuracy. Results: Significant incidents of treatment start delay and beam delivery interruption were observed, mostly related to large pitch rotations of ≥±5°. Optimal setup time of 5–15 minutes was recorded in 61% of the fractions, and optimal beam delivery time of 30–40 minutes in 67% of the fractions. At a default imaging interval of 15 seconds, the percentage of prostate motion beyond PTV margin of 3–5 mm varied among patients, with a mean at 12.8% (range 0.0%–31.1%); and the percentage beyond PTV margin of 2–3 mm was at a mean of 36.0% (range 3.3%–83.1%). These timely detected offsets were all corrected real-time by the robotic manipulator or by operator intervention at the time of treatment interruptions. Conclusion: The durations of patient setup and beam delivery were directly affected by the occurrence of large prostate motion. Frequent imaging of down to 15 second interval is necessary for certain patients. Techniques for reducing prostate motion, such as using endorectal balloon, can be considered to assure consistently higher accuracy and efficiency of prostate SBRT delivery.

  3. Multi-Hazard Analysis for the Estimation of Ground Motion Induced by Landslides and Tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iglesias, Rubén; Koudogbo, Fifame; Ardizzone, Francesca; Mondini, Alessandro; Bignami, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Space-borne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sensors allow obtaining all-day all-weather terrain complex reflectivity images which can be processed by means of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) for the monitoring of displacement episodes with extremely high accuracy. In the work presented, different PSI strategies to measure ground surface displacements for multi-scale multi-hazard mapping are proposed in the context of landslides and tectonic applications. This work is developed in the framework of ESA General Studies Programme (GSP). The present project, called Multi Scale and Multi Hazard Mapping Space based Solutions (MEMpHIS), investigates new Earth Observation (EO) methods and new Information and Communications Technology (ICT) solutions to improve the understanding and management of disasters, with special focus on Disaster Risk Reduction rather than Rapid Mapping. In this paper, the results of the investigation on the key processing steps for measuring large-scale ground surface displacements (like the ones originated by plate tectonics or active faults) as well as local displacements at high resolution (like the ones related with active slopes) will be presented. The core of the proposed approaches is based on the Stable Point Network (SPN) algorithm, which is the advanced PSI processing chain developed by ALTAMIRA INFORMATION. Regarding tectonic applications, the accurate displacement estimation over large-scale areas characterized by low magnitude motion gradients (3-5 mm/year), such as the ones induced by inter-seismic or Earth tidal effects, still remains an open issue. In this context, a low-resolution approach based in the integration of differential phase increments of velocity and topographic error (obtained through the fitting of a linear model adjustment function to data) will be evaluated. Data from the default mode of Sentinel-1, the Interferometric Wide Swath Mode, will be considered for this application. Regarding landslides

  4. Real-time bronchoscope three-dimensional motion estimation using multiple sensor-driven alignment of CT images and electromagnetic measurements.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiongbiao; Mori, Kensaku

    2014-09-01

    Bronchoscope three-dimensional motion estimation plays a key role in developing bronchoscopic navigation systems. Currently external tracking devices, particularly electromagnetic trackers with electromagnetic sensors, are increasingly introduced to navigate surgical tools in pre-clinical images. An unavoidable problem, which is to align the electromagnetic tracker to pre-clinical images, must be solved before navigation. This paper proposes a multiple sensor-driven registration method to establish this alignment without using any anatomical fiducials. Although current fiducially free registration methods work well, they limit to the initialization of optimization and manipulating the bronchoscope along the bronchial centerlines, which could be failed easily during clinical interventions. To address these limitations, we utilize measurements of multiple electromagnetic sensors to calculate bronchoscope geometric center positions that are usually closer to the bronchial centerlines than the sensor itself measured positions. We validated our method on a bronchial phantom. The experimental results demonstrate that our idea of using multiple sensors to determine bronchoscope geometric center positions for fiducial-free registration was very effective. Compared to currently available methods in bronchoscope three-dimensional motion estimation, our method reduced fiducial alignment error from at least 6.79 to 4.68-5.26 mm and significantly improved motion estimation or tracking accuracy from at least 5.42 to 3.78-4.53 mm.

  5. The effect of missing marker genotypes on the accuracy of gene-assisted breeding value estimation: a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Mulder, H A; Meuwissen, T H E; Calus, M P L; Veerkamp, R F

    2010-01-01

    In livestock populations, missing genotypes on a large proportion of the animals is a major problem when implementing gene-assisted breeding value estimation for genes with known effect. The objective of this study was to compare different methods to deal with missing genotypes on accuracy of gene-assisted breeding value estimation for identified bi-allelic genes using Monte Carlo simulation. A nested full-sib half-sib structure was simulated with a mixed inheritance model with one bi-allelic quantitative trait loci (QTL) and a polygenic effect due to infinite number of polygenes. The effect of the QTL was included in gene-assisted BLUP either by random regression on predicted gene content, i.e. the number of positive alleles, or including haplotype effects in the model with an inverse IBD matrix to account for identity-by-descent relationships between haplotypes using linkage analysis information (IBD-LA). The inverse IBD matrix was constructed using segregation indicator probabilities obtained from multiple marker iterative peeling. Gene contents for unknown genotypes were predicted using either multiple marker iterative peeling or mixed model methodology. For both methods, gene-assisted breeding value estimation increased accuracies of total estimated breeding value (EBV) with 0% to 22% for genotyped animals in comparison to conventional breeding value estimation. For animals that were not genotyped, the increase in accuracy was much lower (0% to 5%), but still substantial when the heritability was 0.1 and when the QTL explained at least 15% of the genetic variance. Regression on predicted gene content yielded higher accuracies than IBD-LA. Allele substitution effects were, however, overestimated, especially when only sires and males in the last generation were genotyped. For juveniles without phenotypic records and traits measured only on females, the superiority of regression on gene content over IBD-LA was larger than when all animals had phenotypes. Missing

  6. Manipulation of visual information does not change the accuracy of distance estimation during a blindfolded walking task.

    PubMed

    Commins, Sean; McCormack, Kelsie; Callinan, Erin; Fitzgerald, Helen; Molloy, Eoin; Young, Kerrie

    2013-08-01

    While humans rely on vision during navigation, they are also competent at navigating non-visually. However, non-visual navigation over large distances is not very accurate and can accumulate error. Currently, it is unclear whether this accumulation of error is due to the visual estimate of the distance or to the locomotor production of the distance. In a series of experiments, using a blindfolded walking test, we examine whether enhancing the visual estimate of the distance to a previously seen target, through environmental enrichment, visual imagery, or repeated exposure would improve the accuracy of blindfold navigation across different distances. We also attempt to decrease the visual estimate in order to see if the opposite effect would occur. Our results would indicate that manipulation of the static visual distance estimate did not change the navigation accuracy to any great extent. The only condition that improved accuracy was repeated exposure to the environment through practice. These results suggest that error observed during blindfold navigation may be due to the locomotor production of the distance, rather than the visual process.

  7. Geometric estimation of intestinal contraction for motion tracking of video capsule endoscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Liang; Bao, Guanqun; Pahlavan, Kaveh

    2014-03-01

    Wireless video capsule endoscope (VCE) provides a noninvasive method to examine the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract, especially small intestine, where other endoscopic instruments can barely reach. VCE is able to continuously provide clear pictures in short fixed intervals, and as such researchers have attempted to use image processing methods to track the video capsule in order to locate the abnormalities inside the GI tract. To correctly estimate the speed of the motion of the endoscope capsule, the radius of the intestinal track must be known a priori. Physiological factors such as intestinal contraction, however, dynamically change the radius of the small intestine, which could bring large errors in speed estimation. In this paper, we are aiming to estimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. First a geometric model is presented for estimating the radius of small intestine based on the black hole on endoscopic images. To validate our proposed model, a 3-dimentional virtual testbed that emulates the intestinal contraction is then introduced in details. After measuring the size of the black holes on the test images, we used our model to esimate the radius of the contracted intestinal track. Comparision between analytical results and the emulation model parameters has verified that our proposed method could preciously estimate the radius of the contracted small intestine based on endoscopic images.

  8. Complex phase error and motion estimation in synthetic aperture radar imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soumekh, M.; Yang, H.

    1991-06-01

    Attention is given to a SAR wave equation-based system model that accurately represents the interaction of the impinging radar signal with the target to be imaged. The model is used to estimate the complex phase error across the synthesized aperture from the measured corrupted SAR data by combining the two wave equation models governing the collected SAR data at two temporal frequencies of the radar signal. The SAR system model shows that the motion of an object in a static scene results in coupled Doppler shifts in both the temporal frequency domain and the spatial frequency domain of the synthetic aperture. The velocity of the moving object is estimated through these two Doppler shifts. It is shown that once the dynamic target's velocity is known, its reconstruction can be formulated via a squint-mode SAR geometry with parameters that depend upon the dynamic target's velocity.

  9. A MAP estimator based on geometric Brownian motion for sample distances of laser triangulation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrmann, Markus; Otesteanu, Marius

    2016-11-01

    The proposed algorithm is designed to enhance the line-detection stability in laser-stripe sensors. Despite their many features and capabilities, these sensors become unstable when measuring in dark or strongly-reflective environments. Ambiguous points within a camera image can appear on dark surfaces and be confused with noise when the laser-reflection intensity approaches noise level. Similar problems arise when strong reflections within the sensor image have intensities comparable to that of the laser. In these circumstances, it is difficult to determine the most probable point for the laser line. Hence, the proposed algorithm introduces a maximum a posteriori estimator, based on geometric Brownian motion, to provide a range estimate for the expected location of the reflected laser line.

  10. Estimation of accuracies and expected genetic change from selection for selection indexes that use multiple-trait predictions of breeding values.

    PubMed

    Barwick, S A; Tier, B; Swan, A A; Henzell, A L

    2013-10-01

    Procedures are described for estimating selection index accuracies for individual animals and expected genetic change from selection for the general case where indexes of EBVs predict an aggregate breeding objective of traits that may or may not have been measured. Index accuracies for the breeding objective are shown to take an important general form, being able to be expressed as the product of the accuracy of the index function of true breeding values and the accuracy with which that function predicts the breeding objective. When the accuracies of the individual EBVs of the index are known, prediction error variances (PEVs) and covariances (PECs) for the EBVs within animal are able to be well approximated, and index accuracies and expected genetic change from selection estimated with high accuracy. The procedures are suited to routine use in estimating index accuracies in genetic evaluation, and for providing important information, without additional modelling, on the directions in which a population will move under selection.

  11. Estimating the Accuracy of Neurocognitive Effort Measures in the Absence of a "Gold Standard"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mossman, Douglas; Wygant, Dustin B.; Gervais, Roger O.

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists frequently use symptom validity tests (SVTs) to help determine whether evaluees' test performance or reported symptoms accurately represent their true functioning and capability. Most studies evaluating the accuracy of SVTs have used either known-group comparisons or simulation designs, but these approaches have well-known…

  12. Quantitative estimation of the parameters for self-motion driven by difference in surface tension.

    PubMed

    Suematsu, Nobuhiko J; Sasaki, Tomohiro; Nakata, Satoshi; Kitahata, Hiroyuki

    2014-07-15

    Quantitative information on the parameters associated with self-propelled objects would enhance the potential of this research field; for example, finding a realistic way to develop a functional self-propelled object and quantitative understanding of the mechanism of self-motion. We therefore estimated five main parameters, including the driving force, of a camphor boat as a simple self-propelled object that spontaneously moves on water due to difference in surface tension. The experimental results and mathematical model indicated that the camphor boat generated a driving force of 4.2 μN, which corresponds to a difference in surface tension of 1.1 mN m(-1). The methods used in this study are not restricted to evaluate the parameters of self-motion of a camphor boat, but can be applied to other self-propelled objects driven by difference in surface tension. Thus, our investigation provides a novel method to quantitatively estimate the parameters for self-propelled objects driven by the interfacial tension difference.

  13. The zero-multipole summation method for estimating electrostatic interactions in molecular dynamics: analysis of the accuracy and application to liquid systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Ikuo; Kamiya, Narutoshi; Nakamura, Haruki

    2014-05-21

    In the preceding paper [I. Fukuda, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174107 (2013)], the zero-multipole (ZM) summation method was proposed for efficiently evaluating the electrostatic Coulombic interactions of a classical point charge system. The summation takes a simple pairwise form, but prevents the electrically non-neutral multipole states that may artificially be generated by a simple cutoff truncation, which often causes large energetic noises and significant artifacts. The purpose of this paper is to judge the ability of the ZM method by investigating the accuracy, parameter dependencies, and stability in applications to liquid systems. To conduct this, first, the energy-functional error was divided into three terms and each term was analyzed by a theoretical error-bound estimation. This estimation gave us a clear basis of the discussions on the numerical investigations. It also gave a new viewpoint between the excess energy error and the damping effect by the damping parameter. Second, with the aid of these analyses, the ZM method was evaluated based on molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of two fundamental liquid systems, a molten sodium-chlorine ion system and a pure water molecule system. In the ion system, the energy accuracy, compared with the Ewald summation, was better for a larger value of multipole moment l currently induced until l ≲ 3 on average. This accuracy improvement with increasing l is due to the enhancement of the excess-energy accuracy. However, this improvement is wholly effective in the total accuracy if the theoretical moment l is smaller than or equal to a system intrinsic moment L. The simulation results thus indicate L ∼ 3 in this system, and we observed less accuracy in l = 4. We demonstrated the origins of parameter dependencies appearing in the crossing behavior and the oscillations of the energy error curves. With raising the moment l we observed, smaller values of the damping parameter provided more accurate results and smoother

  14. Experimental support and estimate of the accuracy of the water flow model in structured soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikulina, M.

    2003-04-01

    calculated data and by statistical criteria: average square error of model, as estimation of its accuracy and Wiliams-Clute criterion for comparison and choice of the best prediction. One of the research problems was evaluation of an opportunity to use the parameters of the averaged water release characteristics. The results allow making following conclusions: - For grey forest soils two regimes of water movement are characteristic - regime of infiltration and prefer-ential flow. These regimes are defined by intensity of irrigation. - Macropores and zones of preferential flow are distinguished morphologically and functionally, and are connected with genetic construction of soil horizons, spatial variability of soil properties and soil fauna. - Grey forest soils have differentiated pore space, which is strongly changed in process of swelling and shrinkage. Interaggregat porosity can play important role in formation of preferential flow of the water. - The method of tube with constant head, the infiltrometer method and the method of the irrigation have revealed significant variability of filtration properties of grey forest soil. The variability exists both on a soil profile and within the limits of a genetic horizon. It is necessary to take into account the variability of filtra-tion properties of the soil at simulation of the water and substances movement. - The infiltrometer method and the method of tube with constant head are recommended for receiving of reliable hydrohpysical maintenance of mathematical models. The tube method is diagnostic for using mod-els, which do not take into account dual porosity of soil. The values of the infiltration coefficient from the tube method are recommended for the usage as saturated hydraulic conductivity parameter of macropores in models with dual porosity. - The modeling of regime of infiltration does not require the use of models with dual porosity. However in cases of high intensity irrigation without use of these models one gets

  15. Collective Estimation: Accuracy, Expertise, and Extroversion as Sources of Intra-Group Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonner, Bryan L.; Sillito, Sheli D.; Baumann, Michael R.

    2007-01-01

    Although estimations typically possess correct answers, these answers may be difficult to demonstrate to others. However, providing external information may increase their demonstrability. In this experiment, individuals (N = 60) and 6-person groups (N = 360) generated estimations with or without frames of reference. We hypothesized that…

  16. Development of a High Irradiance LED Configuration for Small Field of View Motion Estimation of Fertilizer Particles

    PubMed Central

    Cool, Simon; Pieters, Jan G.; Mertens, Koen C.; Mora, Sergio; Cointault, Frédéric; Dubois, Julien; van de Gucht, Tim; Vangeyte, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Better characterization of the fertilizer spreading process, especially the fertilizer pattern distribution on the ground, requires an accurate measurement of individual particle properties and dynamics. Both 2D and 3D high speed imaging techniques have been developed for this purpose. To maximize the accuracy of the predictions, a specific illumination level is required. This paper describes the development of a high irradiance LED system for high speed motion estimation of fertilizer particles. A spectral sensitivity factor was used to select the optimal LED in relation to the used camera from a range of commercially available high power LEDs. A multiple objective genetic algorithm was used to find the optimal configuration of LEDs resulting in the most homogeneous irradiance in the target area. Simulations were carried out for different lenses and number of LEDs. The chosen configuration resulted in an average irradiance level of 452 W/m2 with coefficient of variation less than 2%. The algorithm proved superior and more flexible to other approaches reported in the literature and can be used for various other applications. PMID:26569261

  17. Parametric representation of soil isoline equation and its accuracy estimation in red-NIR reflectance space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taniguchi, Kenta; Ikuta, Yasuhiro; Obata, Kenta; Matsuoka, Masayuki; Yoshioka, Hiroki

    2012-10-01

    Retrieval of biophysical parameters from remotely sensed reflectance spectra often involves algebraic manipulations, e.g. spectral vegetation index, to enhance pure signals from a target of one`s interest. An underlying assumption of those processes is an existence of high correlation between an obtained value from the manipulations and amount of the target object. These correlations can be seen in scatter plots of reflectance spectra as isolines that represent a relationship between two reflectances of different wavelengths (bands) under constant values of physical parameters. Therefore, modeling the isolines would contribute to better understanding of retrieval algorithms and eventually to improve their accuracies. The objective of this study is to derive one such relationship observed under a constant spectrum of soil surfaces, known as soil isolines, in red-NIR reflectance space. This work introduces a parametric representation of the soil isolines (soil isoline equation) with the parameter obtained by rotating the red-NIR reflectance space by approximately a quarter of pi radian counter clockwise. The accuracy in the soil isoline equation depends on the order of polynomials used for the representations: It was investigated numerically by conducting experiments with radiative transfer models for vegetation canopy. The results showed that when the first-order approximation were employed for both bands, the accuracy of the parametric representations/approximations of the soil isolines is approximately 0.02 in terms of mean absolute difference from the simulated spectra (with no approximation). The accuracies improved dramatically when one retains the polynomial terms up to the second-order or higher for both bands.

  18. Kinematic state estimation and motion planning for stochastic nonholonomic systems using the exponential map

    PubMed Central

    Park, Wooram; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yu; Moses, Matthew; Chirikjian, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    SUMMARY A nonholonomic system subjected to external noise from the environment, or internal noise in its own actuators, will evolve in a stochastic manner described by an ensemble of trajectories. This ensemble of trajectories is equivalent to the solution of a Fokker–Planck equation that typically evolves on a Lie group. If the most likely state of such a system is to be estimated, and plans for subsequent motions from the current state are to be made so as to move the system to a desired state with high probability, then modeling how the probability density of the system evolves is critical. Methods for solving Fokker-Planck equations that evolve on Lie groups then become important. Such equations can be solved using the operational properties of group Fourier transforms in which irreducible unitary representation (IUR) matrices play a critical role. Therefore, we develop a simple approach for the numerical approximation of all the IUR matrices for two of the groups of most interest in robotics: the rotation group in three-dimensional space, SO(3), and the Euclidean motion group of the plane, SE(2). This approach uses the exponential mapping from the Lie algebras of these groups, and takes advantage of the sparse nature of the Lie algebra representation matrices. Other techniques for density estimation on groups are also explored. The computed densities are applied in the context of probabilistic path planning for kinematic cart in the plane and flexible needle steering in three-dimensional space. In these examples the injection of artificial noise into the computational models (rather than noise in the actual physical systems) serves as a tool to search the configuration spaces and plan paths. Finally, we illustrate how density estimation problems arise in the characterization of physical noise in orientational sensors such as gyroscopes. PMID:20454468

  19. Estimating periodic organ motions based on inverse kinematics using tetrahedron mesh registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Nahyup; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Hyong-Euk; Kim, James D. K.

    2013-03-01

    Minimally/Non-invasive surgery has become increasingly widespread because of its therapeutic benefits such as less pain, less scarring, and shorter hospital stay. However, it is very difficult to eliminate the target cancer cells selectively without damaging nearby normal tissues and vessels since the tumors inside organs cannot be visually tracked in realtime with the existing imaging devices while organs are deformed by respiration and surgical instruments. Note that realtime 2D US imaging is widely used for monitoring the minimally invasive surgery such as Radiofrequency ablation; however, it is difficult to detect target tumors except high-echogenic regions because of its noisy and limited field of view. To handle these difficulties, we present a novel framework for estimating organ motion and deformed shape during respiration from the available features of 2D US images, by means of inverse kinematics utilizing 3D CT volumes at the inhale and exhale phases. First, we generate surface meshes of the target organ and tumor as well as centerlines of vessels at the two extreme phases considering surface correspondence. Then, the corresponding tetrahedron meshes are generated by coupling the internal components for volumetric modeling. Finally, a deformed organ mesh at an arbitrary phase is generated from the 2D US feature points for estimating the organ deformation and tumor position. To show effectiveness of the proposed method, the CT scans from real patient has been tested for estimating the motion and deformation of the liver. The experimental result shows that the average errors are less than 3mm in terms of tumor position as well as the whole surface shape.

  20. Kinematic state estimation and motion planning for stochastic nonholonomic systems using the exponential map.

    PubMed

    Park, Wooram; Liu, Yan; Zhou, Yu; Moses, Matthew; Chirikjian, Gregory S

    2008-04-11

    A nonholonomic system subjected to external noise from the environment, or internal noise in its own actuators, will evolve in a stochastic manner described by an ensemble of trajectories. This ensemble of trajectories is equivalent to the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation that typically evolves on a Lie group. If the most likely state of such a system is to be estimated, and plans for subsequent motions from the current state are to be made so as to move the system to a desired state with high probability, then modeling how the probability density of the system evolves is critical. Methods for solving Fokker-Planck equations that evolve on Lie groups then become important. Such equations can be solved using the operational properties of group Fourier transforms in which irreducible unitary representation (IUR) matrices play a critical role. Therefore, we develop a simple approach for the numerical approximation of all the IUR matrices for two of the groups of most interest in robotics: the rotation group in three-dimensional space, SO(3), and the Euclidean motion group of the plane, SE(2). This approach uses the exponential mapping from the Lie algebras of these groups, and takes advantage of the sparse nature of the Lie algebra representation matrices. Other techniques for density estimation on groups are also explored. The computed densities are applied in the context of probabilistic path planning for kinematic cart in the plane and flexible needle steering in three-dimensional space. In these examples the injection of artificial noise into the computational models (rather than noise in the actual physical systems) serves as a tool to search the configuration spaces and plan paths. Finally, we illustrate how density estimation problems arise in the characterization of physical noise in orientational sensors such as gyroscopes.

  1. Impact of scanning parameters and breathing patterns on image quality and accuracy of tumor motion reconstruction in 4D CBCT: a phantom study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soyoung; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Kahler, Darren; Li, Jonathan G; Sanjiv, Samat S

    2015-01-01

    Four-dimensional, cone-beam CT (4D CBCT) substantially reduces respiration-induced motion blurring artifacts in three-dimension (3D) CBCT. However, the image quality of 4D CBCT is significantly degraded which may affect its accuracy in localizing a mobile tumor for high-precision, image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of scanning parameters hereinafter collectively referred to as scanning sequence) and breathing patterns on the image quality and the accuracy of computed tumor trajectory for a commercial 4D CBCT system, in preparation for its clinical implementation. We simulated a series of periodic and aperiodic sinusoidal breathing patterns with a respiratory motion phantom. The aperiodic pattern was created by varying the period or amplitude of individual sinusoidal breathing cycles. 4D CBCT scans of the phantom were acquired with a manufacturer-supplied scanning sequence (4D-S-slow) and two in-house modified scanning sequences (4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast). While 4D-S-slow used small field of view (FOV), partial rotation (200°), and no imaging filter, 4D-M-slow and 4D-M-fast used medium FOV, full rotation, and the F1 filter. The scanning speed was doubled in 4D-M-fast (100°/min gantry rotation). The image quality of the 4D CBCT scans was evaluated using contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), and motion blurring ratio (MBR). The trajectory of the moving target was reconstructed by registering each phase of the 4D CBCT with a reference CT. The root-mean-squared-error (RMSE) analysis was used to quantify its accuracy. Significant decrease in CNR and SNR from 3D CBCT to 4D CBCT was observed. The 4D-S-slow and 4D-M-fast scans had comparable image quality, while the 4D-M-slow scans had better performance due to doubled projections. Both CNR and SNR decreased slightly as the breathing period increased, while no dependence on the amplitude was observed. The difference of both CNR and SNR

  2. Accuracy Assessment in Structure from Motion 3d Reconstruction from Uav-Born Images: the Influence of the Data Processing Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caroti, G.; Martínez-Espejo Zaragoza, I.; Piemonte, A.

    2015-08-01

    The evolution of Structure from Motion (SfM) techniques and their integration with the established procedures of classic stereoscopic photogrammetric survey have provided a very effective tool for the production of three-dimensional textured models. Such models are not only aesthetically pleasing but can also contain metric information, the quality of which depends on both survey type and applied processing methodologies. An open research topic in this area refers to checking attainable accuracy levels. The knowledge of such accuracy is essential, especially in the integration of models obtained through SfM with other models derived from different sensors or methods (laser scanning, classic photogrammetry ...). Accuracy checks may be conducted by either comparing SfM models against a reference one or measuring the deviation of control points identified on models and measured with classic topographic instrumentation and methodologies. This paper presents an analysis of attainable accuracy levels, according to different approaches of survey and data processing. For this purpose, a survey of the Church of San Miniato in Marcianella (Pisa, Italy), has been used. The dataset is an integration of laser scanning with terrestrial and UAV-borne photogrammetric surveys; in addition, a high precision topographic network was established for the specific purpose. In particular, laser scanning has been used for the interior and the exterior of the church, with the exclusion of the roof, while UAVs have been used for the photogrammetric survey of both roof, with horizontal strips, and façade, with vertical strips.

  3. Accuracy study of time delay estimation techniques in laser pulse ranger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jinliang; Wang, Xingshu; Gao, Yang

    2013-12-01

    Time-of-flight measurement by using laser pulses is an alternative method in laser range finding and laser scanning, the echo pulses originating from backscattering of the emitted laser pulse on targets is detected by optical receiver. The distance of target can be obtained by measuring the round-trip time. Time-of-arrival estimation may be based on schemes such as constant-fraction discriminator (CFD) in analog electronics. In contrast, as sampled signals are available, time delay estimation may be based on schemes like direct cross-correlation function (CCF) and average square difference function (ASDF) in digital electronics. By the way, constant-fraction discriminator can also be used in digital electronics. All this three methods are analyzed and compared with each other. It is shown that estimators based on CCF and ASDF are more precise than conventional CFD based estimator.

  4. Comparison of accuracy between dental and skeletal age in the estimation of chronological age of Down syndrome individuals.

    PubMed

    Hala, Leila Abou; Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli de; Villaça-Carvalho, Maria Fernanda Lima; de Castro Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of dental age (DA) and skeletal age (SA) methods in order to estimate chronological age (CA) in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), contributing to the Forensic Dentistry and making the identification of these individuals age possible. For this, 278 images of individuals were selected and divided in 2 groups: 216 non-DS patients and 62 with DS. At first, DA was evaluated by Nolla method, on panoramic radiographs, followed by SA, evaluated by Greulich and Pyle method. The linear correlation coefficient of Pearson was used for the analysis of concordance between the methods. Paired t-test with confidence interval was used to evaluate the accuracy and Bland and Altman method was applied to estimate limits of concordance. Complementary to this first analysis, descriptive statistics and ANOVA test were applied for comparison among chronological age (CA), dental age (DA) and skeletal age (SA), with a significance level of 95% (p≥0.05), ordering to observe the differences among them. DA, estimated by Nolla, is underestimated in both, DS and non-DS individuals, and it is more notable in DS individuals. SA estimated by Greulich and Pyle method is overestimated, except for non-DS males. The range of variance is greater in SA and DS than DA and non-DS individuals, respectively. A greater accordance was found for DA×CA if compared to SA×CA, indicating that DA, estimated by Nolla method, is more accurate than SA, evaluated by Greulich and Pyle method, for estimating CA of both, DS and non-DS individuals. However, neither method seems to be precise and more caution is required for age estimation in DS individuals. PMID:27426840

  5. Comparison of accuracy between dental and skeletal age in the estimation of chronological age of Down syndrome individuals.

    PubMed

    Hala, Leila Abou; Moraes, Mari Eli Leonelli de; Villaça-Carvalho, Maria Fernanda Lima; de Castro Lopes, Sérgio Lúcio Pereira; Gamba, Thiago de Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the accuracy of dental age (DA) and skeletal age (SA) methods in order to estimate chronological age (CA) in individuals with Down syndrome (DS), contributing to the Forensic Dentistry and making the identification of these individuals age possible. For this, 278 images of individuals were selected and divided in 2 groups: 216 non-DS patients and 62 with DS. At first, DA was evaluated by Nolla method, on panoramic radiographs, followed by SA, evaluated by Greulich and Pyle method. The linear correlation coefficient of Pearson was used for the analysis of concordance between the methods. Paired t-test with confidence interval was used to evaluate the accuracy and Bland and Altman method was applied to estimate limits of concordance. Complementary to this first analysis, descriptive statistics and ANOVA test were applied for comparison among chronological age (CA), dental age (DA) and skeletal age (SA), with a significance level of 95% (p≥0.05), ordering to observe the differences among them. DA, estimated by Nolla, is underestimated in both, DS and non-DS individuals, and it is more notable in DS individuals. SA estimated by Greulich and Pyle method is overestimated, except for non-DS males. The range of variance is greater in SA and DS than DA and non-DS individuals, respectively. A greater accordance was found for DA×CA if compared to SA×CA, indicating that DA, estimated by Nolla method, is more accurate than SA, evaluated by Greulich and Pyle method, for estimating CA of both, DS and non-DS individuals. However, neither method seems to be precise and more caution is required for age estimation in DS individuals.

  6. Accuracy of maximum likelihood estimates of a two-state model in single-molecule FRET

    SciTech Connect

    Gopich, Irina V.

    2015-01-21

    Photon sequences from single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) experiments can be analyzed using a maximum likelihood method. Parameters of the underlying kinetic model (FRET efficiencies of the states and transition rates between conformational states) are obtained by maximizing the appropriate likelihood function. In addition, the errors (uncertainties) of the extracted parameters can be obtained from the curvature of the likelihood function at the maximum. We study the standard deviations of the parameters of a two-state model obtained from photon sequences with recorded colors and arrival times. The standard deviations can be obtained analytically in a special case when the FRET efficiencies of the states are 0 and 1 and in the limiting cases of fast and slow conformational dynamics. These results are compared with the results of numerical simulations. The accuracy and, therefore, the ability to predict model parameters depend on how fast the transition rates are compared to the photon count rate. In the limit of slow transitions, the key parameters that determine the accuracy are the number of transitions between the states and the number of independent photon sequences. In the fast transition limit, the accuracy is determined by the small fraction of photons that are correlated with their neighbors. The relative standard deviation of the relaxation rate has a “chevron” shape as a function of the transition rate in the log-log scale. The location of the minimum of this function dramatically depends on how well the FRET efficiencies of the states are separated.

  7. Accuracy of age estimation in children using radiograph of developing teeth.

    PubMed

    Cameriere, R; Ferrante, L; Liversidge, H M; Prieto, J L; Brkic, H

    2008-04-01

    The aims of this study were: first, to determine the accuracy of the Cameriere method for assessing chronological age in children based on the relationship between age and measurement of open apices in teeth and, second, to compare the accuracy of this method with the widely used Demirjian et al. method and with the method proposed by Willems et al. Orthopantomographs taken from white Italian, Spain and Croatian children (401 girls, 355 boys) aged between 5 and 15 years were analysed following the Cameriere, Demirjian and Willems methods. The difference between chronological and dental age was calculated for each individual and each method (residual). The accuracy of each method was assessed using the mean of the absolute values of the residuals (mean prediction error). Results showed that the Cameriere method slightly underestimated the real age of children. The median of the residuals was 0.081 years (interquartile range, IQR=0.668 years) for girls and 0.036 years for boys (interquartile range, IQR=0.732 years). The Willems method showed an overestimation of the real age of boys, with a median residual error of -0.247 years and an underestimation of the real age of girls (median residual error=0.073 years). Lastly, the Demirjian method overestimated the real age of both boys and girls, with a median residual error of -0.750 years for girls and -0.611 years for boys. The Cameriere method yielded a mean prediction error of 0.407 years for girls and 0.380 years for boys. Although the accuracy of this method was better for boys than for girls, the difference between the two mean prediction errors was not statistically significant (p=0.19). The Demirjian method was found to overestimate age for both boys and girls but the mean prediction error for girls was significantly greater than that for boys (p=0.024), and was significantly less accurate than the Cameriere method (p<0.001). The Willems method was better than that of Demirjian (p=0.0032), but was significantly

  8. Spatiotemporal non-rigid image registration for 3D ultrasound cardiac motion estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeckx, D.; Ector, J.; Maes, F.; D'hooge, J.; Vandermeulen, D.; Voigt, J.-U.; Heidbüchel, H.; Suetens, P.

    2007-03-01

    We present a new method to evaluate 4D (3D + time) cardiac ultrasound data sets by nonrigid spatio-temporal image registration. First, a frame-to-frame registration is performed that yields a dense deformation field. The deformation field is used to calculate local spatiotemporal properties of the myocardium, such as the velocity, strain and strain rate. The field is also used to propagate particular points and surfaces, representing e.g. the endo-cardial surface over the different frames. As such, the 4D path of these point is obtained, which can be used to calculate the velocity by which the wall moves and the evolution of the local surface area over time. The wall velocity is not angle-dependent as in classical Doppler imaging, since the 4D data allows calculating the true 3D motion. Similarly, all 3D myocardium strain components can be estimated. Combined they result in local surface area or volume changes which van be color-coded as a measure of local contractability. A diagnostic method that strongly benefits from this technique is cardiac motion and deformation analysis, which is an important aid to quantify the mechanical properties of the myocardium.

  9. A new measuring method for motion accuracy of 3-axis NC equipments based on composite trajectory of circle and non-circle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Du, Zhengchun; Yang, Jiangguo; Hong, Maisheng

    2011-12-01

    Geometric motion error measurement has been considered as an important task for accuracy enhancement and quality assurance of NC machine tools and CMMs. In consideration of the disadvantages of traditional measuring methods,a new measuring method for motion accuracy of 3-axis NC equipments based on composite trajectory including circle and non-circle(straight line and/or polygonal line) is proposed. The principles and techniques of the new measuring method are discussed in detail. 8 feasible measuring strategies based on different measuring groupings are summarized and optimized. The experiment of the most preferable strategy is carried out on the 3-axis CNC vertical machining center Cincinnati 750 Arrow by using cross grid encoder. The whole measuring time of 21 error components of the new method is cut down to 1-2 h because of easy installation, adjustment, operation and the characteristics of non-contact measurement. Result shows that the new method is suitable for `on machine" measurement and has good prospects of wide application.

  10. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields—An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach

    PubMed Central

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion. PMID:26308839

  11. Insect-Inspired Self-Motion Estimation with Dense Flow Fields--An Adaptive Matched Filter Approach.

    PubMed

    Strübbe, Simon; Stürzl, Wolfgang; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The control of self-motion is a basic, but complex task for both technical and biological systems. Various algorithms have been proposed that allow the estimation of self-motion from the optic flow on the eyes. We show that two apparently very different approaches to solve this task, one technically and one biologically inspired, can be transformed into each other under certain conditions. One estimator of self-motion is based on a matched filter approach; it has been developed to describe the function of motion sensitive cells in the fly brain. The other estimator, the Koenderink and van Doorn (KvD) algorithm, was derived analytically with a technical background. If the distances to the objects in the environment can be assumed to be known, the two estimators are linear and equivalent, but are expressed in different mathematical forms. However, for most situations it is unrealistic to assume that the distances are known. Therefore, the depth structure of the environment needs to be determined in parallel to the self-motion parameters and leads to a non-linear problem. It is shown that the standard least mean square approach that is used by the KvD algorithm leads to a biased estimator. We derive a modification of this algorithm in order to remove the bias and demonstrate its improved performance by means of numerical simulations. For self-motion estimation it is beneficial to have a spherical visual field, similar to many flying insects. We show that in this case the representation of the depth structure of the environment derived from the optic flow can be simplified. Based on this result, we develop an adaptive matched filter approach for systems with a nearly spherical visual field. Then only eight parameters about the environment have to be memorized and updated during self-motion.

  12. Robust estimation of motion blur kernel using a piecewise-linear model.

    PubMed

    Sungchan Oh; Gyeonghwan Kim

    2014-03-01

    Blur kernel estimation is a crucial step in the deblurring process for images. Estimation of the kernel, especially in the presence of noise, is easily perturbed, and the quality of the resulting deblurred images is hence degraded. Since every motion blur in a single exposure image can be represented by 2D parametric curves, we adopt a piecewise-linear model to approximate the curves for the reliable blur kernel estimation. The model is found to be an effective tradeoff between flexibility and robustness as it takes advantage of two extremes: (1) the generic model, represented by a discrete 2D function, which has a high degree of freedom (DOF) for the maximum flexibility but suffers from noise and (2) the linear model, which enhances robustness and simplicity but has limited expressiveness due to its low DOF. We evaluate several deblurring methods based on not only the generic model, but also the piecewise-linear model as an alternative. After analyzing the experiment results using real-world images with significant levels of noise and a benchmark data set, we conclude that the proposed model is not only robust with respect to noise, but also flexible in dealing with various types of blur.

  13. Pose estimation with a Kinect for ergonomic studies: evaluation of the accuracy using a virtual mannequin.

    PubMed

    Plantard, Pierre; Auvinet, Edouard; Pierres, Anne-Sophie Le; Multon, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing human poses with a Kinect is a promising method to evaluate potentials risks of musculoskeletal disorders at workstations. In ecological situations, complex 3D poses and constraints imposed by the environment make it difficult to obtain reliable kinematic information. Thus, being able to predict the potential accuracy of the measurement for such complex 3D poses and sensor placements is challenging in classical experimental setups. To tackle this problem, we propose a new evaluation method based on a virtual mannequin. In this study, we apply this method to the evaluation of joint positions (shoulder, elbow, and wrist), joint angles (shoulder and elbow), and the corresponding RULA (a popular ergonomics assessment grid) upper-limb score for a large set of poses and sensor placements. Thanks to this evaluation method, more than 500,000 configurations have been automatically tested, which would be almost impossible to evaluate with classical protocols. The results show that the kinematic information obtained by the Kinect software is generally accurate enough to fill in ergonomic assessment grids. However inaccuracy strongly increases for some specific poses and sensor positions. Using this evaluation method enabled us to report configurations that could lead to these high inaccuracies. As a supplementary material, we provide a software tool to help designers to evaluate the expected accuracy of this sensor for a set of upper-limb configurations. Results obtained with the virtual mannequin are in accordance with those obtained from a real subject for a limited set of poses and sensor placements. PMID:25599426

  14. Pose Estimation with a Kinect for Ergonomic Studies: Evaluation of the Accuracy Using a Virtual Mannequin

    PubMed Central

    Plantard, Pierre; Auvinet, Edouard; Le Pierres, Anne-Sophie; Multon, Franck

    2015-01-01

    Analyzing human poses with a Kinect is a promising method to evaluate potentials risks of musculoskeletal disorders at workstations. In ecological situations, complex 3D poses and constraints imposed by the environment make it difficult to obtain reliable kinematic information. Thus, being able to predict the potential accuracy of the measurement for such complex 3D poses and sensor placements is challenging in classical experimental setups. To tackle this problem, we propose a new evaluation method based on a virtual mannequin. In this study, we apply this method to the evaluation of joint positions (shoulder, elbow, and wrist), joint angles (shoulder and elbow), and the corresponding RULA (a popular ergonomics assessment grid) upper-limb score for a large set of poses and sensor placements. Thanks to this evaluation method, more than 500,000 configurations have been automatically tested, which would be almost impossible to evaluate with classical protocols. The results show that the kinematic information obtained by the Kinect software is generally accurate enough to fill in ergonomic assessment grids. However inaccuracy strongly increases for some specific poses and sensor positions. Using this evaluation method enabled us to report configurations that could lead to these high inaccuracies. As a supplementary material, we provide a software tool to help designers to evaluate the expected accuracy of this sensor for a set of upper-limb configurations. Results obtained with the virtual mannequin are in accordance with those obtained from a real subject for a limited set of poses and sensor placements. PMID:25599426

  15. A Low Cost Matching Motion Estimation Sensor Based on the NIOS II Microprocessor

    PubMed Central

    González, Diego; Botella, Guillermo; Meyer-Baese, Uwe; García, Carlos; Sanz, Concepción; Prieto-Matías, Manuel; Tirado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    This work presents the implementation of a matching-based motion estimation sensor on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and NIOS II microprocessor applying a C to Hardware (C2H) acceleration paradigm. The design, which involves several matching algorithms, is mapped using Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) technology. These algorithms, as well as the hardware implementation, are presented here together with an extensive analysis of the resources needed and the throughput obtained. The developed low-cost system is practical for real-time throughput and reduced power consumption and is useful in robotic applications, such as tracking, navigation using an unmanned vehicle, or as part of a more complex system. PMID:23201989

  16. Real time estimation of the heaving and pitching motions of a ship, using a Kalman filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Triantafyllou, M.; Athans, M.

    1981-01-01

    In the present study the estimation of the heave and pitch motion of a ship is considered, using Kalman filtering techniques. A significant part of the study is devoted to constructing appropriate models for the sea and the ship. The governing equations are obtained from hydrodynamic considerations in the form of linear differential equations with frequency dependent coefficients. In addition, nonminimum phase characteristics are obtained due to the spatial integration of the water wave forces. The resulting transfer matrix function is irrational and nonminimum phase. The conditions for a finite-dimensional approximation are considered and the impact of the various parameters is assessed. A numerical application is considered for a DD-963 destroyer.

  17. Distance estimation and collision prediction for on-line robotic motion planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kyriakopoulos, K. J.; Saridis, G. N.

    1991-01-01

    An efficient method for computing the minimum distance and predicting collisions between moving objects is presented. This problem has been incorporated in the framework of an in-line motion planning algorithm to satisfy collision avoidance between a robot and moving objects modeled as convex polyhedra. In the beginning the deterministic problem, where the information about the objects is assumed to be certain is examined. If instead of the Euclidean norm, L(sub 1) or L(sub infinity) norms are used to represent distance, the problem becomes a linear programming problem. The stochastic problem is formulated, where the uncertainty is induced by sensing and the unknown dynamics of the moving obstacles. Two problems are considered: (1) filtering of the minimum distance between the robot and the moving object, at the present time; and (2) prediction of the minimum distance in the future, in order to predict possible collisions with the moving obstacles and estimate the collision time.

  18. Ship motion estimation from polarized Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Wang-Qiang; Zhang, Min; Nie, Ding; Sun, Rong-Qing

    2016-07-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to investigate the Doppler spectra from ship wakes on two-dimensional sea surfaces and further estimate the ship motion characteristics. The analysis of the ship wakes is helpful to detect the existence of ships on sea surface. And it will be an alternative method when the radar cross-section values are not competent to identify the ship target. In the study, Doppler spectra for different polarizations are compared with and without ship's wakes based on the second-order small slope approximation method. As expected, there appears the second spectral peak when ship's wake is considered. Moreover, the ship velocities, wind speed, and direction are also analyzed. As the results shown, there is a good linearity relation between the position of the second Doppler spectral peak and the ship velocity. Therefore, it is feasible to detect ship according the Doppler spectra.

  19. Conditions that influence the accuracy of anthropometric parameter estimation for human body segments using shape-from-silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mündermann, Lars; Mündermann, Annegret; Chaudhari, Ajit M.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2004-12-01

    Anthropometric parameters are fundamental for a wide variety of applications in biomechanics, anthropology, medicine and sports. Recent technological advancements provide methods for constructing 3D surfaces directly. Of these new technologies, visual hull construction may be the most cost-effective yet sufficiently accurate method. However, the conditions influencing the accuracy of anthropometric measurements based on visual hull reconstruction are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conditions that influence the accuracy of 3D shape-from-silhouette reconstruction of body segments dependent on number of cameras, camera resolution and object contours. The results demonstrate that the visual hulls lacked accuracy in concave regions and narrow spaces, but setups with a high number of cameras reconstructed a human form with an average accuracy of 1.0 mm. In general, setups with less than 8 cameras yielded largely inaccurate visual hull constructions, while setups with 16 and more cameras provided good volume estimations. Body segment volumes were obtained with an average error of 10% at a 640x480 resolution using 8 cameras. Changes in resolution did not significantly affect the average error. However, substantial decreases in error were observed with increasing number of cameras (33.3% using 4 cameras; 10.5% using 8 cameras; 4.1% using 16 cameras; 1.2% using 64 cameras).

  20. Conditions that influence the accuracy of anthropometric parameter estimation for human body segments using shape-from-silhouette

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mundermann, Lars; Mundermann, Annegret; Chaudhari, Ajit M.; Andriacchi, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    Anthropometric parameters are fundamental for a wide variety of applications in biomechanics, anthropology, medicine and sports. Recent technological advancements provide methods for constructing 3D surfaces directly. Of these new technologies, visual hull construction may be the most cost-effective yet sufficiently accurate method. However, the conditions influencing the accuracy of anthropometric measurements based on visual hull reconstruction are unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the conditions that influence the accuracy of 3D shape-from-silhouette reconstruction of body segments dependent on number of cameras, camera resolution and object contours. The results demonstrate that the visual hulls lacked accuracy in concave regions and narrow spaces, but setups with a high number of cameras reconstructed a human form with an average accuracy of 1.0 mm. In general, setups with less than 8 cameras yielded largely inaccurate visual hull constructions, while setups with 16 and more cameras provided good volume estimations. Body segment volumes were obtained with an average error of 10% at a 640x480 resolution using 8 cameras. Changes in resolution did not significantly affect the average error. However, substantial decreases in error were observed with increasing number of cameras (33.3% using 4 cameras; 10.5% using 8 cameras; 4.1% using 16 cameras; 1.2% using 64 cameras).

  1. Accuracy of a Novel Noninvasive Multisensor Technology to Estimate Glucose in Diabetic Subjects During Dynamic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Sobel, Sandra I.; Chomentowski, Peter J.; Vyas, Nisarg; Andre, David

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether an approach of multisensor technology with integrated data analysis in an armband system (SenseWear® Pro Armband, SWA) can provide estimates of plasma glucose concentration in diabetes. In all, 41 subjects with diabetes participated. On day 1 subjects underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) and on day 2 a 60-minute treadmill test (TT). SWA plasma glucose estimates were compared against reference peripheral venous glucose concentrations. A continuous glucose monitoring device (CGM) was also placed on each subject to serve as a reference for clinical comparison. Pearson coefficient, Clarke error grid (CEG), and mean absolute relative difference (MARD) analyses were used to compare the performance of plasma glucose estimation. There were significant correlations between plasma glucose concentrations estimated by the SWA and the reference plasma glucose concentration during the OGTT (r = .65, P < .05) and the TT (r = .91, P < .05). CEG analysis revealed that during the OGTT, 93% of plasma glucose concentration readings were in the clinically acceptable zone A+B for the SWA and 95% for the CGM. During the TT, the SWA had 96% of readings in zone A+B, compared to 97% for the CGM. During OGTTs, MARDs for the SWA and CGM were 26% and 18%, respectively. During TTs, MARDs were 16% and 12%, respectively. Plasma glucose concentration estimation by the SWA’s noninvasive multisensor approach appears to be feasible and its performance in estimating glucose approaches that of a CGM. The success of this pilot study suggests that multisensor technology holds promising potential for the development of a wearable, noninvasive, painless glucose monitor. PMID:24876538

  2. Beat sampling accuracy in estimating spruce spider mite (Acari: Tetranychidae) populations and injury on juniper.

    PubMed

    Shrewsbury, Paula M; Hardin, Mark R

    2004-08-01

    The use of a standardized beat sampling method for estimating spruce spider mite, Oligonychus ununguis (Jacobi) (Acari: Tetranychidae), densities on a widely used evergreen ornamental plant species, Juniperus chinensis variety 'Sargentii' A. Henry (Cupressaceae), was examined. There was a significant positive relationship between total spruce spider mite densities and spider mite densities from beat sampling on juniper. The slope and intercept of the relationship may be used by pest managers to predict total spider mite densities on plants from beat sample counts. Beat sampling dramatically underestimates the total number of spider mites on a foliage sample. The relationships between spruce spider mite feeding injury and spider mite density estimates from beat sampling juniper foliage and total spider mite counts on foliage were also examined. There was a significant positive relationship between spruce spider mite density as estimated from beat sampling and injury to the plants. There was a similar positive relationship between the total number of spruce spider mites and injury to the plants, suggesting that a pest manager could use beat sampling counts to estimate plant injury and related thresholds. These findings have important implications to decision-making for spruce spider mite control, especially as it relates to threshold levels and determining rates of predator releases. Further assessment of the effectiveness of beat and other sampling methods across multiple spider mite- host plant associations needs to be examined to enable pest managers to select sampling plans that are feasible and reliable.

  3. Increasing the accuracy and automation of fractional vegetation cover estimation from digital photographs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of automated methods to estimate canopy cover (CC) from digital photographs has increased in recent years given its potential to produce accurate, fast and inexpensive CC measurements. Wide acceptance has been delayed because of the limitations of these methods. This work introduces a novel ...

  4. Investigating the Accuracy of Three Estimation Methods for Regression Discontinuity Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Shuyan; Pan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Regression discontinuity design is an alternative to randomized experiments to make causal inference when random assignment is not possible. This article first presents the formal identification and estimation of regression discontinuity treatment effects in the framework of Rubin's causal model, followed by a thorough literature review of…

  5. Estimating Accuracy of Land-Cover Composition From Two-Stage Clustering Sampling

    EPA Science Inventory

    Land-cover maps are often used to compute land-cover composition (i.e., the proportion or percent of area covered by each class), for each unit in a spatial partition of the region mapped. We derive design-based estimators of mean deviation (MD), mean absolute deviation (MAD), ...

  6. INCREASING THE ACCURACY OF MAYFIELD ESTIMATES USING KNOWLEDGE OF NEST AGE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation will focus on the error introduced in nest-survival modeling when nest-cycles are assumed to be of constant length. I will present the types of error that may occur, including biases resulting from incorrect estimates of expected values, as well as biases that o...

  7. On the accuracy of paleopoles estimations based on magnetic field measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vervelidou, F.; Lesur, V.; Morschhauser, A.; Grott, M.

    2015-12-01

    We present a new map of Mars magnetization, based on a recently published martian lithospheric magnetic field model (Morschhauser et al., 2014). We obtain this map by means of the vector Spherical Harmonics, following the approach of Gubbins et al., 2011. This formalism has the advantage to alleviate the non-uniquess issue that characterizes the inversion of the observable magnetic field for the underlying magnetization. It does so by separating the part of the magnetization that produces the observable magnetic field from the part of the magnetization that does not. Based on this map, and a series of synthetic tests, we investigate the accuracy to which paleopoles positions can be retrieved from magnetic field measurements. We discuss our results in combination with previous studies on Mars paleopoles positions.

  8. Family caregiver perspective-taking and accuracy in estimating cancer patient symptom experiences.

    PubMed

    Lobchuk, Michelle M; Vorauer, Jacquie D

    2003-12-01

    As family caregivers assume more prominent roles in the provision of home care to persons with serious illness, investigators must test the effectiveness of novel interventions to facilitate family caring for cancer patients. This article is based on results derived from a larger study carried out in Canada that was designed to compare 98 advanced cancer patient and family caregiver perceptions of 32 patient symptom experiences as captured by the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. We examined two main questions: (1) whether "natural" family caregivers' perceptions of patient lack of energy and worrying are more closely related to a self- or patient-oriented viewpoint and (2) whether induced "imagine-patient" perspective-taking can assist caregivers to achieve better perceptual accuracy. The caregiver's natural responses to neutral instructions that neither encouraged nor discouraged perspective-taking served as the baseline comparison with three other instructional sets, in which caregivers were prompted to: (1) provide a self-report on their own symptom experiences, (2) imagine how they would feel in the patient's situation (imagine-self), or (3) imagine how the patient would respond to his or her symptom situation (imagine-patient). Findings suggested that the family caregivers' natural judgments correspond most closely to what they do under an imagine-patient set than to what they do under any other set. Findings with respect to accuracy indicated that instructions to imagine the patient's perspective helped to prompt adjustments down from a self-oriented viewpoint, although definitive conclusions were precluded by difficulties with order effects.

  9. CO2 flux estimation accuracy evaluation of Global and Regional atmospheric CO2 mission concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, M.; Miller, C.; Weidner, R. J.; Duren, R. M.; Sander, S.; Eldering, A.

    2012-12-01

    We developed an observing system simulation experiment (OSSE) framework to evaluate mission-science-return quantitatively as a function of instrument payload, observation frequency, orbit, and sampling strategy for space-based remote sensing. The OSSE framework integrates GEOSChem and its adjoint system to perform forward/inverse modeling of the simulated measurements. During 2011-2012, we extended the OSSE framework to evaluate CO2 mission concepts in collaboration with the NASA's carbon monitoring system (CMS) flux pilot project team. In this paper, we employ the OSSE framework to analyze the science impact of multiple, simultaneous space-based column CO2 observations from simulated combinations of GOSAT, OCO-2, OCO-3, and a geo-stationary mission concept (GEOFTS). The OSSE process involved generating a CO2 concentration forecast, sampling the CO2 field at the appropriate time and location for each satellite sensor, incorporating realistic cloud climatologies to generate accurate clear-sky viewing statistics, retrieving CO2 profile simulaton in the presence of measurement noise, and finally assimilating the simulated column CO2 retrievals to estimate CO2 fluxes and flux uncertainty reductions. The OSSE process was applied over one-year-long mission period (2009/Jan - 2009/Dec) and the CO2 flux estimation error was analyzed to compute the probability density function (PDF) of CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction. The global OSSEs were performed in 2deg x 2.5 deg spatial resolution with the monthly-average CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction as the science-impact metric. Regional OSSEs were performed in 0.5 deg by 0.666 deg over N. America and the weekly average of the CO2 flux estimation-error-reduction was employed as the science-impact metric. We discuss the results and the projected performance of planned and potential space-based CO2 observing systems.

  10. Sample Size under Inverse Negative Binomial Group Testing for Accuracy in Parameter Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Montesinos-López, Osval Antonio; Montesinos-López, Abelardo; Crossa, José; Eskridge, Kent

    2012-01-01

    Background The group testing method has been proposed for the detection and estimation of genetically modified plants (adventitious presence of unwanted transgenic plants, AP). For binary response variables (presence or absence), group testing is efficient when the prevalence is low, so that estimation, detection, and sample size methods have been developed under the binomial model. However, when the event is rare (low prevalence <0.1), and testing occurs sequentially, inverse (negative) binomial pooled sampling may be preferred. Methodology/Principal Findings This research proposes three sample size procedures (two computational and one analytic) for estimating prevalence using group testing under inverse (negative) binomial sampling. These methods provide the required number of positive pools (), given a pool size (k), for estimating the proportion of AP plants using the Dorfman model and inverse (negative) binomial sampling. We give real and simulated examples to show how to apply these methods and the proposed sample-size formula. The Monte Carlo method was used to study the coverage and level of assurance achieved by the proposed sample sizes. An R program to create other scenarios is given in Appendix S2. Conclusions The three methods ensure precision in the estimated proportion of AP because they guarantee that the width (W) of the confidence interval (CI) will be equal to, or narrower than, the desired width (), with a probability of . With the Monte Carlo study we found that the computational Wald procedure (method 2) produces the more precise sample size (with coverage and assurance levels very close to nominal values) and that the samples size based on the Clopper-Pearson CI (method 1) is conservative (overestimates the sample size); the analytic Wald sample size method we developed (method 3) sometimes underestimated the optimum number of pools. PMID:22457714

  11. Evaluation of Argos Telemetry Accuracy in the High-Arctic and Implications for the Estimation of Home-Range Size

    <